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Sample records for infrared spectroscopy raman

  1. Disease recognition by infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Steiner, Gerald; Beleites, Claudia; Salzer, Reiner

    2009-02-01

    Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy are emerging biophotonic tools to recognize various diseases. The current review gives an overview of the experimental techniques, data-classification algorithms and applications to assess soft tissues, hard tissues and body fluids. The methodology section presents the principles to combine vibrational spectroscopy with microscopy, lateral information and fiber-optic probes. A crucial step is the classification of spectral data by a variety of algorithms. We discuss unsupervised algorithms such as cluster analysis or principal component analysis and supervised algorithms such as linear discriminant analysis, soft independent modeling of class analogies, artificial neural networks support vector machines, Bayesian classification, partial least-squares regression and ensemble methods. The selected topics include tumors of epithelial tissue, brain tumors, prion diseases, bone diseases, atherosclerosis, kidney stones and gallstones, skin tumors, diabetes and osteoarthritis. PMID:19343682

  2. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy of Pyridine under High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, K.; Traikov, K; Dong, Z; Xie, S; Song, Y; Liu, Z

    2010-01-01

    We report the structural transitions of pyridine as a function of pressure up to 26 GPa using in situ Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy. By monitoring changes in the Raman shifts in the lattice region as well as the band profiles in both Raman and IR spectra, a liquid-to-solid transition at 1 GPa followed by solid-to-solid transitions at 2, 8, 11, and 16 GPa were observed upon compression. These transitions were found to be reversible upon decompression from 22 GPa. A further chemical transformation was observed when compressed beyond 22 GPa as evidenced by the substantial and irreversible changes in the Raman and infrared spectra, which could be attributed to the destruction of the ring structure. The observed transformations in pyridine were also compared to those for benzene. The similar transition sequence with well-aligned transition pressures suggests that these isoelectronic aromatics may have similar structures and stabilities under high pressure.

  3. Potential of Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy for Plant Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, H.

    2008-11-01

    Various mid-infrared (MIR) and Raman spectroscopic methods applied to the analysis of valuable plant substances or quality parameters in selected horticultural and agricultural crops are presented. Generally, both spectroscopy techniques allow to identify simultaneously characteristic key bands of individual plant components (e.g. carotenoids, alkaloids, polyacetylenes, fatty acids, amino acids, terpenoids). In contrast to MIR methods Raman spectroscopy mostly does not need any sample pre-treatment; even fresh plant material can be analysed without difficulty because water shows only weak Raman scattering properties. In some cases a significant sensivity enhancement of Raman signals can be achieved if the exciting laser wavelength is adjusted to the absorption range of particular plant chromophores such as carotenoids (Resonance Raman effect). Applying FT-IR or FT Raman micro-spectroscopy the distribution of certain plant constituents in the cell wall can be identified without the need for any physical separation. Furthermore it is also possible to analyse secondary metabolites occurring in the cell vacuoles if significant key bands do not coincide with the spectral background of the plant matrix.

  4. Raman and infrared reflection spectroscopy in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, S.; Shirotani, I.

    1985-03-01

    The symmetry and energies of all optically active phonon modes in black phosphorous are determined by polarized Raman scattering and infrared reflection spectroscopy at room temperature. The obtained energies are; 365 and 470 cm -1 for A g modes, 197 for B lg, 442 for B 2g, 223 and 440 for B 3g, 136 (TO) and 138 (LO) for B lu, and 468 (TO) and 470 (LO) for B 2u, respectively. The small TO-LO splitting is related to the charge transfer between phosphorus atoms induced by the atomic displacement.

  5. Raman and infrared spectroscopy of organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.

    2010-09-01

    We present Raman and infrared studies on the structures of organic semiconductor thin films used for electronic devices. The Raman spectra of crystalline and amorphous states of an organic semiconductor, N,N'-di-1-naphthaleyl-N,N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPD), were measured. These states give rise to slightly different peak positions and widths of each Raman band. Raman images were observed for polycrystalline pentacene films evaporated on a silicon substrate. The structural defects were found in the images of the intensity ratio I1596/I1533, which reflects the orientation of molecules i.e., crystalline domains. Photoinduced infrared absorption from the composite of regioregular poly(3-dodecylthiphene) and C60 was measured by the difference FT-IR method. The observed absorption is attributable to photogenerated carriers. The action spectra of photoinduced infrared absorption are explained by electron transfer from photogenerated excited states on a polymer chain to C60.

  6. Raman and infrared fingerprint spectroscopy of peroxide-based explosives.

    PubMed

    Oxley, Jimmie; Smith, James; Brady, Joseph; Dubnikova, Faina; Kosloff, Ronnie; Zeiri, Leila; Zeiri, Yehuda

    2008-08-01

    A comparative study of the vibrational spectroscopy of peroxide-based explosives is presented. Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethyl-enetriperoxide-diamine (HMTD), now commonly used by terrorists, are examined as well as other peroxide-ring structures: DADP (diacetone diperoxide); TPTP [3,3,6,6,9,9-Hexaethyl-1,2,4,5,7,8-hexaoxo-nonane (tripentanone triperoxide)]; DCypDp {6,7,13,14-Tetraoxadispiro [4.2.4.2]tetradecane (dicyclopentanone diperoxide)}; TCypDp {6,7,15,16,22,23-Hexaoxatrispiro[4.2.4.2.4.2] henicosane (tricyclopentanone triperoxide)}; DCyhDp {7,8,15,16-tetraoxadispiro [5.2.5.2] hexadecane (dicyclohexanone diperoxide)}; and TCyhTp {7,8,14,15,21,22-hexaoxatrispiro [5.2.5.2.5.2] tetracosane (tricyclohexanone triperoxide)}. Both Raman and infrared (IR) spectra were measured and compared to theoretical calculations. The calculated spectra were obtained by calculation of the harmonic frequencies of the studied compounds, at the density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory, and by the use of scaling factors. It is found that the vibrational features related to the peroxide bonds are strongly mixed. As a result, the spectrum is congested and highly sensitive to minor changes in the molecule. PMID:18702865

  7. Near-infrared-excited confocal Raman spectroscopy advances in vivo diagnosis of cervical precancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Joseph; Low, Jeffrey J. H.; Ilancheran, Arunachalam; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a unique optical technique that can probe the changes of vibrational modes of biomolecules associated with tissue premalignant transformation. This study evaluates the clinical utility of confocal Raman spectroscopy over near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) spectroscopy and composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy for improving early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo at colposcopy. A rapid NIR Raman system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic confocal Raman probe was utilized for in vivo NIR AF/Raman spectral measurements of the cervix. A total of 1240 in vivo Raman spectra [normal (n=993), dysplasia (n=247)] were acquired from 84 cervical patients. Principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) together with a leave-one-patient-out, cross-validation method were used to extract the diagnostic information associated with distinctive spectroscopic modalities. The diagnostic ability of confocal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated using the PCA-LDA model developed from the significant principal components (PCs) [i.e., PC4, 0.0023% PC5, 0.00095% PC8, 0.00022%, (p<0.05)], representing the primary tissue Raman features (e.g., 854, 937, 1095, 1253, 1311, 1445, and 1654 cm-1). Confocal Raman spectroscopy coupled with PCA-LDA modeling yielded the diagnostic accuracy of 84.1% (a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 87.1%) for in vivo discrimination of dysplastic cervix. The receiver operating characteristic curves further confirmed that the best classification was achieved using confocal Raman spectroscopy compared to the composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy or NIR AF spectroscopy alone. This study illustrates that confocal Raman spectroscopy has great potential to improve early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo during clinical colposcopy.

  8. Infrared and NIR Raman spectroscopy in medical microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, Dieter

    1998-04-01

    FTIR and FT-NIR Raman spectra of intact microbial cells are highly specific, fingerprint-like signatures which can be used to (i) discriminate between diverse microbial species and strains, (ii) detect in situ intracellular components or structures such as inclusion bodies, storage materials or endospores, (iii) detect and quantify metabolically released CO2 in response to various different substrate, and (iv) characterize growth-dependent phenomena and cell-drug interactions. The characteristic information is extracted from the spectral contours by applying resolution enhancement techniques, difference spectroscopy, and pattern recognition methods such as factor-, cluster-, linear discriminant analysis, and artificial neural networks. Particularly interesting applications arise by means of a light microscope coupled to the spectrometer. FTIR spectra of micro-colonies containing less than 103 cells can be obtained from colony replica by a stamping technique that transfers micro-colonies growing on culture plates to a special IR-sample holder. Using a computer controlled x, y- stage together with mapping and video techniques, the fundamental tasks of microbiological analysis, namely detection, enumeration, and differentiation of micro- organisms can be integrated in one single apparatus. FTIR and NIR-FT-Raman spectroscopy can also be used in tandem to characterize medically important microorganisms. Currently novel methodologies are tested to take advantage of the complementary information of IR and Raman spectra. Representative examples on medically important microorganisms will be given that highlight the new possibilities of vibrational spectroscopies.

  9. Identification of anisodamine tablets by Raman and near-infrared spectroscopy with chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lian; Zang, Hengchang; Li, Jun; Chen, Dejun; Li, Tao; Wang, Fengshan

    2014-06-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy including Raman and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has become an attractive tool for pharmaceutical analysis. In this study, effective calibration models for the identification of anisodamine tablet and its counterfeit and the distinguishment of manufacturing plants, based on Raman and NIR spectroscopy, were built, respectively. Anisodamine counterfeit tablets were identified by Raman spectroscopy with correlation coefficient method, and the results showed that the predictive accuracy was 100%. The genuine anisodamine tablets from 5 different manufacturing plants were distinguished by NIR spectroscopy using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models based on interval principal component analysis (iPCA) method. And the results showed the recognition rate and rejection rate were 100% respectively. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy and NIR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics are feasible and potential tools for rapid pharmaceutical tablet discrimination.

  10. Combined autofluorescence and Raman spectroscopy method for skin tumor detection in visible and near infrared regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. P.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Artemyev, D. N.; Myakinin, O. O.; Khristoforova, Y. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The combined application of Raman and autofluorescence spectroscopy in visible and near infrared regions for the analysis of malignant neoplasms of human skin was demonstrated. Ex vivo experiments were performed for 130 skin tissue samples: 28 malignant melanomas, 19 basal cell carcinomas, 15 benign tumors, 9 nevi and 59 normal tissues. Proposed method of Raman spectra analysis allows for malignant melanoma differentiating from other skin tissues with accuracy of 84% (sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 72%). Autofluorescence analysis in near infrared and visible regions helped us to increase the diagnostic accuracy by 5-10%. Registration of autofluorescence in near infrared region is realized in one optical unit with Raman spectroscopy. Thus, the proposed method of combined skin tissues study makes possible simultaneous large skin area study with autofluorescence spectra analysis and precise neoplasm type determination with Raman spectroscopy.

  11. Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  12. Quantitative determination of the human breast milk macronutrients by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Edlene d. C. M.; Zângaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    This work proposes the evaluation of the macronutrient constitution of human breast milk based on the spectral information provided by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Human breast milk (5 mL) from a subject was collected during the first two weeks of breastfeeding and stocked in -20°C freezer. Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm excitation) coupled to a fiber based Raman probe. Spectra of human milk were dominated by bands of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates in the 600-1800 cm-1 spectral region. Raman spectroscopy revealed differences in the biochemical constitution of human milk depending on the time of breastfeeding startup. This technique could be employed to develop a classification routine for the milk in Human Milk Banking (HMB) depending on the nutritional facts.

  13. Application of Raman Spectroscopy and Infrared Spectroscopy in the Identification of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Depciuch, Joanna; Kaznowska, Ewa; Zawlik, Izabela; Wojnarowska, Renata; Cholewa, Marian; Heraud, Philip; Cebulski, Józef

    2016-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are both techniques that allow for the investigation of vibrating chemical particles. These techniques provide information not only about chemical particles through the identification of functional groups and spectral analysis of so-called "fingerprints", these methods allow for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical substances in the sample. Both of these spectral techniques are frequently being used in biology and medicine in diagnosing illnesses and monitoring methods of therapy. The type of breast cancer found in woman is often a malignant tumor, causing 1.38 million new cases of breast cancer and 458 000 deaths in the world in 2013. The most important risk factors for breast cancer development are: sex, age, family history, specific benign breast conditions in the breast, ionizing radiation, and lifestyle. The main purpose of breast cancer screening tests is to establish early diagnostics and to apply proper treatment. Diagnoses of breast cancer are based on: (1) physical techniques (e.g., ultrasonography, mammography, elastography, magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography [PET]); (2) histopathological techniques; (3) biological techniques; and (4) optical techniques (e.g., photo acoustic imaging, fluorescence tomography). However, none of these techniques provides unique or especially revealing answers. The aim of our study is comparative spectroscopic measurements on patients with the following: normal non-cancerous breast tissue; breast cancer tissues before chemotherapy; breast cancer tissues after chemotherapy; and normal breast tissues received around the cancerous breast region. Spectra collected from breast cancer patients shows changes in amounts of carotenoids and fats. We also observed changes in carbohydrate and protein levels (e.g., lack of amino acids, changes in the concentration of amino acids, structural changes) in comparison with normal breast tissues. This fact

  14. Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrard, D.L.; Bowley, H.J.

    1986-04-01

    The period of this review is from late 1983 to late 1985. During this time over 5000 papers have appeared in the scientific literature dealing with many applications of Raman spectroscopy and extending its use to several new areas of study. As in the previous review in this series most of the applications relevant to solids are covered in one or other of the ten categories, which are the same as those used previously. However, aspects relating to solids which are not covered elsewhere include general reviews and the specific field of semiconductors. This is an area of great current interest in terms of Raman spectroscopy and the characterization of semiconductor materials and surfaces has been reported. Raman scattering also provides a new probe for the elucidation of structural properties of microcrystalline silicon and resonance Raman scattering in silicon at elevated temperatures has been studied. Many studies on carbon have also appeared in the literature including that of the various types of carbon, the use of Raman scattering to investigate disorder and crystallite formation in annealed carbon, in situ studies of intercalation kinetics, structural aspects of cokes and coals, and instrumentation for coal gasification. Raman spectroscopy has been applied to such diverse systems as organic crystals, the determination of modifications in layered crystals, the detection of explosives on silica gel or carbon, diagnostics of heterogeneous chemical processes, and a study of tungsten-halogen bulbs. Laser Raman spectroscopy has also been coupled with liquid chromatography and phase-resolved background suppression has been used to enhance Raman spectra. 397 references.

  15. From near-infrared and Raman to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: progress, limitations and perspectives in bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Elodie; De Bleye, Charlotte; Sacré, Pierre-Yves; Netchacovitch, Lauranne; Hubert, Philippe; Ziemons, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Over recent decades, spreading environmental concern entailed the expansion of green chemistry analytical tools. Vibrational spectroscopy, belonging to this class of analytical tool, is particularly interesting taking into account its numerous advantages such as fast data acquisition and no sample preparation. In this context, near-infrared, Raman and mainly surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) have thus gained interest in many fields including bioanalysis. The two former techniques only ensure the analysis of concentrated compounds in simple matrices, whereas the emergence of SERS improved the performances of vibrational spectroscopy to very sensitive and selective analyses. Complex SERS substrates were also developed enabling biomarker measurements, paving the way for SERS immunoassays. Therefore, in this paper, the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques will be highlighted with a focus on recent progress. PMID:27079546

  16. A versatile femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy setup with tunable pulses in the visible to near infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liangdong; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate a versatile and efficient setup to perform femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS). Technical innovations are implemented to achieve the wavelength tunability for both the picosecond narrowband Raman pump pulse and femtosecond broadband Raman probe pulse. Using a simplified one-grating scheme in a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor followed by a two-stage noncollinear optical parametric amplifier, we tune the Raman pump pulse from ca. 480 to 750 nm. To generate the suitable Raman probe pulse in tandem, we rely on our recently demonstrated broadband up-converted multicolor array technique that readily provides tunable broadband laser sidebands across the visible to near-infrared range. This unique setup has unparalleled flexibility for conducting FSRS. We measure the ground-state Raman spectra of a cyclohexane standard using tunable pump-probe pairs at various wavelengths across the visible region. The best spectral resolution is ∼12 cm{sup −1}. By tuning the pump wavelength closer to the electronic absorption band of a photoacid pyranine in water, we observe the pre-resonantly enhanced Raman signal. The stimulated Raman gain of the 1627 cm{sup −1} mode is increased by over 15 times.

