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Sample records for infrared multiphoton excitation

  1. Multiphoton-Excited Serotonin Photochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gostkowski, Michael L.; Allen, Richard; Plenert, Matthew L.; Okerberg, Eric; Gordon, Mary Jane; Shear, Jason B.

    2004-01-01

    We report photochemical and photophysical studies of a multiphoton-excited reaction of serotonin that previously has been shown to generate a photoproduct capable of emitting broadly in the visible spectral region. The current studies demonstrate that absorption of near-infrared light by an intermediate state prepared via three-photon absorption enhances the photoproduct formation yield, with the largest action cross sections (∼10−19 cm2) observed at the short-wavelength limit of the titanium:sapphire excitation source. The intermediate state is shown to persist for at least tens of nanoseconds and likely to be different from a previously reported oxygen-sensitive intermediate. In addition, the two-photon fluorescence action spectrum for the fluorescent photoproduct was determined and found to have a maximum at ∼780 nm (3.2 eV). A general mechanism for this photochemical process is proposed. PMID:15111435

  2. All-near-infrared multiphoton microscopy interrogates intact tissues at deeper imaging depths than conventional single- and two-photon near-infrared excitation microscopes.

    PubMed

    Sarder, Pinaki; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Akers, Walter J; Tang, Rui; Sudlow, Gail P; Egbulefu, Christopher; Achilefu, Samuel

    2013-10-01

    The era of molecular medicine has ushered in the development of microscopic methods that can report molecular processes in thick tissues with high spatial resolution. A commonality in deep-tissue microscopy is the use of near-infrared (NIR) lasers with single- or multiphoton excitations. However, the relationship between different NIR excitation microscopic techniques and the imaging depths in tissue has not been established. We compared such depth limits for three NIR excitation techniques: NIR single-photon confocal microscopy (NIR SPCM), NIR multiphoton excitation with visible detection (NIR/VIS MPM), and all-NIR multiphoton excitation with NIR detection (NIR/NIR MPM). Homologous cyanine dyes provided the fluorescence. Intact kidneys were harvested after administration of kidney-clearing cyanine dyes in mice. NIR SPCM and NIR/VIS MPM achieved similar maximum imaging depth of ∼100 μm. The NIR/NIR MPM enabled greater than fivefold imaging depth (>500 μm) using the harvested kidneys. Although the NIR/NIR MPM used 1550-nm excitation where water absorption is relatively high, cell viability and histology studies demonstrate that the laser did not induce photothermal damage at the low laser powers used for the kidney imaging. This study provides guidance on the imaging depth capabilities of NIR excitation-based microscopic techniques and reveals the potential to multiplex information using these platforms. PMID:24150231

  3. Saturation of multiphoton absorption upon strong and ultrafast infrared laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guang S.; Zheng, Qingdong; Baev, Alexander; Prasad, Paras N.

    2007-04-01

    Saturation of two- and three-photon absorption has been studied in three dye-solution samples excited with 160-fs laser pulses of 775- and 1280-nm wavelengths, respectively. The effective two- and three-photon absorption coefficients measured for a given sample are not material constants, but dependent on the levels of input laser intensity. These saturation phenomena can be well interpreted by considering the depletion of ground-state population upon strong ultra-short multiphoton excitation. The approximate expressions of effective two- and three-photon absorption coefficients and their intensity dependence are proposed, based on which the experimental results can be well fitted and the saturation parameters for a given sample can be readily determined.

  4. Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Joo, Chulmin; Zhan, Chun; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Akers, Walter J.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    While multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has been performed with a wide range of excitation wavelengths, fluorescence emission has been limited to the visible spectrum. We introduce a paradigm for MPM of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes via nonlinear excitation at 1550 nm. This all-NIR system expands the range of available MPM fluorophores, virtually eliminates background autofluorescence, and allows for use of fiber-based, turnkey ultrafast lasers developed for telecommunications. PMID:20614991

  5. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  6. Comparative analysis of infrared fluorescence generation in multiphoton spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legros, Philippe; Choquet, Daniel; Mottay, Eric P.; Deguil, Nelly; Salin, Francois

    2004-06-01

    We have applied a new, 1030 nm wavelength, infrared diode-pumped femtosecond laser source to multiphoton microscopy, and present comparative results on the efficiency of fluorescence generation versus wavelength for several fluorophores. It is shown that an emission wavelength of 1030 nm is optimal both for GFP and DsRed excitation.

  7. Control of HOD photodissociation dynamics via bond-selective infrared multiphoton excitation and a femtosecond ultraviolet laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amstrup, Bjarne; Henriksen, Niels E.

    1992-12-01

    A scheme for controlling the outcome of a photodissociation process is studied. It involves two lasers—one intense laser in the infrared region which is supposed to excite a particular bond in the electronic ground state, and a second short laser pulse in the ultraviolet region which, at the right moment, excites the molecule to a dissociative electronic state. We consider the HOD molecule which is ideal due to the local mode structure of the vibrational states. It is shown that selective and localized bond stretching can be created in simple laser fields. When such a nonstationary vibrating HOD molecule is photodissociated with a short laser pulse (˜5 fs) complete selectivity between the channels H+OD and D+OH is observed over the entire absorption band covering these channels.

  8. Does Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Vinyl Chloride Yield Cold Vinylidene?

    PubMed

    Fernando, Ravin; Qu, Chen; Bowman, Joel M; Field, Robert W; Suits, Arthur G

    2015-07-01

    Velocity map imaging of the infrared multiphoton dissociation of vinyl chloride shows the formation of HCl in rotational levels below J = 10 that are associated with the three-center elimination pathway. The total translational energy release is observed to peak at 3-5 kcal/mol, which is consistent with the low reverse barrier predicted for the formation of HCl with vinylidene coproducts. Direct dynamics trajectory studies from the three-center transition state reproduce the observed distributions and show that the associated vinylidene is formed with only modest rotational excitation, precluding Coriolis-induced mixing among the excited vibrational levels of acetylene that would lead to distribution of vinylidene character into many vibrationally mixed acetylene vibrational levels. The results suggest that infrared multiphoton dissociation of vinyl chloride is an efficient route to synthesis of stable, cold vinylidene. PMID:26266719

  9. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs.

    PubMed

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5 x 10(-50) cm(4)s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales. PMID:16965161

  10. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W.

    2006-07-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.510-50 cm4s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  11. Formalism for multiphoton plasmon excitation in jellium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2002-07-01

    We present a formalism for the description of multiphoton plasmon excitation processes in jellium clusters. By using our method, we demonstrate that, in addition to dipole plasmon excitations, the multipole plasmons (quadrupole, octupole, etc.) can be excited in a cluster by multiphoton absorption processes, which results in a significant difference between plasmon resonance profiles in the cross sections for multiphoton as compared to single-photon absorption. We calculate the cross sections for multiphoton absorption and analyze the balance between the surface and volume plasmon contributions to multipole plasmons.

  12. Multiphoton Excitation of Upconverting Nanoparticles in Pulsed Regime.

    PubMed

    Hodak, Jose; Chen, Zhijun; Wu, Si; Etchenique, Roberto

    2016-01-19

    Upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) present emission in the visible region upon irradiation with NIR light through a multiphoton mechanism. However, the long characteristic time of their emission has prevented the use of this kind of entities as multiphoton probes. We present a study on the use of erbium-containing UCNPs under pulsed excitation, showing that both the power density and the duration of the excitation pulse are key factors to understand the emission behavior. By adjusting power and excitation rate, we can obtain typical multiphoton z-axis focal exclusive excitation. These findings open the possibility of using UCNPs as probes for controlled localization of uncaging and imaging with multiphoton z-axis sectioning. We show that this can be achieved even at power densities several orders of magnitude lower than traditional multiphoton microscopies. PMID:26703425

  13. Widefield multiphoton excited fluorescence microscopy for animal study in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.-C.; Chang, C.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Su, Y.-D.; Huang, T.-Y.; Chen, S.-J.

    2010-08-01

    Unlike conventional multiphoton excited microscopy according to pixel-by-pixel point scanning, a widefield multiphoton excited microscopy based on spatiotemporal focusing has been developed to construct three-dimensional (3D) multiphoton fluorescence images only with the need of an axial scanning. By implementing a 4.0 W 10 kHz femtosecond laser amplifier with an instant strong peak power and a fast TE-cooled EMCCD camera with an ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection, the multiphoton excited fluorescence images with the excitation area over 100 μm x 100 μm can be achieved at a frame rate up to 80 Hz. A mechanical shutter is utilized to control the exposure time of 1 ms, i.e. average ten laser pulses reach the fluorescent specimen, and hence an uniform enough multiphoton excited fluorescence image can be attained with less photobleaching. The Brownian motion of microbeads and 3D neuron cells of a rat cerebellum have been observed with a lateral spatial resolution of 0.24 μm and an axial resolution of 2.5 μm. Therefore, the developed widefield multiphoton microscopy can provide fast and high-resolution multiphoton excited fluorescence images for animal study in vivo.

  14. Multiphoton interband excitations of quantum gases in driven optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, M.; lschlger, C.; Strter, C.; Prelle, S.; Eckardt, A.; Sengstock, K.; Simonet, J.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the observation of multiphoton interband absorption processes for quantum gases in shaken light crystals. Periodic inertial forcing, induced by a spatial motion of the lattice potential, drives multiphoton interband excitations of up to the ninth order. The occurrence of such excitation features is systematically investigated with respect to the potential depth and the driving amplitude. Ab initio calculations of resonance positions as well as numerical evaluation of their strengths exhibit good agreement with experimental data. In addition our findings could make it possible to reach novel phases of quantum matter by tailoring appropriate driving schemes.

  15. The effects of spherical aberration on multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Young, P.A.; Clendenon, S.G.; Byars, J.M.; Decca, R.S.; Dunn, K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy is almost invariably conducted with samples whose refractive index differ from that of the objective immersion medium, conditions that cause spherical aberration. Due to the quadratic nature of multiphoton fluorescence excitation, spherical aberration is expected to profoundly affect the depth dependence of fluorescence excitation. In order to determine the effect of refractive index mismatch in multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy, we measured signal attenuation, photobleaching rates and resolution degradation with depth in homogeneous samples with minimal light scattering and absorption over a range of refractive indices. These studies demonstrate that signal levels and resolution both rapidly decline with depth into refractive index mismatched samples. Analyses of photobleaching rates indicate that the preponderance of signal attenuation with depth results from decreased rates of fluorescence excitation, even in a system with a descannd emission collection pathway. Similar results were obtained in analyses of fluorescence microspheres embedded in rat kidney tissue, demonstrating that spherical aberration is an important limiting factor in multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy of biological samples. PMID:21118240

  16. Multiphoton excitation of organic chromophores in microbubble resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohoon, Gregory A.; Kieu, Khanh; Norwood, Robert A.

    2014-03-01

    We report the observation of multiphoton excitation of organic chromophores in microbubble whispering gallery mode resonators. High-Q microbubble resonators are a formed by heating a pressurized fused silica capillary to form a hollow bubble which can be filled with liquid. In this case, the microbubble is filled with a solution of Rhodamine 6G dye. The resonator and dye are excited by evanescently coupling CW light from a 980nm laser diode using a tapered optical fiber. The two-photon fluorescence of the dye can be seen with pump powers as low as 1 mW.

  17. Infrared multiphoton ignition and enhancement of combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lavid, M.; Poulos, A.T.

    1986-08-01

    The research demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining reliable ignition and enhancement of combustion by a novel concept, Infrared Multiphoton Absorption/Dissociation (IRMPA/IRMPD). A methanol-oxygen system was chosen to test this concept because methanol is a potential alternative fuel susceptible to IRMPD. Multiphoton absorption, dissociation, and ignition experiments were conducted in closed pyrex reaction cells with IR-transmitting NaCl windows. Various pressures of pure methanol and methanol-oxygen mixtures were irradiated with single pulses from a TEA CO/sub 2/ laser usually tuned at 10.33 micrometers and focused to fluences in the range 1-80 J/cm2. Temporal and spatial ignition behaviors were investigated and successful ignitions were obtained by multiphoton absorption processes. The research scope was expanded to include a second alcohol, 2-propanol.

  18. Multi-photon excited luminescence of magnetic FePt core-shell nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Seemann, K.M.; Kuhn, B.

    2014-01-01

    We present magnetic FePt nanoparticles with a hydrophilic, inert, and biocompatible silico-tungsten oxide shell. The particles can be functionalized, optically detected, and optically manipulated. To show the functionalization the fluorescent dye NOPS was bound to the FePt core-shell nanoparticles with propyl-triethoxy-silane linkers and fluorescence of the labeled particles were observed in ethanol (EtOH). In aqueous dispersion the NOPS fluorescence is quenched making them invisible using 1-photon excitation. However, we observe bright luminescence of labeled and even unlabeled magnetic core-shell nanoparticles with multi-photon excitation. Luminescence can be detected in the near ultraviolet and the full visible spectral range by near infrared multi-photon excitation. For optical manipulation, we were able to drag clusters of particles, and maybe also single particles, by a focused laser beam that acts as optical tweezers by inducing an electric dipole in the insulated metal nanoparticles. In a first application, we show that the luminescence of the core-shell nanoparticles is bright enough for in vivo multi-photon imaging in the mouse neocortex down to cortical layer 5. PMID:25071977

  19. Evidence for excitation of fluorescence in RPE melanin by multiphoton absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Denton, Michael L.

    2002-06-01

    Previously, we reported that ultrashort, near infrared (NIR) laser pulses caused more DNA breakage in cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells than did CW, NIR laser radiation delivering a similar radiant exposure. We hypothesized that this difference was due to multiphoton absorption in an intracellular chromophore such as the RPE melanin. We investigated two-photon excitation of fluorescence in a suspension of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes exposed to a 1-KHz train of approximately 50- fsec laser pulses at 810 nm from a Ti:Sapphire laser, and compared this to the fluorescence excited by CW exposures at 406 nm from a Krypton ion laser. Fluorescence was measured with a PC-based spectrometer. The CW sources excited fluorescence with a peak at 525 nm. The fluorescence intensity depended on the irradiance of the sample, as well as the melanosome concentration. Peak fluorescence was obtained with a suspension of ~2 x 107 melanin granules/ml. The 810-nm, ultrashort pulses also excited fluorescence, but with a broader, lower-amplitude peak. The weaker fluorescence signal excited by the 810-nm ultrashort pulse laser for a given melanosome concentration, compared to 406-nm CW excitation, is possibly due to the smaller two- photon absorption cross-section. These results indicate the involvement of multiphoton absorption in DNA damage.

  20. vuv fluorescence from selective high-order multiphoton excitation of N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Coffee, Ryan N.; Gibson, George N.

    2004-05-01

    Recent fluorescence studies suggest that ultrashort pulse laser excitation may be highly selective. Selective high-intensity laser excitation holds important consequences for the physics of multiphoton processes. To establish the extent of this selectivity, we performed a detailed comparative study of the vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence resulting from the interaction of N{sub 2} and Ar with high-intensity infrared ultrashort laser pulses. Both N{sub 2} and Ar reveal two classes of transitions, inner-valence ns <- np and Rydberg np <- n{sup '}l{sup '}. From their pressure dependence, we associate each transition with either plasma or direct laser excitation. Furthermore, we qualitatively confirm such associations with the time dependence of the fluorescence signal. Remarkably, only N{sub 2} presents evidence of direct laser excitation. This direct excitation produces ionic nitrogen fragments with inner-valence (2s) holes, two unidentified transitions, and one molecular transition, the N{sub 2}{sup +}:X {sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} <- C {sup 2}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}. We discuss these results in the light of a recently proposed model for multiphoton excitation.

  1. Selective multiphoton excitation by parametrically shaped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindinger, A.

    2015-05-01

    Laser pulse shaping is reported for applications on multiphoton processes in dye molecules. Particularly phase-tailored pulse shapes are employed for two-photon excited fluorescence of dyes in a liquid environment, also at the distal end of an optical fiber, in order to improve the contrast between dye markers having similar excitation spectra. Precompensation of the optical fiber properties is utilized by analytical pulse shaping in order to receive specific parametric pulse forms after the fiber. This will lead to new endoscopic imaging applications with an increased fluorescence contrast. Moreover, selective excitation is also demonstrated for three-photon transitions of the two dyes, p-Terphenyl (PTP) and BM-Terphenyl (BMT), in solution by using shaped pulses without a fiber. A good agreement between experiment and theoretical simulation is obtained. With this approach it is possible to achieve a considerable change of the fluorescence contrast between the two dyes which is relevant for imaging applications of biological molecules.

  2. Infrared multiphoton ignition and combustion enhancement of natural gas. Final report, November 1989-October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lavid, M.; Poulos, A.T.; Gulati, S.K.; Stevens, J.G.; Lempert, W.R.

    1993-11-30

    This research program has demonstrated the feasibility of using Infrared Multiphoton (IRMP) processes for reliable ignition and combustion enhancement of natural gas. Hydrocarbon constituents of natural gas are excited with focused, pulsed infrared lasers tuned to discrete resonant frequencies causing their dissociation to very reactive radicals. These radicals participate in chain-branching and chain-propagating reactions significantly improving the combustion of natural gas. Experimental and computational tasks were performed to discern IR laser conditions needed to reliably obtain IRMP ignition and reduction in ignition delay time.

  3. Infrared multiphoton resummation in quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mati, P.

    2016-02-01

    Infrared singularities in massless gauge theories are known since the foundation of quantum field theories. The root of this problem can be tracked back to the very definition of these long-range interacting theories such as QED. It can be shown that singularities are caused by the massless degrees of freedom (i.e. the photons in the case of QED). In the Bloch-Nordsieck model the absence of the infrared catastrophe can be shown exactly by the complete summation of the radiative corrections. In this paper we will give the idea of the derivation of the Bloch-Nordsieck propagators, that describes the infrared structure of the electron propagation, at zero and finite temperatures. Some ideas of the possible applications are also mentioned.

  4. Multiphoton dissociation and thermal unimolecular reactions induced by infrared lasers. [REAMPA code

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, H.L.

    1981-04-01

    Multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of ethyl chloride was studied using a tunable 3.3 ..mu..m laser to excite CH stretches. The absorbed energy increases almost linearly with fluence, while for 10 ..mu..m excitation there is substantial saturation. Much higher dissociation yields were observed for 3.3 ..mu..m excitation than for 10 ..mu..m excitation, reflecting bottlenecking in the discrete region of 10 ..mu..m excitation. The resonant nature of the excitation allows the rate equations description for transitions in the quasicontinuum and continuum to be extended to the discrete levels. Absorption cross sections are estimated from ordinary ir spectra. A set of cross sections which is constant or slowly decreasing with increasing vibrational excitation gives good fits to both absorption and dissociation yield data. The rate equations model was also used to quantitatively calculate the pressure dependence of the MPD yield of SF/sub 6/ caused by vibrational self-quenching. Between 1000-3000 cm/sup -1/ of energy is removed from SF/sub 6/ excited to approx. > 60 kcal/mole by collision with a cold SF/sub 6/ molecule at gas kinetic rate. Calculation showed the fluence dependence of dissociation varies strongly with the gas pressure. Infrared multiphoton excitation was applied to study thermal unimolecular reactions. With SiF/sub 4/ as absorbing gas for the CO/sub 2/ laser pulse, transient high temperature pulses were generated in a gas mixture. IR fluorescence from the medium reflected the decay of the temperature. The activation energy and the preexponential factor of the reactant dissociation were obtained from a phenomenological model calculation. Results are presented in detail. (WHK)

  5. Multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of fluorescent DNA base analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W.

    2004-06-01

    Two- and three-photon excitation was used to investigate the properties of two fluorescent DNA base analogs: 2-aminopurine and 6-methylisoxanthopterin. 2-aminopurine is a widely used fluorescent analog of the DNA base adenine. Three-photon excitation of 2-aminopurine is achievable by using intense femtosecond laser pulses in 850-950 nm spectral region. Interestingly, the three-photon excitation spectrum is blue-shifted relative to the three-times-wavelength single-photon excitation spectrum. The maximum of the absorbance band in the UV is at 305 nm, while the three-photon excitation spectrum has a maximum at around 880 nm. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2-aminopurine for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, due to relatively small three-photon absorption cross-section, a good signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves take very long time to obtain. Fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, the fluorescent analog of guanine, were investigated using two-photon excitation. This molecule has the lowest energy absorption band centered around 350 nm, thus, two-photon excitation is attainable using 700 to 760 nm output of Ti-sapphire laser. The excitation spectrum of this molecule in the infrared well matches the doubled-wavelength single-photon excitation spectrum in the UV. The high fluorescence quantum yield of 6-methylisoxanthopterin allows efficient fluorescence correlation measurements and makes this molecule a very good candidate for using in in vitro DNA-protein interaction studies.

  6. Switching the vibrational excitation of a polyatomic ion in multi-photon strong field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuzhu; Gerber, Thomas; Radi, Peter; Sych, Yaroslav; Knopp, Gregor

    2014-08-01

    The multiphoton ionization (MPI) of CH3I has been investigated by angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy as a function of femtosecond laser excitation intensity. A sudden change in the electron kinetic energy is observed above a specific field strength. The multiphoton excitation at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm becomes vibronically resonant due to Stark shifting of intermediate Rydberg state levels. The present letter gives an experimental evidence for ultrafast optical control of the vibrational excitation in a polyatomic ion by adjusting the intensity of a femtosecond laser pulse.

  7. Infrared resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of magnesium oxide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heijnsbergen, D.; von Helden, G.; Meijer, G.; Duncan, M. A.

    2002-02-01

    Neutral (MgO)n clusters are produced in a molecular beam by laser vaporization in a pulsed-nozzle cluster source. These clusters are ionized via multiphoton absorption from either an ultraviolet excimer laser or a far-infrared free electron laser. While ultraviolet ionization produces mass spectra consistent with previous measurements, infrared ionization produces higher molecular weight ions from the same nascent source distribution. Ultraviolet ionization occurs by direct electronic excitation/ionization, while infrared ionization occurs by vibrational excitation followed by thermionic electron emission. In both cases, prominent masses are observed corresponding to cubic nanocrystals with near equal x:y:z dimensions. By tuning the IR wavelength while recording the mass-resolved ion yield, vibrational spectra are obtained revealing two resonances near 16 and 22 microns. Clusters up to 300 atoms in size are studied, and spectra exhibit a gradual variation with size, converging to positions near to, but not matching the bulk phonon frequencies. Structural implications of these vibrational spectra are investigated.

  8. The effects of refractive index heterogeneity within kidney tissue on multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Young, P A; Clendenon, S G; Byars, J M; Dunn, K W

    2011-05-01

    Although multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy has improved the depth at which useful fluorescence images can be collected in biological tissues, the reach of multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy is nonetheless limited by tissue scattering and spherical aberration. Scattering can be reduced in fixed samples by mounting in a medium whose refractive index closely matches that of the fixed material. Using optical 'clearing', the effects of refractive index heterogeneity on signal attenuation with depth are investigated. Quantitative measurements show that by mounting kidney tissue in a high refractive index medium, less than 50% of signal attenuates in 100 μm of depth. PMID:21118239

  9. Fermi-coupled spherically adapted effective states in the collisionless multiphoton excitation of SF 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lauro, C.; Lattanzi, F.

    1982-10-01

    A calculation method for the collisionless multiphoton excitation of SF 6 by intense CO 2 laser light up to a chain of parallel nv3, ( n - 1) v3 + v2 + v6 … vibrational-rotational ladders linked by Fermi interaction is described. Spherically adapted effective states suitable to the purpose are defined, and matrix elements for multiphoton excitation in the rotatingwave approximation effective hamiltonian formalism are given in this basis. The method is aimed at the investigation of population transfer between the cited parallel vibrational ladders, and is suitable for computer-calculation programmation.

  10. Photodynamic therapy and knocking out of single tumor cells by multiphoton excitation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Koenig, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    Near infrared (NIR) ultrashort laser pulses of 780 nm have been used to induce intracellular photodynamic reactions by nonlinear excitation of porphyrin photosensitizers. Intracellular accumulation and photobleaching of the fluorescent photosensitizers protoporphyrin IX and Photofrin (PF) have been studied by non-resonant two-photon fluorescence excitation of PF and aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-labeled Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. To testify the efficacy of both substrates to induce irreversible destructive effects, the cloning efficiency (CE) of cells exposed to femtosecond pulses of a multiphoton laser scanning microscope (40x/1.3) was determined. In the case of Photofrin accumulation, CEs of 50% and 0% were obtained after 17 laserscans (2 mW?, 16 s/ frame) and 50 scans, respectively. All cells exposed to 50 scans died within 48h after laser exposure. 100 scans were required to induce lethal effects in ALA labeled cells. Sensitizer-free control cells could be scanned 250 times (1.1 h) and more without impact on the reproduction behavior, morphology, and vitality. In addition to the slow phototoxic effect by photooxidation processes, another destructive but immediate effect based on optical breakdown was induced when employing high intense NIR femtosecond laser beams. This was used to optically knock out single tumor cells in living mice (solid Ehrlich-Carcinoma) in a depth of 10 to 100 μm.

  11. Investigations of multiphoton excitation and ionization in a short range potential

    SciTech Connect

    Susskind, S.M.; Cowley, S.C.; Valeo, E.J.

    1989-02-01

    We introduce an approach to the study of excitation and ionization for a system with a short range potential. In particular, analytical and numerical results are presented for the multiphoton ionization rate, under strong field conditions, of an electron confined by a delta-function potential. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Improving the penetration depth in multiphoton excitation laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    McConnell, G

    2006-01-01

    More than a threefold increase in multiphoton laser scanning microscopy depth penetration using a passive predispersion compensation system is reported. Using dispersion-controlled pulses to counteract the effects of positive group delay dispersion in the imaging platform, optical sectioning of fluorescent samples to depths in excess of 800 microm was observed, compared with only 240 microm using a noncompensated setup. Experimental results obtained from both the predispersion compensated and noncompensated systems are compared with theoretical values of pulse broadening in a laser scanning microscope. The observed improvement in depth profiling potentially widens the applications and user base of nonlinear microscopy techniques. PMID:17092169

  13. Chirped multiphoton adiabatic passage for a four-level ladder-type Rydberg excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jing; Zhai, Jingjing; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    We develop a multiphoton adiabatic passage to realize a highly efficient Rydberg excitation in a four-level ladder-type atomic system. The adiabatic passage is based on the existence of a novel quasidark state in the cascade excitation system where the frequencies of the lasers are appropriately chirped with time. We also investigate the influence of the interatomic Rydberg interaction on the passage and extend its application to the preparation of antiblockade Rydberg atom pairs in the Rydberg blockade regime.

  14. Optimizing ultrafast illumination for multiphoton-excited fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    We study the optimal conditions for high throughput two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) and three-photon excited fluorescence (3PEF) imaging using femtosecond lasers. We derive relations that allow maximization of the rate of imaging depending on the average power, pulse repetition rate, and noise characteristics of the laser, as well as on the size and structure of the sample. We perform our analysis using ~100 MHz, ~1 MHz and 1 kHz pulse rates and using both a tightly-focused illumination beam with diffraction-limited image resolution, as well loosely focused illumination with a relatively low image resolution, where the latter utilizes separate illumination and fluorescence detection beam paths. Our theoretical estimates agree with the experiments, which makes our approach especially useful for optimizing high throughput imaging of large samples with a field-of-view up to 10x10 cm2. PMID:27231620

  15. Optimizing ultrafast illumination for multiphoton-excited fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-05-01

    We study the optimal conditions for high throughput two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) and three-photon excited fluorescence (3PEF) imaging using femtosecond lasers. We derive relations that allow maximization of the rate of imaging depending on the average power, pulse repetition rate, and noise characteristics of the laser, as well as on the size and structure of the sample. We perform our analysis using ~100 MHz, ~1 MHz and 1 kHz pulse rates and using both a tightly-focused illumination beam with diffraction-limited image resolution, as well loosely focused illumination with a relatively low image resolution, where the latter utilizes separate illumination and fluorescence detection beam paths. Our theoretical estimates agree with the experiments, which makes our approach especially useful for optimizing high throughput imaging of large samples with a field-of-view up to 10x10 cm(2). PMID:27231620

  16. Multi-photon excitation microscopy in intact animals.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Emily C; Nauman, Michael; Chesnick, Scott; Balaban, Robert S

    2006-04-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy and backscattered-second harmonic generation microscopy permit the investigation of the subcellular events within living animals but numerous aspects of these experiments need to be optimized to overcome the traditional microscope geometry, motion and optical coupling to the subject. This report describes a stable system for supporting a living instrumented mouse or rabbit during endogenous reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and exogenous dye two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy measurements, and backscattered-second harmonic generation microscopy measurements. The system was a modified inverted LSM510 microscope (Carl Zeiss, Inc., Thornwood, NY, U.S.A.) with a rotating periscope that converted the inverted scope to an upright format, with the objective located approximately, 15 cm from the centre of the microscope base, allowing easy placement of an instrumented animal. An Olympus 20x water immersion objective was optically coupled to the tissue, without a cover glass, via a saline bath or custom hydrated transparent gel. The instrumented animals were held on a specially designed holder that poised the animal under the objective as well as permitted different ventilation schemes to minimize motion. Using this approach, quality images were routinely collected in living animals from both the peripheral and body cavity organs. The remaining most significant issue for physiological studies using this approach is motion on the micrometre scale. Several strategies for motion compensation are described and discussed. PMID:16734715

  17. Infrared multiphoton dissociation of SF6 at long wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, U.; Fuss, W.; Kompa, K. L.; Tablas, F. M. G.

    1989-03-01

    The dissociation probability Pd of 32 SF6 was investigated between 908 and 875 cm-1 at room temperature and at 140 K. In the region of the expected Pd maximum of 36SF6 (?905 cm-1), we found a ten times higher Pd(32) (implying a ten times smaller selectivity for 36S) than expected from extrapolation of shorter wavelength data. The Pd spectrum in this and in other regions point to an important role of direct multiphoton transitions to levels containing quanta of the neighboring combination mode ?5+?6 (870 cm-1) besides ?3 quanta. On the short wavelength side of ?3, the analogous transitions involve the ?2+?6 mode (991 cm-1). The wings, and thus the spectral shape of Pd, in the ?3 region are also governed by them. They depend more strongly on temperature than stepwise transitions, because the intermediate near-resonances favor the high rotational states.

  18. Multi-photon excitation microscopy in intact animals

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Emily C.; Nauman, Michael; Chesnick, Scott; Balaban, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) and backscattered-second harmonic generation (B-SHG) microscopy permit the investigation of the subcellular events within living animals, but numerous aspects of these experiments need to be optimized to overcome the traditional microscope geometry, motion, and optical coupling to the subject. This report describes a stable system for supporting a living instrumented mouse or rabbit during endogenous reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(P)H) and exogenous dye TPEFM measurements and B-SHG microscopy measurements. The system was a modified inverted Zeiss LSM510 microscope with a rotating periscope that converted the inverted scope in to an upright format, with the objective approximately 15 cm displaced from the center of the microscope base, allowing the easy placement of an instrumented animal. An Olympus 20x water immersion objective was optically coupled to the tissue, with out a cover glass, via a saline bath or custom hydrated transparent gel. The instrumented animals were held on a specially designed holder that poised the animal under the objective as well as permitted different ventilation schemes to minimize motion. Using this approach, quality images were routinely collected in living animals from both the peripheral and body cavity organs. The remaining most significant issue for physiological studies using this approach is motion on the micron scale. Several strategies for motion compensation are described and discussed. PMID:16734715

  19. Modification of a tandem mass-spectrometer for infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) of gas-phase ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Julie M.; Osburn, Sandra M.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Corcovilos, Theodore A.

    2015-05-01

    Infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) is a method of fragmenting molecular ions for structural analysis of the parent molecule. The target ions absorb many photons, increasing the vibrational state of the excited bonds until the dissociation occurs. We have modified a commercial linear quadrupole trap tandem mass spectrometer (Thermo-Fisher LTQ) by installing a removable high-vacuum window in the rear accessory plate of the mass spectrometer. The window allows us to inject laser light into the ion trap. The shape of the injected laser beam is optimized to match the volume of the ion cloud within the ion trap, improving IRMPD efficiency. We present preliminary data of the IRMPD of weakly bound uranyl-acetone and uranyl-dimethyl sulfoxide clusters using a 20-W pulsed CO2 laser (wavelength 10 . 6 μm), showing previously undetected fragmentation products.

  20. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of human hair.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Alexander; Riemann, Iris; Stark, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    In vivo and in vitro multiphoton imaging was used to perform high resolution optical sectioning of human hair by nonlinear excitation of endogenous as well as exogenous fluorophores. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) based on time-resolved single photon counting and near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse excitation was employed to analyze the various fluorescent hair components. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of intratissue pigments has the potential (i) to identify endogenous keratin and melanin, (ii) to obtain information on intrahair dye accumulation, (iii) to study bleaching effects, and (iv) to monitor the intratissue diffusion of pharmaceutical and cosmetical components along hair shafts. PMID:17152070

  1. Multiphoton stimulation of neurons.

    PubMed

    Hirase, Hajime; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Goldberg, Jesse H; Yuste, Rafael

    2002-06-01

    We pulsed the activation of neurons using a femtosecond laser. Pyramidal neurons are depolarized and fire action potentials when high intensity mode-locked infrared light irradiates somatic membranes and axon initial segments. This depolarization is reversible, does not occur with CW laser light, and appears to be due to multiphoton excitation. We describe two regimes of multiphoton optical stimulation. Low intensity, long duration laser irradiation produces a sustained depolarization, insensitive to sodium channel blockers yet sensitive to antioxidants. On the other hand, high intensity, short duration irradiation can induce fast depolarizations, which appear due to different mechanism. The combination of multiphoton stimulation and optical probing could enable systematic analysis of circuits. PMID:11984845

  2. Multiphoton imaging of quantum dot bioconjugates in cultured cells following Nd:YLF laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Elba E.; Knight, V. B.

    2005-04-01

    Quantum dot bioconjugates offer unprecedented opportunities for monitoring biological processes and molecular interactions in cells, tissues, and organs. We are interested in developing applications that permit investigation of physiological processes and cytoskeletal organization in live cells, and allow imaging of complex organs, such as the auditory and vestibular sensory structures of the inner ear. Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful technique for acquiring images from deep within a sample while reducing phototoxic effects of laser light exposure on cells. Previous studies have established that a solid-state Nd:YLF laser can be used to acquire two-photon and three-photon images from live cells while minimizing phototoxic side effects (Wokosin et al., 1996, Bioimaging, 4:208-214; Squirrell et al., 1999, Nature Biotechnology, 8:763-767). We present here the results of experiments using an all-solid-state Nd:YLF 1047 nm femtosecond laser (Microlase DPM1000) source to excite quantum dot bioconjugates. Cells were labeled with Qdot (Quantum Dot Corporation) bioconjugates or with Alexa Fluor (Molecular Probes) bioconjugates and then imaged with a BioRad 1024 confocal microscope configured for multiphoton imaging using internal or external (non-descanned) detectors. Results demonstrate that the Nd:YLF laser can be used to stimulate fluorescence emission of quantum dots and Alexa Fluor bioconjugates in cultured amphibian (Xenopus) and mammalian (rat, chinese hamster) cells. We conclude that the Nd:YLF laser is a viable excitation source that extends the applicability of quantum dots for investigation of biological processes using multiphoton microscopy.

  3. Cell damage in near-infrared multimode optical traps as a result of multiphoton absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, K.; Liang, H.; Berns, M. W.; Tromberg, B. J.

    1996-07-01

    We report on cell damage of single cells confined in continuous-wave (cw), near-infrared (NIR) multimode optical traps as a result of multiphoton absorption phenomena. Trapping beams at NIR wavelengths less than 800 nm are capable of damaging cells through a two-photon absorption process. Cell damage is more pronounced in multimode cw traps compared with single-frequency true cw NIR traps because of transient power enhancement by longitudinal mode beating. Partial mode locking in tunable cw Ti:sapphire lasers used as trapping beam sources can produce unstable subnanosecond pulses at certain wavelengths that amplify multiphoton absorption effects significantly. We recommend the use of single-frequency long-wavelength NIR trapping beams for optical micromanipulation of vital cells.

  4. Freeform multiphoton excited microfabrication for biological applications using a rapid prototyping CAD-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Lawrence P.; Veilleux, Matthew P.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2006-09-01

    Multiphoton excited polymerization has attracted increasing attention as a powerful 3 dimensional nano/microfabrication tool. The nonlinear excitation confines the fabrication region to the focal volume allowing the potential to achieve freeform fabrication with submicron capabilities. We report the adaptation and use of a computer aided design (CAD) approach, based on rapid prototyping software, which exploits this potential for fabricating with protein and polymers in biologically compatible aqueous environments. 3D structures are drawn in the STL format creating a solid model that can be sliced, where the individual sections are then serially fabricated without overwriting previous layers. The method is shown for potential biological applications including microfluidics, cell entrapment, and tissue engineering.

  5. Freeform multiphoton excited microfabrication for biological applications using a rapid prototyping CAD-based approach.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Lawrence P; Veilleux, Matthew P; Campagnola, Paul J

    2006-09-18

    Multiphoton excited polymerization has attracted increasing attention as a powerful 3 dimensional nano/microfabrication tool. The nonlinear excitation confines the fabrication region to the focal volume allowing the potential to achieve freeform fabrication with submicron capabilities. We report the adaptation and use of a computer aided design (CAD) approach, based on rapid prototyping software, which exploits this potential for fabricating with protein and polymers in biologically compatible aqueous environments. 3D structures are drawn in the STL format creating a solid model that can be sliced, where the individual sections are then serially fabricated without overwriting previous layers. The method is shown for potential biological applications including microfluidics, cell entrapment, and tissue engineering. PMID:19529241

  6. Imaging NO elimination in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of nitroalkanes and alkyl nitrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Ravin; Ariyasingha, Nuwandi M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2016-02-01

    We present a DC slice imaging study of the decomposition of C2, C3 and C4 nitroalkanes and alkyl nitrites, focusing on the NO elimination channel, possibly a minor pathway. Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) is used to induce dissociation on the ground electronic state under collisionless conditions. The channels that produced NO as a product were studied and compared among the target molecules to gain a better understanding of the isomerization of the nitroalkanes prior to dissociation. Trends in the total translational energy and NO rotational temperatures obtained from the images are discussed.

  7. Infrared multiphoton dissociation of anisole: Production and dissociation of phenoxy radical

    SciTech Connect

    Schmoltner, A.M.; Anex, D.S.; Lee, Y.T.

    1992-02-06

    The infrared multiphoton dissociation of anisole in a molecular beam was studied using pulsed CO{sub 2} laser radiation, with the product recoil energy distributions measured using the time-of-flight technique. The only primary process identified was the dissociation into phenoxy and methyl radicals, with the shape of the translational energy distribution of the products revealing a small exit barrier. Under conditions of higher laser fluence, secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radical into carbon monoxide and C{sub 5}H{sub 5} was observed. 28 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Multiphoton resonance in a three-level system with nearly degenerate excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Berent, M.; Parzynski, R.

    2010-08-15

    An analytic study is presented of the efficient multiphoton excitation and strong harmonic generation in three-level systems specified by a pair of nearly degenerate, strongly dipole-coupled excited states. Such systems are physically formed by the three lowest states in, e.g., the hydrogen atom or evenly charged homonuclear diatomic molecular ions under reasonably chosen laser intensities. As a detailed analytic result, we found that the laser pulse of photon energy 2.05eV, duration 0.23ps, and intensity 5x10{sup 13}(W/cm{sup 2}) is able to produce complete inversion of the initial population in the hydrogen atom through the five-photon excitation. At the same photon energy, the pulse of duration 0.41ps and intensity 3.44x10{sup 14}(W/cm{sup 2}) was found to produce the same effect in the molecular ion but through the nine-photon excitation. We show that the accompanying scattering of light has very rich spectrum differing substantially from that of the two-level system.

  9. Live tissue intrinsic emission microscopy using multiphoton-excited native fluorescence and second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Christie, Richard; Nikitin, Alexander Yu; Hyman, Bradley T.; Webb, Watt W.

    2003-06-01

    Multicolor nonlinear microscopy of living tissue using two- and three-photon-excited intrinsic fluorescence combined with second harmonic generation by supermolecular structures produces images with the resolution and detail of standard histology without the use of exogenous stains. Imaging of intrinsic indicators within tissue, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, retinol, indoleamines, and collagen provides crucial information for physiology and pathology. The efficient application of multiphoton microscopy to intrinsic imaging requires knowledge of the nonlinear optical properties of specific cell and tissue components. Here we compile and demonstrate applications involving a range of intrinsic molecules and molecular assemblies that enable direct visualization of tissue morphology, cell metabolism, and disease states such as Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

  10. Influence of multi-photon excitation on the atomic above-threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuan-Ye; Wang, Chun-Cheng; Li, Su-Yu; Guo, Fu-Ming; Ding, Da-Jun; Wim-G, Roeterdink; Chen, Ji-Gen; Zeng, Si-Liang; Liu, Xue-Shen; Yang, Yu-Jun

    2015-04-01

    Using the time-dependent pseudo-spectral scheme, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of a hydrogen-like atom in a strong laser field in momentum space. The intensity-resolved photoelectron energy spectrum in above-threshold ionization is obtained and further analyzed. We find that with the increase of the laser intensity, the above-threshold ionization emission spectrum exhibits periodic resonance structure. By analyzing the population of atomic bound states, we find that it is the multi-photon excitation of bound state that leads to the occurrence of this phenomenon, which is in fairly good agreement with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11274141, 11034003, 11304116, 11274001, and 11247024), and the Jilin Provincial Research Foundation for Basic Research, China (Grant No. 20140101168JC).

  11. Feasibility of using multiphoton excited tissue autofluorescence for in vivo human histopathology.

    PubMed Central

    Dela Cruz, Johanna M.; McMullen, Jesse D.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Zipfel, Warren R.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid and direct imaging of microscopic tissue morphology and pathology can be achieved by multiphoton imaging of intrinsic tissue fluorophores and second harmonic signals. Engineering parameters for developing this technology for clinical applications include excitation levels and collection efficiencies required to obtain diagnostic quality images from different tissue types and whether these levels are mutagenic. Here we provide data on typical average powers required for high signal-to-noise in vivo tissue imaging and assess the risk potential of these irradiance levels using a mammalian cell gene mutation assay. Exposure times of ~16 milliseconds per cell to 760 nm, ~200 fs raster-scanned laser irradiation delivered through a 0.75 NA objective produced negligible mutagenicity at powers up to about 50 mW. PMID:21258552

  12. Second- and third-harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy for simultaneous imaging of cardiomyocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzda, Virginijus; Greenhalgh, Catherine; Aus der Au, Juerg; Squier, Jeffrey A.; Elmore, Steven; van Beek, Johannes H.

    2004-06-01

    Simultaneous detection of second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG) and multiphoton excitation fluorescence with ultrafast laser pulses from a Nd:Glass laser was used to image isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes. The simultaneous detection enabled visualization of different organelles of cardiomyocytes, based on the different contrast mechanisms. It was found that SHG signal depicted characteristic patterns of sarcomeres in a myofilament lattice. The regular pattern of the THG signal, which was anticorrelated with the SHG signal, suggested that the third harmonic is generated within mitochondria. By labeling the cardiomyocytes with the mitochondrial dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), comparisons could be made between the TMRM fluorescence, THG, and SHG images. The TMRM fluorescence had significant correlation with THG signal confirming that part of the THG signal originates from mitochondria.

  13. Live tissue intrinsic emission microscopy using multiphoton-excited native fluorescence and second harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Christie, Richard; Nikitin, Alexander Yu; Hyman, Bradley T.; Webb, Watt W.

    2003-01-01

    Multicolor nonlinear microscopy of living tissue using two- and three-photon-excited intrinsic fluorescence combined with second harmonic generation by supermolecular structures produces images with the resolution and detail of standard histology without the use of exogenous stains. Imaging of intrinsic indicators within tissue, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, retinol, indoleamines, and collagen provides crucial information for physiology and pathology. The efficient application of multiphoton microscopy to intrinsic imaging requires knowledge of the nonlinear optical properties of specific cell and tissue components. Here we compile and demonstrate applications involving a range of intrinsic molecules and molecular assemblies that enable direct visualization of tissue morphology, cell metabolism, and disease states such as Alzheimer's disease and cancer. PMID:12756303

  14. Nonperturbative analysis of the two-level atom: Applications to multiphoton excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Duvall, R.E.; Valeo, E.J.; Oberman, C.R.

    1987-08-01

    Selective excitation in an atomic system subjected to a slowly varying external electromagnetic field is studied using a two-level model. Time evolution of the system is found using an approach which is nonperturbative in the field strength. There is no constraint to small values of the applied field, that is, the field (in appropriate energy units) need not be small compared to the difference in energies of the two levels. Rather, we prey upon the fact that the situation of interest to us is where the frequency of the exciting field is small compared to the frequency associated with the level difference. Transition probabilities and resonance conditions are found which circumscribe both the large and small field limits. In the weak field limit the previous results of high-order perturbation theory are readily recovered. For a monochromatic field the characteristic features of resonance excitation at high harmonic number of the applied field are (a) extremely narrow resonance widths and (b) shifts in resonance positions which are strong functions of field intensity. Because of this sensitivity, we are able to demonstrate that when slow temporal evolution of the field amplitude is taken into account (e.g., due to finite pulse duration) the appropriate mean excitation rate is that due to the uncorrelated contribution of many resonances. The results of this analysis are used to estimate excitation rates in a specific atomic system, Cd/sup 12 +/, which are then compared to multiphoton ionization rates. Our calculations suggest that the ionization rate exceeds the excitation rate by several orders of magnitude. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Watching molecules reorient in liquid crystal droplets with multiphoton-excited fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Daniel A.; Luther, Brenda J.

    2003-08-01

    A new form of time-resolved multiphoton-excited fluorescence imaging is described and used to study electric-field-induced reorientation dynamics in polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (LC) films. This method provides information on the static and dynamic LC orientation via polarization-dependent three-photon excitation of the nematic ultraviolet chromophores in these materials. Static fluorescence images are obtained with ≈235 nm resolution in all three dimensions. In dynamics studies, the three-photon-excited fluorescence is recorded as a function of time and position over individual LC droplets, as an applied electric field is switched on and off. Time-resolved images with ≈235 nm spatial resolution and 200 μs time resolution are obtained. Movies depicting the local reorientation dynamics are prepared from these data and are presented for common ellipsoidal LC droplets and for novel toroidal droplets. The field-induced reorientation dynamics within the ellipsoidal droplets are shown to be more complex (i.e., spatially variable) than in the toroidal droplets. Dynamical complexity is concluded to arise from LC organizational complexity in the droplets. The bipolar configuration found in ellipsoidal droplets incorporates bend and splay deformations of the nematic phase and two disclination points. In contrast, toroidal droplets incorporate a simpler toroidal configuration in which only bend deformations occur.

  16. Ultrafast Multiphoton Pump-probe Photoemission Excitation Pathways in Rutile TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Argondizzo, Adam; Cui, Xuefeng; Wang, Cong; Sun, Huijuan; Shang, Honghui; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2015-04-27

    We investigate the spectroscopy and photoinduced electron dynamics within the conduction band of reduced rutile TiO2(110) surface by multiphoton photoemission (mPP) spectroscopy with wavelength tunable ultrafast (!20 fs) laser pulse excitation. Tuning the mPP photon excitation energy between 2.9 and 4.6 eV reveals a nearly degenerate pair of new unoccupied states located at 2.73 ± 0.05 and 2.85 ± 0.05 eV above the Fermi level, which can be analyzed through the polarization and sample azimuthal orientation dependence of the mPP spectra. Based on the calculated electronic structure and optical transition moments, as well as related spectroscopic evidence, we assign these resonances to transitions between Ti 3d bands of nominally t2g and eg symmetry, which are split by crystal field. The initial states for the optical transition are the reduced Ti3+ states of t2g symmetry populated by formation oxygen vacancy defects, which exist within the band gap of TiO2. Furthermore,we studied the electron dynamics within the conduction band of TiO2 by three-dimensional time-resolved pump-probe interferometric mPP measurements. The spectroscopic and time-resolved studies reveal competition between 2PP and 3PP processes where the t2g-eg transitions in the 2PP process saturate, and are overtaken by the 3PP process initiated by the band-gap excitation from the valence band of TiO2.

  17. Infrared multiphoton ignition and combustion enhancement of natural gas. Final report, February 1988-May 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lavid, M.; Poulos, A.T.

    1990-08-14

    The Phase I feasibility study has demonstrated the potential of using Infrared Multiphoton (IRMP) processes for ignition and combustion enhancement of natural gas. Experiments with IR lasers were conducted to investigate the effects of IRMP techniques on methane, ethane, isotopically substituted surrogates, and sensitized mixtures. Major findings include: (1) Identification of HF/DF laser as an appropriate source for IRMP; (2) Demonstration of IRMP decomposition of deuterated methane with CO{sub 2} laser; (3) Successful IRMP ignition of deuterated methane and ethane mixtures; (4) Successful IRMP ignition of methane mixtures using photo-sensitizers. These experimental findings support the concept that IRMP processes are capable of dissociating methane, other minor constituents of natural gas, or sensitizers to reactive, combustion-enhancing radicals. A comprehensive Phase II contract to bring the concept closer to commercial implementation is underway.

  18. Competing dissociation channels in the infrared multiphoton decomposition of ethyl vinyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisken, F.; Krajnovich, D.; Zhang, Z.; Shen, Y. R.; Lee, Y. T.

    1983-03-01

    Infrared multiphoton decomposition of ethyl vinyl ether (EVE) has been investigated by the crossed laser-molecular beam technique. Competition is observed between the two lowest-energy dissociation channels: (1) EVE → CH3CHO+C2H4, and (2) EVE → CH2CHO+C2H5. Center-of-mass product translational energy distributions were obtained for both dissociation channels. The products of reactions (1) and (2) are formed with mean translational energies of 31 and 5 kcal/mol, respectively. The branching ratio shifts dramatically in favor of the higher energy radical producing channel as the laser intensity and energy fluence are increased, in agreement with the qualitative predictions of statistical unimolecular rate theory.

  19. Aromatic C-H bond activation revealed by infrared multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jašíková, Lucie; Hanikýřová, Eva; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, Jana

    2012-04-01

    Metal-oxide cations are models of catalyst mediating the C-H bond activation of organic substrates. One of the most powerful reagents suggested in the gas phase is based on CuO(+) . Here, we describe the activation of the aromatic C-H bonds of phenanthroline in its complex with CuO(+) . The reaction sequence starts with a hydrogen atom abstraction by the oxygen atom from the 2-position of the phenanthroline ring, followed by OH migration to the ring. Using infrared multiphoton spectroscopy, it is shown that the reaction can be energetically facilitated by additional coordination of a water ligand to the copper ion. As the reaction is intramolecular, a spectroscopic characterization of the product is mandatory in order to unambiguously address the reaction mechanism. PMID:22689621

  20. Structural and dynamical aspects of skin studied by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-based methods.

    PubMed

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2013-12-18

    This mini-review reports on applications of particular multiphoton excitation microscopy-based methodologies employed in our laboratory to study skin. These approaches allow in-depth optical sectioning of the tissue, providing spatially resolved information on specific fluorescence probes' parameters. Specifically, by applying these methods, spatially resolved maps of water dipolar relaxation (generalized polarization function using the 6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthale probe), activity of protons (fluorescence lifetime imaging using a proton sensitive fluorescence probe--2,7-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein) and diffusion coefficients of distinct fluorescence probes (raster imaging correlation spectroscopy) can be obtained from different regions of the tissue. Comparative studies of different tissue strata, but also between equivalent regions of normal and abnormal excised skin, including applications of fluctuation correlation spectroscopy on transdermal penetration of liposomes are presented and discussed. The data from the different studies reported reveal the intrinsic heterogeneity of skin and also prove these strategies to be powerful noninvasive tools to explore structural and dynamical aspects of the tissue. PMID:23608611

  1. Interband photorefractive effect in beta-BBO crystal due to multiphoton excitation by intense ultrashort optical pulses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shixiang; Cai, Hua; Zeng, Heping

    2007-08-20

    This paper presents the first experimental observation of interband photo- refractive (PR) effects in beta-BBO crystal due to multiphoton excitation with intense ultrashort pulses. In order to fully characterize the PR effects, a sensitive intracavity scheme is developed to magnify the dynamics of nonlinear lenses induced by the PR effects. The reproducible PR phenomena depend strongly on the power, wavelength, and spatial intensity profile of the intense laser pulses and the electro-optic coefficient of the optical materials. Its response time is from tens of seconds to several minutes. The results may be very helpful for us to find a solution to overcome the deleterious influence of multiphoton induced photo-charges on nonlinear optical frequency conversions, e.g. optical parametric chirped pulse amplification. PMID:19547410

  2. First in vivo animal studies on intraocular nanosurgery and multiphoton tomography with low-energy 80-MHz near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konig, Karsten; Wang, Bagui; Krauss, Oliver; Riemann, Iris; Schubert, Harald; Kirste, Sigrun; Fischer, Peter

    2004-07-01

    We report on a method for refractive laser surgery based on low-energy femtosecond laser pulses provided by ultracompact turn-key non-amplified laser systems. An additional excimer laser is not required for ablation of the stroma. The novel method has the potential to be used for (i) optical flap creation as well as stroma ablation and (ii) for non-invasive flap-free intrastromal ablation. In addition, 3D multiphoton imaging of the cornea can be performed. In particular, we used sub-nanojoule near infrared 80 MHz femtosecond laser pulses for multiphoton imaging of corneal structures with ultrahigh resolution (< 1μm) as well as for highly precise intraocular refractive surgery. Imaging based on two-photon excited cellular autofluorescence and SHG formation in collagen structures was performed at GW/cm2 intensities, whereas destructive optical breakdown for nanoprocessing occurred at TW/cm2 light intensities. These high intensities were realized with sub-nJ pulses within a subfemtoliter intrastromal volume by diffraction-limited focussing with high NA objectives and beam scanning 50 to 140 μm below the epithelial surface. Multiphoton tomography of the cornea was used to determine the target of interest and to visualize intraocular post-laser effects. Histological examination with light- and electron microscopes of laser-exposed porcine and rabbit eyes reveal a minimum intratissue cut size below 1 μm without destructive effects to surrounding collagen structures. LASIK flaps and intracorneal cavities could be realized with high precision using 200 fs, 80 MHz, sub-nanojoule pulses at 800 nm. First studies on 80 MHz femtosecond laser surgery on living rabbits have been performed.

  3. Isotopically selective multiphoton dissociation of CF/sub 2/HCl in collision conditions of excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Avatkov, O.N.; Vetsko, V.M.; Dzneladze, D.I.; Esadze, G.G.; Kaminskii, A.V.; Kudziev, A.G.; Kudziev, T.A.

    1988-09-01

    The effect of the energy density, laser radiation frequency, and resonance and buffer gas pressure on the process of multiphoton dissociation of CF/sub 2/HCl molecules was experimentally studied. The dependence of the threshold value of the energy density on the resonance gas pressure in long-wave tuning of the radiation frequency on the maxima of the spectra of linear and multiphoton absorption of /sup 13/CF/sub 2/HCl molecules was studied. A model which qualitatively explains the threshold character of dissociation and the increase in selectivity with an increase in the gas pressure and radiation pulse duration was proposed.

  4. Multiphoton tomography for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2008-02-01

    Femtosecond laser multiphoton tomography has been employed in the field of tissue engineering to perform 3D high-resolution imaging of the extracellular matrix proteins elastin and collagen as well as of living cells without any fixation, slicing, and staining. Near infrared 80 MHz picojoule femtosecond laser pulses are able to excite the endogenous fluorophores NAD(P)H, flavoproteins, melanin, and elastin via a non-resonant two-photon excitation process. In addition, collagen can be imaged by second harmonic generation. Using a two-PMT detection system, the ratio of elastin to collagen was determined during optical sectioning. A high submicron spatial resolution and 50 picosecond temporal resolution was achieved using galvoscan mirrors and piezodriven focusing optics as well as a time-correlated single photon counting module with a fast microchannel plate detector and fast photomultipliers. Multiphoton tomography has been used to optimize the tissue engineering of heart valves and vessels in bioincubators as well as to characterize artificial skin. Stem cell characterization and manipulation are of major interest for the field of tissue engineering. Using the novel sub-20 femtosecond multiphoton nanoprocessing laser microscope FemtOgene, the differentiation of human stem cells within spheroids has been in vivo monitored with submicron resolution. In addition, the efficient targeted transfection has been demonstrated. Clinical studies on the interaction of tissue-engineered products with the natural tissue environment can be performed with in vivo multiphoton tomograph DermaInspect.

  5. Multiphoton spectroscopy of human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Hans G.; Weinigel, Martin; Knig, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    In vivo multiphoton-intensity images and emission spectra of human skin are reported. Optical sections from different depths of the epidermis and dermis have been measured with near-infrared laser-pulse excitation. While the intensity images reveal information on the morphology, the spectra show emission characteristics of main endogenous skin fluorophores like keratin, NAD(P)H, melanin, elastin and collagen as well as of second harmonic generation induced by the excitation-light interaction with the dermal collagen network.

  6. Multiphoton near-infrared quantum cutting luminescence of Yb3+ ion cooperative energy transferred from the oxyfluoride vitroceramics phosphor matrix.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaobo; Li, Song; Salamo, Gregory J; Yang, Xiaodong; Hu, Lili; Yu, Chunlei; Zhou, Jing; Huang, Jianhua

    2013-05-01

    In this Letter, we reported on an interesting multiphoton infrared quantum cutting phenomenon in Yb(3+)Tb3(+)-doped oxyfluoride vitroceramics phosphors. From the study results it is found that the absorption of one 288.0 nm photon of the matrix results in the emission of two 975.5 nm photons of the Yb3+ ion. In addition, it is found also that one 255.0 nm photon of the matrix may result in the emission of three 975.5 nm photons of the Yb3+ ion, due to the fact that their cooperative energy transfer rate is larger than multiphonon nonradiative relaxation rate. PMID:23632541

  7. Lung alveolar wall disruption in three-dimensional space identified using second-harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Hogg, James

    2010-02-01

    Second harmonic generation and multiphoton excited fluorescence microscopy methods were used to examine structural remodeling of the extracellular matrix in human lung alveolar walls undergoing emphysematous destruction. Fresh lung samples removed from a patient undergoing lung transplantation for very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were compared to similar samples from an unused donor lung that served as a control. The generated spatially resolved 3D images show the spatial distribution of collagen, elastin and other endogenously fluorescent tissue components such as macrophages. In the case of control lung tissue, we found well ordered alveolar walls with composite type structure made up of collagen matrix and relatively fine elastic fibers. In contrast, lung tissue undergoing emphysematous destruction was highly disorganized with increased alveolar wall thickness compared to control lung tissue.

  8. COMPACT NON-CONTACT TOTAL EMISSION DETECTION FOR IN-VIVO MULTI-PHOTON EXCITATION MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, Brian; Karamzadeh, Nader S.; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Redford, Glen; Kilborn, Karl; Knutson, Jay R.; Balaban, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe a compact, non-contact design for a Total Emission Detection (c-TED) system for intra-vital multi-photon imaging. To conform to a standard upright two-photon microscope design, this system uses a parabolic mirror surrounding a standard microscope objective in concert with an optical path that does not interfere with normal microscope operation. The non-contact design of this device allows for maximal light collection without disrupting the physiology of the specimen being examined. Tests were conducted on exposed tissues in live animals to examine the emission collection enhancement of the c-TED device compared to heavily optimized objective-based emission collection. The best light collection enhancement was seen from murine fat (5×-2× gains as a function of depth), while murine skeletal muscle and rat kidney showed gains of over two and just under two-fold near the surface, respectively. Gains decreased with imaging depth (particularly in the kidney). Zebrafish imaging on a reflective substrate showed close to a two-fold gain throughout the entire volume of an intact embryo (approximately 150 μm deep). Direct measurement of bleaching rates confirmed that the lower laser powers (enabled by greater light collection efficiency) yielded reduced photobleaching in vivo. The potential benefits of increased light collection in terms of speed of imaging and reduced photo-damage, as well as the applicability of this device to other multi-photon imaging methods is discussed. PMID:24251437

  9. Carcinogenic damage to deoxyribonucleic acid is induced by near-infrared laser pulses in multiphoton microscopy via combination of two- and three-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Thomas, Giju; Van Voskuilen, Johan; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear optical imaging modalities (multiphoton excited fluorescence, second and third harmonic generation) applied in vivo are increasingly promising for clinical diagnostics and the monitoring of cancer and other disorders, as they can probe tissue with high diffraction-limited resolution at near-infrared (IR) wavelengths. However, high peak intensity of femtosecond laser pulses required for two-photon processes causes formation of cyclobutane-pyrimidine-dimers (CPDs) in cellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) similar to damage from exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) light. Inaccurate repair of subsequent mutations increases the risk of carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigate CPD damage that results in Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro from imaging them with two-photon excited autofluorescence. The CPD levels are quantified by immunofluorescent staining. We further evaluate the extent of CPD damage with respect to varied wavelength, pulse width at focal plane, and pixel dwell time as compared with more pronounced damage from UV sources. While CPD damage has been expected to result from three-photon absorption, our results reveal that CPDs are induced by competing two- and three-photon absorption processes, where the former accesses UVA absorption band. This finding is independently confirmed by nonlinear dependencies of damage on laser power, wavelength, and pulse width.

  10. Multi-photon ionization and fragmentation of uracil: Neutral excited-state ring opening and hydration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barc, B.; Ryszka, M.; Spurrell, J.; Dampc, M.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Parajuli, R.; Mason, N. J.; Eden, S.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-photon ionization (MPI) of the RNA base uracil has been studied in the wavelength range 220-270 nm, coinciding with excitation to the S2(ππ*) state. A fragment ion at m/z = 84 was produced by 2-photon absorption at wavelengths ≤232 nm and assigned to C3H4N2O+ following CO abstraction. This ion has not been observed in alternative dissociative ionization processes (notably electron impact) and its threshold is close to recent calculations of the minimum activation energy for a ring opening conical intersection to a σ(n-π)π* closed shell state. Moreover, the predicted ring opening transition leaves a CO group at one end of the isomer, apparently vulnerable to abstraction. An MPI mass spectrum of uracil-water clusters is presented for the first time and compared with an equivalent dry measurement. Hydration enhances certain fragment ion pathways (particularly C3H3NO+) but represses C3H4N2O+ production. This indicates that hydrogen bonding to water stabilizes uracil with respect to neutral excited-state ring opening.

