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Sample records for infrared laser radiation

  1. Prophylaxis and treatment of acute radiation ulcers in rats with low-power infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursova, Larisa V.; Kaplan, Michael A.; Nikitina, Rosa G.; Maligina, Antonina I.

    1999-12-01

    Exposure of radiation ulcers in rats to low-power infrared laser radiation (LPLR) (wavelength--890 nm, pulse power--6 W, frequency--150 and 300 Hz, irradiation time--10 min) noticeably accelerates their healing, reduces exudative processes, increases number of specialized cells in wound. Application of LPLR prior to radiation damage decreases ulcer dimensions.

  2. Laser welding of plastics transparent to near-infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kimitoshi; Kurosaki, Yasuo; Saito, Takushi; Satoh, Isao

    2002-06-01

    This paper deals with a development of laser welding of colored plastics. Welding of thermoplastics using near-IR lasers has been seen in wide industrial application. Most of thermoplastics are transparent to near-IR laser. Particular characteristic of near-IR laser radiation has the ability to heat the interface between the transparent part and absorbent one colored with pigments. However, it is difficult to weld a pair of transparent materials by a laser beam, since there is no absorption region within them. In this paper, the influence of near-IR transparent plastics on the yield strength of their weldments has been studied: various colored plastics transparent to diode laser radiation were tested as the welding material. The heat transfer within a welding system was also analyzed and assessed the appropriate absorptivity and transmittance of overlapping colored plastic.

  3. Photochemical synthesis of disilane from silane with infrared laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zavelovich, J. ); Lyman, J.L. )

    1989-07-27

    The authors report the clean and efficient conversion of silane to disilane by CO{sub 2} laser irradiation. The direct irradiation of pure silane at high pressures (from 75 to 1,700 Torr) converts silane to disilane with high selectivity and with efficient use of the absorbed laser radiation. Hydrogen is the only other major volatile product, and the production of solid products is minimal. The proposed mechanism of the photochemical reaction includes (1) collisionally enhanced absorption of the laser radiation by silane, (2) collisional deexcitation of the vibrationally excited silane, (3) concurrent decomposition to SiH{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, (4) production of vibrationally excited disilane by SiH{sub 2} insertion into a silane Si-H bond, (5) collisional quenching of the excited disilane, and (6) rapid cooling of the irradiated gas by thermal expansion. They support the proposed mechanism by additional experiments and model calculations.

  4. Photoblepharokeratoconjunctivitis caused by invisible infrared radiation emitted from a green laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Yahya A H; Khedr, Abdulla H

    2014-01-01

    There are a wide variety of laser pointers sold to the general public. Among those are the high-powered diode-pumped solid-state lasers (>5 mW), which do not follow the laser safety regulations for packing, and are sold as regular lasers without the infrared (IR) filters. In this case report, we encountered a patient with photoblepharokeratoconjunctivitis caused by the invisible IR radiations emitted from a green laser pointer. Owing to the thermal effect of the invisible IR rays led to the disease. PMID:24618868

  5. Pulsed mid-infrared radiation from spectral broadening in laser wakefield simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.; Palastro, J. P.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2013-07-15

    Spectral red-shifting of high power laser pulses propagating through underdense plasma can be a source of ultrashort mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. During propagation, a high power laser pulse drives large amplitude plasma waves, depleting the pulse energy. At the same time, the large amplitude plasma wave provides a dynamic dielectric response that leads to spectral shifting. The loss of laser pulse energy and the approximate conservation of laser pulse action imply that spectral red-shifts accompany the depletion. In this paper, we investigate, through simulation, the parametric dependence of MIR generation on pulse energy, initial pulse duration, and plasma density.

  6. Microprocessing of human hard tooth tissues surface by mid-infrared erbium lasers radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Skrypnik, Alexei V.

    2015-03-01

    A new method of hard tooth tissues laser treatment is described. The method consists in formation of regular microdefects on tissue surface by mid-infrared erbium laser radiation with propagation ratio M2<2 (Er-laser microprocessing). Proposed method was used for preparation of hard tooth tissues surface before filling for improvement of bond strength between tissues surface and restorative materials, microleakage reduction between tissues surface and restorative materials, and for caries prevention as a result of increasing microhardness and acid resistance of tooth enamel.

  7. Melanin and the cellular effects of ultrashort-pulse, near-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Kumar, Neeru; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Stolarski, David J.

    2003-07-01

    Our research into laser bioeffects has increasingly focused on cytotoxic mechanisms affecting genomic expression and programmed cellular stress responses. In the context of DNA damage, we previously reported that more DNA strand breaks were produced in cultured retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exposed to ultrashort pulse, than to CW, near-infrared (NIR) laser radiation. To test the hypothesis that RPE melanin was the cellular chromophore responsible for mediating this damage, the experiments were repeated with a line of human-derived RPE cells that could be grown in culture expressing varying levels of pigmentation. Lightly-pigmented cells were either unexposed, or exposed to the output of a Ti:Sapphire laser producing 810 nm light in mode-locked pulses (48-fsec at 80 MHz), or as CW radiation. Cells were irradiated at 160 W/cm2 or 80 W/cm2 (the estimated ED50 or half-ED50 for a retinal lesion). Immediately following the laser exposure, cells were processed for the comet assay. Longer "comet" tails and larger "comet" areas indicated more DNA strand breaks. In lightly-pigmented RPE cells, the overall comet assay differences among the laser-exposed groups were smaller than those observed in our earlier experiments which utilized highly pigmented primary cells. The comet tail lengths of cells exposed to the mode-locked pulses at the ED50, however, were significantly longer than those of the controls or the CW-exposed cells. The other comet assay parameters examined (tail moment, comet area) did not show consistent differences among the groups. While these results support the involvement of melanin in the ultrashort pulse laser-induced damage to DNA, they do not exclude the involvement of other cellular chromophores. Some preliminary experiments describing other measures of cellular stress responses to laser-induced oxidative stress are described.

  8. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  9. Q-switching of mid-infrared Er:YAG laser and its radiation delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Koranda, Petr; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Cech, Miroslav; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    Q-switching of mid-infrared Er:YAG laser was obtained with an electro-optical shutter. For that the LiNbO3 Pockels cell was used in transversal quarter-wave arrangement with the Brewster angle cut faces used as a polarizer. Parameters and dependences of this Q-switched system were investigated, i.e. a pulse length and generated pulse energy, delay between switching of flashlamp and Q-switch circuit, high voltage applied on Pockels cell were measured and optimized. The resulted giant pulse length and energy was 60 ns and 55 mJ, respectively. This generated pulse was obtained for the applied voltage around 1.4 kV and for the optimum delay value 450 us. Problem of mid-infrared giant pulse delivery, which is needed for various technological applications, was solved by a specially designed cyclic olefin polymer coated silver hollow glass (COP/Ag) waveguide. Parameters of this waveguide were: diameter 700/850 um and length 1 m. The measured transmission was 74 % which corresponded to delivered intensity 86 MW/cm2. Q-switched Er:YAG laser radiation in connection with this special delivery system gives a possibility of the surgical treatment in many medicine branches, for example ophthalmology, urology or dentistry.

  10. Stable 1.25 watts CW far infrared laser radiation at the 119 micron methanol line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Pickett, Herbert M.

    1987-01-01

    Far-infrared CW radiation of 1.25 watts has been obtained at the 119 micron methanol line with a CO2 pump power of 125 watts, and the maximum frequency fluctuation of the free running laser is measured to be less than + or - 100 kHz per hour. Reflecting optics have been used, when possible, to minimize CO2 degradation, and the frequency stability is ensured by cooling the input and output couplers. The input and output assemblies within the lasing medium are enclosed to minimize the external effects on the cavity length and to eliminate the mechanical instabilities associated with the use of bellows. The vibrational bottle-neck is broken by cooling the resonator wall to 5 deg and adding He as the buffer gas.

  11. Effects of Infrared Laser Radiation on the In Vitro Isomerization of All-Trans Retinal to 11-Cis Retinal

    PubMed Central

    Liegner, J.; Taboada, J.; Tsin, A. T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro effect of infrared laser light on the isomerization of all-trans retinal dissolved in an ether/hexane and also an ethanol solvent was studied. Pulsed laser energy at 1064 nm was used to drive the molecular reconfiguration of all-trans retinal to 11-cis retinal. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to quantify the conversion. Overall isomerization was minimal (0.2 percent to 1.0 percent), yet, a significant difference in isomerization due to pulsed infrared laser energy over non-modulated monochromatic laser light was detected (up to 168 percent difference). Potentially, pulsed laser radiation tuned to the ethylenic stretch frequency of the C11=C12 bond of retinal may induce rotational changes to the chromophore. PMID:26321787

  12. Generation of acoustic waves by focused infrared neodymium-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Barry

    1991-02-01

    When the radiation from a sufficiently powerful pulsed laser is focused into the transparent gaseous, liquid or solid media, dielectric breakdown may occur around the beam waist giving rise to a short-lived high-temperature plasma which quickly heats the surrounding material. As a consequence of various energy-coupling mechanisms, this phenomenon causes the emission of one or more high-frequency ultrasonic acoustic waves whose speeds of propagation are dependent upon the physical properties of the host medium. In the high-speed photographic studies described, the 1.06 micron near-infrared radiation from an 8-ns, 10-mJ Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is focused in or onto a variety of fluid and solid materials. The rapid variations in density around the resulting plasma events are visualized using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a sub-nanosecond dye-laser light source and a video-imaging system. Calculations of the corresponding transient pressure distributions are then enacted from the digitally-recorded interferograms using a semi-automatic procedure under the control of a personal computer. Measurements of position, displacement, and velocity are also carried out using the same optical apparatus in schlieren and focused shadowgraph high-speed photographic measurements. The experimental work outlined in the following chapters is divided into three broad fields of interest. In the first of these, a study of the laser-generation of spherical shock waves in atmospheric air is carried out. In the second, the neodymium-laser beam is focused onto different solid-fluid interfaces resulting in the formation of bulk longitudinal and shear waves and surface acoustic waves. The interactions of these waves with various obstacles and defects are investigated with reference to their application to non-destructive testing. In the third and most important field, a detailed study of the dynamics of laser-induced cavitation bubbles in water is carried out. With regard to the associated

  13. Application and possible mechanisms of combining LLLT (low level laser therapy), infrared hyperthermia and ionizing radiation in the treatment of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Edward H.; Woo, Van H.; Harlin-Jones, Cheryl; Heselich, Anja; Frohns, Florian

    2014-02-01

    Benefit of concomitant infrared hyperthermia and low level laser therapy and ionizing radiation is evaluated in this study. The purpose/objectives: presentation with locally advanced bulky superficial tumors is clinically challenging. To enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy and IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy) and/or electron beam therapy we have developed an inexpensive and clinically effective infrared hyperthermia approach that combines black-body infrared radiation with halogen spectrum radiation and discrete wave length infrared clinical lasers LLLT. The goal is to produce a composite spectrum extending from the far infrared to near infrared and portions of the visible spectrum with discrete penetrating wavelengths generated by the clinical infrared lasers with frequencies of 810 nm and/or 830 nm. The composite spectrum from these sources is applied before and after radiation therapy. We monitor the surface and in some cases deeper temperatures with thermal probes, but use an array of surface probes as the limiting safe thermal constraint in patient treatment while at the same time maximizing infrared entry to deeper tissue layers. Fever-grade infrared hyperthermia is produced in the first centimeters while non-thermal infrared effects act at deeper tissue layers. The combination of these effects with ionizing radiation leads to improved tumor control in many cancers.

  14. Coherent infrared radiation from the ALS generated via femtosecond laser modulation of the electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Hao, Z.; Martin, M.C.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2004-07-01

    Interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse co-propagating through a wiggler at the ALS produces large modulation of the electron energies within a short {approx}100 fs slice of the electron bunch. Propagating around the storage ring, this bunch develops a longitudinal density perturbation due to the dispersion of electron trajectories. The length of the perturbation evolves with a distance from the wiggler but is much shorter than the electron bunch length. This perturbation causes the electron bunch to emit short pulses of temporally and spatially coherent infrared light which are automatically synchronized to the modulating laser. The intensity and spectra of the infrared light were measured in two storage ring locations for a nominal ALS lattice and for an experimental lattice with the higher momentum compaction factor. The onset of instability stimulated by laser e-beam interaction had been discovered. The infrared signal is now routinely used as a sensitive monitor for a fine tuning of the laser beam alignment during data accumulation in the experiments with femtosecond x-ray pulses.

  15. Infrared radiation and inversion population of CO2 laser levels in Venusian and Martian atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordiyets, B. F.; Panchenko, V. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Formation mechanisms of nonequilibrium 10 micron CO2 molecule radiation and the possible existence of a natural laser effect in the upper atmospheres of Venus and Mars are theoretically studied. An analysis is made of the excitation process of CO2 molecule vibrational-band levels (with natural isotropic content) induced by direct solar radiation in bands 10.6, 9.4, 4.3, 2.7 and 2.0 microns. The model of partial vibrational-band temperatures was used in the case. The problem of IR radiation transfer in vibrational-rotational bands was solved in the radiation escape approximation.

  16. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  17. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  18. SiC absorption of near-infrared laser radiation at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelmann, B.; Hellmann, R.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a theoretical and experimental investigation of the temperature-dependent optical absorption of nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC for a temperature range between room temperature and the decomposition point. The theoretical model is based on free carrier absorption including the temperature dependence of the electron mobility. With respect to laser material processing of silicon carbide, the analysis focusses on a near-infrared wavelength range. At room temperature, the calculated absorption is in excellent agreement to transmission and reflection measurements. For the experimental study of the absorption at higher temperatures induced by intense 1070-nm laser irradiation, a two-color pyrometer is employed with the thermal emission of the laser interaction zone being collected coaxial to the impinging laser. Exemplarily, the simulated temperature-dependent absorption is used to determine the heating of a 0.4-mm-thick 4H-SiC specimen during laser irradiation and compared to the experimentally determined temperature. In an initial time domain of the irradiation with an attained temperature below 1350 K, the simulated and measured temperatures are in good agreement. Above 1350 K, however, the measured temperature reveals a sharp and fast increase up to 2100 K which is not predicted by the model. This discrepancy is attributed to a strong additional absorption mechanism caused by carbonization at the surface which is confirmed by EDX analysis.

  19. Analgesic effect of simultaneous exposure to infrared laser radiation and μT magnetic field in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslar, Grzegorz; Mrowiec, Janina; Kasperczyk, Slawomir; Sieron-Stoltny, Karolina; Sieron, Aleksander

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the experiment was to estimate the effect of repeated simultaneous exposures to infrared laser radiation and μT variable magnetic field used in magnetostimulation on pain perception in rats, as well as the involvement of endogenous opioid system in the mechanism of this effect. In experimental group clean-shaven scull of male Wistar rats placed individually in a specially designed plastic chamber were simultaneously exposed to infrared laser radiation (wavelength - 855 nm, mean power - 4,1 mW, energy density - 30 J/cm2) and variable magnetic field of saw-like shape of impulse, at a frequency of basic impulse 180-195 Hz and mean induction value of 120 μT generated by magneto-laser applicator of device for magnetostimulation Viofor JPS (Med & Life, Poland) 12 minutes daily for 2 periods of 5 consecutive days, with 2 days-lasting break between them, while control animals were sham-exposed. The pain perception was determined by means of "hot plate" test on the basis of calculated analgesic index. As a result of repeated exposures a significant increase in analgesic index persisting also till 14 th day after the end of a cycle of exposures was observed. This analgesic effect was inhibited by prior i.p. injection of opioid antagonist - Naloxone.

  20. Infrared absorption change in single-walled carbon nanotubes observed by combination spectroscopy of synchrotron radiation and laser.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junpei; Itoh, Minoru; Koike, Masahiro; Kamada, Masao; Endo, Morinobu

    2006-11-01

    The Drude tail due to photo-excited carriers in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been observed in the mid-infrared region by using combination spectroscopy of synchrotron radiation and Ti:sapphire laser. It is found that the density of photo-excited carriers increases as the sample temperature is raised from 12 to 300 K, and their lifetime is of the order of minutes at 300 K. These facts suggest that the movement of photo-excited carriers is largely affected by some extrinsic defect, thus resulting in the long-lasting Drude reflection in SWNTs. PMID:17057323

  1. Spatial temperature distribution in human hairy and glabrous skin after infrared CO2 laser radiation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CO2 lasers have been used for several decades as an experimental non-touching pain stimulator. The laser energy is absorbed by the water content in the most superficial layers of the skin. The deeper located nociceptors are activated by passive conduction of heat from superficial to deeper skin layers. Methods In the current study, a 2D axial finite element model was developed and validated to describe the spatial temperature distribution in the skin after infrared CO2 laser stimulation. The geometry of the model was based on high resolution ultrasound scans. The simulations were compared to the subjective pain intensity ratings from 16 subjects and to the surface skin temperature distributions measured by an infrared camera. Results The stimulations were sensed significantly slower and less intense in glabrous skin than they were in hairy skin (MANOVA, p < 0.001). The model simulations of superficial temperature correlated with the measured skin surface temperature (r > 0.90, p < 0.001). Of the 16 subjects tested; eight subjects reported pricking pain in the hairy skin following a stimulus of 0.6 J/cm2 (5 W, 0.12 s, d1/e2 = 11.4 mm) only two reported pain to glabrous skin stimulation using the same stimulus intensity. The temperature at the epidermal-dermal junction (depth 50 μm in hairy and depth 133 μm in glabrous skin) was estimated to 46°C for hairy skin stimulation and 39°C for glabrous skin stimulation. Conclusions As compared to previous one dimensional heat distribution models, the current two dimensional model provides new possibilities for detailed studies regarding CO2 laser stimulation intensity, temperature levels and nociceptor activation. PMID:21059226

  2. Generating Tunable Far-Infrared Laser Sidebands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, H. M.; Farhoomand, J.

    1986-01-01

    New tunable source extends infrared spectroscopy into far infrared wavelengths. Frequency-Tunable far-infrared radiation produced by mixing of fixed-frequency far-infrared laser beam with output of frequency-tunable klystron. By sweeping klystron frequency in synchronism with video display of detector output, one obtains direct presentation of absorption-cell spectrum. Immediate applications are local oscillator for heterodyne systems and tunable source for spectroscopy.

  3. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  4. The Berkeley tunable far infrared laser spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, G. A.; Laughlin, K. B.; Cohen, R. C.; Busarow, K. L.; Gwo, D.-H.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed description is presented for a tunable far infrared laser spectrometer based on frequency mixing of an optically pumped molecular gas laser with tunable microwave radiation in a Schottky point contact diode. The system has been operated on over 30 laser lines in the range 10-100/cm and exhibits a maximum absorption sensitivity near one part in a million. Each laser line can be tuned by + or - 110 GHz with first-order sidebands.

  5. Dysprosium thiogallate laser: source of mid-infrared radiation at 2.4, 4.3, and 5.4 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, H.; Doroshenko, M. E.; Osiko, V. V.; Jelínek, M.; Šulc, J.; Němec, M.; Vyhlídal, D.; Badikov, V. V.; Badikov, D. V.

    2016-08-01

    Various Dy:PbGa2S4 laser-active material energy transitions originating from the 6H9/2 + 6F11/2 or 6H11/2 energy level were investigated, and the mid-infrared radiation generation has been demonstrated. The Dy:PbGa2S4 laser was pumped by a 1.32-µm free-running Nd:YAG laser or laser diode radiation corresponding to the Dy:PbGa2S4 absorption peak. The Dy:PbGa2S4 crystal was placed in the stable optical resonator with the mirrors chosen according to the required generated wavelength. New laser wavelengths of 2.4 and 5.4 µm were generated from the Dy:PbGa2S4 laser at room temperature. Laser output characteristics at 4.3 µm are also presented.

  6. Delivery of midinfrared (6 to 7-microm) laser radiation in a liquid environment using infrared-transmitting optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Mackanos, Mark A; Jansen, E Duco; Shaw, Brandon L; Sanghera, Jas S; Aggarwal, Ishwar; Katzir, Abraham

    2003-10-01

    Ablation at wavelengths near lambda = 6.45 microm results in tissue ablation with minimal collateral damage (< 40 microm) yet yields a high ablation rate that is useful for human surgery. However, delivery of this wavelength has been limited to that in air and thus to applications in which the target tissue can be readily exposed. The goal of this study is to investigate the potential of a pulsed infrared laser at lambda = 6.45 microm for noncontact ablation in a liquid environment. To this end we investigated fiber delivery in combination with the use of infrared transparent liquids. Transmission characteristics and damage thresholds for two types of fiber materials (silver halide and arsenic sulfide), for high-power pulsed laser radiation were determined using the Mark III free electron laser. Both fibers had comparable bulk losses (0.54 dB/m and 0.62 dB/m, respectively) while the arsenic sulfide fibers showed more coupling losses (37 versus 27%). Damage thresholds were higher in arsenic sulfide fibers than in silver halide fibers (1.12 GW/cm2 versus 0.54 GW/cm2), but both fibers were sufficient to deliver radiant exposures well above the ablation threshold in tissue. Seven different perfluorocarbon liquids (PFCLs), known for their transparency at lambda = 2.94 microm, were investigated and their optical transmission was determined using Fourier transform infrared and direct Beer's law measurements. All of the PFCLs tested had similar values for an absorption coefficient mu(a) at a given wavelength (mu(a) = 0.05 mm(-1) at lambda = 2.94 microm and mu(a) is approximately 3 mm(-1) at lambda = 6.45 microm). Pump-probe imaging showed the ablation sequence (lambda = 6.45 microm) at the fiber tip in a water environment, which revealed a fast expanding and collapsing bubble. In contrast, the volatile PF-5060 showed no fast bubble expansion and collapse, but rather formation of nontransient gas bubbles. Perfluorodecalin did not show any bubble formation at the radiant

  7. Corneal thermal damage threshold dependence on the exposure duration for near-infrared laser radiation at 1319 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiarui; Jiao, Luguang; Chen, Hongxia; Yang, Zaifu; Hu, Xiangjun

    2016-01-01

    The corneal damage effects induced by 1319-nm transitional near-infrared laser have been investigated for years. However, the damage threshold dependence on exposure duration has not been revealed. The in vivo corneal damage thresholds (ED50s) were determined in New Zealand rabbits for 1319-nm laser radiation for exposure durations from 75 ms to 10 s. An additional corneal ED50 was determined at 1338 nm for a 5-ms exposure. The incident corneal irradiance diameter was fixed at 2 mm for all exposure conditions to avoid the influence of spot size on threshold. The ED50s given in terms of the corneal radiant exposure for exposure durations of 5 ms, 75 ms, 0.35 s, 2 s, and 10 s were 39.4, 51.5, 87.2, 156.3, and 311.1 J/cm2, respectively. The 39.4 J/cm2 was derived from the ED50 for 1338 nm (27.0 J/cm2). The ED50s for exposure durations of 75 ms to 10 s were correlated by a power law equation, ED50=128.9t0.36 in J/cm2, where t was the input in the unit of second, with correlation coefficient (R) of 0.997. Enough safe margins existed between the ED50s and the maximum permitted exposures from current laser safety standard.

  8. Retinal thermal damage threshold dependence on exposure duration for the transitional near-infrared laser radiation at 1319 nm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiarui; Jiao, Luguang; Jing, Xiaomin; Chen, Hongxia; Hu, Xiangjun; Yang, Zaifu

    2016-01-01

    The retinal damage effects induced by transitional near-infrared (NIR) lasers have been investigated for years. However, the damage threshold dependence on exposure duration has not been revealed. In this paper, the in-vivo retinal damage ED50 thresholds were determined in chinchilla grey rabbits for 1319 nm laser radiation for exposure durations from 0.1 s to 10 s. The incident corneal irradiance diameter was fixed at 5 mm. The ED50 thresholds given in terms of the total intraocular energy (TIE) for exposure durations of 0.1, 1 and 10 s were 1.36, 6.33 and 28.6 J respectively. The ED50 thresholds were correlated by a power law equation, ED50 = 6.31t0.66 [J] where t is time [s], with correlation coefficient R = 0.9999. There exists a sufficient safety margin (factor of 28~60) between the human ED50 thresholds derived from the rabbit and the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) values in the current laser safety standards. PMID:27231639

  9. Retinal thermal damage threshold dependence on exposure duration for the transitional near-infrared laser radiation at 1319 nm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiarui; Jiao, Luguang; Jing, Xiaomin; Chen, Hongxia; Hu, Xiangjun; Yang, Zaifu

    2016-05-01

    The retinal damage effects induced by transitional near-infrared (NIR) lasers have been investigated for years. However, the damage threshold dependence on exposure duration has not been revealed. In this paper, the in-vivo retinal damage ED50 thresholds were determined in chinchilla grey rabbits for 1319 nm laser radiation for exposure durations from 0.1 s to 10 s. The incident corneal irradiance diameter was fixed at 5 mm. The ED50 thresholds given in terms of the total intraocular energy (TIE) for exposure durations of 0.1, 1 and 10 s were 1.36, 6.33 and 28.6 J respectively. The ED50 thresholds were correlated by a power law equation, ED50 = 6.31t (0.66) [J] where t is time [s], with correlation coefficient R = 0.9999. There exists a sufficient safety margin (factor of 28~60) between the human ED50 thresholds derived from the rabbit and the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) values in the current laser safety standards. PMID:27231639

  10. Generation of Widely Tunable Fourier-Transform Pulsed Terahertz Radiation Using Narrowband Near-Infrared Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjun; Haase, Christa; Merkt, Frédéric

    2009-06-01

    Widely tunable, Fourier-transform-limited pulses of terahertz (THz) radiation have been generated by optical frequency deference using (i) crystals of the highly nonlinear organic salt 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4^'-N^'-methyl stilbazolium tosylate (DAST), (ii) zinc telluride (ZnTe) crystals, and (iii) gallium phosphide (GaP) crystals. Outputs from two narrowband (Δν<1 MHz, λ˜800 nm) cw titanium-doped sapphire (Ti:Sa) ring lasers with a well-controlled frequency difference were shaped into pulses using acousto-optic modulators, coupled into an optical fiber, pulse amplified in Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sa crystals and used as optical sources to pump the THz nonlinear crystals. The THz radiation was detected over a broad frequency range and its bandwidth was determined to be ˜10 MHz. Absorption spectra of gas phase molecules including HF and OCS using the THz source will be presented.