  17. Near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: New developments and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, S.M.; Myrick, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman phenomenon was discovered in 1974 and analytical applications of it are only now being developed. Near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy was first reported in 1988, and the characteristics of the technique are still being determined. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to the technique and to describe some of its characteristics. In addition, some of the applications being explored by the authors, including remote monitoring of groundwater contaminants and qualitative assays for drugs, are presented. 61 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Simulating two-dimensional infrared-Raman and Raman spectroscopies for intermolecular and intramolecular modes of liquid water.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hironobu; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-21

    Full classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two-dimensional (2D) infrared-Raman and 2D Raman spectroscopies of liquid water were carried out to elucidate a mode-mode coupling mechanism using a polarizable water model for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational spectroscopy (POLI2VS). This model is capable of describing both infrared and Raman spectra. Second-order response functions, which consist of one molecular polarizability and two molecular dipole moments for 2D IR-Raman and three molecular polarizabilities for 2D Raman spectroscopies, were calculated using an equilibrium-non-equilibrium hybrid MD approach. The obtained signals were analyzed using a multi-mode Brownian oscillator (BO) model with nonlinear system-bath interactions representing the intramolecular OH stretching, intramolecular HOH bending, hydrogen bonded (HB)-intermolecular librational motion and HB-intermolecular vibrational (translational) motion of liquid water. This model was applied through use of hierarchal Fokker-Planck equations. The qualitative features of the peak profiles in the 2D spectra obtained from the MD simulations are accurately reproduced with the BO model. This indicates that this model captures the essential features of the intermolecular and intramolecular motion. We elucidate the mechanisms governing the 2D signal profiles involving anharmonic mode-mode coupling, the nonlinearities of the polarizability and dipole moment, and the vibrational dephasing processes of liquid water even in the case that the 2D spectral peaks obtained from the MD simulation overlap or are unclear. The mode coupling peaks caused by electrical anharmonic coupling (EAHC) and mechanical anharmonic coupling (MAHC) are observed in all of the 2D spectra. We find that the strength of the MAHC between the OH-stretching and HB-intermolecular vibrational modes is comparable to that between the OH-stretching and HOH bending modes. Moreover, we find that this OH-stretching and HB

  19. Quality and statistical classification of Brazilian vegetable oils using mid-infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Samyn, Pieter; Van Nieuwkerke, Dieter; Schoukens, Gustaaf; Vonck, Leo; Stanssens, Dirk; Van den Aabbeele, Henk

    2012-05-01

    Palm oil, soy oil, sunflower oil, corn oil, castor oil, and rapeseed oil were analyzed with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectroscopy. The quality of different oils was evaluated and statistically classified by principal component analysis (PCA) and a partial least squares (PLS) regression model. First, a calibration set of spectra was selected from one sampling batch. The qualitative variations in spectra are discussed with a prediction of oil composition (saturated, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids) from mid-infrared analysis and iodine value from FT-Raman analysis, based on ratioing the intensity of bands at given wavenumbers. A more robust and convincing oil classification is obtained from two-parameter statistical models. The statistical analysis of FT-Raman spectra favorably distinguishes according to the iodine value, while the mid-infrared spectra are most sensitive to hydroxyl moieties. Second, the models are validated with a set of spectra from another sampling batch, including the same oil types as-received and after different aging times together with a hydrogenated castor oil and high-oleic sunflower oil. There is very good agreement between the model predictions and the Raman measurements, but the statistical significance is lower for mid-infrared spectra. In the future, this calibration model will be used to check vegetable oil qualities before using them in polymerization processes. PMID:22524961

  20. Investigating dehydration from compacts using terahertz pulsed, Raman, and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kogermann, Karin; Zeitler, J Axel; Rantanen, Jukka; Rades, Thomas; Taday, Philip F; Pepper, Michael; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Strachan, Clare J

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dehydration of piroxicam monohydrate (PRXMH) in compacts using terahertz pulsed spectroscopy (TPS), Raman spectroscopy, and reflectance near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Compacts were prepared by using PRXMH and poly(tetrafluoro)ethylene powders and combining them in three different manners before compression to produce compacts in which the PRXMH was dispersed throughout the compact, deposited on one face of the compact, or included as a layer within the compact. TPS was a suitable technique to assess the effect of sample preparation on dehydration, whereas Raman and NIR spectroscopy were limited by their sampling depth and the interference of the polymer matrix. TPS revealed that the dehydration behavior depended largely on the compact preparation method. Non-isothermal dehydration was investigated with all three spectroscopic techniques, combined with principal component analysis (PCA) on samples where the PRXMH was deposited on one face of the compact. In addition, variable temperature X-ray powder diffractometry (VT-XRPD) was used to verify the transformation from PRXMH to anhydrous PRX form I, while thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to monitor the water loss. All three spectroscopic techniques allowed in situ monitoring of the dehydration from the surface layers of the compacts. TPS and Raman spectroscopy detected structural changes of the crystal, while NIR spectroscopy was more sensitive to water loss. PCA of the TPS, Raman spectroscopy, and XRPD data revealed similar dehydration profiles. In contrast, the NIR spectroscopy profile was more similar to the TGA results. The spectroscopic techniques were more suitable than slower techniques such as VT-XRPD for monitoring rapid structural changes that occurred during the dehydration. PMID:18198016

  1. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy to detect the calcification of the annular mitral valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Rick; Otero, E. P.; Costa, M. S.; Villaverde, Antonio G. J. B.; Pomerarantzeff, P. M.; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.

    2004-10-01

    Cardiac valves are subjected to high repetitive mechanical stresses, particularly at the hinge points of the cusps and leaflets due to the over 40 millions cardiac cycles per year. These delicate structures can suffer cumulative lesions, complicated by the deposition of calcium phosphate mineral, which may lead to clinically important disease. Near Infrared Raman Spectroscopy gives important information about biological tissues composition and it is being used for diagnosis of some pathologies. The aim of this work was to detect trough the use of the Raman Spectroscopy technique the mitral annular calcification. A Ti:sapphire laser operating at the near infrared wavelength of 785 nm was used for the excitation of the valve samples and the Raman radiation was detected by an optical spectrometer with a CCD liquid nitrogen cooled detector. In all, ten samples of normal and pathologic tissues were studied. They were approximately squared with the lateral size of 5 mm. It was observed that the Raman spectrum of the calcified mitral valve showed different behavior, when compared to normal tissues. Results indicate that this technique could be used to detect the deposition of the calcium phosphate mineral over the mitral valve.

  2. Near-infrared micro-Raman spectroscopy for in vitro detection of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamemoto, Lori E; Misra, Anupam K; Sharma, Shiv K; Goodman, Marc T; Luk, Hugh; Dykes, Ava C; Acosta, Tayro

    2010-03-01

    Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool for detecting critical differences in biological samples with minimum interference in the Raman spectra from the native fluorescence of the samples. The technique is often suggested as a potential screening tool for cancer. In this article we report in vitro Raman spectra of squamous cells in normal and cancerous cervical human tissue from seven patients, which have good signal-to-noise ratio and which were found to be reproducible. These preliminary results show that several Raman features in these spectra could be used to distinguish cancerous cervical squamous cells from normal cervical squamous cells. In general, the Raman spectra of cervical cancer cells show intensity differences compared to those of normal squamous cell spectra. For example, several well-defined Raman peaks of collagen in the 775 to 975 cm(-1) region are observed in the case of normal squamous cells, but these are below the detection limit of normal Raman spectroscopy in the spectra of invasive cervical cancer cells. In the high frequency 2800 to 3100 cm(-1) region, it is found that the peak area under the CH stretching band is lower by a factor of approximately six in the spectra of cervical cancer cells as compared with that of the normal cells. The Raman chemical maps of regions of cancer and normal cells in the cervical epithelium made from the spectral features in the 775 to 975 cm(-1) and 2800 to 3100 cm(-1) regions are also found to show good correlation with each other. PMID:20223058

  3. Histochemical analysis of human coronary artery using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, James F., III; Roemer, Tjeerd J.; Wang, Yang; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Lees, Robert S.; Kramer, John R., Jr.; Feld, Michael S.

    1995-01-01

    We are developing a method to quantitatively analyze the biochemical composition of human coronary artery in situ using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Samples of normal artery (intima/media and adventitia) and noncalcified and calcified plaque from coronary arteries, obtained from explanted recipient hearts during heart transplantation, were illuminated with 830 nm excitation light from a CW Ti:sapphire laser. Raman spectra were collected in seconds using a spectrograph and a cooled, deep-depletion CCD detector, and calibration and background corrections were made. Artery samples in different stages of atherosclerosis exhibited distinct spectral features, providing clear histochemical indicators for characterizing the type and extent of the lesion. Spectra were analyzed by means of a Raman biochemical assay model to determine the relative weight fractions of cholesterols, triacylglycerol, proteins and calcium minerals. Such information, when obtained clinically, promises to be useful in diagnosing and studying human atherosclerosis, its progression and response to drug therapy.

  4. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy studies on magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, Olena; Jurga-Stopa, Justyna; Coy, Emerson; Peplinska, Barbara; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Jurga, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    This article presents a study on the detection of antibiotics in magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Antibiotics with different spectra of antimicrobial activities, including rifampicin, doxycycline, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone, were studied. Mechanical mixtures of antibiotics and magnetite/Ag nanocomposites, as well as antibiotics and magnetite nanopowder, were investigated in order to identify the origin of FTIR bands. FTIR spectroscopy was found to be an appropriate technique for this task. The spectra of the magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites exhibited very weak (for doxycycline, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone) or even no (for rifampicin) antibiotic bands. This FTIR "invisibility" of antibiotics is ascribed to their adsorbed state. FTIR and Raman measurements show altered Csbnd O, Cdbnd O, and Csbnd S bonds, indicating adsorption of the antibiotic molecules on the magnetite/Ag nanocomposite structure. In addition, a potential mechanism through which antibiotic molecules interact with magnetite/Ag nanoparticle surfaces is proposed.

  5. Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrard, D.L.; Bowley, H.J.

    1988-06-15

    The period of this review is from late 1985 to late 1987. During this time over 6000 papers have been published in the scientific literature dealing with many applications of Raman spectroscopy and extending its use to new areas of study. This article covers only those papers that are relevant to the analytical chemist and this necessitates a highly selective approach. There are some areas that have been the subject of many papers with relatively few being of analytical interest. In such cases the reader is referred to appropriate reviews which are detailed in this section.

  6. Diagnostic potential of near-infrared Raman spectroscopy in the stomach: differentiating dysplasia from normal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Teh, S K; Zheng, W; Ho, K Y; Teh, M; Yeoh, K G; Huang, Z

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a molecular vibrational spectroscopic technique that is capable of optically probing the biomolecular changes associated with diseased transformation. The purpose of this study was to explore near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy for identifying dysplasia from normal gastric mucosa tissue. A rapid-acquisition dispersive-type NIR Raman system was utilised for tissue Raman spectroscopic measurements at 785 nm laser excitation. A total of 76 gastric tissue samples obtained from 44 patients who underwent endoscopy investigation or gastrectomy operation were used in this study. The histopathological examinations showed that 55 tissue specimens were normal and 21 were dysplasia. Both the empirical approach and multivariate statistical techniques, including principal components analysis (PCA), and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), together with the leave-one-sample-out cross-validation method, were employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms for classification of Raman spectra between normal and dysplastic gastric tissues. High-quality Raman spectra in the range of 800–1800 cm−1 can be acquired from gastric tissue within 5 s. There are specific spectral differences in Raman spectra between normal and dysplasia tissue, particularly in the spectral ranges of 1200–1500 cm−1 and 1600–1800 cm−1, which contained signals related to amide III and amide I of proteins, CH3CH2 twisting of proteins/nucleic acids, and the C=C stretching mode of phospholipids, respectively. The empirical diagnostic algorithm based on the ratio of the Raman peak intensity at 875 cm−1 to the peak intensity at 1450 cm−1 gave the diagnostic sensitivity of 85.7% and specificity of 80.0%, whereas the diagnostic algorithms based on PCA-LDA yielded the diagnostic sensitivity of 95.2% and specificity 90.9% for separating dysplasia from normal gastric tissue. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves further confirmed that the most effective

  7. Near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy of Precambrian carbonate stromatolites with post-depositional organic inclusions.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Zuki; Perry, Meredith; Cooper, George; Tang, Suning; McKay, Christopher P; Chen, Bin

    2012-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy has promising potential for future Mars missions as a non-contact detection technique for characterizing organic material and mineralogy. Such a capability will be useful for selecting samples for detailed analysis on a rover and for selecting samples for return to Earth. Stromatolites are important evidence for the earliest life on Earth and are promising targets for Mars investigations. Although constructed by microorganisms, stromatolites are organo-sedimentary structures that can be large enough to be discovered and investigated by a Mars rover. In this paper, we report the Raman spectroscopic investigations of the carbonate mineralogy and organic layering in a Precambrian (~1.5 Gyr old) stromatolite from the Crystal Spring Formation of Southern California. Ultraviolet (UV: 266 nm), visible (514 nm, 633 nm), and near-infrared (NIR: 785 nm, 1064 nm) Raman spectra are presented. We conclude that 1064 nm excitation is the optimal excitation wavelength for avoiding intrinsic fluorescence and detecting organic carbon within the carbonate matrix. Our results confirm that NIR Raman spectroscopy has important applications for future Mars missions. PMID:22800768

  8. A comparison of Fourier transform infrared and near-infrared Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy for quantitative measurements: An application in polymorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeley, C. M.; Spragg, R. A.; Threlfall, T. L.

    Polymorphism in cortisone acetate, a synthetic adrenocortical steroid, and in a compound from a heart disease project has been studied with near-infrared Fourier transform Raman (NIR FT-Raman) spectroscopy. For cortisone acetate similar quantitative precision was obtained with both Raman and diffuse reflection IR measurements. The Raman measurements of the heart disease compound gave a calibration with a standard error of prediction of better than 2.5%. The combination of excellent precision with very convenient measurement of powders makes NIR FT-Raman spectroscopy a valuable tool for quantitative measurements of polymorphism.

  9. Identification of different forms of cocaine and substances used in adulteration using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Penido, Ciro A F O; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T; Zângaro, Renato A; Silveira, Landulfo

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cocaine and subsequent quantification immediately after seizure are problems for the police in developing countries such as Brazil. This work proposes a comparison between the Raman and FT-IR techniques as methods to identify cocaine, the adulterants used to increase volume, and possible degradation products in samples seized by the police. Near-infrared Raman spectra (785 nm excitation, 10 sec exposure time) and FT-IR-ATR spectra were obtained from different samples of street cocaine and some substances commonly used as adulterants. Freebase powder, hydrochloride powder, and crack rock can be distinguished by both Raman and FT-IR spectroscopies, revealing differences in their chemical structure. Most of the samples showed characteristic peaks of degradation products such as benzoylecgonine and benzoic acid, and some presented evidence of adulteration with aluminum sulfate and sodium carbonate. Raman spectroscopy is better than FT-IR for identifying benzoic acid and inorganic adulterants in cocaine. PMID:25428273

  10. Investigation of the composition of anabolic tablets using near infrared spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Rebiere, Hervé; Ghyselinck, Céline; Lempereur, Laurent; Brenier, Charlotte

    2016-03-01

    The use of performance enhancing drugs is a widespread phenomenon in professional and leisure sports. A spectroscopic study was carried out on anabolic tablets labelled as 5 mg methandienone tablets provided by police departments. The analytical approach was based on a two-step methodology: a fast analysis of tablets using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to assess sample homogeneity based on their global composition, followed by Raman chemical imaging of one sample per NIR profile to obtain information on sample formulation. NIR spectroscopy assisted by a principal components analysis (PCA) enabled fast discrimination of different profiles based on the excipient formulation. Raman hyperspectral imaging and multivariate curve resolution - alternating least square (MCR-ALS) provided chemical images of the distribution of the active substance and excipients within tablets and facilitated identification of the active compounds. The combination of NIR spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging highlighted dose-to-dose variations and succeeded in the discrimination of four different formulations out of eight similar samples of anabolic tablets. Some samples contained either methandienone or methyltestosterone whereas one sample did not contain an active substance. Other ingredients were sucrose, lactose, starch or talc. Both techniques were fast and non-destructive and therefore can be carried out as exploratory methods prior to destructive screening methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26198290

  11. Quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance infrared, near-infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Erxleben, Andrea; Ryder, Alan G; McArdle, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    The simultaneous quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs (forms I, III and V) in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR), near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis is reported. To reduce the effect of systematic variations, four different data pre-processing methods; multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), standard normal variate (SNV), first and second derivatives, were applied and their performance was evaluated using their prediction errors. It was possible to derive a reliable calibration model for the three polymorphic forms, in powder ternary mixtures, using a partial least squares (PLS) algorithm with SNV pre-processing, which predicted the concentration of polymorphs I, III and V. Root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for ATR-IR spectra were 5.0%, 5.1% and 4.5% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively, while NIR spectra had a RMSEP of 2.0%, 2.9%, and 2.8% and Raman spectra had a RMSEP of 3.5%, 4.1%, and 3.6% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively. NIR spectroscopy exhibits the smallest analytical error, higher accuracy and robustness. When these advantages are combined with the greater convenience of NIR's "in glass bottle" sampling method both ATR-IR and Raman methods appear less attractive. PMID:20605386

  12. Regeneration of AlH3 studied with Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacina, David; Wegrzyn, J.; Reilly, J. J.; Graetz, Jason

    2010-03-01

    Aluminum hydride compounds are known to exhibit a 10% by weight hydrogen storage capacity that makes them suited for technologies that require hydrogen as a fuel. The current challenge associated with this material is how to regenerate the hydride from the spent fuel and H2 gas. We employ a two-step process to regenerate the hydride compound which first requires the formation of a stable aluminum hydride adduct using a tertiary amine. This is followed by a second step consisting of adduct separation and hydride recovery, involving transamination to create a less stable adduct. We present results which show that alane-amines can be formed by hydrogenation of catalyzed aluminum in a solvent at low pressures using one of several tertiary amines. Raman and infrared spectroscopy was performed on the products of these reactions to better understand the structure of the alane amines that are formed, as well as the hydrogenation reactions that take place. A vibrational analysis of the regeneration products performed with Raman and infrared spectroscopy is presented and will help clarify the molecular and vibrational structures of these alane amine adducts.

  13. Analysis of colon tumors in rats by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Janaína; Hage, Raduan; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Silveira, Fabricio; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T.; Munin, Egberto; Plapler, Hélio

    2007-02-01

    Biomedical applications of near-infrared Raman spectroscopy have increased their importance at the last ten years. This technique can determinate the molecular composition of materials, allowing a sensible and fast biological diagnosis. It has showed to be a promising tool for health diagnosis due to its high sensibility. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in humans beings. In the last decades many experimental models have been developed in animals based in the use of chemical composites to induce the formation and development of these tumors, many of them present similar characteristics to those of natural occurrence aiming to the attainment of information on genesis, evolution, as well as diagnosis and more efficient therapies for treating these neoplasias. Amongst the most used chemical composites is the 1,2- dimetilhydrazine (DMH) because its morphological and histological similarity to those tumors. This study aims to compare in vivo normal colon tissue and tumoral colon tissue, induced by DMH, in rats by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy to permit the use in the near future for an efficient diagnosis in real time besides being useful as an auxiliary method for several therapies, including the photodynamic therapy.