  11. Multi-photon ionization and fragmentation of uracil: neutral excited-state ring opening and hydration effects.

    PubMed

    Barc, B; Ryszka, M; Spurrell, J; Dampc, M; Limão-Vieira, P; Parajuli, R; Mason, N J; Eden, S

    2013-12-28

    Multi-photon ionization (MPI) of the RNA base uracil has been studied in the wavelength range 220-270 nm, coinciding with excitation to the S2(ππ*) state. A fragment ion at m/z = 84 was produced by 2-photon absorption at wavelengths ≤232 nm and assigned to C3H4N2O(+) following CO abstraction. This ion has not been observed in alternative dissociative ionization processes (notably electron impact) and its threshold is close to recent calculations of the minimum activation energy for a ring opening conical intersection to a σ(n-π)π* closed shell state. Moreover, the predicted ring opening transition leaves a CO group at one end of the isomer, apparently vulnerable to abstraction. An MPI mass spectrum of uracil-water clusters is presented for the first time and compared with an equivalent dry measurement. Hydration enhances certain fragment ion pathways (particularly C3H3NO(+)) but represses C3H4N2O(+) production. This indicates that hydrogen bonding to water stabilizes uracil with respect to neutral excited-state ring opening. PMID:24387374

  12. Multi-photon ionization and fragmentation of uracil: Neutral excited-state ring opening and hydration effects

    SciTech Connect

    Barc, B.; Ryszka, M.; Spurrell, J.; Dampc, M.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Parajuli, R.; Mason, N. J.; Eden, S.

    2013-12-28

    Multi-photon ionization (MPI) of the RNA base uracil has been studied in the wavelength range 220–270 nm, coinciding with excitation to the S{sub 2}(ππ*) state. A fragment ion at m/z = 84 was produced by 2-photon absorption at wavelengths ≤232 nm and assigned to C{sub 3}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}O{sup +} following CO abstraction. This ion has not been observed in alternative dissociative ionization processes (notably electron impact) and its threshold is close to recent calculations of the minimum activation energy for a ring opening conical intersection to a σ(n-π)π* closed shell state. Moreover, the predicted ring opening transition leaves a CO group at one end of the isomer, apparently vulnerable to abstraction. An MPI mass spectrum of uracil-water clusters is presented for the first time and compared with an equivalent dry measurement. Hydration enhances certain fragment ion pathways (particularly C{sub 3}H{sub 3}NO{sup +}) but represses C{sub 3}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}O{sup +} production. This indicates that hydrogen bonding to water stabilizes uracil with respect to neutral excited-state ring opening.

  13. Photoleucine Survives Backbone Cleavage by Electron Transfer Dissociation. A Near-UV Photodissociation and Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Action Spectroscopy Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Christopher J.; Martens, Jonathan; Marek, Aleš; Oomens, Jos; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    We report a combined experimental and computational study aimed at elucidating the structure of N-terminal fragment ions of the c type produced by electron transfer dissociation of photo-leucine (L*) peptide ions GL*GGKX. The c 4 ion from GL*GGK is found to retain an intact diazirine ring that undergoes selective photodissociation at 355 nm, followed by backbone cleavage. Infrared multiphoton dissociation action spectra point to the absence in the c 4 ion of a diazoalkane group that could be produced by thermal isomerization of vibrationally hot ions. The c 4 ion from ETD of GL*GGK is assigned an amide structure by a close match of the IRMPD action spectrum and calculated IR absorption. The energetics and kinetics of c 4 ion dissociations are discussed.

  14. Multi-photon Molecular Tagging Thermometry with Femtosecond Excitation (FemtoMTT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouya, Shahram; van Rhijn, Alexander; Safaripour, Alireza; Dantus, Marcos; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2015-11-01

    Following our earlier report of first Molecular Tagging Velocimetry (MTV) measurement under nonlinear resonant femtosecond excitation in an aqueous flow, we present results of Molecular Tagging Thermometry (MTT) in a simple jet flow using femtosecond excitation. The two-photon absorption process of a phosphorescent supramolecule allows for simultaneous velocity and temperature measurement using a pair of images obtained during the lifetime of the tracer. Results reproduce the tracer temperature response under typical single photon excitation, while providing potential for high rep-rate capabilities for simultaneous velocimetry and thermometry in aqueous flows and eliminating the need for short wavelength UV excitation source and UV optical access in flow facilities. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant number FA9550-13-1-0034.

  15. Excitation beyond the monochromatic laser limit: simultaneous 3-D confocal and multiphoton microscopy with a tapered fiber as white-light laser source.

    PubMed

    Betz, Timo; Teipel, Jörn; Koch, Daniel; Härtig, Wolfgang; Guck, Jochen; Käs, Josef; Giessen, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Confocal and multiphoton microscopy are essential tools in modern life sciences. They allow fast and highly resolved imaging of a steadily growing number of fluorescent markers, ranging from fluorescent proteins to quantum dots and other fluorophores, used for the localization of molecules and the quantitative detection of molecular properties within living cells and organisms. Up to now, only one physical limitation seemed to be unavoidable. Both confocal and multiphoton microscopy rely on lasers as excitation sources, and their monochromatic radiation allows only a limited number of simultaneously usable dyes, which depends on the specific number of laser lines available in the used microscope. We have overcome this limitation by successfully replacing all excitation lasers in a standard confocal microscope with pulsed white light ranging from 430 to 1300 nm generated in a tapered silica fiber. With this easily reproducible method, simultaneous confocal and multiphoton microscopy was demonstrated. By developing a coherent and intense laser source with spectral width comparable to a mercury lamp, we provide the flexibility to excite any desired fluorophore combination. PMID:16292969

  16. Isotope-selective infrared multiphoton dissociation of CF3Br in a supersonic free jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Kuze, H.; Tashiro, H.; Takami, M.; Namba, S.

    1986-10-01

    The carbon-isotope selectivity in the multiphoton dissociation of CF3Br is studied in the collisional region of supersonic free jet. The isotopic abundance of12C and13C in C2F6 formed by recombination of the dissociation products is measured with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. An enrichmet factor of 9.4 is obtained for12C with the 9 R(30)CO2 laser line while the factor of 6.9 is obtained for13C with the 9 P(16) line.

  17. Cascade Dissociations of Peptide Cation-Radicals. Part 2. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation and Mechanistic Studies of z-Ions from Pentapeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, Aaron R.; Chung, Thomas W.; Hui, Renjie; Coon, Joshua J.; Tureček, Frantisek

    2012-08-01

    Dissociations of z 4 ions from pentapeptides AAXAR where X = H, Y, F, W, and V produce dominant z 2 ions that account for >50 % of the fragment ion intensity. The dissociation has been studied in detail by experiment and theory and found to involve several isomerization and bond-breaking steps. Isomerizations in z 4 ions proceed by amide trans→cis rotations followed by radical-induced transfer of a β-hydrogen atom from the side chain, forming stable Cβ radical intermediates. These undergo rate-determining cleavage of the Cα-CO bond at the X residue followed by loss of the neutral AX fragment, forming x 2 intermediates. The latter were detected by energy-resolved resonant excitation collision-induced dissociation (CID) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) experiments. The x 2 intermediates undergo facile loss of HNCO to form z 2 fragment ions, as also confirmed by energy-resolved CID and IRMPD MS4 experiments. The loss of HNCO from the x 2 ion from AAHWR is kinetically hampered by the Trp residue that traps the OCNH radical group in a cyclic intermediate.

  18. Multi-photon Molecular Tagging Velocimetry with Femtosecond Excitation (FemtoMTV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koochesfahani, Manoochehr; Pouya, Shahram; van Rhijn, Alexander; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-11-01

    We report results from first MTV measurements in water under nonlinear resonant femtosecond excitation of a phosphorescent supramolecule. Both two-photon and three-photon absorption processes are examined and the feasibility of measurements is demonstrated by single component velocimetry in a simple jet flow. The new capabilities enabled by FemtoMTV include elimination of the need for short wavelength UV excitation source and UV optical access in flow facilities, and potential for high rep-rate flow imaging. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant Number FA9550-13-1-0034.

  19. Multi-photon excited coherent random laser emission in ZnO powders.

    PubMed

    Tolentino Dominguez, Christian; Gomes, Maria de A; Macedo, Zélia S; de Araújo, Cid B; Gomes, Anderson S L

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation and analysis of anti-Stokes coherent random laser (RL) emission from zinc oxide (ZnO) powders excited by one-, two- or three-photon femtosecond laser radiation. The ZnO powders were produced via a novel proteic sol-gel, low-cost and environmentally friendly route using coconut water in the polymerization step of the metal precursor. One- and two-photon excitation at 354 nm and 710 nm, respectively, generated single-band emissions centred at about 387 nm. For three-photon excitation, the emission spectra showed a strong ultraviolet (UV) band (380-396 nm) attributed to direct three-photon absorption from the valence band to the conduction band. The presence of an intensity threshold and a bandwidth narrowing of the UV band from about 20 to 4 nm are clear evidence of RL action. The observation of multiple sub-nanometre narrow peaks in the emission spectra for excitation above the RL threshold is consistent with random lasing by coherent feedback. PMID:25407414

  20. Multi-photon excited coherent random laser emission in ZnO powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolentino Dominguez, Christian; Gomes, Maria De A.; Macedo, Zélia S.; de Araújo, Cid B.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2014-11-01

    We report the observation and analysis of anti-Stokes coherent random laser (RL) emission from zinc oxide (ZnO) powders excited by one-, two- or three-photon femtosecond laser radiation. The ZnO powders were produced via a novel proteic sol-gel, low-cost and environmentally friendly route using coconut water in the polymerization step of the metal precursor. One- and two-photon excitation at 354 nm and 710 nm, respectively, generated single-band emissions centred at about 387 nm. For three-photon excitation, the emission spectra showed a strong ultraviolet (UV) band (380-396 nm) attributed to direct three-photon absorption from the valence band to the conduction band. The presence of an intensity threshold and a bandwidth narrowing of the UV band from about 20 to 4 nm are clear evidence of RL action. The observation of multiple sub-nanometre narrow peaks in the emission spectra for excitation above the RL threshold is consistent with random lasing by coherent feedback.

  1. Precise fluorophore lifetime mapping in live-cell, multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2010-01-01

    Fluorophore excited state lifetime is a useful indicator of micro-environment in cellular optical molecular imaging. For quantitative sensing, precise lifetime determination is important, yet is often difficult to accomplish when using the experimental conditions favored by live cells. Here we report the first application of temporal optimization and spatial denoising methods to two-photon time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to improve lifetime precision in live-cell images. The results demonstrated a greater than five-fold improvement in lifetime precision. This approach minimizes the adverse effects of excitation light on live cells and should benefit FLIM applications to high content analysis and bioimage informatics. PMID:20588712

  2. Dynamics of Cell Migration for cells embedded in Collagen using a multimodal platform of Optical Coherence Tomography, Multi-Photon excitation and Second Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Kandice; Tang, Shuo; Gratton, Enrico

    2007-03-01

    We developed Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS) to analyze the dynamics of cell migration from data obtained on a confocal multi-photon microscope. We assembled a microscope that can simultaneously measure the scattering signal from optical coherence tomography (OCT), multi-photon excited emission (TPEF) and second harmonic signals (SHG) with comparable spatial resolution and the same time resolution. We present data here showing the combined 3-D images of the cells embedded in a collagen matrix. The OCT signal adds fine structural information of the cellular morphology and collagen which is enhanced by the SHG image. The RICS analysis of the TPEF signal gives the dynamics of the GFP --style proteins. We show that the cell morphology and the distribution of cell organelles are different in the collagen matrix than what is observed in cells growing on flat surfaces. Using the three modalities of cell imaging we could reach a more realistic interpretation of cell dynamics in tissue.

  3. Wavelength dependence of nanosecond infrared laser-induced breakdown in water: Evidence for multiphoton initiation via an intermediate state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linz, Norbert; Freidank, Sebastian; Liang, Xiao-Xuan; Vogelmann, Hannes; Trickl, Thomas; Vogel, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of the wavelength dependence (725-1025 nm) of the threshold for nanosecond optical breakdown in water revealed steps consistent with breakdown initiation by multiphoton ionization, with an initiation energy of about 6.6 eV. This value is considerably smaller than the autoionization threshold of about 9.5 eV, which can be regarded as band gap relevant for avalanche ionization. Breakdown initiation is likely to occur via excitation of a valence band electron into a solvated state, followed by rapid excitation into the conduction band. Theoretical analysis based on these assumptions suggests that the seed electron density required for initiating avalanche ionization amounts to 2.5 ×1015c m-3 at 725 nm and drops to 1.1 ×1012c m-3 at 1025 nm. These results demand changes of future breakdown modeling for water, including the use of a larger band gap than previously employed, the introduction of an intermediate energy level for initiation, and consideration of the wavelength dependence of seed electron density.

  4. Generation of coherent ultraviolet radiation in the 330 nm region by multiphoton excitation of sodium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. K.; Wu, C. Y. R.; Kim, C. C.; Judge, D. L.

    1984-03-01

    We report the observation of coherent uv emission at 330.2±0.5 nm when sodium vapor in a heatpipe is irradiated with a pulsed visible dye laser with output wavelength in the 570 595 nm region. It is found that intense uv emission can be produced from Na atoms as well as from Na2 molecules. The excitation functions and their dependence on vapor density and laser power density are presented and the mechanisms for producing the emission are discussed.

  5. Generation of coherent ultraviolet radiation in the 330 nm region by multiphoton excitation of sodium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Kim, C. C.; Judge, D. L.; Chen, J. K.

    1984-03-01

    The paper reports the observation of coherent UV emission at 330.2 + or - 0.5 nm when sodium vapor in a heatpipe is irradiated with a pulsed visible dye laser with output wavelength in the 570-595 nm region. It is found that intense UV emission can be produced from Na atoms as well as from Na2 molecules. The excitation functions and their dependence on vapor density and laser power density are presented and the mechanisms for producing the emission are discussed.

  6. Multiphoton interactions in the strong field regime: Microwave excitation and ionization of Rydberg eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Warren Morton

    We present here an experimental study and theoretical exposition of two-level atoms in the strong field regime, i.e. a regime where we must resort to quantum mechanical techniques other than perturbation theory to properly describe the interactions that take place, as well as an experimental investigation of the many-level problem of microwave ionization. All involve the interaction of Rydberg atoms, atoms with one highly excited electron, with short pulses of radio-frequency or microwave radiation. We also show the relationship between the single cycle time propagator (SCTP), which is simply a time integral of the Schrodinger equation over one cycle of a periodic field, and Floquet theory. We then go on to apply the SCTP to calculate Rabi frequencies, show the dramatic effect of phase in a pulse, and describe the effects of frequency modulation of a strong field.

  7. VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN IN THE LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY NGC 4418

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Kazushi; Aalto, Susanne; Evans, Aaron S.; Wiedner, Martina C.; Wilner, David J.

    2010-12-20

    Infrared pumping and its effect on the excitation of HCN molecules can be important when using rotational lines of HCN to probe dense molecular gas in galaxy nuclei. We report the first extragalactic detection of (sub)millimeter rotational lines of vibrationally excited HCN, in the dust-enshrouded nucleus of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 4418. We estimate the excitation temperature of T{sub vib} {approx} 230 K between the vibrational ground and excited (v{sub 2} = 1) states. This excitation is most likely due to infrared radiation. At this high vibrational temperature the path through the v{sub 2} = 1 state must have a strong impact on the rotational excitation in the vibrational ground level, although it may not be dominant for all rotational levels. Our observations also revealed nearly confusion-limited lines of CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, H{sup 13}CN, HC{sup 15}N, CS, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and HC{sub 3}N at {lambda} {approx} 1 mm. Their relative intensities may also be affected by the infrared pumping.

  8. Selective, sensitive, and rapid phosphopeptide identification in enzymatic digests using ESI-FTICR-MS with infrared multiphoton dissociation.

    PubMed

    Flora, J W; Muddiman, D C

    2001-07-15

    Rapid screening for phosphopeptides within complex proteolytic digests involving electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS) in the negative ion mode with infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) accompanied by improved phosphopeptide sensitivity and selectivity is demonstrated with the tryptic digests of the naturally phosphorylated proteins bovine alpha- and beta-casein. All peptides in a complex proteolytic digest can be examined simultaneously for phosphorylation with a 4-s IR laser pulse at 7-11 W where phosphopeptide signature ions form upon irradiation, as the low energy of activation phosphate moiety cleavage transpires without the dissociation of the unphsophorylated peptide population. The tyrosine phosphorylated peptide HGLDN-pY-R, its nonphosphorylated analogue HGLDNYR, the kinase domain of insulin receptor unphosphorylated TRDIYETDYYRK, monophosphorylated TRDIYED-pY-YRK, and triphosphorylated TRDI-pY-ETD-pY-pY-RK were also used as model peptides in this research. The sensitivity and selectivity of phosphopeptides is shown to greatly improve when the volatile base piperidine is used to adjust the pH of th PMID:11476230

  9. Differentiation and Distributions of DNA/Cisplatin Crosslinks by Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhe; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) mass spectrometry was developed to investigate the distributions of intrastrand crosslinks formed between cisplatin and two oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), d(A1T2G3G4G5T6A7C8C9C10A11T12) (G3-D) and its analog d(A1T2G3G4G5T6T7C8C9C10A11T12) (G3-H), that have been reported to adopt different secondary structures in solution. Based on the formation of site-specific fragment ions upon IRMPD, two isobaric crosslink products were differentiated for each ODN. The preferential formation of G3G4 and G4G5 crosslinks was determined as a function of reaction conditions, including incubation temperature and presence of metal ions. G3-D consistently exhibited a greater preference for formation of the G4G5 crosslink compared to the G3-H ODN. The ratio of G3G4:G4G5 crosslinks increased for both G3-D and G3-H at higher incubation temperatures or when metal salts were added. Comparison of the IRMPD fragmentation patterns of the unmodified ODNs and the intramolecular platinated crosslinks indicated that backbone cleavage was significantly suppressed near the crosslink. PMID:24135806

  10. Dual-color dynamic tracking of GM-CSF receptors/JAK2 kinases signaling activation using temporal focusing multiphoton fluorescence excitation and astigmatic imaging.

    PubMed

    Chien, Fan-Ching; Lien, Chi-Hsiang; Dai, Yang-Hong

    2015-11-30

    The dual-color dynamic particle tracking approach that uses temporal focusing multiphoton fluorescence excitation and two-channel astigmatic imaging is utilized to track molecular trajectories in three dimensions to explore molecular interactions. Images of two fluorophores were obtained to extract their positions by optical sectioning excitation using a fast temporal focusing multiphoton excitation microscope (TFMPEM) and by the simultaneous collection of data in two channels. The presented pair of cylindrical lenses, which was used to adjust the astigmatism effect with the minimum shifting of the imaging plane, was more feasible and flexible than single cylindrical lens for aligning two separate detection channels in astigmatic imaging. The lateral and axial positioning resolutions were observed to be approximately 9-13 nm and 23-30 nm respectively, for the two fluorescence channels. The dynamic movement and binding behavior of clusters of GM-CSF receptors and JAK2 kinases in HeLa cells in the presence of GM-CSF ligands were observed. Therefore, the proposed dual-color tracking strategy is useful for the dynamic study of molecular interactions in living specimens with a fast frame rate, less photobleaching, better penetration depth, and minimum optical trapping force. PMID:26698726

  11. Infrared light excites cells by changing their electrical capacitance

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.; Homma, Kazuaki; Villarreal, Sebastian; Richter, Claus-Peter; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Optical stimulation has enabled important advances in the study of brain function and other biological processes, and holds promise for medical applications ranging from hearing restoration to cardiac pace making. In particular, pulsed laser stimulation using infrared wavelengths >1.5 μm has therapeutic potential based on its ability to directly stimulate nerves and muscles without any genetic or chemical pre-treatment. However, the mechanism of infrared stimulation has been a mystery, hindering its path to the clinic. Here we show that infrared light excites cells through a novel, highly general electrostatic mechanism. Infrared pulses are absorbed by water, producing a rapid local increase in temperature. This heating reversibly alters the electrical capacitance of the plasma membrane, depolarizing the target cell. This mechanism is fully reversible and requires only the most basic properties of cell membranes. Our findings underscore the generality of pulsed infrared stimulation and its medical potential. PMID:22415827

  12. Scaling-up13C separation by infrared multiphoton dissociation of the CHClF2/Br2 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. C.; Wu, B.; Liu, J. L.; Jing, Y.; Chu, M. X.; Xue, L. L.; Ma, P. H.

    1995-06-01

    13C separation at a laboratory scaled-up level by the13C-selective InfraRed MultiPhoton Dissociation (IRMPD) of CHClF2 in the presence of Br2 has been investigated in a flow reactor. With a complete scaled-up system including a flow reactor, an industrially reliable TEA CO2 laser with longer pulse duration and a product-separation set-up for13C separation, it has been attempted to optimize the parameters suitable for large-scale production of the carbon isotope. The optimization of13C separation parameters, such as laser fluence, laser frequency and the partial pressure of CHClF2 and Br2 was tested under static conditions. By irradiation with longer pulses, a lower optimum pressure for a high13C-production rate was determined. Furthermore, the separation process was scaled in the flow system to examine the13C-production rates,13C atomic fractions in the CBr2F2 products and13C depletions in the CHClF2 reactants at different flow rates and laser repetition frequencies. The data obtained from the flow tests demonstrated a 40 mg/h production rate for CBr2F2 at 65%13C by using a 40 W (4 J, 10 Hz) laser beam focused with a lens of 120 cm focal length. If the reliable TEA CO2 laser is operated with 100 W (10 J, 10 Hz) output, the production rate of CBr2F2 for13C at 60% of 200 mg/h can be attained. The measurements of the spatial profile of the focused laser beam imply a 2 g/h production rate for the 60%13C product for an incident power of 200 W (20 J, 10 Hz).

  13. Quasi-Continuous Wave Near-Infrared Excitation of Upconversion Nanoparticles for Optogenetic Manipulation of C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Akshaya; Liu, Haichun; Jayakumar, Muthu Kumara Gnanasammandhan; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Zhang, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging powerful tool to investigate workings of the nervous system. However, the use of low tissue penetrating visible light limits its therapeutic potential. Employing deep penetrating near-infrared (NIR) light for optogenetics would be beneficial but it cannot be used directly. This issue can be tackled with upconversion nanoparticles (UCNs) acting as nanotransducers emitting at shorter wavelengths extending to the UV range upon NIR light excitation. Although attractive, implementation of such NIR-optogenetics is hindered by the low UCN emission intensity that necessitates high NIR excitation intensities, resulting in overheating issues. A novel quasi-continuous wave (quasi-CW) excitation approach is developed that significantly enhances multiphoton emissions from UCNs, and for the first time NIR light-triggered optogenetic manipulations are implemented in vitro and in C. elegans. The approach developed here enables the activation of channelrhodopsin-2 with a significantly lower excitation power and UCN concentration along with negligible phototoxicity as seen with CW excitation, paving the way for therapeutic optogenetics. PMID:26849846

  14. Infrared imaging results of an excited planar jet

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.

    1991-12-01

    Planar jets are used for many applications including heating, cooling, and ventilation. Generally such a jet is designed to provide good mixing within an enclosure. In building applications, the jet provides both thermal comfort and adequate indoor air quality. Increased mixing rates may lead to lower short-circuiting of conditioned air, elimination of dead zones within the occupied zone, reduced energy costs, increased occupant comfort, and higher indoor air quality. This paper discusses using an infrared imaging system to show the effect of excitation of a jet on the spread angle and on the jet mixing efficiency. Infrared imaging captures a large number of data points in real time (over 50,000 data points per image) providing significant advantages over single-point measurements. We used a screen mesh with a time constant of approximately 0.3 seconds as a target for the infrared camera to detect temperature variations in the jet. The infrared images show increased jet spread due to excitation of the jet. Digital data reduction and analysis show change in jet isotherms and quantify the increased mixing caused by excitation. 17 refs., 20 figs.

  15. Large excited state two photon absorptions in the near infrared region of surprisingly stable radical cations of (ferrocenyl)indenes.

    PubMed

    Orian, Laura; Scuppa, Stefano; Santi, Saverio; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2013-08-21

    Multiphoton absorptions are important non-linear optical processes which allow us to explore excited states with low energy photons giving rise to new possibilities for photoinduced processes. Among these processes, multiphoton absorptions from excited states are particularly interesting because of the large susceptibilities characteristic of excited states. Here we explore the nonlinear transmission measurements recorded with 9 ns laser pulses at 1064 nm of the radical cations of (2-ferrocenyl)indene and of (2-ferrocenyl)-hexamethylindene, two interesting very stable molecules. The non-linear transmission data can be interpreted with a multiphoton sequence of three photon absorptions, the first being a one photon absorption related to the intramolecular charge transfer and the second a two photon absorption from the excited state created with the first process. The two photon absorption cross section is found to be several orders of magnitude larger than those usually found for two photon absorbing systems excited from the ground state. PMID:23817723

  16. Infrared emission and excitation in LMC HII regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungerer, V.; Viallefond, F.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared excess (IRE) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) HII nebulae is found to correlate positively with the temperature of the ambient radiation field or with the He(+)/H(+) abundance ratio. This result is discussed in terms of a selective absorption of the photons in the range 504 to 912 A relative to the He ionizing photons. This interpretation may explain the paradox of finding highly excited nebulae with only relatively moderate equivalent width of their Balmer lines.

  17. Near-Infrared Emitting Squaraine Dyes with High 2PA Cross Sections for Multiphoton Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo-Yang; Yao, Sheng; Wang, Xuhua; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Designed to achieve high two-photon absorptivity, new near infrared (NIR) emitting squaraine dyes, (E)-2-(1-(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl)-5-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-4-(1-(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl)-5-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-2H-pyrrolium-2-ylidene)-3-oxocyclobut-1-enolate (1) and (Z)-2-(4-(dibutylamino)-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-(4-(dibutyliminio)-2-hydroxycyclohexa-2,5-dienylidene)-3-oxocyclobut-1-enolate (2) were synthesized and characterized. Their linear photophysical properties were investigated via UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy in various solvents, while their nonlinear photophysical properties were investigated using a combination of two-photon induced fluorescence and open aperture z-scan methods. Squaraine 1 exhibited a high two-photon absorption (2PA) cross section (δ2PA), ~ 20,000 GM at 800 nm, and high photostability with the photochemical decomposition quantum yield one order of magnitude lower than Cy 5, a commercially available pentamethine cyanine NIR dye. The cytotoxicity of the squaraine dyes were evaluated in HCT 116 and COS 7 cell lines to assess the potential of these probes for biomedical imaging. The viability of both cell lines was maintained above 80% at dye concentrations up to 30 μM, indicating good biocompatibility of the probes. Finally, one-photon fluorescence microscopy (1PFM) and two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) imaging was accomplished after incubation of micelle-encapsulated squaraine probes with HCT 116 and COS 7 cells, demonstrating their potential in 2PFM bioimaging. PMID:22591003

  18. Competitive ionization processes of anthracene excited with a femtosecond pulse in the multi-photon ionization regime

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, M.; Hansen, K.

    2011-12-07

    To clarify the ionization mechanism of large molecules under multi-photon ionization conditions, photo-electron spectroscopic studies on anthracene have been performed with electron imaging technique. Electron kinetic energy distributions below a few eV reveal that three kinds of ionization channels coexist, viz., vertical ionization, ionization from Rydberg states, and thermionic hot electron emission. Their relative yield is determined by the characteristic of the laser pulse. The duration in particular influences the ratio between the first two processes, while for higher intensities the last process dominates. Our results provide strong evidence that internal conversion plays an important role for the ionization of the molecule.

  19. Multifocal multiphoton microscopy with adaptive optical correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Simao; Poland, Simon; Krstajic, Nikola; Li, David; Monypenny, James; Walker, Richard; Tyndall, David; Ng, Tony; Henderson, Robert; Ameer-Beg, Simon

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a well established approach for measuring dynamic signalling events inside living cells, including detection of protein-protein interactions. The improvement in optical penetration of infrared light compared with linear excitation due to Rayleigh scattering and low absorption have provided imaging depths of up to 1mm in brain tissue but significant image degradation occurs as samples distort (aberrate) the infrared excitation beam. Multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) FLIM is a method for obtaining functional, high resolution images of biological structures. In order to achieve good statistical accuracy TCSPC typically requires long acquisition times. We report the development of a multifocal multiphoton microscope (MMM), titled MegaFLI. Beam parallelization performed via a 3D Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), increases TCSPC count rate proportional to the number of beamlets produced. A weighted 3D GS algorithm is employed to improve homogeneity. An added benefit is the implementation of flexible and adaptive optical correction. Adaptive optics performed by means of Zernike polynomials are used to correct for system induced aberrations. Here we present results with significant improvement in throughput obtained using a novel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) 1024 pixel single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array, opening the way to truly high-throughput FLIM.

  20. Optical visualization of Alzheimer’s pathology via multiphoton-excited intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Alex C.; Duff, Karen; Gouras, Gunnar K.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsic optical emissions, such as autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG), are potentially useful for functional fluorescence imaging and biomedical disease diagnosis for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, using multiphoton and SHG microscopy, we identified sources of intrinsic emissions in ex vivo, acute brain slices from AD transgenic mouse models. We observed autofluorescence and SHG at senile plaques as well as characterized their emission spectra. The utility of intrinsic emissions was demonstrated by imaging senile plaque autofluorescence in conjunction with SHG from microtubule arrays to assess the polarity of microtubules near pathological lesions. Our results suggest that tissues from AD transgenic models contain distinct intrinsic emissions, which can provide valuable information about the disease mechanisms. PMID:19259208

  1. Controlling condensed-phase vibrational excitation with tailored infrared pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiman, V. D.; Arrivo, S. M.; Melinger, J. S.; Heilweil, E. J.

    1998-08-01

    Vibrational population distributions within the CO-stretching T 1u manifold of W(CO) 6 in room-temperature n-hexane were created by using near-transform limited and linearly chirped picosecond infrared excitation pulses. These pulses were characterized using the second harmonic FROG (frequency-resolved optical gating) algorithm to determine the ˜8 cm -1/ps chirp for both positively- and negatively-chirped 2 ps pulses. FROG and time-resolved transient difference spectra were obtained with an InSb focal plane array detector. While unchirped and positively-chirped excitation leads predominantly to v=1 population, negatively-chirped pulses produce excess population in the v=2 level. These results are compared to predictions from density matrix calculations for a model potential.

  2. Multiphoton multicolor FISH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Goehlert, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Liehr, Thomas; Loncarevic, Ivan F.; Claussen, Uwe; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    2000-12-01

    We describe a novel method of 3D imaging of specific regions of DNA in interphase nuclei and tissues based on multiphoton microscopy and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH). Multiphoton Multicolor FISH (MM-FISH) combines the advantages of (i) using a single NIR excitation wavelength for the simultaneous excitation of multiple FISH fluorophores, (ii) absence of fading in out-of-focus regions, (iii) intrinsic 3D imaging capability and (iv) high light penetration depth. Detection of chromosomal aberrations in amniocytes and tumor cells as well as imaging of FISH fluorophores in biopsies using femtosecond laser pulses at 780 nm and 800 nm are described. First two-photon excited fluorescence decay curves of FISH fluorophores are presented. The fluorophores have been excited via non- resonant two-photon excitation with 150 fs pulses of 0.1 to 8 mW mean laser power of a frequency doubled ultra compact 50 MHz fiber laser and with 80 fs pulses of a compact 80 MHz Ti:sapphire laser. MM-FISH may become an interesting tool in preimplantation diagnosis and molecular pathology.

  3. Clinical multiphoton FLIM tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    This paper gives an overview on current clinical high resolution multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging in volunteers and patients. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in Life Sciences was introduced in Jena/Germany in 1988/89 based on a ZEISS confocal picosecond dye laser scanning microscope equipped with a single photon counting unit. The porphyrin distribution in living cells and living tumor-bearing mice was studied with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. Ten years later, time-gated cameras were employed to detect dental caries in volunteers based on one-photon excitation of autofluorescent bacteria with long fluorescence lifetimes. Nowadays, one-photon FLIM based on picosecond VIS laser diodes are used to study ocular diseases in humans. Already one decade ago, first clinical twophoton FLIM images in humans were taken with the certified clinical multiphoton femtosecond laser tomograph DermaInspectTM. Multiphoton tomographs with FLIM modules are now operating in hospitals at Brisbane, Tokyo, Berlin, Paris, London, Modena and other European cities. Multiple FLIM detectors allow spectral FLIM with a temporal resolution down to 20 ps (MCP) / 250 ps (PMT) and a spectral resolution of 10 nm. Major FLIM applications include the detection of intradermal sunscreen and tattoo nanoparticles, the detection of different melanin types, the early diagnosis of dermatitis and malignant melanoma, as well as the measurement of therapeutic effects in pateints suffering from dermatitis. So far, more than 1,000 patients and volunteers have been investigated with the clinical multiphoton FLIM tomographs DermaInspectTM and MPTflexTM.

  4. Multiphoton microspectroscopy of biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bai-Ling; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Ping C.; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Chen, RangWu; Wang, YiMin; Chen, JianCheng; Wang, Yung-Shun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Huang, Mao-Kuo

    2000-07-01

    The non-linear nature of multi-photon fluorescence excitation restricts the fluorescing volume to the vicinity of the focal point. As a result, the technology has the capacity for micro- spectroscopy of biological specimen at high spatial resolution. Chloroplasts in mesophyll protoplast of Arabidopsis thaliana and maize stem sections were used to demonstrate the feasibility of multi-photon fluorescence micro-spectroscopy at subcellular compartments. Time-lapse spectral recording provides a means for studying the response of cell organelles to high intensity illumination.

  5. Control of multiphoton and avalanche ionization using an ultraviolet-infrared pulse train in femtosecond laser micro/nano-machining of fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoming; Bian, Qiumei; Chang, Zenghu; Corkum, P. B.; Lei, Shuting

    2014-03-01

    We report on the experimental results of micro- and nanostructures fabricated on the surface of fused silica by a train of two femtosecond laser pulses, a tightly focused 266 nm (ultraviolet, UV) pulse followed by a loosely focused 800 nm (infrared, IR) pulse. By controlling the fluence of each pulse below the damage threshold, micro- and nanostructures are fabricated using the combined beams. The resulting damage size is defined by the UV pulse, and a reduction of UV damage threshold is observed when the two pulses are within ~ 1 ps delay. The effects of IR pulse duration on the UV damage threshold and shapes are investigated. These results suggest that the UV pulse generates seed electrons through multiphoton absorption and the IR pulse utilizes these electrons to cause damage by avalanche process. A single rate equation model based on electron density can be used to explain these results. It is further demonstrated that structures with dimensions of 124 nm can be fabricated on the surface of fused silica using 0.5 NA objective. This provides a possible route to XUV (or even shorter wavelength) laser nano-machining with reduced damage threshold.

  6. Studies of protonated and anionic artemisinin in the gas-phase by infrared multi-photon dissociation and by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydou, M.; Gillet, J. C.; Li, X.; Wang, H.; Posner, G. H.; Grégoire, G.; Schermann, J. P.; Bowen, K. H.; Desfrançois, C.

    2007-12-01

    Protonated and anionic artemisinin in the gas phase have respectively been studied by infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and by anion photoelectron spectroscopy. Comparison of the measured IRMPD spectrum with calculated spectra of various conformations showed that the two lowest-energy protonated structures, both corresponding to protonation at the C dbnd O 14 carbonyl site, were observed experimentally. The calculations also indicated that the peroxide bridge in artemisinin is only slightly modified by protonation. Additionally, stable, intact (parent) artemisinin radical anions have been obtained for the first time in the gas phase and the photoelectron spectrum supports the computational finding that the excess electron is mainly localized on the σ ∗ orbital of the peroxide bond. The vertical detachment energy and adiabatic electron affinity, calculated at the MP2/6-31+G ∗ level, are in good agreement with the experimental data and the O-O distance is calculated to be stretched by more than 50% in the anion.

  7. Three-dimensional imaging and uptake of the anticancer drug combretastatin in cell spheroids and photoisomerization in gels with multiphoton excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Kathrin M.; Bisby, Roger H.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Hadfield, John A.; Haycock, John W.; Parker, Anthony W.

    2015-07-01

    The uptake of E-combretastatins, potential prodrugs of the anticancer Z-isomers, into multicellular spheroids has been imaged by intrinsic fluorescence in three dimensions using two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging with 625-nm ultrafast femtosecond laser pulses. Uptake is initially observed at the spheroid periphery but extends to the spheroid core within 30 min. Using agarose gels as a three-dimensional model, the conversion of Z(trans)→E(cis) via two-photon photoisomerization is demonstrated and the location of this photochemical process may be precisely selected within the micron scale in all three dimensions at depths up to almost 2 mm. We discuss these results for enhanced tissue penetration at longer near-infrared wavelengths for cancer therapy and up to three-photon excitation and imaging using 930-nm laser pulses with suitable combretastatin analogs.

  8. Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Vibrational Populations Monitored after Electronic and Infrared Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Werncke, W.; Kozich, V.; Dreyer, J.

    2008-11-14

    Pathways of vibrational energy flow in molecules with an intramolecular hydrogen bond are studied after intramolecular proton transfer reactions as well as after infrared excitation of the O-H stretching vibration which is coupled to this hydrogen bond.

  9. Calculating singlet excited states: Comparison with fast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy of coumarins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.; Wriglesworth, Alisdair; Uroos, Maliha; Calladine, James A.; Murphy, Thomas S.; Hamilton, Michelle; Clark, Ian P.; Towrie, Michael; Dowden, James; Besley, Nicholas A.; George, Michael W.

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to the ground state, the calculation of the infrared (IR) spectroscopy of molecular singlet excited states represents a substantial challenge. Here, we use the structural IR fingerprint of the singlet excited states of a range of coumarin dyes to assess the accuracy of density functional theory based methods for the calculation of excited state IR spectroscopy. It is shown that excited state Kohn-Sham density functional theory provides a high level of accuracy and represents an alternative approach to time-dependent density functional theory for simulating the IR spectroscopy of singlet excited states.

  10. Bleed-through and photobleaching correction in multiphoton FRET microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Masilamani; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2001-04-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy provides a tool to visualize the protein with high spatial and temporal resolution. In multi-photon FRET microscopy one experiences considerably less photobleaching compared to one-photon excitation since the illumination is the diffraction limited spot and the excitation is infrared-pulsed laser light. Because of the spectral overlap involved in the selection of the fluorophore pair for FRET imaging, the spectral bleed-through signal in the FRET channel is unavoidable. We describe in this paper the development of dedicated software to correct the bleed-through signal due to donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules. We used living cells expressed with BFP-RFP (DsRed)-C/EBP(alpha) proteins in the nucleus. We acquired images of different combinations like donor alone, acceptor alone, and both acceptor and donor under similar conditions. We statistically evaluated the percentage of bleed-through signal from one channel to the other based on the overlap areas of the spectra. We then reconstructed the images after applying the correction. Characterization of multi-photon FRET imaging system taking into account the intensity, dwell time, concentration of fluorophore pairs, objective lens and the excitation wavelength are described in this paper.

  11. Microbeam-integrated multiphoton imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Bigelow, Alan W.; Geard, Charles R.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Brenner, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has been added to the array of imaging techniques at the endstation for the Microbeam II cell irradiator at Columbia University’s Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF). This three-dimensional (3D), laser-scanning microscope functions through multiphoton excitation, providing an enhanced imaging routine during radiation experiments with tissuelike samples, such as small living animals and organisms. Studies at RARAF focus on radiation effects; hence, this multiphoton microscope was designed to observe postirradiation cellular dynamics. This multiphoton microscope was custom designed into an existing Nikon Eclipse E600-FN research fluorescence microscope on the irradiation platform. Design details and biology applications using this enhanced 3D-imaging technique at RARAF are reviewed. PMID:19123569

  12. Combined electron capture and infrared multiphoton dissociation for multistage MS/MS in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Kristina; Chalmers, Michael J; Quinn, John P; McFarland, Melinda A; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Marshall, Alan G

    2003-07-01

    We have mounted a permanent on-axis dispenser cathode electron source inside the magnet bore of a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. This configuration allows electron capture dissociation (ECD) to be performed reliably on a millisecond time scale. We have also implemented an off-axis laser geometry that enables simultaneous access to ECD and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD). Optimum performance of both fragmentation techniques is maintained. The analytical utility of performing either ECD or IRMPD on a given precursor ion population is demonstrated by structural characterization of several posttranslationally modified peptides: IRMPD of phosphorylated peptides results in few backbone (b- and y-type) cleavages, and product ion spectra are dominated by neutral loss of H3PO4. In contrast, ECD provides significantly more backbone (c- and z*-type) cleavages without loss of H3PO4. For N-glycosylated tryptic peptides, IRMPD causes extensive cleavage of the glycosidic bonds, providing structural information about the glycans. ECD cleaves all backbone bonds (except the N-terminal side of proline) in a 3-kDa glycopeptide with no saccharide loss. However, only a charge-reduced radical species and some side chain losses are observed following ECD of a 5-kDa glycopeptide from the same protein. An MS3 experiment involving IR laser irradiation of the charge-reduced species formed by electron capture results in extensive dissociation into c- and z-type fragment ions. Mass-selective external ion accumulation is essential for the structural characterization of these low-abundance (modified) peptides. PMID:12964777

  13. Combined infrared multiphoton dissociation and electron capture dissociation with a hollow electron beam in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsybin, Youri O; Witt, Matthias; Baykut, Gökhan; Kjeldsen, Frank; Håkansson, Per

    2003-01-01

    An electron injection system based on an indirectly heated ring-shaped dispenser cathode has been developed and installed in a 7 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. This new hardware design allows high-rate electron capture dissociation (ECD) to be carried out by a hollow electron beam coaxial with the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) trap. Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) can also be performed with an on-axis IR-laser beam passing through a hole at the centre of the dispenser cathode. Electron and photon irradiation times of the order of 100 ms are required for efficient ECD and IRMPD, respectively. As ECD and IRMPD generate fragments of different types (mostly c, z and b, y, respectively), complementary structural information that improves the characterization of peptides and proteins by FTICR mass spectrometry can be obtained. The developed technique enables the consecutive or simultaneous use of the ECD and IRMPD methods within a single FTICR experimental sequence and on the same ensemble of trapped ions in multistage tandem (MS/MS/MS or MS(n)) mass spectrometry. Flexible changing between ECD and IRMPD should present advantages for the analysis of protein digests separated by liquid chromatography prior to FTICRMS. Furthermore, ion activation by either electron or laser irradiation prior to, as well as after, dissociation by IRMPD or ECD increases the efficiency of ion fragmentation, including the w-type fragment ion formation, and improves sequencing of peptides with multiple disulfide bridges. The developed instrumental configuration is essential for combined ECD and IRMPD on FTICR mass spectrometers with limited access into the ICR trap. PMID:12872281

  14. Probing collective excitations in helium nanodroplets: Observation of phonon wings in the infrared spectrum of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, S.; Wollny, G.; von Haeften, K.; Havenith, M.

    2007-03-01

    The authors have recorded the ν3 infrared spectrum of methane in helium nanodroplets using our cw infrared optical parametric oscillator. In a previous paper, Nauta and Miller [Chem. Phys. Lett. 350, 225 (2001)] reported the observation of the monomer rovibrational transitions of methane in helium nanodroplets. Here, they report the observation of additional absorption bands in the frequency range between 2990 and 3070cm-1 blueshifted compared to the monomer transitions. They attribute these absorption features to phonon wings of individual rovibrational transitions, i.e., the simultaneous excitation of collective excitation modes of the quantum fluid and the rovibrational excitation of the methane monomer in the helium nanodroplet.

  15. Conformational changes in matrix-isolated 6-methoxyindole: Effects of the thermal and infrared light excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Jesus, A. J.; Reva, I.; Araujo-Andrade, C.; Fausto, R.

    2016-03-01

    Conformational changes induced thermally or upon infrared excitation of matrix-isolated 6-methoxyindole were investigated. Narrowband near-infrared excitation of the first overtone of the N-H stretching vibration of each one of the two identified conformers is found to induce a selective large-scale conversion of the pumped conformer into the other one. This easily controllable bidirectional process consists in the intramolecular reorientation of the methoxy group and allowed a full assignment of the infrared spectra of the two conformers. Matrices with different conformational compositions prepared by narrow-band irradiations were subsequently used to investigate the effects of both thermal and broadband infrared excitations on the conformational mixtures. Particular attention is given to the influence of the matrix medium (Ar vs. Xe) and conformational effects of exposition of the sample to the spectrometer light source during the measurements.

  16. High multi-photon visible upconversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals: A photon avalanche of Er{sup 3+} induced by 980 nm excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongjin; Song, Zhiguo Li, Chen; Wan, Ronghua; Qiu, Jianbei; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Qi

    2013-12-02

    Under 980 nm excitation, high multi-photon upconversion (UC) emission from the {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}/{sup 4}S{sub 3/2} (green) and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} (red) levels of Er{sup 3+} ions were observed from Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals. These high-energy excited states were populated by a three to ten photon UC process conditionally, which depended on the pump power density and the Er{sup 3+} ion doping concentration, characterizing as a hetero-looping enhanced energy transfer avalanche UC process. UC emission lifetime and Raman analysis suggest that the unusual UC phenomena are initiated by the new and intense phonon vibration modes of BiOCl lattices due to Er{sup 3+} ions doping.

  17. Investigating the 3.3 micron infrared fluorescence from naphthalene following ultraviolet excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Richard M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1994-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) type molecules are proposed as the carriers of the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands. Detailed studies of the 3.3 micrometer infrared emission features from naphthalene, the simplest PAH, following ultraviolet laser excitation are used in the interpretation of the 3.29 micrometer (3040 cm(sup -1)) UIR band. A time-resolved Fourier transform spectrometer is used to record the infrared emission spectrum of gas-phase naphthalene subsequent to ultraviolet excitation facilitated by an excimer laser operated at either 193 nm or 248 nm. The emission spectra differ significantly from the absorption spectrum in the same spectral region. Following 193 nm excitation the maximum in the emission profile is red-shifted 45 cm(sup -1) relative to the absorption maximum; a 25 cm(sup -1) red-shift is observed after 248 nm excitation. The red-shifting of the emission spectrum is reduced as collisional and radiative relaxation removes energy from the highly vibrationally excited molecules. Coupling between the various vibrational modes is thought to account for the differences between absorption and emission spectra. Strong visible emission is also observed following ultraviolet excitation. Visible emission may play an important role in the rate of radiative relaxation, which according to the interstellar PAH hypothesis occurs only by the slow emission of infrared photons. Studying the visible emission properties of PAH type molecules may be useful in the interpretation of the DIB's observed in absorption.

  18. Excitation of far-infrared lines of OH and maser pumping efficiency in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thai-Q-Tung; Dinh-v-Trung; Nguyen-Q-Rieu; Bujarrabal, V.; Le Bertre, T.; Gerard, E.

    1998-03-01

    We present the results obtained with a radiative transfer model to investigate the excitation of OH molecules. Fluxes of far-infrared rotational lines of OH are calculated in terms of a radiatively excited envelope and of a radiative transfer model including collisional and radiative excitation. The agreement with the OH far-infrared lines observed with ISO is satisfactory. The 34.6 mu m line is found to be in absorption as observed. We also predict that the 53.3 mu m line should be seen in absorption and also contributes to the maser pumping process. Maser pumping efficiencies are estimated from the model and compared to the values determined from recent OH far-infrared observations with ISO and OH maser data.

  19. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  20. Stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence reveals a new method of melanoma imaging for dermatologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Lian, Christine; Ma, Jie; Yu, Jingyi; Gu, Zetong; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser, is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. SMPAF images of melanin in a mouse hair and a formalin fixed mouse melanoma were compared with conventional multiphoton fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) images and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) images, all of which were acquired at an excitation wavelength of 920 nm, to further prove the effectiveness of SMPAF in detecting melanin. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection to MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF can be a promising technology to enable melanoma imaging for dermatologists.

  1. Non-destructive Testing by Infrared Thermography Under Random Excitation and ARMA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Candoré, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Photothermal thermography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method, which has many applications in the field of control and characterization of thin materials. This technique is usually implemented under CW or flash excitation. Such excitations are not adapted for control of fragile materials or for multi-frequency analysis. To allow these analyses, in this article, the use of a new control mode is proposed: infrared thermography under random excitation and auto regressive moving average analysis. First, the principle of this NDT method is presented. Then, the method is shown to permit detection, with low energy constraints, of detachments situated in mural paintings.

  2. Excitation of Far-Infrared Lines of OH and Maser Pumping Efficiency in Circumstellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thai-Q-Tung; Dinh-v-Trung; Nguyen-Q-Rieu; Bujarrabal, V.; Le Bertre, T.; Gerard, E.

    We present the results obtained with a radiative transfer model to investigate the excitation of OH molecules. Maser pumping efficiencies are estimated from the model and compared to the value calculated using recent OH far-infrared (FIR) observations with ISO and OH maser data.

  3. In vivo stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence imaging of melanin in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; Abbas, Saleh; Lowe, Jared; Sierra, Heidy; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin because the activation and excitation can be a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser. Our previous work has demonstrated the melanin SMPAF images in sepia melanin, mouse hair, and mouse skin. In this study, we show the feasibility of using SMPAF to detect melanin in vivo. in vivo melanin SMPAF images of normal skin and benign nevus are demonstrated. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection than MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF is a promising technology to enable early detection of melanoma for dermatologists.

  4. Light-Harvesting Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Inactivation of Bacteria under Both Visible and Near-Infrared Excitations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Cao, Xian; Ahmadov, Ms Tevhide Ozkaya; Ding, Rui; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Peng

    2016-04-01

    We report a hybrid singlet oxygen production system, where strong resonance coupling between plasmonic nanoparticles and photosensitizing molecules results in exceptionally high singlet oxygen production under both visible light and near-infrared light excitation, even for the photosensitizing molecules without near-infrared absorption. The light-harvesting property of the plasmon-photosensitizer hybrids leads to an enhanced, broad-spectrum photodynamic inactivation of bacteria under a wide range of excitations, including that with near-infrared light. PMID:26892611

  5. Thermal imaging method to visualize a hidden painting thermally excited by far infrared radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davin, T.; Wang, X.; Chabane, A.; Pawelko, R.; Guida, G.; Serio, B.; Hervé, P.

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of hidden painting is a major issue for cultural heritage. In this paper, a non-destructive active infrared thermographic technique was considered to reveal paintings covered by a lime layer. An extended infrared spectral range radiation was used as the excitation source. The external long wave infrared energy source delivered to the surface is then propagated through the material until it encounters a painting zone. Due to several thermal effects, the sample surface then presents non-uniformity patterns. Using a high sensitive infrared camera, the presence of covered pigments can thus be highlighted by the analysis of the non-stationary phenomena. Reconstituted thermal contrast images of mural samples covered by a lime layer are shown.

  6. Direct Visualization of Excited-State Symmetry Breaking Using Ultrafast Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dereka, Bogdan; Rosspeintner, Arnulf; Li, Zhiquan; Liska, Robert; Vauthey, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Most symmetric quadrupolar molecules designed for two-photon absorption behave as dipolar molecules in the S1 electronic excited state. This is usually explained by a breakup of the symmetry in the excited state. However, the origin of this process and its dynamics are still not fully understood. Here, excited-state symmetry breaking in a quadrupolar molecule with a D-π-A-π-D motif, where D and A are electron donating and accepting units, is observed in real time using ultrafast transient infrared absorption spectroscopy. The nature of the relaxed S1 state was found to strongly depend on the solvent polarity: (1) in nonpolar solvents, it is symmetric and quadrupolar; (2) in weakly polar media, the quadrupolar state observed directly after excitation transforms to a symmetry broken S1 state with one arm bearing more excitation than the other; and (3) in highly polar solvents, the excited state evolves further to a purely dipolar S1 state with the excitation localized entirely on one arm. The time scales associated with the transitions between these states coincide with those of solvation dynamics, indicating that symmetry breaking is governed by solvent fluctuations. PMID:26986957

  7. Controlling electron transfer in condensed phase with bond-specific infrared excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delor, Milan; Scattergood, Paul A.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Keane, Theo; Greetham, Gregory M.; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W.; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2015-08-01

    Using an ultrafast electronic-vibrational pulse-sequence, we show that the outcome of light-induced ET can be radically altered by mode-specific infrared (IR) excitation of vibrations which are coupled to the ET-pathway. IR-control is particularly challenging in condensed phase systems due to the ultrafast timescales involved, in particular rapid intramolecular vibrational redistribution. We demonstrate how an IR-pulse following UV-excitation perturbs nuclear-electronic (vibronic) interactions within a donor-bridge-acceptor system similar in design to those utilized in (bio)chemical light-harvesting, and alters charge-transport pathways and product state yields.

  8. Infrared multiple photon dissociation of chloromethyltrifluorosilane.

    PubMed

    Koshlyakov, Pavel V; Gorelik, Sergey R; Chesnokov, Evgeniy N; Aseev, Oleg S; Rakhymzhan, Asylkhan A; Petrov, Alexander K

    2009-01-01

    Infrared multiphoton absorption and dissociation of chloromethyltrifluorosilane molecules under the action of pulsed transversely excited atmospheric pressure CO2 laser were experimentally studied. Dissociation products were analyzed. The dissociation proceeds via chlorine atom transfer from carbon to silicone. High degrees of silicon isotope separation were achieved. The presence of alpha-chlorine atom in a silicon organic compound brings about a significant improvement in multiple photon dissociation characteristics and an essential increase in isotopic selectivity. PMID:19320849

  9. Clinical multiphoton and CARS microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Weinigel, M.; Darvin, M. E.; Lademann, J.; König, K.

    2012-03-01

    We report on clinical CARS imaging of human skin in vivo with the certified hybrid multiphoton tomograph CARSDermaInspect. The CARS-DermaInspect provides simultaneous imaging of non-fluorescent intradermal lipid and water as well as imaging of two-photon excited fluorescence from intrinsic molecules. Two different excitation schemes for CARS imaging have been realized: In the first setup, a combination of fs oscillator and optical parametric oscillator provided fs-CARS pump and Stokes pulses, respectively. In the second setup a fs oscillator was combined with a photonic crystal fiber which provided a broadband spectrum. A spectral range out of the broadband-spectrum was selected and used for CARS excitation in combination with the residual fs-oscillator output. In both setups, in addition to CARS, single-beam excitation was used for imaging of two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation signals. Both CARS-excitation systems were successfully used for imaging of lipids inside the skin in vivo.

  10. Mid-infrared ultrafast laser pulses induced third harmonic generation in nitrogen molecules on an excited state

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Li, Ziting; Zeng, Bin; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We report on generation of third harmonic from nitrogen molecules on the excited state with a weak driver laser pulse at a mid-infrared wavelength. The excited nitrogen molecules are generated using a circularly polarized intense femtosecond pulse which produces energetic electrons by photoionization to realize collisional excitation of nitrogen molecules. Furthermore, since the third harmonic is generated using a pump-probe scheme, it enables investigation of the excited-state dynamics of nitrogen molecules produced under different conditions. We also perform a comparative investigation in excited argon atoms, revealing different decay dynamics of the molecules and atoms from the excited states in femtosecond laser induced filaments. PMID:26522886

  11. Multiphoton Microwave Ionization of Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurian, Joshua Houston

    This thesis describes a series of multiphoton microwave experiments on Rydberg atoms when the microwave frequency is much greater than the classical Kepler frequency of the excited atoms. A new kHz pulse repetition frequency dye laser system was constructed for Rydberg lithium excitation with a linewidth as narrow as 3 GHz. This new laser system is used for first experiments of multiphoton microwave ionization of Rydberg lithium approaching the photoionization limit using 17 and 36 GHz microwave pulses. A multi-channel quantum defect model is presented that well describes the experimental results, indicating that these results are due to the coherent coupling of many atomic levels both above and below the classical ionization limit. Finally, preliminary results of measuring the final-state distributions of high lying Rydberg states after 17 GHz microwave pulses are presented.

  12. New multimodal multiphoton imaging and spectroscopy apparatus for dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingqiu; Lee, Anthony; Wang, Hequn; Zhao, Jianhua; Tang, Shuo; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2010-02-01

    We present the construction of a new multimodal, multiphoton spectroscopic and imaging instrument for in vivo patient use. Utilizing a tunable femtosecond laser, we are able to simultaneously acquire two-photon excited fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and confocal reflectance images at half video rate, while concurrently acquiring two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation spectra.

  13. Multi-excitation near infrared (NIR) spectral fluorescence imaging using organic fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Koyama, Yoshinori; Barrett, Tristan; Hama, Yukihiro; Choyke, Peter L.

    2008-02-01

    The ability to obtain multi-color fluorescent imaging in vivo simultaneously using multi-targeted imaging probes could be of potential benefit from both a research and a clinical perspective. However, the simultaneous acquisition of more than 2 separate organic fluorophores usually requires more than one excitation source, since a single excitation source may not optimally excite all the fluorophores. In this study, we employed a multi-excitation approach in order to acquire optimized images with multiple near infrared (NIR) organic fluorophores at the same time. Using 3 sets of excitation filters (595+/-20nm, 640+/-25nm, 688+/-17nm) to acquire 3 distinct spectra and spectral unmixing software (CRi, Woburn, MA), it was possible to resolve the emission spectra of each of the NIR fluorophores using commercial software (Nuance, CRi, Woburn, MA) To demonstrate the utility of this approach 2 mouse models were investigated; In one model, mice bearing four implanted malignancies were injected with a cocktail of 3 fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibodies, each with its own distinct NIR fluorophore. In the second model five different lymph node drainage basins were imaged with 5-color dendrimer-based lymphatic imaging agents tagged with 5 different NIR fluorophores. We successfully detected each of the targeted tumors in the first model and all of the lymph nodes by their distinct color in the second model; neither of which would have been possible using the single excitation method. In conclusion, multi-excitation NIR spectral fluorescence imaging is feasible in a reasonable time frame and opens the possibility for in vivo immunohistochemical imaging (IHCi).

  14. Ultrafast excited state dynamics of Pt(II) chromophores bearing multiple infrared absorbers.

    PubMed

    Glik, Elena A; Kinayyigit, Solen; Ronayne, Kate L; Towrie, Michael; Sazanovich, Igor V; Weinstein, Julia A; Castellano, Felix N

    2008-08-01

    The paper reports the synthesis, structural characterization, electrochemistry, ultrafast time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy associated with two independent d (8) square planar Pt(II) diimine chromophores, Pt(dnpebpy)Cl 2 ( 1) and Pt(dnpebpy)(C[triple bond]Cnaph) 2 ( 2), where dnpebpy = 4,4'-(CO 2CH 2- (t) Bu) 2-2,2'-bipyridine and CCnaph = naphthylacetylide. The neopentyl ester substitutions provided markedly improved complex solubility relative to the corresponding ethyl ester which facilitates synthetic elaboration as well as spectroscopic investigations. Following 400 nm pulsed laser excitation in CH 2Cl 2, the 23 cm (-1) red shift in the nu C=O vibrations in 1 are representative of a complex displaying a lowest charge-transfer-to-diimine (CT) excited state. The decay kinetics in 1 are composed of two time constants assigned to vibrational cooling of the (3)CT excited-state concomitant with its decay to the ground state (tau = 2.2 +/- 0.4 ps), and to cooling of the formed vibrationally hot ground electronic state (tau = 15.5 +/- 4.0 ps); we note that an assignment of the latter to a ligand field state cannot be excluded. Ultrafast TA data quantitatively support these assignments yielding an excited-state lifetime of 2.7 +/- 0.4 ps for the (3)CT excited-state of 1 and could not detect any longer-lived species. The primary intention of this study was to develop a Pt (II) complex ( 2) bearing dual infrared spectroscopic tags (C[triple bond]C attached to the metal and CO (ester) attached to the diimine ligand) to independently track the movement of charge density in different segments of the molecule following pulsed light excitation. Femtosecond laser excitation of 2 in CH 2Cl 2 at 400 nm simultaneously induces a red-shift in both the nu C=O (-30 cm (-1)) and the nu C[triple bond]C (-61 cm (-1)) vibrations. The TRIR data in 2 are consistent with a charge transfer assignment, and the significant decrease of the energy of the nu C[triple bond]C vibration suggests a considerable contribution from the acetylide ligands in the highest occupied molecular orbital. Therefore, we assign the lowest energy optical transitions in 2 as a combination of metal-to-ligand and ligand-to-ligand charge transfers. The excited-state of 2 is emissive at RT, with an emission maximum at 715 nm, quantum yield of 0.0012, and lifetime of 23 ns. PMID:18597448

  15. Multiphoton excitation and ionization by elliptically polarized, intense short laser pulses: Recognizing multielectron dynamics and doorway states in C{sub 60} vs Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Shchatsinin, I.; Ritze, H.-H.; Schulz, C. P.; Hertel, I. V.

    2009-05-15

    Ionization and fragmentation of C{sub 60} fullerenes are studied by time-of-flight mass spectrometry, in elliptically polarized femtosecond laser fields at 797 nm of intensities I{sub 0}=(0.5-4.3)x10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. Xe atoms serve as a test case. We derive a qualitative theory describing such polarization studies. It turns out that polarization dependence can very sensitively distinguish single active electron (SAE) and multiple active electrons dynamics. In the case of Xe a clear signature of SAE dynamics is observed, with very pronounced changes in the ion yield as a function of ellipticity, indicative of N=5-8 and 18-22 photon processes for Xe{sup +} and Xe{sup 2+}, respectively. In contrast, only a moderate polarization dependence is observed in the C{sub 60} case, although at least 5 h{nu} photons at 797 nm are needed to generate C{sub 60}{sup +} and additional 11 for C{sub 60}{sup 2+}. At lower intensities, a moderate reduction in the ion yield for circular polarization establishes a two-photon SAE absorption process, connected with the key role of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO)+1(t{sub 1g}) as 'doorway state'. The absence of any polarization effect at 399 nm corroborates this finding. At high intensities enhanced fragmentation is observed, which is tentatively attributed to returning loops of electron trajectories by the combined action of the C{sub 60}{sup +} field and the circularly polarized laser field - in contrast to conventional wisdom that linear polarization should lead to an enhanced recolliding electron yield. No sign of a pronounced multiphoton polarization signature with five and more photons is seen for C{sub 60} which would be predicted by the SAE picture - although the slopes of the ion yield as a function of intensity are given by the corresponding power laws {proportional_to}I{sub 0}{sup N}. This is taken as clear evidence of multielectron dynamics after reaching the doorway state.

  16. Multiphoton absorption is probably not the primary threshold damage mechanism for femtosecond laser pulse exposures in the retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2004-07-01

    Laser induced breakdown has the lowest energy threshold in the femtosecond domain, and is responsible for production of threshold ocular lesions. It has been proposed that multiphoton absorption may also contribute to ultrashort-pulse tissue damage, based on the observation that 33 fs, 810 nm pulse laser exposures caused more DNA breakage in cultured, primary RPE cells, compared to CW laser exposures delivering the same average power. Subsequent studies, demonstrating two-photon excitation of fluorescence in isolated RPE melanosomes, appeared to support the role of multiphoton absorption, but mainly at suprathreshold irradiance. Additional experiments have not found a consistent difference in the DNA strand breakage produced by ultrashort and CW threshold exposures. DNA damage appears to be dependent on the amount of melanin pigmentation in the cells, rather than the pulsewidth of the laser; current studies have found that, at threshold, CW and ultrashort pulse laser exposures produce almost identical amounts of DNA breakage. A theoretical analysis suggest that the number of photons delivered to the RPE melanosome during a single 33-fsec pulse at the ED50 irradiance is insufficient to produce multiphoton excitation. This result appears to exclude the melanosome as a locus for two- or three-photon excitation; however, a structure with a larger effective absorption cross-section than the melanosome may interact with the laser pulses. One possibility is that the nuclear chromatin acts as a unit absorber of photons resulting in DNA damage, but this does not explain the near equivalence of ultrashort and CW exposures in the comet assay model. This equivalence indicated that multiphoton absorption is not a major contributor to the ultrashort pulse laser damage threshold in the near infrared.