  11. [Improved results of the trachea scar stenosis treatment by inclusion in the complex therapy of combined application diprospan and low-intensity infrared laser radiation].

    PubMed

    Israfilova, S B; Gasymov, É M

    2013-09-01

    The experience of treating 61 patients over the rumen of stenosis of the trachea was summarizes. To improve the results suggested inclusion complex diprospan treatment in combination with low intensity infrared laser radiation. The advantages of the proposed method of treatment of tracheal stenosis scarring are reduced severity of chronic inflammation, reducing the proliferation of granulation tissue. PMID:24501929

  12. Infrared laser hemotherapy in cerebral ischemia modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musienko, Julia I.; Nechipurenko, Natalia I.

    2003-10-01

    Use of intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) is considered to be the most effective method of laser therapy and its application is expedient pathogenetically in the ischemic disturbances. The aim of this study is to investigate ILIB influence with infrared laser (IL) with 860 nm wavelength on hemostasis, acid-base status (ABS) of blood in normal rabbits and after modeling of local ischemia of brain (LIB). Experimental cerebral ischemia is characterized by development of hypercoagulation syndrom and metabolic acidosis. ILIB with infrared radiation of 2.0 mW power provokes hypocoagulation in intact animals. Application of ILIB in rabbits after LIB contributes for hemostasis and acid-base status normalizing compared to operated animals. IL radiation with 8,5 mW power results in marked hemostatic activation in all animals. Therefore, beneficial effect of low power laser radiation (LPLR) manifests in narrow power diapason in experimental brain ischemia.

  13. A review of laser-pumped infrared lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The lasing mechanisms are reviewed of molecules that have demonstrated laser action in the laboratories with laser emissions in the spectral range from 3 to 35 microns. A list of lasants and laser mechanisms are defined. The pumping sources for these lasers are mainly infrared lasers; however, the case in which excitation of bromine atoms at 2.71 microns by a flashlamp as energy input is also included in the review. A conceptual drawing of lasing mechanisms is shown. Three pumping mechanisms are shown, the first being the direct-pumped system in which the lasant molecule absorbs the infrared radiation from pump laser directly, and it is excited into the upper laser level from the ground state. The second system is the indirect-pumped system where the infrared-pump laser first excites an absorbing molecule which stores its vibrational energy. Through collision this energy is transferred to the lasant molecule, populating the upper laser level. In the third system, i.e., in a Br2-CO2 mixture, a flashlamp replaces the infrared laser as the pump source for the absorbing molecule.

  14. STRONG FIELD PHYSICS WITH MID INFRARED LASERS.

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    2001-08-27

    Mid-infrared gas laser technology promises to become a unique tool for research in strong-field relativistic physics. The degree to which physics is relativistic is determined by a ponderomotive potential. At a given intensity, a 10 {micro}m wavelength CO{sub 2} laser reaches a 100 times higher ponderomotive potential than the 1 {micro}m wavelength solid state lasers. Thus, we can expect a proportional increase in the throughput of such processes as laser acceleration, x-ray production, etc. These arguments have been confirmed in proof-of-principle Thomson scattering and laser acceleration experiments conducted at BNL and UCLA where the first terawatt-class CO{sub 2} lasers are in operation. Further more, proposals for the 100 TW, 100 fs CO{sub 2} lasers based on frequency-chirped pulse amplification have been conceived. Such lasers can produce physical effects equivalent to a hypothetical multi-petawatt solid state laser. Ultra-fast mid-infrared lasers will open new routes to the next generation electron and ion accelerators, ultra-bright monochromatic femtosecond x-ray and gamma sources, allow to attempt the study of Hawking-Unruh radiation, and explore relativistic aspects of laser-matter interactions. We review the present status and experiments with terawatt-class CO{sub 2} lasers, sub-petawatt projects, and prospective applications in strong-field science.

  15. Pollution Encrustation Removal by Means of Combined Ultraviolet and Infrared Laser Radiation: The Application of this Innovative Methodology on the Surface of the Parthenon West Frieze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouli, P.; Frantzikinaki, K.; Papakonstantinou, E.; Zafiropulos, V.; Fotakis, C.

    This study refers to the innovative laser cleaning methodology developed at FORTH IESL on the combination of ultraviolet and infrared laser radiation emitted from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser for the successful removal of pollution encrustation from marble substrates. The above-mentioned methodology is presented as regards its successful application on the fragile and demanding surface of the Parthenon West Frieze in collaboration with the Committee for the Preservation of the Acropolis Monuments. The aim of this intervention was to remove encrustation, accumulated on the stone due to the atmospheric pollution, without any discoloration or structural alteration to the original surface. The preliminary experiments on all the possible substrates and encrustations present on the surface of the Acropolis monuments and the laser cleaning parameters are presented in detail.

  16. Coherent tunable far infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Tunable, CW, FIR radiation has been generated by nonlinear mixing of radiation from two CO2 lasers in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diode. The FIR difference-frequency power was radiated from the MIM diode antenna to a calibrated InSb bolometer. FIR power of 200 nW was generated by 250 mW from each of the CO2 lasers. Using the combination of lines from a waveguide CO2 laser, with its larger tuning range, with lines from CO2, N2O, and CO2-isotope lasers promises complete coverage of the entire FIR band with stepwise-tunable CW radiation.

  17. Near infrared laser ocular bioeffects

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.J.; Beatrice, E.S.

    1989-05-01

    Thresholds for laser chorioretinal injury in the red end of the visible spectrum and the near-infrared (IR-A) spectral regions are presented. An unpredicted wavelength dependence of the injury threshold for single Q-switched pulses is demonstrated. Four lasers were used to determine thresholds at 40 wavelengths between 532 nm and 1064 nm: a ruby laser, a neodymium:YAG-pumped dye laser, an erbium:YLF laser and an alexandrite laser. Despite many careful and repeated efforts to determine a cause for the variation due to possible variations in the lasers or other aspects of the experimental technique and due to biological absorption properties of the eye, there is no complete or obvious explanation for the significant variations of threshold with small changes in wavelength. The implications of these findings for laser safety standards are presented.

  18. Infrared Radiation and Planetary Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond T.

    2011-11-01

    Infrared radiative transfer theory, one of the most productive physical theories of the past century, has unlocked myriad secrets of the universe including that of planetary temperature and the connection between global warming and greenhouse gases.

  19. Effects of near-infrared laser radiation on the survival and inflammatory potential of Candida spp. involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Clemente, A M; Rizzetto, L; Castronovo, G; Perissi, E; Tanturli, M; Cozzolino, F; Cavalieri, D; Fusi, F; Cialdai, F; Vignali, L; Torcia, M G; Monici, M

    2015-10-01

    Candida spp. usually colonize ulcerative lesions of atrophic mucosa in patients with chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis inducing severe inflammation. The spread of antifungal-resistant strains strongly encouraged the search of complementary or alternative therapeutic strategies to cure inflamed mucosa. In this paper, we studied the effects of a near-infrared (NIR) laser system with dual-wavelength emission (808 nm + 904 nm) on the survival and inflammatory potential of C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. Laser treatment was performed with a Multiwave Locked System laser. Survival and apoptosis of fungal strains were evaluated by colony-forming units (CFU) counting and annexin V staining. Cytokine production was evaluated by ImmunoPlex array. Laser treatment significantly affected the survival of Candida spp. by inducing apoptosis and induced a lower production of inflammatory cytokines by dendritic cells compared to untreated fungi. No differences in the survival and inflammatory potential were recorded in treated or untreated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, used as the control non-pathogenic microorganism. Laser treatment altered the survival and inflammatory potential of pathogenic Candida spp. These data provide experimental support to the use of NIR laser radiation as a co-adjuvant of antifungal therapy in patients with oral mucositis (OM) complicated by Candida infections. PMID:26173694

  20. Optical and infrared lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javan, A.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum mechanical predictions for the gain of an optically pumped CW FIR laser are presented for cases in which one or both of the pump and FIR transitions are pressure or Doppler broadened. The results are compared to those based on the rate equation model. Some of the quantum mechanical predictions are verified in CH3OH.

  1. Advanced infrared laser modulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheo, P. K.; Wagner, R.; Gilden, M.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to develop an electrooptic waveguide modulator for generating continuous tunable sideband power from an infrared CO2 laser. Parameters included were the waveguide configurations, microstrip dimensions device impedance, and effective dielectric constants. An optimum infrared laser modulator was established and was fabricated. This modulator represents the state-of-the-art integrated optical device, which has a three-dimensional topology to accommodate three lambda/4 step transformers for microwave impedance matching at both the input and output terminals. A flat frequency response of the device over 20 HGz or = 3 dB) was achieved. Maximum single sideband to carrier power greater than 1.2% for 20 W microwave input power at optical carrier wavelength of 10.6 microns was obtained.

  2. Banana Dehydration Utilizing Infrared Radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been found to be the main cause of browning in bananas. Infrared radiation (IR) drying could be used to minimize biochemical degradation hence eliminating the need for pre-treatments. This study was to investigate quality characteristics of bananas dried ...

  3. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  4. Synthesis of materials with infrared and ultraviolet lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses three divergent examples of synthesis of materials with lasers. The three techniques are: (1) infrared (CO/sub 2/) laser synthesis of silane (SiH/sub 4/) from disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/); (2) excimer (ArF) laser production of fine silicon powders from methyl- and chloro-substituted silanes; and, (3) excimer (KrF) laser production of fine metallic powders by laser ablation. The mechanism for each process is discussed along with some conclusions about the features of the laser radiation that enable each application. 19 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Parametric infrared tunable laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.; Sutter, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    A parametric tunable infrared laser system was built to serve as transmitter for the remote detection and density measurement of pollutant, poisonous, or trace gases in the atmosphere. The system operates with a YAG:Nd laser oscillator amplifier chain which pumps a parametric tunable frequency converter. The completed system produced pulse energies of up to 30 mJ. The output is tunable from 1.5 to 3.6 micrometers at linewidths of 0.2-0.5 /cm (FWHM), although the limits of the tuning range and the narrower line crystals presently in the parametric converter by samples of the higher quality already demonstrated is expected to improve the system performance further.

  6. Mid-infrared laser filaments in the atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Mitrofanov, A. V.; Voronin, A. A.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Pugžlys, A.; Stepanov, E. A.; Andriukaitis, G.; Flöry, T.; Ališauskas, S.; Fedotov, A. B.; Baltuška, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere offers unique opportunities for long-range transmission of high-power laser radiation and standoff detection. With the critical power of self-focusing scaling as the laser wavelength squared, the quest for longer-wavelength drivers, which would radically increase the peak power and, hence, the laser energy in a single filament, has been ongoing over two decades, during which time the available laser sources limited filamentation experiments in the atmosphere to the near-infrared and visible ranges. Here, we demonstrate filamentation of ultrashort mid-infrared pulses in the atmosphere for the first time. We show that, with the spectrum of a femtosecond laser driver centered at 3.9 μm, right at the edge of the atmospheric transmission window, radiation energies above 20 mJ and peak powers in excess of 200 GW can be transmitted through the atmosphere in a single filament. Our studies reveal unique properties of mid-infrared filaments, where the generation of powerful mid-infrared supercontinuum is accompanied by unusual scenarios of optical harmonic generation, giving rise to remarkably broad radiation spectra, stretching from the visible to the mid-infrared. PMID:25687621

  7. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  8. An infrared search for extraterrestrial laser signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A.

    1986-01-01

    The focus of project SETI is on microwave frequencies, where receivers fundamentally have the best sensitivity for the detection of narrow band signals. Such receivers, when coupled to existing radio telescopes, form an optimum system for broad area searches over the sky. Detection of narrow band infrared signals is best done with a laser heterodyne reciever similar in function to a microwave spectral line receiver. A receiver was built for astrophysical observations at 30 THz (10 microns) and the spectrometer is being adapted for SETI work. The receiver uses a small CO2 laser as the local oscillator, a HgCdTe diode as the photomixer, and a multichannel intermediate frequency (IF) filterbank. An advanced multichannel IF processor is now being built to detect infrared line radiation in 1000 spectral channels each 1 MHz wide. When completed this processor will be used with a ground based telescope next year for a survey of several hundred selected stars for narrow band CO2 laser signals at 30 THz.

  9. Infrared Radiative Properties of Food Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precisely, infrared radiation is electromagnetic radiation whose wavelength is longer than that of visible light, but shorter than that of terahertz radiation and microwaves. The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum spans roughly three orders of magnitude (750 nm to 100 µm) and has been...

  10. Strong-field physics with mid-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.

    2002-04-01

    Mid-infrared gas laser technology promises to become a unique tool for research in strong-field relativistic physics. The degree to which physics is relativistic is determined by a ponderomotive potential. At a given intensity, a 10 μm wavelength CO2 laser reaches a 100 times higher ponderomotive potential than the 1 μm wavelength solid state lasers. Thus, we can expect a proportional increase in the throughput of such processes as laser acceleration, x-ray production, etc. These arguments have been confirmed in proof-of-principle Thomson scattering and laser acceleration experiments conducted at BNL and UCLA where the first terawatt-class CO2 lasers are in operation. Further more, proposals for the 100 TW, 100 fs CO2 lasers based on frequency-chirped pulse amplification have been conceived. Such lasers can produce physical effects equivalent to a hypothetical multi-petawatt solid state laser. Ultra-fast mid-infrared lasers will open new routes to the next generation electron and ion accelerators, ultra-bright monochromatic femtosecond x-ray and gamma sources, allow to attempt the study of Hawking-Unruh radiation, and explore relativistic aspects of laser-matter interactions. We review the present status and experiments with terawatt-class CO2 lasers, sub-petawatt projects, and prospective applications in strong-field science. .

  11. Laser radiation bracket debonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostálová, Tat'jana; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Koranda, Petr; Nemec, Michal; Racek, Jaroslav; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    2008-02-01

    Ceramic brackets are an aesthetic substitute for conventional stainless steel brackets in orthodontic patients. However, ceramic brackets are more brittle and have higher bond strengths, which can lead to bracket breakage and enamel damage during classical type of debonding. This study examined the possibility of laser radiation ceramic brackets removing as well as the possible damage of a surface structure of hard dental tissue after this procedure. Two types of lasers were used for the experiments - a laser diode LIMO HLU20F400 generating a wavelength of 808 nm with the maximum output power 20W at the end of the fiber (core diameter 400 μm, numerical aperture 0.22). As a second source, a diode-pumped Tm:YAP laser system generating a wavelength of 1.9 μm, with up to 3.8 W maximum output power was chosen. For the investigation, extracted incisors with ceramic brackets were used. In both cases, laser radiation was applied for 0.5 minute at a maximum power of 1 W. Temperature changes of the irradiated tissue was registered by camera Electrophysics PV320. After the interaction experiment, the photo-documentation was prepared by the stereomicroscope Nikon SMZ 2T, Japan. The surface tissue analysis was processed in "low vacuum" (30 Pa) regime without desiccation. This technique was used to record back-scattered electron images. Selecting the appropriate laser, resin, and bracket combination can minimize risks of enamel degradation and make debonding more safe.

  12. Subsurface optical stimulation of the rat prostate nerves using continuous-wave near-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-02-01

    Successful identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CN), which are responsible for sexual function, during prostate cancer surgery, will require subsurface detection of the CN beneath a thin fascia layer. This study explores optical nerve stimulation (ONS) in the rat with a fascia layer placed over the CN. Two near-IR diode lasers (1455 nm and 1550 nm lasers) were used to stimulate the CN in CW mode with a 1-mm-diameter spot in 8 rats. The 1455 nm wavelength provides an optical penetration depth (OPD) of ~350 μm, while 1550 nm provides an OPD of ~1000 μm (~3 times deeper than 1455 nm and 1870 nm wavelengths previously tested). Fascia layers with thicknesses of 85 - 600 μm were placed over the CN. Successful ONS was confirmed by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the rat penis at 1455 nm through fascia 110 μm thick and at 1550 nm through fascia 450 μm thick. Higher incident laser power was necessary and weaker and slower ICP responses were observed as fascia thickness was increased. Subsurface ONS of the rat CN at a depth of 450 μm using a 1550 nm laser is feasible.

  13. Models for infrared atmospheric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    Line and band models for infrared spectral absorption are discussed. Radiative transmittance and integrated absorptance of Lorentz, Doppler, and voigt line profiles were compared for a range of parameters. It was found that, for the intermediate path lengths, the combined Lorentz-Doppler (Voigt) profile is essential in calculating the atmospheric transmittance. Narrow band model relations for absorptance were used to develop exact formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Several continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model were compared with the numerical solutions of the wide band models. By employing the line-by-line and quasi-random band model formulations, computational procedures were developed for evaluating transmittance and upwelling atmospheric radiance. Homogeneous path transmittances were calculated for selected bands of CO, CO2, and N2O and compared with experimental measurements. The upwelling radiance and signal change in the wave number interval of the CO fundamental band were also calculated.

  14. Ultra-broadband hybrid infrared laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budilova, O. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Kinyaevskiy, I. O.; Klimachev, Yu. M.; Kotkov, A. A.; Kozlov, A. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A hybrid IR laser system consisting of molecular gas lasers with frequency conversion of laser radiation in a solid-state converter (nonlinear crystal) was developed. One of these gas lasers is a carbon monoxide laser operating in multi-line or single-line mode. Another one is a carbon dioxide laser operating in multi-line mode. The two lasers operate under Q-switching with a joint rotating mirror. Due to sum- and difference-frequency generation in nonlinear crystals, the laser system emits within wavelength range from 2.5 to 16.6 μm. The laser system emitting radiation over such an extremely wide wavelength range (2.7 octaves) is of interest for remote sensing and other applications connected with laser beam propagation in the atmosphere.

  15. Experimental characterization of the saturating, near infrared, self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser: Analysis of radiation properties and electron beam dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murokh, Alex

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the main results of the VISA experiment (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) are presented and analyzed. The purpose of the experiment was to build a state-of-the-art single pass self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL) based on a high brightness electron beam, and characterize its operation, including saturation, in the near infrared spectral region. This experiment was hosted by Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which is a users facility that provides high brightness relativistic electron beams generated with the photoinjector. During the experiment, SASE FEL performance was studied in two regimes: a long bunch, lower gain operation; and a short bunch high gain regime. The transition between the two conditions was possible due to a novel bunch compression mechanism, which was discovered in the course of the experiment. This compression allowed the variation of peak current in the electron beam before it was launched into the 4-m VISA undulator. In the long bunch regime, a SASE FEL power gain length of 29 cm was obtained, and the generated radiation spectral and statistical properties were characterized. In the short bunch regime, a power gain length of under 18 cm was achieved at 842 nm, which is at least a factor of two shorter than ever previously achieved in this spectral range. Further, FEL saturation was obtained before the undulator exit. The FEL system's performance was measured along the length of the VISA undulator, and in the final state. Statistical, spectral and angular properties of the short bunch SASE radiation have been measured in the exponential gain regime, and at saturation. One of the most important aspects of the data analysis presented in this thesis was the development and use of start-to-end numerical simulations of the experiment. The dynamics of the ATF electron beam was modeled starting from the photocathode, through acceleration, transport, and inside the VISA

  16. MIDIR (Mid-Infrared) laser, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Douglas; Jeffers, William; Shellan, Jeffrey

    1988-04-01

    Advances in sensor technology have led to a proliferation of electro-optical systems operating in the mid-infrared (3 to 5 micron). Examples are search and track sets, missile seekers, laser designators, and high energy lasers. To counter enemy use of such systems, jamming and collecting systems which employ lasers of modest power operating within the spectral pass-band of the threat are required. A modulated, wavelength agile, compact, mid-infrared laser of moderate average output powers is extremely attractive for infrared countermeasures and OPTINT collections applications. A unique electric discharge gain generator design has been investigated which promises significant improvements in efficiency, compactness and reliability for pulsed gas laser systems with high peak power and moderate average power outputs.

  17. Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T

    2005-07-01

    The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

  18. Generating Far-Infrared Radiation By Two-Wave Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borenstain, Shmuel

    1992-01-01

    Far-infrared radiation 1 to 6 GHz generated by two-wave mixing in asymmetrically grown GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple-quantum-well devices. Two near-infrared semiconductor diode lasers phase-locked. Outputs amplified, then combined in semiconductor nonlinear multiple-quantum-well planar waveguide. Necessary to optimize design of device with respect to three factors: high degree of confinement of electromagnetic field in nonlinear medium to maximize power density, phase matching to extend length of zone of interaction between laser beams in non-linear medium, and nonlinear susceptibility. Devices used as tunable local oscillators in heterodyne-detection radiometers.

  19. Stimulated radiative laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muys, P.

    2008-04-01

    Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to the radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

  20. Infrared Laser Spectroscopy, 1980-1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Robin S.

    1983-11-01

    The text for the Short Course on Infrared Laser Spectroscopy given at the Los Alamos Conference on Optics '83 is R. S. McDowell, "Vibrational Spectroscopy Using Tunable Lasers," in Vibrational Spectra and Structure, J. R. Durig, ed. (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1981) 10, 1-151, which includes references through 1979. The present paper summarizes progress in this field from 1980 to early 1983.

  1. Infrared laser stimulation of retinal and vestibular neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardin, Fabrice; Bec, Jean-Michel; Albert, Emmanuelle S.; Hamel, Christian; Dupeyron, Gérard; Chabbert, Christian; Marc, Isabelle; Dumas, Michel

    2011-03-01

    The study of laser-neuron interaction has gained interest over the last few years not only for understanding of fundamental mechanisms but also for medical applications such as prosthesis because of the non-invasive characteristic of the laser stimulation. Several authors have shown that near infrared lasers are able to stimulate neurons. It is suggested that a thermal gradient induced by the absorption of the laser radiation on cells is the primary effect but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We show in this work that infrared laser radiations provide a possible way for stimulating retinal and vestibular ganglion cells. We describe relevant physical characteristics allowing safe and reproducible neuron stimulations by single infrared pulses. Calcium fluorescence imaging and electrophysiological recordings have been used to measure ionic exchanges at the neuron membrane. The stimulation system is based on a pulsed laser diode beam of a few mW. Effects of three different wavelengths (from 1470 to 1875 nm) and stimulation durations have been investigated. Variations of the stimulation energy thresholds suggest that the main physical parameter is the water optical absorption. Measurements of the temperature at the cell membrane show that a constant temperature rise is required to stimulate neurons, suggesting a photothermal process.

  2. Infrared laser diode with visible illuminator for biomedical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Podbielska, Halina; Szafranski, C.; Kuzmin, Andrei N.; Ges, J. A.; Ryabtsev, Gennadii I.

    1995-02-01

    The special laser diode device (LDD) leasing in the near infrared region (IR) with two wavelengths: (lambda) 1 equals 850 nm and (lambda) 2 equals 1000 nm, designed for laser therapy, is presented. This device is characterized by a unique feature, namely a separate built-in illuminator, operating in 670 nm. The special construction of LDD and the illuminator enables the user to visualize exactly the surface irradiated by IR radiation. The exposure time and the output of laser power are also controlled and can be displayed on the LED monitor at the front panel. This new device, described here, is compact, low cost, and user friendly.

  3. Infrared Laser Generation Of Heterogeneous Catalysts And Laser-Induced Reactions At Catalytic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danen, Wayne C.; Cheng, , Sheng-San; Iyer, Pradeep K.; Chiou, Shane-Jaw

    1984-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that continuous wave infrared CO2 laser radiation can be util-ized to rapidly produce active catalysts from inert precursors. The activity and selectiv-ity of Ca0 produced from Ca(OH)2 for the isomerization of 1-butene to cis- and trans-2-but-ene is discussed. Variation of the laser irradiation time produces catalytic activity and selectivity qualitatively similar to that resulting from conventional calcination at different temperatures. Pulsed infrared laser-induced reactions at catalytic surfaces are also discussed with emphasis on the dehydrobromination of 2-bromopropane and ethylene elimination from glycine ethyl ester hydrochloride at BaSO4 , A1PO4, and similar surfaces. Correlations are made of the extent of reaction with various experimental parameters including nature of the catalyst, laser frequency, laser fluence, number of laser pulses, and reagent-catalyst ratio.