  14. Early detection of melanoma with the combined use of acoustic microscopy, infrared reflectance and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiannis, Georgios T.; Grivas, Ioannis; Tsingotjidou, Anastasia; Apostolidis, Georgios K.; Grigoriadou, Ifigeneia; Dori, I.; Poulatsidou, Kyriaki-Nefeli; Doumas, Argyrios; Wesarg, Stefan; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Malignant melanoma is a form of skin cancer, with increasing incidence worldwide. Early diagnosis is crucial for the prognosis and treatment of the disease. The objective of this study is to develop a novel animal model of melanoma and apply a combination of the non-invasive imaging techniques acoustic microscopy, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies, for the detection of developing tumors. Acoustic microscopy provides information about the 3D structure of the tumor, whereas, both spectroscopic modalities give qualitative insight of biochemical changes during melanoma development. In order to efficiently set up the final devices, propagation of ultrasonic and electromagnetic waves in normal skin and melanoma simulated structures was performed. Synthetic and grape-extracted melanin (simulated tumors), endermally injected, were scanned and compared to normal skin. For both cases acoustic microscopy with central operating frequencies of 110MHz and 175MHz were used, resulting to the tomographic imaging of the simulated tumor, while with the spectroscopic modalities IR and Raman differences among spectra of normal and melanin- injected sites were identified in skin depth. Subsequently, growth of actual tumors in an animal melanoma model, with the use of human malignant melanoma cells was achieved. Acoustic microscopy and IR and Raman spectroscopies were also applied. The development of tumors at different time points was displayed using acoustic microscopy. Moreover, the changes of the IR and Raman spectra were studied between the melanoma tumors and adjacent healthy skin. The most significant changes between healthy skin and the melanoma area were observed in the range of 900-1800cm-1 and 350-2000cm-1, respectively.

  15. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy on synthetic glasses as analogues of planetary surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Iris; Morlok, Andreas; Klemme, Stephan; Dittmer, Isabelle; Stojic, Aleksandra N.; Hiesinger, Harald; Sohn, Martin; Helbert, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    One of the fundamental aims of space mission is to understand the physical, chemical, and geologic processes and conditions of planetary formation and evolution. For this purpose, it is important to investigate analog material to correctly interpret the returned spacecraft data, including the spectral information from remote planetary surfaces. For example, mid-infrared spectroscopy provides detailed information on the mineralogical compositions of planetary surfaces via remote sensing. Data is affected by numerous factors such as grain size, illumination geometry, space weathering, and temperature. These features need to be systematically investigated on analog material in terrestrial laboratories in order to understand the mineralogy/composition of a planetary surface. In addition, Raman spectroscopy allows non-destructive analyses of planetary surfaces in the case of a landing mission. Our work at the IRIS (Infrared spectroscopy for Interplanetary Studies) laboratory at the Institut für Planetologie produces spectra for a database of the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. Onboard is a mid-infrared spectrometer (MERTIS-Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer). This unique instrument allows us to map spectral features in the 7-14 µm range, with a spatial resolution of ~500 m [1-5]. Comparably, using our Raman spectrometer, we are continuously contributing to the Raman database for upcoming mission, e.g., the Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) onboard of ExoMars [6]. Material on the surface of Mercury and the other terrestrial bodies was exposed to heavy impact cratering [4]. Depending on the P/T conditions during the impact, minerals on planetary surfaces can react with the formation of glassy material. Thus, understanding the effects of impact shock and heat on the mineral structure and the resulting corresponding change in the spectral properties is of high interest for the MERTIS project. Here, we present spectral information on the first glass

  16. [Studies on nano-diamond prepared by explosive detonation by Raman and infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wen, Chao; Jin, Zhi-Hao; Liu, Xiao-Xin; Li, Xun; Guan, Jin-Qing; Sun, De-Yu; Lin, Ying-Rui; Tang, Shi-Ying; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Jun-De

    2005-05-01

    Nano-diamond was synthesized by TNT/RDX explosives detonation in a steel chamber and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser Raman spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. XRD results indicate that nano-diamond has cubic diamond structure. The parameter of unit cell of nano-diamond is 0.359 23 nm and is 0.72% larger than that of the bulk diamond. The high-density defects and other impurity atoms in the nano-diamond structure may lead to the large lattice constant. The examination results of Raman spectra show that the Raman band is broader and shifts to l ow frequency by 3 cm(-1), because the size of nano-diamond reaches nanometer order. There is little graphite in the nano-diamond. There are two peaks in FTIR of the nano-diamond, which are characteristic peaks of diamond at 1 262 and 1 134 cm(-1). Besides these two peaks, there are six peaks at 3 422, 1 643, 2 971, 2 930, 2 857 and 1 788 cm(-1) respectively. The FTIR bands at 2 930 and 2 857 cm(-1) are the antisymmetrical and symmetrical stretch vibration absorption spectra of CH2 respectively. The 3 422 cm(-1) is the stretch vibration absorption peak of O-H. The 1 634 cm(-1) confirms that there are H2O in the nano-diamond. The 2 971 cm(-1) is the antisymmetrical stretch vibration absorption peak of CH3. The 1 788 cm(-1) is the stretch vibration absorption peak of C=O. These indicate that there are H and O elements in the nano-diamond. From the mechanism of the nano-diamond, the authors discuss the reason for the vibration absorption peaks of O-H, CH2, CH3, and C=O, existing in the FTIR of the nano-diamond. PMID:16128062

  17. Near-infrared confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy combined with PCA-LDA multivariate analysis for detection of esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Wang, Yue; Liu, Nenrong; Lin, Duo; Weng, Cuncheng; Zhang, Jixue; Zhu, Lihuan; Chen, Weisheng; Chen, Rong; Feng, Shangyuan

    2013-06-01

    The diagnostic capability of using tissue intrinsic micro-Raman signals to obtain biochemical information from human esophageal tissue is presented in this paper. Near-infrared micro-Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis was applied for discrimination of esophageal cancer tissue from normal tissue samples. Micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements were performed on 54 esophageal cancer tissues and 55 normal tissues in the 400-1750 cm-1 range. The mean Raman spectra showed significant differences between the two groups. Tentative assignments of the Raman bands in the measured tissue spectra suggested some changes in protein structure, a decrease in the relative amount of lactose, and increases in the percentages of tryptophan, collagen and phenylalanine content in esophageal cancer tissue as compared to those of a normal subject. The diagnostic algorithms based on principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminate analysis (LDA) achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 87.0% and specificity of 70.9% for separating cancer from normal esophageal tissue samples. The result demonstrated that near-infrared micro-Raman spectroscopy combined with PCA-LDA analysis could be an effective and sensitive tool for identification of esophageal cancer.

  18. Spectral pre and post processing for infrared and Raman spectroscopy of biological tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Hugh J; Knief, Peter; Keating, Mark E; Bonnier, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy, both infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy, have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications, from in vivo and ex vivo disease diagnostics and screening, to in vitro screening of therapeutics. There remain, however, many challenges related to the accuracy of analysis of physically and chemically inhomogeneous samples, across heterogeneous sample sets. Data preprocessing is required to deal with variations in instrumental responses and intrinsic spectral backgrounds and distortions in order to extract reliable spectral data. Data postprocessing is required to extract the most reliable information from the sample sets, based on often very subtle changes in spectra associated with the targeted pathology or biochemical process. This review presents the current understanding of the factors influencing the quality of spectra recorded and the pre-processing steps commonly employed to improve on spectral quality. It further explores some of the most common techniques which have emerged for classification and analysis of the spectral data for biomedical applications. The importance of sample presentation and measurement conditions to yield the highest quality spectra in the first place is emphasised, as is the potential of model simulated datasets to validate both pre- and post-processing protocols. PMID:26463830

  19. Mineralogical Mapping of the Banded Iron Formations using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy and micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeeby, B. E.; Schoonen, M. A.; Glotch, T. D.; Ohmoto, H.

    2013-12-01

    Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) consist of thin alternating layers of iron-poor silica and iron-bearing phylosilicates, iron oxides, and carbonates and/or sulfides. BIFs are common in the Precambrian. Although BIFs have been the subject of numerous studies, the mechanism and environments of formation remains poorly understood. It has been hotly debated whether BIFs formed by microbes in Fe2+-rich oceans under a reducing atmosphere, or by reactions between locally discharged submarine hydrothermal fluids and O2-rich deep ocean water. The debates have continued mostly because of the lack of detailed studies on the paragenesis of minerals in BIFs to determine which minerals are primary precipitates, and which are diagenetic and metamorphic products. The purpose of this study is to explore the applications of FTIR spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy in micro-scale paragenetic studies of BIF samples. FTIR and Raman are vibrational spectroscopy techniques that provide insight into the chemical bonding within a compound. With these techniques it is possible to resolve the iron oxide, carbonate, and clay mineralogy within BIFs, which is difficult with techniques that rely on elemental analysis, such as TEM-EDAX. Samples used in this study are thin sections of the 2.7 Ga BIFs from Temagami in the Abitibi green stone belt, Ontario, Canada. FTIR analyses were conducted using a Nicolet iN10MX Micro-Imaging FTIR Spectrometer. This instrument is capable of collecting hyperspectral infrared images with a pixel size of 25 microns covering the range from 7000 to 715 cm-1. In addition, we collected point spectra measuring 50X50 microns over a spectral range from 4000 to 400 cm-1. These point spectra were used to distinguish among different iron minerals in the thin sections. Using the hyperspectral data, we created composite false color Images to show mineral variation across the samples. The spectra were modeled using a digital spectral library. After modeling and examination

  20. Examination of nanoparticle inactivation of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms using infrared and Raman spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaonan; Weakley, Andrew T.; Aston, D. Eric; Rasco, Barbara A.; Wang, Shuo; Konkel, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To investigate inactivation effect and mechanism of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) activity against Campylobacter jejuni biofilms. Methods and Results ZnO NPs with concentrations of 0, 0.6, 1.2 and 6 mmol l−1 were employed in antimicrobial tests against C. jejuni planktonic cells and biofilms. C. jejuni sessile cells in biofilms were more resistant to a low concentration of ZnO NPs when compared to planktonic cells. The ZnO NPs penetrated the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) without damage to the EPS and directly interacted with the sessile bacterial cells, as determined using infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy shows alterations in quinone structures and damage to nucleic acids following C. jejuni treatment with ZnO NPs. The mechanism of DNA damage is most likely due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Spectroscopic based partial least squares regression (PLSR) models could predict the number of surviving sessile cell numbers within a bacterial biofilm (≥log 4 CFU, RMSEE <0.36) from Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectral measurements. Conclusions ZnO NPs were found to have antimicrobial activity against C. jejuni biofilms. ZnO NPs penetrated the biofilm EPS within 1 hr without damaging it and interacted directly with sessile cells in biofilms. Alterations in the DNA/RNA bases, which are due to the generation of ROS, appear to result in C. jejuni cell death. Significance and Impact of the Study ZnO NPs may offer a realistic strategy to eliminate C. jejuni biofilms in the environment. PMID:22734855

  1. Near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Part I: Copper and gold electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, S. M.; Katz, L. F.; Archibald, D. D.; Lin, L. T.; Honigs, D. E.

    1988-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectra of pyridine on copper and gold electrodesin the near-infrared were obtained with a Fourier transform Ramanspectrometer. Surface-enhanced Raman spectra were observed forpyridine adsorbed on copper and gold electrodes while a Nd:YAG laser(1.064 ..mu..m) was used for excitation. Good-quality spectra were recordedfor 0.08 mM pyridine on a copper electrode with a single oxidation-reductioncycle, whereas for a gold electrode, several ORCs were necessary.A very intense low-energy Raman band was observed on bothmetals at positive potentials, which may be due to a metal-oxidevibrational mode.

  2. Diagnosing basal cell carcinoma in vivo by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy: a Principal Components Analysis discrimination algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Silveira, Fabrício L.; Bodanese, Benito; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T.; Zângaro, Renato A.

    2012-02-01

    This work demonstrated the discrimination among basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and normal human skin in vivo using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were obtained in the suspected lesion prior resectional surgery. After tissue withdrawn, biopsy fragments were submitted to histopathology. Spectra were also obtained in the adjacent, clinically normal skin. Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm) with a fiber Raman probe. By comparing the mean spectra of BCC with the normal skin, it has been found important differences in the 800-1000 cm-1 and 1250-1350 cm-1 (vibrations of C-C and amide III, respectively, from lipids and proteins). A discrimination algorithm based on Principal Components Analysis and Mahalanobis distance (PCA/MD) could discriminate the spectra of both tissues with high sensitivity and specificity.

  3. Applications of Fourier transform Raman and infrared spectroscopy in forensic sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsov, Albert N.

    2000-02-01

    First in the world literature comprehensive digital complementary vibrational spectra collection of polymer materials and search system was developed. Non-destructive combined analysis using complementary FT-Raman and FTIR spectra followed by cross-parallel searching on digital spectral libraries, was applied in different fields of forensic sciences. Some unique possibilities of Raman spectroscopy has been shown in the fields of examination of questioned documents, paper, paints, polymer materials, gemstones and other physical evidences.

  4. Rapid, noninvasive concentration measurements of aqueous biological analytes by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Berger, A J; Wang, Y; Feld, M S

    1996-01-01

    Accurate concentration measurements of glucose, lactic acid, and creatinine in saline solution have beena chieved with near-IR Raman spectroscopy and a partial least-squares analysis. The Raman spectra were acquired remotely through optical fibers. A root-mean-squared prediction error of 1.2 mM for glucose concentration was achieved in 100 s. Concentrations of other analytes were predicted with similar accuracy. PMID:21069001

  5. Diagnostic segregation of human brain tumours using Fourier-transform infrared and/or Raman spectroscopy coupled with discriminant analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Gajjar, Ketan; Heppenstall, Lara D.; Pang, Weiyi; Ashton, Katherine M.; Trevisan, Júlio; Patel, Imran I.; Llabjani, Valon; Stringfellow, Helen F.; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L.; Dawson, Timothy; Martin, Francis L.

    2013-01-01

    The most common initial treatment received by patients with a brain tumour is surgical removal of the growth. Precise histopathological diagnosis of brain tumours is to some extent subjective. Furthermore, currently available diagnostic imaging techniques to delineate the excision border during cytoreductive surgery lack the required spatial precision to aid surgeons. We set out to determine whether infrared (IR) and/or Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis could be applied to discriminate between normal brain tissue and different tumour types (meningioma, glioma and brain metastasis) based on the unique spectral “fingerprints” of their biochemical composition. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of normal brain and different brain tumours were de-waxed, mounted on low-E slides and desiccated before being analyzed using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform IR (ATR-FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy showed a clear segregation between normal and different tumour subtypes. Discrimination of tumour classes was also apparent with Raman spectroscopy. Further analysis of spectral data revealed changes in brain biochemical structure associated with different tumours. Decreased tentatively-assigned lipid-to-protein ratio was associated with increased tumour progression. Alteration in cholesterol esters-to-phenylalanine ratio was evident in grade IV glioma and metastatic tumours. The current study indicates that IR and/or Raman spectroscopy have the potential to provide a novel diagnostic approach in the accurate diagnosis of brain tumours and have potential for application in intra-operative diagnosis. PMID:24098310

  6. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy to detect anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in blood sera of domestic cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Janaina; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Machado, Rosangela Z.; Martins, Rodrigo A. L.; Zangaro, Renato A.; Villaverde, Antonio G. J. B.

    2001-05-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy has been studied for the last years for many biomedical applications. It is a powerful tool for biological materials analysis. Toxoplasmosis is an important zoonosis in public health, cats being the principal responsible for the transmission of the disease in Brazil. The objective of this work is to investigate a new method of diagnosis of this disease. NIR Raman spectroscopy was used to detect anti Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in blood sera from domestic cats, without sample preparation. In all, six blood serum samples were used for this study. A previous serological test was done by the Indirect Immunoenzymatic Assay (ELISA) to permit a comparative study between both techniques and it showed that three serum samples were positive and the other three were negative to toxoplasmosis. Raman spectra were taken for all the samples and analyzed by using the principal components analysis (PCA). A diagnosis parameter was defined from the analysis of the second and third principal components of the Raman spectra. It was found that this parameter can detect the infection level of the animal. The results have indicated that NIR Raman spectroscopy, associated to the PCA can be a promising technique for serological analysis, such as toxoplasmosis, allowing a fast and sensitive method of diagnosis.

  7. Quantitative analysis of skin chemicals using rapid near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Huang, Zhiwei; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey

    2008-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a non-invasive optical technique that is very sensitive to the structure and conformation of biochemical constitutes. It has been successfully used to study dysplasia and cancer in a variety of human tissues including skin. Researchers have a strong interest in quantitative analysis of the Raman spectra in the hope to find the quantitative molecule changes associated with cancers. Because skin is the largest organ in humans, it is very important to study the variability of Raman spectra for different body sites. In this presentation we report our quantitative analysis of normal skin Raman spectra of twenty-five body sites. Partial least square (PLS) analysis was used to quantify the skin molecules from the in vivo Raman spectra. We find that the absolute Raman intensity differs from person to person and from body site to body site. However the normalized Raman spectra are identical for the same body site. It is particularly interesting to find that the distribution of skin molecules is clustered for the same body regions.

  8. Developments in enzyme immobilization and near-infrared Raman spectroscopy with downstream renewable energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lupoi, Jason

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on techniques for (1) increasing ethanol yields from saccharification and fermentation of cellulose using immobilized cellulase, and (2) the characterization and classification of lignocellulosic feedstocks, and quantification of useful parameters such as the syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) lignin monomer content using 1064 nm dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics.