  17. Multiphoton harvesting metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quah, Hong Sheng; Chen, Weiqiang; Schreyer, Martin K.; Yang, Hui; Wong, Ming Wah; Ji, Wei; Vittal, Jagadese J.

    2015-08-01

    Multiphoton upconversion is a process where two or more photons are absorbed simultaneously to excite an electron to an excited state and, subsequently, the relaxation of electron gives rise to the emission of a photon with frequency greater than those of the absorbed photons. Materials possessing such property attracted attention due to applications in biological imaging, photodynamic therapy, three-dimensional optical data storage, frequency-upconverted lasing and optical power limiting. Here we report four-photon upconversion in metal-organic frameworks containing the ligand, trans, trans-9,10-bis(4-pyridylethenyl)anthracene. The ligand has a symmetrical acceptor-π-donor-π-acceptor structure and a singlet biradical electronic ground state, which boosted its multiphoton absorption cross-sections. We demonstrate that the upconversion efficiency can be enhanced by Förster resonance energy transfer within host-guest metal-organic frameworks consisting of encapsulated high quantum yielding guest molecules. Using these strategies, metal-organic framework materials, which can exhibit frequency-upconverted photoluminescence excited by simultaneous multiphoton absorption, can be rationally designed and synthesized.

  18. Determining two-photon absorption cross sections via nonresonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, John B.; Chandrasekharan, Nirmala; Cullum, Brian M.

    2007-09-01

    Multiphoton excitation of exogenous dyes and endogenous biochemical species has been used extensively for tissue diagnosis by fluorescence spectroscopy. Unfortunately, the majority of endogenous biochemical chromophores have low quantum yields, less than 0.2, therefore determining two-photon cross sections of weakly luminescencing molecules is difficult using two-photon fluorescence spectroscopy. Accurate determination of two-photon cross sections of these biochemicals could provide insight into fluorescence signal reduction caused by the absorption of excitation energy by non-target intracellular species. Non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS) is a novel technique we have developed for condensed matter measurements that has the potential for accurately determining two-photon absorption cross-sections of chemicals with small or non-existant fluorescence quantum yields. In this technique, near infrared light is used to generate an ultrasonic signal following a non-resonant two-photon excitation process. This ultrasonic wave is directly related to the non-radative relaxation of the chromophore of interest and is measured using a contact piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer. The signal from the ultrasonic transducer can then be used to calculate two-photon absorption cross sections. This paper will describe the validation of this technique by measuring the two-photon absorption cross- sections of well characterized chromophores such as rhodamine B and coumarin 1 in solution as well as riboflavin in a gelatin tissue phantom.

  19. Multi-photon processes in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Baodong; Hu, Shu; Li, Hui; Shi, Zhe; Cai, Xianglong; Guo, Jingwei; Tan, Yannan; Liu, Wanfa; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    Achieving population inversion through multi-photon cascade pumping is almost always difficult, and most laser medium work under 1-photon excitation mechanism. But for alkali atoms such as cesium, relatively large absorption cross sections of several low, cascading energy levels enable them properties such as up conversion. Here we carried out research on two-photon excitation alkali fluorescence. Two photons of near infrared region are used to excite alkali atoms to n 2 D5/2, n 2 D3/2 or higher energy levels, then the blue fluorescence of (n+1) 2 P3/2,(n+1) 2 P1/2-->n 2 S1/2 are observed. Different pumping paths are tried and by the recorded spectra, transition routes of cesium are deducted and concluded. Finally the possibility of two-photon style DPALs (diode pumped alkali laser) are discussed, such alkali lasers can give output wavelengths in the shorter end of visual spectroscopy (400-460 nm) and are expected to get application in underwater communication and material laser processing.

  20. Energetics and spin- and Λ-doublet selectivity in the infrared multiphoton dissociation DN3 --> DN(X 3Sigma - , a 1Δ)+N2(X 1Sigma + g): Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, John C.; Casassa, Michael P.; King, David S.

    1988-08-01

    Multiphoton vibrational excitation of deuterated hydrazoic acid, DN3, by a CO2 laser (I=10 GW/cm2) leads to dissociation forming DN in both X 3Σ- (spin forbidden) and a 1Δ (spin allowed) electronic states. Under collisionless conditions, the nascent DN fragments were probed via laser induced fluorescence, to determine initial product state distributions. The DN(X 3Σ-) molecules are formed predominantly in the symmetric F1 and F3 spin-rotation states with little population (≤6%) in the antisymmetric F2 levels. There is no significant population (<3%) in excited DN(3Σ-) vibrational levels. The distribution of rotational states is Boltzmann-like, characterized by a rotational ``temperature'' of about 920 K for the F1, F3 states and 500 K for F2 levels. Doppler profiles showed a large kinetic energy release of about 10 100 cm-1 total in the triplet channel. The DN(1Δ) products are formed preferentially in the symmetric Δ(A'), e-labeled lambda doublet levels: Δ(A')/Δ(A`)=1.44. The DN(1Δ) is formed with no vibrational excitation (<2%); the rotational states are populated Boltzmann-like with a rotational ``temperature'' of 425 K. Doppler profiles give a total kinetic energy of about 1500 cm-1 in this channel. These observations give information about the distribution of energy in the reactant, the location of the barriers to dissociation, and the geometry of the transition states. Alexander, Werner, and Dagdigian (accompanying article) show that the observed DN(3Σ-) spin- and DN(1Δ) Λ-doublet selectivities reflect the symmetry properties of a planar transition state and that the low degree of DN(3Σ-) rotational and vibrational excitation is also expected from the transition state geometry.

  1. 1064 nm Deep near-infrared (NIR) excited raman microspectroscopy for studying photolabile organisms.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masahiro; Sugiura, Miwa; Hayashi, Hidenori; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2011-05-01

    We have constructed a 1064 nm deep near-infrared (NIR) excited multichannel Raman microspectrometer using an InP/InGaAsP multichannel detector. This microspectrometer achieves high sensitivity suitable for in vivo measurements of single living cells with lateral resolution of 0.7 μm and depth resolution of 3.1 μm. It has been applied to the structural analysis of living cyanobacterial cells, well-known model organisms for photosynthesis research, which are too photolabile to be measured with visible laser excitation. High signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) Raman spectra have been obtained from carotenoid, chlorophyll α, and phycocyanin in a single living cyanobacterial cell with no appreciable interference from autofluorescence or photodamage. Sub-micrometer mapping of Raman intensities provides clear distribution images of the three pigments inside the cell. PMID:21513590

  2. Mechanism of oxidative stress generation in cells by localized near-infrared femtosecond laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Chan, Kam Tai; Kong, Siu Kai; Lee, Rebecca Kit Ying

    2009-12-01

    We examined the effect of femtosecond (fs) and continuous wave (CW) lasers at near-infrared range on the creation of reactive oxygen species in a human liver cancer cell line. By controlling the mitochondria electron transport chain (ETC), it was found that a major part of the oxidative stress was generated by the laser induced thermal effect on the mitochondria while the remaining part was created by direct free electron liberation by the fs pulses, which could be observed after breaking the ETC. The study helps clarify the major effects produced on animal cells when excited by fs lasers.

  3. Application of liposome-encapsulated ceramic phoshpors for cancer cell imaging under near infrared excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Hirotada; Tokuzen, Kimikazu; Otsuka, Hiroko; Soga, Kohei; Tashiro, Fumio

    2010-06-01

    Bioimaging with fluorescent probes is used as an invaluable tool in a biomedical field both in vivo and in vitro. However, organic dyes have some problems such as photo-breaching and cytotoxicity due to short wavelength with high quantum energy. Recently, a new approach using rare-earth-doped ceramic nanophosphors (RED-CNP) shows that fluorescence from RED-CNP in both visible (upconversion) and near infrared (NIR) wavelength region under NIR excitation is available for bioimaging. In order to efficiently introduce the RED-CNP into cancer cells, in this study we have developed a lipid nano-particles of liposome-encapsulated erbium (Er) ion-doped Y2O3 (lipo-Y2O3). Cationic lipo-Y2O3 could clearly visualize the intracellular region of human hepatocellular carcinoma Huh-7 cells by a fluorescence microscope measurements equipped with near-infrared excitation source scanning. The results imply that the lipo-Y2O3 would potentially be useful material for imaging of cancer cells. The embedded Y2O3 in the liposome having cancer-specific ligands and/or antibodies on its surface should have a great potential for cancer cell imaging in general in living subjects.

  4. Multiphoton tomography to detect chemo- and biohazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    In vivo high-resolution multiphoton/CARS tomography provides optical biopsies with 300 nm lateral resolution with chemical fingerprints. Thousands of volunteers and patients have been investigated for early cancer diagnosis, evaluation of anti-ageing cosmetic products, and changes of cellular metabolism by UV exposure and decreased oxygen supply. The skin as the outermost and largest organ is also the major target of CB agents. Current UV-based sensors are useful for bio-aerosol sensing but not for evaluating exposed in vivo skin. Here we evaluate the use of 4D multiphoton/CARS tomographs based on near infrared femtosecond laser radiation, time-correlated single photon counting (FLIM) and white light generation by photonic crystal fibers to detect bio- and chemohazards in human in vivo skin using twophoton fluorescence, SHG, and Raman signals.

  5. Comparative study on atomic and molecular Rydberg-state excitation in strong infrared laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hang; Zuo, Wanlong; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Haifeng; Jin, Mingxing; Ding, Dajun; Hu, Shilin; Chen, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Rydberg-state excitation of atoms in strong infrared laser fields provides a new complementary aspect of the perspective of atom-strong field interactions. In this article, we perform an experimental and theoretical study on the corresponding process of diatomic molecules, N2 and O2. We show that neutral molecules can also survive strong 800-nm laser fields in high Rydberg states, while their behavior is remarkably different in comparison with their companion atoms, Ar and Xe. The Rydberg excitation of N2 generally behaves similarly to Ar, while that of O2 is more significantly suppressed than the ionization compared to Xe in a high intensity region, which can be understood in the frame of a semiclassical picture, together with their different structures of molecular orbitals. However, distinct quantum features in the Rydberg excitation processes that are apparently beyond the semiclassical picture have been identified, i.e., the less suppressed probability of O2 at low intensity and the oscillation behavior of the ratio between N2 and Ar, indicating that our understanding of the relevant physics is still far from complete.

  6. Multiphoton tomography of intratissue tattoo nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2012-02-01

    Most of today's intratissue tattoo pigments are unknown nanoparticles. So far, there was no real control of their use due to the absence of regulations. Some of the tattoo pigments contain carcinogenic amines e.g. azo pigment Red 22. Nowadays, the European Union starts to control the administration of tattoo pigments. There is an interest to obtain information on the intratissue distribution, their interaction with living cells and the extracellular matrix, and the mechanisms behind laser tattoo removal. Multiphoton tomographs are novel biosafety and imaging tools that can provide such information non-invasively and without further labeling. When using the spectral FLIM module, spatially-resolved emission spectra, excitation spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes can pr provided. Multiphoton tomographs are used by all major cosmetic comapanies to test the biosafety of sunscreen nanoparticles.

  7. Free electron laser-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry facility for obtaining infrared multiphoton dissociation spectra of gaseous ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, Jose J.; Eyler, John R.; Oomens, Jos; Moore, David T.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; von Helden, Gert; Meijer, Gerard; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.; Blakney, Gregory T.

    2005-02-01

    A Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer has been installed at a free electron laser (FEL) facility to obtain infrared absorption spectra of gas phase ions by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). The FEL provides continuously tunable infrared radiation over a broad range of the infrared spectrum, and the FT-ICR mass spectrometer, utilizing a 4.7Tesla superconducting magnet, permits facile formation, isolation, trapping, and high-mass resolution detection of a wide range of ion classes. A description of the instrumentation and experimental parameters for these experiments is presented along with preliminary IRMPD spectra of the singly-charged chromium-bound dimer of diethyl ether (Cr(C4H10O)2+) and the fluorene molecular ion (C13H10+). Also presented is a brief comparison of the fluorene cation spectrum obtained by the FT-ICR-FEL with an earlier spectrum recorded using a quadrupole ion trap (QIT).

  8. Compact fixed wavelength femtosecond oscillators for multi-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, T.; Klein, J.; Zadoyan, R.; Baldacchini, T.; Franke, T.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years two-photon microscopy with fixed-wavelength has raised increasing interest in life-sciences: Two-photon (2P) absorption spectra of common dyes are broader than single-photon ones. Therefore, excitation of several dyes simultaneously with a single IR laser wavelength is feasible and could be seen as an advantage in 2P microscopy. We used pulsed fixed-wavelength infrared lasers with center wavelength at 1040 nm, for two-photon microscopy in a variety of biologically relevant samples, among these a mouse brain sample, a mouse artery (within the animal, acute preparation), and a preparation of mouse bladder. The 1040 nm laser proved to be efficient not only in exciting fluorescence from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and red fluorescent dyes, but also for second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from muscle tissue and collagen. With this work we demonstrate that economical, small-footprint fixedwavelength lasers can present an interesting alternative to tunable lasers that are commonly used in multiphoton microscopy.

  9. Enhanced eumelanin emission by stepwise three-photon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerimo, Josef; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2011-03-01

    Eumelanin fluorescence from Sepia officinalis and black human hair was activated with near-infrared radiation and multiphoton excitation. A third order multiphoton absorption by a step-wise process appears to be the underlying mechanism. The activation was caused by a photochemical process since it could not be reproduced by simple heating. Both fluorescence and brightfield imaging indicate the near-infrared irradiation caused photodamage to the eumelanin and the activated emission originated from the photodamaged region. At least two different components with about thousand-fold enhanced fluorescence were activated and could be distinguished by their excitation properties. One component was excited with wavelengths in the visible region and exhibited linear absorption dependence. The second component could be excited with near-infrared wavelengths and had a third order dependence on the laser power. The third order dependence is explained by a step-wise excited state absorption (ESA) process since it could be observed equally with the CW and femtosecond lasers. The new method for photoactivating the eumelanin fluorescence was used to map the melanin content in human hair.

  10. Characterizing lamina propria of human gastric mucosa by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. C.; Yang, H. Q.; Chen, G.; Zhuo, S. M.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lamina propria (LP) of gastric mucosa plays an important role in progression of gastric cancer because of the site at where inflammatory reactions occur. Multiphoton imaging has been recently employed for microscopic examination of intact tissue. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), high resolution multiphoton microscopic images of lamina propria (LP) are obtained in normal human gastric mucosa at excitation wavelength λex = 800 nm. The main source of tissue TPEF originated from the cells of gastric glands, and loose connective tissue, collagen, produced SHG signals. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be effective for characterizing the microstructure of LP in human gastric mucosa. The findings will be helpful for diagnosing and staging early gastric cancer in the clinics.

  11. Multiphoton ionization of atomic cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, R.N.; Klots, C.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.; Cooper, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    We describe experimental studies of resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (MPI) of cesium atoms in the presence and absence of an external electric field. In the zero-field studies, photoelectron angular distributions for one- and two-photon resonantly enhanced MPI are compared with the theory of Tang and Lambropoulos. Deviations of experiment from theory are attributed to hyperfine coupling effects in the resonant intermediate state. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent. In the absence of an external electric field, signal due to two-photon resonant three-photon ionization of cesium via np states is undetectable. Application of an electric field mixes nearby nd and ns levels, thereby inducing excitation and subsequent ionization. Signal due to two-photon excitation of ns levels in field-free experiments is weak due to their small photoionization cross section. An electric field mixes nearby np levels which again allows detectable photoionization signal. For both ns and np states the field induced MPI signal increases as the square of the electric field for a given principal quantum number and increases rapidly with n for a given field strength. Finally, we note that the classical two-photon field-ionization threshold is lower for the case in which the laser polarization and the electric field are parallel than it is when they are perpendicular. 22 references, 11 figures.

  12. Multiphoton Assisted Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, E. S.; Jones, R. R.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2008-12-31

    We have observed multiphoton assisted recombination in the presence of a 38.8 GHz microwave field. Stimulated emission of up to ten microwave photons results in energy transfer from continuum electrons, enabling recombination. The maximum electron energy loss is far greater than the 2U{sub p} predicted by the standard 'simpleman's' model. The data are well reproduced by both an approximate analytic expression and numerical simulations in which the combined Coulomb and radiation fields are taken into account.

  13. Multispot multiphoton Ca2+ imaging in acute myocardial slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borile, Giulia; de Mauro, Claudio; Urbani, Andrea; Alfieri, Domenico; Pavone, Francesco S.; Mongillo, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become essential for dynamic imaging in thick living tissues. High-rate, full-field image acquisition in multiphoton microscopy is achievable by parallelization of the excitation and detection pathways. We developed our approach via a diffractive optical element which splits a pulsed laser into 16 beamlets and exploits a descanned detection system consisting of an array of beamlet-associated photomultiplier tubes. The optical performance of the multiphoton multispot system (MCube) has been characterized in cardiac tissue sections and subsequently used for the first time for fluorescence imaging of cardiomyocyte Ca2+ dynamics in viable acute cardiac slices. Multispot multiphoton microscopy (MMM) has never been used before to monitor Ca2+ dynamics in thick, viable tissue samples. Acute heart slices are a powerful close-to-in vivo model of Ca2+ imaging allowing the simultaneous observation of several cells in their own tissue environment, exploiting the multiphoton excitation ability to penetrate scattering tissues. Moreover, we show that the concurrent high spatial and temporal resolutions afforded by the parallel scanning in MMM can be exploited to simultaneously assess subcellular Ca2+ dynamics in different cells in the tissue. We recorded local Ca2+ release events including macrosparks, travelling waves, and rotors.

  14. Visible and near-infrared excitation spectra from the neptunyl ion doped into a uranyl tetrachloride lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Beau J.; Berg, John M.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Wozniak, Nicholas R.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.

    2016-03-01

    Visible and near-infrared illumination induces 5f-5f and ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) transitions of the neptunyl tetrachloride anion in polycrystalline Cs2U(Np)O2Cl4, and results in near-infrared luminescence from the second electronically excited state to the ground state. This photoluminescence is used as a detection method to collect excitation spectra throughout the near-infrared and visible regions. The excitation spectra of LMCT transitions in excitation spectra were identified in previous work. Here the measurement and analysis is extended to include both LMCT and intra-5f transitions. The results manifest variation in structural properties of the neptunium-oxo bond among the low-lying electronic states. Vibronic intensity patterns and energy spacings are used to compare bond lengths and vibrational frequencies in the excited states, confirming significant characteristic differences between those excited by 5f-5f transitions from those due to LMCT transitions. Results are compared with recently published RASPT2/SO calculations of [NpO2Cl4]2-.

  15. Development of UV-excitable red and near-infrared fluorescent labels and their application for simultaneous multicolor bioimaging by single-wavelength excitation.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tetsuya; Umezawa, Keitaro; Shindo, Yutaka; Citterio, Daniel; Oka, Kotaro; Suzuki, Koji

    2013-09-01

    We report a new type of UV-excitable red/NIR-emissive fluorescent dyads (PKF series). Conjugation of a pyrene and a novel bright red/near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore resulted in large quasi-Stokes shift while retaining intense fluorescence emission and sharp spectral bands. Labeling of PKF dyads to biomolecules was performed by means of introduction of a succinimidyl ester. Simultaneous Ca(2+)/albumin dual-color intracellular imaging by PKF in combination with fura-2 (UV-excitable/VIS-emissive Ca(2+) indicator) reveals its usefulness as a new bioimaging tool. PMID:23700213

  16. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics of nanoscale near-infrared emissive polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Timothy V; Ghoroghchian, P Peter; Rubtsov, Igor V; Hammer, Daniel A; Therien, Michael J

    2008-07-30

    Formed through cooperative self-assembly of amphiphilic diblock copolymers and electronically conjugated porphyrinic near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores (NIRFs), NIR-emissive polymersomes (50 nm to 50 microm diameter polymer vesicles) define a family of organic-based, soft-matter structures that are ideally suited for deep-tissue optical imaging and sensitive diagnostic applications. Here, we describe magic angle and polarized pump-probe spectroscopic experiments that: (i) probe polymersome structure and NIRF organization and (ii) connect emitter structural properties and NIRF loading with vesicle emissive output at the nanoscale. Within polymersome membrane environments, long polymer chains constrain ethyne-bridged oligo(porphinato)zinc(II) based supermolecular fluorophore (PZn n ) conformeric populations and disperse these PZn n species within the hydrophobic bilayer. Ultrafast excited-state transient absorption and anisotropy dynamical studies of NIR-emissive polymersomes, in which the PZn n fluorophore loading per nanoscale vesicle is varied between 0.1-10 mol %, enable the exploration of concentration-dependent mechanisms for nonradiative excited-state decay. These experiments correlate fluorophore structure with its gross spatial arrangement within specific nanodomains of these nanoparticles and reveal how compartmentalization of fluorophores within reduced effective dispersion volumes impacts bulk photophysical properties. As these factors play key roles in determining the energy transfer dynamics between dispersed fluorophores, this work underscores that strategies that modulate fluorophore and polymer structure to optimize dispersion volume in bilayered nanoscale vesicular environments will further enhance the emissive properties of these sensitive nanoscale probes. PMID:18611010

  17. Optimizing Fluorescence Collection Efficiency in Multiphoton Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinter, Joseph P.

    Over the past 20 years multiphoton microscopy has established itself as the premier modality for high resolution (<1um) deep tissue in vivo fluorescence imaging. The dramatic improvements in imaging performance when compared to more conventional techniques result from the use of longer wavelength excitation light (˜700--1000 nm), enabling deeper tissue penetration, and the spatially and temporally localized generation of fluorescence inherent in two-photon excitation, which virtually eliminates out-of-focus fluorescence. Imaging depths of ˜500 mum are now considered common practice, however, as the technique continues to increase in popularity and utility significant efforts are being made to maximize imaging depth. These efforts can be compartmentalized into those aimed at increasing fluorescence excitation and those attempting to maximize fluorescence collection. Progress has been made in increasing fluorescence excitation efficiency, however these approaches require costly and complicated optical instrumentation, and are often deemed impractical. Efforts targeted at increasing fluorescence collection efficiency have been limited due to the complexity of describing the ensemble of scattered fluorescent photons emerging from a sample and propagating through a microscope objective and the subsequent fluorescence collection pathway of a multiphoton microscope. Since there is no analytic solution for these fluorescent photon distributions as a function of imaging depth in the relevant, non-diffusive multiphoton imaging range, numerical techniques are required. Here is presented the first computational model of fluorescence propagation through the complete fluorescence collection pathway of a multiphoton microscope. Monte Carlo simulations were used to model the propagation of fluorescence as a function of imaging depth in a scattering sample with physiologically accurate optical properties, and to determine the collected and transmitted fluorescent fraction through the Olympus 20X 0.95NA microscope objective, one of the highest performance and most commonly used objectives for multiphoton imaging. It was determined that the complex trajectories of scattered photons entering the microscope objective emerge from the objective back aperture with a large spatio-angular distribution of fluorescence, which varies significantly with imaging depth and scattering length. Accurate determination of this distribution provided the information necessary to model, design, and fabricate a maximally efficient post-objective fluorescence collection pathway. Simulations corroborated by data from experimental tissue phantoms demonstrate collection efficiency improvements of 50--90% over conventional, non-optimized collection geometries at imaging depths of 1000 mum. Furthermore, the collection efficiency of the optimized system was found to be nearly constant over the entire imaging range (0--1000 mum), and only weakly dependent on the scattering length of the sample. In vivo imaging performance was verified by imaging YFP+ layer V neurons in mouse cortex to a depth of 850 mum. Optimizing the fluorescence collection system in multiphoton microscopy results in large gains in fluorescence collection efficiency which translate into increased imaging depth, higher resolution, and a decrease in required excitation power, thereby reducing the potential for photodamage and generation of background fluorescence. Imaging performance was found to be comparable to that of the complex techniques aimed at increasing fluorescence excitation, but far simpler to implement and at a cost roughly two orders of magnitude less.

  18. Femtosecond transient infrared and stimulated Raman spectroscopy shed light on the relaxation mechanisms of photo-excited peridinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Ragnoni, Elena; Lapini, Andrea; Foggi, Paolo; Hiller, Roger G.; Righini, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    By means of one- and two-dimensional transient infrared spectroscopy and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, we investigated the excited state dynamics of peridinin, a carbonyl carotenoid occurring in natural light harvesting complexes. The presence of singly and doubly excited states, as well as of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, makes the behavior of carbonyl carotenoids in the excited state very complex. In this work, we investigated by time resolved spectroscopy the relaxation of photo-excited peridinin in solvents of different polarities and as a function of the excitation wavelength. Our experimental results show that a characteristic pattern of one- and two-dimensional infrared bands in the C=C stretching region allows monitoring the relaxation pathway. In polar solvents, moderate distortions of the molecular geometry cause a variation of the single/double carbon bond character, so that the partially ionic ICT state is largely stabilized by the solvent reorganization. After vertical photoexcitation at 400 nm of the S2 state, the off-equilibrium population moves to the S1 state with ca. 175 fs time constant; from there, in less than 5 ps, the non-Franck Condon ICT state is reached, and finally, the ground state is recovered in 70 ps. That the relevant excited state dynamics takes place far from the Franck Condon region is demonstrated by its noticeable dependence on the excitation wavelength.

  19. H{sub 2} EJECTION FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: INFRARED MULTIPHOTON DISSOCIATION STUDY OF PROTONATED ACENAPHTHENE AND 9,10-DIHYDROPHENANTHRENE

    SciTech Connect

    Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin T.; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-20

    The infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of protonated acenaphthene ([ACN+H]{sup +}) and 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene ([DHP+H]{sup +}) have been recorded using an infrared free electron laser after the compounds were protonated by electrospray ionization and trapped in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. In both compounds, the loss of two mass units is predominant. Density functional calculations (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)) of the infrared spectra of all possible protonated isomers of each species showed that the observed IRMPD spectra are best fit to the isomer with the largest proton affinity and lowest relative electronic energy. Potential energy surfaces of the most stable isomers of [ACN+H]{sup +} and [DHP+H]{sup +} have been calculated for H and H{sub 2} loss. The lowest energy barriers are for loss of H{sub 2}, with predicted energies 4.28 and 4.15 eV, respectively. After H{sub 2} ejection, the adjacent aliphatic hydrogens migrate to the bare ejection site and stabilize the remaining fragment. Single H loss may occur from [ACN+H]{sup +} but the energy required is higher. No single H loss is predicted from [DHP+H]{sup +}, only H migration around the carbon skeleton. The vibrational bands in the parent closed-shell protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are compared to bands observed from the interstellar medium.

  20. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the visible spectrum would hinder the projected light beam since a laser with wavelength of 532 nm was used as the coherent light source. Experimentations were successful, but only with mitigated efficiency for shearography [2]. The thermal response was the fastest and it was possible to fully locate all defects. For shearography, the available equipment forced us to restrict the area of observation to only one defect at a time (roughly 100 cm²). Numerical models were designed based on the multiple sample tested in the experimental step of the study. Using the COMSOL© finite elements modeling software, numerous simulations yielded results in accordance with experimental data. Different types of defect could be modeled and showed that both shearography and thermography have different sensibility in function of the nature of the defect. Furthermore, analysis of the simulated results demonstrated a relation between the contrast evolution of the temperature and displacement field. In the near future, we expect to make several improvement to our experimental setup. As for the numerical model, some small disparities between the theoretical and experimental results still remain to be addressed. The numerical model could be improved but to do so it requires to raise the shearographic measurements sampling rate close to the one used for infrared thermography. Once this issue will be resolved, it will be possible to use experimental data to refine the numerical model. So, accurate models will be helpful to optimize the overall efficiency of the coupling of thermal shearography and active infrared thermography for in situ NDT application. References [1] Y.Y. Hung, C.Y. Liand, Image-shearing camera for direct measurement of surface strains, Applied Optics, Vol. 18, n°7, pages 1046-1051, 1979 [2] L-D. Théroux, J. Dumoulin, X. Maldague, Square heating applied to shearography and active infrared thermography measurements coupling: form feasibility test in laboratory to numerical study of pultruded CFRP plates glued on concrete specimen, STRAIN journal, in press

  1. Long-Lived Excited-State Dynamics of i-Motif Structures Probed by Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keane, Páraic M; Baptista, Frederico R; Gurung, Sarah P; Devereux, Stephen J; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Brazier, John A; Cardin, Christine J; Kelly, John M; Quinn, Susan J

    2016-05-01

    UV-generated excited states of cytosine (C) nucleobases are precursors to mutagenic photoproduct formation. The i-motif formed from C-rich sequences is known to exhibit high yields of long-lived excited states following UV absorption. Here the excited states of several i-motif structures have been characterized following 267 nm laser excitation using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy (TRIR). All structures possess a long-lived excited state of ∼300 ps and notably in some cases decays greater than 1 ns are observed. These unusually long-lived lifetimes are attributed to the interdigitated DNA structure which prevents direct base stacking overlap. PMID:26879336

  2. Photonic near-field imaging in multiphoton photoemission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Word, R. C.; Saliba, S. D.; Könenkamp, R.

    2013-05-01

    We report the observation of optical near fields in a photonic waveguide of conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) using multiphoton photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Nonlinear two-photon photoelectron emission is enhanced at field maxima created by interference between incident 410-nm and coherently excited guided photonic waves, providing strong phase contrast. Guided modes are observed under both transverse magnetic field (TM) and transverse electric field (TE) polarized illuminations and are consistent with classical electromagnetic theory. Implications on the role of multiphoton PEEM in optical near-field imaging are discussed.

  3. Fibre-coupled multiphoton microscope with adaptive motion compensation

    PubMed Central

    Sherlock, Ben; Warren, Sean; Stone, James; Neil, Mark; Paterson, Carl; Knight, Jonathan; French, Paul; Dunsby, Chris

    2015-01-01

    To address the challenge of sample motion during in vivo imaging, we present a fibre-coupled multiphoton microscope with active axial motion compensation. The position of the sample surface is measured using optical coherence tomography and fed back to a piezo actuator that adjusts the axial location of the objective to compensate for sample motion. We characterise the system’s performance and demonstrate that it can compensate for axial sample velocities up to 700 µm/s. Finally we illustrate the impact of motion compensation when imaging multiphoton excited autofluorescence in ex vivo mouse skin. PMID:26137387

  4. Fibre-coupled multiphoton microscope with adaptive motion compensation.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Ben; Warren, Sean; Stone, James; Neil, Mark; Paterson, Carl; Knight, Jonathan; French, Paul; Dunsby, Chris

    2015-05-01

    To address the challenge of sample motion during in vivo imaging, we present a fibre-coupled multiphoton microscope with active axial motion compensation. The position of the sample surface is measured using optical coherence tomography and fed back to a piezo actuator that adjusts the axial location of the objective to compensate for sample motion. We characterise the system's performance and demonstrate that it can compensate for axial sample velocities up to 700 µm/s. Finally we illustrate the impact of motion compensation when imaging multiphoton excited autofluorescence in ex vivo mouse skin. PMID:26137387

  5. Infrared multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy of a gas-phase complex of uranyl and 3-oxa-glutaramide: an extreme red-shift of the [O═U═O](2+) asymmetric stretch.

    PubMed

    Gibson, John K; Hu, Han-Shi; Van Stipdonk, Michael J; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Li, Jun

    2015-04-01

    The gas-phase complex UO2(TMOGA)2(2+) (TMOGA = tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide) prepared by electrospray ionization was characterized by infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. The IRMPD spectrum from 700-1800 cm(-1) was interpreted using a computational study based on density functional theory. The predicted vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with the measured values, with an average deviation of only 8 cm(-1) (<1%) and a maximum deviation of 21 cm(-1) (<2%). The only IR peak assigned to the linear uranyl moiety was the asymmetric ν3 mode, which appeared at 965 cm(-1) and was predicted by DFT as 953 cm(-1). This ν3 frequency is red-shifted relative to bare uranyl, UO2(2+), by ca. 150 cm(-1) due to electron donation from the TMOGA ligands. Based on the degree of red-shifting, it is inferred that two TMOGA oxygen-donor ligands have a greater effective gas basicity than the four monodentate acetone ligands in UO2(acetone)4(2+). The uranyl ν3 frequency was also computed for uranyl coordinated by two TMGA ligands, in which the central Oether of TMOGA has been replaced by CH2. The computed ν3 for UO2(TMGA)2(2+), 950 cm(-1), is essentially the same as that for UO2(TMOGA)2(2+), suggesting that electron donation to uranyl from the Oether of TMOGA is minor. The computed ν3 asymmetric stretching frequencies for the three actinyl complexes, UO2(TMOGA)2(2+), NpO2(TMOGA)2(2+) and PuO2(TMOGA)2(2+), are comparable. This similarity is discussed in the context of the relationship between ν3 and intrinsic actinide-oxygen bond energies in actinyl complexes. PMID:25785482

  6. An Interplay Between Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Density Functional Theory Computations in the Characterization of a Tripodal Quinolin-8-Olate Gd(III) Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, Margherita; Bianco, Giuliana; Amati, Mario; Belviso, Sandra; Cataldi, Tommaso R. I.; Lelj, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    A new hexadentate, tripodal 8-hydroxyquinoline based ligand (QH3) and its gadolinium(III) tris-chelated (GdQ) complex with hemicage structure was investigated by using high resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS). The protonated adduct of the free ligand and its hemicage tripodal Gd(III) complex, [GdQ + H]+, were first observed in experiments of electrospray ionization (ESI) with a linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometer and further investigated by using high resolution FTICRMS. Gas-phase dissociation of the protonated Gd(III) complex, by infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) FTICR MS, demonstrated a fragmentation pattern with six main product cluster ions labeled as [Fn]+ ( n = 1 up to 6). These product ions suggest the elimination of 7-amino-alkyl or 7-alkyl chains of the hemicage moiety. High resolution MS conditions allowed the elucidation of the fragmentation pattern and product ion structures along with the determination, among the isotopic pattern of Gd, of the chemical compositions of closely related species, which differ in terms of hydrogen content. Among the Gd six naturally stable isotopes, 158Gd is the most abundant, and its peak within each cluster was used as a reference for distinguishing each product ions. Computational DFT investigations were applied to give support to some hypothesis of fragmentation pathways, which could not have been easily justified on the basis of the experimental work. Furthermore, computational studies suggested the coordination geometry of the protonated parent complex and the five- and four-coordinated complexes, which derive from its fragmentation. Furthermore, experimental and computational evidences were collected about the octet spin state of the parent compound.

  7. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Spectroscopy of a Gas-Phase Complex of Uranyl and 3-Oxa-Glutaramide: An Extreme Red-Shift of the [O=U=O]²⁺ Asymmetric Stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K.; Hu, Hanshi; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Li, Jun

    2015-04-09

    The gas-phase complex UO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺ (TMOGA = tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide) prepared by electrospray ionization was characterized by infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. The IRMPD spectrum from 700–1800 cm⁻¹ was interpreted using a computational study based on density functional theory. The predicted vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with the measured values, with an average deviation of only 8 cm⁻¹ (<1%) and a maximum deviation of 21 cm⁻¹ (<2%). The only IR peak assigned to the linear uranyl moiety was the asymmetric ν₃ mode, which appeared at 965 cm⁻¹ and was predicted by DFT as 953 cm⁻¹. This ν₃ frequency is red-shifted relative to bare uranyl, UO₂²⁺, by ca. 150 cm⁻¹ due to electron donation from the TMOGA ligands. Based on the degree of red-shifting, it is inferred that two TMOGA oxygen-donor ligands have a greater effective gas basicity than the four monodentate acetone ligands in UO₂(acetone)₄²⁺. The uranyl ν₃ frequency was also computed for uranyl coordinated by two TMGA ligands, in which the central Oether of TMOGA has been replaced by CH₂. The computed ν₃ for UO₂(TMGA)₂²⁺, 950 cm⁻¹, is essentially the same as that for UO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺, suggesting that electron donation to uranyl from the Oether of TMOGA is minor. The computed ν₃ asymmetric stretching frequencies for the three actinyl complexes, UO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺, NpO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺ and PuO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺, are comparable. This similarity is discussed in the context of the relationship between ν₃ and intrinsic actinide-oxygen bond energies in actinyl complexes.

  8. Experimental Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) studies of small molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehmer, J. L.; Dehmer, P. M.; Pratt, S. T.; Ohalloran, M. A.; Tomkins, F. S.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of exciting opportunities for both basic and applied science. On the applied side, REMPI has great potential as an ultrasensitive, highly selective detector for trace, reactive, or transient species. On the basic side, REMPI affords an unprecedented means of exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. An overview of current studies of excited molecular states is given to illustrate the principles and prospects of REMPI.

  9. Extended infrared line emission excited by starburst and Seyfert activity in NGC 3256 and NGC 4945

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorwood, A. F. M.; Oliva, E.

    1994-07-01

    We present visible and infrared images, 1.5 to 2.3 micrometer infrared spectra and (Fe II) 1.64 micrometer, H2 (1 - 0) S(1) 2.121 micrometer, and Brgamma 2.165 micrometer infrared line contour maps obtained to investigate the nature of the activity and the origin of the infrared line emission in two relatively nearby infrared luminous galaxies. NGC 3256 is a merging system exhibiting starburst activity over a region several kpc across and a high infrared luminosity of approximately 3 x 1011 solar luminosity. A specific search for (Si VI) 1.96 micrometer coronal line emission from a possibly visually obscured Seyfert nucleus proved negative. Extremely high star-formation and SN rates of approximately 20 solar mass/year and approximately 1.5/year, respectively, however, are estimated using the observed integrated Brgamma line luminosites and He I 2.06 micrometer/Brgamma ratios together with an existing starburst model. At this rate, the injection energy associated with SN explosions alone could account for the observed (Fe II) 1.64 micrometer and H2(1 - 0)S(1) line luminosities. NGC 4945 is an almost edge-on spiral with an order of magnitude lower infrared luminosity which is powered by both a approximately 400 pc size starburst and a visually obscured Seyfert nucleus which is a variable source of hard X-ray emission and could substantially contribute to the total luminosity. Its star formation efficiency is higher than in NGC 3256 whereas its luminosity and star formation and SN rates of (approximately 0.4 solar mass/year and approximately 0.05/year are much lower although still adequate to account for the excitation of the observed (Fe II) 1.64 micrometer and H2(1 - 0)S(1) lines. Based on previous survey work, however, the large integrated H2(1 - 0)S(1)/Brgamma ratio observed in this galaxy is also indicative of the presence of a Seyfert nucleus. Maps of the Brgamma, (Fe II), and H2 (1 - 0)S(1) line emission reveal significantly different spatial distributions in the two galaxies. In NGC 3256 the emission extends over a region approximately 4 kpc across and shows similar (Fe II) and Brgamma morphologies, whereas the H2 (1 - 0)S(1) emission does not correlate in detail with either. In particular, it is less peaked on the nucleus and traces a spiral arm and embedded source to the south of the nucleus. This source is also prominent in our K' (2.1 micrometer) image but totally obscured by dust in the visible and is probably the nucleus of the merging companion. Additional evidence that the merger is not yet complete is also provided by the fact that the light distribution in the K' image does not correspond to that expected of a relaxed system. In NGC 4945 the Brgamma emission is largely confined to a approximately 380 pc diameter and less than or equal to 190 pc thick disk in the plane of the galaxy whereas both the (Fe II) 1.64 micrometer and H2 (1 - 0)S(1) line emission extends over the full extent of the molecular complex which is a factor of 2 larger perpendicular to the plane. This morphology is consistent with additional excitation by an embedded active galactic nucleus and/or a starburst driven superwind. The similarity of the observed (Fe II) and H2 intensity profiles perpendicular to the plane suggests a common excitation mechanism for the 'excess' emission which we propose can be attributed to partial ionization and heating of molecular gas respectively by X-rays from the nuclear source. The overall conclusion of this study is that NGC 4945 is probably at an advanced stage of its evolution from a starburst to a Seyfert galaxy whereas there is no evidence that such an evolution is occurring yet in the considerably more luminous, merging system, NGC 3256.

  10. A novel flexible clinical multiphoton tomograph for early melanoma detection, skin analysis, testing of anti-age products, and in situ nanoparticle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2010-02-01

    High-resolution 3D microscopy based on multiphoton induced autofluorescence and second harmonic generation have been introduced in 1990. 13 years later, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have first been launched by JenLab company with the tomography DermaInspect®. This year, the second generation of clinical multiphoton tomographs was introduced. The novel multiphoton tomograph MPTflex, equipped with a flexible articulated optical arm, provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetical examinations. Improved image quality and signal to noise ratio (SNR) are achieved by a very short source-drain spacing, by larger active areas of the detectors and by single photon counting (SPC) technology. Shorter image acquisition time due to improved image quality reduces artifacts and simplifies the operation of the system. The compact folded optical design and the light-weight structure of the optical head eases the handling. Dual channel detectors enable to distinguish between intratissue elastic fibers and collagenous structures simultaneously. Through the use of piezo-driven optics a stack of optical cross-sections (optical sectioning) can be acquired and 3D imaging can be performed. The multiphoton excitation of biomolecules like NAD(P)H, flavins, porphyrins, elastin, and melanin is done by picojoule femtosecond laser pulses from an tunable turn-key femtosescond near infrared laser system. The ability for rapid high-quality image acquisition, the user-friendly operation of the system and the compact and flexible design qualifies this system to be used for melanoma detection, diagnostics of dermatological disorders, cosmetic research and skin aging measurements as well as in situ drug monitoring and animal research.

  11. A radiative transfer model to treat infrared molecular excitation in cometary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debout, V.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Zakharov, V.

    2016-02-01

    The exospheres of small Solar System bodies are now observed with high spatial resolution from space missions. Interpreting infrared spectra of cometary gases obtained with the VIRTIS experiment onboard the Rosetta cometary mission requires detailed modeling of infrared fluorescence emission in optically thick conditions. Efficient computing methods are required since numerous ro-vibrational lines excited by the Sun need to be considered. We propose a new model working in a 3-D environment to compute numerically the local incoming radiation. It uses a new algorithm using pre-defined directions of ray propagation and ray grids to reduce the CPU cost in time with respect to Monte Carlo methods and to treat correctly the sunlight direction. The model is applied to the ν3 bands of CO2 and H2O at 4.3 μ m and 2.7 μ m respectively, and to the CO ∨ (1 → 0) band at 4.7 μ m. The results are compared to the ones obtained by a 1-D algorithm which uses the Escape Probability (EP) method, and by a 3-D "Coupled Escape Probability" (CEP) model, for different levels of optical thickness. Our results suggest that the total band flux may vary strongly with azimuth for optically thick cases whereas the azimuth average total band flux computed is close to the one obtained with EP. Our model globally predicts less intensity reduction from opacity than the CEP model of Gersch and A'Hearn (Gersch, A.M., A'Hearn, M.F. [2014]. Astrophys. J. 787, 36-56). An application of the model to the observation of CO2, CO and H2O bands in 67/P atmosphere with VIRTIS is presented to predict the evolution of band optical thickness along the mission.

  12. Generalized Multiphoton Quantum Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Max; Tan, Si-Hui; Stoeckl, Sarah E.; Sanders, Barry C.; de Guise, Hubert; Heilmann, René; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander; Walther, Philip

    2015-10-01

    Nonclassical interference of photons lies at the heart of optical quantum information processing. Here, we exploit tunable distinguishability to reveal the full spectrum of multiphoton nonclassical interference. We investigate this in theory and experiment by controlling the delay times of three photons injected into an integrated interferometric network. We derive the entire coincidence landscape and identify transition matrix immanants as ideally suited functions to describe the generalized case of input photons with arbitrary distinguishability. We introduce a compact description by utilizing a natural basis that decouples the input state from the interferometric network, thereby providing a useful tool for even larger photon numbers.

  13. A series of flexible design adaptations to the Nikon E-C1 and E-C2 confocal microscope systems for UV, multiphoton and FLIM imaging.

    PubMed

    Botchway, Stanley W; Scherer, Kathrin M; Hook, Steve; Stubbs, Christopher D; Weston, Eleanor; Bisby, Roger H; Parker, Anthony W

    2015-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is widely employed in the life sciences using extrinsic fluorescence of low- and high-molecular weight labels with excitation and emission spectra in the visible and near infrared regions. For imaging of intrinsic and extrinsic fluorophores with excitation spectra in the ultraviolet region, multiphoton excitation with one- or two-colour lasers avoids the need for ultraviolet-transmitting excitation optics and has advantages in terms of optical penetration in the sample and reduced phototoxicity. Excitation and detection of ultraviolet emission around 300 nm and below in a typical inverted confocal microscope is more difficult and requires the use of expensive quartz optics including the objective. In this technical note we describe the adaptation of a commercial confocal microscope (Nikon, Japan E-C1 or E-C2) for versatile use with Ti-sapphire and OPO laser sources and the addition of a second detection channel that enables detection of ultraviolet fluorescence and increases detection sensitivity in a typical fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy experiment. Results from some experiments with this setup illustrate the resulting capabilities. PMID:25664385

  14. High-resolution multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    This review focuses on multimodal multiphoton tomography based on near infrared femtosecond lasers. Clinical multiphoton tomographs for 3D high-resolution in vivo imaging have been placed into the market several years ago. The second generation of this Prism-Award winning High-Tech skin imaging tool (MPTflex) was introduced in 2010. The same year, the world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph. In particular, non-fluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen has been imaged with submicron resolution in patients suffering from psoriasis. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution wide-field systems such as ultrasound, optoacoustical, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer, optimization of treatment strategies, and cosmetic research including long-term testing of sunscreen nanoparticles as well as anti-aging products.

  15. The stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence guided ablation of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; DiMarzio, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated and excited by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser, is a low-cost and reliable method for detecting melanin. We have developed a device utilizing the melanin SMPAF to guide the ablation of melanin with a 975 nm CW laser. This method provides the ability of targeting individual melanin particles with micrometer resolution, and enables localized melanin ablation to be performed without collateral damage. Compared to the traditional selective photothermolysis, which uses pulsed lasers for melanin ablation, this method demonstrates higher precision and lower cost. Therefore, the SMPAF guided selective ablation of melanin is a promising tool of melanin ablation for both medical and cosmetic purposes.

  16. Highly emitting near-infrared lanthanide "encapsulated sandwich" metallacrown complexes with excitation shifted toward lower energy.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Evan R; Eliseeva, Svetlana V; Jankolovits, Joseph; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Petoud, Stéphane; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2014-01-29

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent lanthanide complexes hold great promise for practical applications, as their optical properties have several complementary advantages over organic fluorophores and semiconductor nanoparticles. The fundamental challenge for lanthanide luminescence is their sensitization through suitable chromophores. The use of the metallacrown (MC) motif is an innovative strategy to arrange several organic sensitizers at a well-controlled distance from a lanthanide cation. Herein we report a series of lanthanide “encapsulated sandwich” MC complexes of the form Ln3+ [12-MC(Zn(II),quinHA)-4]2[24-MC(Zn(II),quinHA)-8] (Ln3+ [Zn(II)MC(quinHA)]) in which the MC framework is formed by the self-assembly of Zn2+ ions and tetradentate chromophoric ligands based on quinaldichydroxamic acid (quinHA). A first-generation of luminescent MCs was presented previously but was limited due to excitation wavelengths in the UV. We report here that through the design of the chromophore of the MC assembly, we have significantly shifted the absorption wavelength toward lower energy (450 nm). In addition to this near-visible inter- and/or intraligand charge transfer absorption, Ln3+ [Zn(II)MC(quinHA)] exhibits remarkably high quantum yields, long luminescence lifetimes (CD3OD; Yb3+, QLn(L) = 2.88(2)%, τobs = 150.7(2) μs; Nd3+, QLn(L) = 1.35(1)%, τobs = 4.11(3) μs; Er3+, QLn(L) = 3.60(6)·10–2%, τobs = 11.40(3) μs), and excellent photostability. Quantum yields of Nd3+ and Er3+ MCs in the solid state and in deuterated solvents, upon excitation at low energy, are the highest values among NIR-emitting lanthanide complexes containing C–H bonds. The versatility of the MC strategy allows modifications in the excitation wavelength and absorptivity through the appropriate design of the ligand sensitizer, providing a highly efficient platform with tunable properties. PMID:24432702

  17. Visible-near-infrared luminescent lanthanide ternary complexes based on beta-diketonate using visible-light excitation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lining; Qiu, Yannan; Liu, Tao; Feng, Jing; Deng, Wei; Shi, Liyi

    2015-11-01

    We used the synthesized dinaphthylmethane (Hdnm) ligand whose absorption extends to the visible-light wavelength, to prepare a family of ternary lanthanide complexes, named as [Ln(dnm)3 phen] (Ln = Sm, Nd, Yb, Er, Tm, Pr). The properties of these complexes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and excitation and emission spectroscopy. Generally, excitation with visible light is much more advantageous than UV excitation. Importantly, upon excitation with visible light (401-460 nm), the complexes show characteristic visible (Sm(3+)) as well as near-infrared (Sm(3+), Nd(3+), Yb(3+), Er(3+), Tm(3+), Pr(3+)) luminescence of the corresponding lanthanide ions, attributed to the energy transfer from the ligands to the lanthanide ions, an antenna effect. Now, using these near-infrared luminescent lanthanide complexes, the luminescent spectral region from 800 to 1650 nm, can be covered completely, which is of particular interest for biomedical imaging applications, laser systems, and optical amplification applications. PMID:25691149

  18. Biomedical applications involving multiphoton probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potasek, M.; Beeson, K.; Parilov, E.

    2015-03-01

    Many techniques in biological and clinical science use multiphoton absorbers for fluorescence. The applications include medical imaging for living cells, diagnostic techniques for disease and spectroscopy. The intrinsic value of the multiphoton absorber coefficients is therefore of the utmost importance. Additionally, the laser intensity at which the absorber saturates can determine which absorber, dye or protein is useful for a particular application. Yet, experimental methods for determining the optical coefficients often yield different results. We describe several common methods of 2PA measurements and describe their features. As an example of the importance of applying the correct analysis to measurements, we fit experimental data and obtain values for multiphoton absorbers and accurately obtain their intrinsic values. Finally, we present the optical properties of several multiphoton materials used in biology.

  19. Calculation of multiphoton ionization processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Poe, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    We propose an accurate and efficient procedure in the calculation of multiphoton ionization processes. In addition to the calculational advantage, this procedure also enables us to study the relative contributions of the resonant and nonresonant intermediate states.

  20. Transverse correlations in multiphoton entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Jianming; Rubin, Morton H.; Shih Yanhua

    2007-10-15

    We have analyzed the transverse correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N-photon state. The Klyshko's two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N-photon case.

  1. Maintaining polarization in polarimetric multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Erik; Turcotte, Raphaël; Daradich, Amy; Sadetsky, Grégory; Gravel, Pierre; Bachand, Karine; De Koninck, Yves; Côté, Daniel C

    2015-11-01

    Polarimetric measurements in multiphoton microscopy can reveal information about the local molecular order of a sample. However, the presence of a dichroic through which the excitation beam propagates will generally scramble its polarization. We propose a simple scheme whereby a second properly-oriented compensation dichroic is used to negate any alteration regardless of the wavelength and the initial polarization. We demonstrate how this robust and rapid approach simplifies polarimetric measurements in second-harmonic generation, two-photon excited fluorescence and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. Illustration of the polarization maintaining strategy with the compensating dichroic oriented such that its s- and p-axes are interchanged with these of the primary dichroic. PMID:25691172

  2. Enhanced thermal radiation in terahertz and far-infrared regime by hot phonon excitation in a field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Pei-Kang; Yen, Shun-Tung

    2014-11-14

    We demonstrate the hot phonon effect on thermal radiation in the terahertz and far-infrared regime. A pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor is used for efficiently exciting hot phonons. Boosting the hot phonon population can enhance the efficiency of thermal radiation. The transistor can yield at least a radiation power of 13 μW and a power conversion efficiency higher than a resistor by more than 20%.

  3. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling

    PubMed Central

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca2+ imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25–1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm2 resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca2+] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca2+ involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca2+]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca2+ release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses. PMID:24920028

  4. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling.

    PubMed

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi; Rajguru, Suhrud M

    2014-09-15

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca(2+) imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25-1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm(2) resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca(2+)] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca(2+) involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca(2+)]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca(2+) release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses. PMID:24920028

  5. Photochemistry of UV-excited trifluoroacetylacetone and hexafluoroacetylacetone I: infrared spectra of fluorinated methylfuranones formed by HF photoelimination.

    PubMed

    Muyskens, Karen J; Alsum, Joel R; Thielke, Timothy A; Boer, Jodi L; Heetderks, Tina R; Muyskens, Mark A

    2012-12-20

    The photochemistry of gas-phase 1,1,1-trifluoroacetylacetone (TFAA) excited with ultraviolet (UV) light involves a significant photoelimination channel that produces hydrogen fluoride and a fluorinated methylfuranone, 2,2-difluoro-5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (2FMF). This pathway is remarkable because it is a gas-phase unimolecular reaction that forms a five-membered ring product. This report is the first of such a TFAA photoelimination channel, which is similar to one observed with 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFAA), resulting in 2,2-difluoro-5-trifluoromethyl-3(2H)-furanone. We present infrared spectral observations of 2FMF produced by pulsed, UV-laser excitation of TFAA, along with analogous results from HFAA, supported by density functional theory (DFT) computational studies. DFT results for the infrared spectrum of 5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone, the expected comparable acetylacetone photoelimination product, help suggest that UV excitation of acetylacetone fails to follow a similar type of photoelimination. We use a weighted RMS approach as a figure of merit for comparing calculated infrared frequencies with experimental data. Results from the three acetylacetones reveal how the presence of fluorine atoms in acetylacetone influences the gas-phase molecular photochemistry. PMID:23176295

  6. Influence of Vacuum Cooling on Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infiltration in Fresh Leafy Greens via a Multiphoton-Imaging Approach.

    PubMed

    Vonasek, Erica; Nitin, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Microbial pathogen infiltration in fresh leafy greens is a significant food safety risk factor. In various postharvest operations, vacuum cooling is a critical process for maintaining the quality of fresh produce. The overall goal of this study was to evaluate the risk of vacuum cooling-induced infiltration of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into lettuce using multiphoton microscopy. Multiphoton imaging was chosen as the method to locate E. coli O157:H7 within an intact lettuce leaf due to its high spatial resolution, low background fluorescence, and near-infrared (NIR) excitation source compared to those of conventional confocal microscopy. The variables vacuum cooling, surface moisture, and leaf side were evaluated in a three-way factorial study with E. coli O157:H7 on lettuce. A total of 188 image stacks were collected. The images were analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 association with stomata and E. coli O157:H7 infiltration. The quantitative imaging data were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results indicate that the low-moisture condition led to an increased risk of microbial association with stomata (P < 0.05). Additionally, the interaction between vacuum cooling levels and moisture levels led to an increased risk of infiltration (P < 0.05). This study also demonstrates the potential of multiphoton imaging for improving sensitivity and resolution of imaging-based measurements of microbial interactions with intact leaf structures, including infiltration. PMID:26475109

  7. Development and characterization of non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS) for brain tumor margining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir

    During tumor removal surgery, due to the problems associated with obtaining high-resolution, real-time chemical images of where exactly the tumor ends and healthy tissue begins (tumor margining), it is often necessary to remove a much larger volume of tissue than the tumor itself. In the case of brain tumor surgery, however, it is extremely unsafe to remove excess tissue. Therefore, without an accurate image of the tumor margins, some of the tumor's finger-like projections are inevitably left behind in the surrounding parenchyma to grow again. For this reason, the development of techniques capable of providing high-resolution real-time images of tumor margins up to centimeters below the surface of a tissue is ideal for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors, as well as surgical guidance during brain tumor excision. A novel spectroscopic technique, non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS), is being developed with the capabilities of obtaining high-resolution subsurface chemical-based images of underlying tumors. This novel technique combines the strengths of multiphoton tissue spectroscopy and photoacoustic spectroscopy into a diagnostic methodology that will, ultimately, provide unparalleled chemical information and images to provide the state of sub-surface tissues. The NMPPAS technique employs near-infrared light (in the diagnostic window) to excite ultraviolet and/or visible light absorbing species deep below the tissue's surface. Once a multiphoton absorption event occurs, non-radiative relaxation processes generates a localized thermal expansion and subsequent acoustic wave that can be detected using a piezoelectric transducer. Since NMPPAS employs an acoustic detection modality, much deeper diagnoses can be performed than that is possible using current state of the art high-resolution chemical imaging techniques such as multiphoton fluorescence spectroscopy. NMPPAS was employed to differentiate between excised brain tumors (astrocytoma III) and healthy tissue with over 99% accuracy. NMPPAS spectral features showed evident differences between tumor and healthy tissues, and ratiometric analysis ensured that only a few wavelengths could be used for excitation instead of using numerous wavelength excitations to create spectra. This process would significantly reduce the analysis time while maintaining the same degree of accuracy. Tissue phantoms were fabricated in order to characterize the properties of NMPPAS. Scattering particles were doped into the phantoms to simulate their light scattering properties to real tissues. This allowed for better control over shape, size, reproducibility and doping in the sample while maintaining the light-tissue interaction properties of real tissue. To make NMPPAS viable for clinical applications, the technique was characterized to determine the spatial (lateral and longitudinal) resolution, depth of penetration and its ability to image in three-dimension through layers of tissue. Both resolutions were determined to be near-cellular level resolution (50-70 microm), obtained initially with the aid of the technique of multiphoton fluorescence, and later verified using NMPPAS imaging. Additionally, the maximum depth of penetration and detection was determined to be about 1.4cm, making the technique extremely suitable to margin tumors from underlying tissues in the brain. The capability of NMPPAS to detect and image layers that lie beneath other structures and blood vessels was also investigated. Three-dimensional images were obtained for the first time using NMPPAS. The images were obtained from different depths and structures were imaged through other layers of existing structures in the sample. This verified that NMPPAS was capable of detecting and imaging structures that lie embedded within the tissues. NMPPAS images of embedded structures were also obtained with the presence of hemoglobin, which is potentially the largest source of background in blood-perfused tissues, thus showing that the technique is capable of detecting and differentiating in blood-perfused samples.

  8. Enhancement of visible He2 emission by infrared laser excitation of He metastable atoms in atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Motomura, Hideki; Sakai, Osamu; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2011-02-01

    We observed bright red emission at an intersection of an infrared (IR) laser beam and an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The APPJ had a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge configuration and generated a plasma plume in a He gas flow ejected into air from a glass capillary. Although the laser-beam wavelength was 1083 nm corresponding to He I (23P-23S) atomic transition, the enhanced red emission peaked in the visible region at 640 nm and had broad bandwidth corresponding to He2 (d\\,^{3}\\!\\Sigma_u^{+}{{--}}b\\,^{3}\\Pi _g) molecular transition. This result indicates that the IR laser excitation of He metastable (23S) atoms leads to selective formation of excited He2 (d\\,^{3}\\!\\Sigma_u^{+}) molecules from excited He (23P) atoms. The 640 nm emission intensity decreased as the laser beam moved downstream in the plasma plume, because of the quenching effects on the excited He atoms and the excited He2 molecules by air entrainment. We believe that the He2 (d\\,^{3}\\!\\Sigma_u^{+}) molecular formation follows two potential curves of He2 (f 3Σu or f 3Πu) and (d\\,^{3}\\!\\Sigma_u^{+}) states, overcoming a potential hump by three-body collision processes.

  9. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600 ~ 700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence. PMID:26246319

  10. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600 ~ 700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence.

  11. Combined near-infrared excited SEHRS and SERS spectra of pH sensors using silver nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Gühlke, Marina; Heiner, Zsuzsanna; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-10-21

    Surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of para-mercaptobenzoic acid (pMBA) were studied with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm, using different silver nanostructures as substrates for both SEHRS and SERS. The spectra acquired for different pH values between pH 2 and pH 12 were compared with SERS data obtained from the identical samples at 532 nm excitation. Comparison of the ratios of the enhancement factors from SEHRS and SERS experiments with those from calculations using plasmonic absorbance spectra suggests that the difference between total surface-enhancement factors of SEHRS and SERS for pMBA is mainly explained by a difference between the electromagnetic contributions for linear and non-linear SERS. SERS and SEHRS spectra obtained at near-infrared (NIR) excitation indicate an overall reduction of enhancement by a factor of 2-3 at very low and very high pH, compared to neutral pH. Our data provide evidence that different molecular vibrations and/or different adsorption species are probed in SERS and SEHRS, and that SEHRS is very sensitive to slight changes in the pMBA-nanostructure interactions. We conclude that the combination of SEHRS and SERS using NIR excitation is more powerful for micro-environmental pH sensing than one-photon spectra excited in the visible range alone. PMID:26377486

  12. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Kennis, John T M

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600~700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence. PMID:26246319

  13. Optimization of silver nanoparticles for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of structurally diverse analytes using visible and near-infrared excitation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Matthew W; Smith, Emily A

    2011-09-01

    Several experimental parameters affecting surface enhanced Raman (SER) signals using 488, 785 and 1064 nm excitation for eight diverse analytes are reported. Citrate reduced silver colloids having average diameters ranging from 40 ± 10 to 100 ± 20 nm were synthesized. The nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and absorbance spectrophotometry before and after inducing nanoparticle aggregation with 0.99% v/v 0.5 M magnesium chloride. The nanoparticle aggregates and SERS signal were stable between 30 and 90 minutes after inducing aggregation. For the analytes 4-mercaptopyridine, 4-methylthiobenzoic acid and the dipeptide phenylalanine-cysteine using all three excitation wavelengths, the highest surface area adjusted SER signal was obtained using 70 ± 20 nm nanoparticles, which generated 290 ± 40 nm aggregates with the addition of magnesium chloride. The decrease in the SER signal using non-optimum colloids was 12 to 42% using 488 nm excitation and larger decreases in signal, up to 92%, were observed using near infrared excitation wavelengths. In contrast, pyridine, benzoic acid, and phenylalanine required 220 ± 30 nm aggregates for the highest SER signal with 785 or 1064 nm excitation, but larger aggregates (290 ± 40 nm) were required with 488 nm excitation. The optimum experimental conditions measured with the small molecule analytes held for a 10 amino acid peptide and hemoglobin. Reproducible SERS measurements with 2 to 9% RSD have been obtained by considering nanoparticle size, aggregation conditions, excitation wavelength and the nature of the analyte-silver interaction. PMID:21301711

  14. Combining multiphoton and CARS microscopy for skin imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Weinigel, M.; Lademann, J.; Sterry, W.; Latka, I.; Dietzek, B.; Popp, J.; König, K.