  4. Characterizing Far-infrared Laser Emissions and the Measurement of Their Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael; Zink, Lyndon R

    2015-01-01

    The generation and subsequent measurement of far-infrared radiation has found numerous applications in high-resolution spectroscopy, radio astronomy, and Terahertz imaging. For about 45 years, the generation of coherent, far-infrared radiation has been accomplished using the optically pumped molecular laser. Once far-infrared laser radiation is detected, the frequencies of these laser emissions are measured using a three-laser heterodyne technique. With this technique, the unknown frequency from the optically pumped molecular laser is mixed with the difference frequency between two stabilized, infrared reference frequencies. These reference frequencies are generated by independent carbon dioxide lasers, each stabilized using the fluorescence signal from an external, low pressure reference cell. The resulting beat between the known and unknown laser frequencies is monitored by a metal-insulator-metal point contact diode detector whose output is observed on a spectrum analyzer. The beat frequency between these laser emissions is subsequently measured and combined with the known reference frequencies to extrapolate the unknown far-infrared laser frequency. The resulting one-sigma fractional uncertainty for laser frequencies measured with this technique is ± 5 parts in 10(7). Accurately determining the frequency of far-infrared laser emissions is critical as they are often used as a reference for other measurements, as in the high-resolution spectroscopic investigations of free radicals using laser magnetic resonance. As part of this investigation, difluoromethane, CH2F2, was used as the far-infrared laser medium. In all, eight far-infrared laser frequencies were measured for the first time with frequencies ranging from 0.359 to 1.273 THz. Three of these laser emissions were discovered during this investigation and are reported with their optimal operating pressure, polarization with respect to the CO2 pump laser, and strength. PMID:26709957

  5. Novel materials as potential infrared laser hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkies, Julian Richard

    The work presented in this thesis has concentrated on an assessment and characterisation of potential laser host media which will only support low phonon or vibrational modes. This is a necessary criterion if systems in which the active ions are lanthanides are to be made to lase in the mid-infrared, as in conventional host media non- radiative processes dominate transitions in this region. Research has concentrated upon two main areas. Firstly a spectroscopic study of lanthanide doped PBr3/AlBr3/SbBr3 was undertaken. A detailed investigation and characterisation of the stable solution formation region was carried out. The doping levels achievable were seen to vary across the lanthanide series from a maximum 0.24mol% for praesodymium to a minimum 0.15mol% for ytterbium. Energies of the characteristic 4 f absorptions of the trivalent lanthanides were measured, along with their oscillator strengths. Judd-Ofelt parameters were found for several rare earths. Stimulated emission cross sections were found to be higher than in conventional glass hosts for certain transitions, such as 6.83 × 10 -20 cm2 for the 4F3/2 --> 4I11/2 transition in the Nd3+ doped liquid. This was verified both experimentally and by the Ladenburg-Fuchtbauer relation when compared to a standard silicate glass. The behaviour, both spectroscopic and physical, of the doped solutions was seen to change dramatically upon heating. Heating the solutions gave rise to higher crystallisation rates, but lower non-radiative relaxation rates. Waveguide and laser experiments were attempted in both bulk and capillary geometries, however material factors such as crystallisation and thermal lensing prevented laser action. Secondly, rare earth doped planar waveguides of zinc sulphide were prepared. A full characterisation of the way in which waveguide loss was affected by factors such as deposition rate, doping level and waveguide masking during evaporation was performed. Waveguide losses as low as 1.5dB/cm at 980nm

  6. Mid-infrared Laser System Development for Dielectric Laser Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Igor; Xu, Guibao; Wandel, Scott

    Laser-driven particle accelerators based on dielectric laser acceleration are under development and exhibit unique and challenging pump requirements. Operation in the mid-infrared (5 μm) range with short pulses (<1 ps FWHM), high pulse energy (>500 μJ) and good beam quality is required. We present our progress on the design and development of a novel two- stage source of mid-infrared pulses for this application, which is based on optical parametric amplification. Beta barium borate and zinc germanium phosphide crystals are used, and are pumped by a Ti:sapphire ultrashort laser and seeded by self-phase modulation and parametric generation-based sources.

  7. Mid-infrared solid-state lasers and laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Byvik, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of NASA-Langley's objectives for the development of advanced lasers and laser materials systems applicable to remote sensing in the mid-IR range. Prominent among current concerns are fiber-optic spectroscopy, eye-safe solid-state lasers for both Doppler sensing and mid-IR wavelength-generation laser pumping, and nonlinear optics generating tunable mid-IR radiation. Ho:YAG lasers are noted to exhibit intrinsic advantages for the desired applications, and are pumpable by GaAlAs laser diodes with a quantum efficiency approaching 2.

  8. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Measurement of SOx using Tunable Infrared Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    The absorption characteristics of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) in the infrared region were measured using a quantum cascade laser and an absorption cell of length 1 m heated to 150°C. The laser was scanned over the wavelength range 6.9-7.4 μm, which included the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3. Measurement results showed that the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3 partially overlapped, with peaks at 7.28 μm and 7.35 μm for SO2 and 7.14 μm and 7.25 μm for SO3. These results showed the possbility of using infrared laser absorption spectroscopy for measurement of sulfur oxides (SOx) in flue gas. For SO3 measurement, infrared absorption spectroscopy was shown to be more suitable than ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The absorption characteristics of open air in the same wavelength region showed that the interference due to water vapor must be efficiently removed to perform SOx measurement in flue gas.

  9. Improved source of infrared radiation for spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, D. G.; Rao, K. N.

    1971-01-01

    Radiation from a crimped V-groove in the electrically heated metallic element of a high-resolution infrared spectrometer is more intense than that from plane areas adjacent to the element. Radiation from the vee and the flat was compared by alternately focusing on the entrance slit of a spectrograph.

  10. Infrared absorption of fs-laser textured CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvani, P.; Bellucci, A.; Girolami, M.; Orlando, S.; Valentini, V.; Polini, R.; Mezzetti, A.; Di Fonzo, F.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale periodic texturing on polycrystalline CVD diamond surface was performed to obtain a significant increase in optical absorptance to visible and near-infrared radiation. Surface texturing, obtained by the use of fs-laser ultrashort pulses, has been demonstrated to induce a controlled periodicity of ripples of about 170 nm and length of several µm, able to drastically increase the diamond capability of interacting with solar radiation from its intrinsic visible blindness. Ultraviolet and visible Raman spectroscopy has been used to confirm the absence of non-diamond phases resulting from the process for the fs-laser-textured sample. Moreover, here we investigate the optical properties in the range 200 nm-25 µm. Absorbance of fs-laser-textured CVD diamond is considerably higher than the untreated one at every wavelength, resulting in a remarkable increase in the emittance: It points out the need for an optimization of process parameters to enhance the selective absorption capability.

  11. Two color far infrared laser interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahata, K.; Akiyama, T.; Pavlichenko, R.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ito, Y.; Okajima, S.; Nakayama, K.; Wood, K.

    2006-10-15

    Two color interferometer using a short wavelength far infrared laser has been developed for high performance plasmas on large helical device and for future fusion devices such as ITER. High power laser lines simultaneously oscillating at 57.2 and 47.6 {mu}m were achieved in a CO{sub 2}-laser-pumped CH{sub 3}OD laser. By introducing Ge:Ga photoconductive detectors operating at liquid He temperature, we have successfully detected two color beat signals (0.55 and 1.2 MHz) with excellent signal-to-noise ratio ({approx}40 dB). These beat signals were fed into phase comparators for phase measurement after passing through intermediate frequency bandpass filters. Two color far infraned laser interferometer work was successful in the demonstration of mechanical vibration compensation.

  12. Low Level Laser Therapy: laser radiation absorption in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Paola; Orlando, Stefano; Dell'Ariccia, Marco; Brandimarte, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we report the results of an experimental study in which we have measured the transmitted laser radiation through dead biological tissues of various animals (chicken, adult and young bovine, pig) in order to evaluate the maximum thickness through which the power density could still produce a reparative cellular effect. In our experiments we have utilized a pulsed laser IRL1 ISO model (based on an infrared diode GaAs, λ=904 nm) produced by BIOMEDICA s.r.l. commonly used in Low Level Laser Therapy. Some of the laser characteristics have been accurately studied and reported in this paper. The transmission results suggest that even with tissue thicknesses of several centimeters the power density is still sufficient to produce a cell reparative effect.

  13. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  14. Transition undulator radiation as bright infrared sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1995-02-01

    Undulator radiation contains, in addition to the usual component with narrow spectral features, a broad-band component in the low frequency region emitted in the near forward direction, peaked at an angle 1/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the relativistic factor. This component is referred to as the transition undulator radiation, as it is caused by the sudden change in the electron`s longitudinal velocity as it enters and leaves the undulator. The characteristic of the transition undulator radiation are analyzed and compared with the infrared radiation from the usual undulator harmonics and from bending magnets.

  15. Use of powerful infrared pulsed Nd-YAG laser for treating osteogenic sarcoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biser, Vladimir A.; Kaplan, Michael A.; Kursova, Larisa V.; Neborak, Yuri T.

    1996-01-01

    Powerful infra-red laser radiation may induce necrosis of a malignant tumor located in a human bone without destructing skin cover. A superficial irradiation of the osteogenic sarcoma with an Nd-YAG laser (pulse power no less than 10 MW, average power 100 - 300 mW, time of exposure 10 - 90 min) has resulted in a severe damage of the tumor (more than 90% of the tumor mass) in 57% of cases. A combined laser/gamma irradiation showed a severe damage in 83% of cases. The results obtained suggest that laser radiation with the above parameters combined with gamma radiation may be used in treatment of osteogenic sarcoma.

  16. Porcine skin damage thresholds for 0.6 to 9.5 cm beam diameters from 1070-nm continuous-wave infrared laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Vincelette, Rebecca; Noojin, Gary D; Harbert, Corey A; Schuster, Kurt J; Shingledecker, Aurora D; Stolarski, Dave; Kumru, Semih S; Oliver, Jeffrey W

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing use of high-power fiber lasers in manufacturing and telecommunications industries operating in the infrared spectrum between 1000 and 2000 nm, which are advertised to provide as much as 10 kW continuous output power at 1070 nm. Safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental and modeling investigations with scant data available for these wavelengths. A series of studies using 1070-nm infrared lasers to determine the minimum visible lesion damage thresholds in skin using the Yucatan miniature pig (Sus scrofa domestica) for a range of beam diameters (0.6, 1.1, 1.9, 2.4, 4.7, and 9.5 cm) and a range of exposure durations (10 ms to 10 s) is presented. Experimental peak temperatures associated with each damage threshold were measured using thermal imaging. Peak temperatures at damage threshold for the 10-s exposures were ∼10°C lower than those at shorter exposures. The lowest and highest experimental minimum visible lesion damage thresholds were found to have peak radiant exposures of 19 and 432  J/cm2 for the beam diameter-exposure duration pairs of 2.4 cm, 25 ms and 0.6 cm, 10 s, respectively. Thresholds for beam diameters >2.5  cm had a weak to no effect on threshold radiant exposure levels for exposure times ≤0.25  s, but may have a larger effect on thresholds for exposures ≥10  s. PMID:24658776

  17. Oxide glasses for mid-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Billy D. O.; Jha, Animesh; Jose, Gin; Jiang, Xin

    2011-06-01

    We present an overview of rare-earth doped heavy metal oxide and oxy-fluoride glasses which show promise as host materials for lasers operating in the 2-5 μm spectral region for medical, military and sensing applications. By engineering glass composition and purity, tellurite and germanate glasses can support transmission up to and beyond 5 μm and can have favourable thermal, mechanical and environmental stability compared to fluoride glasses. We discuss techniques for glass purification and water removal for enhanced infrared transmission. By comparing the material properties of the glass, and spectroscopic performance of selected rare-earth dopant ions we can identify promising compositions for fibre and bulk lasers in the mid-infrared. Tellurite glass has recently been demonstrated to be a suitable host material for efficient and compact lasers in the {2 μm spectral region in fibre and bulk form and the next challenge is to extend the operating range further into the infrared region where silica fibre is not sufficiently transparent, and provide an alternative to fluoride glass and fibre.

  18. Lageos orbit decay due to infrared radiation from Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    1987-01-01

    Infrared radiation from the Earth may be the principal reason for the decay of Lageos' orbit. The radiation heats up the laser retroreflectors embedded in Lageos' aluminum surface. This creates a north-south temperature gradient on the satellite. The gradient in turn causes a force to be exerted on Lageos because of recoil from photons leaving its surface. The delayed heating of the retroreflectors due to their thermal inertia gives the force a net along-track component which always acts like drag. A simple thermal model for the retroreflectors indicates that this thermal drag accounts for about half the observed average along-track acceleration of -3.3 x 10 to the -10 power m/sec squared. The contribution from the aluminum surface to this effect is negligible. The infrared effect cannot explain the large observed fluctuations in drag which occur mainly when the orbit intersects the Earth's shadow.

  19. Lageos orbit decay due to infrared radiation from earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    1987-01-01

    Infrared radiation from the earth may be the principal reason for the decay of Lageos' orbit. The radiation heats up the laser retroreflectors embedded in Lageos' aluminum surface. This creates a north-south temperature gradient on the satellite. The gradient in turn causes a force to be exerted on Lageos because of recoil from photons leaving its surface. The delayed heating of the retroreflectors due to their thermal inertia gives the force a net along-track component which always acts like drag. A simple thermal model for the retroreflectors indicates that this thermal drag accounts for about half the observed average along-track acceleration of -3.3 x 10 to the -10th power m/sec squared. The contribution from the aluminum surface to this effect is negligible. The infrared effect cannot explain the large observed fluctuations in drag which occur mainly when the orbit intersects the earth's shadow.

  20. Electro-optic detection of continuous-wave mid-infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hua; Nahata, Ajay

    2002-10-01

    We demonstrate coherent detection of continuous-wave mid-infrared radiation. This radiation is produced by use of conventional difference-frequency mixing and detected via the linear electro-optic effect. The detection process allows for the simultaneous measurement of the amplitude and phase properties of the infrared field. Both processes require an amplitude-modulated optical beam that is derived from the superimposed output of two single-frequency lasers. With appropriate choice of lasers and nonlinear optical crystals, the technique may be applied to any wavelength throughout the far and mid infrared.

  1. Mid-Infrared Laser Orbital Septal Tightening

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Eugene A.; Li, Michael; Lazarow, Frances B.; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Blepharoplasty is one of the most commonly performed facial aesthetic surgeries. While myriad techniques exist to improve the appearance of the lower eyelids, there is no clear consensus on the optimal management of the orbital septum. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the safety and feasibility of the use of the holmium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser for orbital septal tightening, and to determine whether modest use of this laser would provide some degree of clinical efficacy. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Direct laser irradiation of ex vivo bovine tissue was used to determine appropriate laser dosimetry using infrared thermal imaging and optical coherence tomography before conducting a pilot clinical study in 5 patients. Laser irradiation of the lower eyelid orbital septum was performed through a transconjunctival approach. Standardized preoperative and postoperative photographs were taken for each patient and evaluated by 6 unbiased aesthetic surgeons. EXPOSURE Use of the Ho:YAG laser for orbital septal tightening. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE To determine appropriate laser dosimetry, infrared thermal imaging and optical coherence tomography were used to monitor temperature and tissue shape changes of ex vivo bovine tissue that was subjected to direct laser irradiation. For the clinical study, preoperative and postoperative photographs were evaluated by 6 surgeons on a 10-point Likert scale. RESULTS Optical coherence tomography demonstrated that laser irradiation of bovine tissue to a temperature range of 60°C to 80°C resulted in an increase in thickness of up to 2-fold. There were no complications or adverse cosmetic outcomes in the patient study. Patient satisfaction with the results of surgery averaged 7 on a 10-point Likert scale. For 3 patients, 3 (50%) of the evaluators believed there was a mild improvement in appearance of the lower eyelids after surgery. The remaining patients were thought to have no significant changes. CONCLUSIONS AND

  2. A tunable mid-infrared laser source for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1991-01-01

    Many remote sensing needs can be effectively addressed with a tunable laser source in the mid infrared. One potential laser source is an optical parametric oscillator and amplifier system pumped by a near infrared solid state laser. Advantages of such a system and progress made at NASA Langley Research Center to date on such a system are described.

  3. Ultraviolet radiation induced discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Gilson, Verle A.; Schriever, Richard L.; Shearer, James W.

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation source associated with a suitable cathode-anode electrode structure, disposed in a gas-filled cavity of a high pressure pulsed laser, such as a transverse electric atmosphere (TEA) laser, to achieve free electron production in the gas by photoelectric interaction between ultraviolet radiation and the cathode prior to the gas-exciting cathode-to-anode electrical discharge, thereby providing volume ionization of the gas. The ultraviolet radiation is produced by a light source or by a spark discharge.

  4. Mid - infrared solid state lasers for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, Yuri

    This work is devoted to study of novel high power middle-infrared (Mid-IR) laser sources enabling development of portable platform for sensing of organic molecules with the use of recently discovered Quartz Enhanced Photo Acoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS). The ability to detect small concentrations is beneficial to monitor atmosphere pollution as well for biomedical applications such as analysis of human breath to detect earlier stages of cancer or virus activities. A QEPAS technique using a quartz tuning fork (QTF) as a detector enables a strong enhancement of measured signal when pump laser is modulated with a frequency coinciding with a natural frequency of a QTF. It is known that the detectability of acousto-optics based sensors is proportional to the square root of the laser intensity used for detection of analyte. That is the reason why commercially available semiconductor Mid-IR lasers having small output power limit sensitivity of modern QEPAS based sensors. The lack of high power broadly tunable lasers operating with a modulation frequency of quartz forks (~ 32.768 kHz) is the major motivation of this study. Commercially available Mid-IR (2-3.3 microm), single frequency, continuous wave (CW) fiber pumped lasers based on transition metal doped chalcogenides (e.g. Cr:ZnSe) prove to be efficient laser sources for organic molecules detection. However, their direct modulation is limited to several kHz, and cannot be directly used in combination with QEPAS. Hence, one objective of this work is to study and develop fiber laser pumped Ho:YAG (Er:YAG)/Cr:ZnSe tandem laser system/s. Ho (Holmium) and/or Er (Erbium) ions having long radiation lifetime (~ 10 ms) can effectively accumulate population inversion under CW fiber laser excitation. Utilization of acousto-optic (AO) modulators in the cavity of Ho:YAG (Er:YAG) laser will enable effective Q-Switching with repetition rate easily reaching the resonance frequency of a QTF. It is expected that utilization of Ho:YAG (Er

  5. Infrared microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy with a high brightness synchrotron source can achieve a spatial resolution approaching the diffraction limit. However, in order to realize this intrinsic source brightness at the specimen location, some care must be taken in designing the optical system. Also, when operating in diffraction limited conditions, the effective spatial resolution is no longer controlled by the apertures typically used for a conventional (geometrically defined) measurement. Instead, the spatial resolution depends on the wavelength of light and the effective apertures of the microscope`s Schwarzchild objectives. The authors have modeled the optical system from the synchrotron source up to the sample location and determined the diffraction-limited spatial distribution of light. Effects due to the dependence of the synchrotron source`s numerical aperture on wavelength, as well as the difference between transmission and reflection measurement modes, are also addressed. Lastly, they examine the benefits (when using a high brightness source) of an extrinsic germanium photoconductive detector with cone optics as a replacement for the standard MCT detector.

  6. Tunable infrared laser sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libatique, Nathaniel Joseph C.

    diode-pumped tunable mid-infrared (3 mum) fiber laser. (5) New electronically-controlled continuously wavelength-tunable near-infrared sources based on advanced electro-optic scanners fabricated from poled LiTaO3 crystals. (6) The development of continuously tunable electronically-controlled FBG-referenced near infrared sources suitable for trace gas spectroscopy.

  7. Study on laser and infrared attenuation performance of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-cui; Liu, Qing-hai; Dai, Meng-yan; Cheng, Xiang; Fang, Guo-feng; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, the weapon systems of laser and infrared (IR) imaging guidance have been widely used in modern warfare because of their high precision and strong anti-interference. However, military smoke, a rapid and effective passive jamming method, can effectively counteract the attack of precision-guided weapons by their scattering and absorbing effects. The traditional smoke has good visible light (0.4-0.76μm) obscurant performance, but hardly any effects to other electromagnetic wave bands while the weapon systems of laser and IR imaging guidance usually work in broad band, including the near-infrared (1-3μm), middle-infrared (3-5μm), far-infrared (8-14μm), and so on. Accordingly, exploiting new effective obscurant materials has attracted tremendous interest worldwide nowadays. As is known, the nano-structured materials have lots of unique properties comparing with the traditional materials suggesting that they might be the perfect alternatives to solve the problems above. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are well-ordered, all-carbon hollow graphitic nano-structured materials with a high aspect ratio, lengths from several hundred nanometers to several millimeters. CNTs possess many unique intrinsic physical-chemical properties and are investigated in many areas reported by the previous studies. However, no application research about CNTs in smoke technology field is reported yet. In this paper, the attenuation performances of CNTs smoke to laser and IR were assessed in 20m3 smoke chamber. The testing wavebands employed in experiments are 1.06μm and 10.6μm laser, 3-5μm and 8-14μm IR radiation. The main parameters were obtained included the attenuation rate, transmission rate, mass extinction coefficient, etc. The experimental results suggest that CNTs smoke exhibits excellent attenuation ability to the broadband IR radiation. Their mass extinction coefficients are all above 1m2·g-1. Nevertheless, the mass extinction coefficients vary with the sampling time

  8. Near-infrared laser speckle imaging of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Robert Speer

    Current methods of breast cancer diagnostics (self-exam, clinical exam, x-ray mammography) fail to diagnose a significant number of cases while still in readily operable stages. This is especially true in younger women, where fibrotic tissue reduces the efficacy of x-ray mammography. Near infrared (NIR) laser photons pass diffusively through human tissue, creating a speckle pattern in a detector after transmission. The high and low intensity variations of the speckle have the appearance of random noise, but are not. The speckle pattern will have an intensity distribution that is informative about the scattering and absorption properties of the tissue that is imaged. Adaptations to the Los Alamos National Laboratory MCNP code are described that allow simulation of NIR laser transport through human tissue. A HeNe laser was used to create laser intensity patterns via transmission through homogeneous and non-homogeneous tissue phantoms. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to compare the cumulative distribution functions of the laser intensity patterns, and identify the presence of a non-homogeneity. Laser speckle techniques offer the ability to image tumors with few (<3) millimeter resolution without ionizing radiation dose.

  9. Infrared Pulse-laser Long-path Absorption Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Using a Raman-shifted Dye Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minato, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    A pulsed laser source is effective in infrared laser long-path absorption measurements when the optical path length is very long or the reflection from a hard target is utilized, because higher signal-to-noise ratio is obtained in the detection of weak return signals. We have investigated the performance of a pulse-laser long-path absorption system using a hydrogen Raman shifter and a tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, which generates second Stokes radiation in the 2-micron region.

  10. Development of far infrared attenuation to measure electron densities in cw pin discharge lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    A two beam attenuation technique was devised to measure electron densities 10 to the 9th power to 10 to the 11th power cm/3 resolved to 1 cm, in a near atmospheric COFFEE laser discharge, using 496 micrometer and 1,220 micrometer radiations from CH3F, optically pumped by a CO2 laser. A far infrared generator was developed which was suitable except for a periodic intensity variation in FIR output deriving from frequency variation of the pump radiation.

  11. Estimating the Infrared Radiation Wavelength Emitted by a Remote Control Device Using a Digital Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catelli, Francisco; Giovannini, Odilon; Bolzan, Vicente Dall Agnol

    2011-01-01

    The interference fringes produced by a diffraction grating illuminated with radiation from a TV remote control and a red laser beam are, simultaneously, captured by a digital camera. Based on an image with two interference patterns, an estimate of the infrared radiation wavelength emitted by a TV remote control is made. (Contains 4 figures.)

  12. Explosive crystallization of PZT microstructures by femtosecond infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshin, A. S.; Firsova, N. Yu; Emelianov, V. I.; Pronin, I. P.; Senkevich, S. V.; Zhigalina, O. M.; Mishina, E. D.; Sigov, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The features of microstructure crystallization into perovskite phase in lead zirconate titanate film by femtosecond laser radiation of near-infrared range were discussed. In-situ crystallization kinetics by method of second harmonic generation (SHG) was studied. The presence of several types of crystallization was shown, including ultra-fast (explosive) crystallization occurring immediately after the start of exposure, and slow (self-sustaining) crystallization, occurring after termination of exposure. The advantage of the second-harmonic generation microscopy for the study of annealed microstructures was shown. The morphology of microstructures was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  13. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Kratz, D. P.; Caldwell, J.; Kim, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Mutually consistent line-by-line, narrow-band and broad-band infrared radiation models are presented for methane, a potentially important anthropogenic trace gas within the atmosphere. Comparisons of the modeled band absorptances with existing laboratory data produce the best agreement when, within the band models, spurious band intensities are used which are consistent with the respective laboratory data sets, but which are not consistent with current knowledge concerning the intensity of the infrared fundamental band of methane. This emphasizes the need for improved laboratory band absorptance measurements. Since, when applied to atmospheric radiation calculations, the line-by-line model does not require the use of scaling approximations, the mutual consistency of the band models provides a means of appraising the accuracy of scaling procedures. It is shown that Curtis-Godson narrow-band and Chan-Tien broad-band scaling provide accurate means of accounting for atmospheric temperature and pressure variations.

  14. Development of an infrared radiative heating model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Helmle, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared radiative transfer solution algorithms used in global circulation models were assessed. Computation techniques applicable to the Ames circulation model are identified. Transmission properties of gaseous CO2, H2O, and O3 are gathered, and a computer program is developed, using the line parameter tape and Voight profile subroutine, which computes the transmission of CO2, H2O, and O3. A computer code designed to compute atmospheric cooling rates was developed.