  9. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: A Discovery-Based Activity for the General Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgsmiller, Karen L.; O'Connell, Dylan J.; Klauenberg, Kathryn M.; Wilson, Peter M.; Stromberg, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    A discovery-based method is described for incorporating the concepts of IR and Raman spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum. Students use three sets of springs to model the properties of single, double, and triple covalent bonds. Then, Gaussian 03W molecular modeling software is used to illustrate the relationship between bond…

  10. FT-Raman and photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy of syncrude light gas oil distillation fractions.

    PubMed

    Michaelian, Kirk H; Hall, Robert H; Bulmer, J Tim

    2003-11-01

    FT-Raman and photoacoustic (PA) infrared spectra of 12 distillation fractions derived from Syncrude light gas oil (LGO), which has a boiling range from 195 to 343 degrees C, were analyzed in detail in this study. In the fingerprint region (200-1800 cm(-1)) most of the information is obtained from the FT-Raman spectra, which display 36 bands that are assignable to various alkyl or aryl functional groups. Monocyclic, bicyclic and tricyclic aromatics in the 12 fractions were also characterized using Raman bands in this region. The corresponding section of the infrared spectra is much simpler, displaying a relatively small number of bands due to either aromatic or aliphatic CH(n) (n=1, 2 or 3) groups. The Cz.sbnd;H stretching region in both FT-Raman and PA infrared spectra of the LGO distillation fractions was curve-fitted according to procedures established in previous investigations of Syncrude samples with various boiling ranges. The PA spectra of the LGO fractions were also analyzed using an accepted integration strategy that requires no a priori assumptions with regard to the number of constituent bands or their shapes. The curve-fitting results show that the frequencies of the 11 Raman and eight infrared bands used to model the aliphatic ( approximately 2775-3000 cm(-1)) parts of the respective spectra decrease systematically as the median boiling points of the LGO fractions increase. These band positions are consistent with those determined in earlier studies of other distillation fractions. Both curve fitting and integration show that the abundance of CH(2) groups increases at the expense of CH(3) groups as the boiling points of the fractions increase within the LGO region. PMID:14583274

  11. Characterisation of paint samples by infrared and Raman spectroscopy for criminalistic purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zięba-Palus, Janina; Michalska, Aleksandra; Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra

    2011-05-01

    Infrared microspectrometry and Raman microscopy were applied in characterisation of paint coatings, i.e. in identification of pigments and in differentiation between paint samples of similar colour and shade. The use of different excitation lasers enabled us to reduce the fluorescence of the sample and identify the main pigments present in the sample. It was shown that Raman mapping has great potential for the forensic study of paint samples. It is useful because paints are usually chemically complex and heterogeneous mixtures and spectroscopic images allow an assessment of the chemical heterogeneity of a specimen in terms of the spatial distribution of the molecular constituents.

  12. Near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Part II: Copper and gold colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, S. M.; Katz, L. F.; Archibald, D. D.; Honigs, D. E.

    1989-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) on copper and gold metal colloids were obtained with a Fourier transform Raman spectrometer using a Nd:YAG laser (1.064 ..mu..m) for excitation. Enhanced spectra were observed for pyridine and 3-chloropyridine (CP) on copper colloids and for tris(orthophenanthroline)ruthenium(II), Ru(o-phen)/sup 2 +//sub 3/, on copper and gold colloids. The copper-colloid surface-enhanced Raman spectra of pyridine and CP were compared with spectra measured for these molecules on copper electrodes. NIR-SERS enhancements on the metal colloids were at least as large as for visible-wavelength excited SERS. Good-quality spectra of Ru(o-phen)/sup 2 +//sub 3/ were obtained at solution concentrations as low as 0.025 mM.

  13. Infrared extinction spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy of select components of mineral dust mixed with organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2013-06-01

    Radiative transfer calculations as well as satellite and ground-based retrieval algorithms often use Mie theory to account for atmospheric mineral dust. However, the approximations used in Mie theory are often not appropriate for mineral dust and can lead to inaccuracies in modeling optical properties. Analytic models that are based on Rayleigh theory and account for particle shapes can offer significant advantages when used to model the IR extinction of mineral dust in the accumulation size mode. Here we extend our investigations of the IR optical properties of mineral dust to include samples that have been processed with organic acids. In particular, we aerosolize several individual components of mineral dust with organic compounds that are common in the atmosphere. Through online and offline analysis of the resulting aerosol particles combining Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we have identified three distinct outcomes of the interactions, which depend on the nature of the mineral and the organic acid: reactions with segregation of the products within the particle, formation of a uniform coating on the particle, or a formation of external mixture when there is no significant chemical interaction. Analysis of FTIR extinction spectra of the different dust components that have undergone processing shows red shifts of the prominent IR resonance peaks. The extent of the red shift, which varies from 2 to 10 cm-1, depends on the mineral and the nature of the interaction. Spectral simulations showed that the deviation from Mie theory becomes even more pronounced for these processed mineral dust aerosol components.

  14. Delafossite structure of heterogenite polytypes (HCoO2) by Raman and infrared micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlet, C.; Goethals, H.; Vanbrabant, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Heterogenite is commonly referred in mineralogy literature as a cobalt oxy-hydroxide CoO(OH). However, detailed analysis of Raman and infrared spectra acquired on particularly well-crystallized natural samples of heterogenite suggests that the mineral can be characterized by a delafossite-type structure, with a general chemical formula ABO2. Indeed, the Raman spectrum of heterogenite, along the one with grimaldiite (HCrO2), lacks visible free OH-group vibrational modes, while the infrared spectrum shows strong hydrogen bond absorption bands. HCoO2 is thus a better formulation of heterogenite that describes more clearly its vibrational behavior and avoids the confusion in literature. Electronic backscattered diffraction (EBSD) is then used to distinguish and map the 2H and 3R heterogenite natural polytypes for the first time. The comparison of EBSD and Raman mappings clearly indicates that the 2H polytype is characterized by an additional peak at 1220 cm- 1. The presence/absence is therefore an efficient tool to distinguish both polytypes.

  15. Delafossite structure of heterogenite polytypes (HCoO₂) by Raman and infrared micro-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Burlet, C; Goethals, H; Vanbrabant, Y

    2016-04-15

    Heterogenite is commonly referred in mineralogy literature as a cobalt oxy-hydroxide CoO(OH). However, detailed analysis of Raman and infrared spectra acquired on particularly well-crystallized natural samples of heterogenite suggests that the mineral can be characterized by a delafossite-type structure, with a general chemical formula ABO2. Indeed, the Raman spectrum of heterogenite, along the one with grimaldiite (HCrO2), lacks visible free OH-group vibrational modes, while the infrared spectrum shows strong hydrogen bond absorption bands. HCoO2 is thus a better formulation of heterogenite that describes more clearly its vibrational behavior and avoids the confusion in literature. Electronic backscattered diffraction (EBSD) is then used to distinguish and map the 2H and 3R heterogenite natural polytypes for the first time. The comparison of EBSD and Raman mappings clearly indicates that the 2H polytype is characterized by an additional peak at 1220 cm(-1). The presence/absence is therefore an efficient tool to distinguish both polytypes. PMID:26828537

  16. Could near-infrared Raman spectroscopy be correlated with the METAVIR scores in liver lesions induced by hepatitis C virus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggini, Marcio Cesar Reino; Navarro, Ricardo Scarparo; Stefanini, Aline Reis; Sano, Rubens Sato; Silveira, Landulfo

    2013-03-01

    The liver is responsible for several basic functions in human body how the syntheses of the most main proteins and degradation process of toxins, drugs and alcohols. In present days, the viral hepatitis C is one of the highest causes of chronic hepatic illness worldwide, affecting around 3% of the world population. The liver biopsy is considered the gold standard for diagnosing hepatic fibrosis; however, the biopsies may be questioned because of potential sampling error, morbidity, possible mortality and relatively high costs. Spectroscopy techniques such as Raman spectroscopy have been used for diagnosis of human tissues, with favorable results. Raman spectroscopy has been employed to distinguish normal from hepatic lesions through spectral features mainly of proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. In this study, eleven patients with diagnoses of chronic hepatitis C underwent hepatic biopsies having two hepatic fragments collected: one was scored through METAVIR system and the other one was submitted to near-infrared Raman spectroscopy using a dispersive spectrometer (830 nm wavelength, 300 mW laser power and 20 s exposure time). Five spectra were collected in each fragment and submitted to Principal Components Analysis (PCA). Results showed a good correlation between the Raman spectroscopy features and the stage of hepatic fibrosis and inflammation. PCA showed that samples with higher degree of fibrosis presented higher amount of protein features (collagen), whereas samples of higher degree of inflammation presented higher features of hemoglobin, in accordance to the expected evolution of the chronic hepatitis. It has been found an important biomarker for the beginning of hepatic lesion (quinone) with a spectral feature at 1595 cm-1.

  17. Iodine insertion in pentacene thin films investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazayous, M.; Sacuto, A.; Horowitz, G.; Lang, Ph.; Zimmers, A.; Lobo, R. P. S. M.

    2004-08-01

    Vibrational and electronic properties of iodine doped pentacene thin films were studied by Raman and infrared measurements. The observation of the polaronic transition in charged pentacene gives access to the reorganization energy of the pentacene molecules. Iodine insertion induces a modification of the CH vibrational modes located at the end and along the pentacene molecules. At low doping level, iodide ions are intercalated between the two-dimensional pentacene layers. At high doping level, iodine is inserted inside the layers of pentacene in an irreversible way, which is expected to decrease charge transport performance.

  18. Quantitative nondestructive methods for the determination of ticlopidine in tablets using reflectance near-infrared and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Markopoulou, C K; Koundourellis, J E; Orkoula, M G; Kontoyannis, C G

    2008-02-01

    Two different nondestructive spectroscopy methods based on near-infrared (NIR) and Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy were developed for the determination of ticlopidine-hydrochloride (TCL) in pharmaceutical formulations and the results were compared to those obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). An NIR assay was performed by reflectance over the 850-1700 nm region using a partial least squares (PLS) prediction model, while the absolute FT-Raman intensity of TCL's most intense vibration was used for constructing the calibration curve. For both methodologies the spectra were obtained from the as-received film-coated tablets of TCL. The two quantitative techniques were built using five "manual compressed" tablets containing different concentrations and validated by evaluating the calibration model as well as the accuracy and precision. The models were applied to commercial preparations (Ticlid). The results were compared to those obtained from the application of HPLC using the methodology described by "Sanofi Research Department" and were found to be in excellent agreement, proving that NIR, using fiber-optic probes, and FT-Raman spectroscopy can be used for the fast and reliable determination of the major component in pharmaceutical analysis. PMID:18284803

  19. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy for detection and classification of gastrointestinal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Nicholas; Kendall, Catherine A.; Chandratreya, Nitya; Shepherd, Neil; Barr, Hugh

    2002-03-01

    The prospect of utilising NIR-Raman spectroscopy for analysis of gastro-intestinal (GI) tissue has been explored both with snap-frozen and formalin fixed samples. In the oesophagus large sample numbers have been employed and the full spectrum of pathology has been studied. Multivariate analysis techniques have been employed to optimally separate the groups and spectral diagnostic models have been constructed and evaluated by employing cross-validation testing. Sensitivities have been shown to vary between 73 and 100 percent and specificities between 91 and 100 percent, depending on pathology group and tissue type.

  20. Comparing paraffined and deparaffinized breast cancer tissue samples and an analysis of Raman spectroscopy and infrared methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depciuch, J.; Kaznowska, E.; Szmuc, K.; Zawlik, I.; Cholewa, M.; Heraud, P.; Cebulski, J.

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer makes up a quarter of all cancer in women, which is why research into new diagnostic methods and sample preparations need to be developed at an accelerated pace. Researchers are looking for diagnostic tools to detect when an individual has cancer cells and use that information to see what measurements and approaches can be used to take further diagnostic steps. The most common method of sample preparation is the imbibing of tumor tissue in paraffin, which can produce a background for spectroscopic measurements in the range of 500-3500 cm-1. In this study we demonstrated that proper preparation of paraffin-embedded specimens and the measurement methodology can eliminate paraffin vibration, as was done in the work Depciuch et al. 2015. Thanks to this spectroscopic technique there may become a reliable and accurate method of diagnosing breast cancer based on the evidence found from the prepared samples. The study compared the results obtained through Raman spectroscopy and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) measurements of healthy and cancerous breast tissues that were either embedded in paraffin or deparaffinized. The resulting spectrum and accurate analysis led to the conclusion that the appropriate measurement of the background and the elimination of peaks from the paraffin had the greatest impact on the reliability of results. Furthermore, after the accurate, detailed studies FTIR and Raman spectroscopy on samples of breast tissue that were deparaffinized or embedded in paraffin, including a complete analysis of the peak after transformation Kramers-Kröning (KK), it was found that sample preparation did not affect the result obtained by measuring the reflectance in the mid-infrared range, and that this only had a minimal effect relating to the intensity obtained by the measurement of the Raman peak. Only in special cases, when Raman spectroscopic methods are used for research to find the peculiarities of the spectra, are deparaffinization recommended

  1. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. Assessment of bone quality using Raman and infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Suda, Hiromi Kimura

    2015-10-01

    Bone quality, which was defined as "the sum total of characteristics of the bone that influence the bone's resistance to fracture" at the National Institute of Health (NIH) conference in 2001, contributes to bone strength in combination with bone mass. Bone mass is often measured as bone mineral density (BMD) and, consequently, can be quantified easily. On the other hand, bone quality is composed of several factors such as bone structure, bone matrix, calcification degree, microdamage, and bone turnover, and it is not easy to obtain data for the various factors. Therefore, it is difficult to quantify bone quality. We are eager to develop new measurement methods for bone quality that make it possible to determine several factors associated with bone quality at the same time. Analytic methods based on Raman and FTIR spectroscopy have attracted a good deal of attention as they can provide a good deal of chemical information about hydroxyapatite and collagen, which are the main components of bone. A lot of studies on bone quality using Raman and FTIR imaging have been reported following the development of the two imaging systems. Thus, both Raman and FTIR imaging appear to be promising new bone morphometric techniques. PMID:26412727

  2. Two-dimensional Raman and infrared vibrational spectroscopy for a harmonic oscillator system nonlinearly coupled with a colored noise bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2004-01-01

    Multidimensional vibrational response functions of a harmonic oscillator are reconsidered by assuming nonlinear system-bath couplings. In addition to a standard linear-linear (LL) system-bath interaction, we consider a square-linear (SL) interaction. The LL interaction causes the vibrational energy relaxation, while the SL interaction is mainly responsible for the vibrational phase relaxation. The dynamics of the relevant system are investigated by the numerical integration of the Gaussian-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation under the condition of strong couplings with a colored noise bath, where the conventional perturbative approach cannot be applied. The response functions for the fifth-order nonresonant Raman and the third-order infrared (or equivalently the second-order infrared and the seventh-order nonresonant Raman) spectra are calculated under the various combinations of the LL and the SL coupling strengths. Calculated two-dimensional response functions demonstrate that those spectroscopic techniques are very sensitive to the mechanism of the system-bath couplings and the correlation time of the bath fluctuation. We discuss the primary optical transition pathways involved to elucidate the corresponding spectroscopic features and to relate them to the microscopic sources of the vibrational nonlinearity induced by the system-bath interactions. Optical pathways for the fifth-order Raman spectroscopies from an "anisotropic" medium were newly found in this study, which were not predicted by the weak system-bath coupling theory or the standard Brownian harmonic oscillator model.

  3. Two-dimensional Raman and infrared vibrational spectroscopy for a harmonic oscillator system nonlinearly coupled with a colored noise bath.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2004-01-01

    Multidimensional vibrational response functions of a harmonic oscillator are reconsidered by assuming nonlinear system-bath couplings. In addition to a standard linear-linear (LL) system-bath interaction, we consider a square-linear (SL) interaction. The LL interaction causes the vibrational energy relaxation, while the SL interaction is mainly responsible for the vibrational phase relaxation. The dynamics of the relevant system are investigated by the numerical integration of the Gaussian-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation under the condition of strong couplings with a colored noise bath, where the conventional perturbative approach cannot be applied. The response functions for the fifth-order nonresonant Raman and the third-order infrared (or equivalently the second-order infrared and the seventh-order nonresonant Raman) spectra are calculated under the various combinations of the LL and the SL coupling strengths. Calculated two-dimensional response functions demonstrate that those spectroscopic techniques are very sensitive to the mechanism of the system-bath couplings and the correlation time of the bath fluctuation. We discuss the primary optical transition pathways involved to elucidate the corresponding spectroscopic features and to relate them to the microscopic sources of the vibrational nonlinearity induced by the system-bath interactions. Optical pathways for the fifth-order Raman spectroscopies from an "anisotropic" medium were newly found in this study, which were not predicted by the weak system-bath coupling theory or the standard Brownian harmonic oscillator model. PMID:15267286

  4. Near-infrared raman spectroscopy for detection of gastric cancer peritoneal dissemination in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Mao, Wei-zheng; Xu, Ming; Gong, Long-jing; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Han-jing; Zheng, Rong-er

    2011-07-01

    The nude mice injected with human gastric cancer cells (SGC-7901) in their peritoneums were chosen as the animal models of gastric cancer peritoneal dissemination in this research. The Raman spectra at 785nm excitation of both these nude mice which were in different tumor planting periods and the normal counterpart were taken in vivo in the imitate laparotomy. 205 spectra were collected. The spectra of different tissue types were compared and classified by Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm. Significant differences were showed between normal and malignant tissues. The gastric cancer nodules had lower Raman intensities at 870, 1330, 1450, and 1660cm-1, but higher at 1007, 1050, 1093 and 1209cm-1, compared with normal tissues. Additionally, the spectra of malignant tissues had two peaks around 1330 cm-1 (1297cm-1 and 1331cm-1), while the spectra of normal tissues had only one peak (1297cm-1). The differences were attributed to the intensities of the stretching bands of the nucleic acid, protein and water. These features could be used to diagnose gastric cancer. The Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm was used to classify these spectra. For normal and malignant tissues, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 95.73%, 70.73% and 90.73%, respectively, while for different tumor planting periods, they were 98.82%, 98.73% and 98.78%. The experimental results show that Raman spectra differ significantly between cancerous and normal gastric tissues, which provides the experimental basis for the diagnosis of gastric cancer by Raman spectroscopy technology. And SVM algorithm can give the well generalized classification performance for the samples, which expands the application of mathematical algorithms in the classification.