    2011-03-01

    We present combined coherent anti Stokes Raman scattering and two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy, for label-free in vitro and in vivo imaging of skin with both chemical discrimination and subcellular resolution. In particular, we show how CARS microscopy is utilized to image lipid-rich structures inside the skin, preparing for a combined multiphoton and CARS imaging modality for biomedical research and skin imaging. As a further potential application the detection of topically applied oil on the skin is presented.

  15. Quantitative multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada

    2014-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs for label-free multidimensional high-resolution in vivo imaging have been introduced to the market several years ago. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechanooptical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as a CARS module. Non-fluorescent lipids and water, mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged in vivo with submicron resolution in human skin. Sensitive and rapid detectors allow single photon counting and the construction of 3D maps where the number of detected photons per voxel is depicted. Intratissue concentration profiles from endogenous as well exogenous substances can be generated when the number of detected photons can be correlated with the number of molecules with respect to binding and scattering behavior. Furthermore, the skin ageing index SAAID based on the ratio elastin/collagen as well as the epidermis depth based on the onset of SHG generation can be determined.

  16. Multiphoton tomography of astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Pietruszka, Anna; Bückle, Rainer; Gerlach, Nicole; Heinrich, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    Weightlessness may impair the astronaut's health conditions. Skin impairments belong to the most frequent health problems during space missions. Within the Skin B project, skin physiological changes during long duration space flights are currently investigated on three European astronauts that work for nearly half a year at the ISS. Measurements on the hydration, the transepidermal water loss, the surface structure, elasticity and the tissue density by ultrasound are conducted. Furthermore, high-resolution in vivo histology is performed by multiphoton tomography with 300 nm spatial and 200 ps temporal resolution. The mobile certified medical tomograph with a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm is employed to measure two-photon autofluorescence and SHG in the volar forearm of the astronauts. Modification of the tissue architecture and of the fluorescent biomolecules NAD(P)H, keratin, melanin and elastin are detected as well as of SHG-active collagen. Thinning of the vital epidermis, a decrease of the autofluoresence intensity, an increase in the long fluorescence lifetime, and a reduced skin ageing index SAAID based on an increased collagen level in the upper dermis have been found. Current studies focus on recovery effects.

  17. Comparison of objective lenses for multiphoton microscopy in turbid samples

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Avtar; McMullen, Jesse D.; Doris, Eli A.; Zipfel, Warren R.

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of illumination and detection optics is pivotal for multiphoton imaging in highly scattering tissue and the objective lens is the central component in both of these pathways. To better understand how basic lens parameters (NA, magnification, field number) affect fluorescence collection and image quality, a two-detector setup was used with a specialized sample cell to separate measurement of total excitation from epifluorescence collection. Our data corroborate earlier findings that low-mag lenses can be superior at collecting scattered photons, and we compare a set of commonly used multiphoton objective lenses in terms of their ability to collect scattered fluorescence, providing guidance for the design of multiphoton imaging systems. For example, our measurements of epi-fluorescence beam divergence in the presence of scattering reveal minimal beam broadening, indicating that often-advocated over-sized collection optics are not as advantageous as previously thought. These experiments also provide a framework for choosing objective lenses for multiphoton imaging by relating the results of our measurements to various design parameters of the objectives lenses used. PMID:26309771

  18. High-throughput multiphoton-induced three-dimensional ablation and imaging for biotissues

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Li, Pei-Kao; Cheng, Li-Chung; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a temporal focusing-based high-throughput multiphoton-induced ablation system with axially-resolved widefield multiphoton excitation has been successfully applied to rapidly disrupt biotissues. Experimental results demonstrate that this technique features high efficiency for achieving large-area laser ablation without causing serious photothermal damage in non-ablated regions. Furthermore, the rate of tissue processing can reach around 1.6 × 106 μm3/s in chicken tendon. Moreover, the temporal focusing-based multiphoton system can be efficiently utilized in optical imaging through iterating high-throughput multiphoton-induced ablation machining followed by widefield optical sectioning; hence, it has the potential to obtain molecular images for a whole bio-specimen. PMID:25780739

  19. Multiphoton ionization of jet-cooled nickelocene with tunable nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketkov, Sergey Yu.; Selzle, Heinrich L.; Schlag, Edward W.; Titova, Sofia N.

    2003-08-01

    Efficient multiphoton ionization of nickelocene molecules in a supersonically cooled molecular beam has been performed for the first time with a nanosecond tunable dye laser operating in the 35,000-cm -1 region which corresponds to the lowest Rydberg transition observed in the one-photon absorption spectrum. The time-of-flight mass spectra obtained show strong signals of intact molecular ions Cp 2Ni + (Cp=η 5-C 5H 5) and weaker peaks of fragment ions CpNi +. The conditions have been found for generation of Cp 2Ni + as the only ionic product of multiphoton excitation. The ion signal dependence on the laser intensity and the resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectrum measured at the mass of Cp 2Ni + testify for saturation of absorption and/or ionization steps at the laser pulse intensities used (2-6 MW cm -2). Possible mechanisms of multiphoton processes resulting in formation of the ions observed are discussed.

  20. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  1. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the underlying physics. There are now at least six different disciplines that deal with infrared radiation in one form or another, and in one or several different spectral portions of the whole IR range. These are spectroscopy, astronomy, thermal imaging, detector and source development and metrology, as well the field of optical data transmission. Scientists working in these fields range from chemists and astronomers through to physicists and even photographers. This issue presents examples from some of these fields. All the papers—though some of them deal with fundamental or applied research—include interesting elements that make them directly applicable to university-level teaching at the graduate or postgraduate level. Source (e.g. quantum cascade lasers) and detector development (e.g. multispectral sensors), as well as metrology issues and optical data transmission, are omitted since they belong to fundamental research journals. Using a more-or-less arbitrary order according to wavelength range, the issue starts with a paper on the physics of near-infrared photography using consumer product cameras in the spectral range from 800 nm to 1.1 µm [1]. It is followed by a series of three papers dealing with IR imaging in spectral ranges from 3 to 14 µm [2-4]. One of them deals with laboratory courses that may help to characterize the IR camera response [2], the second discusses potential applications for nondestructive testing techniques [3] and the third gives an example of how IR thermal imaging may be used to understand cloud cover of the Earth [4], which is the prerequisite for successful climate modelling. The next two papers cover the vast field of IR spectroscopy [5, 6]. The first of these deals with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the spectral range from 2.5 to 25 µm, studying e.g. ro-vibrational excitations in gases or optical phonon interactions within solids [5]. The second deals mostly with the spectroscopy of liquids such as biofuels and special techniques such as attenuated total reflectance [6]. The two final papers deal with what seem to be wholly different scientific fields [7, 8]. One paper describes SOFIA, an aeroplane-based astronomical observatory covering the whole IR range [7], while the other represents a small review of the quite new topic of terahertz physics at the upper end of the IR spectral range, from around 30 µm to 3 mm wavelength, and its many applications in science and industry [8]. Although artificially separated, all these fields use similar kinds of detectors, similar kinds of IR sources and similar technologies, while the instruments use the same physical principles. We are convinced that the field of infrared physics will develop over the next decade in the same dynamic way as during the last, and this special issue may serve as starting point for regular submissions on the topic. At any rate, it shines a light on this fascinating and many-faceted subject, which started more than 200 years ago. References [1] Mangold K, Shaw J A and Vollmer M 2013 The physics of near-infrared photography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S51-71 [2] Vollmer M and Möllmann K-P 2013 Characterization of IR cameras in student labs Eur. J. Phys. 34 S73-90 [3] Ibarra-Castanedo C, Tarpani J R and Maldague X P V 2013 Nondestructive testing with thermography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S91-109 [4] Shaw J A and Nugent P W 2013 Physics principles in radiometric infrared imaging of clouds in the atmosphere Eur. J. Phys. 34 S111-21 [5] Möllmann K-P and Vollmer M 2013 Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in physics laboratory courses Eur. J. Phys. 34 S123-37 [6] Heise H M, Fritzsche J, Tkatsch H, Waag F, Karch K, Henze K, Delbeck S and Budde J 2013 Recent advances in mid- and near-infrared spectroscopy with applications for research and teaching, focusing on petrochemistry and biotechnology relevant products Eur. J. Phys. 34 S139-59 [7] Krabbe A, Mehlert D, Röser H-P and Scorza C 2013 SOFIA, an airborne observatory for infrared astronomy Eur. J. Phys. 34 S161-77 [8] Zouaghi W, Thomson M D, Rabia K, Hahn R, Blank V and Roskos H G 2013 Broadband terahertz spectroscopy: principles, fundamental research and potential for industrial applications Eur. J. Phys. 34 S179-99

  2. Optical and Near Infrared Study of the Cepheus E Outflow, a Very Low Excitation Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noreiga-Crespo, A.; Ayala, S.; Garnavich, P.; Curiel, S.; Raga, A.; Bohm, K.; Raymond, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we explore the link between the physical properties of the outflow as determined from optical imaging and spectroscopy, and compare these results with those obtained from observations in the near infrared.

  3. Terahertz-to-infrared emission through laser excitation of surface plasmons in metal films with porous nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Zhao, Ji; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, X-C

    2015-06-29

    We report on the investigation of terahertz-to-infrared (THz-to-IR) thermal emission that relies on the excitation of surface plasmons in metal films deposited on a substrate with randomly ordered nanoscale pore arrays. The THz-to-IR radiation was observed both in the direction of laser beam propagation and the reverse direction. The intensity ratio between backward and forward radiation is exponentially dependent on the nominal thickness of the porous metal films. The findings are discussed in view of the proposed generation mechanism based on propagating surface plasmon polaritons on both air/metal and metal/substrate interfaces. PMID:26191727

  4. Evaluation of Barrett Esophagus by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianxin; Wong, Serena; Nathanson, Michael H.; Jain, Dhanpat

    2014-01-01

    Context Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on 2-photon excitation fluorescence and second-harmonic generation allows simultaneous visualization of cellular details and extracellular matrix components of fresh, unfixed, and unstained tissue. Portable multiphoton microscopes, which could be placed in endoscopy suites, and multiphoton endomicroscopes are in development, but their clinical utility is unknown. Objectives To examine fresh, unfixed endoscopic biopsies obtained from the distal esophagus and gastroesophageal junction to (1) define the MPM characteristics of normal esophageal squamous mucosa and gastric columnar mucosa, and (2) evaluate whether diagnosis of intestinal metaplasia/Barrett esophagus (BE) could be made reliably with MPM. Design The study examined 35 untreated, fresh biopsy specimens from 25 patients who underwent routine upper endoscopy. A Zeiss LSM 710 Duo microscope (Carl Zeiss, Thornwood, New York) coupled to a Spectra-Physics (Mountain View, California) Tsunami Ti:sapphire laser was used to obtain a MPM image within 4 hours of fresh specimen collection. After obtaining MPM images, the biopsy specimens were placed in 10% buffered formalin and submitted for routine histopathologic examination. Then, the MPM images were compared with the findings in the hematoxylin-eosin–stained, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. The MPM characteristics of the squamous, gastric-type columnar and intestinal-type columnar epithelium were analyzed. In biopsies with discrepancy between MPM imaging and hematoxylin-eosin–stained sections, the entire tissue block was serially sectioned and reevaluated. A diagnosis of BE was made when endoscopic and histologic criteria were satisfied. Results Based on effective 2-photon excitation fluorescence of cellular reduced pyridine nucleotides and flavin adenine dinucleotide and lack of 2-photon excitation fluorescence of mucin and cellular nuclei, MPM could readily identify and distinguish among squamous epithelial cells, goblet cells, gastric foveolar-type mucous cells, and parietal cells in the area of gastroesophageal junction. Based on the cell types identified, the mucosa was defined as squamous, columnar gastric type (cardia/fundic-type), and metaplastic columnar intestinal-type/BE. Various types of mucosa seen in the study of 35 biopsies included normal squamous mucosa only (n = 14; 40%), gastric cardia-type mucosa only (n = 2; 6%), gastric fundic mucosa (n = 6; 17%), and both squamous and gastric mucosa (n = 13; 37%). Intestinal metaplasia was identified by the presence of goblet cells in 10 of 25 cases (40%) leading to a diagnosis of BE on MPM imaging and only in 7 cases (28%) by histopathology. In 3 of 35 biopsies (9%), clear-cut goblet cells were seen by MPM imaging but not by histopathology, even after the entire tissue block was sectioned. Based on effective 2-photon excitation fluorescence of elastin and second-harmonic generation of collagen, connective tissue in the lamina propria and the basement membrane was also visualized with MPM. Conclusions Multiphoton microscopy has the ability to accurately distinguish squamous epithelium and different cellular elements of the columnar mucosa obtained from biopsies around the gastroesophageal junction, including goblet cells that are important for the diagnosis of BE. Thus, use of MPM in the endoscopy suite might provide immediate microscopic images during endoscopy, improving screening and surveillance of patients with BE. PMID:24476518

  5. Laser action in chromium-activated forsterite for near infrared excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on laser action in chromium-doped forsterite (Cr:Mg2SiO4) for 1064-nm excitation of the crystal's double-hump absorption band spanning the 850-1200-nm wavelength range. The cavity arrangement used for obtaining laser action in Cr:Mg2SiO2 was similar to that described by Petricevic et al. (1988). The fundamental and second harmonic emissions from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at a 10-Hz repetition rate were used for excitation of the NIR and visible bands, respectively. Pulsed laser action was readily observed for both the 1064-nm and 532-nm pumping at or above the respective thresholds. The laser parameters of the 532-nm and 1064-nm excitations were similar, indicating that the IR band is responsible for laser action for both excitations.

  6. Mitigating phototoxicity during multiphoton microscopy of live Drosophila embryos in the 1.0-1.2 µm wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Débarre, Delphine; Olivier, Nicolas; Supatto, Willy; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Light-induced toxicity is a fundamental bottleneck in microscopic imaging of live embryos. In this article, after a review of photodamage mechanisms in cells and tissues, we assess photo-perturbation under illumination conditions relevant for point-scanning multiphoton imaging of live Drosophila embryos. We use third-harmonic generation (THG) imaging of developmental processes in embryos excited by pulsed near-infrared light in the 1.0-1.2 µm range. We study the influence of imaging rate, wavelength, and pulse duration on the short-term and long-term perturbation of development and define criteria for safe imaging. We show that under illumination conditions typical for multiphoton imaging, photodamage in this system arises through 2- and/or 3-photon absorption processes and in a cumulative manner. Based on this analysis, we derive general guidelines for improving the signal-to-damage ratio in two-photon (2PEF/SHG) or THG imaging by adjusting the pulse duration and/or the imaging rate. Finally, we report label-free time-lapse 3D THG imaging of gastrulating Drosophila embryos with sampling appropriate for the visualisation of morphogenetic movements in wild-type and mutant embryos, and long-term multiharmonic (THG-SHG) imaging of development until hatching. PMID:25111506

  7. Attosecond x-ray sources generation from pre-excited He+ ions using mid-infrared homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liqiang; Liu, Hang

    2015-10-01

    A promising method is proposed to generate the intense ultrabroadband supercontinuum spectra and the ultrashort attosecond x-ray pulses from pre-excited He+ ion with the homogeneous and inhomogeneous two-color mid-infrared laser field combined with a unipolar pulse. For the homogeneous case, by optimizing the two mid-infrared pulses and the unipolar pulse, not only the harmonic cutoff has been extended, but also the harmonic modulation has been remarkably reduced. Moreover, we found the above harmonic extension scheme can be achieved in the multi-cycle pulse region and by preparing the initial state of He+ ion as the coherent superposition of the ground and the first excited states, the harmonic yield can be enhanced by 4-6 orders of magnitude compared with the case of the single ground initial state. Furthermore, with the introduction of the inhomogeneous of the combined field, the harmonic cutoff can be further enhanced, resulting in a supercontinuum with the bandwidth of 1648 eV. As a result, a series of intense 32as x-ray pulses can be obtained, which are 4-6 orders of magnitude improvement in comparison with the single initial state case.

  8. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  9. Accurate far-infrared rotational frequencies of carbon monoxide in excited vibrational states

    SciTech Connect

    Stroh, F.; Evenson, K.M.

    1994-12-31

    Pure rotational transitions of carbon monoxide in the excited vibrational states v=1 and v=2 of the ground electronic state have been measured in the 0.3 to 4.0THz spectral region. Accurate center frequencies of 50 transitions with J values up to J=33 as well as improved sets of rotational constants are reported.

  10. Infrared/ultraviolet quadruple resonance spectroscopy to investigate structures of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, M.; Bartl, K.; Gerhards, M.

    2012-03-21

    Molecular beam investigations in combination with IR/UV spectroscopy offer the possibility to obtain structural information on isolated molecules and clusters. One of the demanding tasks is the discrimination of different isomers, e.g., by the use of isomer specific UV excitations. If this discrimination fails due to overlaying UV spectra of different isomers, IR/IR methods offer another possibility. Here, we present a new IR/UV/IR/UV quadruple resonance technique to distinguish between different isomers especially in the electronically excited state. Due to the IR spectra, structural changes and photochemical pathways in excited states can be assigned and identified. The method is applied to the dihydrated cluster of 3-hydroxyflavone which has been investigated as photochemically relevant system and proton wire model in the S{sub 1} state. By applying the new IR/UV/IR/UV technique, we are able to show experimentally that both in the electronic ground (S{sub 0}) and the electronically excited state (S{sub 1}) two isomers have to be assigned.

  11. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jhih; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2009-07-01

    We utilize multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of noncancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from humans. Our results show that the combination of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from noncancerous lung tissues. Specifically, noncancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure, while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55+/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15, respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13, respectively. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from noncancerous tissues.

  12. Multiphoton imaging of excised normal skin and keloid scar: preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Michael B.; Yeh, Alvin T.; Torkian, Behrooz; Sun, Chung-Ho; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Wong, Brian J.

    2004-07-01

    Wound healing is a physiologic process that acts to repair disruptions in the continuity of tissue caused by injury or surgical incision. Keloids and hypertrophic scars are forms of aberrant wound healing, which are characterized by the overproduction of collagen, resulting in an excessive amount of scar tissue. Keloid tumors, by definition, grow outside the boundary of the original tissue damage. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an imaging technique which allows imaging of living specimens, without the use of fixation or stains. Images of collagen fibers are produced by the second harmonic signal intensity generated by endogenous fluorescence through excitation by infrared laser light. A postauricular keloid tumor was excised from a patient. The tissue was dissected, and a portion was imaged using MPM. Normal skin tissue was isolated from a patient undergoing a facelift. A portion of this tissue was also dissected and imaged using MPM. MPM images were taken using a 63X water immersion objective lens on a two-photon microscope and a titanium-sapphire laser. Images were taken beginning at the surface of the tissue and moving in at intervals of 200 nm to a final depth of 30 μm. The two-photon images were used to reconstruct three-dimensional representations of the collagen matrix within the tissues, which are readily contrasted. Density of the collagen within each tissue was also ascertained using depth dependant decay of the image intensity. Multiphoton imaging was successfully used to image the collagen matrix of normal skin and a keloid scar, demonstrating differences in their microstructures.

  13. Surface deactivation of vibrationally excited N2 studied using infrared titration combined with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, D.; Lopatik, D.; Guaitella, O.; Ionikh, Y.; Röpcke, J.; Rousseau, A.

    2014-01-01

    The wall de-excitation probability \\gamma_{N_{2}} of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules was determined using infrared (IR) titration with CO, CO2 and N2O. Gas mixtures of N2 with 0.05-0.5% of CO (CO2 or N2O) were excited by a pulsed dc discharge at p = 133 Pa in a cylindrical discharge tube. During the afterglow, the vibrational relaxation of titrating molecules was monitored in situ with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy. The value of \\gamma _{N_{2}} was deduced from measured vibrational relaxation times using a model of vibrational kinetics in N2. It was found that adsorption of IR tracers on the surface may increase the value of \\gamma _{N_{2}} by a factor up to two, depending on the molecule and the surface material. It was demonstrated that N2O is the most inert and reliable tracer and it was used for the determination of \\gamma_{N_{2}} on silica, Pyrex, TiO2, Al2O3 and anodized aluminum. Pretreatment of the silica surface by low-pressure plasma was found to have a strong effect on the vibrational de-excitation. Values of \\gamma_{N_{2}} measured after O2, Ar and N2 plasma pretreatment of the same silica discharge tube were 5.7 × 10-4, 8.2 × 10-4 and 11 × 10-4, respectively. This study clearly demonstrates that the presence of adsorbed atoms and molecules on the surface may significantly alter the value of \\gamma_{N_{2}} .

  14. Simultaneous time and wavelength resolved spectroscopy under two-colour near infrared and terahertz excitation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, J; Wagner, M; Zybell, S; Winnerl, S; Stehr, D; Helm, M; Schneider, H

    2011-10-01

    Time and wavelength resolved spectroscopy requires optical sources emitting very short pulses and a fast detection mechanism capable of measuring the evolution of the output spectrum as a function of time. We use table-top Ti:sapphire lasers and a free-electron laser (FEL) emitting ps pulses as excitation sources and a streak camera coupled to a spectrometer for detection. One of the major aspects of this setup is the synchronization of pulses from the two lasers which we describe in detail. Optical properties of the FEL pulses are studied by autocorrelation and electro-optic sampling measurements. We discuss the advantages of using this setup to perform photoluminescence quenching in semiconductor quantum wells and quantum dots. Carrier redistribution due to pulsed excitation in these heterostructures can be investigated directly. Sideband generation in quantum wells is also studied where the intense FEL pulses facilitate the detection of the otherwise weak nonlinear effect. PMID:22047280

  15. Simultaneous time and wavelength resolved spectroscopy under two-colour near infrared and terahertz excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, J.; Wagner, M.; Zybell, S.; Winnerl, S.; Stehr, D.; Helm, M.; Schneider, H.

    2011-10-01

    Time and wavelength resolved spectroscopy requires optical sources emitting very short pulses and a fast detection mechanism capable of measuring the evolution of the output spectrum as a function of time. We use table-top Ti:sapphire lasers and a free-electron laser (FEL) emitting ps pulses as excitation sources and a streak camera coupled to a spectrometer for detection. One of the major aspects of this setup is the synchronization of pulses from the two lasers which we describe in detail. Optical properties of the FEL pulses are studied by autocorrelation and electro-optic sampling measurements. We discuss the advantages of using this setup to perform photoluminescence quenching in semiconductor quantum wells and quantum dots. Carrier redistribution due to pulsed excitation in these heterostructures can be investigated directly. Sideband generation in quantum wells is also studied where the intense FEL pulses facilitate the detection of the otherwise weak nonlinear effect.

  16. Anti-Stokes fluorescence from endogenously formed protoporphyrin IX – Implications for clinical multiphoton diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kantere, Despina; Guldbrand, Stina; Paoli, John; Goksör, Mattias; Hanstorp, Dag; Wennberg, Ann-Marie; Smedh, Maria; Ericson, Marica B

    2013-01-01

    Multiphoton imaging based on two-photon excitation is making its way into the clinics, particularly for skin cancer diagnostics. It has been suggested that endogenously formed protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) induced by aminolevulinic acid or methylaminolevulinate can be applied to improve tumor contrast, in connection to imaging of tissue autofluorescence. However, previous reports are limited to cell studies and data from tissue are scarce. No report shows conclusive evidence that endogenously formed PpIX increases tumor contrast when performing multiphoton imaging in the clinical situation. We here demonstrate by spectral analysis that two-photon excitation of endogenously formed PpIX does not provide additional contrast in superficial basal cell carcinomas. In fact, the PpIX signal is overshadowed by the autofluorescent background. The results show that PpIX should be excited at a wavelength giving rise to one-photon anti-Stokes fluorescence, to overcome the autofluorescent background. Thus, this study reports on a plausible method, which can be implemented for clinical investigations on endogenously formed PpIX using multiphoton microscopy. Three-dimensional multiphoton microscopy images obtained from a superficial basal cell carcinoma illustrating higher porphyrin contrast when anti-stokes excitation (710 nm) is used compared to two-photon excitation (810 nm). PMID:22997024

  17. Population transfer by multiphoton adiabatic rapid passage

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, H.; Gurian, J. H.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2011-03-15

    The population of atoms in Rydberg states is efficiently transferred with a change in principal quantum number n of up to ten via multiphoton adiabatic rapid passage through a single multiphoton resonance using a frequency-chirped microwave pulse. A quantum-mechanical picture of multiphoton adiabatic rapid passage in a one-dimensional atom using a Floquet approach provides a good description of most, but not all, of the observed phenomena.

  18. Multispot multiphoton Ca²⁺ imaging in acute myocardial slices.

    PubMed

    Borile, Giulia; de Mauro, Claudio; Urbani, Andrea; Alfieri, Domenico; Pavone, Francesco S; Mongillo, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become essential for dynamic imaging in thick living tissues. High-rate, full-field image acquisition in multiphoton microscopy is achievable by parallelization of the excitation and detection pathways. We developed our approach via a diffractive optical element which splits a pulsed laser into 16 beamlets and exploits a descanned detection system consisting of an array of beamlet-associated photomultiplier tubes. The optical performance of the multiphoton multispot system (MCube) has been characterized in cardiac tissue sections and subsequently used for the first time for fluorescence imaging of cardiomyocyte Ca²⁺ dynamics in viable acute cardiac slices. Multispot multiphoton microscopy (MMM) has never been used before to monitor Ca²⁺ dynamics in thick, viable tissue samples. Acute heart slices are a powerful close-to-in vivo model of Ca²⁺ imaging allowing the simultaneous observation of several cells in their own tissue environment, exploiting the multiphoton excitation ability to penetrate scattering tissues. Moreover, we show that the concurrent high spatial and temporal resolutions afforded by the parallel scanning in MMM can be exploited to simultaneously assess subcellular Ca²⁺ dynamics in different cells in the tissue. We recorded local Ca²⁺ release events including macrosparks, travelling waves, and rotors. PMID:25517401

  19. Optical Emission Studies of Copper Plasma Induced Using Infrared Transversely Excited Atmospheric (IR TEA) Carbon Dioxide Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Milos; Kuzmanovic, Miroslav; Rankovic, Dragan; Ciganovic, Jovan; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Savovic, Jelena; Trtica, Milan

    2015-04-01

    Spatially resolved, time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy was applied for investigation of copper plasma produced by a nanosecond infrared (IR) transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm. The effect of surrounding air pressure, in the pressure range 0.1 to 1013 mbar, on plasma formation and its characteristics was investigated. A linear dependence of intensity threshold for plasma formation on logarithm of air pressure was found. Lowering of the air pressure reduces the extent of gas breakdown, enabling better laser-target coupling and thus increases ablation. Optimum air pressure for target plasma formation was 0.1 mbar. Under that pressure, the induced plasma consisted of two clearly distinguished and spatially separated regions. The maximum intensity of emission, with sharp and well-resolved spectral lines and negligibly low background emission, was obtained from a plasma zone 8 mm from the target surface. The estimated excitation temperature in this zone was around 7000 K. The favorable signal to background ratio obtained in this plasma region indicates possible analytical application of TEA CO2 laser produced copper plasma. Detection limits of trace elements present in the Cu sample were on the order of 10 ppm (parts per million). Time-resolved measurements of spatially selected plasma zones were used to find a correlation between the observed spatial position and time delay. PMID:25741748

  20. Record Multiphoton Absorption Cross-Sections by Dendrimer Organometalation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Peter V; Watson, Laurance A; Barlow, Adam; Wang, Genmiao; Cifuentes, Marie P; Humphrey, Mark G

    2016-02-01

    Large increases in molecular two-photon absorption, the onset of measurable molecular three-photon absorption, and record molecular four-photon absorption in organic π-delocalizable frameworks are achieved by incorporation of bis(diphosphine)ruthenium units with alkynyl linkages. The resultant ruthenium alkynyl-containing dendrimers exhibit strong multiphoton absorption activity through the biological and telecommunications windows in the near-infrared region. The ligated ruthenium units significantly enhance solubility and introduce fully reversible redox switchability to the optical properties. Increasing the ruthenium content leads to substantial increases in multiphoton absorption properties without any loss of optical transparency. This significant improvement in multiphoton absorption performance by incorporation of the organometallic units into the organic π-framework is maintained when the relevant parameters are scaled by molecular weights or number of delocalizable π-electrons. The four-photon absorption cross-section of the most metal-rich dendrimer is an order of magnitude greater than the previous record value. PMID:26797727

  1. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    In this work, we utilized multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of non-cancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from human. Our results show that the combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from non-cancerous lung tissues. Specifically, non-cancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI or SAAID) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55 +/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15 respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13 respectively. Intrinsic fluorescence ratio (FAD/NADH) of SCC and non-cancerous tissues are 0.40+/-0.05 and 0.53+/-0.05 respectively, the redox ratio of SCC diminishes significantly, indicating that increased cellular metabolic activity. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from non-cancerous tissues. With additional development, multiphoton microscopy may be used for the clinical diagnosis of lung cancers.

  2. Ground and excited state infrared spectroscopy of jet-cooled radicals: Exploring the photophysics of trihydronaphthyl and inden-2-ylmethyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, Nathanael M.; Mehta-Hurt, Deepali N.; Korn, Joseph A.; Sibert, Edwin L.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    The alkyl and aromatic CH stretch infrared spectra of inden-2-ylmethyl (I2M, C10H9) and trihydronaphthyl (THN, C10H11) radicals have been recorded under jet-cooled conditions in the ground (D0) and first electronically excited (D1) states using resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy. Previously, the vibronic spectroscopy of a series of C10H9 and C10H11 hydronaphthyl radicals were investigated and their thermochemical properties were evaluated with isomer specificity [J. A. Sebree et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 11, 6255-6262 (2010)]. We show here that one of the m/z 129 spectral carriers characterized in that work was misidentified as 2-hydronaphthyl (2-HN) radical, appearing in a discharge of 1,2-dihydronaphthalene in close proximity to 1-hydronaphthyl radical. The D0-RIDIR spectrum in the alkyl CH stretch region positively identifies the m/z 129 isomer as I2M, whose two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI) spectrum was recently reported by Schmidt and co-workers [T. P. Troy et al., Chem. Sci. 2, 1755-1765 (2011)]. Here, we further characterize the I2M and THN radicals by recording their gas phase IR spectra in the alkyl and aromatic CH stretch regions, and explore the spectroscopic consequences of electronic excitation on the CH stretch absorptions. A local-mode CH stretch Hamiltonian incorporating cubic stretch-bend coupling between anharmonic CH stretches and CH2 scissor modes is utilized to describe their Fermi resonance interactions. Excellent agreement between the experimental and theoretical results facilitates the interpretation of the D0- and D1-state RIDIR spectra of I2M, revealing that upon excitation the alkyl CH stretches decrease in frequency by 70 cm-1, while the allyl-like CH stretches experience a modest blueshift. In comparison, the photophysics of THN are strikingly different in that the IR transitions that possess vibrational motion along the CβH and CδH bonds are absent in the D1-RIDIR spectrum yet are predicted to be present from the theoretical model. Several hypotheses are considered to account for the perturbations to these vibrations.

  3. Pulsed near-infrared laser diode excitation system for biomedical photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Allen, Thomas J; Beard, Paul C

    2006-12-01

    A pulsed laser diode system operating at 905 nm has been developed for the generation of photoacoustic signals in tissue. It was evaluated by measuring the photoacoustic waveforms generated in a blood vessel phantom comprising three dye-filled (mu(a)=1 mm(-1)) tubes of diameters 120-580 microm immersed to a maximum depth of 9 mm in a turbid liquid (mu'(s)=1 mm(-1)). The system was then combined with a cylindrical scanning system to obtain two-dimensional images of a tissue phantom. The signal-to-noise ratio of the detected signals in both cases and the image contrast in the latter suggest that such a system could provide a compact and inexpensive alternative to current excitation sources for superficial imaging applications. PMID:17099750

  4. Femtosecond laser pulse optimization for multiphoton cytometry and control of fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, Eric Robert

    This body of work encompasses optimization of near infrared femtosecond laser pulses both for enhancement of flow cytometry as well as adaptive pulse shaping to control fluorescence. A two-photon system for in vivo flow cytometry is demonstrated, which allows noninvasive quantification of circulating cell populations in a single live mouse. We monitor fluorescently-labeled red blood cells for more than two weeks, and are also able to noninvasively measure circulation times of two distinct populations of breast cancer cells simultaneously in a single mouse. We build a custom laser excitation source in the form of an extended cavity mode-locked oscillator, which enables superior detection in whole blood or saline of cell lines expressing fluorescent proteins including the green fluorescent protein (GFP), tdTomato and mPlum. A mathematical model explains unique features of the signals. The ability to distinguish different fluorescent species is central to simultaneous measurement of multiple molecular targets in high throughput applications including the multiphoton flow cytometer. We demonstrate that two dyes which are not distinguishable to one-photon measurements can be differentiated and in fact quantified in mixture via phase-shaped two-photon excitation pulses found by a genetic algorithm. We also selectively enhance or suppress two-photon fluorescence of numerous common dyes with tailored pulse shapes. Using a multiplicative (rather than ratiometric) fitness parameter, we are able to control the fluorescence while maintaining a strong signal. With this method, we control the two-photon fluorescence of the blue fluorescent protein (BFP), which is of particular interest in investigations of protein-protein interactions, and has frustrated previous attempts of control. Implementing an acousto-optic interferometer, we use the same experimental setup to measure two-photon excitation cross-sections of dyes and prove that photon-photon interferences are the predominant mechanism of control. This research establishes the basis for molecularly tailored pulse shaping in multiphoton flow cytometry, which will advance our ability to probe the biology of circulating cells during disease progression and response to therapy.

  5. Multiphoton adaptation of a commercial low-cost confocal microscope for live tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, James J.; Larson, Adam M.; Wensel, Theodore G.; Saggau, Peter

    2009-05-01

    The Nikon C1 confocal laser scanning microscope is a relatively inexpensive and user-friendly instrument. We describe a straightforward method to convert the C1 for multiphoton microscopy utilizing direct coupling of a femtosecond near-infrared laser into the scan head and fiber optic transmission of emission light to the three-channel detector box. Our adapted system can be rapidly switched between confocal and multiphoton mode, requires no modification to the original system, and uses only a few custom-made parts. The entire system, including scan mirrors and detector box, remain under the control of the user-friendly Nikon EZ-C1 software without modification.

  6. Plasma membrane nanoporation as a possible mechanism behind infrared excitation of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, Hope T.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Musick, Joshua D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Short infrared (IR) laser pulses have been used to stimulate action potentials in neurons both in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon has remained elusive. In vitro studies have found that pulsed IR exposure generates a nearly instant change in capacitance in the plasma membrane, characterized by inward rectification, a common feature in pore-forming exposures, such as electrical pulses and acoustic shock waves. Based on this similarity, we hypothesize that the mechanism of IR stimulation is the formation of short-lived nanopores in the plasma membrane. These transient, small-diameter pores allow the influx of extracellular ions that lead to action potential generation, possibly through activation of secondary messenger pathways or depolarization of the cell membrane resulting in activation of voltage-gated ion channels. Approach. A variety of fluorescent markers are used to observe the cell response to IR stimulation to monitor for effects indicative of nanoporation in other modalities. Main results. We observe rapid, transient rises in intracellular Ca2+, influx of YO-PRO-1 and propidium iodide into the cell signifying membrane permeabilization, cellular blebbing and swelling, and activation of the intracellular phosphoinositides lipid signaling pathway. Significance. This conclusion better explains the experimental observations and limitations of IR-induced neurological stimulation and represents a distinct theoretical shift in the understanding of the mechanism of IR-induced stimulation.

  7. Spread of cochlear excitation during stimulation with pulsed infrared radiation: inferior colliculus measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, C.-P.; Rajguru, S. M.; Matic, A. I.; Moreno, E. L.; Fishman, A. J.; Robinson, A. M.; Suh, E.; Walsh, J. T., Jr.

    2011-10-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has received considerable attention over the last few years. It provides an alternative method to artificially stimulate neurons without electrical current or the introduction of exogenous chromophores. One of the primary benefits of INS could be the improved spatial selectivity when compared with electrical stimulation. In the present study, we have evaluated the spatial selectivity of INS in the acutely damaged cochlea of guinea pigs and compared it to stimulation with acoustic tone pips in normal-hearing animals. The radiation was delivered via a 200 µm diameter optical fiber, which was inserted through a cochleostomy into the scala tympani of the basal cochlear turn. The stimulated section along the cochlear spiral ganglion was estimated from the neural responses recorded from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). ICC responses were recorded in response to cochlear INS using a multichannel penetrating electrode array. Spatial tuning curves (STCs) were constructed from the responses. For INS, approximately 55% of the activation profiles showed a single maximum, ~22% had two maxima and ~13% had multiple maxima. The remaining 10% of the profiles occurred at the limits of the electrode array and could not be classified. The majority of ICC STCs indicated that the spread of activation evoked by optical stimuli is comparable to that produced by acoustic tone pips.

  8. Mid-infrared Otto excitation of transverse electric modes in doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Mendieta, F.

    2015-04-01

    We have studied numerically the excitation of surface modes of transverse electric polarization in doped graphene. Using the prism-based Otto configuration, the electromagnetic resonances were found within ultra-tiny angular windows of width of order of Δ θ i = 10-3 degrees or lower, beyond the critical angle where evanescent fields are already available. We obtained absorption peaks of angular position strongly dependent on the prism-graphene separation d, which is larger than dc, the cutoff prism-graphene separation. We prove numerically that dc depends on the graphene parameters and can be written as d c = α / 2 , where α ( ω ) is the decay length of the electromagnetic field of the modes. With doping levels of Fermi energy 0.2 eV ≤ μ ≤ 0.3 eV, we found resonances within the range of 80-145 THz. The numerical calculations show the mayor role played by the graphene losses that, indeed, can obliterate the mode resonance.

  9. Development of infrared sensors using energy transfer/energy upconversion processes: Study of laser excited fluorescence in rare Earth ion doped crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash-Stevenson, S. K.; Reddy, B. R.; Venkateswarlu, P.

    1994-01-01

    A summary is presented of the spectroscopic study of three systems: LaF3:Ho(3+), LaF3:Er(3+) and CaF2:Nd(3+). When the D levels of Ho(3+) in LaF3 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 640 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from J (416 nm), F (485 nm), and E (546 nm) levels. Energy upconverted emissions were also observed from F and E levels of Ho(3+) when the material was excited with an 800 nm near infrared laser. When the D levels of Er(3+) in LaF3 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 637 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from the E (540 nm) and P (320, 400, and 468 nm) levels. Energy upconverted emissions were also observed from F, E, and D levels of Er(3+) when the material was resonantly excited with an 804 nm near infrared laser. When the D levels of Nd(3+) in CaF2 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 577 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from the L (360 and 382 nm), K (418 nm), and I (432 nm) levels. Very weak upconverted emissions were detected when this system was irradiated with a near infrared laser. The numbers in parentheses are the wavelengths of the emissions.

  10. Near-infrared-excited confocal Raman spectroscopy advances in vivo diagnosis of cervical precancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Joseph; Low, Jeffrey J. H.; Ilancheran, Arunachalam; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a unique optical technique that can probe the changes of vibrational modes of biomolecules associated with tissue premalignant transformation. This study evaluates the clinical utility of confocal Raman spectroscopy over near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) spectroscopy and composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy for improving early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo at colposcopy. A rapid NIR Raman system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic confocal Raman probe was utilized for in vivo NIR AF/Raman spectral measurements of the cervix. A total of 1240 in vivo Raman spectra [normal (n=993), dysplasia (n=247)] were acquired from 84 cervical patients. Principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) together with a leave-one-patient-out, cross-validation method were used to extract the diagnostic information associated with distinctive spectroscopic modalities. The diagnostic ability of confocal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated using the PCA-LDA model developed from the significant principal components (PCs) [i.e., PC4, 0.0023% PC5, 0.00095% PC8, 0.00022%, (p<0.05)], representing the primary tissue Raman features (e.g., 854, 937, 1095, 1253, 1311, 1445, and 1654 cm-1). Confocal Raman spectroscopy coupled with PCA-LDA modeling yielded the diagnostic accuracy of 84.1% (a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 87.1%) for in vivo discrimination of dysplastic cervix. The receiver operating characteristic curves further confirmed that the best classification was achieved using confocal Raman spectroscopy compared to the composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy or NIR AF spectroscopy alone. This study illustrates that confocal Raman spectroscopy has great potential to improve early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo during clinical colposcopy.

  11. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Li-Chung; Su, Hung-Wei; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Cho, Keng-Chi; Yen, Wei-Chung; Xu, Chris; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Temporal profile distortions reduce excitation efficiency and image quality in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy. In order to compensate the distortions, a wavefront sensorless adaptive optics system (AOS) was integrated into the microscope. The feedback control signal of the AOS was acquired from local image intensity maximization via a hill-climbing algorithm. The control signal was then utilized to drive a deformable mirror in such a way as to eliminate the distortions. With the AOS correction, not only is the axial excitation symmetrically refocused, but the axial resolution with full two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) intensity is also maintained. Hence, the contrast of the TPEF image of a R6G-doped PMMA thin film is enhanced along with a 3.7-fold increase in intensity. Furthermore, the TPEF image quality of 1μm fluorescent beads sealed in agarose gel at different depths is improved. PMID:24940539

  12. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Li-Chung; Su, Hung-Wei; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Cho, Keng-Chi; Yen, Wei-Chung; Xu, Chris; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2014-06-01

    Temporal profile distortions reduce excitation efficiency and image quality in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy. In order to compensate the distortions, a wavefront sensorless adaptive optics system (AOS) was integrated into the microscope. The feedback control signal of the AOS was acquired from local image intensity maximization via a hill-climbing algorithm. The control signal was then utilized to drive a deformable mirror in such a way as to eliminate the distortions. With the AOS correction, not only is the axial excitation symmetrically refocused, but the axial resolution with full two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) intensity is also maintained. Hence, the contrast of the TPEF image of a R6G-doped PMMA thin film is enhanced along with a 3.7-fold increase in intensity. Furthermore, the TPEF image quality of 1μm fluorescent beads sealed in agarose gel at different depths is improved. PMID:24940539

  13. Singlet and triplet excitation management in a bichromophoric near-infrared-phosphorescent BODIPY-benzoporphyrin platinum complex

    SciTech Connect

    Whited, M. T.; Djurovich, P. I.; Roberts, Sean T.; Durrell, A. C.; Schlenker, C. W.; Bradforth, Stephen E.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2011-01-12

    Multichromophoric arrays provide one strategy for assembling molecules with intense absorptions across the visible spectrum but are generally focused on systems that efficiently produce and manipulate singlet excitations and therefore are burdened by the restrictions of (a) unidirectional energy transfer and (b) limited tunability of the lowest molecular excited state. In contrast, we present here a multichromophoric array based on four boron dipyrrins (BODIPY) bound to a platinum benzoporphyrin scaffold that exhibits intense panchromatic absorption and efficiently generates triplets. The spectral complementarity of the BODIPY and porphryin units allows the direct observation of fast bidirectional singlet and triplet energy transfer processes (kST(1BDP→1Por) = 7.8 × 1011 s-1, kTT(3Por→3BDP) = 1.0 × 1010 s-1, kTT(3BDP→3Por) = 1.6 × 1010 s-1), leading to a long-lived equilibrated [3BDP][Por]⇌[BDP][3Por] state. This equilibrated state contains approximately isoenergetic porphyrin and BODIPY triplets and exhibits efficient near-infrared phosphorescence (λem = 772 nm, Φ = 0.26). Taken together, these studies show that appropriately designed triplet-utilizing arrays may overcome fundamental limitations typically associated with core-shell chromophores by tunable redistribution of energy from the core back onto the antennae.

  14. In Vivo Microscopy of the Mouse Brain Using Multiphoton Laser Scanning Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Elizabeth J.

    2008-01-01

    The use of multiphoton microscopy for imaging mouse brain in vivo offers several advantages and poses several challenges. This tutorial begins by briefly comparing multiphoton microscopy with other imaging modalities used to visualize the brain and its activity. Next, an overview of the techniques for introducing fluorescence into whole animals to generate contrast for in vivo microscopy using two-photon excitation is presented. Two different schemes of surgically preparing mice for brain imaging with multiphoton microscopy are reviewed. Then, several issues and problems with in vivo microscopy - including motion artifact, respiratory and cardiac rhythms, maintenance of animal health, anesthesia, and the use of fiducial markers – are discussed. Finally, examples of how these techniques have been applied to visualize the cerebral vasculature and its response to hypercapnic stimulation are provided. PMID:20975841

  15. Application of Multiphoton Microscopy in Dermatological Studies: a Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Elijah; Rowlands, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the historical and more recent developments of multiphoton microscopy, as applied to dermatology. Multiphoton microscopy offers several advantages over competing microscopy techniques: there is an inherent axial sectioning, penetration depths that compete well with confocal microscopy on account of the use of near-infrared light, and many two-photon contrast mechanisms, such as second-harmonic generation, have no analogue in one-photon microscopy. While the penetration depths of photons into tissue are typically limited on the order of hundreds of microns, this is of less concern in dermatology, as the skin is thin and readily accessible. As a result, multiphoton microscopy in dermatology has generated a great deal of interest, much of which is summarized here. The review covers the interaction of light and tissue, as well as the various considerations that must be made when designing an instrument. The state of multiphoton microscopy in imaging skin cancer and various other diseases is also discussed, along with the investigation of aging and regeneration phenomena, and finally, the use of multiphoton microscopy to analyze the transdermal transport of drugs, cosmetics and other agents is summarized. The review concludes with a look at potential future research directions, especially those that are necessary to push these techniques into widespread clinical acceptance. PMID:25075226

  16. The multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.P. . UEO Enrichment Technical Operations Div.)

    1992-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy studies of UF{sub 6} have been conducted using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental ({lambda}=1064 nm) and its harmonics ({lambda}=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF{sub x}{sup +} fragment ions even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. The laser power dependence of U{sup n+} ions signals indicates that saturation can occur for many of the steps required for their ionization. In general, the doubly-charged uranium ion (U{sup 2+}) intensity is much greater than that of the singly-charged uranium ion (U{sup +}). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the U{sup n+} (n = 1- 4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The dominance of the U{sup 2+} ion and the absence or very small intensities of UF{sub x}{sup +} fragments, along with the unsaturated wavelength dependence, indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms after the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule.

  17. Excited State Molecular Dynamics in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipp, Lucas; Natan, Adi; Bucksbaum, Philip

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of excited electronic states in molecules created through strong field, multiphoton excitation. Several excited states can come into multiphoton resonance with the ground state during an intense laser pulse due to large AC stark shifts, and while most of the excited state population is subsequently ionized, a fraction of the population remains in these excited states. We probe this excited state population in N2 with a time delayed weak field and collect the angle-resolved photoelectron spectrum. By varying the pump intensity and the probe delay, we gain insight into bound state electron dynamics in molecules in intense laser fields, and the ensuing field free dynamics.

  18. Mitigating Phototoxicity during Multiphoton Microscopy of Live Drosophila Embryos in the 1.0–1.2 µm Wavelength Range

    PubMed Central

    Débarre, Delphine; Olivier, Nicolas; Supatto, Willy; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Light-induced toxicity is a fundamental bottleneck in microscopic imaging of live embryos. In this article, after a review of photodamage mechanisms in cells and tissues, we assess photo-perturbation under illumination conditions relevant for point-scanning multiphoton imaging of live Drosophila embryos. We use third-harmonic generation (THG) imaging of developmental processes in embryos excited by pulsed near-infrared light in the 1.0–1.2 µm range. We study the influence of imaging rate, wavelength, and pulse duration on the short-term and long-term perturbation of development and define criteria for safe imaging. We show that under illumination conditions typical for multiphoton imaging, photodamage in this system arises through 2- and/or 3-photon absorption processes and in a cumulative manner. Based on this analysis, we derive general guidelines for improving the signal-to-damage ratio in two-photon (2PEF/SHG) or THG imaging by adjusting the pulse duration and/or the imaging rate. Finally, we report label-free time-lapse 3D THG imaging of gastrulating Drosophila embryos with sampling appropriate for the visualisation of morphogenetic movements in wild-type and mutant embryos, and long-term multiharmonic (THG-SHG) imaging of development until hatching. PMID:25111506

  19. Selective IR multiphoton dissociation of molecules in a pulsed gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface as an alternative to low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, G. N.; Petin, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of studies on the isotope-selective infrared multiphoton dissociation (IR MFD) of SF6 and CF3I molecules in a pulsed, gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface. The productivity of this method in the conditions of a specific experiment (by the example of SF6 molecules) is evaluated. A number of low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation based on the use of infrared lasers for selective excitation of molecules are analysed and their productivity is estimated. The methods are compared with those of selective dissociation of molecules in the flow interacting with a surface. The advantages of this method compared to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation and the IR MPD method in the unperturbed jets and flows are shown. It is concluded that this method could be a promising alternative to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation.

  20. Multiphoton microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging and optical spectroscopy for the diagnosis of neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Melissa Caroline

    2007-12-01

    Cancer morbidity and mortality is greatly reduced when the disease is diagnosed and treated early in its development. Tissue biopsies are the gold standard for cancer diagnosis, and an accurate diagnosis requires a biopsy from the malignant portion of an organ. Light, guided through a fiber optic probe, could be used to inspect regions of interest and provide real-time feedback to determine the optimal tissue site for biopsy. This approach could increase the diagnostic accuracy of current biopsy procedures. The studies in this thesis have characterized changes in tissue optical signals with carcinogenesis, increasing our understanding of the sensitivity of optical techniques for cancer detection. All in vivo studies were conducted on the dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene treated hamster cheek pouch model of epithelial carcinogenesis. Multiphoton microscopy studies in the near infrared wavelength region quantified changes in tissue morphology and fluorescence with carcinogenesis in vivo. Statistically significant morphological changes with precancer included increased epithelial thickness, loss of stratification in the epithelium, and increased nuclear diameter. Fluorescence changes included a statistically significant decrease in the epithelial fluorescence intensity per voxel at 780 nm excitation, a decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, an electron donor in oxidative phosphorylation), and an increase in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, an electron acceptor in oxidative phosphorylation) with precancer. The redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of FAD/NADH, a measure of the cellular oxidation-reduction state) did not significantly change with precancer. Cell culture experiments (MCF10A cells) indicated that the decrease in protein-bound NADH with precancer could be due to increased levels of glycolysis. Point measurements of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra in the ultraviolet to visible wavelength range indicated that the most diagnostic optical signals originate from sub-surface tissue layers. Optical properties extracted from these spectroscopy measurements showed a significant decrease in the hemoglobin saturation, absorption coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and fluorescence intensity (at 400 nm excitation) in neoplastic compared to normal tissues. The results from these studies indicate that multiphoton microscopy and optical spectroscopy can non-invasively provide information on tissue structure and function in vivo that is related to tissue pathology.

  1. Multiphoton cryo microscope with sample temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; Knig, K.

    2013-02-01

    We present a multiphoton microscope system which combines the advantages of multiphoton imaging with precise control of the sample temperature. The microscope provides online insight in temperature-induced changes and effects in plant tissue and animal cells with subcellular resolution during cooling and thawing processes. Image contrast is based on multiphoton fluorescence intensity or fluorescence lifetime in the range from liquid nitrogen temperature up to +600C. In addition, micro spectra from the imaged regions can be recorded. We present measurement results from plant leaf samples as well as Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  2. Resolving shocked and UV excited components of H2 emission in planetary nebulae with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Kyle; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) form when low and intermediate-mass stars eject their outer layers into the ISM at the end of the AGB phase. Many PNe exhibit near-infrared (NIR) emission from molecular hydrogen (H2). This NIR emission arises from radiative decay out of excited rotation-vibration (rovibrational) states. The rovibrational states can be populated by excitation to higher electronic states through absorption of a far-UV photon followed by a radiative cascade to the electronic ground state, or by collisions (e.g., in a hot gas). The two processes populate the rovibrational levels of H2 differently, so the observed emergent emission spectrum provides an effective probe of the mechanisms that excite the H2. Many PNe display line intensity ratios that are intermediate between these two processes (Otsuka et al. 2013). With the advantages of the high spectral resolution (R~40000), broad wavelength coverage (1.45-2.45 μm), and high spatial resolution of the Immersion GRating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS, Park et al. 2014), we are able to differentiate components in position-velocity space: we see a slowly expanding UV-excited H2 shell in the PN M 1-11 and two faster moving “bullets” of thermalized H2 that we interpret as shocked gas from a bipolar outflow. We also present observations of several other PNe that exhibit similar morphologies of thermalized and UV-excited H2 components.

  3. Experimental demonstration of mode-selective phonon excitation of 6H-SiC by a mid-infrared laser with anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kyohei; Hachiya, Kan; Okumura, Kensuke; Mishima, Kenta; Inukai, Motoharu; Torgasin, Konstantin; Omer, Mohamed; Sonobe, Taro; Zen, Heishun; Negm, Hani; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-10-28

    Mode-selective phonon excitation by a mid-infrared laser (MIR-FEL) is demonstrated via anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements of 6H-silicon carbide (SiC). Irradiation of SiC with MIR-FEL and a Nd-YAG laser at 14 K produced a peak where the Raman shift corresponds to a photon energy of 119 meV (10.4 μm). This phenomenon is induced by mode-selective phonon excitation through the irradiation of MIR-FEL, whose photon energy corresponds to the photon-absorption of a particular phonon mode.

  4. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  5. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors.

    PubMed

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  6. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  7. Multiphoton ionization of the magnesium atom

    SciTech Connect

    Alimov, D.T.; Bel 'Kovskii, A.N.; Medvedeva, V.K.; Torsunova, M.A.

    1986-08-01

    The author investigated the process of multiphoton ionization of the magnesium atom in the radiation field of a neodymium laser based on yttrium-aluminum garnet. The experiments were carried out at the fundamental frequency w = 9345 cm/sup -1/) and the second harmonic (w = 18,790 cm/sup -1/) of the laser radiation. A beam-crossing method involving atomic and laser beams was used and the laser was yttrium-aluminum-garnet operating in a Q-switching mode. The investigations show that both singly and doubly charged ions are formed in multiphoton ionization of the magnesium atom and both resonance and direct processes of multiphoton ionization can occur for single-electron multiphoton ionization in relation to the frequency.

  8. Imaging carious dental tissues with multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Po-Yen; Lyu, Hong-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen; Chang, Chia-Seng; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, multiphoton excitation was utilized to image normal and carious dental tissues noninvasively. Unique structures in dental tissues were identified using the available multimodality (second harmonic, autofluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime analysis) without labeling. The collagen in dentin exhibits a strong second harmonic response. Both dentin and enamel emit strong autofluorescence that reveals in detail morphological features (such as dentinal tubules and enamel rods) and, despite their very similar spectral profiles, can be differentiated by lifetime analysis. Specifically, the carious dental tissue exhibits a greatly reduced autofluorescence lifetime, which result is consistent with the degree of demineralization, determined by micro-computed tomography. Our findings suggest that two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging may be a promising tool for diagnosing and monitoring dental caries. PMID:21326645

  9. MULTI-PHOTON PHOSPHOR FEASIBILITY RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    R. Graham; W. Chow

    2003-05-01

    Development of multi-photon phosphor materials for discharge lamps represents a goal that would achieve up to a doubling of discharge (fluorescent) lamp efficacy. This report reviews the existing literature on multi-photon phosphors, identifies obstacles in developing such phosphors, and recommends directions for future research to address these obstacles. To critically examine issues involved in developing a multi-photon phosphor, the project brought together a team of experts from universities, national laboratories, and an industrial lamp manufacturer. Results and findings are organized into three categories: (1) Multi-Photon Systems and Processes, (2) Chemistry and Materials Issues, and (3) Concepts and Models. Multi-Photon Systems and Processes: This category focuses on how to use our current understanding of multi-photon phosphor systems to design new phosphor systems for application in fluorescent lamps. The quickest way to develop multi-photon lamp phosphors lies in finding sensitizer ions for Gd{sup 3+} and identifying activator ions to red shift the blue emission from Pr{sup 3+} due to the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 1}I{sub 6} transition associated with the first cascading step. Success in either of these developments would lead to more efficient fluorescent lamps. Chemistry and Materials Issues: The most promising multi-photon phosphors are found in fluoride hosts. However, stability of fluorides in environments typically found in fluorescent lamps needs to be greatly improved. Experimental investigation of fluorides in actual lamp environments needs to be undertaken while working on oxide and oxyfluoride alternative systems for backup. Concepts and Models: Successful design of a multi-photon phosphor system based on cascading transitions of Gd{sup 3+} and Pr{sup 3+} depends critically on how the former can be sensitized and the latter can sensitize an activator ion. Methods to predict energy level diagrams and Judd-Ofelt parameters of multi-photon transitions are needed to help guide the experimental material selection. This report provides the theoretical basis for leading knowledgeable researchers along the path to develop multi-photon phosphor systems. The ultimate goal, a doubling of fluorescent lamp efficacy, is not going to be easily obtained. This report begins the process and should be followed with detailed experimental and theoretical research to continue the development process.

  10. Multiphoton microscopy based cryo-imaging of inflated frozen human lung sections at -60°C in healthy and COPD lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Kayra, Damian; Zhang, Angela; Suzuki, Masaru; McDonough, John; Elliott, W. M.; Cooper, Joel D.; Hogg, James C.

    2013-02-01

    Lung is a complex gas exchanger with interfacial area (where the gas exchange takes place) is about the size of a tennis court. Respiratory function is linked to the biomechanical stability of the gas exchange or alveolar regions which directly depends on the spatial distributions of the extracellular matrix fibers such fibrillar collagens and elastin fibers. It is very important to visualize and quantify these fibers at their native and inflated conditions to have correct morphometric information on differences between control and diseased states. This can be only achieved in the ex vivo states by imaging directly frozen lung specimens inflated to total lung capacity. Multiphoton microscopy, which uses ultra-short infrared laser pulses as the excitation source, produces multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF) signals from endogenously fluorescent proteins (e.g. elastin) and induces specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from non-centrosymmetric proteins such as fibrillar collagens in fresh human lung tissues [J. Struct. Biol. (2010)171,189-196]. Here we report for the first time 3D image data obtained directly from thick frozen inflated lung specimens (~0.7- 1.0 millimeter thick) visualized at -60°C without prior fixation or staining in healthy and diseased states. Lung specimens donated for transplantation and released for research when no appropriate recipient was identified served as controls, and diseased lung specimens donated for research by patients receiving lung transplantation for very severe COPD (n=4) were prepared as previously described [N. Engl. J. Med. (2011) 201, 1567]. Lung slices evenly spaced between apex and base were examined using multiphoton microscopy while maintained at -60°C using a temperature controlled cold stage with a temperature resolution of 0.1°C. Infrared femto-second laser pulses tuned to 880nm, dry microscopic objectives, and non-de-scanned detectors/spectrophotometer located in the reflection geometry were used for generating the 3D images/spectral information. We found that this novel imaging approach can provide spatially resolved 3D images with spectral specificities from frozen inflated lungs that are sensitive enough to identity the micro-structural details of fibrillar collagens and elastin fibers in alveolar walls in both healthy and diseased tissues.

  11. Origin of near to middle infrared luminescence and energy transfer process of Er3+/Yb3+co-doped fluorotellurite glasses under different excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Feifei; Liu, Xueqiang; Ma, Yaoyao; Kang, Shuai; Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping

    2015-02-01

    We report the near to middle infrared luminescence and energy transfer process of Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped fluorotellurite glasses under 980, 1550 and 800 nm excitations, respectively. Using a 980 nm laser diode pump, enhanced 1.5 and 2.7 μm emissions from Er3+:I13/2-->4I15/2 and I11/2-->4I13/2 transitions are observed, in which Yb3+ ions can increase pumping efficiency and be used as energy transfer donors. Meanwhile, Yb3+ can also be used as an acceptor and intensive upconversion luminescence of around 1000 nm is achieved from Er3+:I11/2-->4I15/2 and Yb3+: F5/2-->4F7/2 transitions using 1550 nm excitation. In addition, the luminescence properties and variation trendency by 800 nm excitation is similar to that using 1550 nm excitation. The optimum Er3+ and Yb3+ ion ratio is 1:1.5 and excess Yb3+ ions decrease energy transfer efficiency under the two pumpings. These results indicate that Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped fluorotellurite glasses are potential middle- infrared laser materials and may be used to increase the efficiency of the silicon solar cells.

  12. Highly-reproducible Raman scattering of NaYF4:Yb,Er@SiO2@Ag for methylamphetamine detection under near-infrared laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongmei; Liu, Honglin; Han, Zhenzhen; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-08-01

    This study reported the significantly improved Raman enhancement ability of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) by decorating them on single NaYF4:Yb,Er@SiO2 core-shell particles (UC@SiO2@Ag) under a 785 nm excitation. The optimal thickness of the silica shell can be easily obtained by adjusting the amounts of TEOS, which is the crucial element to balance the upconversion and the formation of a hot spot by Ag NP aggregation. This substrate revealed highly reproducible properties, which is crucial to the practical application of SERS technology. This substrate exhibited an excellent sensitivity for methylamphetamine detection under near-infrared excitation. The advantages of NIR excitation in our SERS sensing open up a new application field of UC-noble metal composites, and also promise a new research direction for the synthesis and applications of SERS-active nanostructures. PMID:26090604

  13. Promising new wavelengths for multi-photon microscopy: thinking outside the Ti:Sapphire box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Greg; Amor, Rumelo; Dempster, John; Amos, William B.; McConnell, Gail

    2013-02-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) imaging is dominated by the Ti:Sapphire laser as the source for excitation. However, it is limited when considering 3PE of common fluorophores and efficient 2PE of UV dyes which require wavelengths beyond the range of the Ti:Sapphire. Two ultra-short pulsed sources are presented as alternatives: a novel optical parametric oscillator (OPO) geometry (1400-1600nm) and the sum-frequency mixing of an OPO and Yb-doped fibre laser, providing a tunable output (626-635nm). For long wavelengths, we report three-photon laser scanning microscopy (3PLSM) using a bi-directional pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with signal wavelength output at 1500 nm. This novel laser was used to overcome the high optical loss in the infrared spectral region observed in laser scanning microscopes and objective lenses that renders them otherwise difficult to use for imaging. To test our system, we performed 3PLSM auto-fluorescence imaging of live plant cells at 1500 nm, specifically Spirogyra, and compared performance with two-photon excitation (2PLSM) imaging using a femtosecond pulsed Ti:Sapphire laser at 780 nm. Analysis of cell viability based on cytoplasmic organelle streaming and structural changes of cells revealed that at similar peak powers, 2PLSM caused gross cell damage after 5 minutes but 3PLSM showed little or no interference with cell function after 15 minutes. The 1500 nm OPO was thus shown to be a practical laser source for live cell imaging. For short wavelengths, we report the use of an all-solid-state ultra-short pulsed source specifically for two-photon microscopy at wavelengths shorter than those of the conventional Ti:Sapphire laser. Our approach involved sumfrequency mixing of the output from the long-wavelength OPO described above with residual pump radiation to generate fs-pulsed output in the red spectral region. We demonstrated the performance of our ultra-short pulsed system using fluorescently labelled and autofluorescent tissue, and compared with conventional Ti:Sapphire excitation. We observed a more than 3-fold increase in fluorescence signal intensity using our visible laser source in comparison with the Ti:Sapphire laser for two-photon excitation at equal illumination powers of 22 mW or less.