  15. New powerful metal vapor lasers oscillating in deep ultraviolet and middle infrared spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Vuchkov, N. K.; Sabotinov, N. V.

    2010-09-01

    Middle infrared and deep ultraviolet laser systems, which are based on high-power high-beam-quality stable-operating He-SrBr2 and Cu+ Ne-CuBr lasers excited in nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge, are developed, patented and studied. Optimal discharge conditions, such as active zone diameter, vapor pressure, buffer-gas pressure, electrical excitation scheme parameters, average input power, pulse repetition frequency, are found. The highest output laser parameters are obtained for the Sr atom and Cu+ lasers, respectively. These lasers equipped with optical systems for control of laser radiation parameters, such as laser beam divergence, laser intensity distribution, etc. are used in a large variety of applications, such as precise material microprocessing, including biological tissues, determination of linear optical properties of different materials newly developed, laser-induced modification of conductive polymers, laserinduced fluorescence in wide-gap semiconductors, instead of free electron and excimer lasers, respectively.

  16. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of laser-irradiated cementum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; White, Joel M.; Cecchini, Silvia C. M.; Hennig, Thomas

    2003-06-01

    Utilizing Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in specular reflectance mode chemical changes of root cement surfaces due to laser radiation were investigated. A total of 18 samples of root cement were analyzed, six served as controls. In this study laser energies were set to those known for removal of calculus or for disinfection of periodontal pockets. Major changes in organic as well as inorganic components of the cementum were observed following Nd:YAG laser irradiation (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse duration 250 μs, free running, pulse repetition rate 20 Hz, fiber diameter 320 μm, contact mode; Iskra Twinlight, Fontona, Slovenia). Er:YAG laser irradiation (wavelength 2.94 μm, pulse duration 250 μs, free running, pulse repetition rate 6 Hz, focus diameter 620 μm, air water cooling 30 ml/min; Iskra Twinlight, Fontona, Slovenia) significantly reduced the Amid bands due to changes in the organic components. After irradiation with a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser (wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 200 ns, q-switched, pulse repetition rate 20 Hz, beam diameter 800 μm, contact mode, water cooling 30 ml/min; laboratory prototype) only minimal reductions in the peak intensity of the Amide-II band were detected.

  17. Band models and correlations for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption of infrared radiation by various line and band models are briefly reviewed. Narrow band model relations for absorptance are used to develop 'exact' formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Application of a wide band model to a particular gas largely depends upon the spectroscopic characteristic of the absorbing-emitting molecule. Seven continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model are presented and each one of these is compared with the exact (numerical) solutions of the wide band models. Comparison of these results indicate the validity of a correlation for a particular radiative transfer application. In radiative transfer analyses, use of continuous correlations for total band absorptance provides flexibilities in various mathematical operations.

  18. Low-intensity infrared lasers alter actin gene expression in skin and muscle tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Campos, V. M. A.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; Peregrino, A. A. F.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2013-02-01

    The biostimulative effect of low-intensity lasers is the basis for treatment of diseases in soft tissues. However, data about the influence of biostimulative lasers on gene expression are still scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared lasers on the expression of actin mRNA in skin and muscle tissue. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats was exposed to low-intensity infrared laser radiation at different fluences and frequencies. One and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of actin mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency and time after exposure. The results could be useful for laser dosimetry, as well as to justify the therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases of skin and muscle tissues based on low-intensity infrared laser radiation.

  19. The Visualization of Infrared Radiation Using Thermal Sensitive Foils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a set of demonstration school experiments where infrared radiation is detected using thermal sensitive foils. The possibility of using standard glass lenses for infrared imaging is discussed in detail. It is shown that with optic components made from glass, infrared radiation up to 2.5 µm of wavelength can be detected. The…

  20. Picosecond infrared laser (PIRL): an ideal phonomicrosurgical laser?

    PubMed

    Hess, Markus; Hildebrandt, Michael Dominik; Müller, Frank; Kruber, Sebastian; Kroetz, Peter; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Kammal, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Wöllmer, Wolfgang; Miller, Dwayne

    2013-11-01

    A comparison of tissue cutting effects in excised cadaver human vocal folds after incisions with three different instruments [scalpel, CO2 laser and the picosecond infrared laser-(PIRL)] was performed. In total, 15 larynges were taken from human cadavers shortly after death. After deep freezing and thawing for the experiment, the vocal folds suspended in the hemilarynx were incised. Histology and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) analyses were performed. Damage zones after cold instrument cuts ranged from 51 to 135 μm, as compared to 9-28 μm after cutting with the PIRL. It was shown that PIRL incision had smaller zones of tissue coagulation and tissue destruction, when compared with scalpel and CO2 laser cuts. The PIRL technology provides an (almost) atraumatic laser, which offers a quantum jump towards realistic 'micro'-phonosurgery on a factual cellular dimension, almost entirely avoiding coagulation, carbonization, or other ways of major tissue destruction in the vicinity of the intervention area. Although not available for clinical use yet, the new technique appears promising for future clinical applications, so that technical and methodological characteristics as well as tissue experiments seem worthwhile to be communicated at this stage of development. PMID:23708442

  1. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E; Senesac, Larry R; Rajic, Slobodan; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Smith, Barton; Datskos, Panos G

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated an infrared (IR) microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the IR photothermal spectra of molecules absorbed on the surface of uncooled thermal micromechanical detectors. IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy requires no chemical specific coatings and the chemical specificity of the presented method is a consequence of the wavelength-specific absorption of IR photons from tunable quantum cascade lasers due to vibrational spectral bands of the analyte. We have obtained IR photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of RDX and a monolayer of 2-mercaptoethanol, over the wavelength region from 6 to 10 m. We found that in this wavelength region both chemicals exhibit a number of photothermal absorption features that are in good agreement with their respective IR spectra.

  2. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhães, L.A.G.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  3. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Barboza, L L; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  4. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratz, David P.; Ces, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchy of line-by-line, narrow-band, and broadband infrared radiation models are discussed for ozone, a radiatively important atmospheric trace gas. It is shown that the narrow-band (Malkmus) model is in near-precise agreement with the line-by-line model, thus providing a means of testing narrow-band Curtis-Godson scaling, and it is found that this scaling procedure leads to errors in atmospheric fluxes of up to 10 percent. Moreover, this is a direct consequence of the altitude dependence of the ozone mixing ratio. Somewhat greater flux errors arise with use of the broadband model, due to both a lesser accuracy of the broadband scaling procedure and to inherent errors within the broadband model, despite the fact that this model has been tuned to the line-by-line model.

  5. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  6. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  7. Remote infrared radiation detection using piezoresistive microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Oden, P.I.; Thundat, T.; Wachter, E.A.; Warmack, R.J.; Hunter, S.R.

    1996-11-01

    A novel micromechanical infrared (IR) radiation sensor has been developed using commercially available piezoresistive microcantilevers. Microcantilevers coated with a heat absorbing layer undergo bending due to the differential stress between the top layer (coating) and the substrate. The bending causes a change in the piezoresistance and is proportional to the amount of heat absorbed. The microcantilever IR sensor exhibits two distinct thermal responses: a fast one ({lt}ms) and a slower one ({approximately}10 ms). A noise equivalent power (at a modulation frequency of 30 Hz) was estimated to be {approximately}70 nW/Hz{sup 1/2}. This value can be further reduced by designing microcantilevers with better thermal isolation that can allow microcantilevers to be used as uncooled IR radiation detectors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Infrared Thermographic Study of Laser Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mohler, Jonathan H.; Chow, Charles T. S.

    1986-07-01

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet. The experimental apparatus used to make these observations is described. The temperature distributions recorded are shown to be in good agreement with those predicted by heat transfer theory. Heat content values calculated from the observed temperature distributions are used to calculate thermal and kinetic parameters for several samples. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  9. Tunable diode lasers for 3-30 micron infrared operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    The tunable diode laser is now widely used in high resolution infrared spectroscopy studies, taking into account laboratory and industrial applications. The present investigation is concerned with advances related to laser performance and reliability. The advances are the result of improvements in materials and device technologies. Reliability data for broad-area Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se lasers are considered along with performance improvements in stripe-geometry lasers, laser performance at wavelengths above 25 microns, and laser performance at wavelengths below 4 microns. Attention is given to tunable Pb-salt infrared diode lasers, mesa-stripe geometry lasers of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se and PbS(1-x)Se(x), and long wavelength diode laser emission observed in both Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te and Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se.

  10. Effect of infrared radiation on the lens

    PubMed Central

    Aly, Eman Mohamed; Mohamed, Eman Saad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Infrared (IR) radiation is becoming more popular in industrial manufacturing processes and in many instruments used for diagnostic and therapeutic application to the human eye. Aim: The present study was designed to investigate the effect of IR radiation on rabbit’s crystalline lens and lens membrane. Materials and Methods: Fifteen New Zealand rabbits were used in the present work. The rabbits were classified into three groups; one of them served as control. The other two groups were exposed to IR radiation for 5 or 10 minutes. Animals from these two irradiated groups were subdivided into two subgroups; one of them was decapitated directly after IR exposure, while the other subgroup was decapitated 1 hour post exposure. IR was delivered from a General Electric Lamp model 250R 50/10, placed 20 cm from the rabbit and aimed at each eye. The activity of Na+-K+ ATPase was measured in the lens membrane. Soluble lens proteins were extracted and the following measurements were carried out: estimation of total soluble protein, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. For comparison between multiple groups, analysis of variance was used with significance level set at P < 0.001. Results: The results indicated a change in the molecular weight of different lens crystalline accompanied with changes in protein backbone structure. These changes increased for the groups exposed to IR for 10 minutes. Moreover, the activity of Na+-K+ ATPase significantly decreased for all groups. Conclusions: The protein of eye lens is very sensitive to IR radiation which is hazardous and may lead to cataract. PMID:21350278

  11. Comparative hazard evaluation of near-infrared diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W J

    1994-05-01

    Hazard evaluation methods from various laser protection standards differ when applied to extended-source, near-infrared lasers. By way of example, various hazard analyses are applied to laser training systems, which incorporate diode lasers, specifically those that assist in training military or law enforcement personnel in the proper use of weapons by simulating actual firing by the substitution of a beam of near-infrared energy for bullets. A correct hazard evaluation of these lasers is necessary since simulators are designed to be directed toward personnel during normal use. The differences among laser standards are most apparent when determining the hazard class of a laser. Hazard classification is based on a comparison of the potential exposures with the maximum permissible exposures in the 1986 and 1993 versions of the American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers, Z136.1, and the accessible emission limits of the federal laser product performance standard. Necessary safety design features of a particular system depend on the hazard class. The ANSI Z136.1-1993 standard provides a simpler and more accurate hazard assessment of low-power, near-infrared, diode laser systems than the 1986 ANSI standard. Although a specific system is evaluated, the techniques described can be readily applied to other near-infrared lasers or laser training systems. PMID:8175359

  12. Radiation response issues for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalma, Arne H.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

  13. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  14. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  15. Applications of the Infrared Free Electron Laser in Nonlinear and Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fann, Wunshain

    1990-01-01

    Free Electron Lasers (FEL) have been envisioned as novel radiation sources tunable over a wide spectral range. In this dissertation I report two types of experiments that used the infrared FEL, Mark III, to study nonlinear optical properties of conjugated polymers and the possibility of long lived vibrational excitations in acetanilide, a hydrogen-bonded molecular crystal.

  16. Infrared Laser Desorption: Mechanisms and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, Claude Ricketts

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L^2MS), a combination of infrared (IR) laser desorption with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, to investigate (1) the mechanism of IR laser desorption, (2) the composition of aromatic molecules in extraterrestrial samples, and (3) the measurement of compound-specific carbon isotope ratios. First, a description of the mechanism of IR laser desorption of monolayer and submonolayer coverages of molecules adsorbed to an insulator surface is presented. The vibrational and translational energy distributions of aniline-d7 molecules desorbed from single-crystal sapphire (Al_2 O_3) are recorded using L ^2MS. The energy distributions are found to be in equilibrium with each other and with the temperature of the surface at the time of desorption. The translational and angular distributions of monolayer coverages are altered by the collisions of desorbing molecules with each other. Second, spatial and chemical analyses of the carbonaceous components in chondritic meteorites are presented. A microprobe L^2MS instrument (mu L^2MS) capable of analyzing samples with a spatial resolution of 40 mu m and zeptomole (10^{-21} mole) sensitivity is described and used to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in small particles and heterogeneous samples. PAH distributions are used to distinguish between samples from different meteorite classes, and the effects of thermal processing within a given meteorite class are observed. Sliced wafers of meteorite are found to contain an inhomogeneous distribution of PAHs. muL^2MS studies of meteorite samples are coordinated with scanning electron microscopy studies, and the abundances of aromatic compounds across the surface of a sample are consistent with gross structural features but not with elemental or mineralogical features. Third, a description of a method for performing compound-specific carbon isotope

  17. Effects of radiation on laser diodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, Carol Celeste

    2004-09-01

    The effects of ionizing and neutron radiation on the characteristics and performance of laser diodes are reviewed, and the formation mechanisms for nonradiative recombination centers, the primary type of radiation damage in laser diodes, are discussed. Additional topics include the detrimental effects of aluminum in the active (lasing) volume, the transient effects of high-dose-rate pulses of ionizing radiation, and a summary of ways to improve the radiation hardness of laser diodes. Radiation effects on laser diodes emitting in the wavelength region around 808 nm are emphasized.

  18. Effect of microstructure on the coupled electromagnetic-thermo-mechanical response of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine-estane energetic aggregates to infrared laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Judith A.; Zikry, M. A.

    2015-09-28

    The coupled electromagnetic (EM)-thermo-mechanical response of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine-estane energetic aggregates under laser irradiation and high strain rate loads has been investigated for various aggregate sizes and binder volume fractions. The cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) crystals are modeled with a dislocation density-based crystalline plasticity formulation and the estane binder is modeled with finite viscoelasticity through a nonlinear finite element approach that couples EM wave propagation with laser heat absorption, thermal conduction, and inelastic deformation. Material property and local behavior mismatch at the crystal-binder interfaces resulted in geometric scattering of the EM wave, electric field and laser heating localization, high stress gradients, dislocation density, and crystalline shear slip accumulation. Viscous sliding in the binder was another energy dissipation mechanism that reduced stresses in aggregates with thicker binder ligaments and larger binder volume fractions. This investigation indicates the complex interactions between EM waves and mechanical behavior, for accurate predictions of laser irradiation of heterogeneous materials.

  19. Tunable excitation of mid-infrared optically pumped semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsen, Linda J.; Kunz, Jeremy; Ongstad, Andrew P.; Kaspi, Ron

    2013-01-01

    While conventional semiconductor lasers employ electrical injection for carrier excitation, optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSLs) have demonstrated high output powers and high brightness in the mid-infrared. An important consideration for optically pumped lasers is efficient absorption of the pump beam, which can be achieved through increasing the number of periods in the active region, by placing the active region in a cavity with an optical thickness of twice the pump wavelength between distributed Bragg reflectors (Optical Pumping Injection Cavity), or by periodically inserting the active quantum wells into an InGaAsSb waveguide designed to absorb the pump radiation (Integrated Absorber). A tunable optical pumping technique is utilized by which threshold intensities are minimized and efficiencies are maximized. The near-IR idler output of a Nd:YAG-pumped optical parametric oscillator (10 Hz, ~4 ns) is the tunable optical pumping source in this work. Results are presented for an OPSL with a type-II W active region embedded in an integrated absorber to enhance the absorption of the optical pump beam. Emission wavelengths range from 4.64 μm at 78 K to 4.82 μm at 190 K for optical pump wavelengths ranging from 1930-1950 nm. The effect of wavelength tuning is demonstrated and compared to single wavelength pumping (1940 nm) at a higher duty cycle (20- 30%). Comparisons are also made to other OPSLs, including a discussion of the characteristic temperature and high temperature performance of these devices.

  20. Radiation effects in IRAS extrinsic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, L.; Langford, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    During the calibration and testing of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) focal plane, it was observed that the extrinsic photoconductor detectors were affected by gamma radiation at dose levels of the order of one rad. Since the flight environment will subject the focal plane to dose levels of this order from protons in single pass through the South Atlantic Anomaly, an extensive program of radiation tests was carried out to measure the radiation effects and to devise a method to counteract these effects. The effects observed after irradiation are increased responsivity, noise, and rate of spiking of the detectors after gamma-ray doses of less than 0.1 rad. The detectors can be returned almost to pre-irradiation performance by increasing the detector bias to breakdown and allowing a large current to flow for several minutes. No adverse effects on the detectors have been observed from this bias boost, and this technique will be used for IRAS with frequent calibration to ensure the accuracy of observations made with the instrument.

  1. Alteration of GABAergic Neurotransmission by Pulsed Infrared Laser Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hua-Jun; Kao, Chris; Gallagher, Martin J.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Konrad, Peter E.; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Transient electrical impulses are conventionally used to elicit physiological responses in excitable tissues. While electrical stimulation has many advantages, it requires an electrode-tissue interface, exhibits relatively low spatial selectivity and always produces a “stimulus artifact”. Recently, it has been shown that pulsed, low-energy infrared laser light can evoke nerve, muscle and sensory responses similar to those induced by traditional electrical stimulation in a contact-free, damage-free, artifact-free and spatially selective manner. However, the effect of transient infrared laser light on neurotransmission in the CNS is still largely unknown. Here, we tested the effect of infrared laser light on GABAergic neurotransmission. We recorded spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) from cultured rat cortical neurons prior to and after infrared laser stimulation. Using transient infrared laser light, we either stimulated the neuronal soma that had axonal projections to the recorded neuron or directly stimulated the axons that projected to the recorded neuron. Optical stimulation led to enhanced amplitude, decreased decay time constant and increased frequency of sIPSCs. These alterations of sIPSC properties produced by optical stimulation were specifically mediated by GABAA receptors and caused by the transient laser light per se since no exogenous substances such as caged compounds were used. These data show that optical stimulation using transient infrared laser light can alter GABAergic neurotransmission and demonstrate that it may be an alternative approach to electrical stimulation in studying GABAergic function. PMID:20654645

  2. Thermal Infrared Radiative Forcing By Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan

    The work mainly focuses on the study of thermal infrared (IR) properties of atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the estimation of the aerosol-induced direct longwave (LW) radiative forcing in the spectral region 5-20 mum at the Earth's surface (BOA; bottom of the atmosphere) and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) in cloud-free atmospheric conditions. These objectives were accomplished by conducting case studies on clear sky, smoky, and dusty conditions that took place in the Great Basin of the USA in 2013. Both the solar and thermal IR measurements and a state-of-the-science radiative transfer model, the LBLDIS, a combination of the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model and the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) solver were employed for the study. The LW aerosol forcing is often not included in climate models because the aerosol effect on the LW is often assumed to be negligible. We lack knowledge of aerosol characteristics in the LW region, and aerosol properties exhibit high variability. We have found that the LW TOA radiative forcing due to fine mode aerosols, mainly associated with small biomass burning smoke particles, is + 0.4 W/m2 which seems to be small, but it is similar to the LW radiative forcing due to increase in CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere since the preindustrial era of 1750 (+ 1.6 W/m 2). The LW radiative forcing due to coarse mode aerosols, associated with large airborne mineral dust particles, was found to be as much as + 5.02 W/m2 at the surface and + 1.71 W/m2 at the TOA. All of these significant positive values of the aerosol radiative forcing both at the BOA and TOA indicate that the aerosols have a heating effect in the LW range, which contributes to counterbalancing the cooling effect associated with the aerosol radiative forcing in the shortwave (SW) spectral region. In the meantime, we have found that LW radiative forcing by aerosols is highly sensitive to particle size and complex refractive indices of

  3. Probe And Enhancement Of SBS Based Phonons In Infrared Fibers Using Waveguide Coupled External Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chung; Chong, Yat C.; Fong, Chee K.

    1989-06-01

    Interaction of GHz and MHz radiation with CO2 laser propagation in a silver halide fiber using sBs based phonon coupling is furthet investigated. The external signal serves to both probe and enhance laser generated sBs phonons in the fiber. Efficient coupling of microwave radiation into the fiber is accomplished by placing the fiber in a hollow metallic waveguide, designed and constructed to transmit the dominant mode in the 0.9-2.0 GHz band. MHz radiation is conveniently coupled into the fiber using the guided microwave radiation as carrier. Phonon emissions from the fiber under CO2 laser pumping are first established on a spectrum analyzer; low frequency generators ale then tuned to match these frequencies and their maximum interaction recorded. Such interactions are systematically studied by monitoring the amplitude and waveform of the reflected and transmitted laser pulse at various power levels and frequencies of the externally coupled radiation. A plot of reflected laser power versus incident laser power reveals a distinct sBs generated phonon threshold. Variouslaunch directions of the GHz and MHz radiation with respect to the direction of laser propagation are realized to verify theory governing sBs interactions. The MHz radiation and its associated phonons in the fiber are convenient tools for probing sBs related phenomenon in infrared fibers.

  4. Infrared radiation of thin plastic films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, C. L.; Chan, C. K.; Cunnington, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    A combined analytical and experimental study is presented for infrared radiation characteristics of thin plastic films with and without a metal substrate. On the basis of the thin-film analysis, a simple analytical technique is developed for determining band-averaged optical constants of thin plastic films from spectral normal transmittance data for two different film thicknesses. Specifically, the band-averaged optical constants of polyethylene terephthalate and polyimide were obtained from transmittance measurements of films with thicknesses in the range of 0.25 to 3 mil. The spectral normal reflectance and total normal emittance of the film side of singly aluminized films are calculated by use of optical constants; the results compare favorably with measured values.

  5. Transport of infrared radiation in cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN; Weinman, J. A.; Davies, R.

    1981-01-01

    The transport of infrared radiation in a single cuboidal cloud using a vertical two steam approximation was modeled. The emittance of the top face of the model cloud is always less than that for a plane parallel cloud of the same optical depth. The hemisphere flux escaping from the cloud top has a gradient from the center to the edges which brighten when the cloud is over warmer ground. Cooling rate calculations in the 8 to 13.6 micrometer region show that there is cooling from the sides of the cloud at all levels even when there is heating of the core from the ground below. The radiances exiting from model cuboidal clouds were computed by path integration over the source function obtained with the two stream approximation. It is suggested that the brightness temperature measured from finite clouds will overestimate the cloud top temperature.

  6. Radiative Transfer Simulations of Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Wiebe, Dmitry; Fateeva, Anna; Vasyunina, Tatiana

    2011-04-01

    The determination of prestellar core structure is often based on observations of (sub)millimeter dust continuum. However, recently the Spitzer Space Telescope provided us with IR images of many objects not only in emission but also in absorption. We developed a technique to reconstruct the density and temperature distributions of protostellar objects based on radiation transfer (RT) simulations both in mm and IR wavelengths. Best-fit model parameters are obtained with the genetic algorithm. We apply the method to two cores of Infrared Dark Clouds and show that their observations are better reproduced by a model with an embedded heating source despite the lack of 70 μm emission in one of these cores. Thus, the starless nature of massive cores can only be established with the careful case-by-case RT modeling.

  7. Infrared laser in the treatment of craniomandibular disorders, arthrogenous pain

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, T.L.

    1989-05-01

    The fast removal of intra-articular inflammation of the temporomandibular joint in five different patients after infrared laser application is described. Parameters of clinical evaluation was maximum mouth opening and subjective pain. The application of infrared laser of 700 Hz frequency for 3 minutes during five consecutive days at the skin over the painful area of the temporomandibular joint was used. However, the importance of concomitant mandibular stabilization is stressed to achieve optimal result.

  8. Infrared radiation budget of the Harmattan haze. [West Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, P. M.; Weickmann, H. K.

    1975-01-01

    Infrared in situ observations of the West African Harmaltan Haze during the 1974 GATE field phase were conducted to determine the radiative properties of the tropospheric phenomenon and to develop a calculation model for radiative transfer through the haze. Radiometric observations of the dust haze were analyzed for haze infrared transmission. Infrared and tropospheric cooling rates are given together with the haze volume absorption rate.

  9. Preliminary report of plants and processes for infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-18

    The industrial uses and unwanted industrial occurrences of infrared radiation were discussed. The physical characteristics of infrared radiation were described. Exposure to infrared radiation was considered for the following industries: chemicals and allied products, contract construction, electrical equipment, fabricated metals, food and related products, furniture and fixtures, instruments, leather products, manufacturing, primary metals, printing and publishing, rubber and plastics, and stone, clay and glass. The extent of employee exposure to infrared radiation depended on wavelength and energy, proximity of worker to source, degree of worker protection with heat shields, clothing, and tinted goggles, and general workplace conditions. The eye was the critical organ due to its limited ability to dissipate the absorbed heat and its sensitivity to elevated intraocular temperatures. The skin was also a primary concern as it has an extensive surface area and is the initial absorber of incident infrared radiation.

  10. Method for generation of tunable far infrared radiation from two-dimensional plasmons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Tunable far infrared radiation is produced from two-dimensional plasmons in a heterostructure, which provides large inversion-layer electron densities at the heterointerface, without the need for a metallic grating to couple out the radiation. Instead, a light interference pattern is produced on the planar surface of the heterostructure using two coherent laser beams of a wavelength selected to be strongly absorbed by the heterostructure in order to penetrate through the inversion layer. The wavelength of the far infrared radiation coupled out can then be readily tuned by varying the angle between the coherent beams, or varying the wavelength of the two interfering coherent beams, thus varying the periodicity of the photoconductivity grating to vary the wavelength of the far infrared radiation being coupled out.