  5. Auger resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; LeBrun, T.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    As noted above, traditional spectroscopy of the electronic structure of the inner shells of atoms, molecules, and solids is limited by the lifetime broadening of the core-excited states. This limitation can also be avoided with the non-radiative analog of X-ray Raman scattering - resonant Auger Raman spectroscopy. We have used this technique to study the K-shell excitation spectrum of argon as the photon energy is continuously scanned across threshold.

  6. Infra-red and Raman spectroscopy of free-base and zinc phthalocyanines isolated in matrices.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ciaran; Dozova, Nadia; McCaffrey, John G; FitzGerald, Simon; Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Crépin, Claudine

    2010-09-21

    The infrared absorption spectra of matrix-isolated zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and free-base phthalocyanine (H(2)Pc) have been recorded in the region from 400 to 4000 cm(-1) in solid N(2), Ar, Kr and Xe. Raman spectra have been recorded in doped KBr pellets. The isotopomers HDPc and D(2)Pc have been synthesised in an attempt to resolve the conflicting assignments that currently exist in the literature for the N-H bending modes in H(2)Pc spectra. A complete correlation between the vibrational modes of the three free-base isotopomers and ZnPc has been achieved. Comparison of the IR and Raman spectroscopic results, obtained with isotopic substitution and with predictions from large basis set ab initio calculations, allows identification of the in-plane (IP) and out-of-plane (OP) N-H bending modes. The largest IP isotope shift is observed in the IR at 1046 cm(-1) and at 1026 cm(-1) in Raman spectra while the largest effect in the OP bending modes is at 764 cm(-1). OP bending modes are too weak to be observed in the experimental Raman data. The antisymmetric N-H stretching mode is observed at approximately 3310 cm(-1) in low temperature solids slightly blue shifted from, but entirely consistent with the literature KBr data. With the exception of the N-H stretches, the recorded H/D isotope shifts in all the N-H vibrations are complex, with the IP bending modes exhibiting small nu(H)/nu(D) ratios (the largest value is 1.089) while one of the observed OP modes has a ratio < 1. DFT results reveal that the small ratios arise in particular from strong coupling of the N-H IP bending modes with IP stretching modes of C-N bonds. The unexpected finding of a nu(H)/nu(D) ratio smaller than one was analysed theoretically by examining the evolution of the frequencies of the free base by increasing the mass from H to D in a continuous manner. A consequence of this frequency increase in the heavier isotopomer is that the direction of the N-D OP bend is reversed from the N-H OP bend

  7. Nondestructive discrimination between normal and hematological malignancy cell lines using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Lin, Duo; Chen, Weiwei; Yu, Yun; Xu, Jijin; Liang, Zhen; Lin, Xi; Dong, Zhong; Shi, Hong

    2014-08-01

    An accurate understanding of biomolecular changes in living cells associated with malignant transformation is of paramount importance in early cancer detection. The aim of this study was to apply near-infrared Raman spectroscopy (RS) for differentiating cancer from normal cells. High-quality Raman spectra in the range of 450-1800 cm-1 can be obtained from 31 normal and 64 hematological malignancy cells including 43 CA46 and 21 U266 cells. There were significant differences in Raman spectra between normal and cancer groups, which suggests special changes in the percentage of biomolecules including lipid, nucleic acids and proteins in different cell lines. A diagnostic accuracy of 100% can be achieved by principal components analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) for classification between cancer and normal cell lines. This exploratory study demonstrates the potential application of the RS technique combined with PCA-LDA as a clinical cell-based biosensor for the noninvasive cancer detection and screening at the molecular level.

  8. Femtosecond transient infrared and stimulated Raman spectroscopy shed light on the relaxation mechanisms of photo-excited peridinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Ragnoni, Elena; Lapini, Andrea; Foggi, Paolo; Hiller, Roger G.; Righini, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    By means of one- and two-dimensional transient infrared spectroscopy and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, we investigated the excited state dynamics of peridinin, a carbonyl carotenoid occurring in natural light harvesting complexes. The presence of singly and doubly excited states, as well as of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, makes the behavior of carbonyl carotenoids in the excited state very complex. In this work, we investigated by time resolved spectroscopy the relaxation of photo-excited peridinin in solvents of different polarities and as a function of the excitation wavelength. Our experimental results show that a characteristic pattern of one- and two-dimensional infrared bands in the C=C stretching region allows monitoring the relaxation pathway. In polar solvents, moderate distortions of the molecular geometry cause a variation of the single/double carbon bond character, so that the partially ionic ICT state is largely stabilized by the solvent reorganization. After vertical photoexcitation at 400 nm of the S2 state, the off-equilibrium population moves to the S1 state with ca. 175 fs time constant; from there, in less than 5 ps, the non-Franck Condon ICT state is reached, and finally, the ground state is recovered in 70 ps. That the relevant excited state dynamics takes place far from the Franck Condon region is demonstrated by its noticeable dependence on the excitation wavelength.

  9. Qualitative and quantitative study of polymorphic forms in drug formulations by near infrared FT-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Martin E.; Griesser, Ulrich J.; Sawatzki, Juergen

    2003-12-01

    Near infrared FT-Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of polymorphic forms in a number of commercial drug products containing the polymorphic drug compounds sorbitol, mannitol, famotidine, acemetacin, carbamazepine, meprobamate and phenylbutazone. The crystal forms present in the drug products were identified based on the position, intensity and shape of characteristic bands. Quantitative analysis of a mixture of two crystal forms of mannitol in a drug product was carried out using a partial least-squares method. In drug products containing meprobamate, sorbitol, and carbamazepine, the thermodynamically stable form was found exclusively, whereas metastable polymorphs were found in solid dosage forms of acemetacin, phenylbutazone, famotidine and mannitol. A mixture of two polymorphic forms of mannitol in Lipobay tablets was determined to consist of 30.8±3.8% of the metastable modification I. The simple sample preparation, the occurrence of sharp bands in the spectra as well as the high reproducibility and accuracy qualifies FT-Raman spectroscopy for the identification and quantification of crystal forms in drug products. The method is perfectly suited to meet the regulatory requirements of monitoring crystal forms during processing and storage and often succeeds in detecting the present crystal form in drug products even when the used excipients are not known.

  10. Raman Spectroscopy and Related Techniques in Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Downes, Andrew; Elfick, Alistair

    2010-01-01

    In this review we describe label-free optical spectroscopy techniques which are able to non-invasively measure the (bio)chemistry in biological systems. Raman spectroscopy uses visible or near-infrared light to measure a spectrum of vibrational bonds in seconds. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) microscopy and stimulated Raman loss (SRL) microscopy are orders of magnitude more efficient than Raman spectroscopy, and are able to acquire high quality chemically-specific images in seconds. We discuss the benefits and limitations of all techniques, with particular emphasis on applications in biomedicine—both in vivo (using fiber endoscopes) and in vitro (in optical microscopes). PMID:21151763

  11. Recognition of microfossils in rock matrix using Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: a potential for Biosignatures Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politi, R.; Marzo, G. A.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Fonti, S.; Blanco, A.; Brunetto, R.; Marra, A. C.

    The widespread evidences of ancient water on Mars and the improving rover technology demand to foster the search for traces of extinct micro-organisms on Mars In order to implement the search for extinct life in the next decades missions the Astrophysics Group of the University of Lecce has started a research program based on a systematic study of terrestrial fossils We use a combination of visual and spectroscopic techniques to understand the suitable configuration of instruments capable of detecting possible microfossils-like structure in a geological sample We present here reflectance IR and micro Raman spectroscopy data obtained from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary K-T sequence Gubbio Italy together with their albedo-correlated maps and microscope images plane polarized light We used K and T limestone samples comprising thicksim 95 calcareous nanofloras and planktonic foraminifera and 5 clay as a test bed for this experiment Although extensive carbonate outcrops were not observed on the surface of Mars fossiliferous rocks could still exist beneath the lava flow widespread at surface The basic idea here is to acquire and model spectral features of a mineral matrix i e CaCO 3 progressively enriched in microfossil-like inclusions then compare the synthetic spectra with that of an actual sample rich in calcareous microfossils Fossilization is complex process to predict and model We attempt to reduce this complexity by using an iterative model where at a very first approximation the microfossil-like particle is a small

  12. Pressure effects on the proximal heme pocket in myoglobin probed by Raman and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, O; Buchter, S; Tabirian, A; Schulte, A

    1997-01-01

    The influence of high pressure on the heme protein conformation of myoglobin in different ligation states is studied using Raman spectroscopy over the temperature range from 30 to 295 K. Photostationary experiments monitoring the oxidation state marker bands demonstrate the change of rebinding rate with pressure. While frequency changes of vibrational modes associated with rigid bonds of the porphyrin ring are <1 cm(-1), we investigate a significant shift of the iron-histidine mode to higher frequency with increasing pressure (approximately 3 cm(-1) for deltaP = 190 MPa in Mb). The observed frequency shift is interpreted structurally as a conformational change affecting the tilt angle between the heme plane and the proximal histidine and the out-of-plane iron position. Independent evidence for iron motion comes from measurements of the redshift of band III in the near-infrared with pressure. This suggests that at high pressure the proximal heme pocket and the protein are altered toward the bound state conformation, which contributes to the rate increase for CO binding. Raman spectra of Mb and photodissociated MbCO measured at low temperature and variable pressure further support changes in protein conformation and are consistent with glasslike properties of myoglobin below 160 K. PMID:9370469

  13. Characterization of the sulphate mineral coquimbite, a secondary iron sulphate from Javier Ortega mine, Lucanas Province, Peru - Using infrared, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Gobac, Željka Žigovečki; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; Lana, Cristiano; Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes

    2014-04-01

    The mineral coquimbite has been analysed using a range of techniques including SEM with EDX, thermal analytical techniques and Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The mineral originated from the Javier Ortega mine, Lucanas Province, Peru. The chemical formula was determined as ()∑2.00()3·9HO. Thermal analysis showed a total mass loss of ˜73.4% on heating to 1000 °C. A mass loss of 30.43% at 641.4 °C is attributed to the loss of SO3. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of sulphate tetrahedra, aluminium oxide/hydroxide octahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. The Raman spectrum shows well resolved bands at 2994, 3176, 3327, 3422 and 3580 cm-1 attributed to water stretching vibrations. Vibrational spectroscopy combined with thermal analysis provides insight into the structure of coquimbite.

  14. Combination of Raman, Infrared, and X-Ray Energy-Dispersion Spectroscopies and X-Ray Diffraction to Study a Fossilization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa Filho, Francisco Eduardo; da Silva, João Hermínio; Feitosa Saraiva, Antônio Álamo; Brito, Deyvid Dennys S.; Viana, Bartolomeu Cruz; de Oliveira Abagaro, Bruno Tavares; de Tarso Cavalcante Freire, Paulo

    2011-12-01

    X-ray diffraction was combined with X-ray energy-dispersion, Fourier-transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopies to study the fossilization of a Cretaceous specimen of the plant Brachyphyllum castilhoi, a fossil from the Ipubi Formation, in the Araripe Sedimentary Basin, Northeastern Brazil. Among the possible fossilization processes, which could involve pyrite, silicon oxide, calcium oxide, or other minerals, we were able to single out pyritization as the central mechanism producing the fossil, more than 100 million years ago. In addition to expanding the knowledge of the Ipubi Formation, this study shows that, when combined with other experimental techniques, Raman spectroscopy is a valuable tool at the paleontologist's disposal.

  15. Raman spectroscopy of composites

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.J.; Andrews, M.C.; Yang, X.; Huang, Y.L.; Gu, X.; Day, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    It is demonstrated that Raman Spectroscopy can be used to follow the micromechanics of the deformation of high-performance fibers within composites. The technique can be applied to a wide range of fiber systems including aramids, carbon and ceramic (using fluorescence spectroscopy) fibers. Well-defined Raman spectra are obtained and the position of the Raman bands shift on the application of stress or strain. It is possible to determine the point-to-point variation of strain along an individual fiber inside a transparent matrix under any general state of stress or strain. Examples are given of the use of the technique to study a variety of phenomena in a wide range of composite systems. The phenomena investigated include thermal stresses, fiber/matrix adhesion, matrix yielding for both fragmentation and pull-out tests. The systems studied include aramid/epoxy, carbon/epoxy and ceramic-fiber/glass composites.

  16. Raman spectroscopy in astrobiology.

    PubMed

    Jorge Villar, Susana E; Edwards, Howell G M

    2006-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is proposed as a valuable analytical technique for planetary exploration because it is sensitive to organic and inorganic compounds and able to unambiguously identify key spectral markers in a mixture of biological and geological components; furthermore, sample manipulation is not required and any size of sample can be studied without chemical or mechanical pretreatment. NASA and ESA are considering the adoption of miniaturised Raman spectrometers for inclusion in suites of analytical instrumentation to be placed on robotic landers on Mars in the near future to search for extinct or extant life signals. In this paper we review the advantages and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of complex specimens with relevance to the detection of bio- and geomarkers in extremophilic organisms which are considered to be terrestrial analogues of possible extraterrestial life that could have developed on planetary surfaces. PMID:16456933

  17. Fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, T.; Yan, D.; Hanf, S.; Popp, J.

    2014-05-01

    Fiber enhanced Raman sensing is presented for versatile and extremely sensitive analysis of pharmaceutical drugs and biogenic gases. Elaborated micro-structured optical fibers guide the light with very low losses within their hollow core and provide at the same time a miniaturized sample container for the analytes. Thus, fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy (FERS) allows for chemically selective detection of minimal sample amounts with high sensitivity. Two examples are presented in this contribution: (i) the detection of picomolar concentrations of pharmaceutical drugs; and (ii) the analysis of biogenic gases within a complex mixture of gases with analytical sensitivities in the ppm range.

  18. A case study of real-time monitoring of solid-state phase transformations in acoustically levitated particles using near infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Sönke; Wu, Jian X; Laackmann, Julian; Moritz, Hans-Ulrich; Rantanen, Jukka; Rades, Thomas; Leopold, Claudia S

    2013-01-23

    The objective of this study was to monitor the amorphous-to-crystalline solid-state phase transformation kinetics of the model drug ibuprofen with spectroscopic methods during acoustic levitation. Chemical and physical information was obtained by real-time near infrared (NIRS) and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The recrystallisation kinetic parameters (overall recrystallisation rate constant β and the time needed to reach 50% of the equilibrated level t(50)), were determined using a multivariate curve resolution approach. The acoustic levitation device coupled with non-invasive spectroscopy enabled monitoring of the recrystallisation process of the difficult-to-handle (adhesive) amorphous sample. The application of multivariate curve resolution enabled isolation of the underlying pure spectra, which corresponded well with the reference spectra of amorphous and crystalline ibuprofen. The recrystallisation kinetic parameters were estimated from the recrystallisation profiles. While the empirical recrystallisation rate constant determined by NIR and Raman spectroscopy were comparable, the lag time for recrystallisation was significantly lower with Raman spectroscopy as compared to NIRS. This observation was explained by the high energy density of the Raman laser beam, which might have led to local heating effects of the sample and thus reduced the recrystallisation onset time. It was concluded that acoustic levitation with NIR and Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate curve resolution allowed direct determination of the recrystallisation kinetics of amorphous drugs and thus is a promising technique for monitoring solid-state phase transformations of adhesive small-sized samples during the early phase of drug development. PMID:23069619

  19. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy of Yttrium Aluminum Borate Glasses and Glass-ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J.; Brooks, M.; Crenshaw, T.; Morris, A.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Morgan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Raman spectra of glasses and glass-ceramics in the Y2O3-Al2O3-B2O3 system are reported. Glasses with B2O3 contents ranging from 40 to 60 mole percent were prepared by melting 20 g of the appropriate oxide or carbonate powders in alumina crucibles at 1400 C for 45 minutes. Subsequent heat treatments of the glasses at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C were performed in order to induce nucleation and crystallization. It was found that Na2CO3 added to the melt served as a nucleating agent and resulted in uniform bulk crystallization. The Raman spectra of the glasses are interpreted primarily in terms of vibrations of boron - oxygen structural groups. Comparison of the Raman spectra of the glass-ceramic samples with spectra of aluminate and borate crystalline materials reveal that these glasses crystallize primarily as yttrium aluminum borate, YAl3(BO3)4.

  20. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy to detect anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibody in blood sera of domestic cats: quantitative analysis based on partial least-squares multivariate statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Janaína; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Machado, Rosangela Z.; Zângaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo

    2010-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an important zoonosis in public health because domestic cats are the main agents responsible for the transmission of this disease in Brazil. We investigate a method for diagnosing toxoplasmosis based on Raman spectroscopy. Dispersive near-infrared Raman spectra are used to quantify anti-Toxoplasma gondii (IgG) antibodies in blood sera from domestic cats. An 830-nm laser is used for sample excitation, and a dispersive spectrometer is used to detect the Raman scattering. A serological test is performed in all serum samples by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for validation. Raman spectra are taken from 59 blood serum samples and a quantification model is implemented based on partial least squares (PLS) to quantify the sample's serology by Raman spectra compared to the results provided by the ELISA test. Based on the serological values provided by the Raman/PLS model, diagnostic parameters such as sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive prediction values, and negative prediction values are calculated to discriminate negative from positive samples, obtaining 100, 80, 90, 83.3, and 100%, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, associated with the PLS, is promising as a serological assay for toxoplasmosis, enabling fast and sensitive diagnosis.