  14. Ionization delays in few-cycle-pulse multiphoton quantum-beat spectroscopy in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazourek, Renate; Reduzzi, Maurizio; Carpeggiani, Paolo A.; Sansone, Giuseppe; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    We explore quantum beats in the photoelectron signal produced when a bound electron wave packet created by an isolated attosecond pulse is ionized by a delayed, few-cycle infrared pulse. Our calculations for helium atoms show that the broad bandwidth of the few-cycle pulse creates spectrally overlapping photoelectron peaks that result from one-, two-, or three-photon ionization processes. The beat signals can, in principle, be interferometrically resolved with high resolution, giving access to the relative phase between different multiphoton ionization pathways. For few-cycle near-infrared fields the relative spectral phases can be extracted over a large energy region, and dynamical information becomes available. We find that multiphoton ionization is temporally shifted with respect to one-photon ionization by several hundred attoseconds. Our results also reveal the impact of depletion and resonant pathways on the phase of the quantum beats.

  15. Multimodal microscopy and the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua

    The author's work is divided into three aspects: multimodal microscopy, stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, and customized-profile lenses (CPL) for on-axis laser scanners, which will be introduced respectively. A multimodal microscope provides the ability to image samples with multiple modalities on the same stage, which incorporates the benefits of all modalities. The multimodal microscopes developed in this dissertation are the Keck 3D fusion multimodal microscope 2.0 (3DFM 2.0), upgraded from the old 3DFM with improved performance and flexibility, and the multimodal microscope for targeting small particles (the "Target" system). The control systems developed for both microscopes are low-cost and easy-to-build, with all components off-the-shelf. The control system have not only significantly decreased the complexity and size of the microscope, but also increased the pixel resolution and flexibility. The SMPAF of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near-infrared (NIR) laser, has potential applications for a low-cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. The photophysics of melanin SMPAF has been studied by theoretical analysis of the excitation process and investigation of the spectra, activation threshold, and photon number absorption of melanin SMPAF. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin, mouse melanoma, and human black and white hairs are compared with images taken by conventional multi-photon fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). SMPAF images significantly increase specificity and demonstrate the potential to increase sensitivity for melanin detection compared to MPFM images and CRM images. Employing melanin SMPAF imaging to detect melanin inside human skin in vivo has been demonstrated, which proves the effectiveness of melanin detection using SMPAF for medical purposes. Selective melanin ablation with micrometer resolution has been presented using the Target system. Compared to the traditional selective photothermolysis, this method demonstrates higher precision, higher specificity and deeper penetration. Therefore, the SMPAF guided selective ablation of melanin is a promising tool of removing melanin for both medical and cosmetic purposes. Three CPLs have been designed for low-cost linear-motion scanners, low-cost fast spinning scanners and high-precision fast spinning scanners. Each design has been tailored to the industrial manufacturing ability and market demands.

  16. Mitochondria-targeted Triphenylamine Derivatives Activatable by Two-Photon Excitation for Triggering and Imaging Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chennoufi, Rahima; Bougherara, Houcine; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Dumat, Blaise; Henry, Etienne; Subra, Frédéric; Bury-Moné, Stéphanie; Mahuteau-Betzer, Florence; Tauc, Patrick; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Deprez, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) leads to cell death by using a combination of a photosensitizer and an external light source for the production of lethal doses of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since a major limitation of PDT is the poor penetration of UV-visible light in tissues, there is a strong need for organic compounds whose activation is compatible with near-infrared excitation. Triphenylamines (TPAs) are fluorescent compounds, recently shown to efficiently trigger cell death upon visible light irradiation (458 nm), however outside the so-called optical/therapeutic window. Here, we report that TPAs target cytosolic organelles of living cells, mainly mitochondria, triggering a fast apoptosis upon two-photon excitation, thanks to their large two-photon absorption cross-sections in the 760-860 nm range. Direct ROS imaging in the cell context upon multiphoton excitation of TPA and three-color flow cytometric analysis showing phosphatidylserine externalization indicate that TPA photoactivation is primarily related to the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway via ROS production, although significant differences in the time courses of cell death-related events were observed, depending on the compound. TPAs represent a new class of water-soluble organic photosensitizers compatible with direct two-photon excitation, enabling simultaneous multiphoton fluorescence imaging of cell death since a concomitant subcellular TPA re-distribution occurs in apoptotic cells. PMID:26947258

  17. Mitochondria-targeted Triphenylamine Derivatives Activatable by Two-Photon Excitation for Triggering and Imaging Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chennoufi, Rahima; Bougherara, Houcine; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Dumat, Blaise; Henry, Etienne; Subra, Frédéric; Bury-Moné, Stéphanie; Mahuteau-Betzer, Florence; Tauc, Patrick; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Deprez, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) leads to cell death by using a combination of a photosensitizer and an external light source for the production of lethal doses of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since a major limitation of PDT is the poor penetration of UV-visible light in tissues, there is a strong need for organic compounds whose activation is compatible with near-infrared excitation. Triphenylamines (TPAs) are fluorescent compounds, recently shown to efficiently trigger cell death upon visible light irradiation (458 nm), however outside the so-called optical/therapeutic window. Here, we report that TPAs target cytosolic organelles of living cells, mainly mitochondria, triggering a fast apoptosis upon two-photon excitation, thanks to their large two-photon absorption cross-sections in the 760–860 nm range. Direct ROS imaging in the cell context upon multiphoton excitation of TPA and three-color flow cytometric analysis showing phosphatidylserine externalization indicate that TPA photoactivation is primarily related to the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway via ROS production, although significant differences in the time courses of cell death-related events were observed, depending on the compound. TPAs represent a new class of water-soluble organic photosensitizers compatible with direct two-photon excitation, enabling simultaneous multiphoton fluorescence imaging of cell death since a concomitant subcellular TPA re-distribution occurs in apoptotic cells. PMID:26947258

  18. Excitation of the E2 and W1 "Arched" Filaments Near the Galactic Center as Deduced from Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgan, Sean W.J.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Simpson, Janet P.; Haas, Michael R.; Morris, Mark

    1994-01-01

    We present measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) fine structure lines [S III] (33 microns), [Si II] (35 microns), [O III] (51, 88 microns), [O I] (63 microns) and [C II] (158 microns) and the adjacent continua along a scan crossing the E2 and W1 thermal radio filaments in the Galactic center 'Arc'. The deduced electron density and excitation vary along the scan by less than factors of two and three, respectively. The properties of the two filaments are similar: the line and continuum fluxes peak at the radio ridge, and the ridge/off-ridge contrast is greatest for the FIR continuum and ionized lines, lower for the single dish radio measurements (Sofue et al. 1986), and smallest for the low excitation lines. The spatial coincidence of the FIR and radio peaks demonstrates that any excitation mechanism for the radio continuum filaments must also account for the FIR line and continuum emission. The FIR luminosity of approx. 3 x 10(exp 5) Solar Luminosity per beam, and the association of [O III] emission with the filaments poses difficulties for shock and MHD models. Photoionization of molecular cloud edges by a random distribution of stars is the most likely excitation mechanism among those proposed. The continuum and the low excitation line fluxes are consistent with an origin in photodissociated molecular material adjacent to the photoionized gas.

  19. Multiphoton Rabi oscillations of a ringlike three-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yong Lin; Han, Jiu Ning

    2012-04-01

    We propose a ringlike three-level model and show that it can be realized using Stark states of highly excited potassium interacting with two-mode microwave fields. We demonstrate this by using both analytical model and numerical simulations to study the problems of multiphoton Rabi oscillations. The results show that the Rabi oscillation patterns of the ringlike three-level system exhibit additional envelope and nodes compared to the oscillatory behavior of a three-level cascade system; in other words, there exist collapse and revival phenomena for Rabi oscillation patterns. The origin of the collapse and revival of the population oscillations is the multiphoton two-color resonances at frequency ?=n?1+m?2. Our analytic results are in good agreement with numerical simulations. In addition, all the analytical solutions for the three basic configurations of the three-level system classified as the ?, vee, and cascade systems can be deduced from our analytical solution for the ringlike three-level configuration by setting one of the three coupling strengths equal to 0.

  20. Multibeam multifocal multiphoton photon counting imaging in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Erich E.

    Multiphoton microscopy is an invaluable technique for the neurological community, allowing for deep explorations within highly scattering tissues such as the brain. However, prior to this research multiphoton microscopy was limited in its ability to rapidly construct volumetric images deep within scattering specimens. This work establishes a technique that permits such exploration through the application of multiple beams separated in both space and time, where signal photons corresponding to those beams are demultiplexed through the use of a field programmable gate array. With this system a number of improvements are provided to research in scattering media, including the coveted ability to perform photon-counting imaging with multiple beams. The ability to perform these measurements with multiple beams permits unique quantitative measurements of fluorophores within living specimens, allowing new research into dynamic three-dimensional behavior occurring within the brain. Additionally, the ability to perform multimodal measurements without filtering allows for unique avenues of research where the harmonic generation is indistinguishable from the two-photon excited fluorescence. These improvements provide neuroscience researchers with a large assortment of technological tools that will permit them to perform numerous novel experiments within the brain and other highly-scattering specimens, which should one day lead to significant advances in our understanding of complex neuronal activity.

  1. Resonance Enhanced Multi-photon Spectroscopy of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligare, Marshall Robert

    For over 50 years DNA has been studied to better understand its connection to life and evolution. These past experiments have led to our understanding of its structure and function in the biological environment but the interaction of DNA with UV radiation at the molecular level is still not very well understood. Unique mechanisms in nucleobase chromaphores protect us from adverse chemical reactions after UV absorption. Studying these processes can help develop theories for prebiotic chemistry and the possibility of alternative forms of DNA. Using resonance enhanced multi-photon spectroscopic techniques in the gas phase allow for the structure and dynamics of individual nucleobases to be studied in detail. Experiments studying different levels of structure/complexity with relation to their biological function are presented. Resonant IR multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular mechanics and DFT calculations are used to determine gas phase structures of anionic nucleotide clusters. A comparison of the identified structures with known biological function shows how the hydrogen bonding of the nucleotides and their clusters free of solvent create favorable structures for quick incorporation into enzymes such as DNA polymerase. Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy techniques such as resonant two photon ionization (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance are used to further elucidate the structure and excited state dynamics of the bare nucleobases thymine and uracil. Both exhibit long lived excited electronic states that have been implicated in DNA photolesions which can ultimately lead to melanoma and carcinoma. Our experimental data in comparison with many quantum chemical calculations suggest a new picture for the dynamics of thymine and uracil in the gas phase. A high probability of UV absorption from a vibrationally hot ground state to the excited electronic state shows that the stability of thymine and uracil comes from its intrinsic molecular properties and possibly a hydrogen bonding solvent capable of dissipating excess vibrational energy. Due to the high specificity and sensitivity of resonant two photon ionization coupled with molecular beam mass spectrometry a new analytical technique for identifying molecular markers in archaeological vessels is presented. The xanthine alkaloids theobromine, theophylline and caffeine are identified in Central American and North American pottery sherds by direct desorption/resonant laser ionization mass spectrometry.

  2. Two-color multiphoton ionization of diazabicyclooctane in a supersonic free jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Masaaki; Ebata, Takayuki; Mikami, Naohiko; Ito, Mitsuo

    1983-11-01

    Two-color multiphoton ionization (MPI) spectroscopy has been applied for diazabicyclooctane (DABCO) in a supersonic free jet. The MPI spectra due to transitions from the various vibronic levels of the S 1 (3s Rydberg) state which were excited by the first laser revealed the high Rydberg states above the adiabatic ionization potential. The ionization process and the vibrational potential of the ion are discussed.

  3. Femtosecond multiphoton ionization of free and aggregated NaI via Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stibbe, Darian T.; Charron, Eric; Suzor-Weiner, Annick

    2001-12-01

    Using a wave packet simulation on simplified potential curves, we investigate the vibrational dynamics of NaI in its first excited electronic state, both isolated and aggregated with a molecule of acetonitrile. The probe signal is obtained by resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of the diatomic chromophore NaI via Rydberg states. The addition of acetonitrile is found to change greatly the ionization signal, suggesting strong modification of the reaction dynamics.

  4. Nanoparticle-assisted-multiphoton microscopy for in vivo brain imaging of mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Neuro/brain study has attracted much attention during past few years, and many optical methods have been utilized in order to obtain accurate and complete neural information inside the brain. Relying on simultaneous absorption of two or more near-infrared photons by a fluorophore, multiphoton microscopy can achieve deep tissue penetration and efficient light detection noninvasively, which makes it very suitable for thick-tissue and in vivo bioimaging. Nanoparticles possess many unique optical and chemical properties, such as anti-photobleaching, large multiphoton absorption cross-section, and high stability in biological environment, which facilitates their applications in long-term multiphoton microscopy as contrast agents. In this paper, we will introduce several typical nanoparticles (e.g. organic dye doped polymer nanoparticles and gold nanorods) with high multiphoton fluorescence efficiency. We further applied them in two- and three-photon in vivo functional brain imaging of mice, such as brain-microglia imaging, 3D architecture reconstruction of brain blood vessel, and blood velocity measurement.

  5. Multi-focal multiphoton lithography.

    PubMed

    Ritschdorff, Eric T; Nielson, Rex; Shear, Jason B

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton lithography (MPL) provides unparalleled capabilities for creating high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) materials from a broad spectrum of building blocks and with few limitations on geometry, qualities that have been key to the design of chemically, mechanically, and biologically functional microforms. Unfortunately, the reliance of MPL on laser scanning limits the speed at which fabrication can be performed, making it impractical in many instances to produce large-scale, high-resolution objects such as complex micromachines, 3D microfluidics, etc. Previously, others have demonstrated the possibility of using multiple laser foci to simultaneously perform MPL at numerous sites in parallel, but use of a stage-scanning system to specify fabrication coordinates resulted in the production of identical features at each focal position. As a more general solution to the bottleneck problem, we demonstrate here the feasibility for performing multi-focal MPL using a dynamic mask to differentially modulate foci, an approach that enables each fabrication site to create independent (uncorrelated) features within a larger, integrated microform. In this proof-of-concept study, two simultaneously scanned foci produced the expected two-fold decrease in fabrication time, and this approach could be readily extended to many scanning foci by using a more powerful laser. Finally, we show that use of multiple foci in MPL can be exploited to assign heterogeneous properties (such as differential swelling) to micromaterials at distinct positions within a fabrication zone. PMID:22282105

  6. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for the characterisation of kavalactones in the kava plant: elemental formulae confirmation by dual spray accurate mass measurement and structural confirmation by infrared multiphoton dissociation and sustained off-resonance irradiation collision induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Emma; Bristow, Tony

    2006-01-01

    Roots and extracts of the kava plant have been used in herbal medicine to treat sleep disturbances, stress and anxiety, although reported cases of liver toxicity led to many countries restricting its sale. The detection of the presence of kava in many medicinal products requires the use of methods capable of identifying the kavalactones with high certainty. Here, we describe the use of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) for the characterisation of six kavalactones (kavain, dihydrokavain, methysticin, dihydromethysticin, yangonin and desmethoxyyangonin) utilising accurate mass measurement for the determination of their elemental formulae and product ion MS (both sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation and infrared multiphoton dissociation (SORI-CID and IRMPD) for structural confirmation. High performance liquid chromatography/FT-ICR-MS with a dual spray system for internal calibration of mass spectra was employed for accurate mass measurement and the determination of elemental formulae of the kavalactones in both standards and a root extract to confirm the presence of the kavalactones in the root powder. Mass accuracy of < 1 ppm was achieved. For structural confirmation, the IRMPD and SORI-CID spectra of the kavalactones in standards and a kava root powder extract were compared. Accurate mass measurement of the product ions was also conducted by external calibration and the elemental formula determined to aid with structural confirmation. The presence of the same fragment ions detected in the standards as in the extract further confirmed the presence of the kavalactones in the kava root powder with high certainty. PMID:17057279

  7. Characterization and application of chirped photonic crystal fiber in multiphoton imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiali; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey; Skibina, Julia S; Steinmeyer, Günter; Tang, Shuo

    2014-05-01

    Fiber delivery of ultrashort pulses is important for multiphoton endoscopy. A chirped photonic crystal fiber (CPCF) is first characterized for its transmission bandwidth, propagation loss, and dispersion properties. Its extremely low dispersion (~150 fs(2)/m) enables the delivery of sub-30 fs pulses through a ~1 m-long CPCF. The CPCF is then incorporated into a multiphoton imaging system and its performance is demonstrated by imaging various biological samples including yew leaf, mouse tendon, and human skin. The imaging quality is further compared with images acquired by a multiphoton imaging system with free-space or hollow-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) delivery of pulses. Compared with free-space system, the CPCF delivered system maintains the same ultrashort pulsewidth and the image qualities are comparable. Compared with the PBF delivery, CPCF provides a 35 times shorter pulsewidth at the sample location, which results in a ~12 and 50 times improvement in two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) signals respectively. Our results show that CPCF has great potential for fiber delivery of ultrashort pulses for multiphoton endoscopy. PMID:24921739

  8. Live-cell multiphoton fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with an improved large Stokes shift fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yinghua; Meurer, Matthias; Raghavan, Sarada; Rebane, Aleksander; Lindquist, Jake R.; Santos, Sofia; Kats, Ilia; Davidson, Michael W.; Mazitschek, Ralph; Hughes, Thomas E.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Knop, Michael; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2015-01-01

    We report an improved variant of mKeima, a monomeric long Stokes shift red fluorescent protein, hmKeima8.5. The increased intracellular brightness and large Stokes shift (∼180 nm) make it an excellent partner with teal fluorescent protein (mTFP1) for multiphoton, multicolor applications. Excitation of this pair by a single multiphoton excitation wavelength (MPE, 850 nm) yields well-separable emission peaks (∼120-nm separation). Using this pair, we measure homo- and hetero-oligomerization interactions in living cells via multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (MPE-FCS). Using tandem dimer proteins and small-molecule inducible dimerization domains, we demonstrate robust and quantitative detection of intracellular protein–protein interactions. We also use MPE-FCCS to detect drug–protein interactions in the intracellular environment using a Coumarin 343 (C343)-conjugated drug and hmKeima8.5 as a fluorescence pair. The mTFP1/hmKeima8.5 and C343/hmKeima8.5 combinations, together with our calibration constructs, provide a practical and broadly applicable toolbox for the investigation of molecular interactions in the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25877871

  9. Multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Crawford, Darrell; Burczynski, Frank J.; Liu, Xin; Liau, Ian; Roberts, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is the preferred method when in vivo deep-tissue imaging is required. This review presents the application of multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function. In particular, multiphoton microscopy is useful in imaging intracellular events, such as mitochondrial depolarization and cellular metabolism in terms of NAD(P)H changes with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The morphology of hepatocytes can be visualized without exogenously administered fluorescent dyes by utilizing their autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signal of collagen, which is useful in diagnosing liver disease. More specific imaging, such as studying drug transport in normal and diseased livers are achievable, but require exogenously administered fluorescent dyes. If these techniques can be translated into clinical use to assess liver function, it would greatly improve early diagnosis of organ viability, fibrosis, and cancer.

  10. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photoelectron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  11. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael D.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope. PMID:27182429

  12. New developments in multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    80 years ago, the PhD student Maria Goeppert predicted in her thesis in Goettingen, Germany, two-photon effects. It took 30 years to prove her theory, and another three decades to realize the first two-photon microscope. With the beginning of this millennium, first clinical multiphoton tomographs started operation in research institutions, hospitals, and in the cosmetic industry. The multiphoton tomograph MPTflexTM with its miniaturized flexible scan head became the Prism-Award 2010 winner in the category Life Sciences. Multiphoton tomographs with its superior submicron spatial resolution can be upgraded to 5D imaging tools by adding spectral time-correlated single photon counting units. Furthermore, multimodal hybrid tomographs provide chemical fingerprinting and fast wide-field imaging. The world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph in spring 2010. In particular, nonfluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen have been imaged in patients with dermatological disorders. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution imaging tools such as ultrasound, optoacoustic, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer (malignant melanoma), optimization of treatment strategies (wound healing, dermatitis), and cosmetic research including long-term biosafety tests of ZnO sunscreen nanoparticles and the measurement of the stimulated biosynthesis of collagen by anti-ageing products.

  13. Temperature Analysis of Laser Gain Plasma Medium in a Slab-Type RF Discharge Excited CO2 Laser Using Near Infrared Diode-Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Takashi; Nozue, Hirokazu; Fujishiro, Takehiko; Tei, Kazuyoku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru

    2010-11-01

    A novel optical method of temperature measurement was used to analyze a slab-type 40 MHz RF discharge excited CO2 laser plasma active medium. The method was based on near-infrared absorption spectroscopy with a 1.6 µm distributed-feedback (DFB) semiconductor laser. Gas temperatures from 450 to 650 K were measured at pressures of 1 to 6 kPa with discharge electrode distances of 5.0 and 7.5 mm. This method may provide a practical sensor for the real-time diagnostics of the active medium of CO2 lasers.

  14. LASERS: TEA laser excited by a self-sustained discharge and emitting due to infrared transitions in Xe I, Kr I, Ar I, and Ne I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, V. O.; Tochitskiĭ, S. Ya; Churakov, V. V.

    1988-03-01

    Fairly intense output pulses due to infrared transitions in Xe I, Kr I, Ar I, and Ne I rare gases were generated in a simple TEA laser excited by a self-sustained discharge. Characteristics of the energy, spectral, and time parameters of this laser were studied. A specific output energy of 70 mJ · liter-1 · atm-1 was obtained for Xe I. It was found that the addition of Ar to a binary Ne-He mixture resulted in lasing at the 1.15 μm wavelength in a TEA laser.

  15. Label-free multi-photon imaging using a compact femtosecond fiber laser mode-locked by carbon nanotube saturable absorber

    PubMed Central

    Kieu, K.; Mehravar, S.; Gowda, R.; Norwood, R. A.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate label-free multi-photon imaging of biological samples using a compact Er3+-doped femtosecond fiber laser mode-locked by a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT). These compact and low cost lasers have been developed by various groups but they have not been exploited for multiphoton microscopy. Here, it is shown that various multiphoton imaging modalities (e.g. second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and three-photon excitation fluorescence (3PEF)) can be effectively performed on various biological samples using a compact handheld CNT mode-locked femtosecond fiber laser operating in the telecommunication window near 1560nm. We also show for the first time that chlorophyll fluorescence in plant leaves and diatoms can be observed using 1560nm laser excitation via three-photon absorption. PMID:24156074

  16. Multiphoton coherent control in complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2005-01-01

    Control of multiphoton transitions is demonstrated for a multilevel system by generalizing the instantaneous phase of any chirped pulse as individual terms of a Taylor series expansion. In the case of a simple two-level system, all odd terms in the series lead to population inversion while the even terms lead to self-induced transparency. The results hold for multiphoton transitions that do not have any lower-order photon resonance or any intermediate virtual state dynamics within the laser pulse width. PMID:17396157

  17. Fast volumetric imaging with patterned illumination via digital micro-mirror device-based temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Han; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Wei; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy (TFMPM) has the advantage of area excitation in an axial confinement of only a few microns; hence, it can offer fast three-dimensional (3D) multiphoton imaging. Herein, fast volumetric imaging via a developed digital micromirror device (DMD)-based TFMPM has been realized through the synchronization of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) with a dynamic piezoelectric stage for axial scanning. The volumetric imaging rate can achieve 30 volumes per second according to the EMCCD frame rate of more than 400 frames per second, which allows for the 3D Brownian motion of one-micron fluorescent beads to be spatially observed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the dynamic HiLo structural multiphoton microscope can reject background noise by way of the fast volumetric imaging with high-speed DMD patterned illumination. PMID:27231617

  18. Studies on wide-field-of-view multiphoton imaging using the flexible clinical multiphoton tomograph MPTflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton imaging systems are capable of high-resolution 3-D image acquisition of deep tissue. A first commercially available CE-certified biomedical system for subcelluar resolution of human skin has been launched by JenLab company with the DermaInspectR in 2002. The demand for more flexibility caused the development of the MPTflexR, which provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetic examinations. However the high resolution of clinical multiphoton tomographs are adherent with a small field-of-view (FOV) of about 360×360μm2. Especially time-consuming is the relocation of areas of interest (AOI) like lesions, sweat glands or hair shafts during a multiphoton examination. This limitation can be be overcome by macroscopic large-area (wide-field-ofview) multiphoton tomography, which is tested first within this work.

  19. Infrared phonon anomaly and magnetic excitations in single-crystal Cu3Bi(SeO3)2O2Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. H.; Stephens, P. W.; Martin, C.; Constable, E.; Lewis, R. A.; Berger, H.; Carr, G. L.; Tanner, D. B.

    2012-11-01

    Infrared reflection and transmission as a function of temperature have been measured on single crystals of Cu3Bi(SeO3)2O2Cl. The complex dielectric function and optical properties along all three principal axes of the orthorhombic cell were obtained via Kramers-Kronig analysis and by fits to a Drude-Lorentz model. Below 115 K, 16 additional modes [8(E∥â)+6(E∥b̂)+2(E∥ĉ)] appear in the phonon spectra; however, powder x-ray diffraction measurements do not detect a new structure at 85 K. Potential explanations for the new phonon modes are discussed. Transmission in the far infrared as a function of temperature has revealed magnetic excitations originating below the magnetic ordering temperature (Tc˜24 K). The origin of the excitations in the magnetically ordered state will be discussed in terms of their response to different polarizations of incident light, behavior in externally applied magnetic fields, and the anisotropic magnetic properties of Cu3Bi(SeO3)2O2Cl as determined by dc susceptibility measurements.

  20. Infrared study on room-temperature atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)hafnium and remote plasma-excited oxidizing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kanomata, Kensaku; Ohba, Hisashi; Pungboon Pansila, P.; Ahmmad, Bashir; Kubota, Shigeru; Hirahara, Kazuhiro; Hirose, Fumihiko

    2015-01-01

    Room-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO{sub 2} was examined using tetrakis (ethylmethylamino)hafnium (TEMAH) and remote plasma-excited water and oxygen. A growth rate of 0.26 nm/cycle at room temperature was achieved, and the TEMAH adsorption and its oxidization on HfO{sub 2} were investigated by multiple internal reflection infrared absorption spectroscopy. It was observed that saturated adsorption of TEMAH occurs at exposures of ∼1 × 10{sup 5} L (1 L = 1 × 10{sup −6} Torr s) at room temperature, and the use of remote plasma-excited water and oxygen vapor is effective in oxidizing the TEMAH molecules on the HfO{sub 2} surface, to produce OH sites. The infrared study suggested that Hf–OH plays a role as an adsorption site for TEMAH. The reaction mechanism of room temperature HfO{sub 2} ALD is discussed in this paper.

  1. ALMA DETECTION OF THE VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN J = 4-3 EMISSION LINE IN THE AGN-HOSTING LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY IRAS 20551–4250

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro

    2013-10-01

    We present results from our ALMA Cycle 0 observations, at the frequencies around the HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC J = 4-3 transition lines, of the luminous infrared galaxy IRAS 20551–4250 at z = 0.043, which is known to host an energetically important obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). In addition to the targeted HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC J = 4-3 emission lines, two additional strong emission lines are seen, which we attribute to H{sub 2}S and CH{sub 3}CN(+CCH). The HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratio (∼0.7) is higher than in the other starburst-dominated galaxy (∼0.2) observed in our ALMA Cycle 0 program. We tentatively (∼5σ) detected the vibrationally excited (v {sub 2} = 1) HCN J = 4-3 (l = 1f) emission line, which is important for testing an infrared radiative pumping scenario for HCN. This is the second detection of this molecular transition in external galaxies. The most likely reason for this detection is not only the high flux of this emission line, but also the small molecular line widths observed in this galaxy, suggesting that vibrational excitation of HCN may be relatively common in AGN-hosting galaxies.

  2. Influence of multiphoton events in measurement of two-photon absorption cross-sections and optical nonlinear parameters under femtosecond pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailaja, Rallabandi; Bisht, Prem B.; Singh, C. P.; Bindra, K. S.; Oak, S. M.

    2007-09-01

    Absolute values of two-photon absorption cross-sections of some laser dyes in methanol solution have been measured by using the transmission method. From the fluorescence yield measurements under multiphoton excitation, the number of involved photons in the process has also been estimated. It is found that the presence of higher photon events may lead to erroneous values of measured two-photon absorption cross-sections. It is shown here that the Z-scan technique is capable of differentiating between the two- and three-photon absorption processes. Nonlinear optical parameters under femtosecond pumping by multiphoton resonant excitation at 800 nm are also given here.

  3. Squared multiphoton pulses for spectral selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternin, Edward; Goelman, Gadi; Bendahan, Yosef; Vega, Shimon

    It has been shown previously that multiphoton resonances may be achieved by applying radiofrequency irradiation simultaneously at several frequencies with offsets from resonance related by a harmonic relationship. In practice, this is equivalent to using RF pulses whose amplitudes are time-dependent. However, it is also possible to achieve multiphoton resonances with a sequence of conventional, constant-amplitude RF pulses of varying phase. These "squared" approximations reproduce closely the results obtained using the amplitude-modulated pulses, both in computer simulations and in the experiments. A much more rapid dependence of the strength of the effective irradiation field on the amplitude of the applied RF is a feature of multiphoton experiments; this can enhance spatial and spectral selectivity considerably. The spectral characteristics of squared multiphoton composite pulses are analyzed in detail, and the influence of various parameters of the pulse sequence is considered. The results are tested in a 3'P NMR experiment in which a single spectral line is selectively inverted.

  4. Characterization of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jiazhao; Chen, G.; Liu, Y. C.; Zhuo, S. M.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.

    2011-11-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world; almost two-thirds of gastric cancer cases and deaths occur in less developed regions. The initial diagnosis of gastric cancer often is delayed because up to 80 percent of patients are asymptomatic during the early stages of stomach cancer. So the ability to perform real-time in vivo histological diagnosis for early gastric cancer at the cellular level during ongoing endoscopy is a long-standing goal of endoscopists. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), MPM images of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa were obtained at excitation wavelength of 800 nm. The features such as the appearance of abnormal cells and the large loss of collagen in cancerous gastric submucosa were extracted to be as significant indicators to distinguish cancerous submucosa from normal submucosa. With the implementation of multiphoton microscopy concept in endoscopy applications, multiphoton endoscopy might realize in vivo histological diagnosis goal of endoscopists.

  5. Characterization of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jiazhao; Chen, G.; Liu, Y. C.; Zhuo, S. M.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world; almost two-thirds of gastric cancer cases and deaths occur in less developed regions. The initial diagnosis of gastric cancer often is delayed because up to 80 percent of patients are asymptomatic during the early stages of stomach cancer. So the ability to perform real-time in vivo histological diagnosis for early gastric cancer at the cellular level during ongoing endoscopy is a long-standing goal of endoscopists. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), MPM images of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa were obtained at excitation wavelength of 800 nm. The features such as the appearance of abnormal cells and the large loss of collagen in cancerous gastric submucosa were extracted to be as significant indicators to distinguish cancerous submucosa from normal submucosa. With the implementation of multiphoton microscopy concept in endoscopy applications, multiphoton endoscopy might realize in vivo histological diagnosis goal of endoscopists.

  6. Exploration of the subcycle multiphoton ionization dynamics and transient electron density structures with Bohmian trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Li, Peng-Cheng; Chu, Shih-I.

    2015-06-01

    An accurate three-dimensional numerical scheme for the De Broglie-Bohm framework of Bohmian mechanics is presented. This method is utilized to explore the subcycle multiphoton ionization dynamics of the hydrogen atom subject to intense near-infrared laser fields on the subfemtosecond time scale. The analysis of the time-dependent electron density reveals that several distinct density portions can be shaped and detached from the core within a half cycle of the laser field. As a complementary perspective, we identify several distinct groups of the Bohmian trajectories which represent the multiple detachments of the electron density at different times. The method presented provides very accurate electron densities and Bohmian trajectories that allow to uncover the origin of the formation of the transient and distinct electron structures seen in the multiphoton ionization processes.

  7. Exploring the molecular chemistry and excitation in obscured luminous infrared galaxies. An ALMA mm-wave spectral scan of NGC 4418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costagliola, F.; Sakamoto, K.; Muller, S.; Martín, S.; Aalto, S.; Harada, N.; van der Werf, P.; Viti, S.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Spaans, M.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Extragalactic observations allow the study of molecular chemistry and excitation under physical conditions which may differ greatly from those found in the Milky Way. The compact, obscured nuclei (CON) of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRG) combine large molecular columns with intense infrared (IR), ultra-violet (UV), and X- radiation and represent ideal laboratories for the study of the chemistry of the interstellar medium (ISM) under extreme conditions. Aims: Our aim was to obtain for the first time a multi-band spectral scan of a LIRG, and to derive molecular abundances and excitation to be compared to other Galactic and extragalactic environments. Methods: We obtained an ALMA Cycle 0 spectral scan of the dusty LIRG NGC 4418, spanning a total of 70.7 GHz in bands 3, 6, and 7. We use a combined local thermal equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE (NLTE) fit of the spectrum in order to identify the molecular species and to derive column densities and excitation temperatures. We derive molecular abundances and compare them with other Galactic and extragalactic sources by means of a principal component analysis. Results: We detect 317 emission lines from a total of 45 molecular species, including 15 isotopic substitutions and 6 vibrationally excited variants. Our LTE/NLTE fit find kinetic temperatures from 20 to 350 K, and densities between 105 and 107 cm-3. The spectrum is dominated by vibrationally excited HC3N, HCN, and HNC, with vibrational temperatures from 300 to 450 K. We find that the chemistry of NCG 4418 is characterized by high abundances of HC3N, SiO, H2S, and c-HCCCH but a low CH3OH abundance. A principal component analysis shows that NGC 4418 and Arp 220 share very similar molecular abundances and excitation, which clearly set them apart from other Galactic and extragalactic environments. Conclusions: Our spectral scan confirms that the chemical complexity in the nucleus of NGC 4418 is one of the highest ever observed outside our Galaxy. The similar molecular abundances observed toward NCG 4418 and Arp 220 are consistent with a hot gas-phase chemistry, with the relative abundances of SiO and CH3OH being regulated by shocks and X-ray driven dissociation. The bright emission from vibrationally excited species confirms the presence of a compact IR source, with an effective diameter smaller than 5 pc and brightness temperatures higher than 350 K. The molecular abundances and the vibrationally excited spectrum are consistent with a young AGN/starburst system. We suggest that NGC 4418 may be a template for a new kind of chemistry and excitation, typical of CON. Because of the narrow line widths and bright molecular emission, NGC 4418 is the ideal target for further studies of the chemistry in CONs. The spectrum in Fig. 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A91Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Fluorescence Detection of H5N1 Virus Gene Sequences Based on Optical Tweezers with Two-Photon Excitation Using a Single Near Infrared Nanosecond Pulse Laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Cao, Di; Kang, Ya-Feng; Lin, Yi; Cui, Ran; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2016-04-19

    We present an analytical platform by combining near-infrared optical tweezers with two-photon excitation for fluorescence detection of H5N1 virus gene sequences. A heterogeneous enrichment strategy, which involved polystyrene (PS) microsphere and quantum dots (QDs), was adopted. The final hybrid-conjugate microspheres were prepared by a facile one-step hybridization procedure by using PS microspheres capturing target DNA and QDs tagging, respectively. Quantitative detection was achieved by the optical tweezers setup with a low-cost 1064 nm nanosecond pulse laser for both optical trapping and two-photon excitation for the same hybrid-conjugate microsphere. The detection limits for both neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences and hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences are 16-19 pM with good selectivity for one-base mismatch, which is approximately 1 order of magnitude lower than the most existing fluorescence-based analysis method. Besides, because of the fact that only signal from the trapped particle is detected upon two-photon excitation, this approach showed extremely low background in fluorescence detection and was successfully applied to directly detect target DNA in human whole serum without any separation steps and the corresponding results are very close to that in buffer solution, indicating the strong anti-interference ability of this method. Therefore, it can be expected to be an emerging alternative for straightforward detecting target species in complex samples with a simple procedure and high-throughput. PMID:27023254

  9. Conjugated Polymer-Based Hybrid Nanoparticles with Two-Photon Excitation and Near-Infrared Emission Features for Fluorescence Bioimaging within the Biological Window.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yanlin; Liu, Peng; Ding, Hui; Wu, Yishi; Yan, Yongli; Liu, Heng; Wang, Xuefei; Huang, Fei; Zhao, Yongsheng; Tian, Zhiyuan

    2015-09-23

    Hybrid fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) capable of fluorescing near-infrared (NIR) light (centered ∼730 nm) upon excitation of 800 nm laser light were constructed. A new type of conjugated polymer with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) feature, P-F8-DPSB, was used as the NIR-light harvesting component and the energy donor while a NIR fluorescent dye, DPA-PR-PDI, was used as the energy acceptor and the NIR-light emitting component for the construction of the fluorescent NPs. The hybrid NPs possess δ value up to 2.3 × 10(6) GM per particle upon excitation of 800 nm pulse laser. The excellent two-photon absorption (TPA) property of the conjugated polymer component, together with its high fluorescence quantum yield (ϕ) up to 45% and the efficient energy transfer from the conjugated polymer to NIR-emitting fluorophore with efficiency up to 90%, imparted the hybrid NPs with TPEF-based NIR-input-NIR-output fluorescence imaging ability with penetration depth up to 1200 μm. The practicability of the hybrid NPs for fluorescence imaging in Hela cells was validated. PMID:26340609

  10. Near infrared excited micro-Raman spectra of 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture and ruby fluorescence at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. B.; Shen, Z. X.; Tang, S. H.; Kuok, M. H.

    1999-06-01

    Near infrared (NIR) lasers, as a new excitation source for Raman spectroscopy, has shown its unique advantages and is being increasingly used for some special samples, such as those emitting strong fluorescence in the visible region. This article focuses on some issues related to high-pressure micro-Raman spectroscopy using NIR excitation source. The Raman spectra of 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture (4:1 M-E) show a linear variation in both Raman shifts and linewidths under pressure up to 18 GPa. This result is useful in distinguishing Raman scattering of samples from that of the alcohol mixture, an extensively used pressure-transmitting medium. The R1 fluorescence in the red region induced by two-photon absorption of the NIR laser is strong enough to be used as pressure scale. The frequency and line width of the R1 lines are very sensitive to pressure change and the glass transition of the pressure medium. Our results manifest that it is reliable and convenient to use NIR induced two-photon excited fluorescence of ruby for both pressure calibration and distribution of pressure in the 4:1 M-E pressure transmitting medium.

  11. Multiphoton Ca2+ production occurring before the onset of Ca+ saturation: is it a fingerprint of direct double ionization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liontos, I.; Cohen, S.; Lyras, A.

    2010-05-01

    Singly and doubly charged Ca ions have been produced by multiphoton excitation of Ca vapour with 5 ns, low intensity (<=3 × 1011 W cm-2) dye-laser pulses in the 675-685 nm wavelength range, including the four-photon 4s2 1S0 → 4p2 1S0 excitation. The intensity and wavelength dependence of the ion yields was recorded as well as the fluorescence emission from excited states of the Ca ion in an effort to identify the excitation pathways leading to single and double ionization. Unambiguous evidence for the absorption of at least two photons above the first ionization threshold was recorded, in agreement with earlier results for Mg and Sr obtained under similar conditions. However, certain characteristics of the process differ significantly from those of the earlier results, despite the apparent similarity in both the atomic structure and the excitation scheme. The most striking and unexpected finding is that for a certain wavelength, the Ca2+ yield is observable well before the saturation intensity of Ca+ and, moreover, it grows with intensity and saturates in parallel with the Ca+ yield. Possible mechanisms behind this outcome are discussed in detail as well as their implications for the multiphoton multiple ionization of complex atoms. Our tentative conclusion is that the occurrence of doubly charged ion production before the singly charged ion saturation should not be considered as 'synonymous' with direct (or non-sequential) multiphoton double ionization.

  12. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections.

  13. Label-free discrimination of normal and pulmonary cancer tissues using multiphoton fluorescence ratiometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Yang-Fang; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-07-01

    We performed multiphoton excited autofluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy for the distinction of normal, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) specimens. In addition to morphological distinction, we derived quantitative metrics of cellular redox ratios for cancer discrimination. Specifically, the redox ratios of paired normal/SCC and normal/LAC specimens were found to be 0.53±0.05/0.41±0.06 and 0.56±0.02/0.35±0.06, respectively. The lower redox ratios in cancer specimens, indicating an increase in metabolic activity. These results show that the combination of morphological multiphoton imaging along with redox ratio indices can be used for the discrimination of normal and pulmonary cancer tissues.

  14. First-principles calculation of multiphoton absorption cross section of α-quartz under femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dong; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Feng; Qu, Liangti; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-05-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory-based first-principles calculations have been used to study the ionization process and electron excitation. The results show that the number of excited electrons follows the power law σ k I k at peak intensities of I < 5 × 1013 W/cm2, indicating that the multiphoton ionization plays a key role. The multiphoton absorption cross section of α-quartz σ k is further calculated to be 3.54 × 1011 cm-3 ps-1 (cm2/TW)6. Using the plasma model, the theoretical results of the damage threshold fluences are consistent with the experimental data, which validates the calculated value of multiphoton absorption cross section. By employing the calculated cross section value in the plasma model, the damage threshold fluences are theoretically estimated, being consistent with the experimental data, which validates the calculated value of multiphoton absorption cross section. The preliminary multiscale model shows great potential in the simulation of laser processing.

  15. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Ross A.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Ascenzi, Daniela; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Buma, Wybren Jan; Scheper, Connie R.; de Lange, Cornelis A.

    1996-08-01

    Rydberg excited states of the OCS molecule in the energy range 70500-86000 cm-1 have been investigated via the two and three photon resonance enhancements they provide in the mass resolved multiphoton ionization (MPI) spectrum of a jet-cooled sample of the parent molecule. Spectral interpretation has been assisted by companion measurements of the kinetic energies of the photoelectrons that accompany the various MPI resonances. The present study supports the earlier conclusions of Weinkauf and Boesl [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 4459 (1993)] regarding five Rydberg origins in the 70500-73000 cm-1 energy range, attributable to, respectively, states of 3Π, 1Π, 3Δ, 1Δ and 1Σ+ symmetry arising from the 4pλ←3π orbital promotion. We also identify a further 21 Rydberg origins at higher energies. These partition into clumps with quantum defects ca. 3.5 and 4.5, which we associate with the orbital promotions npλ←3π (n=5,6), and others with near integer quantum defect which are interpretable in terms of excitation to s,d and (possibly) f Rydberg orbitals. We also identify MPI resonances attributable to CO(X 1Σ+) fragments and to S atoms in both their ground (3P) and excited (1D) electronic states. Analysis of the former resonances confirms that the CO(X) fragments resulting from one photon dissociation of OCS at excitation wavelengths ca. 230 nm are formed with a highly inverted, bimodal rotational state population distribution, whilst the latter are consistent with previous reports of the wavelength dependence for forming ground and excited state S atoms in the near uv photolysis of OCS.

  16. Facile and high spatial resolution ratio-metric luminescence thermal mapping in microfluidics by near infrared excited upconversion nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Wenbin; Li, Shunbo; Wen, Weijia

    2016-02-01

    A local area temperature monitor is important for precise control of chemical and biological processes in microfluidics. In this work, we developed a facile method to realize micron spatial resolution of temperature mapping in a microfluidic channel quickly and cost effectively. Based on the temperature dependent fluorescence emission of NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) under near-infrared irradiation, ratio-metric imaging of UCNPs doped polydimethylsiloxane can map detailed temperature distribution in the channel. Unlike some reported strategies that utilize temperature sensitive organic dye (such as Rhodamine) to achieve thermal sensing, our method is highly chemically inert and physically stable without any performance degradation in long term operation. Moreover, this method can be easily scaled up or down, since the spatial and temperature resolution is determined by an optical imaging system. Our method supplied a simple and efficient solution for temperature mapping on a heterogeneous surface where usage of an infrared thermal camera was limited.

  17. Molecular engineering of intensely near-infrared absorbing excited states in highly conjugated oligo(porphinato)zinc-(polypyridyl)metal(II) supermolecules.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Timothy V; Ishizuka, Tomoya; Therien, Michael J

    2007-08-01

    A new series of chromophores, MPZn(n), which combine ethyne-bridged bis(terpyridyl)metal(II)-(porphinato)zinc(II) (MPZ(n)) and oligomeric, ethyne-bridged (porphinato)zinc(II) (PZn(n)) architectures, have been synthesized and characterized, along with a series of derivatives bearing pyrrolidinyl electron-releasing groups on the ancillary terpyridine units (Pyr(m)MPZn(n)). Cyclic voltammetric studies, as well as NMR, electronic absorption, fluorescence, and femtosecond pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopies, have been employed to study the ground- and excited-state properties of these unusual chromophores. All of these species possess intensely absorbing excited states having large spectral bandwidth that penetrate deep in the near-infrared (NIR) energy regime. Electronic structural variation of the molecular framework shows that the excited-state absorption maximum can be extensively modulated [lambdamax(T(1) --> T(n))] (880 nm < lambdamax < 1126 nm), while concomitantly maintaining impressively large T(1) --> T(n) absorption manifold spectral bandwidth (full width at half-maximum, fwhm, approximately 2000-2500 cm(-1)). Furthermore, these studies enable correlation of supermolecular electronic structure with the magnitude of the excited-state lifetime (tau(es)) and demonstrate that this parameter can be modulated over 4 orders of magnitude ( approximately 1 ns < tau(es) < 45 micros). Terpyridyl pyrrolidinyl substituents can be utilized to destabilize terpyridyl ligand pi(*) energy levels and diminish the E1/2 (M3+/2+) value of the bis(terpyridyl)metal(II) center: such perturbations determine the relative energies of the PZn(n)-derived 1pi-pi(*) and bis(terpyridyl)metal(II) charge-transfer states and establish whether the T(1)-state wave functions of MPZn(n) and PyrmMPZn(n) species manifest the extensive electronic delocalization and charge-separated (CS) features characteristic of long-lived triplet states that absorb strongly in the NIR. PMID:17629267

  18. Two-photon imaging with longer wavelength excitation in intact Arabidopsis tissues.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Yoko; Kurihara, Daisuke; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    In vivo imaging of living organisms is an important tool to investigate biological phenomena. Two-photon excitation microscopy (2PEM) is a laser-scanning microscopy that provides noninvasive, deep imaging in living organisms based on the principle of multiphoton excitation. However, application of 2PEM to plant tissues has not been fully developed, as plant-specific autofluorescence, optically dense tissues, and multiple light-scattering structures diminish the clarity of imaging. In this study, the advantages of 2PEM were identified for deep imaging of living and intact Arabidopsis thaliana tissues. When compared to single-photon imaging, near-infrared 2PEM, especially at 1000 nm, reduced chloroplast autofluorescence; autofluorescence also decreased in leaves, roots, pistils, and pollen grains. For clear and deep imaging, longer excitation wavelengths using the orange fluorescent proteins (FPs) TagRFP and tdTomato gave better results than with other colors. 2PEM at 980 nm also provided multicolor imaging by simultaneous excitation, and the combination of suitable FPs and excitation wavelengths allowed deep imaging of intact cells in root tips and pistils. Our results demonstrated the importance of choosing both suitable FPs and excitation wavelengths for clear two-photon imaging. Further advances in in vivo analysis using 2PEM will facilitate more extensive studies in the plant biological sciences. PMID:25588923

  19. Imaging tissue engineering scaffolds using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yen; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Young, Tai-Horng; Lo, Wen; Chen, Wei-Liang; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we combined two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation imaging to investigate the three-dimensional microstructure and nonlinear optical properties of tissue engineering scaffolds. We focused on five different types of scaffold materials commonly used in tissue engineering, including: open-cell polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid, collagen composite scaffold, collagraft bone graft matrix strip, and nylon. By the use of multiphoton microscopy and a motorized stage, we obtained high resolution, spectrally resolved structural information of the scaffolds over large areas or in three-dimensions. Our results show that the nonlinear optical properties of the scaffolds will enable us to spectrally and morphologically distinguish the different types of scaffold materials investigated. We envision multiphoton microscopy to be a useful technique in tissue engineering applications in understanding the interplay between cultured cells and the scaffold materials. PMID:17943985

  20. Multiphoton adiabatic passage for atom optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demeter, Gabor; Djotyan, Gagik P.

    2009-04-15

    We study the force exerted on two-level atoms by short, counterpropagating laser pulses. When the counterpropagating pulses overlap each other partially, multiphoton adiabatic processes are possible in several configurations, which amplify the force exerted on the atoms. We investigate the practical usefulness of such multiphoton adiabatic transitions for the manipulation of the atoms' mechanical state. In particular, we compare the efficiency of a pair of constant frequency, oppositely detuned laser pulses and that of a pair of frequency-chirped pulses. We also consider the case of prolonged exposure to a sequence of laser pulses for a duration that is comparable to or much larger than the spontaneous lifetime of the atoms. We use numerical methods to calculate the reduction of the force and the heating of the atomic ensemble when spontaneous emission cannot be neglected during the interaction. In addition, we derive simple approximate formulas for the force and the heating, and compare them to the numerical results.

  1. Fundamental studies of molecular multiphoton ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.C.; Compton, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    For several years the authors have performed fundamental studies of molecular multiphoton ionization (MPI). We will present a potpourri of techniques and results chosen to illustrate the interesting complexities of molecular MPI. Techniques used include time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, supersonic expansion cooling of molecular beams, harmonic generation, two-color laser MPI, and polarization spectroscopy. Whenever possible the relevance of these results to resonance ionization spectroscopy schemes will be delineated. 23 references, 10 figures.

  2. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C.; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L.; Padera, Timothy P.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates—only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  3. Discrimination of zeolites and beryllium containing silicates using portable Raman spectroscometric equipment with near-infrared excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehlička, J.; Vandenabeele, P.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper Raman spectra were obtained for a series of zeolites (thomsonite, stilbite, natrolite) and beryllium containing silicates (beryl, chrysoberyl, euclase, phenacite, bavenite, milarite) using a portable Raman specrometer with a 785 nm laser excitation to show the possibility to apply this setting for unambiguous detection and discrimination of these silicate minerals. Obtained spectra contain the most intense Raman bands at the same positions ±2-4 cm -1 as reported in the literature. The use of these bands permits the unambiguous identification of these phases. Data show the possibility to discriminate individual species of similar whitish color and aspect. Measurements showed an excellent correspondence of Raman bands obtained using the portable system and a laboratory Raman microspectrometer (with the same excitation laser wavelenght). However, for several minerals of these groups (chrysoberyl, bertrandite, chiavennite) Raman spectra were not of sufficient quality to permit unambiguous identification. The reasons are discussed. Raman spectrum of chiavennite CaMnBe 2Si 5O 13(OH) 2·2(H 2O) - a transformation product occurring together with bavenite on the surface of beryl crystals was obtained for the first time using the laboratory Raman spectrometer.

  4. Discrimination of zeolites and beryllium containing silicates using portable Raman spectroscometric equipment with near-infrared excitation.

    PubMed

    Jehlička, J; Vandenabeele, P; Edwards, H G M

    2012-02-01

    In this paper Raman spectra were obtained for a series of zeolites (thomsonite, stilbite, natrolite) and beryllium containing silicates (beryl, chrysoberyl, euclase, phenacite, bavenite, milarite) using a portable Raman specrometer with a 785 nm laser excitation to show the possibility to apply this setting for unambiguous detection and discrimination of these silicate minerals. Obtained spectra contain the most intense Raman bands at the same positions ±2-4 cm(-1) as reported in the literature. The use of these bands permits the unambiguous identification of these phases. Data show the possibility to discriminate individual species of similar whitish color and aspect. Measurements showed an excellent correspondence of Raman bands obtained using the portable system and a laboratory Raman microspectrometer (with the same excitation laser wavelenght). However, for several minerals of these groups (chrysoberyl, bertrandite, chiavennite) Raman spectra were not of sufficient quality to permit unambiguous identification. The reasons are discussed. Raman spectrum of chiavennite CaMnBe(2)Si(5)O(13)(OH)(2)·2(H(2)O) - a transformation product occurring together with bavenite on the surface of beryl crystals was obtained for the first time using the laboratory Raman spectrometer. PMID:22099060

  5. OT2_egonza01_3: Excited H2O and OH as tracers of buried activity in the nuclear regions of (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Alfonso, E.

    2011-09-01

    H2O and OH are key tracers of the structure, kinematics, and activity in the nuclear regions of (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs): with their excitation dominated by pumping by far-infrared continuum radiation, they probe the nuclear source of the far-IR radiation and its associated structures (disks, torus); their P-Cygni, absorption, and emission profiles trace massive molecular outflows and possibly inflows, and the astrophysically important associated energetics involved in the (negative) feedback from star formation and/or AGN on the molecular gas; they probe the physical and radiative environments (X-rays, cosmic rays, hot cores) where they reside. In order to distinguish among the above scenarios, we propose PACS spectroscopy of key transitions of H2O and OH in a sample of 9 bright (U)LIRGs where submillimeter H2O lines have been detected with SPIRE, as well as key diagnostic lines of NH3 and OH+ to ascertain the formation mechanism and implied physical processes. The proposed observations will serve as a crucial benchmark for future routine observations of H2O with ALMA in the distant Universe.

  6. Bioinspired near-infrared-excited sensing platform for in vitro antioxidant capacity assay based on upconversion nanoparticles and a dopamine-melanin hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Chen, Chuan; Ke, Xuebin; Kang, Ning; Shen, Yuqing; Liu, Yongliang; Zhou, Xi; Wang, Hongjun; Chen, Changqing; Ren, Lei

    2015-02-11

    A novel core-shell structure based on upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles (UCNPs) and dopamine-melanin has been developed for evaluation of the antioxidant capacity of biological fluids. In this approach, dopamine-melanin nanoshells facilely formed on the surface of UCNPs act as ultraefficient quenchers for upconversion fluorescence, contributing to a photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism. This spontaneous oxidative polymerization of the dopamine-induced quenching effect could be effectively prevented by the presence of various antioxidants (typically biothiols, ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), and Trolox). The chemical response of the UCNPs@dopamine-melanin hybrid system exhibited great selectivity and sensitivity toward antioxidants relative to other compounds at 100-fold higher concentration. A satisfactory correlation was established between the ratio of the "anti-quenching" fluorescence intensity and the concentration of antioxidants. Besides the response of the upconversion fluorescence signal, a specific evaluation process for antioxidants could be visualized by the color change from colorless to dark gray accompanied by the spontaneous oxidation of dopamine. The near-infrared (NIR)-excited UCNP-based antioxidant capacity assay platform was further used to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of cell extracts and human plasma, and satisfactory sensitivity, repeatability, and recovery rate were obtained. This approach features easy preparation, fluorescence/visual dual mode detection, high specificity to antioxidants, and enhanced sensitivity with NIR excitation, showing great potential for screening and quantitative evaluation of antioxidants in biological systems. PMID:25604145

  7. Luminescence quenching of conductive Si nanocrystals via “Linkage emission”: Hopping-like propagation of infrared-excited Auger electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Masashi; Crowe, Iain F.; Halsall, Matthew P.; Hamilton, Bruce; Knights, Andrew P.; Gwilliam, Russell M.

    2014-08-14

    Phosphorus (P) is an n-type dopant for conductive silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc's), the electrical activation of which may be monitored through a non-radiative Auger recombination process that quenches the Si-nc luminescence. We investigated this quenching mechanism through electrical measurements of Si-nc's. Infrared-excited Auger electron emission as the non-radiative process was directly probed and the dynamics of the process are determined from a frequency response analysis. To explain the dynamics, we propose a model in which Auger electrons with a low kinetic energy establish a local inter-nanocrystal conductance and the repetition of this local conductance results in a constant photocurrent (“linkage emission”). This emission becomes significant by electron filling in the Si-nc's owing to the electrical activation of P, which is consistent with observed luminescence quenching behavior. We found that the IR photo-excited emission is distinct from the thermally induced hopping conduction and show that confined, rather than trapped, charges are the source of the Auger electrons. Thus, the process consumes both confined charges and the recombination energy for Auger emission, which explains the luminescence quenching mechanism of Si-nc:P.

  8. Simulated infrared emission spectra of highly excited polyatomic molecules: a detailed model of the PAH-UIR hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A detailed description of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)/unidentified infrared band (UIR) mechanism is presented in which experimental spectral bandshape functions are used to simulate IR emission spectra for individual molecules. These spectra are additively superimposed to produce a conglomerate spectrum representative of a family of PAH molecules. Ab initio vibrational frequencies and intensities for nine PAHs (neutral and cationic) as large as ovalene are used in conjunction with measured bandshape and temperature-dependent redshift data to simulate the UIR bands. The calculated spectra of cations provide a closer match to the UIRs than do those of the neutrals. However, the PAH cations used in the simulations fail to reproduce the details of the UIR emission spectra. The discrepancies are potentially alleviated if both larger PAHs and a greater number of PAHs were included in the simulation.

  9. Intrinsic indicator of photodamage during label-free multiphoton microscopy of cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Andresen, Elisabeth F; Geiger, Kathrin D; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Multiphoton imaging has evolved as an indispensable tool in cell biology and holds prospects for clinical applications. When addressing endogenous signals such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) or second harmonic generation, it requires intense laser irradiation that may cause photodamage. We report that increasing endogenous fluorescence signal upon multiphoton imaging constitutes a marker of photodamage. The effect was studied on mouse brain in vivo and ex vivo, on ex vivo human brain tissue samples, as well as on glioblastoma cells in vitro, demonstrating that this phenomenon is common to a variety of different systems, both ex vivo and in vivo. CARS microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy were used to analyze the photodamage. The development of a standard easy-to-use model that employs rehydrated cryosections allowed the characterization of the irradiation-induced fluorescence and related it to nonlinear photodamage. In conclusion, the monitoring of endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence during label-free multiphoton microscopy enables to estimate damage thresholds ex vivo as well as detect photodamage during in vivo experiments. PMID:25343251

  10. Multiphoton imaging of upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles in three dimensional models of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainer, Christian F.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-02-01

    While upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles have numerous advantages over other exogenous contrast agents used in scanned multiphoton imaging, their long luminescence lifetimes cause images collected with non-descanned detection to be greatly blurred. We demonstrate herein the use of Richardson-Lucy deconvolution to deblur luminescence images obtained via multiphoton scanning microscopy. Images were taken of three dimensional models of colon and ovarian cancer following incubation with NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles functionalized with an antibody for EGFR and folic acid respectively. Following deconvolution, images had a lateral resolution on par with the optimal performance of the imaging system used, ~1.2 μm, and an axial resolution of ~5 μm. Due to the relatively high multiphoton excitation efficiency of these nanoparticles, it is possible to follow binding of individual particles in tissue. In addition, their extreme photostability allows for prolonged imaging without significant loss in luminescence signal. With these advantageous properties in mind, we also discuss the potential application of upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles for tracking of specific, cancer relevant receptors in tissue.

  11. In vivo multiphoton imaging of collagen remodeling after microablative fractional rejuvenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, Riccardo; Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Troiano, Michela; Campolmi, Piero; Morini, Cristiano; Cosci, Alessandro; Massi, Daniela; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2011-03-01

    The potential of multiphoton microscopy in providing in-vivo early diagnosis of skin lesions has already been demonstrated, while its capability in therapy follow-up has not been deeply explored so far. Two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy were used in combination to follow-up collagen remodeling after laser micro-ablative rejuvenation. Treated regions of volunteers were imaged with multiphoton microscopy before and after treatment, and we found a strong age-dependence of the treatment effectiveness. In particular, the photorejuvenating effect was negligible in young subjects (< 30 years), whereas a significant production of new collagen was observed in aged subjects (> 70 years). Quantification of the amount of newly produced collagen and its organization were performed by means of visual examination of two-photon images. The obtained results demonstrate the performance of laser fractional micro-ablative rejuvenation without the need of an invasive biopsy as well as the wide applicability range of applications for multiphoton microscopy in clinical dermatology.

  12. Multiphoton Imaging of Upconverting Lanthanide Nanoparticles in Three Dimensional Models of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gainer, Christian F.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    While upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles have numerous advantages over other exogenous contrast agents used in scanned multiphoton imaging, their long luminescence lifetimes cause images collected with non-descanned detection to be greatly blurred. We demonstrate herein the use of Richardson-Lucy deconvolution to deblur luminescence images obtained via multiphoton scanning microscopy. Images were taken of three dimensional models of colon and ovarian cancer following incubation with NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles functionalized with an antibody for EGFR and folic acid respectively. Following deconvolution, images had a lateral resolution on par with the optimal performance of the imaging system used, ~1.2 μm, and an axial resolution of ~5 μm. Due to the relatively high multiphoton excitation efficiency of these nanoparticles, it is possible to follow binding of individual particles in tissue. In addition, their extreme photostability allows for prolonged imaging without significant loss in luminescence signal. With these advantageous properties in mind, we also discuss the potential application of upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles for tracking of specific, cancer relevant receptors in tissue. PMID:24353385

  13. Multiphoton Imaging of Upconverting Lanthanide Nanoparticles in Three Dimensional Models of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gainer, Christian F; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-02-22

    While upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles have numerous advantages over other exogenous contrast agents used in scanned multiphoton imaging, their long luminescence lifetimes cause images collected with non-descanned detection to be greatly blurred. We demonstrate herein the use of Richardson-Lucy deconvolution to deblur luminescence images obtained via multiphoton scanning microscopy. Images were taken of three dimensional models of colon and ovarian cancer following incubation with NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles functionalized with an antibody for EGFR and folic acid respectively. Following deconvolution, images had a lateral resolution on par with the optimal performance of the imaging system used, ~1.2 μm, and an axial resolution of ~5 μm. Due to the relatively high multiphoton excitation efficiency of these nanoparticles, it is possible to follow binding of individual particles in tissue. In addition, their extreme photostability allows for prolonged imaging without significant loss in luminescence signal. With these advantageous properties in mind, we also discuss the potential application of upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles for tracking of specific, cancer relevant receptors in tissue. PMID:24353385

  14. Ultralow-threshold multiphoton-pumped lasing from colloidal nanoplatelets in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingjie; Zhi, Min; Zhu, Hai; Wu, Wen-Ya; Xu, Qing-Hua; Jhon, Mark Hyunpong; Chan, Yinthai

    2015-09-01

    Although multiphoton-pumped lasing from a solution of chromophores is important in the emerging fields of nonlinear optofluidics and bio-photonics, conventionally used organic dyes are often rendered unsuitable because of relatively small multiphoton absorption cross-sections and low photostability. Here, we demonstrate highly photostable, ultralow-threshold multiphoton-pumped biexcitonic lasing from a solution of colloidal CdSe/CdS nanoplatelets within a cuvette-based Fabry-Pérot optical resonator. We find that colloidal nanoplatelets surprisingly exhibit an optimal lateral size that minimizes lasing threshold. These nanoplatelets possess very large gain cross-sections of 7.3 × 10-14 cm2 and ultralow lasing thresholds of 1.2 and 4.3 mJ cm-2 under two-photon (λexc=800 nm) and three-photon (λexc=1.3 μm) excitation, respectively. The highly polarized emission from the nanoplatelet laser shows no significant photodegradation over 107 laser shots. These findings constitute a more comprehensive understanding of the utility of colloidal semiconductor nanoparticles as the gain medium in high-performance frequency-upconversion liquid lasers.