  11. Efficient dielectric metasurface collimating lenses for mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, Amir; Briggs, Ryan M; Horie, Yu; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-12-28

    Light emitted from single-mode semiconductor lasers generally has large divergence angles, and high numerical aperture lenses are required for beam collimation. Visible and near infrared lasers are collimated using aspheric glass or plastic lenses, yet collimation of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers typically requires more costly aspheric lenses made of germanium, chalcogenide compounds, or other infrared-transparent materials. Here we report mid-infrared dielectric metasurface flat lenses that efficiently collimate the output beam of single-mode quantum cascade lasers. The metasurface lenses are composed of amorphous silicon posts on a flat sapphire substrate and can be fabricated at low cost using a single step conventional UV binary lithography. Mid-infrared radiation from a 4.8 μm distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser is collimated using a polarization insensitive metasurface lens with 0.86 numerical aperture and 79% transmission efficiency. The collimated beam has a half divergence angle of 0.36° and beam quality factor of M2=1.02. PMID:26831996

  12. Efficient dielectric metasurface collimating lenses for mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabi, Amir; Briggs, Ryan M.; Horie, Yu; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-12-01

    Light emitted from single-mode semiconductor lasers generally has large divergence angles, and high numerical aperture lenses are required for beam collimation. Visible and near infrared lasers are collimated using aspheric glass or plastic lenses, yet collimation of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers typically requires more costly aspheric lenses made of germanium, chalcogenide compounds, or other infrared-transparent materials. Here we report mid-infrared dielectric metasurface flat lenses that efficiently collimate the output beam of single-mode quantum cascade lasers. The metasurface lenses are composed of amorphous silicon posts on a flat sapphire substrate and can be fabricated at low cost using a single step conventional UV binary lithography. Mid-infrared radiation from a 4.8 $\\mu$m distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser is collimated using a polarization insensitive metasurface lens with 0.86 numerical aperture and 79% transmission efficiency. The collimated beam has a half divergence angle of 0.36$^\\circ$ and beam quality factor of $M^2$=1.02.

  13. Mid-infrared laser-spectroscopic sensing of chemical species.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Markus W

    2015-05-01

    This letter reports on mid-infrared laser-based detection and analysis of chemical species. Emphasis is put on broadly tunable laser sources and sensitive detection schemes. Selected examples from our lab illustrate the performance and potential of such systems in various areas including environmental and medical sensing. PMID:26257952

  14. Mid-infrared laser-spectroscopic sensing of chemical species

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Markus W.

    2014-01-01

    This letter reports on mid-infrared laser-based detection and analysis of chemical species. Emphasis is put on broadly tunable laser sources and sensitive detection schemes. Selected examples from our lab illustrate the performance and potential of such systems in various areas including environmental and medical sensing. PMID:26257952

  15. Tunable Infrared Lasers: Preparing for Expanded use in Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Killinger, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    The literature on the use of tunable infrared lasers, for atmospheric trace gas detection and monitoring is about 25 years of age. However, this field, whith its myriad of potential application areas, has always been driven by the available laser technology. As new or improved laser devices become available, with characteristics which lend themselves to operation in compact, nearly autonomous instruments, their application to atmospheric science and environmental measurements expands.

  16. Applications of infrared laser spectroscopy to laser chemistry and laser development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Robin S.; Viswanath, A. K.

    The impact on infrared molecular spectroscopy of high-resolution tunable laser sources and laser-controlled Fourier-transform spectrometers is discussed, with special reference to rovibrational spectra of spherical-top molecules such as CH4, OsO4, SiF4, SF6, and UF6. The role of tunable laser spectroscopy in analyzing the CF4 laser, resulting in the precise prediction of lasing frequencies between 605 and 655/cm, is described. Studies of overtone and combination bands of SF6 enable the vibrational anharmonicity to be determined, resulting in a more detailed description of the pump transitions involved in laser photochemistry, and of higher vibrational levels and pathways to excitation and dissociation. This permits more accurate calculations of vibrational state densities for spherical-top molecules. Implications for the photochemistry of species, such as SiF4, SF6, UF6, and Ni(Co)4, are discussed.

  17. Red and infrared gas laser beam for therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Ristici, Marin; Ristici, E.; Tivarus, Madalina-Elena

    2000-06-01

    For the low power laser therapy, the experiments show that better results are obtained when the laser beam is an overlapping of two radiations: one in the visible region of the spectrum and the other in IR region. Also, some experiments show that for good results in biostimulation it is important to have a high coherence length of laser beam; this is not the case of the laser diodes The He-Ne laser has the best coherence, being able to generate laser radiations in visible and IR. It has tow strong laser lines: 633 nm and 1.15 micrometers . Although their gains are about the same, the available power of the red radiation is 3-4 times higher because of its larger width, when they oscillate separately. Using special dichroic mirrors for simultaneous reflection of the both liens, the laser beam will consist of the two radiations, each of them having good coherence . A 420 mm active length, 1.8 mm inner diameter He-Ne laser tube and a special designed resonator has been developed. The mirrors reflect both radiations as follows: one reflects 99.9 percent and the other, the output mirror, reflects 98 percent. There is a competition between them because these lines have a common lower level. The output power of the laser beam as 6 mW for 633 nm and 4 mW for 1.15 micrometers , respectively.

  18. Transport of infrared radiation in cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan, MR.; Weinman, J. A.; Davies, R.

    1981-01-01

    The transport of infrared radiation in a single cuboidal cloud is modeled using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. Computations are made at 10 microns for a Deirmendjian (1969) C-1 water cloud where the single scattering albedo is equal to 0.638 and the asymmetry parameter is 0.865. The results indicate that the emittance of the top face of the model cloud is always less than that for a plane parallel cloud of the same optical depth. The hemispheric flux escaping from the cloud top possesses a gradient from the center to the edges which are warmer when the cloud is over warmer ground. Cooling rate calculations in the 8-13.6 micron region demonstrate that there is cooling out of the sides of the cloud at all levels even when there is heating of the core from the ground below. The radiances exiting from model cuboidal clouds are computed by path integration over the source function obtained with the two-stream approximation. Results indicate that the brightness temperature measured from finite clouds will overestimate the cloud-top temperature.

  19. Near infrared femtosecond laser ablation of urinary calculi in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel M.; Kuranov, Roman V.; McElroy, Austin B.; Wang, Tianyi; Paranjape, Amit S.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2009-02-01

    Pulsed light emitted from a near infrared (λ=800nm) femtosecond laser is capable of plasma induced photodisruption of various materials. We used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate human urinary calculi. Femtosecond pulsed laser interaction with urinary calculi was investigated with various stone compositions, different incident fluences and number of applied pulses. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography was used to image cross sections of ablation craters on the surface of urinary calculi. Our results indicate that femtosecond laser pulses can ablate various calculi compositions. Crater diameter and depth varies from tens of microns to several hundred microns when up to 1000 pulses were applied. Future studies are required to determine if pulsed near infrared femtosecond laser pulses can be applied clinically for lithotripsy of urinary calculi.

  20. Infrared Signatures of Laser Induced Plasma in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hening, Alexandru; Lu, Ryan; Ramirez, Ayax; Advanced Technology Team

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of the temporal and spatial evolution of laser generated plasma in air is necessary for the development of potential applications which range from laser induced ionized micro channels and filaments able to transfer high electric pulses over few hundreds of meters, to the generation of plasma artifacts in air, far away from the laser source. This work is focused mainly on the infrared spectrum. The influence of laser parameters (energy per pulse, pulse duration, repetition rate, wavelength and etc.) on the plasma formation and evolution has been investigated. Laser transmission losses through the air as well as through the breakdown plasma as well as their effect on infrared plasma signature are to be presented.

  1. Airborne laser systems for atmospheric sounding in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark A.; Jia, Huamin; Zammit-Mangion, David

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents new techniques for atmospheric sounding using Near Infrared (NIR) laser sources, direct detection electro-optics and passive infrared imaging systems. These techniques allow a direct determination of atmospheric extinction and, through the adoption of suitable inversion algorithms, the indirect measurement of some important natural and man-made atmospheric constituents, including Carbon Dioxide (CO2). The proposed techniques are suitable for remote sensing missions performed by using aircraft, satellites, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), parachute/gliding vehicles, Roving Surface Vehicles (RSV), or Permanent Surface Installations (PSI). The various techniques proposed offer relative advantages in different scenarios. All are based on measurements of the laser energy/power incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Experimental results are presented relative to ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ = 1064 nm and λ = 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 KHz PRF NIR laser systems in a variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft above ground level. Future activities are planned to validate the atmospheric retrieval algorithms developed for CO2 column density measurements, with emphasis on aircraft related emissions at airports and other high air-traffic density environments.

  2. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-11-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  3. Ocular hazards of tunable continuous-wave near-infrared laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, David J.; Edsall, Peter R.; Fuller, Douglas F.; Hoxie, Stephen W.

    1996-04-01

    Retinal damage thresholds (ED50s) were determined in Rhesus monkey eyes for 100 ms exposures to collimated radiation from a tunable Ti:Sapphire laser at several wavelengths from 700 nm to 900 nm. Prior research using 15 ns duration laser pulses showed a strong variability of ED50 with wavelength for retinal exposure in Rhesus monkeys to laser radiation in the near infrared spectrum. Current studies with the Ti:Sapphire laser show similar variability of ED50 with wavelength for 100 ms retinal exposures. Previously measured light transmission and absorption properties of ocular tissues do not provide a complete or obvious explanation for the significant variations of threshold with small changes in wavelength. Similar wavelength dependencies of ED50 for the two exposure durations in the wavelength range of 750 nm to 830 nm suggest that linear absorption is a cause of the variability. However, differences in the ED50 curves at other wavelengths show that nonlinear mechanisms also contribute.

  4. [The treatment of neurogenic hyperreflexic bladder dysfunctions in girls with low-intensity laser radiation].

    PubMed

    Kosilov, K V; Itskovich, A I; Orekhov, V R

    1995-01-01

    120 girls were investigated for the efficacy of three methods of treatment: conventional, infrared laser radiation on the projection of the bladder plus He-Ne laser radiation on biologically active points (BAP), red He-Ne laser BAP radiation. All the patients suffered from neurogenic hyperreflexic dysfunctions of the bladder, 99.8% had the diagnosis of vegetovascular dystonia, 94.9% had sympathetic-tonic or mixed patterns. The combined laser exposure brought about the greatest response rate-90.0%. PMID:7785111

  5. Near and medium infrared optical fiber lasers and emerging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudenzano, F.; Mescia, L.; Allegretti, L.; De Sario, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Di Tommaso, A.; Palmisano, T.; Petruzzelli, V.

    2010-02-01

    Laser cavities emitting in the near and medium infrared wavelength range, made of rare earth doped optical fibers and suitable pairs of integrated mirrors, are used in a large number of applications. Nowadays, the efficient employment of near and medium infrared laser beams is largely widespread in the field of m*aterial processing, surgery, directed energy, remote sensing, spectroscopy, imaging, and so on. In a lot of cases, the high conversion efficiency, the excellent beam quality, the compactness and, the good heat dissipation capability make fiber lasers competitive and attractive with respect to other light sources, such as ion-doped crystal and bulk glass lasers, optical parametric oscillators, semiconductor and gas lasers. The paper aims to recall and/or briefly illustrate a few among the numerous strategies recently followed by research laboratories and industries to obtain laser sources based on rare earth doped optical fibres. A recall on the host materials and the dopants employed for their construction, and the corresponding applications is given, too. Moreover, an example of near infrared (NIR) fiber optic laser development, by employing available on market components is illustrated by underlining the possibility to easily obtain high beam quality.

  6. Extended emission wavelength of random dye lasers by exploiting radiative and non-radiative energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Ismail, Wan Zakiah; Goldys, Ewa M.; Dawes, Judith M.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate long-wavelength operation (>700 nm) of random dye lasers (using a methylene blue dye) with the addition of rhodamine 6G and titania, enabled by radiative and non-radiative energy transfer. The pump energy is efficiently absorbed and transferred to the acceptors, to support lasing in random dye lasers in the near infrared. The optimum random laser performance with the highest emission intensity and the lowest lasing threshold was achieved for a concentration of methylene blue as the acceptor equal to 6× the concentration of rhodamine 6G (donor). Excessive levels of methylene blue increased the lasing threshold and broadened the methylene blue emission linewidth due to dye quenching from re-absorption. This is due to competition between the donor emission and energy transfer and between absorption loss and fluorescence quenching. The radiative and non-radiative energy transfer is analyzed as a function of the acceptor concentration and pump energy density, with consideration of the spectral overlap. The dependence of the radiative and non-radiative transfer efficiency on the acceptor concentration is obtained, and the energy transfer parameters, including the radiative and non-radiative energy transfer rate constants ( K R and K NR), are investigated using Stern-Volmer analysis. The analysis indicates that radiative energy transfer is the dominant energy transfer mechanism in this system.

  7. Mid-infrared tunable laser based on the Cr:ZnSe active crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koranda, Petr; Jelínková, Helena; Nemec, Michal; Šulc, Jan; Doroshenko, Maxim E.; Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Komar, Vitaly K.; Gerasimenko, Andriy S.; Puzikov, Vyacheslav M.; Badikov, V. V.; Badikov, D. V.

    2008-02-01

    Broadly tunable mid-infrared laser sources operated at room-temperature are desired in many technological and medical applications. The aim of the project was to design and construct broadly tunable powerful Cr:ZnSe laser. The investigated Cr:ZnSe various shaped bulk crystals were grown by the Bridgman method or by the floating zone method. The absorption spectrum was measured to be from 1500 to 2000 nm and the emission spectrum was from 2100 to 2800 nm. Three different lasers were utilized for coherent longitudinal pumping of Cr:ZnSe laser, namely flashlamp-pumped Er:YAP laser (generated wavelength 1660 nm), diode-pumped Tm:YLF laser (generated wavelength 1912 nm) and diode-pumped Tm:YAP laser (generated wavelength 1980 nm). The constructed Cr:ZnSe laser operated in pulsed as well as in continuous-wave regime. In the first case the Cr:ZnSe crystal grown by the floating zone method was studied. The maximal output power in continuous-wave regime was 310 mW with the slope-efficiency 73% for the Tm:YAP laser pumping. In the second case the Cr:ZnSe prism grown by the Bridgman method which served simultaneously as laser active medium and intracavity dispersive element was investigated. For the Er:YAP laser pumping the maximal output energy was 20 mJ with the slope-efficiency 36%. The output radiation was tunable in the range from 2050 nm up to 2750 nm. For the Tm:YAP laser pumping the maximal output power in continuous-wave regime was 175 mW with the slope-efficiency 24%. The output radiation was tunable in the interval from 2220 nm up to 2680 nm. The generated radiation beam spatial structure was close to TEM00.

  8. Model polyimide films: Synthesis, characterization, and deposition by resonant infrared laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, Nicole Leigh

    A new deposition technique for high performance polymer films, resonant infrared laser ablation (RIR-LA) is presented. Ultraviolet laser deposition techniques have been shown to cause decomposition and depolymerization of the deposited polymer films. We hypothesized that the infrared radiation would be a gentler technique compared to ultraviolet radiation and should leave the polymer structure intact. We proposed a technique where a solution-based polymeric precursor is frozen in liquid nitrogen, placed in vacuum chamber, and ablated by a rastered infrared laser beam. Then the ejected material is collected on a substrate forming a thin polymeric film. First we tested the technique on a 15 weight % pyromellitic dianhydride-co-4,4'-oxidianiline (PMDA-ODA) in N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), the polymeric precursor to polyimide. PMDA-ODA is converted to polyimide by a thermal cure near 250 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results confirmed that the PMDA-ODA was transferred intact and without curing by RIR-LA. Molecular weight studies show that only a small portion of the original molecular weight is lost, allowing for the preservation of strength and structural properties. The technique was then tested with other polymers including polyamide imide and polyether imide. Both polymers were successfully transferred intact with no signs of curing. Polyamide imide boasts an even lower cure temperature than polyimide at only 150°C, illustrating how effective RIR-LA is at avoiding thermal transformations.

  9. Plans for a far-infrared free-electron laser in India

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Kumar, V.; Ramamurthi, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Centre for Advanced Technology is building the INDUS complex of synchrotron radiation sources. As part of this programme it is also proposed to build a far-infrared free-electron laser oscillator. This will use a microtron injector and a 40 period undulator made of NdFeB permanent magnets, and is designed to law around 200 microns. We discuss details of the FEL design and the present status of experimental activities on this front.

  10. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy for astronomical purposes. [laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townes, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    Heterodyne infrared astronomy was carried out using CO2 lasers and some solid state tunable lasers. The best available detectors are mercury cadmium telluride photodiodes. Their quantum efficiencies reach values near 0.5 and in an overall system an effective quantum efficiency, taking into account optical losses and amplifier noise, of about 0.25 was demonstrated. Initial uses of 10 micron heterodyne spectroscopy were for the study of planetary molecular spectra.

  11. Advanced optic fabrication using ultrafast laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lauren L.; Qiao, Jun; Qiao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Advanced fabrication and finishing techniques are desired for freeform optics and integrated photonics. Methods including grinding, polishing and magnetorheological finishing used for final figuring and polishing of such optics are time consuming, expensive, and may be unsuitable for complex surface features while common photonics fabrication techniques often limit devices to planar geometries. Laser processing has been investigated as an alternative method for optic forming, surface polishing, structure writing, and welding, as direct tuning of laser parameters and flexible beam delivery are advantageous for complex freeform or photonics elements and material-specific processing. Continuous wave and pulsed laser radiation down to the nanosecond regime have been implemented to achieve nanoscale surface finishes through localized material melting, but the temporal extent of the laser-material interaction often results in the formation of a sub-surface heat affected zone. The temporal brevity of ultrafast laser radiation can allow for the direct vaporization of rough surface asperities with minimal melting, offering the potential for smooth, final surface quality with negligible heat affected material. High intensities achieved in focused ultrafast laser radiation can easily induce phase changes in the bulk of materials for processing applications. We have experimentally tested the effectiveness of ultrafast laser radiation as an alternative laser source for surface processing of monocrystalline silicon. Simulation of material heating associated with ultrafast laser-material interaction has been performed and used to investigate optimized processing parameters including repetition rate. The parameter optimization process and results of experimental processing will be presented.

  12. Terahertz radiation from a laser plasma filament.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-C; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J; Ruhl, H; Sheng, Z-M

    2011-03-01

    By the use of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we clarify the terahertz (THz) radiation mechanism from a plasma filament formed by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The nonuniform plasma density of the filament leads to a net radiating current for THz radiation. This current is mainly located within the pulse and the first cycle of the wakefield. As the laser pulse propagates, a single-cycle and radially polarized THz pulse is constructively built up forward. The single-cycle shape is mainly due to radiation damping effect. PMID:21517604

  13. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers on XPA and XPC gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-09-01

    Laser devices emit monochromatic, coherent, and highly collimated intense beams of light that are useful for a number of biomedical applications. However, for low-intensity lasers, possible adverse effects of laser light on DNA are still controversial. In this work, the expression of XPA and XPC genes in skin and muscle tissue exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at different fluences in continuous mode emission. Skin and muscle tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of XPA and XPC mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats, depending on physical (fluence and wavelength) and biological (tissue) parameters. Laser light could modify expression of genes related to the nucleotide excision repair pathway at fluences and wavelengths used in clinical protocols.

  14. Decomposition of NO studied by infrared emission and CO laser absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Flower, W. L.; Monat, J. P.; Kruger, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    A diagnostic technique for monitoring the concentration of NO using absorption of CO laser radiation was developed and applied in a study of the decomposition kinetics of NO. Simultaneous measurements of infrared emission by NO at 5.3 microns were also made to validate the laser absorption technique. The data were obtained behind incident shocks in NO-N2O-Ar (or Kr) mixtures, with temperatures in the range 2400-4100 K. Rate constants for dominant reactions were inferred from comparisons with computer simulations of the reactive flow.

  15. Laser mode complexity analysis in infrared waveguide free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prazeres, Rui

    2016-06-01

    We analyze an optical phenomenon taking place in waveguide free-electron lasers, which disturbs, or forbids, operation in far infrared range. Waveguides in the optical cavity are used in far-infrared and THz ranges in order to avoid diffraction optical losses, and a hole coupling on output mirror is used for laser extraction. We show that, when the length of the waveguide exceeds a given limit, a phenomenon of "mode disorder" appears in the cavity, which makes the laser difficult, or impossible, to work properly. This phenomenon is even more important when the waveguide covers the whole length of the cavity. A numerical simulation describes this effect, which creates discontinuities of the laser power in the spectral domain. We show an example with an existing infrared Free-Electron Laser, which exhibits such discontinuities of the power, and where no convincing explanation was proposed until now.

  16. Detecting radiation reaction at moderate laser intensities.

    PubMed

    Heinzl, Thomas; Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Bulanov, Stepan S; Rykovanov, Sergey; Schroeder, Carl B; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim P

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new method of detecting radiation reaction effects in the motion of particles subjected to laser pulses of moderate intensity and long duration. The effect becomes sizable for particles that gain almost no energy through the interaction with the laser pulse. Hence, there are regions of parameter space in which radiation reaction is actually the dominant influence on charged particle motion. PMID:25768626

  17. Anomalous dispersion and the pumping of far infrared (FIR) lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the anomalous dispersion at the pump transition in molecular far-infrared lasers (FIR) can lead to sizable focusing and defocusing effects. Criteria for beam spreading and trapping are considered with CH2F as an example.

  18. Vital parameters related low level laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Capone, Stefania

    2011-08-01

    The first work hypotesis is that biosensors on the patient detecting heart, breath rate and skin parameters, modulate laser radiation to enhance the therapeutic outcome; in the second work hypotesis: biofeedback could be effective, when integrated in the low level laser energy release.

  19. The interaction of infrared radiation with the eye: A review of the literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, H. S.

    1972-01-01

    A compilation of data concerning the effects of infrared radiation on the eye is presented. Information in the following areas is included: (1) transmission and absorption of infrared radiation by the ocular tissues, (2) range of infrared radiation which is harmful to the ocular tissues, (3) infrared radiation thresholds of the various oscular tissues, and (4) infrared radiation transmission and absorption of current optic materials.

  20. Nd:YAG laser systems with radiation delivery by thin hollow waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Michal; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Iwai, Katsumasa; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2008-04-01

    The goal of the work was the investigation of hollow waveguide utilization for near infrared laser radiation delivery. As basic delivery unit, a new thin cyclic olefin polymer coated silver hollow glass waveguide with diameters 100/190 μm or 250/360 μm and length up to 20 cm was used. Four near infrared laser sources were based on the Nd:YAG crystals. The first one - Nd:YAG laser passively Q-switched by LiF:F 2- saturable absorber - was coherently pumped by Alexandrite radiation. The system generated 1.06 μm wavelength radiation with 6 ns length of pulse and 0.7 mJ maximum output energy. The second and third laser systems were compact longitudinally diode pumped Nd:YAG lasers generating radiation at wavelength 1.06 μm and 1.44 μm. These lasers were operating in a free-running regime under pulsed pumping (pulse repetition rate 50 Hz). Mean output power 160 mW (90 mW) with pulse length 0.5 ms (1 ms) was generated at wavelength 1.06 μm (1.44 μm). The last radiation source was the Nd:YAG/V:YAG microchip laser pumped by laser diode and generating the radiation at 1.34 μm wavelength. The output power, pulse length, and repetition rate were 25 mW, 6 ns, and 250 Hz, respectively. All lasers were generating beam with gaussian TEM 00 profile. These radiations were focused into thin a waveguide and delivery radiation characteristics were investigated. It was recognized that the output spatial structure is significantly modified in all cases. However a compact delivery system can be useful for near infrared powerful radiation delivery in some special technological and medical applications.

  1. Mid-infrared spatial filter fabrication using laser chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet D'Aubigny, Christian Y.; Walker, Christopher K.; Golish, Dathon R.

    2004-10-01

    Feedhorns like those commonly used in radio-telescope and radio communication equipment couple very efficiently (>98%) to the fundamental Gaussian mode (TEM00). High order modes are not propagated through a single-mode hollow metallic waveguides. It follows that a back to back feedhorn design joined with a small length of single-mode waveguide can be used as a very high throughput spatial filter. Laser micro machining provides a mean of scaling successful waveguide and quasi-optical components to far and mid infrared wavelengths. A laser micro machining system optimized for THz and far IR applications has been in operation at Steward Observatory for several years and produced devices designed to operate at λ=60μm. A new laser micromachining system capable of producing mid-infrared devices will soon be operational. These proceedings review metallic hollow waveguide spatial filtering theory, feedhorn designs as well as laser chemical etching and the design of a new high-NA UV laser etcher capable of sub-micron resolution to fabricate spatial filters for use in the mid-infrared.

  2. Optimized laser application in dermatology using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Roderick A.; Donne, Kelvin E.; Clement, Marc; Kiernan, Michael N.

    2002-03-01

    Infrared thermography can be used to optimize the application of lasers in dermatology with particular reference to the treatment of certain skin disorders such as vascular lesions and depilation. The efficacy of treatment is dependent upon a number of factors including: Optimization and correct selection of laser parameters such as wavelength and spot size. Human factors, such as laser operator skill, patient's skin type and anatomical location. By observing the thermal effects of laser irradiation on the skins surface during treatment results in improved efficacy and minimizes the possible threshold to skin damage, reducing the possibility of burning and scarring. This is of particular significance for example, in the control of purpura for the treatment of vascular lesions. The optimization is validated with reference to a computer model that predicts various skin temperatures based on two different laser spot sizes.