  1. Discrimination of selected species of pathogenic bacteria using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Siqueira e Oliveira, Fernanda S.; Giana, Hector E.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    It has been proposed a method based on Raman spectroscopy for identification of different microorganisms involved in bacterial urinary tract infections. Spectra were collected from different bacterial colonies (Gram negative: E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis, P. aeruginosa, E. cloacae and Gram positive: S. aureus and Enterococcus sp.), grown in culture medium (Agar), using a Raman spectrometer with a fiber Raman probe (830 nm). Colonies were scraped from Agar surface placed in an aluminum foil for Raman measurements. After pre-processing, spectra were submitted to a Principal Component Analysis and Mahalanobis distance (PCA/MD) discrimination algorithm. It has been found that the mean Raman spectra of different bacterial species show similar bands, being the S. aureus well characterized by strong bands related to carotenoids. PCA/MD could discriminate Gram positive bacteria with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and Gram negative bacteria with good sensitivity and high specificity.

  2. Discrimination of selected species of pathogenic bacteria using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Siqueira e Oliveira, Fernanda SantAna; Giana, Hector Enrique; Silveira, Landulfo

    2012-10-01

    A method, based on Raman spectroscopy, for identification of different microorganisms involved in bacterial urinary tract infections has been proposed. Spectra were collected from different bacterial colonies (Gram-negative: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae, and Gram-positive: Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp.), grown on culture medium (agar), using a Raman spectrometer with a fiber Raman probe (830 nm). Colonies were scraped from the agar surface and placed on an aluminum foil for Raman measurements. After preprocessing, spectra were submitted to a principal component analysis and Mahalanobis distance (PCA/MD) discrimination algorithm. We found that the mean Raman spectra of different bacterial species show similar bands, and S. aureus was well characterized by strong bands related to carotenoids. PCA/MD could discriminate Gram-positive bacteria with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and Gram-negative bacteria with sensitivity ranging from 58 to 88% and specificity ranging from 87% to 99%.

  3. High-pressure study of ScH3: Raman, infrared, and visible absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Tetsuji; Ohura, Hiroyuki; Takeichi, Tomoo; Ohmura, Ayako; Machida, Akihiko; Watanuki, Tetsu; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Sasaki, Shigeo; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Takemura, Kenichi

    2011-08-01

    Raman, IR, and visible absorption spectra of scandium trihydride (ScH3) have been measured at high pressures up to 50 GPa, to investigate the structural and electronic phase transitions. Successive hcp-intermediate-fcc phase transitions were observed at 25 and 46 GPa by Raman and IR measurements. It was suggested that the intermediate phase of ScH3 takes the same structure as that of YH3 with a long periodicity of the stacking of the metal planes. The visible absorption spectra allowed us to determine that the energy gap of ScH3 is 1.7 eV at the ambient condition and is closed around 50 GPa, at which the crystal structure transforms to fcc.

  4. Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Vibrational Populations Monitored after Electronic and Infrared Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Werncke, W.; Kozich, V.; Dreyer, J.

    2008-11-14

    Pathways of vibrational energy flow in molecules with an intramolecular hydrogen bond are studied after intramolecular proton transfer reactions as well as after infrared excitation of the O-H stretching vibration which is coupled to this hydrogen bond.

  5. In-line near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) for in situ evaluation of the transesterification reaction.

    PubMed

    Fontalvo-Gómez, Miriam; Colucci, José A; Velez, Natasha; Romañach, Rodolfo J

    2013-10-01

    Biodiesel was synthesized from different commercially available oils while in-line Raman and near-infrared (NIR) spectra were obtained simultaneously, and the spectral changes that occurred during the reaction were evaluated with principal component analysis (PCA). Raman and NIR spectra were acquired every 30 s with fiber optic probes inserted into the reaction vessel. The reaction was performed at 60-70 °C using magnetic stirring. The time of reaction was 90 min, and during this time, 180 Raman and NIR spectra were collected. NIR spectra were collected using a transflectance probe and an optical path length of 1 mm at 8 cm(-1) spectral resolution and averaging 32 scans; for Raman spectra a 3 s exposure time and three accumulations were adequate for the analysis. Raman spectroscopy showed the ester conversion as evidenced by the displacement of the C=O band from 1747 to 1744 cm(-1) and the decrease in the intensity of the 1000-1050 cm(-1) band and the 1405 cm(-1) band as methanol was consumed in the reaction. NIR spectra also showed the decrease in methanol concentration with the band in the 4750-5000 cm(-1) region; this signal is present in the spectra of the transesterification reaction but not in the neat oils. The variations in the intensity of the methanol band were a main factor in the in-line monitoring of the transesterification reaction using Raman and NIR spectroscopy. The score plot of the first principal component showed the progress of the reaction. The final product was analyzed using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy and using mid-infrared spectroscopy, confirming the conversion of the oils to biodiesel. PMID:24067570

  6. Structural characterization of dioscorin, the major tuber protein of yams, by near infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yu-Hsiu; Tseng, Chi-Yin; Chen, Wenlung

    2006-01-01

    As very little is known about the molecular structure of dioscorin, the major storage protein of yam tuber, we report here FT-Raman spectroscopic investigation of this yam protein isolated from D. alata L., for the first time. According to a series of purification and identification by ion-exchange chromatography, gel chromatography, SDS-PAGE, and MALDI-TOF-MS, it shows that the major storage protein is made up of dioscorin A (M.W. ~33 kDa) and dioscorin B (M.W. ~31 kDa). Raman spectral results indicate that the secondary structure of dioscorin A is major in α-helix, while dioscorin B belongs to anti-parallel β- sheet. It also shows that the microenvironment of major amino acids including tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, and methionine, and cysteine exhibit explicit differences between these two components. The conformation of disulfide bonding in dioscorin A predominates in Gauche-Gauche-Trans form, while Gauche-Gauche-Gauche and Trans-Gauche-Trans share the conformation in dioscorin B. Structural resemblance between dioscorin A and crude yam proteins implies that dioscorin A exhibits structural preference even though its content is lower than dioscorin B.

  7. Infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, B. A.

    1984-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopic analysis is reviewed. Applications to chemical analysis of preimpregnated carbon fiber materials, including polystyrene spectra, epoxy resin analysis, mineral loads analysis, determination of epoxy groups and identification of spurious organic materials are discussed. The advantages of the method for quality control are pointed out.

  8. Fourier-transform infrared and Raman difference spectroscopy studies of the phosphorus-containing dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandyukov, A. E.; Majoral, J. P.; Caminade, A. M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2004-06-01

    FT IR and Raman spectra of 12 generations of the phosphorus-containing starburst dendrimers containing PS and PO bonds with terminal aldehyde and PCl groups were compared. The influence of the encirclement on the band frequencies and intensity is studied and due to the predictable, controlled and reproducible structure of the dendrimers the information usually inaccessible is obtained. Bands in the IR difference ( G2'(PO) G2'(PS)) spectra have characteristic EPR-like form. The strong band at 1600 cm -1 show marked changes of the optical density in dependence of the aldehyde (CHO) or azomethyne (CHN) substituents in the aromatic ring. The analysis of difference spectra enables one to assign the characteristic bands ν(PS) and ν(PO) for the bonds in the core, in the repeating unit and in the terminal groups of the dendrimers. This assignment is supported by the calculation of the absorption curves of the different fragments of dendrimer with the force constants and electro-optical parameters. The IR and Raman spectra of dendrimers are depended on the ratio of number terminal groups to a number of repeating units, which in its turn is strictly determined by the generation number. Thus, the marked differences in the vibrational spectra of the first successive generations aspire to zero for the higher ones. The rather rigid repeated units with little conformational flexibility define the perfect microstructure of the studied phosphorus-containing dendrimers up to the eleventh generation.

  9. Safranin-O dye in the ground state. A study by density functional theory, Raman, SERS and infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofrumento, C.; Arci, F.; Carlesi, S.; Ricci, M.; Castellucci, E.; Becucci, M.

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of ground state structural and vibrational properties of Safranin-O is presented. The experimental results, obtained by FTIR, Raman and SERS spectroscopy, are discussed in comparison to the results of DFT calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory. The calculated spectra reproduce quite satisfactorily the experimental data. The calculated Safranin-O equilibrium structure and the assignment of the vibrational spectra are reported as well. From the changes between Raman and SERS spectra a model is presented for the interaction of Safranin-O with silver nanoparticles.

  10. Safranin-O dye in the ground state. A study by density functional theory, Raman, SERS and infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lofrumento, C; Arci, F; Carlesi, S; Ricci, M; Castellucci, E; Becucci, M

    2015-02-25

    The analysis of ground state structural and vibrational properties of Safranin-O is presented. The experimental results, obtained by FTIR, Raman and SERS spectroscopy, are discussed in comparison to the results of DFT calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. The calculated spectra reproduce quite satisfactorily the experimental data. The calculated Safranin-O equilibrium structure and the assignment of the vibrational spectra are reported as well. From the changes between Raman and SERS spectra a model is presented for the interaction of Safranin-O with silver nanoparticles. PMID:25247839

  11. Raman Spectroscopy of Cocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Frank; Reardon, Paul; Ochoa, Romulo; Abourahma, Heba; Marti, Marcus; Dimeo, Rachel

    2010-02-01

    Cocrystals are a class of compounds that consist of two or more molecules that are held together by hydrogen bonding. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are those that contain an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) as one of the components. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are of particular interest and have gained a lot of attention in recent years because they offer the ability to modify the physical properties of the API, like solubility and bioavailability, without altering the chemical structure of the API. The APIs that we targeted for our studies are theophylline (Tp) and indomethacin (Ind). These compounds have been mixed with complementary coformers (cocrystal former) that include acetamide (AcONH2), melamine (MLM), nicotinic acid (Nic-COOH), 4-cyanopyridine (4-CNPy) and 4-aminopyridine (4-NH2Py). Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterize these cocrystals. Spectra of the cocrystals were compared to those of the coformers to analyze for peak shifts, specifically those corresponding to hydrogen bonding. A 0.5 m CCD Spex spectrometer was used, in a micro-Raman setup, for spectral analysis. An Argon ion Coherent laser at 514.5 nm was used as the excitation source. )

  12. Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Daniel R; Mathies, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is an ultrafast nonlinear optical technique that provides vibrational structural information with high temporal (sub-50 fs) precision and high spectral (10 cm(-1) ) resolution. Since the first full demonstration of its capabilities ≈15 years ago, FSRS has evolved into a mature technique, giving deep insights into chemical and biochemical reaction dynamics that would be inaccessible with any other technique. It is now being routinely applied to virtually all possible photochemical reactions and systems spanning from single molecules in solution to thin films, bulk crystals and macromolecular proteins. This review starts with an historic overview and discusses the theoretical and experimental concepts behind this technology. Emphasis is put on the current state-of-the-art experimental realization and several variations of FSRS that have been developed. The unique capabilities of FSRS are illustrated through a comprehensive presentation of experiments to date followed by prospects. PMID:26919612

  13. Far-infrared and resonance Raman spectroscopy and isotopic substitution studies of halogen-bridged platinum chain solids

    SciTech Connect

    Love, S.P.; Worl, L.A.; Donohoe, R.J.; Huckett, S.C.; Johnson, S.R.; Swanson, B.I.

    1992-12-31

    Here we our most recent results on the vibrational spectroscopy of the MX chain solids [Pt(en){sub 2}][Pt(en){sub 2}X{sub 2}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 4}, (X=Cl, Br or I, and en = C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N{sub 2}), referred to as PtX. Isotopic substitutions are used to clarify the nature of various vibrational modes. For Raman spectroscopy, fundamental phonon frequencies are determined, when possible, by excitation far below the band edge using a Ti:Sapphire laser, thus avoiding defect production, while photo-induced defects are studied specifically after intentional production.

  14. Investigation of the records of earthquake slip in carbonaceous materials from the Taiwan Chelungpu fault by means of infrared and Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirono, Tetsuro; Maekawa, Yuka; Yabuta, Hikaru

    2015-05-01

    To understand the mechanism of fault lubrication during the 1999 Taiwan Chi-Chi earthquake, we developed a new temperature proxy for carbonaceous materials by using infrared and Raman spectroscopies together with heating and friction experiments. We found marked anomalies in the infrared and Raman spectra of carbonaceous materials retrieved from the primary slip zone of the earthquake: the infrared spectra exhibited very weak aliphatic CH2 and CH3 peaks and aromatic C=C absorbance peaks, and the Raman spectra exhibited very weak disordered and graphitic bands and a high ratio of disordered band area to graphitic band area. Those weak peaks and bands and the band area ratio were reproduced by heating carbonaceous materials from the nearby host rock to 700°C. These results suggest that the frictional heat in the slip zone reached approximately 700°C. We characterized the host rock's carbonaceous materials by means of elemental analysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and simultaneous thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry and found that the H/C and O/C ratios were 1.29 and 0.30, respectively (which are close to the ratios for lignin) and that the volatile fraction was as high as 48 wt %. The pyrolysates obtained by heating from 100 to 400°C were dominated by phenols, fatty alcohols, and n-alkanes. When the residue from pyrolysis at 100-400°C was rapidly heated to 700°C, the resulting pyrolysate was dominated by phenols, aromatic compounds, heterocyclic compounds, and n-alkenes. This information suggests that change in the infrared and Raman spectra with increasing temperature may have been due to decomposition and aromatization reactions during pyrolysis. Rapid heating during earthquake slip may promote reactions of carbonaceous materials that are different from the reactions that occur during long-term geological metamorphism.

  15. High-throughput prediction of eucalypt lignin syringyl/guaiacyl content using multivariate analysis: a comparison between mid-infrared, near-infrared, and Raman spectroscopies for model development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to rapidly and efficiently screen potential biofuel feedstock candidates for quintessential traits, robust high-throughput analytical techniques must be developed and honed. The traditional methods of measuring lignin syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) ratio can be laborious, involve hazardous reagents, and/or be destructive. Vibrational spectroscopy can furnish high-throughput instrumentation without the limitations of the traditional techniques. Spectral data from mid-infrared, near-infrared, and Raman spectroscopies was combined with S/G ratios, obtained using pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry, from 245 different eucalypt and Acacia trees across 17 species. Iterations of spectral processing allowed the assembly of robust predictive models using partial least squares (PLS). Results The PLS models were rigorously evaluated using three different randomly generated calibration and validation sets for each spectral processing approach. Root mean standard errors of prediction for validation sets were lowest for models comprised of Raman (0.13 to 0.16) and mid-infrared (0.13 to 0.15) spectral data, while near-infrared spectroscopy led to more erroneous predictions (0.18 to 0.21). Correlation coefficients (r) for the validation sets followed a similar pattern: Raman (0.89 to 0.91), mid-infrared (0.87 to 0.91), and near-infrared (0.79 to 0.82). These statistics signify that Raman and mid-infrared spectroscopy led to the most accurate predictions of S/G ratio in a diverse consortium of feedstocks. Conclusion Eucalypts present an attractive option for biofuel and biochemical production. Given the assortment of over 900 different species of Eucalyptus and Corymbia, in addition to various species of Acacia, it is necessary to isolate those possessing ideal biofuel traits. This research has demonstrated the validity of vibrational spectroscopy to efficiently partition different potential biofuel feedstocks according to lignin S/G ratio, significantly

  16. The use of Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy (FTR) for the investigation of structural changes in wool fibre keratin after enzymatic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowska, Elżbieta; Rom, Monika; Włochowicz, Andrzej; Wysocki, Marian; Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra

    2004-10-01

    Keratin of wool fibres obtained from Polish Merino Sheep was treated with proteolytic enzyme in buffered conditions. The zoll of orthosilicic acid was applied as a pretreatment, before enzymatic attack. It has been shown that buffer environment has significant influence on the changes in the structure of wool fibre keratin. Depending of the type of buffer utilised, different conformational changes are observed. Ammonia and tetraborate buffers were used (within pH=8.2). Each of the used buffers had a different influence on the changes in the structure of wool fibre keratin. Ammonia buffer caused bigger conformational changes in the region of disulphide bonds while tetraborate buffer disrupted the stability of amide components. To evaluate the changes of wool keratin structure infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were applied.

  17. Determining the Authenticity of Gemstones Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponick, Aaron; Marchozzi, Emedio; Johnston, Cynthia R.; Wigal, Carl T.

    1998-04-01

    The benefits of laser spectroscopy in the undergraduate curriculum have been the focus of several recent articles in this journal. Raman spectroscopy has been of particular interest since the similarities of Raman to conventional infrared spectroscopy make the interpretation of spectral data well within undergraduate comprehension. In addition, the accessibility to this technology is now within the reach of most undergraduate institutions. This paper reports the development of an experiment using Raman spectroscopy which determines the authenticity of both diamonds and pearls. The resulting spectra provide an introduction to vibrational spectroscopy and can be used in a variety of laboratory courses ranging from introductory chemistry to instrumental analysis.