  15. Ultralow-threshold multiphoton-pumped lasing from colloidal nanoplatelets in solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjie; Zhi, Min; Zhu, Hai; Wu, Wen-Ya; Xu, Qing-Hua; Jhon, Mark Hyunpong; Chan, Yinthai

    2015-01-01

    Although multiphoton-pumped lasing from a solution of chromophores is important in the emerging fields of nonlinear optofluidics and bio-photonics, conventionally used organic dyes are often rendered unsuitable because of relatively small multiphoton absorption cross-sections and low photostability. Here, we demonstrate highly photostable, ultralow-threshold multiphoton-pumped biexcitonic lasing from a solution of colloidal CdSe/CdS nanoplatelets within a cuvette-based Fabry-Pérot optical resonator. We find that colloidal nanoplatelets surprisingly exhibit an optimal lateral size that minimizes lasing threshold. These nanoplatelets possess very large gain cross-sections of 7.3 × 10(-14) cm(2) and ultralow lasing thresholds of 1.2 and 4.3 mJ cm(-2) under two-photon (λexc=800 nm) and three-photon (λexc=1.3 μm) excitation, respectively. The highly polarized emission from the nanoplatelet laser shows no significant photodegradation over 10(7) laser shots. These findings constitute a more comprehensive understanding of the utility of colloidal semiconductor nanoparticles as the gain medium in high-performance frequency-upconversion liquid lasers. PMID:26419950

  16. Ultralow-threshold multiphoton-pumped lasing from colloidal nanoplatelets in solution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingjie; Zhi, Min; Zhu, Hai; Wu, Wen-Ya; Xu, Qing-Hua; Jhon, Mark Hyunpong; Chan, Yinthai

    2015-01-01

    Although multiphoton-pumped lasing from a solution of chromophores is important in the emerging fields of nonlinear optofluidics and bio-photonics, conventionally used organic dyes are often rendered unsuitable because of relatively small multiphoton absorption cross-sections and low photostability. Here, we demonstrate highly photostable, ultralow-threshold multiphoton-pumped biexcitonic lasing from a solution of colloidal CdSe/CdS nanoplatelets within a cuvette-based Fabry–Pérot optical resonator. We find that colloidal nanoplatelets surprisingly exhibit an optimal lateral size that minimizes lasing threshold. These nanoplatelets possess very large gain cross-sections of 7.3 × 10−14 cm2 and ultralow lasing thresholds of 1.2 and 4.3 mJ cm−2 under two-photon (λexc=800 nm) and three-photon (λexc=1.3 μm) excitation, respectively. The highly polarized emission from the nanoplatelet laser shows no significant photodegradation over 107 laser shots. These findings constitute a more comprehensive understanding of the utility of colloidal semiconductor nanoparticles as the gain medium in high-performance frequency-upconversion liquid lasers. PMID:26419950

  17. Clinical optical coherence tomography combined with multiphoton tomography for evaluation of several skin disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Speicher, Marco; Bückle, Rainer; Reckfort, Julia; McKenzie, Gordon; Welzel, Julia; Koehler, Martin J.; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The first clinical trial of optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with multiphoton tomography (MPT) and dermoscopy is reported. State-of-the-art (i) OCT systems for dermatology (e.g. multibeam swept source OCT), (ii) the femtosecond laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM, and (iii) digital dermoscopes were applied to 47 patients with a diversity of skin diseases and disorders such as skin cancer, psoriasis, hemangioma, connective tissue diseases, pigmented lesions, and autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Dermoscopy, also called 'epiluminescent microscopy', provides two-dimensional color images of the skin surface. OCT imaging is based on the detection of optical reflections within the tissue measured interferometrically whereas nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and the second harmonic generation are the bases of MPT images. OCT cross sectional "wide field" image provides a typical field of view of 5 x 2 mm2 and offers fast information on the depth and the volume of the investigated lesion. In comparison, multiphoton tomography presents 0.36 x 0.36 mm2 horizontal or diagonal sections of the region of interest within seconds with submicron resolution and down to a tissue depth of 200 μm. The combination of OCT and MPT provides a synergistic optical imaging modality for early detection of skin cancer and other skin diseases.

  18. Excitation of dark plasmonic cavity modes via nonlinearly induced dipoles: applications to near-infrared plasmonic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biris, Claudiu G.; Panoiu, Nicolae C.

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate that dark plasmon modes of cavity-shaped plasmonic structures made of metallic nanowires can be excited by local dipoles induced via second-harmonic generation. The optical properties of these plasmonic cavity modes are thoroughly characterized by using a numerical method that provides a complete description of the optical field at both the fundamental frequency and the second harmonic. In particular, we show that the optical properties of these plasmonic cavity modes are strongly dependent on the geometry of the plasmonic cavity and the material parameters of its constituents. This enhanced sensitivity of dark plasmonic cavity modes to the surrounding dielectric environment can find applications in plasmonic sensing. Specifically, this novel approach to sensing reveals that detection limits of 10 - 5 refractive index units can readily be achieved by using wavelength-sized plasmonic devices.

  19. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V{yields}T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V{yields}T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH{sub 3} production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  20. Multiphoton dissociation of H2S by intense x-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Brendan; Fang, Li; Hoener, Matthias; Kukk, Edwin; Kanter, Elliot; Bozek, John; Berrah, Nora

    2011-05-01

    We will report on sequential multiphoton ionization of H2S by intense pulses of x-rays from the LCLS free electron laser. Following L-shell excitation, fragmentation of the molecule is observed by Auger electron, photoelectron, and ion time-of-flight spectroscopy. Intensity dependent features in these spectra shed light on the dynamics of the dissociation process. This work is funded by the DOE-SC-BES, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division.

  1. Waveguide-integrated single- and multi-photon detection at telecom wavelengths using superconducting nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, Simone; Kahl, Oliver; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-04-13

    We investigate single- and multi-photon detection regimes of superconducting nanowire detectors embedded in silicon nitride nanophotonic circuits. At near-infrared wavelengths, simultaneous detection of up to three photons is observed for 120 nm wide nanowires biased far from the critical current, while narrow nanowires below 100 nm provide efficient single photon detection. A theoretical model is proposed to determine the different detection regimes and to calculate the corresponding internal quantum efficiency. The predicted saturation of the internal quantum efficiency in the single photon regime agrees well with plateau behavior observed at high bias currents.

  2. Electrostatically tunable plasmonic devices fabricated on multi-photon polymerized three-dimensional microsprings.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Hiroaki; Saito, Yasuto

    2016-01-11

    Electrostatically tunable plasmonic devices on three-dimensional (3D) microsprings were fabricated using multi-photon polymerization followed by metal deposition. These plasmonic devices comprised a nanostructured Au microplate and two 3D microsprings. The maximum plasmon excitation efficiency was 35%, a value achieved with incident light of wavelength 632.8 nm. The efficiency could be continuously changed from almost zero to maximum by inclining the microplates with the application of DC voltage up to 50 V. Such dynamic functionality is useful for the realization of highly integrated optoelectronic devices and tunable metamaterials. PMID:26832293

  3. Photon absorption in step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of Sepia melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles

    2013-02-01

    Previous research has shown that melanin goes through a step-wise three-photon absorption process when the fluorescence is activated with high laser intensity. We have conducted further research using even higher laser intensity for the activation, and have shown the possibility of observing power dependence other than third-order. This article discusses the possible energy states of Sepia melanin by studying the power dependence curves of the step-wise multi-photon activated fluorescence signal. Three different excitation channels are activated. Possible reasons causing the three channels are discussed.

  4. Identification of dirty necrosis in colorectal carcinoma based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianhuang; Jiang, Weizhong; Yang, Yinghong; Chen, Zhifen; Feng, Changyin; Li, Hongsheng; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-06-01

    Dirty necrosis within glandular lumina is often considered as a characteristic of colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) that is a diagnostically useful feature of CRCs with DNA microsatellite instability (MSI). Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is based on the second-harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence signals, was used to identify dirty necrosis. Our results demonstrated that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of dirty necrosis and the signal intensity as well as an emission spectrum that can help to differentiate dirty necrosis from cancer cells. These findings indicate that MPM may be helpful in distinguishing MSI colorectal carcinoma via the identification of dirty necrosis.

  5. Multi-photon microscopy based on resonant four-wave mixing of colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masia, F.; Langbein, W.; Borri, P.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate a novel multi-photon imaging modality based on the detection of four-wave mixing (FWM) from colloidal nanoparticles. Four-wave mixing is a third-order signal which can be excited and detected in resonance with the ground-state excitonic transition of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. The coherent FWM signal is detected interferometrically to reject incoherent backgrounds for improved image contrast compared to fluorescence methods. We measure transversal and axial resolutions of 140nm and 590nm respectively, significantly beating the one-photon diffraction limit. We also demonstrate optical imaging of quantum-dot-labeled Golgi structures of HepG2 cells.

  6. Resonant multiphoton ionization spectra of molecules and molecular fragments. Technical report, October 1987--September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The objective of our research under this contract is to carry out studies of resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) processes in molecules. In the (n + 1) - REMPI process of interest an atom or molecule in a specific initial state absorbs n photons making a transition to an intermediate state from which it is subsequently ionized by absorption of an additional photon. A remarkable feature of resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization is that the narrow bandwidth radiation of lasers makes it possible (i) to select a specific rovibrational level in the initial state of a molecule or fragment, (ii) to resonantly pump this level up to a selected rotational-vibrational level of an excited electronic state, and (iii) to subsequently photoionize the state that has been resonantly excited. The extreme state-selectivity and sensitivity make REMPI both a tool with several practical applications and an important technique for probing the photoionization dynamics of vibrationally and electronically excited states. Some significant applications of this technique include its use for state-specific detection of species and diagnostics in combustion and chemical etching media and plasmas, (ii) for state-specific generation of molecular ions for use in ion-molecule reaction studies, and (iii) as a probe of photofragmentation and gas-surface scattering including alignment and orientation effects in these processes.

  7. Optimal spectral filtering in soliton self-frequency shift for deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Qiu, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Tunable optical solitons generated by soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) have become valuable tools for multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Recent progress in MPM using 1700 nm excitation enabled visualizing subcortical structures in mouse brain in vivo for the first time. Such an excitation source can be readily obtained by SSFS in a large effective-mode-area photonic crystal rod with a 1550-nm fiber femtosecond laser. A longpass filter was typically used to isolate the soliton from the residual in order to avoid excessive energy deposit on the sample, which ultimately leads to optical damage. However, since the soliton was not cleanly separated from the residual, the criterion for choosing the optimal filtering wavelength is lacking. Here, we propose maximizing the ratio between the multiphoton signal and the n'th power of the excitation pulse energy as a criterion for optimal spectral filtering in SSFS when the soliton shows dramatic overlapping with the residual. This optimization is based on the most efficient signal generation and entirely depends on physical quantities that can be easily measured experimentally. Its application to MPM may reduce tissue damage, while maintaining high signal levels for efficient deep penetration.

  8. Multiple-photon excitation imaging with an all-solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wokosin, David L.; Centonze, Victoria F.; White, John G.; Hird, Steven N.; Sepsenwol, S.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.; Maker, Gareth T.; Ferguson, Allister I.

    1996-05-01

    Two-photon excitation imaging is a recently described optical sectioning technique where fluorophore excitation is confined to--and therefore defines--the optical section being observed. This characteristic offers a significant advantage over laser-scanning confocal microscopy; the volume of fluorophore excited in the minimum necessary for imaging, thereby minimizing the destructive effects of fluorophore excitation in living tissues. In addition, a confocal pinhole is not required for optical scattering--thus further reducing the excitation needed for efficient photon collection. We have set up a two-photon excitation imaging system which uses an all-solid-state, short-pulse, long-wavelength laser as an excitation source. The source is a diode-pumped, mode-locked Nd:YLF laser operating in the infrared (1047 nm). This laser is small, has modest power requirements, and has proven reliable and stable in operation. The short laser pulses from the laser are affected by the system optical path; this has been investigated with second harmonic generation derived from a nonlinear crystal. The system has been specifically designed for the study of live biological specimens. Two cell types especially sensitive to high-energy illumination, the developing Caenorhabditis elegans embryo and the crawling sperm of the nematode, Ascaris, were used to demonstrate the dramatic increase in viability when fluorescence is generated by two-photon excitation. The system has the capability of switching between two-photon and confocal imaging modes to facilitate direct comparison of theory of these two optical sectioning techniques on the same specimen. A heavily stained zebra fish embryo was used to demonstrate the increase in sectioning depth when fluorescence is generated by infrared two- photon excitation. Two-photon excitation with the 1047 nm laser produces bright images with a variety of red emitting fluorophores, and some green emitting fluorophores, commonly used in biological research. Fortuitously, we have found that at least four blue emitting fluorophores normally excited by UV light are excited by the pulsed 1047 nm laser, by what we believe to be three-photon excitation. Multi-photon excitation is demonstrated by a double labelled C. elegans embryo.

  9. Picosecond ultraviolet multiphoton laser photolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy of liquid benzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, H.; Masuhara, H.; Mataga, N.

    1985-04-25

    Ultraviolet multiphoton excitation with a picosecond laser pulse at the wavelength of no appreciable ground-state absorption has been used to excite benzene and alkylbenzenes homogeneously in the neat liquid state and to investigate their photophysical and photochemical primary processes by picosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectral measurements. The excimer formation processes in neat liquid benzenes excited by two-photon absorption of the 355-nm picosecond pulse from a Nd/sup 3 -/:YAG laser have been confirmed to proceed via ionization and recombination processes, and the lifetime of the ionized (ion pair) state has been determined to be 10-20 ps in neat benzene. 26 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  10. Time-resolved two-color photoacoustic and multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, D.J.; Parker, G.R. Jr.; Kuppermann, A.

    1984-05-15

    The multiphoton ionization and photoacoustic signals from aniline have been detected as a function of time delay between two laser pulses of different wavelength. The first pulse excited the S/sub 0/ ..-->.. S/sub 1/ 0--0 transition. The second pulse either excited S/sub 1/ to a higher singlet state, or a triplet state produced by intersystem crossing to a higher triplet state, depending on the time delay between pulses. Both ionization and dissociation processes are observed. By varying the conditions of excitation it appears that a given amount of energy can be selectively channeled almost exclusively into either ionization or dissociation pathways. The results are explained using a simple Franck--Condon factor model.

  11. Polymer microcantilevers fabricated via multiphoton absorption polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayindir, Z.; Sun, Y.; Naughton, M. J.; LaFratta, C. N.; Baldacchini, T.; Fourkas, J. T.; Stewart, J.; Saleh, B. E. A.; Teich, M. C.

    2005-02-01

    We have used multiphoton absorption polymerization to fabricate a series of microscale polymer cantilevers. Atomic force microscopy has been used to characterize the mechanical properties of microcantilevers with spring constants that were found to span more than four decades. From these data, we extracted a Young's modulus of E =0.44GPa for these microscale cantilevers. The wide stiffness range and relatively low elastic modulus of the microstructures make them attractive candidates for a range of microcantilever applications, including measurements on soft matter.

  12. Ratiometric two-photon excited photoluminescence of quantum dots triggered by near-infrared-light for real-time detection of nitric oxide release in situ.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui; Gui, Rijun; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yanfeng

    2016-05-30

    Probe-donor integrated nanocomposites were developed from conjugating silica-coated Mn(2+):ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with MoS2 QDs and photosensitive nitric oxide (NO) donors (Fe4S3(NO)7(-), RBS). Under excitation with near-infrared (NIR) light at 808 nm, the Mn(2+):ZnS@SiO2/MoS2-RBS nanocomposites showed the dual-emissive two-photon excited photoluminescence (TPEPL) that induced RBS photolysis to release NO in situ. NO caused TPEPL quenching of Mn(2+):ZnS QDs, but it produced almost no impact on the TPEPL of MoS2 QDs. Hence, the nanocomposites were developed as a novel QDs-based ratiometric TPEPL probe for real-time detection of NO release in situ. The ratiometric TPEPL intensity is nearly linear (R(2) = 0.9901) with NO concentration in the range of 0.01∼0.8 μM, which corresponds to the range of NO release time (0∼15 min). The detection limit was calculated to be approximately 4 nM of NO. Experimental results confirmed that this novel ratiometric TPEPL probe possessed high selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of NO against potential competitors, and especially showed high detection performance for NIR-light triggered NO release in tumor intracellular microenvironments. These results would promote the development of versatile probe-donor integrated systems, also providing a facile and efficient strategy to real-time detect the highly controllable drug release in situ, especially in physiological microenvironments. PMID:27154831

  13. The pressure, temperature and excitation frequency dependent Raman spectra; and infrared spectra of CuBrSe 3 and CuISe 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfati, Jonathan D.; Burns, Gary R.

    1994-11-01

    Raman and Infrared Spectra of CuBrSe 3 and CuISe 3 have been measured. The fundamentals were assigned by analogy to other adducts of Cu(I) halides and to the Se 6 ring molecule. CuBrSe 3 has two strong Raman bands at 247 and 272 cm -1.; CuISe 3 has two strong bands at 243 and 264 cm -1. The strongest IR bands of CuBrSe 3 and CuISe 3 are at 78 and 74 cm -1 respectively. The wavenumbers of the CuX (X = Br or I) stretching modes agree well with the empirical correlation found between overlineν(CuX) and the CuX bond lengths in adducts of phosphine and amine bases, and are shown to be relatively independent of the nature of the coordinating ligands. The pressure dependences from 0 to 20 kbar and temperature dependences from 10-425 K of the Raman-active phonons were measured. In contrast to allotropes of Se, there was no anomalous behaviour of the A 1-type stretching modes of the Se 6 ring. This shows that the interference of intramolecular Se bonds by intermolecular Se bonds is much reduced by the rings' separation by the (CuBr) x chains or Cu 2I 2 rhombs. The coefficients (∂ overlineν/∂p) T of the external modes are smaller relative to the internal modes than those of rhombohedral Se. The relative intensity of all the Raman bands increased monotonically with decreasing exciting frequency for the range of excitation lines used in this study.

  14. The multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.P.

    1992-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy studies of UF{sub 6} have been conducted using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental ({lambda}=1064 nm) and its harmonics ({lambda}=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF{sub x}{sup +} fragment ions even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. The laser power dependence of U{sup n+} ions signals indicates that saturation can occur for many of the steps required for their ionization. In general, the doubly-charged uranium ion (U{sup 2+}) intensity is much greater than that of the singly-charged uranium ion (U{sup +}). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the U{sup n+} (n = 1- 4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The dominance of the U{sup 2+} ion and the absence or very small intensities of UF{sub x}{sup +} fragments, along with the unsaturated wavelength dependence, indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms after the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule.

  15. Photoemission from femtosecond multiphoton ionization of bulk GaAs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunkow, Evan; Clayburn, Nathan; Ledoux, Micah; Gay, Timothy

    2013-05-01

    GaAs photocathodes produce spin polarized electron beams when illuminated with circularly polarized light with photon energy approximately equal to the bandgap energy (λ ~ 800 nm). Such photocathodes are prepared with a negative electron affinity (NEA) in order to allow electrons excited to the conduction band to be emitted into the vacuum. We propose a novel source of spin polarized electrons based on multiphoton absorption in bulk GaAs using a 20 femtosecond pulse laser. Preliminary results are presented where linearly polarized light, incident on non-NEA bulk GaAs, produced a photocurrent that was measured using a channel electron multiplier. We determined that the number of photoemitted electrons per laser pulse, N, varies as N =k*P3.72where k = 3*10-5 and P is the average power of the laser in mW. This result is expected because the spectral width of the laser is such that much of the spectrum has energies that require four photons to be absorbed to emit an electron but some of the energies require only three photons to emit an electron. Future experiments will use a Mott polarimeter and circularly polarized light to investigate the polarization of the emitted electron beam.

  16. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen identification. The novel in vivo non-invasive imaging system offers the possibility to detect and to localize CB agents in tissues and to gain information on their impact on respiratory chain activity, cell division and metabolism. The system DermaInspect can also be used to detect food and water contamination.

  17. Organic matter humification in vermifiltration process for domestic sewage sludge treatment by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Xing, Meiyan; Yang, Jian; Zhao, Limin; Dai, Xiaohu

    2013-10-15

    Performance of a conventional biofilter (BF) and two vermifilters (VFs, different heights) containing earthworms was investigated for domestic sewage sludge (DWS) treatment. Humic-acid like (HAL) fraction isolated from the influent sludge (IS) and effluent sludge of BF (ESBF) and VFs (ESVFs) were determined the elemental and functional composition, and structural characteristics using various analytical approaches. Results showed that performance of DWS treatment in the VFs was preferable to that in the BF. With respect to IS-HAL and ESBF-HAL, ESVFs-HAL had low C, H and N contents and C/O ratio, and high O, carboxyl and phenolic OH group contents, and C/N, C/H and E4/E6 ratios, and large molecular weight. The excitation-emission (Ex/Em) matrix spectra revealed that an additional peak was found at Ex/Em wavelength pairs of 345/435 nm in ESVFs-HAL. Further, Fourier transform infrared spectra showed that vermifiltration led to the loss of aliphatic materials and carbohydrates, and the enrichment of carbonyl and phenolic OH groups in HAL fractions. Additionally, the increase in VF height seemed to accelerate humification degree of organic matter in the effluent sludge. In summary, vermifiltration is alternate technology for transformation of organic matter into humic substances, and thus improves quality of DWS as soil organic fertilizer. PMID:23981770

  18. Multiphoton absorption of HF laser photons by molecules containing a hydroxyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, Robert D.; Evans, D. K.; McClusky, F. K.

    1980-08-01

    Multiphoton absorption (MPA) of HF laser radiation has been studied, as a function of pressure (15 Pa to 1.3 kPa) and fluence (2 mJ/cm2 to 75 J/cm2) for the series: water, methanol, methan-d3-ol, ethanol, and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. As the group attached to the -OH is made more complex, the quasicontinuum occurs after fewer excitation steps, and under ''collisionless'' conditions, the same degree of multiphoton excitation is found to require a lower fluence. For water, at pressures between 73 Pa and 1.3 kPa, the cross sections are considerably lower than those for the other molecules, and MPA requires fluences in excess of ˜75 J/cm2. The remaining molecules divide into two groups, the ''small'' molecules (CH3OH and CD3OH) and the ''large'' molecules (C2H5OH and CF3CH2OH). For the small molecules at low pressures, the cross sections decrease with increasing fluence, an effect which is thought to be due to anharmonic bottlenecking. As pressure increases, the fluence dependence of the cross sections disappear. For the large molecules, anharmonic bottlenecking appears to be reduced, due to the greater density of states, and cross sections increase with increasing fluence according to the empirical form: σ(E, P)=K'Eb'Pa (where P is pressure, E is fluence and b', a, and K' are constants). The facility of HF laser-induced collisionless multiphoton dissociation of the -OH containing molecules is discussed in light of these results.

  19. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters.

    PubMed

    Apicella, B; Li, X; Passaro, M; Spinelli, N; Wang, X

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure. PMID:24880286

  20. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Spinelli, N.; Wang, X.

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  1. High-Order Multiphoton Ionization of the Noble Gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Michael Dale

    Ionization of an atom by the absorption of several photons from a stong electromagnetic field is considered. Specifically, the absolute yield of multiply charged ions of the noble gases, argon, krypton, and xenon produced using a well -characterized, tunable picosecond dye laser is reported as a function of both laser intensity and frequency. Theoretical models are developed to provide a quantitative interpretation of the data. The experiments were designed to investigate the influence of intermediate atomic states on the multiphoton ionization probability at intensities such that the strength of the applied field approached that of the internal atomic field. This was accomplished by measuring the ion yield over a broad range of laser intensity, 10^ {12}<=q I <=q 4times 10^{14} W/cm^2 and frequency. The laser wavelength was varied between 570 and 620 nm and the second harmonic, 285 to 310 nm. Enhancement of the yield of singly-charged krypton ions by two orders of magnitude by three-photon resonant, four-photon ionization was observed at intensities nearly two orders of magnitude above previous results. A model which considers only two atomic levels coupled by the strong field is presented and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. Measured values of the three-photon Rabi rate to, and the photoionization cross sections of, several excited states of Kr I are reported. In addition, even at intensities exceeding 10 ^{13} W/cm^2 , it was possible to find frequencies at which no resonant enhancement of the ionization probability could be observed. Charge states as high as Ar^ {4+}, Kr^{5+} and Xe^{6+} produced by this non-resonant multiphoton ionization were observed at the highest intensities. No evidence was found to suggest that the higher charge states are formed by the direct removal of multiple electrons. Conversely, the data is well described by a model of sequential ionization. A non-resonant, low-frequency photoionization model, similar to that of Keldysh and Reiss is presented which yields quantitative agreement with the experimental results with no adjustable parameters.

  2. a UV+VUV Multiphoton Ionization Scheme for OH Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beames, Joseph M.; Liu, Fang; Lester, Marsha I.

    2012-06-01

    OH radicals are of significant atmospheric interest as a dominant oxidizing agent in day-time tropospheric chemistry. In this study, a 1+1' multiphoton ionization (MPI) scheme is employed to record rotationally-resolved spectra of OH radicals via the A^2Σ^+ resonant intermediate state. UV excitation is used to prepare OH A^2Σ^+(v=1, {J}, F_i), which is subsequently ionized by a second photon of fixed frequency VUV (118.3 nm), generated by tripling the 355 nm output of a Nd:YAG laser. The mass-selected OH^+ ion signal from 1+1' MPI is detected using time-of flight mass spectrometry and compared with the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signal arising from OH A^2Σ^+-X^2π(1,0) excitation. The MPI signal is observed over a range of UV+VUV total energies, corresponding to various OH A^2Σ^+ (v=1, {J}, F_i) intermediate states, with relative intensities that differ considerably from LIF. The ion signal is enhanced relative to LIF at combined UV + VUV photon energies consistent with an autoionizing 3{d} Rydberg state that converges on the OH^+ A^3π ion core; direct ionization into OH^+ X^3Σ^- is forbidden in a one-photon electric-dipole transition from OH A^2Σ^+. The MPI intensities have been quantified relative to LIF over the OH A^2Σ^+-X^2π(1,0) region such that this scheme is now applicable for quantitative state-selective detection of OH X^2π. J. M. Beames, F. Liu, M. I. Lester and C. Murray, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 241102 (2011). J. D. Barr, A. De Fanis, J. M. Dyke, S. D. Gamblin, N. Hooper, A. Morris, S. Stranges, J. B. West, and T. G. Wright, J. Chem. Phys. 110, 345 (1999).

  3. Multiphoton photochemistry of red fluorescent proteins in solution and live cells.

    PubMed

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Stoltzfus, Caleb; Topol, Igor; Collins, Jack; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Barnett, Lauren; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander

    2014-08-01

    Genetically encoded fluorescent proteins (FPs), and biosensors based on them, provide new insights into how living cells and tissues function. Ultimately, the goal of the bioimaging community is to use these probes deep in tissues and even in entire organisms, and this will require two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM), with its greater tissue penetration, lower autofluorescence background, and minimum photodamage in the out-of-focus volume. However, the extremely high instantaneous light intensities of femtosecond pulses in the focal volume dramatically increase the probability of further stepwise resonant photon absorption, leading to highly excited, ionizable and reactive states, often resulting in fast bleaching of fluorescent proteins in TPLSM. Here, we show that the femtosecond multiphoton excitation of red FPs (DsRed2 and mFruits), both in solution and live cells, results in a chain of consecutive, partially reversible reactions, with individual rates driven by a high-order (3-5 photon) absorption. The first step of this process corresponds to a three- (DsRed2) or four-photon (mFruits) induced fast isomerization of the chromophore, yielding intermediate fluorescent forms, which then subsequently transform into nonfluorescent products. Our experimental data and model calculations are consistent with a mechanism in which ultrafast electron transfer from the chromophore to a neighboring positively charged amino acid residue triggers the first step of multiphoton chromophore transformations in DsRed2 and mFruits, consisting of decarboxylation of a nearby deprotonated glutamic acid residue. PMID:25004113

  4. Multiphoton microscopy using intrinsic signals for pharmacological studies in unstained cardiac and vascular tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Boulesteix, Thierry; Pena, Ana-Maria; Pages, Nicole; Senni, Karim; Godeau, Gaston; Sauviat, Martin-Pierre; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2005-03-01

    We report two novel applications of multiphoton microscopy for pharmacological studies of unstained cardiovascular tissue. First, we show that second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy of unstained cardiac myocytes can be used to determine the sarcomere length with sub-resolution accuracy, owing to the remarkable contrast of the SHG signal originating from myosin filaments. A measurement precision of 20 nm is achieved, taking the sample variability into account. We used this technique to measure sarcomere contracture in the presence of saxitoxin, and results were in agreement with mechanical measurements of atrial tissue contracture. Second, we characterized multiphoton microscopy of intact unlabeled arteries. We performed simultaneous detection of two-photon-excited fluorescence (2PEF) from elastin laminae and SHG from collagen fibers upon 860 nm excitation. Combined 2PEF/SHG images provide a highly specific, micron scale description of the architecture of these two major components of the vessel wall. We used this methodology to study the effects of lindane (a pesticide) on the artery wall structure and evidenced structural alteration of the vessel morphology.

  5. Multiphoton microscopy and microspectroscopy for diagnostics of inflammatory and neoplastic lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Flanders, James; Southard, Teresa L.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2012-03-01

    Limitations of current medical procedures for detecting early lung cancers inspire the need for new diagnostic imaging modalities for the direct microscopic visualization of lung nodules. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides for subcellular resolution imaging of intrinsic fluorescence from unprocessed tissue with minimal optical attenuation and photodamage. We demonstrate that MPM detects morphological and spectral features of lung tissue and differentiates between normal, inflammatory and neoplastic lung. Ex vivo MPM imaging of intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence was performed on mouse and canine neoplastic, inflammatory and tumor-free lung sites. Results showed that MPM detected microanatomical differences between tumor-free and neoplastic lung tissue similar to standard histopathology but without the need for tissue processing. Furthermore, inflammatory sites displayed a distinct red-shifted fluorescence compared to neoplasms in both mouse and canine lung, and adenocarcinomas displayed a less pronounced fluorescence emission in the 500 to 550 nm region compared to adenomas in mouse models of lung cancer. These spectral distinctions were also confirmed by two-photon excited fluorescence microspectroscopy. We demonstrate the feasibility of applying MPM imaging of intrinsic fluorescence for the differentiation of lung neoplasms, inflammatory and tumor-free lung, which motivates the application of multiphoton endoscopy for the in situ imaging of lung nodules.

  6. Molecular photoelectron angular distribution rotations in multi-photon resonant ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} by circularly polarized ultraviolet laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Kai-Jun Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D.

    2015-04-14

    We study effects of pulse durations on molecular photoelectron angular distributions (MPADs) in ultrafast circular polarization ultraviolet resonant ionization processes. Simulations performed on aligned H{sub 2}{sup +} by numerically solving time dependent Schrödinger equations show rotations of MPADs with respect to the molecular symmetry axes. It is found that in multi-photon resonant ionization processes, rotation angles are sensitive to pulse durations, which we attribute to the coherent resonant excitation between the ground state and the intermediate excited electronic state induced by Rabi oscillations. Multi-photon nonresonant and single photon ionization processes are simulated and compared which exhibit a constant rotation angle. An asymmetry parameter is introduced to describe the pulse duration sensitivity by perturbation theory models. Influence of pulse frequency detunings on MPADs is also investigated where oscillations of rotations are absent at long pulse durations due to nonresonance excitation.

  7. Multiphoton imaging of biological samples during freezing and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2014-02-01

    We applied multiphoton microscopic imaging to observe freezing and heating effects in plant- and animal cell samples. The experimental setups consisted of a multiphoton imaging system and a heating and cooling stage which allows for precise temperature control from liquid nitrogen temperature (-196°C 77 K) up to +600°C (873 K) with heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K/min and 150 K/min. Two multiphoton imaging systems were used: a system based on a modified optical microscope and a flexible mobile system. To illustrate the imaging capabilities, plant leafs as well as animal cells were microscopically imaged in vivo during freezing based on autofluorescence lifetime and intensity of intrinsic molecules. The measurements illustrate the usefulness of multiphoton imaging to investigate freezing effects on animal and plant cells.

  8. Photophysical characterization of sickle cell disease hemoglobin by multi-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Genevieve D.; Howard, Scott S.

    2015-01-01

    The photophysical properties of human sickle cell disease (SCD) Hemoglobin (Hb) is characterized by multi-photon microscopy (MPM). The intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal associated with extracted hemoglobin was investigated and the solidified SCD variant (HbS) was found to demonstrate broad emission peaking around 510 nm when excited at 800 nm. MPM is used to dynamically induce and image HbS gelling by photolysis of deoxygenated HbS. For comparison, photolysis conditions were applied to a healthy variant of human hemoglobin (HbA) and found to remain in solution not forming fibers. The use of this signal to study the mechanism of HbS polymerization associated with the sickling of SCD erythrocytes is discussed. PMID:26504657

  9. 4π Confocal Microscope for Multiphoton Optical Sectioning of GaN Film Luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucer, K. B.; Liang, Difei; Williams, R. T.; Morkoc, H.

    2001-08-01

    In the 4π confocal microscope developed by S. W. Hell et al, laser light coherently illuminates both sides of a thin sample through a pair of high-NA objectives, effectively producing a single standing-wave fringe of 2-photon fluorescence excitation with weak side lobes. Developed initially for biological applications, the 4π microscope of Hell et al demonstrated 75 nm axial resolution with 810 nm light. We have constructed a 4π confocal multiphoton microscope for 3d analysis of band-edge/excitonic photoluminescence in thin films. Excitation is with 130 fs pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser. Instrumental features and preliminary tests with rhodamine and GaN and InN films are reported.

  10. REVIEW ARTICLE Multiphoton polymerization of hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2010-12-01

    Multiphoton polymerization has been developed as a direct laser writing technique for the preparation of complex 3D structures with resolution beyond the diffraction limit of light. The combination of two or more hybrid materials with different functionalities in the same system has allowed the preparation of structures with advanced properties and functions. Furthermore, the surface functionalization of the 3D structures opens new avenues for their applications in a variety of nanobiotechnological fields. This paper describes the principles of 2PP and the experimental set-up used for 3D structure fabrication. It also gives an overview of the materials that have been employed in 2PP so far and depicts the perspectives of this technique in the development of new active components.

  11. Single and Multiphoton Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelley D.; Majewska, Ania K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is a microscopy technique for measuring the kinetics of fluorescently labeled molecules, and can be applied both in vitro and in vivo for two-and three-dimensional systems. This chapter discusses the three basic FRAP methods: traditional FRAP, multi-photon FRAP (MPFRAP), and FRAP with spatial Fourier analysis (SFA-FRAP). Each discussion is accompanied by a description of the appropriate mathematical analysis appropriate for situations in which the recovery kinetics are dictated by free diffusion. In some experiments, the recovery kinetics are dictated by the boundary conditions of the system, and FRAP is then used to quantify the connectivity of various compartments. Since the appropriate mathematical analysis is independent of the bleaching method, the analysis of compartmental connectivity is discussed last, in a separate section. PMID:25561627

  12. Multi-photon entanglement in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Mehul; Erhard, Manuel; Huber, Marcus; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Forming the backbone of quantum technologies today, entanglement has been demonstrated in physical systems as diverse as photons, ions and superconducting circuits. Although steadily pushing the boundary of the number of particles entangled, these experiments have remained in a two-dimensional space for each particle. Here we show the experimental generation of the first multi-photon entangled state where both the number of particles and dimensions are greater than two. Two photons in our state reside in a three-dimensional space, whereas the third lives in two dimensions. This asymmetric entanglement structure only appears in multiparticle entangled states with d > 2. Our method relies on combining two pairs of photons, high-dimensionally entangled in their orbital angular momentum. In addition, we show how this state enables a new type of ‘layered’ quantum communication protocol. Entangled states such as these serve as a manifestation of the complex dance of correlations that can exist within quantum mechanics.

  13. Rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Daniel H. Beerepoot, Maarten T. P.; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-11-28

    Rotational averaging of tensors is a crucial step in the calculation of molecular properties in isotropic media. We present a scheme for the rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections. We extend existing literature on rotational averaging to even-rank tensors of arbitrary order and derive equations that require only the number of photons as input. In particular, we derive the first explicit expressions for the rotational average of five-, six-, and seven-photon absorption cross sections. This work is one of the required steps in making the calculation of these higher-order absorption properties possible. The results can be applied to any even-rank tensor provided linearly polarized light is used.

  14. Generation of High-Order Squeezing in Multiphoton Micromaser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fu-Li; Huang, Qing

    1996-01-01

    The generation of steady state higher-order squeezing in the sense of Hong and Mandel and also of Hillery in a multiphoton micromaser is studied. The results show that the cotangent state which is generated by the coherent trapping scheme in a multiphoton micromaser can exhibit not only second-order squeezing but also fourth-order and squared field amplitude squeezings. The influence of the cavity loss on the squeezings is investigated.

  15. Near infrared and visible luminescence from xerogels covalently grafted with lanthanide [Sm(3+), Yb(3+), Nd(3+), Er(3+), Pr(3+), Ho(3+)] β-diketonate derivatives using visible light excitation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lining; Qiu, Yannan; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Jin Z; Dang, Song; Feng, Jing; Wang, Zhijuan; Zhang, Hongjie; Shi, Liyi

    2013-10-01

    A series of ternary lanthanide β-diketonate derivatives covalently bonded to xerogels (named as Ln-DP-xerogel, Ln = Sm, Yb, Nd, Er, Pr, Ho) by doubly functionalized alkoxysilane (dbm-Si) was synthesized in situ via a sol-gel process. The properties of these xerogel materials were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The data and analyses suggest that the lanthanide derivatives have been covalently grafted to the corresponding xerogels successfully. Of importance here is that, after excitation with visible light (400-410 nm), the xerogels all show characteristic visible (Sm(3+)) as well as near-infrared (NIR; Sm(3+), Yb(3+), Nd(3+), Er(3+), Pr(3+), Ho(3+)) luminescence of the corresponding Ln(3+) ions, which is attributed to the energy transfer from the ligands to the Ln(3+) ions via an antenna effect. Exciting with visible light is advantageous over UV excitation. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, it is the first observation of NIR luminescence with visible light excitation from xerogels covalently bonded with the Sm(3+), Pr(3+), and Ho(3+) derivatives. Compared to lanthanide complexes (Ln = Er, Nd, Yb) functionalized periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) materials that exhibit similar optical properties reported in our previous work, the Ln-DP-xerogel (Ln = Sm, Yb, Nd, Er, Pr, Ho) in this case offer advantages in terms of ease of synthesis and handling and potentially low cost for emerging technological applications. Development of near-infrared luminescence of the lanthanide materials with visible light excitation is of strong interest to emerging applications such as chemosensors, laser systems, and optical amplifiers. PMID:24063535

  16. Visualizing laser-skin interaction in vivo by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Chan, Jung-Yi; Lee, Jin-Ning; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Lin, Sung-Jan

    2009-03-01

    Recently, multiphoton microscopy has gained much popularity as a noninvasive imaging modality in biomedical research. We evaluate the potential of multiphoton microscopy for monitoring laser-skin reaction in vivo. Nude mouse skin is irradiated with an erbium:YAG laser at various fluences and immediately imaged by a multiphoton microscope. The alterations of cutaneous nonlinear optical properties including multiphoton autofluorescence and second-harmonic generation associated with laser irradiation are evaluated morphologically and quantitatively. Our results show that an erbium:YAG laser at a low fluence can selectively disrupt the stratum corneum, and this alteration may account for the penetration enhancing effect of laser-assisted transcutaneous drug delivery. At a higher fluence, the zone of tissue ablation as well as the disruption of the surrounding stratum corneum, keratinocytes, and dermal extracellular matrix can be better characterized by multiphoton microscopy as compared with conventional histology. Furthermore, the degree of collagen damage in the residual thermal zone can be quantified by second-harmonic generation signals, which have significant difference between control skin, skin irradiated with a 1.5-, 8-, and 16-J/cm2 erbium:YAG laser (P<0.05). We show that multiphoton microscopy can be a useful noninvasive imaging modality for monitoring laser-skin reaction in vivo.

  17. Particle modeling of microplasma generated by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholeti, Siva Sashank

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is a technique applied to the spectroscopy of atoms. The REMPI technique typically involves a resonant single or multiple photon absorption to an electronically excited intermediate state followed by another photon which ionizes the atom. Rayleigh scattering of REMPI plasma has given rise to a non-intrusive, time accurate measurement of electron formation and loss, which lead to many applications viz. trace species detection and micro-plasma diagnostics. It is very important to quantify the expansion process and the evolution of energy of electrons and ions. The operation scale of this process is in microns and non continuum nature of the process lead to the use of PIC/MCC scheme to compu- tationally model REMPI technique. This work attempts to understand and analyze the processes taking place during the expansion of REMPI plasma computationally using the PIC/MCC scheme. One dimensional and two dimensional approximations are considered to analyze the REMPI plasma expansion in Argon gas generated by a laser with a focal shape of a prolate ellipsoid. The expansion of the plasma is found to be very sensitive to the initial velocity distribution of the electrons. REMPI plasma expansion is shown to be ambipolar in nature, with the radial expansion more predominant than axial expansion, hence requiring the 2D model. Electron energy distribution functions(EEDFs) are found at various radial locations along with the corresponding mean energies. The deviation of the EEDFs from that of equilibrium Maxwell-Boltzmann energy distribution is presented both qualitatively and quanti- tatively, indicating the predominant processes at various instances in time.

  18. Dynamics of C-Br bond dissociation in methyl 2-bromopropionate at 235 nm: A resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ankur; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of the C-Br bond dissociation on UV excitation of methyl 2-bromopropionate mainly to the 1(n?*) state, repulsive in the C-Br bond, has been investigated, employing resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. Both the ground state and spin-orbits excited bromine atoms were detected, with the former being the major channel. Bromine fragments show bimodal translational energy distributions, with slow and fast (major) bromine atoms arising mainly from the ground and excited electronic states, respectively. The measured recoil anisotropy suggests isotropic angular distributions of bromine atoms. Molecular orbital calculations reveal an important role of avoided curve crossing on C-Br bond dissociation dynamics.

  19. Photon statistics of atomic fluorescence after {pi}-pulse excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, Kazuyoshi; Koshino, Kazuki

    2010-09-15

    The photon statistics of atomic fluorescence after {pi}-pulse excitation is investigated in a system in which the input and output ports are connected to an atom. Since spontaneous decay during input pulse excitation occurs, the output pulse generally contains a multiphoton component with a certain probability. We quantitatively evaluate the probability of the output pulse containing multiple photons and determine the conditions for ideal single-photon generation.

  20. Photon-momentum transfer in multiphoton ionization and in time-resolved holography with photoelectrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D.; Corkum, Paul B.

    2015-11-01

    In most models and theoretical calculations describing multiphoton ionization by infrared light, the dipole approximation is used. This is equivalent to setting the very small photon momentum to zero. Using numerical solutions of the two-dimensional (2-D) time-dependent Schrödinger equation for one electron (H-like) systems, we show that, for linear polarization, the radiation pressure on photoelectrons is very sensitive to the details of the ionization mechanism. The directly ionized photoelectrons, those that never recollide with the parent ion, are driven in the direction of the laser photon momentum, whereas a fraction of slower photoelectrons are pushed in the opposite direction, leading to the counterintuitive shifts observed in recent experiments [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 243001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.243001]. This complex response is due to the interplay between the Lorentz force and the Coulomb attraction from the ion. On average, however, the photoelectron momentum is in the direction of the photon momentum as in the case of circular polarization. The influence of the photon momentum is shown to be discernible in the holographic patterns of time-resolved atomic and molecular holography with photoelectrons, thus suggesting a new research subject in multiphoton ionization.

  1. Insights on proximity effect and multiphoton induced luminescence from gold nanospheres in far field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borglin, Johan; Guldbrand, Stina; Evenbratt, Hanne; Kirejev, Vladimir; Grnbeck, Henrik; Ericson, Marica B.

    2015-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in far-field multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPM) based on the phenomena of multiphoton induced luminescence (MIL). This is of interest for biomedical applications, e.g., for cancer diagnostics, as MPM allows for working in the near-infrared (NIR) optical window of tissue. It is well known that the aggregation of particles causes a redshift of the plasmon resonance, but its implications for MIL applying far-field MPM should be further exploited. Here, we explore MIL from 10 nm gold nanospheres that are chemically deposited on glass substrates in controlled coverage gradients using MPM operating in NIR range. The substrates enable studies of MIL as a function of inter-particle distance and clustering. It was shown that MIL was only detected from areas on the substrates where the particle spacing was less than one particle diameter, or where the particles have aggregated. The results are interpreted in the context that the underlying physical phenomenon of MIL is a sequential two-photon absorption process, where the first event is driven by the plasmon resonance. It is evident that gold nanospheres in this size range have to be closely spaced or clustered to exhibit detectable MIL using far-field MPM operating in the NIR region.

  2. Stepwise multiphoton activation fluorescence reveals a new method of melanin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; Mega, Yair; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-06-01

    The stepwise multiphoton activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave mode near infrared (NIR) laser, reveals a broad spectrum extending from the visible spectra to the NIR and has potential application for a low-cost, reliable method of detecting melanin. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin are compared with conventional multiphoton fluorescence microscopy and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). By combining CRM with SMPAF, we can locate melanin reliably. However, we have the added benefit of eliminating background interference from other components inside mouse hair and skin. The melanin SMPAF signal from the mouse hair is a mixture of a two-photon process and a third-order process. The melanin SMPAF emission spectrum is activated by a 1505.9-nm laser light, and the resulting spectrum has a peak at 960 nm. The discovery of the emission peak may lead to a more energy-efficient method of background-free melanin detection with less photo-bleaching.

  3. Stepwise multiphoton activation fluorescence reveals a new method of melanin detection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; Mega, Yair; Dimarzio, Charles A

    2013-06-01

    The stepwise multiphoton activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave mode near infrared (NIR) laser, reveals a broad spectrum extending from the visible spectra to the NIR and has potential application for a low-cost, reliable method of detecting melanin. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin are compared with conventional multiphoton fluorescence microscopy and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). By combining CRM with SMPAF, we can locate melanin reliably. However, we have the added benefit of eliminating background interference from other components inside mouse hair and skin. The melanin SMPAF signal from the mouse hair is a mixture of a two-photon process and a third-order process. The melanin SMPAF emission spectrum is activated by a 1505.9-nm laser light, and the resulting spectrum has a peak at 960 nm. The discovery of the emission peak may lead to a more energy-efficient method of background-free melanin detection with less photo-bleaching. PMID:23291783

  4. Insights on proximity effect and multiphoton induced luminescence from gold nanospheres in far field optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, Johan; Guldbrand, Stina; Evenbratt, Hanne; Kirejev, Vladimir; Ericson, Marica B.; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-12-07

    Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in far-field multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPM) based on the phenomena of multiphoton induced luminescence (MIL). This is of interest for biomedical applications, e.g., for cancer diagnostics, as MPM allows for working in the near-infrared (NIR) optical window of tissue. It is well known that the aggregation of particles causes a redshift of the plasmon resonance, but its implications for MIL applying far-field MPM should be further exploited. Here, we explore MIL from 10 nm gold nanospheres that are chemically deposited on glass substrates in controlled coverage gradients using MPM operating in NIR range. The substrates enable studies of MIL as a function of inter-particle distance and clustering. It was shown that MIL was only detected from areas on the substrates where the particle spacing was less than one particle diameter, or where the particles have aggregated. The results are interpreted in the context that the underlying physical phenomenon of MIL is a sequential two-photon absorption process, where the first event is driven by the plasmon resonance. It is evident that gold nanospheres in this size range have to be closely spaced or clustered to exhibit detectable MIL using far-field MPM operating in the NIR region.

  5. High-resolution multiphoton optical tomography of tissues: an in vitro and in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Ehlers, Alexander; Dimitrow, Enrico; Kaatz, Martin; Elsner, Peter; Martin, Sven; König, Karsten

    2006-03-01

    Multiphoton optical tomography based on NIR (near-infrared) femtosecond laser pulses provides non-invasive optical sectioning of skin with high spatial intracellular resolution and high tissue penetration. The imaging system DermaInspect was used to perform this technology in clinical studies in vivo on patients with suspicious melanoma. Pigmented cell clusters based on non-linear luminescence were clearly distinguished from non-pigmented cells in the epidermis using the autofluorescence of endogenous fluorophores like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, elastin, collagen and melanin. Some of the investigated tissues showed differences in the structure of the epidermal layers and the presence of dendritic cells compared to normal skin. Multiphoton laser microscopy was used to visualize extracellular matrix (ECM) structures of native and tissueengineered heart valves. The quality of the resulting 3-D images allowed an exact differentiation between collagenous and elastic fibers. The analysis of heart valve tissues of patients with cardiomyopathy revealed a dramatic loss of its capability to generate SH (second harmonic), indicating a structural deformation of the collagenous fibers, which was virtually impossible to obtain by routine histological or immunohistological staining. These results indicate that NIR femtosecond laser scanning systems can be employed as novel non-invasive optical technology for 3-D resolved ECM component imaging and in vitro and in vivo tissue diagnosis.

  6. Setup and use of a two-laser multiphoton microscope for multichannel intravital fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Roussos, Evanthia T; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing biological mechanisms dependent upon the interaction of many cell types in vivo requires both multiphoton microscope systems capable of expanding the number and types of fluorophores that can be imaged simultaneously while removing the wavelength and tunability restrictions of existing systems, and enhanced software for extracting critical cellular parameters from voluminous 4D data sets. We present a procedure for constructing a two-laser multiphoton microscope that extends the wavelength range of excitation light, expands the number of simultaneously usable fluorophores and markedly increases signal to noise via ‘over-clocking’ of detection. We also utilize a custom-written software plug-in that simplifies the quantitative tracking and analysis of 4D intravital image data. We begin by describing the optics, hardware, electronics and software required, and finally the use of the plug-in for analysis. We demonstrate the use of the setup and plug-in by presenting data collected via intravital imaging of a mouse model of breast cancer. The procedure may be completed in ~24 h. PMID:21959234

  7. In vivo multiphoton NADH fluorescence reveals depth-dependent keratinocyte metabolism in human skin.

    PubMed

    Balu, Mihaela; Mazhar, Amaan; Hayakawa, Carole K; Mittal, Richa; Krasieva, Tatiana B; König, Karsten; Venugopalan, Vasan; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    We employ a clinical multiphoton microscope to monitor in vivo and noninvasively the changes in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence of human epidermal cells during arterial occlusion. We correlate these results with measurements of tissue oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentration during oxygen deprivation using spatial frequency domain imaging. During arterial occlusion, a decrease in oxyhemoglobin corresponds to an increase in NADH fluorescence in the basal epidermal cells, implying a reduction in basal cell oxidative phosphorylation. The ischemia-induced oxygen deprivation is associated with a strong increase in NADH fluorescence of keratinocytes in layers close to the stratum basale, whereas keratinocytes from epidermal layers closer to the skin surface are not affected. Spatial frequency domain imaging optical property measurements, combined with a multilayer Monte Carlo-based radiative transport model of multiphoton microscopy signal collection in skin, establish that localized tissue optical property changes during occlusion do not impact the observed NADH signal increase. This outcome supports the hypothesis that the vascular contribution to the basal layer oxygen supply is significant and these cells engage in oxidative metabolism. Keratinocytes in the more superficial stratum granulosum are either supplied by atmospheric oxygen or are functionally anaerobic. Based on combined hemodynamic and two-photon excited fluorescence data, the oxygen consumption rate in the stratum basale is estimated to be ∼0.035 μmoles/10(6) cells/h. PMID:23332078

  8. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of fibrotic focus in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijia; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    During the proliferation of breast cancer, the desmoplastic can evoke a fibrosis response by invading healthy tissue. Fibrotic focus (FF) in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast had been reported to be associated with significantly poorer survival rate than IDC without FF. As an important prognosis indicator, it's difficult to obtain the exact fibrotic information from traditional detection method such as mammography. Multiphoton imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) has been recently employed for microscopic examination of unstained tissue. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to image the fibrotic focus in invasive ductal carcinoma tissue. The morphology and distribution of collagen in fibrotic focus can be demonstrated by the SHG signal. Variation of collagen between IDC with and without FF will be examined and further characterized, which may be greatly related to the metastasis of breast cancer. Our result suggested that the MPM can be efficient in identifying and locating the fibrotic focus in IDC. Combining with the pathology analysis and other detecting methods, MPM owns potential in becoming an advanced histological tool for detecting the fibrotic focus in IDC and collecting prognosis information, which may guide the subsequent surgery option and therapy procedure for patients.

  9. Deep-tissue multiphoton fluorescence lifetime microscopy for intravital imaging of protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruhwirth, G. O.; Matthews, D. R.; Brock, A.; Keppler, M.; Vojnovic, B.; Ng, T.; Ameer-Beg, S.

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has proven to be a valuable tool in beating the Rayleigh criterion for light microscopy by measuring Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorophores. Applying multiphoton FLIM, we previously showed in a human breast cancer cell line that recycling of a membrane receptorgreen fluorescent protein fusion is enhanced concomitantly with the formation of a receptor:protein kinase C α complex in the endosomal compartment. We have extended this established technique to probe direct protein-protein interactions also in vivo. Therefore, we used various expressible fluorescent tags fused to membrane receptor molecules in order to generate stable two-colour breast carcinoma cell lines via controlled retroviral infection. We used these cell lines for establishing a xenograft tumour model in immune-compromised Nude mice. Using this animal model in conjunction with scanning Ti:Sapphire laser-based two-photon excitation, we established deep-tissue multiphoton FLIM in vivo. For the first time, this novel technique enables us to directly assess donor fluorescence lifetime changes in vivo and we show the application of this method for intravital imaging of direct protein-protein interactions.

  10. Label-free monitoring of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. X.; Li, H. S.; Chen, Z. F.; Feng, C. Y.; Yang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. Z.; Guan, G. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Xu, J.

    2014-06-01

    The monitoring and evaluation of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy are important for endoscopic resection of precursor lesions to disrupt the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and halt progression to invasive neoplastic disease. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to identify different stages during the development of colorectal adenocarcinoma including adenoma with low-grade and high-grade dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma invading the submucosa. It was found that by combining two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging, MPM can reveal the morphological changes of the epithelial cells and glands, identify the invasive position and depth of atypical glands and quantitatively describe the change of the cellular nucleus and the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio during the stepwise progression of colorectal adenocarcinoma. These are important pathological findings for pathologists when diagnosing colorectal lesions. With the advancement of a compact and flexible multiphoton endoscope for in vivo imaging and clinical applications, MPM has the potential to provide immediate histological diagnosis for the monitoring and evaluation of the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy.

  11. InVivo Multiphoton NADH Fluorescence Reveals Depth-Dependent Keratinocyte Metabolism in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Mihaela; Mazhar, Amaan; Hayakawa, CaroleK.; Mittal, Richa; Krasieva, TatianaB.; Knig, Karsten; Venugopalan, Vasan; Tromberg, BruceJ.

    2013-01-01

    We employ a clinical multiphoton microscope to monitor invivo and noninvasively the changes in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence of human epidermal cells during arterial occlusion. We correlate these results with measurements of tissue oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentration during oxygen deprivation using spatial frequency domain imaging. During arterial occlusion, a decrease in oxyhemoglobin corresponds to an increase in NADH fluorescence in the basal epidermal cells, implying a reduction in basal cell oxidative phosphorylation. The ischemia-induced oxygen deprivation is associated with a strong increase in NADH fluorescence of keratinocytes in layers close to the stratum basale, whereas keratinocytes from epidermal layers closer to the skin surface are not affected. Spatial frequency domain imaging optical property measurements, combined with a multilayer Monte Carlo-based radiative transport model of multiphoton microscopy signal collection in skin, establish that localized tissue optical property changes during occlusion do not impact the observed NADH signal increase. This outcome supports the hypothesis that the vascular contribution to the basal layer oxygen supply is significant and these cells engage in oxidative metabolism. Keratinocytes in the more superficial stratum granulosum are either supplied by atmospheric oxygen or are functionally anaerobic. Based on combined hemodynamic and two-photon excited fluorescence data, the oxygen consumption rate in the stratum basale is estimated to be ?0.035 ?moles/106 cells/h. PMID:23332078

  12. In vivo multiphoton imaging of the cornea: polarization-resolved second harmonic generation from stromal collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, G.; Gusachenko, I.; Kowalczuk, L.; Lamarre, I.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy provides specific and contrasted images of unstained collagenous tissues such as tendons or corneas. Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements have been implemented in a laserscanning multiphoton microscope. Distortion of the polarimetric response due to birefringence and diattenuation during propagation of the laser excitation has been shown in rat-tail tendons. A model has been developed to account for these effects and correct polarization-resolved SHG images in thick tissues. This new modality is then used in unstained human corneas to access two quantitative parameters: the fibrils orientation within the collagen lamellae and the ratio of the main second-order nonlinear tensorial components. Orientation maps obtained from polarization resolution of the trans-detected SHG images are in good agreement with the striated features observed in the raw images. Most importantly, polarization analysis of the epi-detected SHG images also enables to map the fibrils orientation within the collagen lamellae while epi-detected SHG images of corneal stroma are spatially homogenous and do not enable direct visualization of the fibrils orientation. Depth profiles of the polarimetric SHG response are also measured and compared to models accounting for orientation changes of the collagen lamellae within the focal volume. Finally, in vivo polarization-resolved SHG is performed in rat corneas and structural organization of corneal stroma is determined using epi-detected signals.

  13. Soliton dynamics in the multiphoton plasma regime

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad A.; Combrié, Sylvain; Colman, Pierre; Zheng, Jiangjun; De Rossi, Alfredo; Wong, Chee Wei

    2013-01-01

    Solitary waves have consistently captured the imagination of scientists, ranging from fundamental breakthroughs in spectroscopy and metrology enabled by supercontinuum light, to gap solitons for dispersionless slow-light, and discrete spatial solitons in lattices, amongst others. Recent progress in strong-field atomic physics include impressive demonstrations of attosecond pulses and high-harmonic generation via photoionization of free-electrons in gases at extreme intensities of 1014 W/cm2. Here we report the first phase-resolved observations of femtosecond optical solitons in a semiconductor microchip, with multiphoton ionization at picojoule energies and 1010 W/cm2 intensities. The dramatic nonlinearity leads to picojoule observations of free-electron-induced blue-shift at 1016 cm−3 carrier densities and self-chirped femtosecond soliton acceleration. Furthermore, we evidence the time-gated dynamics of soliton splitting on-chip, and the suppression of soliton recurrence due to fast free-electron dynamics. These observations in the highly dispersive slow-light media reveal a rich set of physics governing ultralow-power nonlinear photon-plasma dynamics.

  14. Unconditionally secure key distillation from multiphotons

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2006-01-15

    In this paper, we prove that the unconditionally secure key can be surprisingly extracted from multiphoton emission part in the photon polarization-based quantum key distribution. One example is shown by explicitly proving that one can indeed generate an unconditionally secure key from Alice's two-photon emission part proposed by Scarani [et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 057901 (2004)]. Which is called the Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin (SARG04) protocol. This protocol uses the same four states as in Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) and differs only in the classical postprocessing protocol. It is, thus, interesting to see how the classical postprocessing of quantum key distribution might qualitatively change its security. We also show that one can generate an unconditionally secure key from the single to the four-photon part in a generalized SARG04 protocol that uses six states. Finally, we also compare the bit error rate threshold of these protocols with the one in the BB84 protocol and the original six-state protocol assuming a depolarizing channel.

  15. Simultaneous excitation of multiple fluororophores with a compact femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legros, Philippe; Choquet, Daniel; Gueguen, Stéphane; Mottay, Eric; Deguil, Nelly

    2006-02-01

    We report on a flexible multiphoton imaging system, suitable for simultaneous and efficient excitation of red (DsRed), yellow (YFP), green (GFP) and blue (DAPI) fluorophores. We used a simple, compact laser system, consisting of a 1 μm high energy diode-pumped oscillator and a tunable wavelength extension using a photonics crystal fibre. The combination of a near IR excitation wavelength, high energy per pulse for efficient three photon excitation and spectral extension for GFP excitation allows for high flexibility.We present experimental results of simultaneous and efficient imaging fluorophores couples from the UV to the red (DAPI-RFP, GFP-RFP).

  16. Development of a compact supersonic jet/multiphoton ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometer for the on-site analysis of dioxin, part II: Application to chlorobenzene and dibenzofuran.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Junichi; Nakano, Bunji; Imasaka, Totaro

    2003-03-01

    A compact supersonic jet/multiphoton ionization/mass spectrometer (SSJ/MPI/MS) equipped with a single pump system was developed for use in the analysis of dioxin. A mass spectrum and multiphoton ionization spectrum were obtained for chlorobenzene and dibenzofuran using an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) for excitation and subsequent ionization. The detection limit for chlorobenzene (S/N = 3) was 0.3 ppb, which corresponds to an absolute amount of 0.1 pg. The rotational temperature was 35 K. This slightly high temperature can be attributed to the long nozzle throat used in the instrument. PMID:12675344

  17. Photofragmentation, state interaction, and energetics of Rydberg and ion-pair states: Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HI

    SciTech Connect

    Hróðmarsson, Helgi Rafn; Wang, Huasheng; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2014-06-28

    Mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization data for hydrogen iodide (HI), for two-photon resonance excitation to Rydberg and ion-pair states in the 69 600–72 400 cm{sup −1} region were recorded and analyzed. Spectral perturbations due to homogeneous and heterogeneous interactions between Rydberg and ion-pair states, showing as deformations in line-positions, line-intensities, and line-widths, were focused on. Parameters relevant to photodissociation processes, state interaction strengths and spectroscopic parameters for deperturbed states were derived. Overall interaction and dynamical schemes to describe the observations are proposed.

  18. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of molecules and molecular fragments. Annual progress report, March 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    In this report, the author will review the progress made in his studies of ion rotational distributions resulting from resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of excited electronic states and from single-photon ionization of ground electronic states of jet-cooled molecules by coherent VUV and XUV radiation. To do so he will select a few examples from his studies which serve to highlight his progress and to identify the background and significance of the specific spectral features and systems he has chosen to study.

  19. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states of atomic sulphur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woutersen, S.; Milan, J. B.; Buma, W. J.; de Lange, C. A.

    1997-05-01

    Several previously unobserved Rydberg states of the sulphur atom above the lowest ionization threshold are identified and assigned using (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. All states were accessed by two-photon transitions from either the 3P ground or the 1D excited state, prepared by in situ photodissociation of H2S. The observed states derive from the (2Do)5p and (2Po)4p configurations. For the (2Do)5p 3F and (2Po)4p 3D triplets, extensive photoelectron spectroscopic studies enable a detailed comparison of the autoionization and photoionization rates of these states.