  3. Radiation Degradation Mechanisms in Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johston, A. H.; Miyahira, T. F.

    2004-01-01

    Degradation mechanisms are investigated for laser diodes fabricated with different materials and wavelengths between 660 and 1550 nm. A new approach is developed that evaluates degradation below the laser threshold to determine the radiation-induced recombination density. This allows mechanisms at high injection, such as Auger recombination, to be separated from low-injection damage. New results show that AlGaInP lasers in the visible region are nearly an order of magnitude more resistant to radiation than devices fabricated with AlGaAs or AlGaAsP at longer wavelengths.

  4. In vivo studies of ultrafast near-infrared laser tissue bonding and wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-10-01

    Femtosecond (fs) pulse lasers in the near-infrared (NIR) range exhibit very distinct properties upon their interaction with biomolecules compared to the corresponding continuous wave (CW) lasers. Ultrafast NIR laser tissue bonding (LTB) was used to fuse edges of two opposing animal tissue segments in vivo using fs laser photoexcitation of the native vibrations of chomophores. The fusion of the incised tissues was achieved in vivo at the molecular level as the result of the energy-matter interactions of NIR laser radiation with water and the structural proteins like collagen in the target tissues. Nonthermal vibrational excitation from the fs laser absorption by water and collagen induced the formation of cross-links between tissue proteins on either sides of the weld line resulting in tissue bonding. No extrinsic agents were used to facilitate tissue bonding in the fs LTB. These studies were pursued for the understanding and evaluation of the role of ultrafast NIR fs laser radiation in the LTB and consequent wound healing. The fs LTB can be used for difficult to suture structures such as blood vessels, nerves, gallbladder, liver, intestines, and other viscera. Ultrafast NIR LTB yields promising outcomes and benefits in terms of wound closure and wound healing under optimal conditions.

  5. Trace gas monitoring with infrared laser-based detection schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, M. W.; Bartlome, R.; Marinov, D.; Rey, J. M.; Vogler, D. E.; Wächter, H.

    2008-02-01

    The success of laser-based trace gas sensing techniques crucially depends on the availability and performance of tunable laser sources combined with appropriate detection schemes. Besides near-infrared diode lasers, continuously tunable midinfrared quantum cascade lasers and nonlinear optical laser sources are preferentially employed today. Detection schemes are based on sensitive absorption measurements and comprise direct absorption in multi-pass cells as well as photoacoustic and cavity ringdown techniques in various configurations. We illustrate the performance of several systems implemented in our laboratory. These include time-resolved multicomponent traffic emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser photoacoustic system, a diode-laser based cavity ringdown device for measurements of impurities in industrial process control, isotope ratio measurements with a difference frequency (DFG) laser source combined with balanced path length detection, detection of methylamines for breath analysis with both a near-IR diode laser and a DFG source, and finally, acetone measurements with a heatable multipass cell intended for vapor phase studies on doping agents in urine samples.

  6. The design of infrared laser radar for vehicle initiative safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Xu, Xi-ping; Li, Xiao-yu; Li, Tian-zhi; Liu, Yu-long; Wu, Jia-hui

    2013-09-01

    Laser radar for vehicle is mainly used in advanced vehicle on-board active safety systems, such as forward anti-collision systems, active collision warning systems and adaptive cruise control systems, etc. Laser radar for vehicle plays an important role in the improvement of vehicle active safety and the reduction of traffic accidents. The stability of vehicle active anti-collision system in dynamic environment is still one of the most difficult problems to break through nowadays. According to people's driving habit and the existed detecting technique of sensor, combining the infrared laser range and galvanometer scanning technique , design a 3-D infrared laser radar which can be used to assist navigation, obstacle avoidance and the vehicle's speed control for the vehicle initiative safety. The device is fixed to the head of vehicle. Then if an accident happened, the device could give an alarm to remind the driver timely to decelerate or brake down, by which way can people get the purpose of preventing the collision accidents effectively. To accomplish the design, first of all, select the core components. Then apply Zemax to design the transmitting and receiving optical system. Adopt 1550 nm infrared laser transmitter as emission unit in the device, a galvanometer scanning as laser scanning unit and an InGaAs-APD detector as laser echo signal receiving unit. Perform the construction of experimental system using FPGA and ARM as the core controller. The system designed in this paper can not only detect obstacle in front of the vehicle and make the control subsystem to execute command, but also transfer laser data to PC in real time. Lots of experiments using the infrared laser radar prototype are made, and main performance of it is under tested. The results of these experiments show that the imaging speed of the laser radar can reach up to 25 frames per second, the frame resolution of each image can reach 30×30 pixels, the horizontal angle resolution is about 6. 98

  7. Dichromatic laser radiation effects on DNA of Escherichia coli and plasmids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, W. A.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Dichromatic and consecutive laser radiations have attracted increased attention for clinical applications as offering new tools for the treatment of dysfunctional tissues in situations where monochromatic radiation is not effective. This work evaluated the survival, filamentation and morphology of Escherichia coli cells, and the induction of DNA lesions, in plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation. Exponential and stationary wild type and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein deficient E. coli cultures were exposed to consecutive low-intensity dichromatic laser radiation (infrared laser immediately after red laser) to study the survival, filamentation and morphology of bacterial cells. Plasmid DNA samples were exposed to dichromatic radiation to study DNA lesions by electrophoretic profile. Dichromatic laser radiation affects the survival, filamentation and morphology of E. coli cultures depending on the growth phase and the functional repair mechanism of oxidizing lesions in DNA, but does not induce single/double strands breaks or alkali-labile DNA lesions. Results show that low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation induces biological effects that differ from those induced by monochromatic laser radiation, suggesting that other therapeutic effects could be obtained using dichromatic radiation.

  8. Electronic modulation of infrared radiation in graphene plasmonic resonators.

    PubMed

    Brar, Victor W; Sherrott, Michelle C; Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Seyoon; Kim, Laura; Choi, Mansoo; Sweatlock, Luke A; Atwater, Harry A

    2015-01-01

    All matter at finite temperatures emits electromagnetic radiation due to the thermally induced motion of particles and quasiparticles. Dynamic control of this radiation could enable the design of novel infrared sources; however, the spectral characteristics of the radiated power are dictated by the electromagnetic energy density and emissivity, which are ordinarily fixed properties of the material and temperature. Here we experimentally demonstrate tunable electronic control of blackbody emission from graphene plasmonic resonators on a silicon nitride substrate. It is shown that the graphene resonators produce antenna-coupled blackbody radiation, which manifests as narrow spectral emission peaks in the mid-infrared. By continuously varying the nanoresonator carrier density, the frequency and intensity of these spectral features can be modulated via an electrostatic gate. This work opens the door for future devices that may control blackbody radiation at timescales beyond the limits of conventional thermo-optic modulation. PMID:25948173

  9. Laser action in chromium-activated forsterite for near-infrared excitation: Is Cr/sup 4 +/ the lasing ion

    SciTech Connect

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S.K.; Alfano, R.R.

    1988-12-26

    Room-temperature pulsed laser action has been obtained in chromium-activated forsterite (Cr:Mg/sub 2/SiO/sub 4/) for excitation of the near-infrared absorption band of the system by the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG laser. The characteristics of laser emission are similar to those observed for 532 nm pumping. It is suggested that the laser action is due to a ''center'' other than the trivalent chromium (Cr/sup 3 +/), presumably the tetravalent chromium (Cr/sup 4 +/).

  10. Free-electron laser - far-infrared study of Fef2:Mn. Report No. 1, January 1986-January 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, J.; Kaminski, J.; Jaccarino, V.

    1987-01-01

    The first use of a free-electron laser (FEL) for condensed-matter research was made on iron fluoride:manganese with the far-infrared radiation from the UCSB FEL. The versatility of the FEL for linear and nonequilibrium spectroscopy is demonstrated in studies of the host and impurity modes.

  11. Polarimeter measures sea state characteristics using emitted infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Hilgeman, T.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared polarimeter, capable of operating between 1 and 12 micrometers wavelength has been used to measure the polarization of emitted radiation from the sea. The observed polarization at 10.6 micrometers from a smooth sea was found to be positive, indicating the dominance of reflected infrared sky radiation over the emitted. With the appearance of waves, the percent polarization increased, as expected, for a zenith angle well above the Brewster angle for water. This is qualitatively in accordance with a model presented to explain the behavior. Initial analyses indicate that the polarized components of the sea's emitted and reflected radiation are affected by type and direction of waves, angle of viewing, and foam. The effects of variations in these parameters require further delineation. The infrared polarimetric technique appears to be a novel new passive method for remote monitoring of waves.

  12. High speed infrared radiation thermometer, system, and method

    DOEpatents

    Markham, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The high-speed radiation thermometer has an infrared measurement wavelength band that is matched to the infrared wavelength band of near-blackbody emittance of ceramic components and ceramic thermal barrier coatings used in turbine engines. It is comprised of a long wavelength infrared detector, a signal amplifier, an analog-to-digital converter, an optical system to collect radiation from the target, an optical filter, and an integral reference signal to maintain a calibrated response. A megahertz range electronic data acquisition system is connected to the radiation detector to operate on raw data obtained. Because the thermometer operates optimally at 8 to 12 .mu.m, where emittance is near-blackbody for ceramics, interferences to measurements performed in turbine engines are minimized. The method and apparatus are optimized to enable mapping of surface temperatures on fast moving ceramic elements, and the thermometer can provide microsecond response, with inherent self-diagnostic and calibration-correction features.

  13. Shifting of infrared radiation using rotational raman resonances in diatomic molecular gases

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A device for shifting the frequency of infrared radiation from a CO.sub.2 laser by stimulated Raman scattering in either H.sub.2 or D.sub.2. The device of the preferred embodiment comprises an H.sub.2 Raman laser having dichroic mirrors which are reflective for 16 .mu.m radiation and transmittive for 10 .mu.m, disposed at opposite ends of an interaction cell. The interaction cell contains a diatomic molecular gas, e.g., H.sub.2, D.sub.2, T.sub.2, HD, HT, DT and a capillary waveguide disposed within the cell. A liquid nitrogen jacket is provided around the capillary waveguide for the purpose of cooling. In another embodiment the input CO.sub.2 radiation is circularly polarized using a Fresnel rhomb .lambda./4 plate and applied to an interaction cell of much longer length for single pass operation.

  14. Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Edward A.

    1998-11-17

    An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

  15. Scanning Laser Infrared Molecular Spectrometer (SLIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David C.; Rickey, Kelly; Ksendzov, Alexander; George, Warren P.; Aljabri, Abdullah S.; Steinkraus, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    This prototype innovation is a novel design that achieves very long, effective laser path lengths that are able to yield ppb (parts per billion) and sub-ppb measurements of trace gases. SLIMS can also accommodate multiple laser channels covering a wide range of wavelengths, resulting in detection of more chemicals of interest. The mechanical design of the mirror cell allows for the large effective path length within a small footprint. The same design provides a robust structure that lends itself to being immune to some of the alignment challenges that similar cells face. By taking a hollow cylinder and by cutting an elliptically or spherically curved surface into its inner wall, the basic geometry of a reflecting ring is created. If the curved, inner surface is diamond-turned and highly polished, a surface that is very highly reflective can be formed. The surface finish can be further improved by adding a thin chrome or gold film over the surface. This creates a high-quality, curved, mirrored surface. A laser beam, which can be injected from a small bore hole in the wall of the cylinder, will be able to make many low-loss bounces around the ring, creating a large optical path length. The reflecting ring operates on the same principle as the Herriott cell. The difference exists in the mirror that doesn't have to be optically aligned, and which has a relatively large, internal surface area that lends itself to either open air or evacuated spectroscopic measurements. This solid, spherical ring mirror removes the possibility of mirror misalignment caused by thermal expansion or vibrations, because there is only a single, solid reflecting surface. Benefits of the reflecting ring come into play when size constraints reduce the size of the system, especially for space missions in which mass is at a premium.

  16. Investigation of Infra-red and Nonequilibrium Air Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, Christophe O.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University. This program was intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Prior to this work, the radiative emission of air plasmas in the infrared had been the object of few experimental investigations, and although several infrared systems were already modeled in radiation codes such as NEQAIR, measurements were required to validate numerical predictions and indicate whether all transitions of importance were accounted for in the model. The program was further motivated by the fact that 9 excited states (A, B, C, D, B', F, H, and H') of NO radiate in the infrared, especially between 1 and 1.5 microns where at least 9 transitions involving can be observed. Because these IR transitions are relatively well separated from each other, excited NO states concentrations can be easily measured, thus providing essential information on excited-state chemistry for use in optical diagnostics or in electronic excitation model validation. Detailed comparisons between measured and simulated spectra are presented.

  17. Infrared radiative energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in various energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. Both gray and non-gray radiative formulations for absorption and emission by molecular gases are presented. The gray gas formulations are based on the Planck mean absorption coefficient and the non-gray formulations are based on the wide band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux and divergence of radiative flux are developed. These are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The procedure developed was applied to several realistic problems. Results of selected studies are presented.

  18. Ultrafast pulses from a mid-infrared fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tomonori; Jackson, Stuart D; Hudson, Darren D

    2015-09-15

    Ultrafast laser pulses at mid-infrared wavelengths (2-20 μm) interact strongly with molecules due to the resonance with their vibration modes. This enables their application in frequency comb-based sensing and laser tissue surgery. Fiber lasers are ideal to achieve these pulses, as they are compact, stable, and efficient. We extend the performance of these lasers with the production of 6.4 kW at a wavelength of 2.8 μm with complete electric field retrieval using frequency-resolved optical gating techniques. Contrary to the problems associated with achieving a high average power, fluoride fibers have now shown the capability of operating in the ultrafast, high-peak-power regime. PMID:26371902

  19. Near-Infrared Laser Adjuvant for Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Yuan, Jianping; Forbes, Benjamin; Hibert, Mathew L.; Lee, Eugene L. Q.; Whicher, Laura; Goudie, Calum; Yang, Yuan; Chen, Tao; Edelblute, Beth; Collette, Brian; Edington, Laurel; Trussler, James; Nezivar, Jean; Leblanc, Pierre; Bronson, Roderick; Tsukada, Kosuke; Suematsu, Makoto; Dover, Jeffrey; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Safe and effective immunologic adjuvants are often essential for vaccines. However, the choice of adjuvant for licensed vaccines is limited, especially for those that are administered intradermally. We show that non-tissue damaging, near-infrared (NIR) laser light given in short exposures to small areas of skin, without the use of additional chemical or biological agents, significantly increases immune responses to intradermal influenza vaccination without augmenting IgE. The NIR laser-adjuvanted vaccine confers increased protection in a murine influenza lethal challenge model as compared to unadjuvanted vaccine. We show that NIR laser treatment induces the expression of specific chemokines in the skin resulting in recruitment and activation of dendritic cells and is safe to use in both mice and humans. The NIR laser adjuvant technology provides a novel, safe, low-cost, simple-to-use, potentially broadly applicable and clinically feasible approach to enhancing vaccine efficacy as an alternative to chemical and biological adjuvants. PMID:24349390

  20. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  1. Infrared Laser System for Extended Area Monitoring of Air Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowman, L. R.; Gillmeister, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution monitoring system using a spectrally scanning laser has been developed by the General Electric Company. This paper will report on an evaluation of a breadboard model, and will discuss applications of the concept to various ambient air monitoring situations. The system is adaptable to other tunable lasers. Operating in the middle infrared region, the system uses retroreflectors to measure average concentrations over long paths at low, safe power levels. The concept shows promise of meeting operational needs in ambient air monitoring and providing new data for atmospheric research.

  2. Tunable Radiation Source by Coupling Laser-Plasma-Generated Electrons to a Periodic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Chen, Z. L.; Kon, A.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Zhuo, H. B.; Wang, H. B.; Zhang, B. H.; Gu, Y. Q.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Wang, L.; Yu, M. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Kodama, R.

    2011-12-23

    Near-infrared radiation around 1000 nm generated from the interaction of a high-density MeV electron beam, obtained by impinging an intense ultrashort laser pulse on a solid target, with a metal grating is observed experimentally. Theoretical modeling and particle-in-cell simulation suggest that the radiation is caused by the Smith-Purcell mechanism. The results here indicate that tunable terahertz radiation with tens GV/m field strength can be achieved by using appropriate grating parameters.

  3. Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Far infrared (FIR) radiation (λ = 3–100 μm) is a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum that has been investigated for biological effects. The goal of this review is to cover the use of a further sub-division (3– 12 μm) of this waveband, that has been observed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, to stimulate cells and tissue, and is considered a promising treatment modality for certain medical conditions. Technological advances have provided new techniques for delivering FIR radiation to the human body. Specialty lamps and saunas, delivering pure FIR radiation (eliminating completely the near and mid infrared bands), have became safe, effective, and widely used sources to generate therapeutic effects. Fibers impregnated with FIR emitting ceramic nanoparticles and woven into fabrics, are being used as garments and wraps to generate FIR radiation, and attain health benefits from its effects. PMID:23833705

  4. Processing of polymer surfaces by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutz, E. W.; Frerichs, H.; Stricker, J.; Wesner, D. A.

    1995-11-01

    The processing of polymer surfaces by laser radiation is investigated as a function of laser parameters (fluence, mode of operation) and processing variables (repetition rate, pulse number). Polymers under investigation are polyamide, polymethylmethacrylate, polypropylene, polystyrene, polycarbonate, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer, styrene-acrylonitrile copolymer, polybutadiene terephtalate, and polyoxymethylene, which are studied in air within different processing regimes such as modification of surface properties for subsequent metallization and removal of material for structuring of surface geometry. The metallization of polymers, which are pretreated by laser irradiation, wet chemical etching or plasma etching, is performed via electroplating and physical vapour deposition as a function of surface properties. The removal of polymers including non-thermal and thermal processes is done by direct processing techniques in the demagnification mode within one processing step. The diagnosis and the modelling of physical processes involved in tailoring the surface properties of polymers with laser radiation have to be implied to improve any application of these materials.

  5. Infrared Pulsed Laser Deposition: Applications in Photonics and Biomedical Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Richard

    2006-04-01

    Resonant infrared pulsed-laser deposition (RIR-PLD) shows significant promise for synthesizing thin films of small organic molecules, thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers and biopolymers, without compromising structure or functionality. This contrasts with most attempts at UV-PLD of organic materials, which have often been accompanied by severe photochemical or photothermal degradation of the ablated material. Representative recent successes in RIR-PLD include deposition of: polymers for light emission and hole transport; functionalized polymers and nanoparticles for chemical and biological sensing; and biocompatible polymers suitable for coating medical devices or drug-delivery vehicles. Plume imaging and various other optical- and mass-spectroscopy experiments appear to confirm that polymers or organic molecules ablated by resonant infrared laser irradiation experience a high spatial and temporal density of vibrational excitation, but tend to remain in the electronic ground state. The mechanism of RIR-PLD is observed to depend on the anharmonicity of the mid-infrared absorption modes, their finite relaxation time, mode-specific nonlinear absorption, and rapid changes in polymer viscosity as a function of temperature. Many of the RIR-PLD experiments to date were carried out using a tunable, mid-infrared, picosecond free-electron laser. However, if RIR-PLD is to become a practical tool for making organic thin films, it will be necessary to develop more conventional lasers that can achieve a similar combination of high pulse intensity, low pulse energy, high pulse-repetition frequency and moderate average power. In conclusion, the prospects for developing precisely such table-top RIR-PLD systems will be discussed.

  6. Infrared Laser Optoacoustic Detection Of Gases And Vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. A.; Cummins, P. G.; Bone, S. A.; Davies, P. B.

    1988-10-01

    Mid-infrared laser optoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect a variety of gases and vapours. Performance was calibrated using the signal from a known concentration of ethene, and then the method applied to the perfume alcohol geraniol. Detection limits were found to be 1 ppb for ethene and 70 ppb for geraniol on their strongest absorption lines for a few seconds measurement time.

  7. DNA repair gene expression in biological tissues exposed to low-intensity infrared laser.

    PubMed

    de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Araújo de Campos, Vera Maria; Ferreira Machado, Samara Cristina; de Freitas Peregrino, Antonio Augusto; Geller, Mauro; de Paoli, Flavia

    2013-07-01

    Special properties of laser light have led to its usefulness in many applications in therapy. Excitation of endogenous chromophores in biotissues and generation of free radicals could be involved in its biological effects. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluated the expression of APE1 and OGG1 genes related to repair of DNA lesions induced by free radicals. Skin and muscle tissues of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity infrared laser at different fluences and frequencies. After laser exposition of 1 and 24 h, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of APE1 and OGG1 gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of APE1 and OGG1 mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissues of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency, and time after exposure. Our study suggests that low-intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of DNA lesions by base excision repair pathway. PMID:22941447

  8. Spectroscopic Study of Terahertz Generation in Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yifan; Vijayraghavan, Karun; Jung, Seungyong; Jiang, Aiting; Kim, Jae Hyun; Demmerle, Frederic; Boehm, Gerhard; Amann, Markus C.; Belkin, Mikhail A.

    2016-02-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade laser sources based on intra-cavity difference-frequency generation are currently the only room-temperature mass-producible diode-laser-like emitters of coherent 1-6 THz radiation. Device performance has improved dramatically over the past few years to reach milliwatt-level power output and broad tuning from 1.2 to 5.9 THz, all at room-temperature. Terahertz output in these sources originates from intersubband optical nonlinearity in the laser active region. Here we report the first comprehensive spectroscopic study of the optical nonlinearity and investigate its dependence on the mid-infrared pump frequencies. Our work shows that the terahertz generation efficiency can vary by a factor of 2 or greater depending on the spectral position of the mid-infrared pumps for a fixed THz difference-frequency. We have also measured for the first time the linewidth for transitions between the lower quantum cascade laser states, which is critical for determining terahertz nonlinearity and predicting optical loss in quantum cascade laser waveguides.

  9. Spectroscopic Study of Terahertz Generation in Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Lasers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yifan; Vijayraghavan, Karun; Jung, Seungyong; Jiang, Aiting; Kim, Jae Hyun; Demmerle, Frederic; Boehm, Gerhard; Amann, Markus C; Belkin, Mikhail A

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade laser sources based on intra-cavity difference-frequency generation are currently the only room-temperature mass-producible diode-laser-like emitters of coherent 1-6 THz radiation. Device performance has improved dramatically over the past few years to reach milliwatt-level power output and broad tuning from 1.2 to 5.9 THz, all at room-temperature. Terahertz output in these sources originates from intersubband optical nonlinearity in the laser active region. Here we report the first comprehensive spectroscopic study of the optical nonlinearity and investigate its dependence on the mid-infrared pump frequencies. Our work shows that the terahertz generation efficiency can vary by a factor of 2 or greater depending on the spectral position of the mid-infrared pumps for a fixed THz difference-frequency. We have also measured for the first time the linewidth for transitions between the lower quantum cascade laser states, which is critical for determining terahertz nonlinearity and predicting optical loss in quantum cascade laser waveguides. PMID:26879901

  10. Spectroscopic Study of Terahertz Generation in Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yifan; Vijayraghavan, Karun; Jung, Seungyong; Jiang, Aiting; Kim, Jae Hyun; Demmerle, Frederic; Boehm, Gerhard; Amann, Markus C.; Belkin, Mikhail A.

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade laser sources based on intra-cavity difference-frequency generation are currently the only room-temperature mass-producible diode-laser-like emitters of coherent 1–6 THz radiation. Device performance has improved dramatically over the past few years to reach milliwatt-level power output and broad tuning from 1.2 to 5.9 THz, all at room-temperature. Terahertz output in these sources originates from intersubband optical nonlinearity in the laser active region. Here we report the first comprehensive spectroscopic study of the optical nonlinearity and investigate its dependence on the mid-infrared pump frequencies. Our work shows that the terahertz generation efficiency can vary by a factor of 2 or greater depending on the spectral position of the mid-infrared pumps for a fixed THz difference-frequency. We have also measured for the first time the linewidth for transitions between the lower quantum cascade laser states, which is critical for determining terahertz nonlinearity and predicting optical loss in quantum cascade laser waveguides. PMID:26879901

  11. Resonant Infrared Pulsed-Laser Deposition of Polymers Using a Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stephen; Bellmont, Ron; Bubb, Daniel; Haglund, Richard; Schriver, Ken

    2004-11-01

    Thin films of polyethylene glycol and polystyrene have been produced using resonant infrared pulsed-laser deposition (RIR-PLD). The laser used for the experiments was a tunable, high pulse-repetition rate free-electron laser operating in the mid-IR (2.9 - 3.5 im). Transfer of polymers with molecular weights up to 13,000 was accomplished at resonant vibrational frequencies without concomitant fragmentation or other photochemical degradation, in contrast to PLD techniques using ultraviolet lasers. Potential applications for this technique include drug delivery coatings and chemical and biological sensor construction.

  12. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  13. UCLA infrared free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, James W.; Hartman, Steven C.; Park, Sanghyun; Pellegrini, Claudio; Rosenzweig, James B.; Smolin, J. A.; Barletta, W. A.; Cline, David B.; Cooper, Richard K.; Kolonko, J.; Davis, J. G.; Hairapetian, G.; Joshi, Chand J.; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.; Ivanchenkov, S. N.; Khlebnikov, A. S.; Varfolomeev, A. A.