  18. Free-standing gold elliptical nanoantenna with tunable wavelength in near-infrared region for enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Che; Hatab, Nahla A.; Gu, Baohua; Chao, Bo-Kai; Li, Jia-Han; Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) amplifying antenna for the possible usage in the near-infrared region. Instead of the visible-light range amplifying antenna such as a bowtie, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation results indicate that elliptical antenna could provide large electromagnetic field enhancement at near-infrared wavelength by combining the free-standing enhancement property with large aspect ratios of the ellipse geometry. The simulation results consist with the enhancement factors characterized by SERS measurements at the excited wavelength of 785 nm for different aspect ratios and periodicities. In addition to the redshift of the resonance wavelength as the aspect ratio of ellipse increases, the free-standing structure modifies the resonance behavior and the dielectric environment of antenna by elevating the elliptical disk from the substrate. To interpret the simulation results, the analytical solution of resonance wavelength for ellipsoid dimmer is derived based on Lorentz-Mie theory, and comparisons are made between the analytical solution and simulation results. The quasi-static analytical solution provides a way to characterize the resonance behavior of two ellipsoid particles as a function of the gap distance, aspect ratio, and dielectric environment. The electrodynamic analysis for the periodic structure was performed in our FDTD simulations.

  19. Raman spectroscopy in halophile research.

    PubMed

    Jehlička, Jan; Oren, Aharon

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy plays a major role in robust detection of biomolecules and mineral signatures in halophile research. An overview of Raman spectroscopic investigations in halophile research of the last decade is given here to show advantages of the approach, progress made as well as limits of the technique. Raman spectroscopy is an excellent tool to monitor and identify microbial pigments and other biomolecules in extant and extinct halophile biomass. Studies of bottom gypsum crusts from salterns, native evaporitic sediments, halite inclusions, and endoliths as well as cultures of halophilic microorganisms permitted to understand the content, distribution, and behavior of important molecular species. The first papers describing Raman spectroscopic detection of microbiological and geochemical key markers using portable instruments are highlighted as well. PMID:24339823

  20. Raman spectroscopy in halophile research

    PubMed Central

    Jehlička, Jan; Oren, Aharon

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy plays a major role in robust detection of biomolecules and mineral signatures in halophile research. An overview of Raman spectroscopic investigations in halophile research of the last decade is given here to show advantages of the approach, progress made as well as limits of the technique. Raman spectroscopy is an excellent tool to monitor and identify microbial pigments and other biomolecules in extant and extinct halophile biomass. Studies of bottom gypsum crusts from salterns, native evaporitic sediments, halite inclusions, and endoliths as well as cultures of halophilic microorganisms permitted to understand the content, distribution, and behavior of important molecular species. The first papers describing Raman spectroscopic detection of microbiological and geochemical key markers using portable instruments are highlighted as well. PMID:24339823

  1. Raman spectroscopy of shocked water

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Graham, W.B.; Walrafen, G.E.

    1983-07-01

    Raman scattering has been used extensively to study the vibrational and rotational properties of molecules under a variety of conditions. Here, interest is in the behavior of water molecules shocked to high pressures and temperatures. Behind the shock front the water molecules undergo changes in bonding and the molecules may become ionized. Raman spectroscopy can be used to determine the molecular species behind the shock front. In addition, changes in Raman spectra can yield information regarding inter- and intramolecular potentials and the temperature behind the shock front.

  2. Far-Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy Investigation of Phonon Modes in Amorphous and Crystalline Epitaxial GeTe-Sb2Te3 Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragaglia, V.; Holldack, K.; Boschker, J. E.; Arciprete, F.; Zallo, E.; Flissikowski, T.; Calarco, R.

    2016-06-01

    A combination of far-infrared and Raman spectroscopy is employed to investigate vibrational modes and the carrier behavior in amorphous and crystalline ordered GeTe-Sb2Te3 alloys (GST) epitaxially grown on Si(111). The infrared active GST mode is not observed in the Raman spectra and vice versa, indication of the fact that inversion symmetry is preserved in the metastable cubic phase in accordance with the Fm3 space group. For the trigonal phase, instead, a partial symmetry break due to Ge/Sb mixed anion layers is observed. By studying the crystallization process upon annealing with both the techniques, we identify temperature regions corresponding to the occurrence of different phases as well as the transition from one phase to the next. Activation energies of 0.43 eV and 0.08 eV for the electron conduction are obtained for both cubic and trigonal phases, respectively. In addition a metal-insulator transition is clearly identified to occur at the onset of the transition between the disordered and the ordered cubic phase.

  3. Far-Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy Investigation of Phonon Modes in Amorphous and Crystalline Epitaxial GeTe-Sb2Te3 Alloys.

    PubMed

    Bragaglia, V; Holldack, K; Boschker, J E; Arciprete, F; Zallo, E; Flissikowski, T; Calarco, R

    2016-01-01

    A combination of far-infrared and Raman spectroscopy is employed to investigate vibrational modes and the carrier behavior in amorphous and crystalline ordered GeTe-Sb2Te3 alloys (GST) epitaxially grown on Si(111). The infrared active GST mode is not observed in the Raman spectra and vice versa, indication of the fact that inversion symmetry is preserved in the metastable cubic phase in accordance with the Fm3 space group. For the trigonal phase, instead, a partial symmetry break due to Ge/Sb mixed anion layers is observed. By studying the crystallization process upon annealing with both the techniques, we identify temperature regions corresponding to the occurrence of different phases as well as the transition from one phase to the next. Activation energies of 0.43 eV and 0.08 eV for the electron conduction are obtained for both cubic and trigonal phases, respectively. In addition a metal-insulator transition is clearly identified to occur at the onset of the transition between the disordered and the ordered cubic phase. PMID:27340085

  4. Far-Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy Investigation of Phonon Modes in Amorphous and Crystalline Epitaxial GeTe-Sb2Te3 Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Bragaglia, V.; Holldack, K.; Boschker, J. E.; Arciprete, F.; Zallo, E.; Flissikowski, T.; Calarco, R.

    2016-01-01

    A combination of far-infrared and Raman spectroscopy is employed to investigate vibrational modes and the carrier behavior in amorphous and crystalline ordered GeTe-Sb2Te3 alloys (GST) epitaxially grown on Si(111). The infrared active GST mode is not observed in the Raman spectra and vice versa, indication of the fact that inversion symmetry is preserved in the metastable cubic phase in accordance with the Fm3 space group. For the trigonal phase, instead, a partial symmetry break due to Ge/Sb mixed anion layers is observed. By studying the crystallization process upon annealing with both the techniques, we identify temperature regions corresponding to the occurrence of different phases as well as the transition from one phase to the next. Activation energies of 0.43 eV and 0.08 eV for the electron conduction are obtained for both cubic and trigonal phases, respectively. In addition a metal-insulator transition is clearly identified to occur at the onset of the transition between the disordered and the ordered cubic phase. PMID:27340085

  5. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  6. Investigating Antibacterial Effects of Garlic (Allium sativum) Concentrate and Garlic-Derived Organosulfur Compounds on Campylobacter jejuni by Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and Electron Microscopy ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaonan; Rasco, Barbara A.; Jabal, Jamie M. F.; Aston, D. Eric; Lin, Mengshi; Konkel, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to study the cell injury and inactivation of Campylobacter jejuni from exposure to antioxidants from garlic. C. jejuni was treated with various concentrations of garlic concentrate and garlic-derived organosulfur compounds in growth media and saline at 4, 22, and 35°C. The antimicrobial activities of the diallyl sulfides increased with the number of sulfur atoms (diallyl sulfide < diallyl disulfide < diallyl trisulfide). FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed that organosulfur compounds are responsible for the substantial antimicrobial activity of garlic, much greater than those of garlic phenolic compounds, as indicated by changes in the spectral features of proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides in the bacterial cell membranes. Confocal Raman microscopy (532-nm-gold-particle substrate) and Raman mapping of a single bacterium confirmed the intracellular uptake of sulfur and phenolic components. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to verify cell damage. Principal-component analysis (PCA), discriminant function analysis (DFA), and soft independent modeling of class analogs (SIMCA) were performed, and results were cross validated to differentiate bacteria based upon the degree of cell injury. Partial least-squares regression (PLSR) was employed to quantify and predict actual numbers of healthy and injured bacterial cells remaining following treatment. PLSR-based loading plots were investigated to further verify the changes in the cell membrane of C. jejuni treated with organosulfur compounds. We demonstrated that bacterial injury and inactivation could be accurately investigated by complementary infrared and Raman spectroscopies using a chemical-based, “whole-organism fingerprint” with the aid of chemometrics and electron microscopy. PMID:21642409

  7. Raman spectroscopy of white wines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Coralie; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Guyon, François; Médina, Bernard; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Guillaume, François

    2015-08-15

    The feasibility of exploiting Raman scattering to analyze white wines has been investigated using 3 different wavelengths of the incoming laser radiation in the near-UV (325 nm), visible (532 nm) and near infrared (785 nm). To help in the interpretation of the Raman spectra, the absorption properties in the UV-visible range of two wine samples as well as their laser induced fluorescence have also been investigated. Thanks to the strong intensity enhancement of the Raman scattered light due to electronic resonance with 325 nm laser excitation, hydroxycinnamic acids may be detected and analyzed selectively. Fructose and glucose may also be easily detected below ca. 1000 cm(-1). This feasibility study demonstrates the potential of the Raman spectroscopic technique for the analysis of white wines. PMID:25794745

  8. A near-infrared Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy of epidermal keratinocytes: changes in the protein?DNA structure following malignant transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaoling; Butler, Ian S.; Kremer, Richard

    2005-01-01

    We report here the use of near-infrared (NIR) Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy to analyze normal human epidermal keratinocytes prior to and following malignant transformation. Our analysis indicates specific Raman spectral differences between immortalized (HPK1A) and malignant ras transformed (HPK1A- ras) cells. In addition, striking spectral differences are seen in the DNA isolated from these cells and particularly in the 843/810 cm -1 ratio with values of 1.6 ± 0.13 in HPK1A cells and 0.68 ± 0.09 in HPK1A- ras cells (mean ± S.D., n = 12, P < 0.001) indicating specific alterations in the backbone conformation markers following malignant transformation. Subsequently, we analysed the effect of a strong inhibitor of keratinocyte growth, the Vitamin D analog EB1089, on the Raman spectra of intact cells and on the 843/810 cm -1 ratio in the DNA isolated from both cell lines. Specific changes were observed in intact cells in the 1300-750 cm -1 region. Furthermore, the 843/810cm -1 ratio of isolated DNA from HPK1A cells was not affected by EB1089 but significantly increased in DNA isolated from HPK1A-ras cells so much that it became closer to the value observed for HPK1A cells (1.07 ± 0.10). Our data suggest that Raman analysis of DNA and in particular the 843/810cm -1 ratio can provide useful indices of malignant transformation and efficacy of anticancer agents.

  9. Doping inhomogeneity and staging of ultra-thin graphite intercalation compound flakes probed by visible and near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Li, Xiao-Li; Li, Qiao-Qiao; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2015-07-01

    When ultra-thin graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) are deposited on the SiO2/Si substrate, it is found that their colors are dependent on the thickness of GIC flakes. The sample colors of ultrathin GIC flakes can no longer provide qualitative information on the stage index. Here, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy is thus applied to study the doping inhomogeneity and staging of ultra-thin GICs by FeCl3 intercalation. The G band intensity of stage-1 GIC flakes is strongly enhanced by 532-nm laser excitation, while that of stage-2 and stage-3 flakes exhibits strong intensity enhancement for 785-nm laser excitation. The near-infrared lasers are suggested to probe the doping inhomogeneity and staging of ultra-thin GIC flakes. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11225421, 11474277, and 11434010).

  10. Raman Spectroscopy of Amorphous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Friedmann, T.A.; Missert, N.A.; Siegal, M.P.; Sullivan, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Amorphous carbon is an elemental form of carbon with low hydrogen content, which may be deposited in thin films by the impact of high energy carbon atoms or ions. It is structurally distinct from the more well-known elemental forms of carbon, diamond and graphite. It is distinct in physical and chemical properties from the material known as diamond-like carbon, a form which is also amorphous but which has a higher hydrogen content, typically near 40 atomic percent. Amorphous carbon also has distinctive Raman spectra, whose patterns depend, through resonance enhancement effects, not only on deposition conditions but also on the wavelength selected for Raman excitation. This paper provides an overview of the Raman spectroscopy of amorphous carbon and describes how Raman spectral patterns correlate to film deposition conditions, physical properties and molecular level structure.

  11. Combining Raman and infrared spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the structural elucidation of cyclodextrin-based polymeric hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Venuti, V; Rossi, B; D'Amico, F; Mele, A; Castiglione, F; Punta, C; Melone, L; Crupi, V; Majolino, D; Trotta, F; Gessini, A; Masciovecchio, C

    2015-04-21

    A detailed experimental and theoretical vibrational analysis of hydrogels of β-cyclodextrin nanosponges (β-CDNS), obtained by polymerization of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with the cross-linking agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), is reported here. Thorough structural characterization is achieved by exploiting the complementary selection rules of FTIR-ATR and Raman spectroscopies and by supporting the spectral assignments by DFT calculations of the spectral profiles. The combined analysis of the FTIR-ATR spectra of the polymers hydrated with H2O and D2O allowed us to isolate the HOH bending of water molecules not involved in symmetrical, tetrahedral environments. The analysis of the HOH bending mode was carried out as a function of temperature, showing the existence of a supercooled state of the water molecules. The highest level of cooperativity of the hydrogen bond scheme was reached at a value of the β-CD/EDTA molar ratio n = 6. Finally, the connectivity pattern of "uncoupled" water molecules bound to the nanosponge backbone was found to be weakened by increasing T. The temperature above which the population of non-tetracoordinated water molecules becomes predominant turned out to be independent of the parameter n. PMID:25798878

  12. [Infrared and Raman spectra study on Tianhuang].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-gui; Chen, Tao

    2012-08-01

    The Tianhuang stones, from Shoushan in China, were studied by using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy to obtain the spectra characterization. Wave numbers 3621, 3629 and 3631 cm(-1) in the IR spectra and 3626, 3627 and 3632 cm(-1) in the Raman spectra are the characteristic peaks of dickitic Tianhuang, nacritic Tianhuang and illitic Tianhuang, respectively. Raman spectra assigned to OH are in good agreement with the IR results at 3550 -3750 cm(-1). Dickitic Tianhuang includes ordered dickite and disordered dickite. Compared with ordered dickite, the band assigned to OH3 of disordered dickite shifts to low-frequency by 8 cm(-1) and the relative intensity becomes stronger. The disorder structure may relate to the high level of Fe. The IR absorption spectra of nacritic Tianhuang superimposes strong peaks of dickite, indicating that IR absorption bands of dickite are stronger than that of nacrite at 3550-3750 cm(-1). The main mineral composition of illitic Tianhuang is 2M(1), while illite Tianhuang contains a small amount of 1M. All these characters provide a theoretical basis for the scientific identification of Tianhuang. PMID:23156769

  13. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculation studies of C H⋯O hydrogen bondings and thermal behavior of biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Harumi; Dybal, Jiří; Murakami, Rumi; Noda, Isao; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2005-06-01

    This review paper reports infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculation studies of C-H⋯O hydrogen bondings and thermal behavior of biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates. IR and Raman spectra were measured for poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and a new type of bacterial copolyester, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate- co-3-hydroxyhexanoate), P(HB- co-HHx) (HHx=12 mol%) over a temperature range of 20 °C to higher temperatures (PHB, 200 °C; HHx=12 mol%, 140 °C) to explore their structure and thermal behavior. One of bands due to the CH 3 asymmetric stretching modes appears near 3010 cm -1 in the IR and Raman spectra of PHB and P(HB- co-HHx) at 20 °C. These frequencies of IR and Raman CH 3 asymmetric stretching bands are much higher than usual. These anomalous frequencies of the CH 3 asymmetric stretching bands together with the X-ray crystallographic structure of PHB have suggested that there is an inter- or intra-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bond between the C dbnd6 O group in one helical structure and the CH 3 group in the other helical structure in PHB and P(HB- co-HHx). The quantum chemical calculation of model compounds of PHB also has suggested the existence of C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds in PHB and P(HB- co-HHx). It is very likely that a chain of C-H⋯O hydrogen bond pairs link two parallel helical structures in the crystalline parts. The temperature-dependent IR and Raman spectral variations have revealed that the crystallinity of P(HB- co-HHx) (HHx=12 mol%) decreases gradually from a fairly low temperature (about 60 °C), while the crystallinity of PHB remains almost unchanged until just below its melting temperature. It has also been found from the IR and Raman studies that for both PHB and P(HB- co-HHx) the weakening of the C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds starts from just above room temperature, but the deformation of helical structures occurs after the weakening of the C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds advances to some extent.

  14. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrell, Robin L.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the basis for the technique and its experimental requirements. Describes a few examples of the analytical problems to which surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been and can be applied. Provides a perspective on the current limitations and frontiers in developing SERS as an analytical technique. (MVL)

  15. Raman and photothermal spectroscopies for explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finot, Eric; Brulé, Thibault; Rai, Padmnabh; Griffart, Aurélien; Bouhélier, Alexandre; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Detection of explosive residues using portable devices for locating landmine and terrorist weapons must sat- isfy the application criteria of high reproducibility, specificity, sensitivity and fast response time. Vibrational spectroscopies such as Raman and infrared spectroscopies have demonstrated their potential to distinguish the members of the chemical family of more than 30 explosive materials. The characteristic chemical fingerprints in the spectra of these explosives stem from the unique bond structure of each compound. However, these spectroscopies, developed in the early sixties, suffer from a poor sensitivity. On the contrary, MEMS-based chemical sensors have shown to have very high sensitivity lowering the detection limit down to less than 1 picogram, (namely 10 part per trillion) using sensor platforms based on microcantilevers, plasmonics, or surface acoustic waves. The minimum amount of molecules that can be detected depends actually on the transducer size. The selectivity in MEMS sensors is usually realized using chemical modification of the active surface. However, the lack of sufficiently selective receptors that can be immobilized on MEMS sensors remains one of the most critical issues. Microcantilever based sensors offer an excellent opportunity to combine both the infrared photothermal spectroscopy in their static mode and the unique mass sensitivity in their dynamic mode. Optical sensors based on localized plasmon resonance can also take up the challenge of addressing the selectivity by monitoring the Surface Enhanced Raman spectrum down to few molecules. The operating conditions of these promising localized spectroscopies will be discussed in terms of reliability, compactness, data analysis and potential for mass deployment.