  20. Selective enhancement of resonant multiphoton ionization with strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Zhang, Peng; Luo, Siqiang; Zhou, Yueming; Zhang, Qingbin; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution photoelectron momentum distributions of Xe atoms ionized by 800-nm linearly polarized laser fields have been traced at intensities from 1.1 ×1013 to 3.5 ×1013W /c m2 using velocity-map imaging techniques. At certain laser intensities, the momentum spectrum exhibits a distinct double-ring structure for low-order above-threshold ionization, which appears to be absent at lower or higher laser intensities. By investigating the intensity-resolved photoelectron energy spectrum, we find that this double-ring structure originates from resonant multiphoton ionization involving multiple Rydberg states of atoms. Varying the laser intensity, we can selectively enhance the resonant multiphoton ionization through certain atomic Rydberg states. The photoelectron angular distributions of multiphoton resonance are also investigated for the low-order above-threshold ionization.

  1. Vibrational resonance enhanced broadband multiphoton absorption in a triphenylamine derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Changgui; Cui Yiping; Huang Wei; Yun Binfeng; Wang Zhuyuan; Hu Guohua; Cui Jing; Lu Zhifeng; Qian Ying

    2007-09-17

    Multiphoton absorption of 2,5-bis[4-(2-N,N-diphenylaminostyryl)phenyl]-1,3,4-oxadiazole was experimentally studied by using femtosecond laser pulses. This material demonstrates a very broad multiphoton absorption band of around 300 nm width with two peaks of 1250 and 1475 nm. The first peak results from the three-photon absorption process while the second is attributed to the vibrational resonance enhanced four-photon absorption process. Combination of these two processes provides a much broader multiphoton absorption band. In this letter, the analytical solution to nonlinear transmission of a three-photon absorption process is also given when the incident beam has a Gaussian transverse spatial profile.

  2. Evaluation of multiphoton effects in down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, Kazuyoshi; Koshino, Kazuki

    2010-04-15

    Multiphoton effects in down-conversion are investigated based on the full-quantum multimode formalism by considering a three-level system as a prototype nonlinear system. We analytically derive the three-photon output wave function for two input photons, where one of the two input photons is down-converted and the other one is not. Using this output wave function, we calculate the down-conversion probability, the purity, and the fidelity to evaluate the entanglement between a down-converted photon pair and a non-down-converted photon. It is shown that the saturation effect occurs by multiphoton input and that it affects both the down-conversion probability and the quantum correlation between the down-converted photon pair and the non-down-converted photon. We also reveal the necessary conditions for multiphoton effects to be strong.

  3. Infrared-active quadruple contrast FePt nanoparticles for multiple scale molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shang-Wei; Liu, Chien-Liang; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Shen, Yu-Fang; Kuo, Lun-Chang; Wu, Cheng-Ham; Hsieh, Tsung-Yuan; Wu, Pei-Chun; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Yang, Che-Chang; Chang, Kai-Yao; Lu, Meng-Hua; Li, Pai-Chi; Chen, Shi-Ping; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lu, Chen-Wen; Chen, Yi-An; Huang, Chih-Chia; Wang, Churng-Ren Chris; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Li, Meng-Lin; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-04-01

    A single nanomaterial with multiple imaging contrasts and functions is highly desired for multiscale theragnosis. Herein, we demonstrate single 1-1.9 μm infrared-active FePt alloy nanoparticles (FePt NPs) offering unprecedented four-contrast-in-one molecular imaging - computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), photoacoustic (PA) imaging, and high-order multiphoton luminescence (HOMPL) microscopy. The PA response of FePt NPs outperforms that of infrared-active gold nanorods by 3- to 5.6-fold under identical excitation fluence and particle concentrations. HOMPL (680 nm) of an isolated FePt NP renders spatial full-width-at-half-maximum values of 432 nm and 300 nm beyond the optical diffraction limit for 1230-nm and 920-nm excitation, respectively. The in vivo targeting function was successfully visualized using HOMPL, PA imaging, CT, and MRI, thereby validating FePt as a single nanomaterial system covering up to four types (Optical/PA/CT/MRI) of molecular imaging contrast, ranging from the microscopic level to whole-body scale investigation. PMID:26854391

  4. Fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence from glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}:NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals under excitation of two near infrared femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Xiaoying; Cheng, Wenjing; Zhou, Kan; Ma, Jing; Feng, Donghai; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Jia, Tianqing; Chen, Ping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-08-14

    In this paper, we report fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence of glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}: NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals excited simultaneously by two near infrared femtosecond lasers. When the glass ceramic was irradiated by 800 nm femtosecond laser, weak red emission centered at 670 nm was detected. Bright red light was observed when the fs laser wavelength was tuned to 1490 nm. However, when excited by the two fs lasers simultaneously, the sample emitted bright green light centered at 550 nm, while the red light kept the same intensity. The dependences of the red and the green light intensities on the two pump lasers are much different, which enables us to manipulate the color emission by adjusting the two pump laser intensities, respectively. We present a theoretical model of Er{sup 3+} ions interacting with two fs laser fields, and explain well the experimental results.

  5. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process. PMID:26120588

  6. On-line screening of airborne PAH contamination by simultaneous multiphoton ionization and laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gridin, V.V.; Inoue, Takanori; Ogawa, Teiichiro; Schechter, I.

    2000-04-01

    In this preliminary study, the feasibility of on-line monitoring of sub-micron polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) aerosols by a combination of laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) and laser multiphoton ionization (LMPI) techniques was investigated. For this purpose, an aerosol contaminated nitrogen gas was slowly bubbled through a quartz measurement chamber filled with hexane. Continuous PAH monitoring was maintained over two hours of the resultant concentration process. Simultaneous LIF and LMPI excitation was achieved by a pulsed dye laser, operated at 283 nm. For this wavelength, pyrene and naphthalene aerosols were used as target PAH materials. The resultant fluorescence light was collected by an optical fiber, while the LMPI signals were acquired by a pair of stainless steel electrodes immersed in the solution, allowing an automated readout of the photoionization current. The results indicate that PAH sub-micron aerosols, at an air concentration of 1 mg/m{sup 3}, can be monitored in this way.

  7. Entanglement of molecular-orientation, rotational and orbital degrees of freedom in multiphoton orientational wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainos, C.; Dutier, G.; Grucker, J.; Perales, F.; Baudon, J.; Ducloy, M.

    2008-02-01

    Multiphoton orientational wave packets induced by short resonant polarized laser pulses in a rotationally-frozen interacting molecule contain relevant information. The entanglement of the orbital, rotational and orientational degrees of freedom shows a strong dependence on the polarization state of the absorbed photons and the space orientation of the interacting molecule and enables one to assign the orbital state of the excited molecular electron, to measure the space orientation of the interacting molecule from the orientational recurrences, to relate the measured temporal widths to the angular momentum photon state and the coherence of the laser pulse, to obtain information on the ground rotational state, or to measure the effective temperature of an isotropic molecular assembly. The space orientation of a small number of independent molecules can be distinguished from their distinct orientational dependence in the formation of the individual orientational wave packets.

  8. Mapping femtosecond pulse front distortion and group velocity dispersion in multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tullis, I. D.; Ameer-Beg, S. M.; Barber, P. R.; Rankov, V.; Vojnovic, B.

    2006-02-01

    Group velocity dispersion (GVD) and pulse front distortion of ultrashort pulses are of critical importance in efficient multiphoton excitation microscopy. Since measurement of the pulse front distortion due to a lens is not trivial we have developed an imaging interferometric cross-correlator which allows us to measure temporal delays and pulse-widths across the spatial profile of the beam. The instrument consists of a modified Michelson interferometer with a reference arm containing a voice-coil delay stage and an arm which contains the optics under test. The pulse replicas are recombined and incident on a 22×22 lenslet array. The beamlets are focused in a 0.5 mm thick BBO crystal (cut for Type I second harmonic generation), filtered to remove the IR component of the beam and imaged using a 500 fps camera. The GVD and pulse front distortion are extracted from the temporal stack of beamlet images to produce a low resolution spatio-temporal map.

  9. Multiphoton fluorescence spectra and lifetimes of biliverdins and their protein-associated complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chin-Jie; Wu, Cheng-Ham; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2012-03-01

    To investigate whether endogenous biliverdins can serve as a fluorescence metabolic marker in cancer diagnosis, we measured their multiphoton fluorescence spectra and lifetimes with femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser. Excited at 1230nm, the two-photon fluorescence of biliverdins peaks around 670nm. The corresponding lifetime (<100ps) was much shorter than those of porphyrins (~10ns), which is another commonly present metabolites in living cells. Further mixing biliverdins with proteins like fetal bovine serum (FBS), biliverdins reductase A (BVRA), or heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the yields of red autofluorescences didn't change a lot, but the corresponding lifetimes with HO-1 and BSA were lengthened to 200~300ps. This indicates that biliverdin can have an association with these proteins and change its lifetime. These spectral and temporal characteristics of fluorescence make biliverdin a potential marker fluorophore for hyperspectral diagnosis on the heme catabolism in human cells or tissues.

  10. Multiphoton microscopy using frequency-doubled compact femtosecond erbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lin; Chong, Shau Poh; Mills, Arthur; Jones, David; Tang, Shuo

    2014-02-01

    We report on the development of a compact multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled, femtosecond erbium-doped fiber laser source at 1.58 μm. By use of periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3, frequency-doubled pulses at 790 nm with average power of 75 mW and pulse width of 130 fs are applied as the excitation source. The fiber laser is optimized for its parameters along with the dispersive properties of the delivery fiber such that the MPM signal is maximized at the sample location. Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) scanner, miniature objective, and multimode fiber are further used to make the MPM system compact. MPM images are obtained from unstained biological samples. The MPM system with a compact, portable, low-cost fiber laser has a great potential to transform the bench-top MPM system to a portable system for in vivo MPM imaging.

  11. Optical clearing and multiphoton imaging of paraffin-embedded specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Degan, Simone; Fischer, Martin C.; Warren, Warren S.

    2013-02-01

    New labeling, imaging, or analysis tools could provide new retrospective insights when applied to archived, paraffin-embedded samples. Deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy of paraffin-embedded specimens is achieved using optical clearing with mineral oil. We tested a variety of murine tissue specimens including skin, lung, spleen, kidney, and heart, acquiring multiphoton autofluorescence and second-harmonic generation, and pump-probe images This technique introduces the capability for non-destructive 3-dimensional microscopic imaging of existing archived pathology specimens, enabling retrospective studies.

  12. Effect of multiphoton ionization on performance of crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Kishor; Strickland, D; Campbell, M C W; Sharma, R P

    2014-12-15

    This Letter presents a model for propagation of a laser pulse in a human crystalline lens. The model contains a transverse beam diffraction effect, laser-induced optical breakdown for the creation of plasma via a multiphoton ionization process, and the gradient index (GRIN) structure. Plasma introduces the nonlinearity in the crystalline lens which affects the propagation of the beam. The multiphoton ionization process generates plasma that changes the refractive index and hence leads to the defocusing of the laser beam. The Letter also points out the relevance of the present investigation to cavitation bubble formation for restoring the elasticity of the eyes. PMID:25502994

  13. Unambiguous atomic Bell measurement assisted by multiphoton states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan Mauricio; Bernád, József Zsolt; Alber, Gernot

    2016-05-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate an unambiguous Bell measurement of atomic qubits assisted by multiphoton states. The atoms interact resonantly with the electromagnetic field inside two spatially separated optical cavities in a Ramsey-type interaction sequence. The qubit states are postselected by measuring the photonic states inside the resonators. We show that if one is able to project the photonic field onto two coherent states on opposite sites of phase space, an unambiguous Bell measurement can be implemented. Thus, our proposal may provide a core element for future components of quantum information technology such as a quantum repeater based on coherent multiphoton states, atomic qubits and matter-field interaction.

  14. A Statistical Model for Multiphoton Calcium Imaging of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Wasim Q.; Schummers, James; Sur, Mriganka; Brown, Emery N.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton calcium fluorescence imaging has gained prominence as a valuable tool for the study of brain cells, but the corresponding analytical regimes remain rather naive. In this paper, we develop a statistical framework that facilitates principled quantitative analysis of multiphoton images. The proposed methods discriminate the stimulus-evoked response of a neuron from the background firing and image artifacts. We develop a harmonic regression model with colored noise, and estimate the model parameters with computationally efficient algorithms. We apply this model to in vivo characterization of cells from the ferret visual cortex. The results demonstrate substantially improved tuning curve fitting and image contrast. PMID:19964727

  15. New insights and system designs for temporally focused multiphoton optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayblum, Tom; Schejter, Adi; Dana, Hod; Shoham, Shy

    2015-03-01

    Temporal focusing (TF) multiphoton systems constitute a powerful solution for cellular resolution optogenetic stimulation and recording in three-dimensional, scattering tissue. Here, we address two fundamental aspects in the design of such systems: first, we examine the design of TF systems with specific optical sectioning by comparatively analyzing previously published results. Next, we develop a solution for obtaining TF in a flexible three-dimensional pattern of cellmatched focal spots. Our solution employs spatio-temporal focusing (SSTF) in a unique optical system design that can be integrated before essentially any multiphoton imaging or stimulation system.

  16. Nonlinear optical imaging characteristics of colonic adenocarcinoma using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nenrong; Chen, Rong; Li, Hongsheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), a noninvasive optical method with high resolution and high sensitivity, can obtain detailed microstructures of biotissues at submolecular level. In this study, MPM is used to image microstructure varieties of human colonic mucosa and submucosa with adenocarcinoma. Some parameters, such as gland configuration, SHG/TPEF intensity ratio, and collagen orientation and so on, should serve the indicators of early colorectal cancer. The exploratory results show that it's potential for the development of multiphoton mini-endoscopy in real-time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  17. Adaptive optics multiphoton microscopy to study ex vivo ocular tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Juan M.; Gualda, Emilio J.; Artal, Pablo

    2010-11-01

    We develop an adaptive optics (AO) multiphoton microscope by incorporating a deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor. The AO module operating in closed-loop is used to correct for the aberrations of the illumination laser beam. This increases the efficiency of the nonlinear processes in reducing tissue photodamage, improves contrast, and enhances lateral resolution in images of nonstained ocular tissues. In particular, the use of AO in the multiphoton microscope provides a better visualization of ocular structures, which are relevant in ophthalmology. This instrument might be useful to explore the possible connections between changes in ocular structures and the associated pathologies.

  18. Multiphoton Coherent Manipulation in Large Spin Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiorescu, Irinel

    2009-03-01

    Manipulation of quantum information allows certain algorithms to be performed at unparalleled speeds. Photons are an ideal choice to manipulate qubits as they interact with quantum systems in predictable ways. They are a versatile tool for manipulating, reading/coupling qubits and for encoding/transferring quantum information over long distances. Spin-based qubits have well known behavior under photon driving and can be potentially operated up to room temperature. When diluted enough to avoid uncontrolled spin-spin interactions, a variety of spin qubits show long coherence times, e.g. the nitrogen vacancies in pure diamonds (1,2), nitrogen atoms trapped in a C60 cage (3), Ho3+ and Cr5+ ions (4,5) and molecular magnets (6,7). We have used large spin Mn2+ ions (S=5/2) to realize a six level system that can be operated by means of single as well as multi-photon coherent Rabi oscillations (8). This spin system has a very small anisotropy whose effect can be tuned in-situ to turn the system into a multi-level harmonic system. This offer new ways of manipulating, reading and resetting a spin qubit. Decoherence effects are strongly reduced by the quasi-isotropic electron interaction with the crystal field and with the 55Mn nuclear spins. [0pt] 1. R. Hanson et al., Science 320, 352 (2008). [0pt] 2. M.V. Gurudev Dutt et al., Science 316, 1312 (2007). [0pt] 3. G.W. Morley et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 220501 (2007). [0pt] 4. S. Bertaina et al., Nat. Nanotech. 2, 39 (2007). [0pt] 5. S. Nellutla et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 137601 (2007). [0pt] 6. A. Ardavan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 057201 (2007). [0pt] 7. S. Bertaina et al., Nature 453, 203,(2008). [0pt] 8. S. Bertaina et al., submitted.

  19. Intense Visible and Near-Infrared Upconversion Photoluminescence in Colloidal LiYF4:Er3+ Nanocrystals under Excitation at 1490 nm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanying; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Kachynski, Aliaksandr; gren, Hans; Prasad, Paras N.

    2012-01-01

    We report intense upconversion photoluminescence (PL) in colloidal LiYF4:Er3+ nanocrystals under excitation with telecom-wavelength at 1490 nm. The intensities of two- and three-photon anti-Stokes upconversion PL bands are higher than or comparable to that of the Stokes emission under excitation with low power density in the range of 5120 W/cm2. The quantum yield of the upconversion PL was measured to be as high as ~1.20.1%, which is almost 4 times higher than the highest upconversion PL quantum yield reported up to date for lanthanide-doped nanocrystals in 100 nm sized hexagonal NaYF4:Yb3+20%, Er3+2% using excitation at ~980 nm. Power dependence study revealed that the intensities of all PL bands have linear dependence on the excitation power density, which was explained by saturation effects in the intermediate energy states. PMID:21557587

  20. Imaging photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules by femtosecond multiphoton coincidence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, C. Stefan; Ram, N. Bhargava; Powis, Ivan; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Here, we provide a detailed account of novel experiments employing electron-ion coincidence imaging to discriminate chiral molecules. The full three-dimensional angular scattering distribution of electrons is measured after photoexcitation with either left or right circular polarized light. The experiment is performed using a simplified photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging setup employing only a single particle imaging detector. Results are reported applying this technique to enantiomers of the chiral molecule camphor after three-photon ionization by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm and 380 nm. The electron-ion coincidence imaging provides the photoelectron spectrum of mass-selected ions that are observed in the time-of-flight mass spectra. The coincident photoelectron spectra of the parent camphor ion and the various fragment ions are the same, so it can be concluded that fragmentation of camphor happens after ionization. We discuss the forward-backward asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution which is expressed in Legendre polynomials with moments up to order six. Furthermore, we present a method, similar to one-photon electron circular dichroism, to quantify the strength of the chiral electron asymmetry in a single parameter. The circular dichroism in the photoelectron angular distribution of camphor is measured to be 8% at 400 nm. The electron circular dichroism using femtosecond multiphoton excitation is of opposite sign and about 60% larger than the electron dichroism observed before in near-threshold one-photon ionization with synchrotron excitation. We interpret our multiphoton ionization as being resonant at the two-photon level with the 3s and 3p Rydberg states of camphor. Theoretical calculations are presented that model the photoelectron angular distribution from a prealigned camphor molecule using density functional theory and continuum multiple scattering X alpha photoelectron scattering calculations. Qualitative agreement is observed between the experimental results and the theoretical calculations of the Legendre moments representing the angular distribution for the two enantiomers. The electron-ion coincidence technique using multiphoton ionization opens new directions in table-top analytical mass-spectrometric applications of mixtures of chiral molecules.

  1. Imaging photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules by femtosecond multiphoton coincidence detection.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, C Stefan; Ram, N Bhargava; Powis, Ivan; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2013-12-21

    Here, we provide a detailed account of novel experiments employing electron-ion coincidence imaging to discriminate chiral molecules. The full three-dimensional angular scattering distribution of electrons is measured after photoexcitation with either left or right circular polarized light. The experiment is performed using a simplified photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging setup employing only a single particle imaging detector. Results are reported applying this technique to enantiomers of the chiral molecule camphor after three-photon ionization by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm and 380 nm. The electron-ion coincidence imaging provides the photoelectron spectrum of mass-selected ions that are observed in the time-of-flight mass spectra. The coincident photoelectron spectra of the parent camphor ion and the various fragment ions are the same, so it can be concluded that fragmentation of camphor happens after ionization. We discuss the forward-backward asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution which is expressed in Legendre polynomials with moments up to order six. Furthermore, we present a method, similar to one-photon electron circular dichroism, to quantify the strength of the chiral electron asymmetry in a single parameter. The circular dichroism in the photoelectron angular distribution of camphor is measured to be 8% at 400 nm. The electron circular dichroism using femtosecond multiphoton excitation is of opposite sign and about 60% larger than the electron dichroism observed before in near-threshold one-photon ionization with synchrotron excitation. We interpret our multiphoton ionization as being resonant at the two-photon level with the 3s and 3p Rydberg states of camphor. Theoretical calculations are presented that model the photoelectron angular distribution from a prealigned camphor molecule using density functional theory and continuum multiple scattering X alpha photoelectron scattering calculations. Qualitative agreement is observed between the experimental results and the theoretical calculations of the Legendre moments representing the angular distribution for the two enantiomers. The electron-ion coincidence technique using multiphoton ionization opens new directions in table-top analytical mass-spectrometric applications of mixtures of chiral molecules. PMID:24359367

  2. Coherent beam control through inhomogeneous media in multi-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Hari Prasad

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has become a primary tool for high-resolution deep tissue imaging because of its sensitivity to ballistic excitation photons in comparison to scattered excitation photons. The imaging depth of multi-photon microscopes in tissue imaging is limited primarily by background fluorescence that is generated by scattered light due to the random fluctuations in refractive index inside the media, and by reduced intensity in the ballistic focal volume due to aberrations within the tissue and at its interface. We built two multi-photon adaptive optics (AO) correction systems, one for combating scattering and aberration problems, and another for compensating interface aberrations. For scattering correction a MEMS segmented deformable mirror (SDM) was inserted at a plane conjugate to the objective back-pupil plane. The SDM can pre-compensate for light scattering by coherent combination of the scattered light to make an apparent focus even at a depths where negligible ballistic light remains (i.e. ballistic limit). This problem was approached by investigating the spatial and temporal focusing characteristics of a broad-band light source through strongly scattering media. A new model was developed for coherent focus enhancement through or inside the strongly media based on the initial speckle contrast. A layer of fluorescent beads under a mouse skull was imaged using an iterative coherent beam control method in the prototype two-photon microscope to demonstrate the technique. We also adapted an AO correction system to an existing in three-photon microscope in a collaborator lab at Cornell University. In the second AO correction approach a continuous deformable mirror (CDM) is placed at a plane conjugate to the plane of an interface aberration. We demonstrated that this "Conjugate AO" technique yields a large field-of-view (FOV) advantage in comparison to Pupil AO. Further, we showed that the extended FOV in conjugate AO is maintained over a relatively large axial misalignment of the conjugate planes of the CDM and the aberrating interface. This dissertation advances the field of microscopy by providing new models and techniques for imaging deeply within strongly scattering tissue, and by describing new adaptive optics approaches to extending imaging FOV due to sample aberrations.

  3. Imaging photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules by femtosecond multiphoton coincidence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, C. Stefan; Ram, N. Bhargava; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Powis, Ivan

    2013-12-21

    Here, we provide a detailed account of novel experiments employing electron-ion coincidence imaging to discriminate chiral molecules. The full three-dimensional angular scattering distribution of electrons is measured after photoexcitation with either left or right circular polarized light. The experiment is performed using a simplified photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging setup employing only a single particle imaging detector. Results are reported applying this technique to enantiomers of the chiral molecule camphor after three-photon ionization by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm and 380 nm. The electron-ion coincidence imaging provides the photoelectron spectrum of mass-selected ions that are observed in the time-of-flight mass spectra. The coincident photoelectron spectra of the parent camphor ion and the various fragment ions are the same, so it can be concluded that fragmentation of camphor happens after ionization. We discuss the forward-backward asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution which is expressed in Legendre polynomials with moments up to order six. Furthermore, we present a method, similar to one-photon electron circular dichroism, to quantify the strength of the chiral electron asymmetry in a single parameter. The circular dichroism in the photoelectron angular distribution of camphor is measured to be 8% at 400 nm. The electron circular dichroism using femtosecond multiphoton excitation is of opposite sign and about 60% larger than the electron dichroism observed before in near-threshold one-photon ionization with synchrotron excitation. We interpret our multiphoton ionization as being resonant at the two-photon level with the 3s and 3p Rydberg states of camphor. Theoretical calculations are presented that model the photoelectron angular distribution from a prealigned camphor molecule using density functional theory and continuum multiple scattering X alpha photoelectron scattering calculations. Qualitative agreement is observed between the experimental results and the theoretical calculations of the Legendre moments representing the angular distribution for the two enantiomers. The electron-ion coincidence technique using multiphoton ionization opens new directions in table-top analytical mass-spectrometric applications of mixtures of chiral molecules.

  4. Landau-Dykhne approximation for multiphoton dipole-forbidden transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Zon, B. A. Kornev, A. S.

    2007-06-15

    A two-level system in a monochromatic laser field is considered in the Landau-Dykhne approximation under the violation of dipole selection rules. An analytic expression is obtained for the rate of transitions. The multiphoton and tunneling limits are found.

  5. A multiphoton microscope platform for imaging the mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Lei, Tim C.; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the ability of multiphoton microscopy to obtain full three-dimensional high-resolution images of the intact mouse eye anterior chamber without need for enucleation. Methods A custom multiphoton microscope was constructed and optimized for deep tissue imaging. Simultaneous two-photon autofluorescence (2PAF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging were performed. A mouse holder and stereotaxic platform were designed to access different parts of the eye for imaging. A reservoir for keeping the eye moist was used during imaging sessions. Results Non-invasive multiphoton images deep inside the anterior chamber of the mouse eye were obtained without the need for enucleation. The iris, corneal epithelium and endothelium, trabecular meshwork region and conjunctiva were visualized by the 2PAF and SHG signals. Identification of the anatomy was achieved by the intrinsic properties of the native tissue without any exogenous labeling. Images as deep as 600 microns into the eye were clearly demonstrated. Full three-dimensional image reconstructions of the entire anterior chamber were performed and analyzed using custom software. Conclusions Multiphoton imaging is a highly promising tool for ophthalmic research. We have demonstrated the ability to image the entire anterior chamber of the mouse eye in its native state. These results provide a foundation for future in vivo studies of the eye. PMID:22815637

  6. Advances in time-dependent methods for multiphoton processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.C.; Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.

    1990-09-01

    This paper discusses recent theoretical results on above threshold ionization harmonic generation and high-frequency, high intensity suppression of ionization. These studies of multiphoton processes in atoms and molecules for short, intense pulsed optical lasers have been carried out using techniques which involve the explicit solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. 43 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of molecules and molecular fragments. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) utilizes pulsed laser radiation to prepare a molecule in an excited state via absorption of one or more photons and to subsequently ionize that state before it can decay. A remarkable feature of REMPI, and one that is very basic to many of its applications and uses, is that the very narrow bandwidth of the {open_quotes}pump{close_quotes} laser makes it possible to select a specific vibrational and rotational level in the initial state and to prepare the excited state of interest in a single vibrational and rotational level. Thus, by suitable choice of the photon pump transition, it is possible to selectively ionize a species of interest without ionizing any other species that might be present. This feature makes REMPI one of the most powerful tools for ultrasensitive detection of species. With REMPI it is also possible to study the photoionization dynamics of a single rotational level of an excited electronic state. Such state-resolved studies can certainly be expected to provide significant insight into the underlying dynamics of molecular photoionization.

  8. Origin and effect of high-order dispersion in ultrashort pulse multiphoton microscopy in the 10 fs regime.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weichao; Liu, Yujia; Xi, Peng; Ren, Qiushi

    2010-12-10

    Short pulses can induce high nonlinear excitation, and thus they should be favorable for use in multiphoton microscopy. However, the large spectral dispersion can easily destroy the advantages of the ultrashort pulse if there is no compensation. The group delay dispersion (GDD), third-order dispersion, and their effects on the intensity and bandwidth of second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal were analyzed. We found that the prism pair used for compensating the GDD of the two-photon microscope actually introduces significant negative high-order dispersion (HOD), which dramatically narrowed down the two-photon absorption probability for ultrashort pulses. We also investigated the SHG signal after GDD and HOD compensation for different pulse durations. Without HOD compensation, the SHG efficiency dropped significantly for a pulse duration below 20 fs. We experimentally compared the SHG and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal intensity for 11 fs versus 50 fs pulses, a pulse duration close to that commonly used in conventional multiphoton microscopy. The result suggested that after adaptive phase compensation, the 11fs pulse can yield a 3.2- to 6.0-fold TPEF intensity and a 5.1-fold SHG intensity, compared to 50 fs pulses. PMID:21151226

  9. Optical depletion mechanism of upconverting luminescence and its potential for multi-photon STED-like microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruitao; Zhan, Qiuqiang; Liu, Haichun; Wen, Xuanyuan; Wang, Baoju; He, Sailing

    2015-12-14

    Simulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy is very powerful, but still suffers from small tissue penetration depth, photobleaching of fluorescent probes and complicated imaging systems. Here, we propose an optical luminescence depletion mechanism employing upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) and explore its potential for multi-photon STED-like microscopy. With the addition of Yb³⁺ ions in NaYF₄:Er³⁺ UCNPs, the two-photon green emission of Er³⁺ under 795-nm excitation was successfully depleted by 1140-nm laser through the synergetic effect of the excited state absorption and the interionic energy transfer. This STED-like depletion mechanism was systematically investigated using steady-state rate equations, evidenced by the surprising emerging of 478-nm emission. The green emission depletion efficiency was about 30%, limited by the current laser source. Our work indicates that NaYF₄:Yb³⁺/Er³⁺ UCNPs will be potential probes for multi-photon super-resolution microscopy with many advantages, including long-wavelength-induced large penetration, non-photobleaching and non-photoblinking properties, cost-effective and simplified imaging systems. PMID:26699029

  10. Torsional tunneling splittings in the v4 = 1 excited torsional state of Si2H6: analysis of hot bands accompanying fundamental transitions in the high resolution infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, F.; di Lauro, C.; Horneman, V.-M.

    The (ν4 + ν6) - ν4, (ν4 + ν8) - ν4 and (ν4 + ν9) - ν4 hot infrared systems of disilane (Si2H6) have been analysed at high resolution, and the values of the relative vibration-rotation-torsion parameters have been determined. The torsional splitting is about 0.500 cm-1 in the ν4 and ν4 + ν6 states, and decreases strongly in the vibrationally degenerate upper states ν4 + ν8 (about 0.0272 cm-1 on average) and ν4 + ν9 (about 0.3019 cm-1), consistent with theoretical predictions. Comparison between the vibrational wavenumbers of cold transitions and hot transitions originating in the excited torsional state v4 = 1 allows one to determine the change of the fundamental torsional frequency ν4 caused by the excitation of small amplitude vibrations. A remarkable increase in ν4 of about 8.599 cm-1 is found in the v9 = 1 state (E1d SiH3-rocking mode, asymmetric to inversion in the staggered geometry), and this corresponds to an increase in the torsional barrier height in this excited fundamental vibrational state by about 48.77 cm-1. The mechanism responsible for the decrease of the torsional splittings in the degenerate vibrational states is briefly outlined by means of second-order perturbation theory, using torsion-hindered vibrational basis functions of E1d and E2d symmetries for the degenerate modes.

  11. Probing the fate of lowest-energy near-infrared metal-centered electronic excited states: CuCl(4)(2-) and IrBr(6)(2-).

    PubMed

    Matveev, Sergey M; Mereshchenko, Andrey S; Panov, Maxim S; Tarnovsky, Alexander N

    2015-04-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the radiationless relaxation dynamics of CuCl4(2-) and IrBr6(2-) complexes directly promoted into their lowest-energy excited metal-centered states upon near-infrared femtosecond excitation at 2000 nm. Both the excited CuCl4(2-) (2)E and IrBr6(2-) (2)Ug'(T2g) states undergo internal conversion to the ground electronic states, yet with significantly different lifetimes (55 fs and 360 ps, respectively) despite the fact that the (2)E and (2)Ug'(T2g) states are separated by the same energy gap (∼5000 cm(-1)) from the respective ground state. This difference likely arises from the predominance of the Jahn-Teller effect in a Cu(2+) ion and the spin-orbit coupling effect in an Ir(4+) ion. The approach documented in this work may be used for elucidating the role of low-energy metal-centered states in relaxation cascades of a number of coordination compounds, allowing for design of efficient light-triggered metal complexes. PMID:25646640

  12. Sub-Cycle Dynamics of High Harmonic Generation of He Atoms Excited by Attosecond Pulses and Driven by Near-Infrared Laser Fields: A Self-Interaction-Free TDDFT Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the self-interaction-free time-dependent density functional theory, we have performed 3D ab initio calculations of He atoms in near-infrared (NIR) laser fields subject to excitation by a single extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse (SAP). We have explored the novel dynamical behavior of the sub-cycle high harmonic generation (HHG) for transitions from the excited states to the ground state and found oscillation structures with respect to the time delay between the SAP and NIR fields. The oscillatory pattern in the photon emission spectra has a period of 1.3 fs which is half of the NIR laser optical cycle, similar to that recently measured in the experiments on transient absorption of He. We present the photon emission spectra from 1s2p, 1s3p, 1s4p, 1s5p, and 1s6p excited states as functions of the time delay. We explore the sub-cycle Stark shift phenomenon in NIR fields and its influence on the photon emission process. Our analysis reveals several new features of the sub-cycle HHG dynamics and we identify the mechanisms responsible for the observed peak splitting in the photon emission spectra. This work was partially supported by DOE.

  13. Subcycle dynamics of high-order-harmonic generation of He atoms excited by attosecond pulses and driven by near-infrared laser fields: A self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional theory, we have performed three-dimensional (3D) ab initio calculations of He atoms in near-infrared (NIR) laser fields subject to excitation by a single extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse (SAP). We have explored the dynamical behavior of the subcycle high harmonic generation (HHG) for transitions from the excited states to the ground state and found oscillation structures with respect to the time delay between the SAP and NIR fields. The oscillatory pattern in the photon emission spectra has a period of ˜1.3 fs which is half of the NIR laser optical cycle, similar to that recently measured in the experiments on transient absorption of He [M. Chini et al., Sci. Rep. 3, 1105 (2013), 10.1038/srep01105]. We present the photon emission spectra from 1s2p, 1s3p, 1s4p, 1s5p, and 1s6p excited states as functions of the time delay. We explore the subcycle Stark shift phenomenon in NIR fields and its influence on the photon emission process. Our analysis reveals several interesting features of the subcycle HHG dynamics and we identify the mechanisms responsible for the observed peak splitting in the photon emission spectra.

  14. Time delay and excitation mode induced tunable red/near-infrared to green emission ratio of Er doped BiOCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avram, Daniel; Florea, Mihaela; Tiseanu, Ion; Tiseanu, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    Herein, we report on the emission color tunability of Er doped BiOCl measured under up—conversion as well as x-ray excitation modes. The dependence of red (670 nm) to green emission (543 nm) ratio on Er concentration (1 and 5%), excitation wavelength into different (656.4, 802 and 976 nm) or across single Er absorption levels (965 ÷ 990 nm) and delay after the laser pulse (0.001 ÷ 1 ms) is discussed in terms of ground state absorption/excited state absorption and energy transfer up-conversion mechanisms. A first example of extended Er x-ray emission measured in the range of 500 to 1700 nm shows comparable emission intensities corresponding to 543 nm and 1500 nm based transitions. The present results together with our earlier report on the upconversion emission of Er doped BiOCl excited at 1500 nm, suggest that Er doped BiOCl may be considered an attractive system for optical and x-ray imaging applications.

  15. Detecting the imaging characteristics of colorectal carcinoma invading the muscularis propria with multiphoton microscopy Detecting the imaging characteristics of colorectal carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, J. X.; Chen, G.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Jiang, X. S.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the characteristics of the muscularis propria (mp) of human colorectum tissue with carcinoma invasion and help to advance the development for the diagnosis and therapy of early colorectal cancer. Multiphoton microscopic imaging system was used to achieve two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and the second harmonic generation (SHG) images of samples respectively through the two-channel model. This work demonstrates the use of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) in obtaining clear images from thick layers of label-free tissues. Combined with endoscopy and miniaturization probes will be helpful for representing new methods to assess the functional behaviors of tissue and diagnose the early colorectal cancer in vivo.

  16. Insights on the CN B 2Σ+ + Ar potential from ultraviolet fluorescence excitation and infrared depletion studies of the CN-Ar complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Bridget A.; Beames, Joseph M.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2012-06-01

    UV laser-induced fluorescence and IR-UV fluorescence depletion studies have been used to characterize the intermolecular levels of the CN-Ar complex in the excited state correlating with CN B 2Σ+ + Ar. Additional CN-Ar features are identified to lower wavenumber than reported previously. Fluorescence depletion spectra are recorded to confirm that these CN-Ar features and other higher energy features in the B-X spectrum originate from a common ground state level. The UV depletion is induced by IR excitation of CN-Ar from the ground state zero-point level to a hindered internal rotor state (nK = 11) in the CN overtone region. The lowest energy feature in the B-X spectrum at 25 714.1 cm-1 is assigned as a transition to the zero-point level of the B state and also yields its binding energy, D0 = 186(2) cm-1, which is in excellent accord with theoretical predictions. The next feature approximately 40 cm-1 higher is attributed to overlapping transitions to intermolecular levels with bend ({v}_bK = 1^1) or stretch (vs = 1) excitation. Yet higher features (previously reported) are also assigned, based on their transition type and wavenumber, which are consistent with the intermolecular energy level pattern computed theoretically. Finally, the intensity profile of the lowest energy features in the B-X spectrum reflects the predicted change in the CN (B 2Σ+, X 2Σ+) + Ar potentials upon electronic excitation from a weakly anisotropic potential about the linear N≡C-Ar configuration in the ground state to a more strongly bound linear C≡N-Ar structure in the excited B electronic state.

  17. Multi-photon ionization of atoms in intense short-wavelength radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The unprecedented characteristics of XUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) have stimulated numerous investigations focusing on the detailed understanding of fundamental photon-matter interactions in atoms and molecules. In particular, the high intensities (up to 106 W/cm2) giving rise to non-linear phenomena in the short wavelength regime. The basic phenomenology involves the production of highly charged ions via electron emission to which both sequential and direct multi-photon absorption processes contribute. The detailed investigation of the role and relative weight of these processes under different conditions (wavelength, pulse duration, intensity) is the key element for a comprehensive understanding of the ionization dynamics. Here the results of recent investigations are presented, performed at the FELs in Hamburg (FLASH) and Trieste (FERMI) on atomic systems with electronic structures of increasing complexity (Ar, Ne and Xe). Mainly, electron spectroscopy is used to obtain quantitative information about the relevance of various multi-photon ionization processes. For the case of Ar, a variety of processes including above threshold ionization (ATI) from 3p and 3s valence shells, direct 2p two-photon ionization and resonant 2p-4p two-photon excitations were observed and their role was quantitatively determined comparing the experimental ionization yields to ab-initio calculations of the cross sections for the multi-photon processes. Using Ar as a benchmark to prove the reliability of the combined experimental and theoretical approach, the more complex and intriguing case of Xe was studied. Especially, the analysis of the two-photon ATI from the Xe 4d shell reveals new insight into the character of the 4d giant resonance, which was unresolved in the linear one-photon regime. Finally, the influence of intense XUV radiation to the relaxation dynamics of the Ne 2s-3p resonance was investigated by angle-resolved electron spectroscopy, especially be observing the intensity dependent variation of the angular distribution patterns for the sequential ionization process.

  18. Novel techniques with multiphoton microscopy: Deep-brain imaging with microprisms, neurometabolism of epilepsy, and counterfeit paper money detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Thomas H.

    Multiphoton microscopy is a laser-scanning fluorescence imaging method with extraordinary potential. We describe three innovative multiphoton microscopy techniques across various disciplines. Traditional in vivo fluorescence microscopy of the mammalian brain has a limited penetration depth (<400 microm). We present a method of imaging 1 mm deep into mouse neocortex by using a glass microprism to relay the excitation and emission light. This technique enables simultaneous imaging of multiple cortical layers, including layer V, at an angle typical of slice preparations. At high-magnification imaging using an objective with 1-mm of coverglass correction, resolution was sufficient to resolve dendritic spines on layer V GFP neurons. Functional imaging of blood flow at various neocortical depths is also presented, allowing for quantification of red blood cell flux and velocity. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of NADH reveals information on neurometabolism. NADH, an intrinsic fluorescent molecule and ubiquitous metabolic coenzyme, has a lifetime dependent on enzymatic binding. A novel NADH FLIM algorithm is presented that produces images showing spatially distinct NADH fluorescence lifetimes in mammalian brain slices. This program provides advantages over traditional FLIM processing of multi-component lifetime data. We applied this technique to a GFP-GFAP pilocarpine mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Results indicated significant changes in the neurometabolism of astrocytes and neuropil in the cell and dendritic layers of the hippocampus when compared to control tissue. Data obtained with NADH FLIM were subsequently interpreted based on the abnormal activity reported in epileptic tissue. Genuine U.S. Federal Reserve Notes have a consistent, two-component intrinsic fluorescence lifetime. This allows for detection of counterfeit paper money because of its significant differences in fluorescence lifetime when compared to genuine paper money. We used scanning multiphoton laser excitation to sample a ˜4 mm2 region from 54 genuine Reserve Notes. Three types of counterfeit samples were tested. Four out of the nine counterfeit samples fit to a one-component decay. Five out of nine counterfeit samples fit to a two-component model, but are identified as counterfeit due to significant deviations in the longer lifetime component compared to genuine bills.

  19. Infrared Luminescence at 1010 nm and 1500 nm in LiNbO3:Er3+ Excitted by Short Pulse Radiation at 980 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokanyan, E. P.; Demirkhanyan, G. G.; Steveler, E.; Rinnert, H.; Aillerie, M.

    Luminescence of LiNbO3:Er3+ crystal at a wavelength of 1010 nm and 1500 nm under pulsed excitation of different power at a wavelength of 980 nm are experimentally and theoretically studied. It is revealed, that the main part of the absorbed energy gives rise to the luminescence at 1500 nm. Considered concentrations of Er3+ impurity ions allow to exclude cooperative processes in the impurity subsystem. The experimental results are interpreted in the framework of a three electronic levels system, assuming that the population of the higher lasing level 4I13/2 in the crystal under study is caused by relaxation processes from the excited level. It is shown that for obtaining of a laser radiation at about 1500 nm one can effectively use a pulse-pumping at 980 nm with a power density in a range of 50 ÷ 60 MW/cm2.

  20. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  1. Multi-photon intracellular sodium imaging combined with UV-mediated focal uncaging of glutamate in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kleinhans, Christian; Kafitz, Karl W; Rose, Christine R

    2014-01-01

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has enabled the analysis of morphological and physiological parameters of brain cells in the intact tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. Combined with electrophysiology, it is widely used to study activity-related calcium signals in small subcellular compartments such as dendrites and dendritic spines. In addition to calcium transients, synaptic activity also induces postsynaptic sodium signals, the properties of which are only marginally understood. Here, we describe a method for combined whole-cell patch-clamp and multi-photon sodium imaging in cellular micro domains of central neurons. Furthermore, we introduce a modified procedure for ultra-violet (UV)-light-induced uncaging of glutamate, which allows reliable and focal activation of glutamate receptors in the tissue. To this end, whole-cell recordings were performed on Cornu Ammonis subdivision 1 (CA1) pyramidal neurons in acute tissue slices of the mouse hippocampus. Neurons were filled with the sodium-sensitive fluorescent dye SBFI through the patch-pipette, and multi-photon excitation of SBFI enabled the visualization of dendrites and adjacent spines. To establish UV-induced focal uncaging, several parameters including light intensity, volume affected by the UV uncaging beam, positioning of the beam as well as concentration of the caged compound were tested and optimized. Our results show that local perfusion with caged glutamate (MNI-Glutamate) and its focal UV-uncaging result in inward currents and sodium transients in dendrites and spines. Time course and amplitude of both inward currents and sodium signals correlate with the duration of the uncaging pulse. Furthermore, our results show that intracellular sodium signals are blocked in the presence of blockers for ionotropic glutamate receptors, demonstrating that they are mediated by sodium influx though this pathway. In summary, our method provides a reliable tool for the investigation of intracellular sodium signals induced by focal receptor activation in intact brain tissue. PMID:25350367

  2. Multi-photon Intracellular Sodium Imaging Combined with UV-mediated Focal Uncaging of Glutamate in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christine R.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has enabled the analysis of morphological and physiological parameters of brain cells in the intact tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. Combined with electrophysiology, it is widely used to study activity-related calcium signals in small subcellular compartments such as dendrites and dendritic spines. In addition to calcium transients, synaptic activity also induces postsynaptic sodium signals, the properties of which are only marginally understood. Here, we describe a method for combined whole-cell patch-clamp and multi-photon sodium imaging in cellular micro domains of central neurons. Furthermore, we introduce a modified procedure for ultra-violet (UV)-light-induced uncaging of glutamate, which allows reliable and focal activation of glutamate receptors in the tissue. To this end, whole-cell recordings were performed on Cornu Ammonis subdivision 1 (CA1) pyramidal neurons in acute tissue slices of the mouse hippocampus. Neurons were filled with the sodium-sensitive fluorescent dye SBFI through the patch-pipette, and multi-photon excitation of SBFI enabled the visualization of dendrites and adjacent spines. To establish UV-induced focal uncaging, several parameters including light intensity, volume affected by the UV uncaging beam, positioning of the beam as well as concentration of the caged compound were tested and optimized. Our results show that local perfusion with caged glutamate (MNI-Glutamate) and its focal UV-uncaging result in inward currents and sodium transients in dendrites and spines. Time course and amplitude of both inward currents and sodium signals correlate with the duration of the uncaging pulse. Furthermore, our results show that intracellular sodium signals are blocked in the presence of blockers for ionotropic glutamate receptors, demonstrating that they are mediated by sodium influx though this pathway. In summary, our method provides a reliable tool for the investigation of intracellular sodium signals induced by focal receptor activation in intact brain tissue. PMID:25350367

  3. The role of resonances in strong-field multiphoton processes

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.; Kulander, K.C.

    1990-10-01

    Resonantly-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) has been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical study since the invention of the laser. Until recently, the overwhelming majority of REMPI research have been conducted at intensities less than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. At these intensities, the strength of the applied field remains less than one percent of the atomic Coulomb field experienced by the outer electrons in a typical noble gas atom. In this regime, treatment of the applied field as a weak perturbation on the atomic system yields excellent agreement with experiment. Here, we investigate the role of resonances in multiphoton ionization at much higher intensities, specifically, we examine the behavior and influence of resonances as the strength of the applied field becomes a significant fraction of the atomic field. 33 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Multiphoton Imaging of Ultrasound Bioeffects in the Murine Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott; Skoch, Jesse; Bacskai, Brian; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of multiphoton imaging in the murine brain during exposure to ultrasound. Our experimental setup coupled ultrasound through the ventral surface of the mouse while allowing imaging through a cranial window from the dorsal surface. Field attenuation was estimated by scanning the field after insertion of a freshly sacrificed mouse; beam profile and peak position were preserved, suggesting adequate targeting for imaging experiments. C57 mice were imaged with a Biorad multiphoton microscope while being exposed to ultrasound (f = 1.029 MHz, peak pressure ˜ 200 kPa, average power ˜ 0.18 W) with IV injection of Optison. We observed strong vasoconstriction coincident with US and Optison, as well as permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier.

  5. Waveguide characterization with multi-photon photoemission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Word, Robert C.; Saliba, Sebastian; Koenenkamp, Rolf

    2012-10-01

    Multi-photon photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) images surface interactions of visible light with matter, showing electromagnetic (EM) waves that propagate at or near the surface. Images are interferometric, showing where incident and surface waves are in-phase (bright) and out-of-phase (dark), with strong contrast between regions of high and low rates of photoelectron emission. Interferogram analysis can determine the amplitude, wavelength, phase evolution, and propagation decay length of the surface waves. Most multi-photon PEEM studies focus on surface plasmon polaritons. We show that this technique can also be applied to conducting thin-film waveguides, measuring the properties of confined EM waves in a two-mode slab waveguide made of indium tin oxide on glass, which are consistent with waveguide theory. This research was funded by the US Department of Energy Basic Science Office under contract DE-FG02-10ER46406.

  6. Characteristics of subgingival calculus detection by multiphoton fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Oi-Hong; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin; Chen, How-Foo

    2011-06-01

    Subgingival calculus has been recognized as a major cause of periodontitis, which is one of the main chronic infectious diseases of oral cavities and a principal cause of tooth loss in humans. Bacteria deposited in subgingival calculus or plaque cause gingival inflammation, function deterioration, and then periodontitis. However, subgingival calculus within the periodontal pocket is a complicated and potentially delicate structure to be detected with current dental armamentaria, namely dental x-rays and dental probes. Consequently, complete removal of subgingival calculus remains a challenge to periodontal therapies. In this study, the detection of subgingival calculus employing a multiphoton autofluorescence imaging method was characterized in comparison with a one-photon confocal fluorescence imaging technique. Feasibility of such a system was studied based on fluorescence response of gingiva, healthy teeth, and calculus with and without gingiva covered. The multiphoton fluorescence technology perceived the tissue-covered subgingival calculus that cannot be observed by the one-photon confocal fluorescence method.

  7. Hybrid label-free multiphoton and optoacoustic microscopy (MPOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Dominik; Tserevelakis, George J.; Omar, Murad; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-07-01

    Many biological applications require a simultaneous observation of different anatomical features. However, unless potentially harmful staining of the specimens is employed, individual microscopy techniques do generally not provide multi-contrast capabilities. We present a hybrid microscope integrating optoacoustic microscopy and multiphoton microscopy, including second-harmonic generation, into a single device. This combined multiphoton and optoacoustic microscope (MPOM) offers visualization of a broad range of structures by employing different contrast mechanisms and at the same time enables pure label-free imaging of biological systems. We investigate the relative performance of the two microscopy modalities and demonstrate their multi-contrast abilities through the label-free imaging of a zebrafish larva ex vivo, simultaneously visualizing muscles and pigments. This hybrid microscopy application bears great potential for developmental biology studies, enabling more comprehensive information to be obtained from biological specimens without the necessity of staining.

  8. Evaluation of endogenous species involved in brain tumors using multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2013-05-01

    It has been shown that using non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS), excised brain tumor (grade III astrocytoma) and healthy tissue can be differentiated from each other, even in neighboring biopsy samples[1, 2]. Because of this, this powerful technique offers a great deal of potential for use as a surgical guidance technique for tumor margining with up to cellular level spatial resolution[3]. NMPPAS spectra are obtained by monitoring the non-radiative relaxation pathways via ultrasonic detection, following two-photon excitation with light in the optical diagnostic window (740nm-1100nm). Based upon significant differences in the ratiometric absorption of the tissues following 970nm and 1100nm excitation, a clear classification of the tissue can be made. These differences are the result of variations in composition and oxidation state of certain endogenous biochemical species between healthy and malignant tissues. In this work, NADH, NAD+ and ATP were measured using NMPPAS in model gelatin tissue phantoms to begin to understand which species might be responsible for the observed spectral differences in the tissue. Each species was placed in specific pH environments to provide control over the ratio of oxidized to reduced forms of the species. Ratiometric analyses were then conducted to account for variability caused due to instrumental parameters. This paper will discuss the potential roles of each of the species for tumor determination and their contribution to the spectral signature.

  9. Non-descanned multifocal multiphoton microscopy with a multianode photomultiplier tube

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jae Won; Yew, Elijah Y. S.; Kim, Daekeun; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T. C.

    2015-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) improves imaging speed over a point scanning approach by parallelizing the excitation process. Early versions of MMM relied on imaging detectors to record emission signals from multiple foci simultaneously. For many turbid biological specimens, the scattering of emission photons results in blurred images and degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We have recently demonstrated that a multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) placed in a descanned configuration can effectively collect scattered emission photons from each focus into their corresponding anodes significantly improving image SNR for highly scattering specimens. Unfortunately, a descanned MMM has a longer detection path resulting in substantial emission photon loss. Optical design constraints in a descanned geometry further results in significant optical aberrations especially for large field-of-view (FOV), high NA objectives. Here, we introduce a non-descanned MMM based on MAPMT that substantially overcomes most of these drawbacks. We show that we improve signal efficiency up to fourfold with limited image SNR degradation due to scattered emission photons. The excitation foci can also be spaced wider to cover the full FOV of the objective with minimal aberrations. The performance of this system is demonstrated by imaging interneuron morphological structures deep in the brains of living mice. PMID:25874160

  10. Vectorizable wave propagation FORTRANcode for calculations of multiphoton dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Julian J.-L.; Yuan, J. M.; Jiang, T.-F.

    1992-06-01

    A vectorizable FORTRAN code for the ETA10 or other vector machines for numerical calculation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is presented. Preliminary results for the multiphoton dissociation of nitrogen oxide are shown. The applied electric field was approximated by a classical sinusoidal wave; both sinusoidal and cosinusoidal wave forms were tested, and the internuclear potential was taken to be a Morse function. Dissociation histories of three types were found.

  11. Mid-J CO shock tracing observations of infrared dark clouds. II. Low-J CO constraints on excitation, depletion, and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pon, A.; Johnstone, D.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.; Palau, A.; Butler, M. J.; Kaufman, M.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Tan, J. C.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared dark clouds are kinematically complex molecular structures in the interstellar medium that can host sites of massive star formation. We present maps measuring 4 square arcminutes of the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 3 to 2 lines from selected locations within the C and F (G028.37+00.07 and G034.43+00.24) infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), as well as single pointing observations of the 13CO and C18O J = 2 to 1 lines towards three cores within these clouds. We derive CO gas temperatures throughout the maps and find that CO is significantly frozen out within these IRDCs. We find that the CO depletion tends to be the highest near column density peaks with maximum depletion factors between 5 and 9 in IRDC F and between 16 and 31 in IRDC C. We also detect multiple velocity components and complex kinematic structure in both IRDCs. Therefore, the kinematics of IRDCs seem to point to dynamically evolving structures yielding dense cores with considerable depletion factors. Based on observations carried out with the JCMT and IRAM 30 m Telescopes. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).IRAM CO observations are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A96

  12. Non-invasive multiphoton imaging of extracellular matrix structures

    PubMed Central

    Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become a powerful method for the artifact-free, nondestructive evaluation of deep-tissue cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in their native environment. By interacting with highly non-centrosymmetric molecular assemblies such as fibrillar collagen, the non-linear process called second harmonic generation (SHG) has also proven to be an important diagnostic tool for the visualization of ECM compartments in situ with submicron resolution without the need for tissue processing. This review reports on applications of multiphoton-induced autofluorescence and SHG microscopy to identify collagen and elastic fiber orientation in native, tissue-engineered and processed, as well as healthy and diseased, tissues and organs. SHG signal profiling was used to quantify ECM damage in various cardiovascular and exocrine tissues, as well as cartilage. These novel imaging modalities open the general possibility of high-resolution in situ and more important in vivo imaging of ECM structures, cells and intracellular organelles in living intact tissues. Heart valve leaflets have a unique extracellular matrix that is organized in distinct layers, which can be non-destructively visualized by multiphoton imaging. PMID:19343671

  13. Two-photon-excited luminescence from a Eu3+-doped lithium niobate crystal pumped by a near-infrared femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ai-Hua; Zheng, Zhi-Ren; Lü, Qiang; Xu, Zhao-Peng; Sun, Liang; Liu, Wei-Long; Wu, Wen-Zhi; Lü, Tian-Quan

    2010-09-01

    Red upconversion luminescence (UCL) is observed using an 800 nm femtosecond laser to irradiate a Eu3+-doped LiNbO3 single crystal. Power-dependent and polarization-dependent experiments demonstrate that the red UCL originates from Eu3+ two-photon simultaneous absorption rather than second harmonic generation of nonlinear optical crystal followed by reabsorption of Eu3+. Two different kinds of Eu3+-centers, called Eu3+-pairs, are revealed via emission spectra. Besides using femtosecond laser excitation to simulate diode laser excitation with broad line, the efficient two-photon simultaneous absorption can populate more Eu3+ to upper levels, these are beneficial to the study of cross relaxation with submicrosecond resolution between Eu3+-pairs occurred in practical application. Transient UCL spectra and decay curves suggest that the luminescent state D50 is fed by way of both multiphonon relaxation through state D51 and cross relaxation of D52+F70→D50+F75.

  14. Subcycle dynamics of high harmonic generation in valence-shell and virtual states of Ar atoms excited by attosecond pulses and driven by near-infrared laser fields: A self-interaction-free TDDFT theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the self-interaction-free time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), we have performed an ab initio all-electron study of subcycle structure, dynamics, and spectra of high harmonic generation (HHG) processes of Ar atoms in the presence of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulses and near-infrared (NIR) laser fields. The TDDFT equations are solved accurately and efficiently via the time-dependent generalized pseudospectral (TDGPS) method. We focus on the subcycle (with respect to NIR field) temporal behavior of the level shift of the excited energy levels and related dynamics of harmonic photon emission. We observe and identify the subcycle shifts in the harmonic emission spectrum as a function of the time delay between the XUV and NIR pulses. We present and analyze the harmonic emission spectra from 3snp0, 3p0ns, 3p1nd1,3p1np1, 3p0nd0, 3p0np0, and 3p0ns excited states and the 3p04p0-virtual state as functions of the time delay. In addition, we explore the subcycle a.c. Stark shift phenomenon in NIR fields and its influence on the harmonic emission process. Our analysis reveals several novel features of the subcycle HHG dynamics and spectra as well as temporal energy level shift. This work was partially supported by DOE.

  15. Full dimensional (15-dimensional) quantum-dynamical simulation of the protonated water-dimer III: Mixed Jacobi-valence parametrization and benchmark results for the zero point energy, vibrationally excited states, and infrared spectrum.

    PubMed

    Vendrell, Oriol; Brill, Michael; Gatti, Fabien; Lauvergnat, David; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2009-06-21

    Quantum dynamical calculations are reported for the zero point energy, several low-lying vibrational states, and the infrared spectrum of the H(5)O(2)(+) cation. The calculations are performed by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. A new vector parametrization based on a mixed Jacobi-valence description of the system is presented. With this parametrization the potential energy surface coupling is reduced with respect to a full Jacobi description, providing a better convergence of the n-mode representation of the potential. However, new coupling terms appear in the kinetic energy operator. These terms are derived and discussed. A mode-combination scheme based on six combined coordinates is used, and the representation of the 15-dimensional potential in terms of a six-combined mode cluster expansion including up to some 7-dimensional grids is discussed. A statistical analysis of the accuracy of the n-mode representation of the potential at all orders is performed. Benchmark, fully converged results are reported for the zero point energy, which lie within the statistical uncertainty of the reference diffusion Monte Carlo result for this system. Some low-lying vibrationally excited eigenstates are computed by block improved relaxation, illustrating the applicability of the approach to large systems. Benchmark calculations of the linear infrared spectrum are provided, and convergence with increasing size of the time-dependent basis and as a function of the order of the n-mode representation is studied. The calculations presented here make use of recent developments in the parallel version of the MCTDH code, which are briefly discussed. We also show that the infrared spectrum can be computed, to a very good approximation, within D(2d) symmetry, instead of the G(16) symmetry used before, in which the complete rotation of one water molecule with respect to the other is allowed, thus simplifying the dynamical problem. PMID:19548725

  16. The near-infrared structure and spectra of the bipolar nebulae M2-9 and AFGL 2688: The role of ultraviolet pumping and shocks in molecular hydrogen excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hora, Joseph L.; Latter, William B.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution near-infrared images and moderate resolution spectra were obtained of the bipolar nebulae M2-9 and AFGL 2688. The ability to spatially and spectrally resolve the various components of the nebulae has proved to be important in determining their physical structure and characteristics. In M2-9, the lobes are found to have a double-shell structure. The inner shell is dominated by emission from hydrogen recombination lines, and the outer shell is primarily emission from H2 lines in teh 2-2.5 micron region. Analysis of H2 line ratios indicates that the H2 emission is radiatively excited. A well-resolved photodissociation region is observed in the lobes. The spectrum of the central source is dominated by H recombination lines and a strong continuum rising toward longer wavelengths consistent with a T = 795 K blackbody. Also present are lines of He I and Fe II. In contrast, the N knot and E lobe of M2-9 show little continuum emission. The N knot spectrum consists of lines of (Fe II) and hydrogen recombination lines. In AGFL 2688, the emission from the bright lobes is mainly continuum reflected from the central star. Several molecular features from C2 and CN are present. In the extreme end of the N lobe and in the E equatorial region, the emission is dominated by lines of H2 in the 2-2.5 region. The observed H2 line ratios indicate that the emission is collisionally excited, with an excitation temperature T(sub ex) approixmately = 1600 +/- 100 K.

  17. Cryogenic exciter

    DOEpatents

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  18. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K.; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J.; Tang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications. PMID:27231633

  19. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3-D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblast contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Fagot, Dominique; Olive, Christian; Michelet, Jean-Franois; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Leroy, Frdric; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Martin, Jean-Louis; Colonna, Anne; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2010-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are responsible for the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix and can be potentially targeted by anti-aging ingredients. Investigation of the modulation of fibroblast contraction by these ingredients requires the implementation of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies. We use multiphoton microscopy to visualize unstained engineered dermal tissue by combining second-harmonic generation that reveals specifically fibrillar collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence from endogenous cellular chromophores. We study the fibroblast-induced reorganization of the collagen matrix and quantitatively evaluate the effect of Y-27632, a RhoA-kinase inhibitor, on dermal substitute contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblasts with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA-kinase inhibitor. Moreover, we show that the inhibitory effects are reversible. Our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the extracellular matrix induced by fibroblast contraction or other processes.

  20. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3-D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblast contraction.

    PubMed

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Fagot, Dominique; Olive, Christian; Michelet, Jean-François; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Leroy, Frédéric; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Martin, Jean-Louis; Colonna, Anne; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2010-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are responsible for the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix and can be potentially targeted by anti-aging ingredients. Investigation of the modulation of fibroblast contraction by these ingredients requires the implementation of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies. We use multiphoton microscopy to visualize unstained engineered dermal tissue by combining second-harmonic generation that reveals specifically fibrillar collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence from endogenous cellular chromophores. We study the fibroblast-induced reorganization of the collagen matrix and quantitatively evaluate the effect of Y-27632, a RhoA-kinase inhibitor, on dermal substitute contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblasts with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA-kinase inhibitor. Moreover, we show that the inhibitory effects are reversible. Our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the extracellular matrix induced by fibroblast contraction or other processes. PMID:21054112

  1. Multiphoton and magnetic resonance imaging of Barley embryos: comparing micro-imaging techniques across scale and parameter barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Martin; Manz, Bertram; Riemann, Iris; Volke, Frank; Weschke, Winfriede; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton stimulated autofluorescence microscopy and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) address different molecular properties of the sample and reach to a different length scale. MRI maps density or mobility of nuclei (here: hydrogen), and targets at whole objects from the scale of sub-millimetres to meters. Multiphoton imaging profits from the nonlinear absorption of light in the focus of a femtosecond laser source stimulating the autofluorescence of biomolecules. As this effect relies on a high light intensity the accessible field of view is limited, but the resolution is very high. Studying a plant embryo (barley) we compare the two techniques. At 770 nm excitation the cell walls of the embryo exhibited significant autofluorescence, allowing for a subcellular resolution. While details where imaged with an objective of N.A. 1.3, an overview was generated with a N.A. as low as 0.25. The overview image as well as merged images and tomographical data were used to link the high-resolution optical data with the three-dimensional highresolution MR images. There, images of the proton density were acquired using a standard 3D spin-echo imaging pulse sequence. While the optical high-resolution data provides a field of view restricted to only a small part of the embryo, the MR image contains the whole grain. Bridging the scales it might be possible to trace transport of e.g. nutrients from large structure of the plant to the cellular level.