    1992-05-01

    A compact 20 MeV linac with an RF laser-driven electron gun will drive a high-gain (10 cm gain length), 10.6 micrometers wavelength FEL amplifier, operating in the SASE mode. FEL physics in the high-gain regime will be studied, including start-up from noise, optical guiding, sidebands, saturation, and superradiance, with emphasis on the effects important for future short wavelength operation of FEL's. The hybrid undulator, designed and built at the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy in the U.S.S.R., has forty periods, each 1.5 cm long. The magnetic material is a hybrid combination of SmCo5 blocks and Nd-Fe-B blocks, with vanadium-permendur yokes. The gap distance between pole-tips is fixed at 5 mm. On axis the peak value of the completed undulator's magnetic field was measured to be 7.3 kGauss (+/- 0.25%). Measurements during the conditioning phase of the RF gun for the electron beam's peak dark-current show 6 mA without the longitudinal magnetic focusing field in the gun and 34 mA with the focusing field active. The peak current from photoemission is calculated to be 200 A.

  14. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, S.; Klopf, J. M.; Schriver, K. E.; Park, H. K.; Kelley, M. J.; Haglund, R. F.

    2014-03-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C-H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C-H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  15. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Senthil R.; Klopf, John M.; Schriver, Kenneth E.; Park, HyeKyoung; Kelley, Michael J.; Haglund, Jr., Richard F.

    2013-08-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C–H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C–H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  16. Laser radiation effects on Mycoplasma agalactiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Cerasela Z.; Grigoriu, Constantin; Dinescu, Maria; Pascale, Florentina; Popovici, Adrian; Gheorghescu, Lavinia; Cismileanu, Ana; Avram, Eugenia

    2002-08-01

    The biological effects of the laser radiation emitted by the Nd:YAG laser (second harmonic, wavelength 532 nm /fluence 32 mJ/cm2/pulse duration 6 ns) on the Mycoplasma agalactiae bacterium were studied. The radiation was found to intensify the multiplication of the bacteria irradiated in TRIS buffer (0.125 M), without however affecting the proteinic composition of the cell membrane. When the bacteria were irradiated in their growth medium (PPLO broth) being later cultivated on a solid medium (PPLO agar), the exclusive presence of the atypical colonies (granular and T-like ones) was noticed.

  17. Feasibility of Jujube peeling using novel infrared radiation heating technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared (IR) radiation heating has a promising potential to be used as a sustainable and effective method to eliminate the use of water and chemicals in the jujube-peeling process and enhance the quality of peeled products. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of use IR he...

  18. Rectenna that converts infrared radiation to electrical energy

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W.

    2016-09-06

    Technologies pertaining to converting infrared (IR) radiation to DC energy are described herein. In a general embodiment, a rectenna comprises a conductive layer. A thin insulator layer is formed on the conductive layer, and a nanoantenna is formed on the thin insulator layer. The thin insulator layer acts as a tunnel junction of a tunnel diode.

  19. SIMULTANEOUS ROUGH RICE DRYING AND DISINFESTATION WITH INFRARED RADIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the drying characteristics, milling quality and disinfestation effectiveness of rough rice under infrared (IR) radiation heating. Freshly harvested medium grain rice (M202) samples with low (20.6%) and high (25.0%) moisture contents (MC) were used for ...

  20. Quality Characteristics of Dried Bananas Produced with Infrared Radiation Technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Browning of fruits during drying is a major quality concern. The enzyme polyphenol oxidase has been found to be the main cause of browning in bananas. Infrared radiation (IR) drying could be used to minimize enzymatic browning hence eliminating the need for pre-treatments. This study was to inves...

  1. Dynamics of photoprocesses induced by femtosecond infrared radiation in free molecules and clusters of iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompanets, V. O.; Lokhman, V. N.; Poydashev, D. G.; Chekalin, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of photoprocesses induced by femtosecond infrared radiation in free Fe(CO)5 molecules and their clusters owing to the resonant excitation of vibrations of CO bonds in the 5-μm range has been studied. The technique of infrared excitation and photoionization probing (λ = 400 nm) by femtosecond pulses has been used in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It has been found that an infrared pulse selectively excites vibrations of CO bonds in free molecules, which results in a decrease in the yield of the Fe(CO)5 + molecular ion. Subsequent relaxation processes have been analyzed and the results have been interpreted. The time of the energy transfer from excited vibrations to other vibrations of the molecule owing to intramolecular relaxation has been measured. The dynamics of dissociation of [Fe(CO)5] n clusters irradiated by femtosecond infrared radiation has been studied. The time dependence of the yield of free molecules has been measured under different infrared laser excitation conditions. We have proposed a model that well describes the results of the experiment and makes it possible, in particular, to calculate the profile of variation of the temperature of clusters within the "evaporation ensemble" concept. The intramolecular and intracluster vibrational relaxation rates in [Fe(CO)5] n clusters have been estimated.

  2. Fabrication and spectral tuning of standing gold infrared antennas using single fs-laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Reininghaus, Martin; Wortmann, Dirk; Cao, Zhao; Hoffmann, Jón Mattis; Taubner, Thomas

    2013-12-30

    Upright standing gold monopole nanoantennas are fabricated by irradiation of thin gold films with single pulses of fs-laser radiation. The resulting antennas exhibit extinction resonances in the mid infrared spectral rage for p-polarized light under grazing incidence. Due to the free charge carriers in the surrounding gold film of the antenna, the resonance condition of the thin-wire monopole antenna can be explained by introducing image charges yielding an observable resonance wavelength of four times the antenna length. The antenna length is controlled coarsely by the focusing numerical aperture and fine by the pulse energy of the laser pulse producing the structure. An additional ultrafine tuning of the resonance wavelength with a sub-10 nm resolution is realized by an additional coating process subsequent to the laser structuring. PMID:24514811

  3. Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation using COBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Michael

    2001-01-01

    This project was initiated to allow completion of the primary investigation of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (CORE) mission, and to study the implications of those findings. The Principal Investigator (PI) on this grant was also the Principal Investigator on the DIRBE team. The project had two specific goals: Goal 1: Seek improved limits upon, or detections of, the cosmic infrared background radiation using data from the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). Goal 2: Explore the implications of the limits and measured values of the cosmic infrared background for energy releases in the Universe since the formation of the first luminous sources. Both of these goals have been successfully accomplished.

  4. Bi-directional terahertz-to-infrared emission from metal-coated nanostructures upon femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Zhao, Ji; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, X-C

    2015-09-21

    We report on the investigation of bi-directional terahertz-to-infrared (THz-to-IR) radiation from a metal film coated on a substrate with randomly ordered pore arrays by irradiation of femtosecond laser pulses. THz-to-IR radiation was observed both for front-side excitation (laser incident on the metal surface) and for rear-side excitation (laser incident on the substrate). In both cases, the radiation was observed both in the propagation direction of the laser beam and in the reverse direction. Considering these findings, we propose a thermal emission mechanism based on the production of surface plasmons, either delocalized (through phase-matched excitation) or localized (through surface roughness) at the air/metal and metal/substrate interfaces. PMID:26406717

  5. Thermodynamic response of soft biological tissues to pulsed infrared-laser irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, V; Nishioka, N S; Mikić, B B

    1996-01-01

    The physical mechanisms that achieve tissue removal through the delivery of short pulses of high-intensity infrared laser radiation, in a process known as laser ablation, remain obscure. The thermodynamic response of biological tissue to pulsed infrared laser irradiation was investigated by measuring and analyzing the stress transients generated by Q-sw Er:YSGG (lambda = 2.79 microns) and TEA CO2 (lambda = 10.6 microns) laser irradiation of porcine dermis using thin-film piezoelectric transducers. For radiant exposures that do not produce material removal, the stress transients are consistent with thermal expansion of the tissue samples. The temporal structure of the stress transients generated at the threshold radiant exposure for ablation indicates that the onset of material removal is delayed with respect to irradiation. Once material removal is achieved, the magnitude of the peak compressive stress and its variation with radiant exposure are consistent with a model that considers this process as an explosive event occurring after the laser pulse. This mechanism is different from ArF- and KrF-excimer laser ablation where absorption of ultraviolet radiation by the collagenous tissue matrix leads to tissue decomposition during irradiation and results in material removal via rapid surface vaporization. It appears that under the conditions examined in this study, explosive boiling of tissue water is the process that mediates the ablation event. This study provides evidence that the dynamics and mechanism of tissue ablation processes can be altered by targeting tissue water rather than the tissue structural matrix. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:8744336

  6. Research of infrared laser based pavement imaging and crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hanyu; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Xiuhua; Jing, Genqiang

    2013-08-01

    Road crack detection is seriously affected by many factors in actual applications, such as some shadows, road signs, oil stains, high frequency noise and so on. Due to these factors, the current crack detection methods can not distinguish the cracks in complex scenes. In order to solve this problem, a novel method based on infrared laser pavement imaging is proposed. Firstly, single sensor laser pavement imaging system is adopted to obtain pavement images, high power laser line projector is well used to resist various shadows. Secondly, the crack extraction algorithm which has merged multiple features intelligently is proposed to extract crack information. In this step, the non-negative feature and contrast feature are used to extract the basic crack information, and circular projection based on linearity feature is applied to enhance the crack area and eliminate noise. A series of experiments have been performed to test the proposed method, which shows that the proposed automatic extraction method is effective and advanced.

  7. Investigation of jewelry powders radiating far-infrared rays and the biological effects on human skin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, B H; Park, C M; Oh, T J; Han, S H; Kang, H H; Chang, I S

    2002-01-01

    Far-infrared rays have certain kinds of effects on the human body, especially on skin, blood circulation, and skin cell vitalizing. Some jewelry powders radiate far-infrared rays. Jade has powerful far-infrared ray radiation, and tourmaline has pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties and radiated far-infrared rays. The jewelry powders (fine powdered jade and tourmaline powders) were screened by far-infrared rays for radiation properties and tested for the effects of far-infrared rays on the human skin by temperature observation using an infrared thermal analyzer. PMID:12053208

  8. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    underlying physics. There are now at least six different disciplines that deal with infrared radiation in one form or another, and in one or several different spectral portions of the whole IR range. These are spectroscopy, astronomy, thermal imaging, detector and source development and metrology, as well the field of optical data transmission. Scientists working in these fields range from chemists and astronomers through to physicists and even photographers. This issue presents examples from some of these fields. All the papers—though some of them deal with fundamental or applied research—include interesting elements that make them directly applicable to university-level teaching at the graduate or postgraduate level. Source (e.g. quantum cascade lasers) and detector development (e.g. multispectral sensors), as well as metrology issues and optical data transmission, are omitted since they belong to fundamental research journals. Using a more-or-less arbitrary order according to wavelength range, the issue starts with a paper on the physics of near-infrared photography using consumer product cameras in the spectral range from 800 nm to 1.1 µm [1]. It is followed by a series of three papers dealing with IR imaging in spectral ranges from 3 to 14 µm [2-4]. One of them deals with laboratory courses that may help to characterize the IR camera response [2], the second discusses potential applications for nondestructive testing techniques [3] and the third gives an example of how IR thermal imaging may be used to understand cloud cover of the Earth [4], which is the prerequisite for successful climate modelling. The next two papers cover the vast field of IR spectroscopy [5, 6]. The first of these deals with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the spectral range from 2.5 to 25 µm, studying e.g. ro-vibrational excitations in gases or optical phonon interactions within solids [5]. The second deals mostly with the spectroscopy of liquids such as biofuels and special

  9. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging Without Harmful Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the detection of transmitted radiation, the spatial organization and composition of materials in the body can be ascertained. In this paper, we describe an original apparatus that teaches these concepts by utilizing near infrared radiation and an up-converting phosphorescent screen to safely probe the contents of an opaque enclosure.

  10. Continuous-wave vs. pulsed infrared laser stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation has recently been developed as an alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuouswave (CW) infrared laser radiation, for potential diagnostic applications. A Thulium fiber laser (λ = 1870 nm) was used for non-contact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, was achieved with the laser operating in either CW mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation was observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42-45 °C), not an incident fluence, as previously reported. CW optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a laser with lower power output than pulsed stimulation. CW optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intra-operative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  11. Laser scan microscope and infrared laser scan microcope: two important tools for device testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Eberhard

    1991-03-01

    The optical beam induced current (OBIC) produced in devices by a laser scan microscope (LSM) is used to localize hot spots, leakage currents, electrostatic discharge defects and weak points. The LSM also allows photoluminescence measurements with high spatial and energy resolution. Using the infrared laser scan microscope (IR LSM), defects in the metallization and latch-up sensitive region could be detected from the back of the device.

  12. Modeling and analyzing characteristics of self-infrared radiation on airplane-skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaozhao; Wu, Wenyuan; Wu, Chengguo; Yang, Yuntao; Huang, Yanhua; Sunxiaobo, Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    The characteristic of the self-infrared radiation of airplane-skin is very important for the stealth performance of airplane. Based on the theory of the airplane-skin temperature field, the distribution of the atmospheric temperature field and the principle of the black-body radiation function the self-infrared radiation model was established. In specified flight conditions, the influence of the atmospheric temperature, the speed of flight, the emissivity and the sight angle detection on the self-infrared radiation of the airplane skin were analyzed. Through the simulation of infrared radiation, some results under different flight states are obtained. The simulation results show that skin infrared radiation energy mainly concentrate on the far infrared wavebands, and various factors have different effects on the infrared radiation of skin. This conclusion can help reduce the infrared radiation and improve the stealth performance of airplane in the engineering design and the selection of flight conditions.

  13. A novel laser angioplasty guided hollow fiber using mid-infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihashi-Suzuki, Sachiko; Yamada, Shinya; Sato, Izuru; Awazu, Kunio

    2006-02-01

    We have proposed selective removal of cholesterol ester by infrared laser of wavelength with 5.75 μm irradiation; the wavelength of 5.75 μm correspond with the ester bond C=O stretching vibration. The flexible laser guiding line and a compact light source are required for our proposal. We used a compact mid-infrared tunable laser by difference frequency generation; DFG laser was developed for substitute light source of free electron laser. In the present work, first, we have developed hollow optical fiber with a diamond lens-tip to deliver DFG laser in the blood vessel and evaluated the transmission of DFG laser from 5.5 μm to 7.5 μm. The transmission of 5.75 μm is about 65%, the DFG beam was focused on the tip of fiber by diamond lens-tip. Secondly, we performed the selective removal experiment of cholesterol ester using the hollow optical fiber with diamond lens-tip and DFG laser. The sample used a two layer model, cholesterol oleate and gelatin. The cholesterol oleate was decomposed by 5.75 μm DFG irradiation with 3.8 W/cm2.

  14. Radiation drive in laser heated hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L.J.; Kauffman, R.L.; Darrow, C.B.

    1995-11-03

    Nearly 10 years of Nova experiments and analysis have lead to a relatively detailed quantitative and qualitative understanding of radiation drive in laser heated hohlraums. Our most successful quantitative modelling tool is 2D Lasnex numerical simulations. Analysis of the simulations provides us with insight into the details of the hohlraum drive. In particular we find hohlraum radiation conversion efficiency becomes quite high with longer pulses as the accumulated, high Z blow-off plasma begins to radiate. Extensive Nova experiments corroborate our quantitative and qualitative understanding.

  15. Development of Mid-Infrared Lasers for the Measurement of Trace Atmospheric Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannun, R. A.; Witinski, M. F.; Forouhar, S.; Anderson, J.

    2012-12-01

    In order to thoroughly characterize atmospheric composition at all altitudes, an unprecedented scientific and technical effort is needed. Essential to the advancement of both satellite and in situ science are improvements in continuous wave (CW) and high-power pulsed laser systems in the infrared spectral region integrated with miniaturized electronic and optical components, allowing for the deployment of single mode light sources aboard satellite and UAV platforms. Sources in the the spectral region from 2.8 μm to 3.5 μm are crucial to the sensitive and precise quantification of several atmospherically relevant species, including: OH, H2O, H218O, HDO, CH4, 13CH4, CO2, CH2O, and C2H6, all of which present strong fundamental vibrational absorptions in this mid-infrared range. Currently, however, a massive technology gap exists in both CW and pulsed laser systems within this spectral window. Recent developments include the advancement of CW tunable diode technology using new solid state materials to improve electron hole localization, and the initial integration of these lasers into miniaturized optoelectronic systems ideal for in situ deployment. In addition, high-power pulsed light sources have been produced using optical parametric generation (OPG). A single-frequency Nd:YAG pumps a nonlinear crystal, injection seeded with a diode laser to enhance efficiency and reduce the bandwidth of the output radiation, creating a light source ideal for LIDAR and other remote sensing applications.

  16. Ablation of crystalline oxides by infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Fumiya; Cahill, David G.; Gundrum, Bryan; Averback, R. S.

    2006-10-15

    We use focused laser pulses with duration of 180 fs and wavelength of 800 nm to study the interactions of high power near-infrared light with the surfaces of single-crystal transparent oxides (sapphire, LaAlO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, and MgO); the morphologies of the ablation craters are studied by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. With the exception of LaAlO{sub 3}, the high temperature annealing of these oxide crystals produces atomically flat starting surfaces that enable studies of the morphology of ablation craters with subnanometer precision. The threshold fluence for ablation is determined directly from atomic-force microscopy images and increases approximately linearly with the band gap of the oxide. For all oxides except sapphire, the depth of the ablation crater increases approximately as the square root of the difference between the peak laser fluence and the threshold fluence for ablation. Sapphire shows unique behavior: (i) at laser fluences within 1 J/cm{sup 2} of the threshold for ablation, the depth of the ablation crater increases gradually instead of abruptly with laser fluence, and (ii) the rms roughness of the ablation crater shows a pronounced minimum of <0.2 nm at a laser fluence of 1 J/cm{sup 2} above the threshold.

  17. Near-infrared laser diodes in monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Zen, Jyh-Myng; Czuppon, Tibor

    1992-05-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable analytical tool for environmental and process monitoring. Several publications have addressed different spectroscopic applications related to process monitoring. Since most chemicals absorb in the UVIVis part of the spectrum, the majority of laser applications utilize this shorter wavelength region. Nevertheless, the utilization of the longer wavelength part of the electromagnetic spectrum may be advantageous due to its relatively low interference. The environmental and process monitoring applications of this spectral region may be especially advantageous if semiconductor lasers are utilized as light sources. Laser diodes have all the properties of other types of lasers with the added benefits of compactness, low power consumption, low cost and long lifetime. However, to utilize this spectral region for environmental or process monitoring applications, appropriate near-infrared (NIR) absorbing probe molecules need to be employed. These probes may be used to determine analytical properties important for environmental or process monitoring applications, e.g., pH, oxygen concentration, metal ion determinations, solvent hydrophobicity, just to mention a few. These NIR probes may be incorporated into polymers to form a stable probe arrangement for convenient monitoring using semiconductor lasers. The utility can be further enhanced using fiber optics. In this paper the use of MR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy for monitoring applications will be demonstrated.

  18. Retinal safety of near-infrared lasers in cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Schuele, Georg; Anderson, Dan; Dewey, David; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Femtosecond lasers have added unprecedented precision and reproducibility to cataract surgery. However, retinal safety limits for the near-infrared lasers employed in surgery are not well quantified. We determined retinal injury thresholds for scanning patterns while considering the effects of reduced blood perfusion from rising intraocular pressure and retinal protection from light scattering on bubbles and tissue fragments produced by laser cutting. We measured retinal damage thresholds of a stationary, 1030-nm, continuous-wave laser with 2.6-mm retinal spot size for 10- and 100-s exposures in rabbits to be 1.35 W (1.26 to 1.42) and 0.78 W (0.73 to 0.83), respectively, and 1.08 W (0.96 to 1.11) and 0.36 W (0.33 to 0.41) when retinal perfusion is blocked. These thresholds were input into a computational model of ocular heating to calculate damage threshold temperatures. By requiring the tissue temperature to remain below the damage threshold temperatures determined in stationary beam experiments, one can calculate conservative damage thresholds for cataract surgery patterns. Light scattering on microbubbles and tissue fragments decreased the transmitted power by 88% within a 12 deg angle, adding a significant margin for retinal safety. These results can be used for assessment of the maximum permissible exposure during laser cataract surgery under various assumptions of blood perfusion, treatment duration, and scanning patterns.

  19. Dy:PbGa2S4 laser radiation and its delivery by hollow waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínková, Helena; Nemec, Michal; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Iwai, Katsumasa; Takaku, Hiroyuki; Doroshenko, Maxim; Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Badikov, Valerii V.; Badikov, Dmitri V.

    2012-01-01

    The mid-infrared radiation generated by bulk Dy:PbGa2S4 laser working at room temperature was characterized and for its delivery the special type of COP/Ag hollow waveguide was used. The optical pumping of Dy:PbGa2S4 laser was performed by flashlamp pumped Er:YLF laser at 1.73 μm wavelength. The compact 60 mm long Dy:PbGa2S4 laser oscillator worked in free-running mode with the repetition rate 1.5 Hz. The output energy was 5.1 mJ in 80 μs long pulse at 4.3 μm wavelength. The spatial beam structure was close to the Gaussian shape. The goal of the presented study was the preliminary investigation of the mid-infrared Dy:PbGa2S4 radiation delivery possibility by the cyclic olefin polymer and silver coated hollow glass waveguide. The length of the waveguide was 103 cm and the inner diameter was 700 μm. The thickness of the polymer inner layer was calculated for the optimal 4 μm radiation transmission. Mid-infrared laser radiation was coupled into the waveguide by the CaF2 lens with the focal length 55 mm. The characterization of delivered 4.3 μm radiation was provided. It was observed that the spatial structure is changing essentially, which follows from the transmission principle of the hollow waveguide. As conclude the delivery system for 4.3 μm mid-infrared Dy:PbGa2S4 laser radiation was investigated for the first time.

  20. Quantum band engineering of nitride semiconductors for infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malis, O.; Edmunds, C.; Li, D.; Shao, J.; Gardner, G.; Li, W.; Fay, P.; Manfra, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    The III-nitride semiconductors have been proposed as candidate materials for new quantum cascade lasers in the nearinfrared (1.5-3 μm), and far-infrared (30-60 μm), due to the large conduction-band offset between GaN and Alcontaining alloys (>1 eV), and the large longitudinal optical (LO) phonon energy (90 meV), respectively. The challenges of III-nitride intersubband devices are twofold: material and design related. Due to large electron effective mass, the nitride intersubband materials require the ability to fine-tune the atomic structure at an unprecedented sub-nanometer level. Moreover, the III-N materials exhibit built-in polarization fields that complicate the design of intersubband lasers. This paper presents recent results on c-plane nitride resonant-tunneling diodes that are important for the prospects of farinfrared nitride lasers. We also report near-infrared absorption and photocurrent measurements in nonpolar (m-plane) AlGaN/GaN superlattices.

  1. Microscopic spectral imaging using mid-infrared semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bujin-.; Wang, Yi; Peng, Chuan; Luo, Guipeng; Le, Han Q.

    2003-07-01

    Infrared micro-spectroscopy is a useful tool for basic research and biomedical applications. Conventional microspectroscopic imaging apparatuses use thermal sources for sample illumination, which have low brightness, low optical spectral intensity, and high noise. This work evaluates the system engineering advantages of using mid-infrared semiconductor lasers that offer orders-of magnitude higher brightness, spectral intensity, and lower noise. A laser-based microscopic spectral imaging system with focal plane array detectors demonstrated a high signal-to-noise ratio (>20 dB) at video frame rate for a large illuminated area. Microscopic spectral imaging with fixed-wavelength and tunable lasers of 4.6, 6, and 9.3-μm wavelength was applied to a number of representative samples that consist of biological tissues (plant and animal) and solid material (a stack of laminated polymers). Transmission spectral images with ~30-dB dynamic range were obtained with clear evidence of spectral features for different samples. The potential of more advanced systems with a wide coverage of spectral bands is discussed.

  2. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed measurements and modeling of the spectral emission of an atmospheric pressure air plasma at temperatures up to -3400 K have been made. The cold gas injected in the plasma torch contained an estimated mole fraction of water vapor of approximately 4.5 x 10(exp -3) and an estimated carbon dioxide mole fraction of approximately 3.3 x 10(exp -4). Under these conditions, the minimum level of air plasma emission is found to be between 3.9 and 4.15 microns. Outside this narrow region, significant spectral emission is detected that can be attributed to the fundamental and overtone bands of NO and OH, and to the v(sub 3) and the (v(sub 1)+v(sub 3)) bands Of CO2. Special attention was paid to the effects of ambient air absorption in the optical path between the plasma and the detector. Excellent quantitative agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated spectra, which are both on absolute intensity scales, thus lending confidence in the radiation models incorporated into NEQAIR2-IR over the course of this research program.

  3. Effects of Near-Infrared Laser on Neural Cell Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Kataoka, Yosky; Yamada, Hisao; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-08-01

    Near-infrared laser has been used to relieve patients from various kinds of pain caused by postherpetic neuralgesia, myofascial dysfunction, surgical and traumatic wound, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinically, He-Ne (λ=632.8 nm, 780 nm) and Ga-Al-As (805 ± 25 nm) lasers are used to irradiate trigger points or nerve ganglion. However the precise mechanisms of such biological actions of the laser have not yet been resolved. Since laser therapy is often effective to suppress the pain caused by hyperactive excitation of sensory neurons, interactions with laser light and neural cells are suggested. As neural excitation requires large amount of energy liberated from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), we examined the effect of 830-nm laser irradiation on the energy metabolism of the rat central nervous system and isolated mitochondria from brain. The diode laser was applied for 15 min with irradiance of 4.8 W/cm2 on a 2 mm-diameter spot at the brain surface. Tissue ATP content of the irradiated area in the cerebral cortex was 19 % higher than that of the non-treated area (opposite side of the cortex), whereas the ADP content showed no significant difference. Irradiation at another wavelength (652 nm) had no effect on either ATP or ADP contents. The temperature of the brain tissue was increased 4.5 - 5.0 °C during the irradiation of both 830-nm and 652-nm laser light. Direct irradiation of the mitochondrial suspension did not show any wavelength-dependent acceleration of respiration rate nor ATP synthesis. These results suggest that the increase in tissue ATP content did not result from the thermal effect, but from specific effect of the laser operated at 830 nm. Electrophysiological studies showed the hyperpolarization of membrane potential of isolated neurons and decrease in membrane resistance with irradiation of the laser, suggesting an activation of potassium channels. Intracellular ATP is reported to regulate some kinds of potassium channels. Possible mechanisms

  4. Infrared laser sealing of porcine tissues: preliminary in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Rosenbury, Sarah B.; Giglio, Nicholas C.; Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Perkins, William C.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Ward, Arlen; Nau, William H.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    We are exploring infrared (IR) lasers as an alternative energy modality to radiofrequency (RF) and ultrasonic (US) devices intended to provide rapid surgical hemostasis with minimal collateral zones of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. Previously, a 1470-nm IR laser sealed and cut ex vivo porcine renal arteries of 1-8 mm in 2 s, yielding burst pressures < 1200 mmHg (compared to normal systolic blood pressure of 120 mmHg) and thermal coagulation zones < 3 mm (including the seal). This preliminary study describes in vivo testing of a laser probe in a porcine model. A prototype, fiber optic based handheld probe with vessel/tissue clasping mechanism was tested on blood vessels < 6 mm diameter using incident 1470-nm laser power of 35 W for 1-5 s. The probe was evaluated for hemostasis after sealing isolated and bundled vasculature of abdomen and hind leg, as well as liver and lung parenchyma. Sealed vessel samples were collected for histological analysis of lateral thermal damage. Hemostasis was achieved in 57 of 73 seals (78%). The probe consistently sealed vasculature in small bowel mesentery, mesometrium, and gastro splenic and epiploic regions. Seal performance was less consistent on hind leg vasculature including saphenous arteries and bundles and femoral and iliac arteries. Collagen denaturation averaged 1.6 mm in 8 samples excised for histologic examination. A handheld laser probe sealed porcine vessels in vivo. With further improvements in probe design and laser parameter optimization, IR lasers may provide an alternative to RF and US vessel sealing devices.

  5. Flexible hollow polycarbonate fiber for endoscopic infrared laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Masayuki; Shi, Yi-Wei; Iwai, Katsumasa; Matsuura, Yuji; Zhu, Xiao-Song; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    2007-07-01

    For endoscopic application, inexpensive, safe, and extremely flexible hollow infrared optical fibers have been fabricated based on the polycarbonate (PC) capillary with silver and cyclic olefin polymer (COP) as inner coatings. By optimizing the drawing condition of PC capillary from a commercially available polycarbonate tube and inner-coating process, transmission efficiency of hollow PC fibers is shown to be equal to those of glass capillary based ones. Both Er:YAG laser light and green pilot beam were delivered through the endoscope with low losses even when it was sharply bent with a bending radius as small as 1 centimeter. Preliminary experiments were also conducted on possibility of transmitting infrared thermal image by using bundled silver-coated PC hollow fibers.

  6. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation.

    PubMed

    O'Callahan, Brian T; Lewis, William E; Möbius, Silke; Stanley, Jared C; Muller, Eric A; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-12-14

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy. With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainable near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. The use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy. PMID:26698997

  7. Infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emissions from energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Clayton S.; Brown, E.; Hommerich, Uwe; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.; Snyder, A. Peter

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has shown great promise for applications in chemical, biological, and explosives (CBE) sensing and has significant potential for real time standoff detection and analysis. We have studied LIBS emissions in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral region for potential applications in CBE sensing. Detailed MIR-LIBS studies were performed for several energetic materials for the first time. In this study, the IR signature spectral region between 4 - 12 um was mined for the appearance of MIR-LIBS emissions that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species.

  8. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Robertson, J. B.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An infrared radiation detector including a cadmium sulfide platelet having a cathode formed on one of its ends and an anode formed on its other end is presented. The platelet is suitably doped such that stationary high-field domains are formed adjacent the cathode when based in the negative differential conductivity region. A negative potential is applied to the cathode such that a high-field domain is formed adjacent to the cathode. A potential measuring probe is located between the cathode and the anode at the edge of the high-field domain and means are provided for measuring the potential at the probe whereby this measurement is indicative of the infrared radiation striking the platelet.

  9. Tunable Infrared Laser Instruments for Airborne Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, A.; Diskin, G.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J. G.; Sachse, G.; Slate, T.; Rana, M.; Podolske, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable infrared laser-based instruments on airborne platforms have provided invaluable contributions to atmospheric studies over the past several decades. This paper presents an overview of some recent studies and developments using this approach that were presented at the 2007 Field Laser Applications in Industry and Research (FLAIR, http://www.inoa.it/flair/) conference in Florence, Italy. The present overview only covers select in situ absorption-based instruments that were presented in the airborne session at this conference. In no case are comprehensive details presented. These details can be found in the numerous references given. Additional approaches based upon cavity-enhanced and photoacoustic measurements, which are also making invaluable contributions in airborne atmospheric studies, are not discussed in this brief overview.

  10. Scattering assisted injection based injectorless mid infrared quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Siddharth Kamoua, Ridha

    2014-06-07

    An injectorless five-well mid infrared quantum cascade laser is analyzed which relies on phonon scattering injection in contrast to resonant tunneling injection, which has been previously used for injectorless designs. A Monte Carlo based self-consistent electron and photon transport simulator is used to analyze the performance of the analyzed design and compare it to existing injectorless designs. The simulation results show that the analyzed design could greatly enhance the optical gain and the characteristic temperatures of injectorless quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) which have typically been hindered by low characteristic temperatures and significant temperature related performance degradation. Simulations of the analyzed device predict threshold current densities of 0.85 kA/cm{sup 2} and 1.95 kA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K and 300 K, respectively, which are comparable to the threshold current densities of conventional injector based QCLs.

  11. Chemical analysis of surgical smoke by infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianella, Michele; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-11-01

    The chemical composition of surgical smoke, a gaseous by-product of some surgical devices—lasers, drills, vessel sealing devices—is of great interest due to the many toxic components that have been found to date. For the first time, surgical smoke samples collected during routine keyhole surgery were analyzed with infrared laser spectroscopy. Traces (ppm range) of methane, ethane, ethylene, carbon monoxide and sevoflurane were detected in the samples which consisted mostly of carbon dioxide and water vapor. Except for the anaesthetic sevoflurane, none of the compounds were present at dangerous concentrations. Negative effects on the health of operation room personnel can be excluded for many toxic compounds found in earlier studies, since their concentrations are below recommended exposure limits.

  12. Infrared laser welding of the rabbit cornea in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, John M.; Burstein, Neal L.; Nowicki, Michael J.; Zietkiewicz, Christopher J.; Jeffers, William Q.

    1995-05-01

    The hydrogen fluoride laser has been used to successfully weld corneal tissue in vivo. Previous experiments have demonstrate the success of producing watertight welds in both porcine and human cadaver corneas. Wound bursting strengths of up to three times normal intraocular pressure have been reported. In this study, an in vivo model was utilized, specifically the rabbit cornea. Twelve New Zealand white rabbits, received a 7 mm, full thickness, linear corneal incision in one eye, and stay sutures were placed. Six of the wounds were welded with a semiconductor infrared laser, and six eyes served as controls. At two and four weeks, both histologic and tensiometric studies were performed. There was a trend toward increasing wound strength when the two and four week specimens were compared. Corneal welding may prove to be an adjunct to current suturing techniques in humans. Procedures requiring the closure of corneal incisions such as cataract extraction or penetrating keratoplasty may benefit from this technique.

  13. Suggested state regulations for control fo radiation. Volume 2: Nonionizing radiation, lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Information is presented on classifying lasers into four classes is presented; defines what a laser product is; states requirements for medical surveillance for persons exposed to laser radiation; specifies requirements for registration of laser facilities, mobile lasers, and persons servicing lasers/systems.

  14. Effect of helium-neon and infrared laser irradiation on wound healing in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, B.; McCarthy, R.J.; Ivankovich, A.D.; Forde, D.E.; Overfield, M.; Bapna, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the biostimulating effects of helium-neon laser radiation (HeNe; 632.8 nm), pulsed infrared laser radiation (IR; 904 nm), and the two combined on skin wound healing in New Zealand white rabbits. Seventy-two rabbits received either (1) no exposure, (2) 1.65 J/cm2 HeNe, (3) 8.25 J/cm2 pulsed IR, or (4) both HeNe and IR together to one of two dorsal full-thickness skin wounds, daily, for 21 days. Wound areas were measured photographically at periodic intervals. Tissue samples were analyzed for tensile strength, and histology was done to measure epidermal thickness and cross-sectional collagen area. Significant differences were found in the tensile strength of all laser-treated groups (both the irradiated and nonirradiated lesion) compared to group 1. No differences were found in the rate of wound healing or collagen area. Epidermal growth was greater in the HeNe-lased area compared to unexposed tissue, but the difference was not significant. Thus, laser irradiation at 632.8 nm and 904 nm alone or in combination increased tensile strength during wound healing and may have released tissue factors into the systemic circulation that increased tensile strength on the opposite side as well.

  15. Investigation of infra-red and nonequilibrium air radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes progress on the first year of a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this date, the radiative emission of air plasmas in the infrared has been the object of few experimental investigations, and although several infrared systems are already modeled in radiation codes such as NEQAIR, measurements are required to validate numerical predictions and indicate whether all transitions of importance are accounted for. The present program is motivated by the fact that 9 excited states (A, B, C, D, B', F, H, and H') of NO radiate in the infrared, especially between 1 and 1.5 microns where at least 9 transitions involving can be observed. Because these IR transitions are relatively well separated from each other, excited NO states concentrations can be easily measured, thus providing essential information on excited-state chemistry for use in optical diagnostics or in electronic excitation model validation. Developing accurate collisional-radiative models for these excited NO states is of importance as the UV-VUV transitions of NO (beta, gamma, epsilon, beta prime, gamma prime) produce a major, if not dominant, fraction of the radiation emitted by air plasmas. During the first year of the program, research has focused on the spectral range 1.0 to 1.5 microns, as detailed in Section 2 of this report. The measurements, conducted in a 50 kW radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma torch operating on air at atmospheric pressure, extend previous shock tube investigations by Wray to a wider spectral range (1.0 to 1.5 microns vs 0.9 to 1.2 microns) and higher temperatures (7600 K in the plasma torch versus 6700 K in the shock-tube). These higher temperatures in the present experiment have made it possible to

  16. Infrared Laser Ablation Sample Transfer for MALDI and Electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit King

    2011-08-01

    We have used an infrared laser to ablate materials under ambient conditions that were captured in solvent droplets. The droplets were either deposited on a MALDI target for off-line analysis by MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry or flow-injected into a nanoelectrospray source of an ion trap mass spectrometer. An infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system at 2.94 μm wavelength and approximately 1 mJ pulse energy was focused onto samples for ablation at atmospheric pressure. The ablated material was captured in a solvent droplet 1-2 mm in diameter that was suspended from a silica capillary a few millimeters above the sample target. Once the sample was transferred to the droplet by ablation, the droplet was deposited on a MALDI target. A saturated matrix solution was added to the deposited sample, or in some cases, the suspended capture droplet contained the matrix. Peptide and protein standards were used to assess the effects of the number of IR laser ablation shots, sample to droplet distance, capture droplet size, droplet solvent, and laser pulse energy. Droplet collected samples were also injected into a nanoelectrospray source of an ion trap mass spectrometer with a 500 nL injection loop. It is estimated that pmol quantities of material were transferred to the droplet with an efficiency of approximately 1%. The direct analysis of biological fluids for off-line MALDI and electrospray was demonstrated with blood, milk, and egg. The implications of this IR ablation sample transfer approach for ambient imaging are discussed.

  17. Infrared Laser Activation of Soluble and Membrane Protein Assemblies in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, Victor A; Liko, Idlir; Mize, Todd H; Bush, Matthew F; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-07-19

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) is the dominant method for probing intact macromolecular complexes in the gas phase by means of mass spectrometry (MS). The energy obtained from collisional activation is dependent on the charge state of the ion and the pressures and potentials within the instrument: these factors limit CID capability. Activation by infrared (IR) laser radiation offers an attractive alternative as the radiation energy absorbed by the ions is charge-state-independent and the intensity and time scale of activation is controlled by a laser source external to the mass spectrometer. Here we implement and apply IR activation, in different irradiation regimes, to study both soluble and membrane protein assemblies. We show that IR activation using high-intensity pulsed lasers is faster than collisional and radiative cooling and requires much lower energy than continuous IR irradiation. We demonstrate that IR activation is an effective means for studying membrane protein assemblies, and liberate an intact V-type ATPase complex from detergent micelles, a result that cannot be achieved by means of CID using standard collision energies. Notably, we find that IR activation can be sufficiently soft to retain specific lipids bound to the complex. We further demonstrate that, by applying a combination of collisional activation, mass selection, and IR activation of the liberated complex, we can elucidate subunit stoichiometry and the masses of specifically bound lipids in a single MS experiment. PMID:27328020

  18. Laser hyperdoping silicon for enhanced infrared optoelectronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrender, Jeffrey M.

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification have attracted interest for decades as a method to achieve impurity concentrations in silicon orders of magnitude above the equilibrium solubility limit. The incorporation of sulfur into silicon using this technique led to the observation of strong broadband infrared absorption in the resulting material. This observation, combined with interest in impurity band optoelectronic device concepts, has resulted in renewed interest in laser techniques for achieving high impurity concentrations. In this paper, I review the literature that led to the present understanding of laser hyperdoping and provide a summary of the optical and optoelectronic measurements made on sulfur hyperdoped silicon to date. I mention recent work exploring transition metal impurities and discuss how considerations discovered in early solidification and later rapid solidification work inform our approaches to kinetically trapping such impurities. I also provide a simplified picture of how a laser hyperdoping process is typically carried out, as an entry point for an experimentalist seeking to fabricate such layers.

  19. Diode laser arrays for dynamic infrared scene projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, D. Brett; Cooper, John B.

    1993-08-01

    A novel concept for dynamic IR scene projection using IR diode lasers has been developed. This technology offers significant cost and performance advantages over other currently available projector technologies. Performance advantages include high dynamic range, multiple wavebands, and high frame rates. A projector system which utilizes a 16-element linear array has been developed and integrated into the millimeter wave/infrared (MMW/IR) hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) facility at the US Army Missile Command's (USAMICOM's) Research, Development, and Engineering Center (RDEC). This projector has demonstrated dynamic range in excess of 105, apparent temperatures greater than 2500 degree(s)C, and nanosecond response times. Performance characteristics for this projector system are presented in the paper. Designs for projectors to test other IR sensor configurations, including FPAs, have been developed and are presented as well. The FPA design consists of a linear array of diode lasers scanned by a polygon mirror. This low-cost projector offers high resolution, high contrast 2-D scenes at up to 10 KHz frame rates. Simulation of active IR countermeasures is another promising application of diode laser projector systems. The diode laser is capable of simulating flares or virtually any IR jammer waveform.

  20. Investigation of germanium Raman lasers for the mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Troia, Benedetto; Soref, Richard A; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2015-06-29

    In this paper we present a detailed theoretical investigation of integrated racetrack Raman lasers based on the germanium material system operating in the mid-infrared beyond the germanium two-photon absorption cut-off wavelength of 3.17 μm. The effective Raman gain has been estimated in waveguides based on germanium-on-silicon, germanium-on-SOI and germanium-on-Si3N4 technology platforms as a function of their crystallographic orientations. Furthermore, general design guidelines have been determined by means of a comparative analysis of Raman laser performance, i.e. the threshold power, polarization and directionality of the excited Stokes signals as a function of racetrack cavity length and directional-coupler dimensions. Finally, the emitted Raman laser power has been evaluated as a function of overall propagation losses and operative wavelengths up to 3.8 μm, while the time dynamics of Raman lasers has been simulated assuming continuous and pulse waves as input pump signals. PMID:26191733

  1. High-power continuous-wave mid-infrared radiation generated by difference frequency mixing of diode-laser-seeded fiber amplifiers and its application to dual-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, D. G.; Richter, D.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Goldberg, L.; Koplow, J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the generation of up to 0.7 mW of narrow-linewidth (<60-MHz) radiation at 3.3 micrometers by difference frequency mixing of a Nd:YAG-seeded 1.6-W Yb fiber amplifier and a 1.5-micrometers diode-laser-seeded 0.6-W Er/Yb fiber amplifier in periodically poled LiNbO3. A conversion efficiency of 0.09%/W (0.47 mWW-2 cm-1) was achieved. A room-air CH4 spectrum acquired with a compact 80-m multipass cell and a dual-beam spectroscopic configuration indicates an absorption sensitivity of +/-2.8 x 10(-5) (+/-1 sigma), corresponding to a sub-parts-in-10(9) (ppb) CH4 sensitivity (0.8 ppb).

  2. Quantitative dental measurements by use of simultaneous frequency-domain laser infrared photothermal radiometry and luminescence.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, Lena; Feng, Chris; Mandelis, Andreas; Abrams, Stephen H

    2002-02-01

    Modulated (frequency-domain) infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR) is used as a dynamic quantitative dental inspection tool complementary to modulated luminescence (LM) to quantify sound enamel or dentin. A dynamic high-spatial-resolution experimental imaging setup, which can provide simultaneous measurements of laser-induced modulated PTR and LM signals from defects in teeth, has been developed. Following optical absorption of laser photons, the experimental setup can monitor simultaneously and independently the nonradiative (optical-to-thermal) energy conversion by infrared PTR and the radiative deexcitation by LM emission. The relaxation lifetimes (tau1, tau2) and optical absorption, scattering, and spectrally averaged infrared emission coefficients (mu(alpha), mu(s), mu(IR)) of enamel are then determined with realistic three-dimensional LM and photothermal models for turbid media followed by multiparameter fits to the data. A quantitative band of values for healthy enamel with respect to these parameters can be generated so as to provide an explicit criterion for the assessment of healthy enamel and, in a future extension, to facilitate the diagnosis of the onset of demineralization in carious enamel. PMID:11993925

  3. Radiative trapping in intense laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of electrons in counter-propagating, circularly polarized laser beams are shown to exhibit attractors whose ability to trap particles depends on the ratio of the beam intensities and a single parameter describing radiation reaction. Analytical expressions are found for the underlying limit cycles and the parameter range in which they are stable. In high-intensity optical pulses, where radiation reaction strongly modifies the trajectories, the production of collimated gamma-rays and the initiation of non-linear cascades of electron–positron pairs can be optimized by a suitable choice of the intensity ratio.

  4. Mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haibach, Fred; Erlich, Adam; Deutsch, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Block Engineering has developed an absorption spectroscopy system based on widely tunable Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL). The QCL spectrometer rapidly cycles through a user-selected range in the mid-infrared spectrum, between 6 to 12 μm (1667 to 833 cm-1), to detect and identify substances on surfaces based on their absorption characteristics from a standoff distance of up to 2 feet with an eye-safe laser. It can also analyze vapors and liquids in a single device. For military applications, the QCL spectrometer has demonstrated trace explosive, chemical warfare agent (CWA), and toxic industrial chemical (TIC) detection and analysis. The QCL's higher power density enables measurements from diffuse and highly absorbing materials and substrates. Other advantages over Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy include portability, ruggedness, rapid analysis, and the ability to function from a distance through free space or a fiber optic probe. This paper will discuss the basic technology behind the system and the empirical data on various safety and security applications.

  5. Features of gallstone and kidney stone fragmentation by IR-pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishche, Sergei A.

    1995-05-01

    It is shown that infra-red ((lambda) equals 1064 nm) long pulse (approximately 100 microsecond(s) ) radiation of YAG:Nd laser, operating in free generation regime, effectively fragments gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones. The features of the mechanism of this process are investigated. Laser lithotripsy is nowadays a method widely used for fragmentation of gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones. Flashlamp pumped dye lasers of microsecond duration are most often used for such purposes. Nevertheless, there are some reports on lithotripsies with nanosecond duration laser pulses (for example, Q-switched YAG:Nd laser). The mechanism of the laser fragmentation of such stones was supposed to be the next. The laser powerful radiation, delivered through the optical fiber, is absorbed by the material of the stone. As a result of such highly localized energy absorption, dense plasma is formed, which expands. Such plasma and vapor, liquid confined, forms a cavitation bubble. This bubble grows, reaches its most dimension and then collapses on itself in some hundreds of micro seconds. Shock waves generated during the growth and the collapse of these bubbles are the origin of fragmentation of the stone. It is necessary to say that there are rather confined data on the hundreds microsecond laser pulse fragmentation especially what concerns the usage of infra-red (IR) YAG:Nd lasers with long laser pulses. Clearing this problem would result in better understanding of the fragmentation mechanism and it could favor development of simple and more reliable laser systems for lithotripsy. In this work we report about investigation of features of an effective fragmentation of gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones under exposure of IR ((lambda) equals 1064 nm) radiation of repetitive YAG:Nd laser working in free generation regime.

  6. Laser Infrared Desorption Spectroscopy to Detect Complex Organic Molecules on Icy Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollit, Luke S.; Beegle, Luther W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Desorption-Infrared Spectroscopy (LD-IR) uses an IR laser pulse to desorb surface materials while a spectrometer measures the emission spectrum of the desorbed materials (Figure 1). In this example, laser desorption operates by having the incident laser energy absorbed by near surface material (10 microns in depth). This desorption produces a plume that exists in an excited state at elevated temperatures. A natural analog for this phenomenon can be observed when comets approach the sun and become active and individual molecular emission spectra can be observed in the IR [1,2,3,4,5]. When this occurs in comets, the same species that initially emit radiation down to the ground state are free to absorb it, reducing the amount of detectable emission features. The nature of our technique results in absorption not occurring, because the laser pulse could easily be moved away form the initial desorption plume, and still have better spatial resolution then reflectance spectroscopy. In reflectance spectroscopy, trace components have a relatively weak signal when compared to the entire active nature of the surface. With LDIR, the emission spectrum is used to identify and analyze surface materials.

  7. 3-D ice shape measurements using mid-infrared laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoliang; Bansmer, Stephan

    2015-02-23

    A general approach based on mid-infrared (MIR) laser scanning is proposed to measure the 3-D ice shape no matter whether the ice is composed of clear ice, rime ice, mixed ice, or even supercooled water droplets or films. This is possible because MIR radiation penetrates ice and water only within a depth of less than 10 micrometers. First, an MIR laser point scanning technique is implemented and verified on transparent glass and clear ice. Then, to improve efficiency, an MIR laser line scanning method is developed and validated on different models. At last, several sequential MIR laser line scans are applied to trace the 3-D shape evolution of the continuous ice accretion on an airfoil in an icing wind tunnel. The ice growth process can be well observed in the results. The MIR scan shows a good agreement with the traditional visible laser scan on a plastic replication of the final ice shape made by the mold and casting method. PMID:25836526

  8. A cesium plasma TELEC device for conversion of laser radiation to electric power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.; Rasor, N. S.; Lee, G.; Billman, K. W.

    1978-01-01

    Tests of the thermoelectronic laser energy converter (TELEC) concept are reported. This device has been devised as a means to convert high-average-power laser radiation into electrical energy, a crucial element in any space laser power transmission scheme using the available high-power/efficiency infrared lasers. Theoretical calculations, based upon inverse bremsstrahlung absorption in a cesium plasma, indicate internal conversion efficiency up to 50% with an overall system efficiency of 42%. The experiments reported were made with a test cell designed to confirm the theoretical model rather than demonstrate efficiency; 10.6-micron laser-beam absorption was limited to about 0.001 of the incident beam by the short absorption region. Nevertheless, confirmatory results were obtained, and the conversion of absorbed radiation to electric power is estimated to be near 10%.

  9. Changes in mouse Leydig cell steroidogenesis following infrared and helium-neon laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Celani, M F; Grandi, M; Gilioli, G

    1987-03-01

    The effects on mouse Leydig cell steroidogenesis of infrared (IR) laser rays, in the presence or absence of helium-neon (He-Ne) radiations, were investigated. Testosterone (T) production in response to luteinizing hormone (LH) by mouse Leydig cells exposed to IR (4.2 X 10(-3) J/cm2/min) plus He-Ne (8.0 X 10(-7) J/cm2/min) laser radiations was significantly higher than that by control Leydig cells. The Leydig cell responsiveness to LH (T delta %), as well as the secretion of cyclic AMP (cAMP) and androstenedione (A) in response to the highest dose of LH (0.5 mIU), were also significantly increased by the IR plus He-Ne irradiation. In contrast, the He-Ne irradiation (8.0 X 10(-7) J/cm2/min) in the absence of IR rays failed to affect T production by mouse Leydig cells. Similar results were obtained by adding to the He-Ne rays a low dose of IR radiation (3.4 X 10(-3) J/cm2/min), whereas higher doses of IR radiations (4.2 X 10(-3) and 5.1 X 10(-3) J/cm2/min) elicited a similar significant increase of T production by mouse interstitial cells. PMID:3595730

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.