  2. Site-Specific Dynamics of β-Sheet Peptides with (D) Pro-Gly Turns Probed by Laser-Excited Temperature-Jump Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Popp, Alexander; Scheerer, David; Chi, Heng; Keiderling, Timothy A; Hauser, Karin

    2016-05-01

    Turn residues and side-chain interactions play an important role for the folding of β-sheets. We investigated the conformational dynamics of a three-stranded β-sheet peptide ((D) P(D) P) and a two-stranded β-hairpin (WVYY-(D) P) by time-resolved temperature-jump (T-jump) infrared spectroscopy. Both peptide sequences contain (D) Pro-Gly residues that favor a tight β-turn. The three-stranded β-sheet (Ac-VFITS(D) PGKTYTEV(D) PGOKILQ-NH2 ) is stabilized by the turn sequences, whereas the β-hairpin (SWTVE(D) PGKYTYK-NH2 ) folding is assisted by both the turn sequence and hydrophobic cross-strand interactions. Relaxation times after the T-jump were monitored as a function of temperature and occur on a sub-microsecond time scale, (D) P(D) P being faster than WVYY-(D) P. The Xxx-(D) Pro tertiary amide provides a detectable IR band, allowing us to probe the dynamics site-specifically. The relative importance of the turn versus the intrastrand stability in β-sheet formation is discussed. PMID:26789931

  3. N-H Stretching Excitations in Adenosine-Thymidine Base Pairs in Solution: Base Pair Geometries, Infrared Line Shapes and Ultrafast Vibrational Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Greve, Christian; Preketes, Nicholas K.; Fidder, Henk; Costard, Rene; Koeppe, Benjamin; Heisler, Ismael A.; Mukamel, Shaul; Temps, Friedrich; Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We explore the N-H stretching vibrations of adenosine-thymidine base pairs in chloroform solution with linear and nonlinear infrared spectroscopy. Based on estimates from NMR measurements and ab initio calculations, we conclude that adenosine and thymidine form hydrogen bonded base pairs in Watson-Crick, reverse Watson-Crick, Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen configurations with similar probability. Steady-state concentration- and temperature dependent linear FT-IR studies, including H/D exchange experiments, reveal that these hydrogen-bonded base pairs have complex N-H/N-D stretching spectra with a multitude of spectral components. Nonlinear 2D-IR spectroscopic results, together with IR-pump-IR-probe measurements, as also corroborated by ab initio calculations, reveal that the number of N-H stretching transitions is larger than the total number of N-H stretching modes. This is explained by couplings to other modes, such as an underdamped low-frequency hydrogen-bond mode, and a Fermi resonance with NH2 bending overtone levels of the adenosine amino-group. Our results demonstrate that modeling based on local N-H stretching vibrations only is not sufficient and call for further refinement of the description of the N-H stretching manifolds of nucleic acid base pairs of adenosine and thymidine, incorporating a multitude of couplings with fingerprint and low-frequency modes. PMID:23234439

  4. Comparing the dynamical effects of symmetric and antisymmetric stretch excitation of methane in the Cl+CH4 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, Hans A.; Camden, Jon P.; Brown, Davida J. Ankeny; Zare, Richard N.

    2004-03-01

    The effects of two nearly isoenergetic C-H stretching motions on the gas-phase reaction of atomic chlorine with methane are examined. First, a 1:4:9 mixture of Cl2, CH4, and He is coexpanded into a vacuum chamber. Then, either the antisymmetric stretch (ν3=3019 cm-1) of CH4 is prepared by direct infrared absorption or the infrared-inactive symmetric stretch (ν1=2917 cm-1) of CH4 is prepared by stimulated Raman pumping. Photolysis of Cl2 at 355 nm generates fast Cl atoms that initiate the reaction with a collision energy of 1290±175 cm-1 (0.16±0.02 eV). Finally, the nascent HCl or CH3 products are detected state-specifically via resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and separated by mass in a time-of-flight spectrometer. We find that the rovibrational distributions and state-selected differential cross sections of the HCl and CH3 products from the two vibrationally excited reactions are nearly indistinguishable. Although Yoon et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 9568 (2003)] report that the reactivities of these two different types of vibrational excitation are quite different, the present results indicate that the reactions of symmetric-stretch excited or antisymmetric-stretch excited methane with atomic chlorine follow closely related product pathways. Approximately 37% of the reaction products are formed in HCl(v=1,J) states with little rotational excitation. At low J states these products are sharply forward scattered, but become almost equally forward and backward scattered at higher J states. The remaining reaction products are formed in HCl(v=0,J) and have more rotational excitation. The HCl(v=0,J) products are predominantly back and side scattered. Measurements of the CH3 products indicate production of a non-negligible amount of umbrella bend excited methyl radicals primarily in coincidence with the HCl(v=0,J) products. The data are consistent with a model in which the impact parameter governs the scattering dynamics.

  5. Caught in the Act: Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy of Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Heather D.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2009-01-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy provides a unique opportunity to discover and characterize biological phenomena in the natural context of living organisms. Here we provide an overview of multiphoton microscopy with particular attention to its application for studying host-pathogen interactions. PMID:19154984

  6. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining. PMID:26830089

  7. Near-infrared excited state dynamics of melanins: the effects of iron content, photo-damage, chemical oxidation, and aggregate size.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Mary Jane; Wilson, Jesse W; Robles, Francisco E; Dall, Christopher P; Glass, Keely; Simon, John D; Warren, Warren S

    2014-02-13

    Ultrafast pump-probe measurements can discriminate the two forms of melanin found in biological tissue (eumelanin and pheomelanin), which may be useful for diagnosing and grading melanoma. However, recent work has shown that bound iron content changes eumelanin's pump-probe response, making it more similar to that of pheomelanin. Here we record the pump-probe response of these melanins at a wider range of wavelengths than previous work and show that with shorter pump wavelengths the response crosses over from being dominated by ground-state bleaching to being dominated by excited-state absorption. The crossover wavelength is different for each type of melanin. In our analysis, we found that the mechanism by which iron modifies eumelanin's pump-probe response cannot be attributed to Raman resonances or differences in melanin aggregation and is more likely caused by iron acting to broaden the unit spectra of individual chromophores in the heterogeneous melanin aggregate. We analyze the dependence on optical intensity, finding that iron-loaded eumelanin undergoes irreversible changes to the pump-probe response after intense laser exposure. Simultaneously acquired fluorescence data suggest that the previously reported "activation" of eumelanin fluorescence may be caused in part by the dissociation of metal ions or the selective degradation of iron-containing melanin. PMID:24446774

  8. Near-Infrared Excited State Dynamics of Melanins: The Effects of Iron Content, Photo-Damage, Chemical Oxidation, and Aggregate Size

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast pumpprobe measurements can discriminate the two forms of melanin found in biological tissue (eumelanin and pheomelanin), which may be useful for diagnosing and grading melanoma. However, recent work has shown that bound iron content changes eumelanins pumpprobe response, making it more similar to that of pheomelanin. Here we record the pumpprobe response of these melanins at a wider range of wavelengths than previous work and show that with shorter pump wavelengths the response crosses over from being dominated by ground-state bleaching to being dominated by excited-state absorption. The crossover wavelength is different for each type of melanin. In our analysis, we found that the mechanism by which iron modifies eumelanins pumpprobe response cannot be attributed to Raman resonances or differences in melanin aggregation and is more likely caused by iron acting to broaden the unit spectra of individual chromophores in the heterogeneous melanin aggregate. We analyze the dependence on optical intensity, finding that iron-loaded eumelanin undergoes irreversible changes to the pumpprobe response after intense laser exposure. Simultaneously acquired fluorescence data suggest that the previously reported activation of eumelanin fluorescence may be caused in part by the dissociation of metal ions or the selective degradation of iron-containing melanin. PMID:24446774

  9. Corneal imaging and refractive index measurement using a combined multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Tom; Chong, Shau Poh; Zhou, Yifeng; Moloney, Gregory; Tang, Shuo

    2013-02-01

    Refractive index (RI) is the optical property of a medium that describes its ability to bend incident light. The corneal refractive index is an especially important measurement in corneal and intraocular refractive surgery where its precise estimation is necessary to obtain accurate surgical outcomes. In this study, we calculated the corneal RI using a combined multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. MPM excites and detects nonlinear signals including two photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). TPEF signals are observed from NADH in the cytoplasm, allowing MPM to image the cellular structures in the corneal epithelium and endothelium. SHG signals are observed from collagen, an abundant connective tissue found in the stroma. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) produces cross-sectional, structural images based on the interference fringes created by the reflected light from the sample and reference arms. Our system uses a single sub-10 fs Ti: sapphire laser source which is good for both MPM excitation and OCT resolution. The MPM and OCT images are coregistered when they are taken successively because their axial resolutions are similar and the system shares the laser source and the scanning unit. We can calculate the RI by measuring the optical thickness and the optical path length of the cornea from the MPM and OCT images respectively. We have imaged and calculated the RI of murine and piscine corneas. We were able to see the epithelial, stromal, and endothelial layers and compare their relative thicknesses and the organization of the stromal collagen lamellae. Our results showed that our system can provide both functional and structural information about the cornea and measure the RI of multi-layered tissues.

  10. Label-free imaging and quantitative chemical analysis of Alzheimer's disease brain samples with multimodal multiphoton nonlinear optical microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Kim, Dae Hwan; Song, Woo Keun; Oh, Myoung-Kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2015-05-01

    We developed multimodal multiphoton microspectroscopy using a small-diameter probe with gradient-index lenses and applied it to unstained Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain samples. Our system maintained the image quality and spatial resolution of images obtained using an objective lens of similar numerical aperture. Multicolor images of AD brain samples were obtained simultaneously by integrating two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microendoscope platform. Measurements of two hippocampal regions, the cornus ammonis-1 and dentate gyrus, revealed more lipids, amyloid fibers, and collagen in the AD samples than in the normal samples. Normal and AD brains were clearly distinguished by a large spectral difference and quantitative analysis of the CH mode using CARS microendoscope spectroscopy. We expect this system to be an important diagnosis tool in AD research.

  11. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of molecules and molecular fragments. Annual technical report, March 1991--February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) utilizes pulsed laser radiation to prepare a molecule in an excited state via absorption of one or more photons and to subsequently ionize that state before it can decay. The overall objective of this effort is to carry out theoretical studies of these REMPI processes in molecules and molecular fragments which are designed to provide a robust analysis and prediction of key spectral features of interest in several experimental studies and applications of this technique. A specific and very important objective of the effort is to predict the vibrational and rotational ion distributions which result from REMPI of representative molecules and to understand the underlying mechanisms that give use to these ion distributions. The author highlights progress made during this period.

  12. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin staining differentiates carcinoma in situ lesion from normal oesophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2013-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a powerful, important tool for tissues imaging at the molecular level. In this paper, this technique was extended to histological investigations, differentiating carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesion from normal oesophagus by imaging histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The results show that the histology procedures of dehydration, paraffin embedding, and de-paraffinizing highlighted two photon excited fluorescence of cytoplasm and nucleolus of epithelial cell and collagen in stroma. MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of CIS lesion including changes of squamous cells and full epithelium, identification of basement membrane, especially prominent nucleolus. The studies described here show that MPM has the potential for future retrospective studies of tumor staging by employing on histological section specimens without H&E staining.

  13. Effect of laser spectral bandwidth on coherent control of resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shuwu; School of Science, Nantong University, Nantong 226007 ; Ding, Jingxin Lu, Chenhui; Jia, Tianqing; Zhang, Shian Sun, Zhenrong

    2014-02-28

    The high-resolution (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy (REMPI-PS) can be obtained by measuring the photoelectron intensity at a given kinetic energy and scanning the single π phase step position. In this paper, we further demonstrate that the high-resolution (2 + 1) REMPI-PS cannot be achieved at any measured position of the kinetic energy by this measurement method, which is affected by the laser spectral bandwidth. We propose a double π phase step modulation to eliminate the effect of the laser spectral bandwidth, and show the advantage of the double π phase step modulation on achieving the high-resolution (2 + 1) REMPI-PS by considering the contributions involving on- and near-resonant three-photon excitation pathways.

  14. In vivo three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and multiphoton microscopy in a mouse model of ovarian neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jennifer M.; Marion, Samuel L.; Rice, Photini Faith; Bentley, David L.; Besselsen, David; Utzinger, Urs; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2013-03-01

    Our goal is to use optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to detect early tumor development in a mouse model of ovarian neoplasia. We hope to use information regarding early tumor development to create a diagnostic test for high-risk patients. In this study we collect in vivo images using OCT, second harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence from non-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD)-dosed and VCD-dosed mice. VCD causes follicular apoptosis (simulating menopause) and leads to tumor development. Using OCT and MPM we visualized the ovarian microstructure and were able to see differences between non-VCD-dosed and VCD-dosed animals. This leads us to believe that OCT and MPM may be useful for detecting changes due to early tumor development.

  15. Quantum Radiation Reaction Effects in Multiphoton Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  16. Use of adaptive optics for improved multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girkin, John M.; Marsh, Paul N.

    2004-06-01

    We report on the integration of active optical elements in a multiphoton microscope to improve the resolution and overall image quality when imaging deeply into biological samples. Optical models were generated of sample systems and these have been compared with the performance of the complete imaging system. The active elements used were commercially available flexible membrane mirrors controlled by custom, home written, software. Significant improvements in image quality have been demonstrated using a range of optimisation routines based on the analysis of the images produced by the system, rather than with a wavefront sensor. A three-fold increase in the resolution 100?m into the sample was achieved.

  17. Dynamic Multiphoton Microscopy: Focusing Light on Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Molitoris, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major global health problem; much research has been conducted on AKI, and numerous agents have shown benefit in animal studies, but none have translated into treatments. There is, therefore, a pressing unmet need to increase knowledge of the pathophysiology of AKI. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides a tool to non-invasively visualize dynamic events in real time and at high resolution in rodent kidneys, and in this article we review its application to study novel mechanisms and treatments in different forms of AKI. PMID:25180263

  18. Multiphoton ionization of ions, neutrals, and clusters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1995-12-28

    A multiyear research program investigating molecular detection methods based on multiphoton spectroscopy has been completed under DOE sponsorship. A number of new laser-based spectroscopic methods were developed and applied to a variety of aromatic hydrocarbons, including monomer and cluster species. The objectives of sensitivities approaching single molecule detection combined with high selectivity were achieved. This report references the status of the field at the beginning of this work and summarizes the significant progress during the period from 1987 onward. Detailed scientific findings from the studies are presented in the published literature referenced throughout this report.

  19. Exploration of multiphoton entangled states by using weak nonlinearities

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying-Qiu; Ding, Dong; Yan, Feng-Li; Gao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    We propose a fruitful scheme for exploring multiphoton entangled states based on linear optics and weak nonlinearities. Compared with the previous schemes the present method is more feasible because there are only small phase shifts instead of a series of related functions of photon numbers in the process of interaction with Kerr nonlinearities. In the absence of decoherence we analyze the error probabilities induced by homodyne measurement and show that the maximal error probability can be made small enough even when the number of photons is large. This implies that the present scheme is quite tractable and it is possible to produce entangled states involving a large number of photons. PMID:26751044

  20. Signal enhancement in multiphoton imaging by the use of coated glass substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sheng-Lin; Guo, Han-Wen; Chen, Yang-Fan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    In nonlinear optical imaging of biological specimens, more than half of the generated luminescence signal is lost, when signal collection is performed in the epi-illuminated geometry. In this study, we enhanced the collected luminescence signal by the use of alternating multiply-coated layers of tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) on standard microscope cover glasses that has high transmission in the near-infrared wavelength region and high reflection of the visible, luminescence signal. Our coating is biocompatible, allows visual examination of the specimens and optimize collection of the luminescence signal. We demonstrated this approach on a number of specimens including sulforhodamine solution, fluorescence microspheres, and labeled 3T3 cells. In all cases, the use of coated cover glass enhanced signal, optimally by a factor of about 2. Image analysis of labeled 3T3 cells also shows signal enhancement did not contribute to additional photobleaching. Our results show that properly designed coated cover glass can enhance detected signal in multiphoton microscopy and result in improved image quality. PMID:26417521

  1. Cooper minima in electron spectra after multiphoton above-threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2015-05-01

    We have performed calculations of electron momentum and energy distributions after multiphoton above-threshold ionization (ATI) for several one-electron quantum systems (H, He+, H2+,and HeH2+) in intense laser fields. We use the carrier wavelengths in the near-infrared band (730 to 800 nm) and the peak intensities 5 ×1013 to 1 ×1014 W/cm2. For some initial states of the systems under consideration, the spectra exhibit minima in the low-energy region (3 to 7 eV), which resemble the famous Cooper minima in one-photon ionization processes. The minima are well pronounced for the initial states with the electronic orbitals that have nodal surfaces, such as 2 s state of He+, 1σu state of H2+,and 2 σ state of HeH2+. Such minima are not observed for the initial ground electronic states, as well as for initial 2 p state of He+, which possess nodeless orbitals. The effect is essentially non-perturbative; the positions of the minima depend on the intensity and frequency of the laser field. Nonetheless, it seems the nodal structure of the initial electronic orbital plays a crucial role in shaping these minima in the ATI electron spectra. This work is partially supported by DOE.

  2. Multiphoton control of the 1,3-cyclohexadiene ring-opening reaction in the presence of competing solvent reactions.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; White, James L; Florean, Andrei C; Bucksbaum, Philip H; Sension, Roseanne J

    2008-07-31

    Although physical chemistry has often concentrated on the observation and understanding of chemical systems, the defining characteristic of chemistry remains the direction and control of chemical reactivity. Optical control of molecular dynamics, and thus of chemical reactivity provides a path to use photon energy as a smart reagent in a chemical system. In this paper, we discuss recent research in this field in the context of our studies of the multiphoton optical control of the photo-initiated ring-opening reaction of 1,3-cyclohexadiene (CHD) to form 1,3,5- cis-hexatriene (Z-HT). Closed-loop feedback and learning algorithms are able to identify pulses that increase the desired target state by as much as a factor of two. Mechanisms for control are discussed through the influence of the intensity dependence, the nonlinear power spectrum, and the projection of the pulses onto low orders of polynomial phase. Control measurements in neat solvents demonstrate that competing solvent fragmentation reactions must also be considered. In particular, multiphoton excitation of cyclohexane alone is capable of producing hexatriene. Statistical analyses of data sets obtained in learning algorithm searches in neat cyclohexane and for CHD in hexane and cyclohexane highlight the importance of linear and quadratic chirp, while demonstrating that the control features are not so easily defined. Higher order phase components are also important. On the basis of these results the involvement of low-frequency ground-state vibrational modes is proposed. When the population is transferred to the excited state, momentum along the torsional coordinate may keep the wave packet localized as it moves toward the conical intersections controlling the yield of Z-HT. PMID:18593101

  3. Clinical studies of pigmented lesions in human skin by using a multiphoton tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Mihaela; Kelly, Kristen M.; Zachary, Christopher B.; Harris, Ronald M.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; König, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-02-01

    In vivo imaging of pigmented lesions in human skin was performed with a clinical multiphoton microscopy (MPM)-based tomograph (MPTflex, JenLab, Germany). Two-photon excited fluorescence was used for visualizing endogenous fluorophores such as NADH/FAD, keratin, melanin in the epidermal cells and elastin fibers in the dermis. Collagen fibers were imaged by second harmonic generation. Our study involved in vivo imaging of benign melanocytic nevi, atypical nevi and melanoma. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify in vivo the characteristic features and their frequency in pigmented lesions at different stages (benign, atypical and malignant) and to evaluate the ability of in vivo MPM to distinguish atypical nevi from melanoma. Comparison with histopathology was performed for the biopsied lesions. Benign melanocytic nevi were characterized by the presence of nevus cell nests at the epidermal-dermal junction. In atypical nevi, features such as lentiginous hyperplasia, acanthosis and architectural disorder were imaged. Cytological atypia was present in all the melanoma lesions imaged, showing the strongest correlation with malignancy. The MPM images demonstrated very good correlation with corresponding histological images, suggesting that MPM could be a promising tool for in vivo non-invasive pigmented lesion diagnosis, particularly distinguishing atypical nevi from melanoma.

  4. Digital deconvolution filter derived from linear discriminant analysis and application for multiphoton fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Shane Z; Schmitt, Paul D; Muir, Ryan D; DeWalt, Emma L; Simpson, Garth J

    2014-04-01

    A digital filter derived from linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is developed for recovering impulse responses in photon counting from a high speed photodetector (rise time of ~1 ns) and applied to remove ringing distortions from impedance mismatch in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. Training of the digital filter was achieved by defining temporally coincident and noncoincident transients and identifying the projection within filter-space that best separated the two classes. Once trained, data analysis by digital filtering can be performed quickly. Assessment of the reliability of the approach was performed through comparisons of simulated voltage transients, in which the ground truth results were known a priori. The LDA filter was also found to recover deconvolved impulses for single photon counting from highly distorted ringing waveforms from an impedance mismatched photomultiplier tube. The LDA filter was successful in removing these ringing distortions from two-photon excited fluorescence micrographs and through data simulations was found to extend the dynamic range of photon counting by approximately 3 orders of magnitude through minimization of detector paralysis. PMID:24559143

  5. Optical tweezers and multiphoton microscopies integrated photonic tool for mechanical and biochemical cell processes studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Faustino, W. M.; Fontes, A.; Fernandes, H. P.; Barjas-Castro, M. d. L.; Metze, K.; Giorgio, S.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-09-01

    The research in biomedical photonics is clearly evolving in the direction of the understanding of biological processes at the cell level. The spatial resolution to accomplish this task practically requires photonics tools. However, an integration of different photonic tools and a multimodal and functional approach will be necessary to access the mechanical and biochemical cell processes. This way we can observe mechanicaly triggered biochemical events or biochemicaly triggered mechanical events, or even observe simultaneously mechanical and biochemical events triggered by other means, e.g. electricaly. One great advantage of the photonic tools is its easiness for integration. Therefore, we developed such integrated tool by incorporating single and double Optical Tweezers with Confocal Single and Multiphoton Microscopies. This system can perform 2-photon excited fluorescence and Second Harmonic Generation microscopies together with optical manipulations. It also can acquire Fluorescence and SHG spectra of specific spots. Force, elasticity and viscosity measurements of stretched membranes can be followed by real time confocal microscopies. Also opticaly trapped living protozoas, such as leishmania amazonensis. Integration with CARS microscopy is under way. We will show several examples of the use of such integrated instrument and its potential to observe mechanical and biochemical processes at cell level.

  6. Ultrasensitive standoff chemical sensing based on nonlinear multi-photon laser wave-mixing spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregerson, Marc; Hetu, Marcel; Iwabuchi, Manna; Jimenez, Jorge; Warren, Ashley; Tong, William G.

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear multi-photon laser wave mixing is presented as an ultrasensitive optical detection method for chem/bio agents in thin films and gas- and liquid-phase samples. Laser wave mixing is an unusually sensitive optical absorption-based detection method that offers significant inherent advantages including excellent sensitivity, small sample requirements, short optical path lengths, high spatial resolution, high spectral resolution and standoff remote detection capability. Wave mixing can detect trace amounts of chemicals even when using micrometer-thin samples, and hence, it can be conveniently interfaced to fibers, microarrays, microfluidic systems, lab-on-a-chip, capillary electrophoresis and other capillary- or fiber-based chemical separation systems. The wave-mixing signal is generated instantaneously as the two input laser beams intersect inside the analyte of interest. Laser excitation wavelengths can be tuned to detect multiple chemicals in their native form since wave mixing can detect both fluorescing and non-fluorescing samples at parts-pertrillion or better detection sensitivity levels. The wave-mixing signal is a laser-like coherent beam, and hence, it allows reliable and effective remote sensing of chemicals. Sensitive wave-mixing detectors offer many potential applications including sensitive detection of biomarkers, early detection of diseases, sensitive monitoring of environmental samples, and reliable detection of hazardous chem/bio agents with a standoff detection capability.

  7. Monitoring chemically enhanced transdermal delivery of zinc oxide nanoparticles by using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen; Hsu, Chih-Ting; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Wu, Chung-Long; Chiang, Shu-Jen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Shean-Jen; Chen, Chia-Chun; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are commonly used in sunscreens to reduce the risk of skin cancer by blocking ultraviolet radiation. ZnO NPs absorption through the transdermal route may not cause high health risk as inhalation or ingestion. However, in practical usage of sunscreens and cosmetics, ZnO NPs are topically applied to a large area of skin with long periods hence the potential absorption amount of ZnO NPs is still need to be concerned. Therefore, if the ZnO NPs are able the pass the barrier of normal skin, the pathways of transdermal delivery and the factors of enhancements become important issues. In this work, multiphoton microscopy provides us a non-invasive visualization of ZnO NPs in skin. Moreover, we quantitatively analyzed the enhancement of oleic acid and ethanol. Due to the fact that photoluminance of ZnO NPs spectrally overlaps autofluorence from skin stratum corneum (SC) and high turbidity of both ZnO NPs and SC, it is difficult to resolve the distribution of ZnO NPs in skin by using fluorescence microscopy. In this work, the second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from ZnO NPs which double the frequency of excitation source to characterize the delivery pathways and penetration depth in skin. Moreover, we quantitatively compare the ZnO NPs delivery efficiency in normal skin and in skins with three chemically enhancing conditions: ethanol, oleic acid and the combination of ethanol and oleic acid.

  8. Optical limiting based on multiphoton processes in carbon nanostructures and heterocyclic quadrupolar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorini, Raffaella; Pedron, D.; Ferrante, C.; Bozio, Renato; Brusatin, Giovanna; Innocenzi, Plinio; Della Negra, F.; Maggini, Michele; Abbotto, Alessandro; Beverina, L.; Pagani, Giorgio A.

    2003-02-01

    A novel scheme for implementing the joint exploitation of different, somehow complementary mechanisms of nonlinear transmission in an optical limiting device is proposed. As active materials we have chosen the fullerene derivative FULP, as a reverse saturable absorber, and a new heterocyclic quadrupolar dye, PEPEP, with highly efficient multiphoton absorption for nanosecond pulses. The nonlinear absorption properties of PEPEP in solution are extensively investigated for both femtosecond and nanosecond pulses. When Z-scan experiments are performed with nanosecond pulses, much larger effective cross sections are measured than with femtosecond pulses and with remarkably different wavelength dispersion. This is interpreted as due to two-photon absorption followed by one-photon absorption from the excited state. Chemically modified nonlinear molecules are incorporated in a hybrid organic-inorganic sol-gel matrix. Sufficiently high concentrations are achieved to allow the assembling of thin sol-gel disks into a "tandem" limiter with a total thickness smaller than the Rayleigh range of the focused laser beam. Preliminary testing of our limiter is reported and shows encouraging results. The resistance of the FULP-doped sol-gel glass to laser damage is substantially improved and the nonlinear attenuation at high pulse energies is enhanced.

  9. Three dimensional multiphoton imaging of fresh and whole mount developing mouse mammary glands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The applications of multiphoton microscopy for deep tissue imaging in basic and clinical research are ever increasing, supplementing confocal imaging of the surface layers of cells in tissue. However, imaging living tissue is made difficult by the light scattering properties of the tissue, and this is extraordinarily apparent in the mouse mammary gland which contains a stroma filled with fat cells surrounding the ductal epithelium. Whole mount mammary glands stained with Carmine Alum are easily archived for later reference and readily viewed using bright field microscopy to observe branching architecture of the ductal network. Here, we report on the advantages of multiphoton imaging of whole mount mammary glands. Chief among them is that optical sectioning of the terminal end bud (TEB) and ductal epithelium allows the appreciation of abnormalities in structure that are very difficult to ascertain using either bright field imaging of the stained gland or the conventional approach of hematoxylin and eosin staining of fixed and paraffin-embedded sections. A second advantage is the detail afforded by second harmonic generation (SHG) in which collagen fiber orientation and abundance can be observed. Methods GFP-mouse mammary glands were imaged live or after whole mount preparation using a Zeiss LSM510/META/NLO multiphoton microscope with the purpose of obtaining high resolution images with 3D content, and evaluating any structural alterations induced by whole mount preparation. We describe a simple means for using a commercial confocal/ multiphoton microscope equipped with a Ti-Sapphire laser to simultaneously image Carmine Alum fluorescence and collagen fiber networks by SHG with laser excitation set to 860 nm. Identical terminal end buds (TEBs) were compared before and after fixation, staining, and whole mount preparation and structure of collagen networks and TEB morphologies were determined. Flexibility in excitation and emission filters was explored using the META detector for spectral emission scanning. Backward scattered or reflected SHG (SHG-B) was detected using a conventional confocal detector with maximum aperture and forward scattered or transmitted SHG (SHG-F) detected using a non-descanned detector. Results We show here that the developing mammary gland is encased in a thin but dense layer of collagen fibers. Sparse collagen layers are also interspersed between stromal layers of fat cells surrounding TEBs. At the margins, TEBs approach the outer collagen layer but do not penetrate it. Abnormal mammary glands from an HAI-1 transgenic FVB mouse model were found to contain TEBs with abnormal pockets of cells forming extra lumens and zones of continuous lateral bud formation interspersed with sparse collagen fibers. Parameters influencing live imaging and imaging of fixed unstained and Carmine Alum stained whole mounts were evaluated. Artifacts induced by light scattering of GFP and Carmine Alum signals from epithelial cells were identified in live tissue as primarily due to fat cells and in whole mount tissue as due to dense Carmine Alum staining of epithelium. Carmine Alum autofluorescence was detected at excitation wavelengths from 750 to 950 nm with a peak of emission at 623 nm (~602-656 nm). Images of Carmine Alum fluorescence differed dramatically at emission wavelengths of 565–615 nm versus 650–710 nm. In the latter, a mostly epithelial (nuclear) visualization of Carmine Alum predominates. Autofluorescence with a peak emission of 495 nm was derived from the fixed and processed tissue itself as it was present in the unstained whole mount. Contribution of autofluorescence to the image decreases with increasing laser excitation wavelengths. SHG-B versus SHG-F signals revealed collagen fibers and could be found within single fibers, or in different fibers within the same layer. These differences presumably reflected different states of collagen fiber maturation. Loss of SHG signals from layer to layer could be ascribed to artifacts rendered by light scattering from the dense TEB structures, and unless bandpass emissions were selected, contained unfiltered non-SHG fluorescence and autofluorescent emissions. Flexibility in imaging can be increased using spectral emission imaging to optimize emission bandwidths and to separate SHG-B, GFP, and Carmine Alum signals, although conventional filters were also useful. Conclusions Collagen fibril arrangement and TEB structure is well preserved during the whole mount procedure and light scattering is reduced dramatically by extracting fat resulting in improved 3D structure, particularly for SHG signals originating from collagen. In addition to providing a bright signal, Carmine Alum stained whole mount slides can be imaged retrospectively such as performed for the HAI-1 mouse gland revealing new aspects of abnormal TEB morphology. These studies demonstrated the intimate contact, but relatively sparse abundance of collagen fibrils adjacent to normal and abnormal TEBS in the developing mammary gland and the ability to obtain these high resolution details subject to the discussed limitations. Our studies demonstrated that the TEB architecture is essentially unchanged after processing. PMID:23919456

  10. Resonant IR multi-photon dissociation spectroscopy of a trapped and sympathetically cooled biomolecular ion species.

    PubMed

    Wellers, Ch; Borodin, A; Vasilyev, S; Offenberg, D; Schiller, S

    2011-11-14

    In this work we demonstrate vibrational spectroscopy of polyatomic ions that are trapped and sympathetically cooled by laser-cooled atomic ions. We use the protonated dipeptide tryptophan-alanine (HTyrAla(+)) as a model system, cooled by barium ions to less than 800 mK secular temperature. The spectroscopy is performed on the fundamental vibrational transition of a local vibrational mode at 2.74 μm using a continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Resonant IR multi-photon dissociation spectroscopy (R-IRMPD) (without the use of a UV laser) generates charged molecular fragments, which are sympathetically cooled and trapped, and subsequently released from the trap and counted. We measured the cross section for R-IRMPD under conditions of low intensity, and found it to be approximately two orders smaller than the vibrational excitation cross section. The observed rotational bandwidth of the vibrational transition is larger than the one expected from the combined effects of 300 K black-body temperature, conformer-dependent line shifts, and intermolecular vibrational relaxation broadening (J. Stearns et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2007, 127, 154322-154327). This indicates that as the internal energy of the molecule grows, an increase of the rotational temperature of the molecular ions well above room temperature (up to on the order of 1000 K), and/or an appreciable shift of the vibrational transition frequency (approx. 6-8 cm(-1)) occurs. PMID:21971203

  11. Identification of non-neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanghai; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Gastric polyps can be broadly defined as luminal lesions projecting above the plane of the mucosal surface. They are generally divided into non-neoplastic and neoplastic polyps. Accurate diagnosis of neoplastic polyps is important because of their well-known relationship with gastric cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. In this study, we used MPM to image the microstructure of gastric polyps, including fundic gland polyps, hyperplastic polyps, inflammatory fibroid polyps and adenomas, then compared with gold-standard hematoxylin- eosin(H-E)-stained histopathology. MPM images showed that different gastric polyps have different gland architecture and cell morphology. Dilated, elongated or branch-like hyperplastic polyps are arranged by columnar epithelial cells. Inflammatory fibroid polyps are composed of small, thin-walled blood vessels surrounded by short spindle cells. Fundic glands polyps are lined by parietal cells and chief cells, admixed with normal glands. Gastric adenomas are generally composed of tubules or villi of dysplastic epithelium, which usually show some degree of intestinal-type differentiation toward absorptive cells, goblet cells, endocrine cells. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be used to identify non- neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps without the need of any staining procedure.

  12. Label-free identification of the hippocampus and surrounding structures by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu; Jiang, Liwei; Du, Huiping; Wang, Xingfu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    The hippocampus is one of the essential neuroanatomical substrates and plays an important role in different neurological illnesses. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on intrinsic nonlinear optical processes two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), was applied to label-freely detect the entire hippocampus and surrounding structures in high-magnification imaging, as well as acquire large-scale MPM images at subcellular resolution. It was found that MPM has the capability to identify cornu ammonis, dentate gyrus (DG), alveus, and fimbria of the entire hippocampus, choroid plexus in lateral ventricles, and white matter tracts. MPM also can be used to quantitatively describe the differences of the cellular nucleus in the cornu ammonis and the DG, further identify the morphological features of hippocampal subfields. In addition, the surrounding structures of the hippocampus including the lateral ventricles and white matter serve as useful information to determine the position of the hippocampus. Our results suggest that with the development of the clinical feasibility of two-photon fiberscopes and microendoscope probes, MPM has the potential for in vivo intraoperative identification and monitoring of hippocampus-related lesions without the need for tissue labelling or fluorescent markers.

  13. Studies of new two-photon fluorescent probes suitable for multiphoton microscopy in biological settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvishi, Raz; Berkovic, Garry; Kotler, Zvi; Krief, Pnina; Shapiro, Lev; Klug, Jacob T.; Skorka, Jacqueline; Khodorkovsky, Vladimir

    2003-11-01

    Multi-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (MPLSM) requires efficient two-photon absorbing fluorescent (TPF) probes. In particular, probes exhibiting bio-functionality are very attractive for MPLSM studies of biological samples. We have synthesized and studied a new class of TPF probes capable of caging metal ions, such as Ca+2 and Na+, which play an important role in neuronal mechanisms. The TPF probes are based on a tetraketo derivative with a symmetric Donor-Acceptor-Donor (D-A-D) structure. The donor is an azacrown moiety, which also serves as a metal ion-caging unit. We studied the linear and the non-linear spectroscopic properties of these TPF probes as a function of conjugation length and the size of the crown ring. We find that this new class of TPF probes possesses very large two-photon excitation cross-section coefficients (~1000GM) at near IR wavelengths as well as affinity to metal ions. In the presence of changing sodium ion concentration the dye spectra reveals four distinguishable forms and the TPF efficiency changes strongly. We therefore conclude that the dye can perform as a sensitive metal ion TPF probe.

  14. Photolytic production of C/sup 2/H: collisional quenching of A tilde /sup 2/II. -->. X tilde /sup 2/Sigma/sup +/ infrared emission and the removal of excited C/sub 2/H

    SciTech Connect

    Shokoohi, F.; Watson, T.A.; Reisler, H.; Kong, F.; Renlund, A.M.; Wittig, C.

    1986-10-23

    The authors report the observation of time-resolved C/sub 2/H A tilde /sup 2/II ..-->.. X tilde /sup 2/Sigma/sup +/ infrared emission (1-5 ..mu..m) following the 193-nm photolyses of C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/HBr. Quenching of this emission by numerous collision partners (M) under pseudo-first-order conditions leads to large bimolecular rate coefficients (e.g. > 10/sup -11/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, except when M is a rare gas or N/sub 2/). Although such rate coefficients can be assigned to the quenching of fluorescence, they do not represent state-to-state processes, since quenching is due to an intricate combination of reactive, radiative, and energy-transfer processes. In separate experiments, rate coefficients are determined by monitoring the time-resolved CH A/sup 2/..delta.. ..-->.. X/sup 2/II chemiluminescence which is produced directly by the reaction of C/sub 2/H with O/sub 2/, and the C/sub 2/H species responsible for the CH emissions is identified as electronically and/or vibrationally excited C/sub 2/H. The above results are in agreement with recent molecular beam experiments that show that nascent C/sub 2/H contains considerably internal energy following the 193-nm photolysis of C/sub 2/H/sub 2/.

  15. Non-invasive multiphoton imaging of extracellular matrix structures.

    PubMed

    Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2008-12-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become a powerful method for the artifact-free, nondestructive evaluation of deep-tissue cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in their native environment. By interacting with highly non-centrosymmetric molecular assemblies such as fibrillar collagen, the non-linear process called second harmonic generation (SHG) has also proven to be an important diagnostic tool for the visualization of ECM compartments in situ with submicron resolution without the need for tissue processing. This review reports on applications of multiphoton-induced autofluorescence and SHG microscopy to identify collagen and elastic fiber orientation in native, tissue-engineered and processed, as well as healthy and diseased, tissues and organs. SHG signal profiling was used to quantify ECM damage in various cardiovascular and exocrine tissues, as well as cartilage. These novel imaging modalities open the general possibility of high-resolution in situ and more important in vivo imaging of ECM structures, cells and intracellular organelles in living intact tissues. PMID:19343671

  16. Multiphoton imaging: a view to understanding sulfur mustard lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert J. S.; Madren-Whalley, Janna S.

    2003-07-01

    It is well known that topical exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) produces persistent, incapacitating blisters of the skin. However, the primary lesions effecting epidermal-dermal separation and disabling of mechanisms for cutaneous repair remain uncertain. Immunofluorescent staining plus multiphoton imaging of human epidermal tissues and keratinocytes exposed to SM (400 μM x 5 min)have revealed that SM disrupts adhesion-complex molecules which are also disrupted by epidermolysis bullosa-type blistering diseases of the skin. Images of keratin-14 showed early, progressive, postexposure collapse of the K5/K14 cytoskeleton that resulted in ventral displacement of the nuclei beneath its collapsing filaments. This effectively corrupted the dynamic filament assemblies that link basal-cell nuclei to the extracellular matrix via α6β4-integrin and laminin-5. At 1 h postexposure, there was disruption in the surface organization of α6β4 integrins, associated displacement of laminin-5 anchoring sites and a concomitant loss of functional asymmetry. Accordingly, our multiphoton images are providing compelling evidence that SM induces prevesicating lesions that disrupt the receptor-ligand organization and cytoskeletal systems required for maintaining dermal-epidermal attachment, signal transduction, and polarized mobility.

  17. Quantitative multiphoton imaging for guiding basal-cell carcinoma removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Hsu, Chih-Jung; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Kuo, Chien-Jui; Chen, Jau-Shiuh; Chan, Jung-Yi; Lin, Wei-Chou; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-02-01

    For secure removal of the basal cell carcinoma tissue, the technique of Mohs' micrographic surgery is often used. However, Mohs' micrographic surgery is time-consuming. In this work, we evaluate the ability of multiphoton fluorescence (MF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging to discriminate the borders of human basal cell carcinoma. Morphologically, basal cell carcinomas are featured by clumps of autofluorecent cells with relatively large nuclei and marked peripheral palisading in the dermis. In contrast, SHG from collagen contributes largely to the multiphoton signal in normal dermis. Within the cancer stroma, SHG signals diminish and are replaced by autofluorescent signals. The results suggest that normal collagen structures responsible for SHG have been altered in the cancer stroma and may reflect an up-regulated collagenolytic activity of cancer cells. To better delineate the cancer cells and cancer stroma from normal dermis, a quantitative MF to SHG index (MFSI) is developed. We demonstrate that this index can be used to differentiate cancer cells and adjacent cancer stroma from normal dermis. Our work shows that MF and SHG imaging can be an alternative for the real-time guidance of the secure removal of basal cell carcinoma.

  18. Scaling up multiphoton neural scanning: the SSA algorithm.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Renaud; Annecchino, Luca A; Schultz, Simon R

    2014-01-01

    In order to reverse-engineer the information processing capabilities of the cortical circuit, we need to densely sample neural circuit; it may be necessary to sample the activity of thousands of neurons simultaneously. Frame scanning techniques do not scale well in this regard, due to the time "wasted" scanning extracellular space. For scanners in which inertia can be neglected, path length minimization strategies enable large populations to be imaged at relatively high sampling rates. However, in a standard multiphoton microscope, the scanners responsible for beam deflection are inertial, indicating that an optimal solution should take rotor and mirror momentum into account. We therefore characterized the galvanometric scanners of a commercial multiphoton microscope, in order to develop and validate a MATLAB model of microscope scanning dynamics. We tested the model by simulating scan paths across pseudo-randomly positioned neuronal populations of differing neuronal density and field of view. This model motivated the development of a novel scanning algorithm, Adaptive Spiral Scanning (SSA), in which the radius of a circular trajectory is constantly updated such that it follows a spiral trajectory scanning all the cells. Due to the kinematic efficiency of near-circular trajectories, this algorithm achieves higher sampling rates than shortest path approaches, while retaining a relatively efficient coverage fraction in comparison to raster or resonance based frame-scanning approaches. PMID:25570582

  19. The effect of radial polarization in multiphoton lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Le; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Dong, Xian-Zi; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Considering the axially symmetric polarization and intensity distribution, radially polarized (RP) laser beam has comparatively higher axial component of electric field and smaller size of focal spot compared to linearly polarized (LP) laser. In this study, the effect of radial polarization on multiphoton fabrication has been studied, and polymer spots and lines are chosen as the study objects of 2D micro/nano structures of multiphoton lithography. These structures were fabricated with IP-L, a commercial negative photoresist, by RP fs-pulse laser beam which was tightly focused by an objective lens with high numerical aperture. Multiple experimental conditions, such as fabrication power, exposure time and scanning velocity, were verified in order to observe the structural variation of these polymer structures. On the basis of measurement from images of the scanning electron microscope, the transverse and longitudinal sizes of polymer spots and lines could be analyzed, and the relationship between the aspect ratio (AR) and the above experimental conditions could be acquired. The statistical results agree with our predictions that the RP laser beam can significantly reduce the AR, and the AR in RP laser fabrication has little correlation with conditions besides fabrication power, such as exposure time and scanning velocity.

  20. Rigid and high NA multiphoton fluorescence GRIN-endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkl, Selma; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan; Stark, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Kaatz, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-07-01

    Multiphoton autofluorescence imaging offers minimal-invasive examination of cells without the need of staining and complicated confocal detection systems. Therefore, it is especially interesting for non-invasive clinical diagnostics. To extend this sophisticated technique from superficial regions to deep lying cell layers, internal body parts and specimens difficult of access, the bulky optics need to be reduced in diameter. This is done by tiny GRIN-optics, based on a radial gradient in the reflective index. Of especial interest for multi-photon applications is the newly developed GRIN-lens assembly with increased numerical aperture. High resolution images of plant tissue, hair and cells show the improved image quality,compared to classical GRIN-lenses. The rigid GRIN-endoscopes are already applied in wound healing studies. Here, the GRIN-lenses with diameters smaller than 3 mm enter small skin depressions. They reproduce the focus of a conventional laser scanning tomograph tens of mm apart in the specimen under study. We present first clinical measurements of elastin and SHG of collagen of in-vivo human skin of venous ulcers (ulcer curis).

  1. Low cost laser system generating 26-fs pulse duration, 30-kW peak power, and tunability from 800 to 1200 nm for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resan, Bojan; Brunner, Felix; Rohrbacher, Andreas; Ammann, Hubert; Weingarten, Kurt J.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel low-cost, low-noise, tunable, high-peak-power, ultrafast laser system based on a SESAMmodelocked, solid-state Yb tungstate laser plus spectral broadening via a microstructured fiber followed by pulse compression. The spectral selection, tuning, and pulse compression are performed with a simple prism compressor. The spectral broadening and fiber parameters are chosen to insure low-noise and short pulse operation of the tunable output. The long-term stable output pulses are tunable from 800 to 1200 nm, with a peak power up to 30 kW and pulse duration down to 26 fs. We demonstrate the generation of an output beam with 30 fs pulsewidth and multiple colors in infrared. In particular, we compressed selected spectral slices centered at 960 and 1100 nm suitable for imaging with green fluorescent protein and red dyes. Such a multicolor, 30 fs laser is ideally suited for simultaneous multispectral multiphoton imaging. This system is attractive for variety of applications including multiphoton (TPE, SHG, THG, CARS) and multimodal microscopy, nanosurgery, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Such system is simpler, lower-cost, and much easier to use (fully turn-key) compared to a currently available solutions for near-infrared ultrashort pulses, typically a Ti:sapphire laser-pumped OPO.

  2. Multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy of different skin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Lo, Wen; Sun, Yen; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2005-04-01

    In recent years, non-linear imaging techniques such as multiphoton fluorescence and harmonic generation microscopy have been successfully applied to dermatological imaging. Confocal-like image quality, enhanced depth penetration, and non-linear spectral signatures are among the main advantages of this family of techniques. In this presentation, we will focus on the applications of multiphoton microscopy to skin specimens in different physiological states. Images of normal and diseased tissue specimens will be presented and spectrally characterized. Our work has potential applications in developing multiphoton microscopy into a clinically applicable diagnostic tool.

  3. Multiphoton imaging with a novel compact diode-pumped Ti:sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Knig, Karsten; Andersen, Peter; Le, Tuan; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2015-12-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy commonly relies on bulky and expensive femtosecond lasers. We integrated a novel minimal-footprint Ti:sapphire oscillator, pumped by a frequency-doubled distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode laser, into a clinical multiphoton tomograph and evaluated its imaging capability using different biological samples, i.e. cell monolayers, corneal tissue, and human skin. With the novel laser, the realization of very compact Ti:sapphire-based systems for high-quality multiphoton imaging at a significantly size and weight compared to current systems will become possible. Microsc. Res. Tech. 78:1154-1158, 2015. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26534831

  4. Fringe-free, Background-free, Collinear Third Harmonic Generation FROG Measurements for Multiphoton Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, R; Spahr, E; Squier, J A; Durfee, C G; Walker, B C; Fittinghoff, D N

    2006-07-21

    Collinear pulse measurement tools useful at the full numerical aperture (NA) of multiphoton microscope objectives are a necessity for a quantitative characterization of the femtosecond pulses focused by these systems. In this letter, we demonstrate a simple new technique, for characterizing the pulse at the focus in a multiphoton microscope. This technique, a background-free, fringe-free, form of frequency-resolved optical gating, uses the third harmonic signal generated from a glass coverslip. Here it is used to characterize 100 fs pulses (typical values for a multiphoton microscope) at the focus of a 0.65 NA objective.

  5. Modulation of the pupil function of microscope objective lens for multifocal multi-photon microscopy using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for high precision modulation of the pupil function of a microscope objective lens to improve the performance of multifocal multi-photon microscopy (MMM). To modulate the pupil function, we adopt a spatial light modulator (SLM) and place it at the conjugate position of the objective lens. The SLM can generate an arbitrary number of spots to excite the multiple fluorescence spots (MFS) at the desired positions and intensities by applying an appropriate computer-generated hologram (CGH). This flexibility allows us to control the MFS according to the photobleaching level of a fluorescent protein and phototoxicity of a specimen. However, when a large number of excitation spots are generated, the intensity distribution of the MFS is significantly different from the one originally designed due to misalignment of the optical setup and characteristics of the SLM. As a result, the image of a specimen obtained using laser scanning for the MFS has block noise segments because the SLM could not generate a uniform MFS. To improve the intensity distribution of the MFS, we adaptively redesigned the CGH based on the observed MFS. We experimentally demonstrate an improvement in the uniformity of a 10 × 10 MFS grid using a dye solution. The simplicity of the proposed method will allow it to be applied for calibration of MMM before observing living tissue. After the MMM calibration, we performed laser scanning with two-photon excitation to observe a real specimen without detecting block noise segments.

  6. Quantitative structural markers of colorectal dysplasia in a cross sectional study of ex vivo murine tissue using label-free multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Sandra P.; Greening, Gage J.; Lai, Keith K.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon excitation of label-free tissue is of increasing interest, as advances have been made in endoscopic clinical application of multiphoton microscopy, such as second harmonic generation (SHG) scanning endoscopy used to monitor cervical collagen in mice1. We used C57BL mice as a model to investigate the progression of gastrointestinal structures, specifically glandular area and circularity. We used multiphoton microscopy to image ex-vivo label-free murine colon, focusing on the collagen structure changes over time, in mice ranging from 10 to 20 weeks of age. Series of images were acquired within the colonic and intestinal tissue at depth intervals of 20 microns from muscularis to the epithelium, up to a maximum depth of 180 microns. The imaging system comprised a two-photon laser tuned to 800nm wavelength excitation, and the SHG emission was filtered with a 400/40 bandpass filter before reaching the photomultiplier tube. Images were acquired at 15 frames per second, for 200 to 300 cumulative frames, with a field of view of 261um by 261um, and 40mW at sample. Image series were compared to histopathology H&E slides taken from adjacent locations. Quantitative metrics for determining differences between murine glandular structures were applied, specifically glandular area and circularity. PMID:27134336

  7. Vacuum ultraviolet and near-infrared excited luminescence properties of Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}:RE{sup 3+}, Na{sup +} (RE=Tb, Yb, Er, Tm, and Ho)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jia; Wang Yuhua; Guo Linna; Zhang Feng; Wen Yan; Liu Bitao; Huang Yan

    2011-08-15

    Tb{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, and Ho{sup 3+} doped Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} were synthesized by solid-state reaction, and their luminescence properties were studied by spectra techniques. Tb{sup 3+}-doped samples can exhibit intense green emission under VUV excitation, and the brightness for the optimal Tb{sup 3+} content is comparable with that of the commercial Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Mn{sup 2+} green phosphor. Under near-infrared laser excitation, the upconversion luminescence spectra of Yb{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, and Ho{sup 3+} doped samples demonstrate that the red, green, and blue tricolored fluorescence could be obtained by codoping Yb{sup 3+}-Ho{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+}-Er{sup 3+}, and Yb{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+} in Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, respectively. Good white upconversion emission with CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.358, 0.362) is achieved by quadri-doping Yb{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+}-Er{sup 3+}-Ho{sup 3+} in Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, in which the cross-relaxation process between Er{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}, producing the {sup 1}D{sub 2}-{sup 3}F{sub 4} transition of Tm{sup 3+}, is found. The upconversion mechanisms are elucidated through the laser power dependence of the upconverted emissions and the energy level diagrams. - Graphical abstract: The CPO:0.25Tb{sup 3+}, 0.25Na{sup +} exhibits a comparable brightness to the commercial Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Mn{sup 2+} upon 147 nm excitation. Good white light color is achieved in CPO:Yb{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+}-Er{sup 3+}-Ho{sup 3+} under 980 nm excitation. Highlights: > Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Tb{sup 3+},Na{sup +} exhibits a comparable brightness with commercial Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Mn{sup 2+}. > Red, green and blue colors are achieved in Yb{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+} doped Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. > Good white emission is obtained in Yb{sup 3+}-Ho{sup 3+}-Er{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+} quadri-doped Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. > Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Tb{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+} could be potential phosphors.

  8. FROM THE CURRENT LITERATURE: Quasiresonant nonlinear optical processes involving excited and ionized atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, S. M.; Koroteev, Nikolai I.

    1990-07-01

    This review examines the nonlinear optical properties of highly excited and ionized gaseous media and low-temperature plasmas. The authors concentrate particularly on the role of excited atomic and ionized states, as well as continuum states. The authors cite and discuss experimental results of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and optical harmonic generation in media consisting of excited atoms and ions. Nonlinear optical experiments involving the continuum states in intense optical fields are examined. In this connection the authors also discuss above-threshold ionization and the multiphoton stripping of atoms.

  9. Monitoring wound healing by multiphoton tomography/endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kaatz, Martin; Hipler, Christina; Zens, Katharina; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs are employed to perform rapid label-free high-resolution in vivo histology. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as rigid two-photon GRIN microendoscope. Mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged with submicron resolution in human skin. The system was employed to study the healing of chronic wounds (venous leg ulcer) and acute wounds (curettage of actinic or seborrheic keratosis) on a subcellular level. Furthermore, a flexible sterile foil as interface between wound and focusing optic was tested.

  10. Multiphoton quantum Rabi oscillations in ultrastrong cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garziano, Luigi; Stassi, Roberto; Macr?, Vincenzo; Kockum, Anton Frisk; Savasta, Salvatore; Nori, Franco

    2015-12-01

    When an atom is strongly coupled to a cavity, the two systems can exchange a single photon through a coherent Rabi oscillation. This process enables precise quantum-state engineering and manipulation of atoms and photons in a cavity, which play a central role in quantum information and measurement. Recently, a new regime of cavity QED was reached experimentally where the strength of the interaction between light and artificial atoms (qubits) becomes comparable to the atomic transition frequency or the resonance frequency of the cavity mode. Here we show that this regime can strongly modify the concept of vacuum Rabi oscillations, enabling multiphoton exchanges between the qubit and the resonator. We find that experimental state-of-the-art circuit-QED systems can undergo two- and three-photon vacuum Rabi oscillations. These anomalous Rabi oscillations can be exploited for the realization of efficient Fock-state sources of light and complex entangled states of qubits.

  11. Multiphoton Microscopy and Interaction of Intense Light Pulses with Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Jean-Michel

    2011-07-01

    The nanoscale manipulation of soft-matter, such as biological tissues, in its native environment has promising applications in medicine to correct for defects (eg. eye cataracts) or to destroy malignant regions (eg. cancerous tumours). To achieve this we need the ability to first image and then do precise ablation with sub-micron resolution with the same setup. For this purpose, we designed and built a multiphoton microscope and tested it on goldfish gills and bovine cells. We then studied light-matter interaction on a hard polymer (PMMA) because the nature of ablation of soft-matter in its native environment is complex and not well understood. Ablation and modification thresholds for successive laser shots were obtained. The ablation craters revealed 3D nanostructures and polarization dependent orientation. The interaction also induced localized porosity in PMMA that can be controlled.

  12. Theory of multiphoton and tunnel ionization in a bichromatic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bagulov, D. S.; Kotelnikov, I. A.

    2013-01-15

    The imaginary-time method [6, 7] is used to calculate the multiphoton and tunnel ionization probabilities for atoms in a laser radiation field part of which is converted into the second harmonic. We assume that the first harmonic has a linear or elliptical polarization and the second harmonic is polarized linearly, with its polarization vector making an arbitrary angle with that of the first harmonic. The mean momentum of the photoelectrons knocked out from atoms is shown to depend on the phase shift between the first and second harmonics and their mutual polarization and to be identically equal to zero for a monochromatic field. An important difference between the case of elliptical polarization and the case of linear polarization of both harmonics is the absence of conditions under which the conditions for dominance of one of the two generation mechanisms considered here can be identified during the generation of terahertz radiation from the region of optical breakdown in a gas.

  13. Reassignment of Scattered Emission Photons in Multifocal Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jae Won; Singh, Vijay Raj; Kim, Ki Hean; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Peng, Qiwen; Yu, Hanry; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) achieves fast imaging by simultaneously scanning multiple foci across different regions of specimen. The use of imaging detectors in MMM, such as CCD or CMOS, results in degradation of image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the scattering of emitted photons. SNR can be partly recovered using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT). In this design, however, emission photons scattered to neighbor anodes are encoded by the foci scan location resulting in ghost images. The crosstalk between different anodes is currently measured a priori, which is cumbersome as it depends specimen properties. Here, we present the photon reassignment method for MMM, established based on the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation, for quantification of crosstalk between the anodes of MAPMT without a priori measurement. The method provides the reassignment of the photons generated by the ghost images to the original spatial location thus increases the SNR of the final reconstructed image. PMID:24898470

  14. Molecule-specific darkfield and multiphoton imaging using gold nanocages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powless, Amy J.; Jenkins, Samir V.; McKay, Mary Lee; Chen, Jingyi; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Due to their robust optical properties, biological inertness, and readily adjustable surface chemistry, gold nanostructures have been demonstrated as contrast agents in a variety of biomedical imaging applications. One application is dynamic imaging of live cells using bioconjugated gold nanoparticles to monitor molecule trafficking mechanisms within cells; for instance, the regulatory pathway of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) undergoing endocytosis. In this paper, we have demonstrated a method to track endocytosis of EGFR in MDA-MB-468 breast adenocarcinoma cells using bioconjugated gold nanocages (AuNCs) and multiphoton microscopy. Dynamic imaging was performed using a time series capture of 4 images every minute for one hour. Specific binding and internalization of the bioconjugated AuNCs was observed while the two control groups showed non-specific binding at fewer surface sites, leading to fewer bound AuNCs and no internalization.

  15. Reassignment of scattered emission photons in multifocal multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae Won; Singh, Vijay Raj; Kim, Ki Hean; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Peng, Qiwen; Yu, Hanry; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T C

    2014-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) achieves fast imaging by simultaneously scanning multiple foci across different regions of specimen. The use of imaging detectors in MMM, such as CCD or CMOS, results in degradation of image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the scattering of emitted photons. SNR can be partly recovered using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT). In this design, however, emission photons scattered to neighbor anodes are encoded by the foci scan location resulting in ghost images. The crosstalk between different anodes is currently measured a priori, which is cumbersome as it depends specimen properties. Here, we present the photon reassignment method for MMM, established based on the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation, for quantification of crosstalk between the anodes of MAPMT without a priori measurement. The method provides the reassignment of the photons generated by the ghost images to the original spatial location thus increases the SNR of the final reconstructed image. PMID:24898470

  16. Multiphoton intravital microscopy setup to visualize the mouse mammary gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Herrera Torres, Ana M.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Baratti, Mariana O.; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, light microscopy-based techniques have been extended to live mammalian models leading to the development of a new imaging approach called intravital microscopy (IVM). Although IVM has been introduced at the beginning of the last century, its major advancements have occurred in the last twenty years with the development of non-linear microscopy that has enabled performing deep tissue imaging. IVM has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool that provide information on tissues such as morphology, cellular architecture, and metabolic status. IVM has become an indispensable tool in numerous areas. This study presents and describes the practical aspects of IVM necessary to visualize epithelial cells of live mouse mammary gland with multiphoton techniques.

  17. Optimization-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Jacopo; van Werkhoven, Tim; Verhaegen, Michel; Truong, Hoa H; Keller, Christoph U; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2014-06-01

    Optical aberrations have detrimental effects in multiphoton microscopy. These effects can be curtailed by implementing model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics, which only requires the addition of a wavefront shaping device, such as a deformable mirror (DM) to an existing microscope. The aberration correction is achieved by maximizing a suitable image quality metric. We implement a model-based aberration correction algorithm in a second-harmonic microscope. The tip, tilt, and defocus aberrations are removed from the basis functions used for the control of the DM, as these aberrations induce distortions in the acquired images. We compute the parameters of a quadratic polynomial that is used to model the image quality metric directly from experimental input-output measurements. Finally, we apply the aberration correction by maximizing the image quality metric using the least-squares estimate of the unknown aberration. PMID:24977374

  18. In vivo multiphoton tomography in skin aging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knig, Karsten; Bckle, Rainer; Weinigel, Martin; Khler, Johannes; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-02-01

    High-resolution clinical multiphoton tomography based on the femtosecond laser system DermaInspect has been performed on hundreds of patients and volunteers in Australia, Asia, and Europe. The system enables the in vivo detection of the elastin and the collagen network as well as the imaging of melanin clusters in aging spots. The epidermis-dermis junction can be detected with submicron resolution. One major applications of this novel HighTech imaging tool is the determination of the skin aging index SAAID as well as the study of the effects of anti-aging products. In particular, the stimulated biosynthesis of collagen can be investigated over long periods of time. The system with its sub-500 nm lateral resolution is able to image age-related modifications of the extracellular matrix on the level of a single elastin fiber.

  19. Clinical multiphoton tomography and clinical two-photon microendoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knig, Karsten; Bckle, Rainer; Weinigel, Martin; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We report on applications of high-resolution clinical multiphoton tomography based on the femtosecond laser system DermaInspectTM with its flexible mirror arm in Australia, Asia, and Europe. Applications include early detection of melanoma, in situ tracing of pharmacological and cosmetical compounds including ZnO nanoparticles in the epidermis and upper dermis, the determination of the skin aging index SAAID as well as the study of the effects of anti-aging products. In addition, first clinical studies with novel rigid high-NA two-photon 1.6 mm GRIN microendoscopes have been conducted to study the effect of wound healing in chronic wounds (ulcus ulcera) as well as to perform intrabody imaging with subcellular resolution in small animals.

  20. Live-animal imaging of renal function by multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kenneth W; Sutton, Timothy A; Sandoval, Ruben M

    2007-07-01

    Intravital microscopy, microscopy of living animals, is a powerful research technique that combines the resolution and sensitivity found in microscopic studies of cultured cells with the relevance and systemic influences of cells in the context of the intact animal. The power of intravital microscopy has recently been extended with the development of multiphoton fluorescence microscopy systems capable of collecting optical sections from deep within the kidney at subcellular resolution, supporting high-resolution characterizations of the structure and function of glomeruli, tubules, and vasculature in the living kidney. Fluorescent probes are administered to an anesthetized, surgically prepared animal, followed by image acquisition for up to 3 hr. Images are transferred via a high-speed network to specialized computer systems for digital image analysis. This general approach can be used with different combinations of fluorescent probes to evaluate processes such as glomerular permeability, proximal tubule endocytosis, microvascular flow, vascular permeability, mitochondrial function, and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. PMID:18770850