  16. Raman spectroscopy for optical diagnosis of laryngeal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Seng Khoon; Zheng, Wei; Lau, David P.; Huang, Zhiwei

    2008-02-01

    In this report, the diagnostic ability of near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy for identifying the malignant tumors from normal tissues in the larynx was studied. A rapid NIR Raman system was utilized. Multivariate statistical techniques were employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms. Raman spectra in the range of 800-1,800 cm-1 differed significantly between normal and malignant tumor tissues. The diagnostic algorithms can yielded a diagnostic sensitivity of 92.9% and specificity 83.3% for separating malignant tumors from normal laryngeal tissues. NIR Raman spectroscopy with multivariate statistical techniques has a potential for the non-invasive detection of malignant tumors in the larynx.

  17. Raman spectroscopy of illicit substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Robert J.; Faulds, Karen; Smith, W. Ewen

    2007-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides a very effective method of identifying an illicit substance in situ without separation or contact other than with a laser beam. The equipment required is steadily improving and is now reliable and simple to operate. Costs are also coming down and hand held portable spectrometers are proving very effective. The main limitations on the use of the technique are that it is insensitive in terms of the number of incident photons converted into Raman scattered photons and fluorescence produced in the sample by the incident radiation interferes. Newer methods, still largely in the development phase, will increase the potential for selected applications. The use of picosecond pulsed lasers can discriminate between fluorescence and Raman scattering and this has been used in the laboratory to examine street samples of illicit drugs. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering, in which the analyte requires to be adsorbed onto a roughened metal surface, creates a sensitivity to compete with fluorescence and quenches fluorescence for molecules on a surface. This provides the ability to detect trace amounts of substances in some cases. The improving optics, detection capability and the reliability of the new methods indicate that the potential for the use of Raman spectroscopy for security purposes will increase with time.

  18. Adsorption of Amino Acids (Ala, Cys, His, Met) on Zeolites: Fourier Transform Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Cristine E. A.; de Santana, Henrique; Casado, Clara; Coronas, Joaquin; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    2011-06-01

    Minerals adsorb more amino acids with charged R-groups than amino acids with uncharged R-groups. Thus, the peptides that form from the condensation of amino acids on the surface of minerals should be composed of amino acid residues that are more charged than uncharged. However, most of the amino acids (74%) in today's proteins have an uncharged R-group. One mechanism with which to solve this paradox is the use of organophilic minerals such as zeolites. Over the range of pH (pH 2.66-4.50) used in these experiments, the R-group of histidine (His) is positively charged and neutral for alanine (Ala), cysteine (Cys), and methionine (Met). In acidic hydrothermal environments, the pH could be even lower than those used in this study. For the pH range studied, the zeolites were negatively charged, and the overall charge of all amino acids was positive. The conditions used here approximate those of prebiotic Earth. The most important finding of this work is that the relative concentrations of each amino acid (X=His, Met, Cys) to alanine (X/Ala) are close to 1.00. This is an important result with regard to prebiotic chemistry because it could be a solution for the paradox stated above. Pore size did not affect the adsorption of Cys and Met on zeolites, and the Si/Al ratio did not affect the adsorption of Cys, His, and Met. ZSM-5 could be used for the purification of Cys from other amino acids (Student-Newman-Keuls test, p<0.05), and mordenite could be used for separation of amino acids from each other (Student-Newman-Keuls test, p<0.05). As shown by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, Ala interacts with zeolites through the group, and methionine-zeolite interactions involve the COO, , and CH3 groups. FT-IR spectra show that the interaction between the zeolites and His is weak. Cys showed higher adsorption on all zeolites; however, the hydrophobic Van der Waals interaction between zeolites and Cys is too weak to produce any structural changes in the Cys groups (amine

  19. In vitro analysis of riboflavin-modified, experimental, two-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro-Raman studies

    PubMed Central

    Daood, Umer; Swee Heng, Chan; Neo Chiew Lian, Jennifer; Fawzy, Amr S

    2015-01-01

    To modify two-step experimental etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and to study its effect on the bond strength, degree of conversion, along with resin infiltration within the demineralized dentin substrate, an experimental adhesive-system was modified with different concentrations of riboflavin (m/m, 0, 1%, 3%, 5% and 10%). Dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid, bonded with respective adhesives, restored with restorative composite–resin, and sectioned into resin–dentin slabs and beams to be stored for 24 h or 9 months in artificial saliva. Micro-tensile bond testing was performed with scanning electron microscopy to analyse the failure of debonded beams. The degree of conversion was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) at different time points along with micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis. Data was analyzed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's for pair-wise comparison. Modification with 1% and 3% riboflavin increased the micro-tensile bond strength compared to the control at 24 h and 9-month storage with no significant differences in degree of conversion (P<0.05). The most predominant failure mode was the mixed fracture among all specimens except 10% riboflavin-modified adhesive specimens where cohesive failure was predominant. Raman analysis revealed that 1% and 3% riboflavin adhesives specimens showed relatively higher resin infiltration. The incorporation of riboflavin in the experimental two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive at 3% (m/m) improved the immediate bond strengths and bond durability after 9-month storage in artificial saliva without adversely affecting the degree of conversion of the adhesive monomers and resin infiltration. PMID:25257880

  20. In vitro analysis of riboflavin-modified, experimental, two-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro-Raman studies.

    PubMed

    Daood, Umer; Swee Heng, Chan; Neo Chiew Lian, Jennifer; Fawzy, Amr S

    2015-06-01

    To modify two-step experimental etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and to study its effect on the bond strength, degree of conversion, along with resin infiltration within the demineralized dentin substrate, an experimental adhesive-system was modified with different concentrations of riboflavin (m/m, 0, 1%, 3%, 5% and 10%). Dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid, bonded with respective adhesives, restored with restorative composite-resin, and sectioned into resin-dentin slabs and beams to be stored for 24 h or 9 months in artificial saliva. Micro-tensile bond testing was performed with scanning electron microscopy to analyse the failure of debonded beams. The degree of conversion was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) at different time points along with micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis. Data was analyzed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's for pair-wise comparison. Modification with 1% and 3% riboflavin increased the micro-tensile bond strength compared to the control at 24 h and 9-month storage with no significant differences in degree of conversion (P<0.05). The most predominant failure mode was the mixed fracture among all specimens except 10% riboflavin-modified adhesive specimens where cohesive failure was predominant. Raman analysis revealed that 1% and 3% riboflavin adhesives specimens showed relatively higher resin infiltration. The incorporation of riboflavin in the experimental two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive at 3% (m/m) improved the immediate bond strengths and bond durability after 9-month storage in artificial saliva without adversely affecting the degree of conversion of the adhesive monomers and resin infiltration. PMID:25257880

  1. Raman spectroscopy of bone metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Sottnik, Joseph; Morris, Michael; Keller, Evan

    2012-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy of bone has been used to characterize chemical changes occurring in diseases such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and osteomyelitis. Metastasis of cancer into bone causes changes to bone quality that are similar to those observed in osteoporosis, such as decreased bone strength, but with an accelerated timeframe. In particular, osteolytic (bone degrading) lesions in bone metastasis have a marked effect on patient quality of life because of increased risk of fractures, pain, and hypercalcemia. We use Raman spectroscopy to examine bone from two different mouse models of osteolytic bone metastasis. Raman spectroscopy measures physicochemical information which cannot be obtained through standard biochemical and histological measurements. This study was reviewed and approved by the University of Michigan University Committee on the Care and Use of Animals. Two mouse models of prostate cancer bone metastasis, RM1 (n=3) and PC3-luc (n=4) were examined. Tibiae were injected with RM1 or PC3-luc cancer cells, while the contralateral tibiae received a placebo injection for use as controls. After 2 weeks of incubation, the mice were sacrificed and the tibiae were examined by Raman microspectroscopy (λ=785 nm). Spectroscopic markers corresponding to mineral stoichiometry, bone mineralization, and mineral crystallinity were compared in spectra from the cancerous and control tibiae. X-ray imaging of the tibia confirmed extensive osteolysis in the RM1 mice, with tumor invasion into adjoining soft tissue and moderate osteolysis in the PC3-luc mice. Raman spectroscopic markers indicate that osteolytic lesions are less mineralized than normal bone tissue, with an altered mineral stoichiometry and crystallinity.

  2. Identifying Raman and Infrared Vibrational Motions of Erythritol Tetranitrate.

    PubMed

    Oleske, Jeffrey B; Smith, Barry T; Barber, Jeffrey; Weatherall, James C

    2015-12-01

    The vibrational bands of erythritol tetranitrate (ETN) were measured experimentally with both Raman spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. Seventy-two (3N-6) vibrational modes were predicted for ETN using density functional theory calculations performed using the B3LYP/6-31G* density functional basis set and geometry optimization. Raman spectroscopy and ATR FT-IR were used to measure observable Raman and IR signatures between 140 and 3100 wavenumbers (cm(-1)). Within this spectral range, 32 Raman bands and 21 IR bands were measured and identified by their predicted vibrational motion. The spectroscopic and theoretical analysis of ETN performed will advance the detection and identification capabilities of field measuring instruments for this explosive. PMID:26647149

  3. FT-Raman Spectroscopy: A Catalyst for the Raman Explosion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The limitations of Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy, which is used to detect and analyze the scattered radiation, are discussed. FT-Raman has served to revitalize a field that was lagging and the presence of Raman instrumentation as a routine analytical tool is established for the foreseeable future.

  4. Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy of Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Jason R.

    Clinical diagnoses of bone health and fracture risk typically rely upon measurements of bone density or structure, but the strength of a bone is also dependent upon its chemical composition. One technology that has been used extensively in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies to measure the chemical composition of bone is Raman spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique provides chemical information about a sample by probing its molecular vibrations. In the case of bone tissue, Raman spectra provide chemical information about both the inorganic mineral and organic matrix components, which each contribute to bone strength. To explore the relationship between bone strength and chemical composition, our laboratory has contributed to ex vivo, exposed-bone animal studies of rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, and prolonged lead exposure. All of these studies suggest that Raman-based predictions of biomechanical strength may be more accurate than those produced by the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. The utility of Raman spectroscopy in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies has inspired attempts to perform bone spectroscopy transcutaneously. Although the results are promising, further advancements are necessary to make non-invasive, in vivo measurements of bone that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk. In order to separate the signals from bone and soft tissue that contribute to a transcutaneous measurement, we developed an overconstrained extraction algorithm that is based upon fitting with spectral libraries derived from separately-acquired measurements of the underlying tissue components. This approach allows for accurate spectral unmixing despite the fact that similar chemical components (e.g., type I collagen) are present in both soft tissue and bone and was applied to experimental data in order to transcutaneously detect, to our knowledge for the first time, age- and disease-related spectral

  5. Infrared and Raman Imaging of Heterogeneous Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    E Stavistki; B Weckhuysen

    2011-12-31

    The miniaturization of in situ spectroscopic tools has been recognized as a forefront instrumental development for the characterization of heterogeneous catalysts. With the multitude of micro-spectroscopic methods available fundamental insight into the structure-function relationships of catalytic processes can be obtained. Among these techniques vibrational spectroscopy is one of the most versatile methods and capable to shed insight into the molecular structure of reaction intermediates and products, the chemical state of catalyst materials during reaction as well as the nature of interactions between reactants/intermediates/products and the catalyst surface. In this tutorial review we discuss the recent developments in the field of infrared (IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy and illustrate their potential. Showcase examples include (1) chemical imaging of spatial heterogeneities during catalyst preparation, (2) high-throughput catalyst screening, (3) transport and adsorption phenomena within catalytic solids and (4) reactivity studies of porous oxides, such as zeolites. Finally, new in situ spectroscopy tools based on vibrational spectroscopy and their potential in the catalysis domain are discussed.

  6. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  7. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy in Mineral Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for rapid identification of minerals and gemstones. Raman spectrometers also allow PL studies for authentication of samples and geological provenance, diamond type screening and detection of HPHT treatments.

  8. Determining the amounts of urea and glucose in urine of patients with renal complications from diabetes mellitus and hypertension by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bispo, Jeyse A. M.; Silveira, Landulfo; Vieira, Elzo E. d. S.; Fernandes, Adriana B.

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus and hypertension diseases are frequently found in the same patient, which if untreated predispose to atherosclerotic and kidney diseases. The objective of this study was to identify potential biomarkers in the urine of diabetic and hypertensive patients through dispersive near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Urine samples were collected from patients with diabetes and hypertension but no complications (LG), high degree of complications (HG), and control ones: one fraction was submitted to biochemical tests and another one was stored frozen (-20°C) until spectral analysis. Samples were warmed up and placed in an aluminum sample holder for Raman spectra collection using a dispersive spectrometer (830 nm wavelength, 300 mW laser power and 20 s exposure time). Spectra were then submitted to Principal Components Analysis. The PCA loading vectors 1 and 3 revealed spectral features of urea/creatinine and glucose, respectively; the PCA scores showed that patients with diabetes/hypertension (LG and HG) had higher amount of glucose in the urine compared to the normal group (p < 0.05), which can bring serious consequences to patients. Also, the PCA scores showed that the amount of urea decreased in the groups with diabetes/hypertension (p < 0.05), which generates the same concern as it is a marker that has a strong importance in the metabolic changes induced by such diseases. These results, applied to the analysis of urine of patients with diabetes/hypertension, can lead to early diagnostic information of complications and a possible disease prognosis in the patients where no complications from diabetes and hypertension were found.

  9. Raman spectroscopies in shock-compressed materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.; Shaner, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering have been used to measure temperatures and changes in molecular vibrational frequencies for detonating and shocked materials. Inverse Raman and Raman induced Kerr effect spectroscopies have been suggested as diagnostic probes for determining and phenomenology of shock-induced chemical reactions. The practicality, advantages, and disadvantages of using Raman scattering techniques as diagnostic probes of microscopic phenomenology through and immediately behind the shock front of shock-compressed molecular systems are discussed.

  10. Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Shyam N.

    The discovery of near-infrared energy is ascribed to Herschel in the nineteenth century; the first industrial application however began in the 1950s. Initially near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used only as an add-on unit to other optical devices, that used other wavelengths such as ultraviolet (UV), visible (Vis), or mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometers. In the 1980s, a single unit, stand-alone NIRS system was made available, but the application of NIRS was focused more on chemical analysis. With the introduction of light-fibre optics in the mid 1980s and the monochromator-detector developments in early 1990s, NIRS became a more powerful tool for scientific research. This optical method can be used in a number of fields of science including physics, physiology, medicine and food.

  11. Detailed structural study of β-artemether: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of Infrared, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jianchao; Li, Linwei; Zhou, Zhixu; Geng, Yiding; Sun, Tiemin

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the experimental and theoretical studies on the structure of β-artemether are presented. The optimized molecular structure, Mulliken atomic charges, vibrational spectra (IR, Raman and vibrational circular dichroism), and molecular electrostatic potential have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (2d, p) basis set. Reliable vibrational assignments for Artemether have been made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) has been explored by ab initio calculations, and then was used to compare with the experimental VCD. The consistence between them confirmed the absolute configuration of Artemether. In addition, HOMO-LUMO of the title compound as well as thermo-dynamical parameters has illustrated the stability of β-artemether.

  12. Applications of Raman scattering spectroscopy to halide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendow, B.; Banerjee, P. K.; Drexhage, M. G.

    1983-04-01

    Polarized Raman scattering spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating fundamental vibrational properties, structure and bonding, origins of IR edge absorption, and dispersion of the IR refractive index. In this paper, the application of Raman spectroscopy to halide glasses and, in particular, heavy metal fluoride glasses, is described. The spectra of the latter differ substantially from those of simple oxide, halide or chalcogenide glasses and, moreover, display a wide range of vibrational characteristics, depending on composition. In combination with infrared spectroscopy, useful guidelines can be developed for tailoring glass compositions for specific applications.

  13. Coherent and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy in shocked and unshocked liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.; Schiferl, D.; Chatelet, M.; Turner, T.P.; Shaner, J.W.; Shampine, D.L.; Holt, W.T.

    1985-01-01

    Coherent and non-coherent Raman spectroscopy is being used to study the structure and energy transfer in molecular liquids at high pressures. Stimulated Raman scattering, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, and Raman induced Kerr effect scattering measurements have been performed in liquid benzene and liquid nitromethane shocked to pressures up to 11 GPa. Frequency shifts were observed for the 992 cm/sup -1/ ring stretching mode of benzene and the 920 cm/sup -1/ CN stretching mode of nitromethane. Results of these dynamic experiments are compared to spontaneous Raman scattering measurements made in a high temperature diamond anvil cell. Also, a picosecond infrared pump/spontaneous anti-Strokes Raman probe experiment is being used to measure CH stretch vibrational relaxation times in liquid halogenated methanes statically compressed to a few tenths GPa. 87 refs., 17 figs.

  14. Experimental demonstration of mode-selective phonon excitation of 6H-SiC by a mid-infrared laser with anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kyohei; Hachiya, Kan; Okumura, Kensuke; Mishima, Kenta; Inukai, Motoharu; Torgasin, Konstantin; Omer, Mohamed; Sonobe, Taro; Zen, Heishun; Negm, Hani; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-10-28

    Mode-selective phonon excitation by a mid-infrared laser (MIR-FEL) is demonstrated via anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements of 6H-silicon carbide (SiC). Irradiation of SiC with MIR-FEL and a Nd-YAG laser at 14 K produced a peak where the Raman shift corresponds to a photon energy of 119 meV (10.4 μm). This phenomenon is induced by mode-selective phonon excitation through the irradiation of MIR-FEL, whose photon energy corresponds to the photon-absorption of a particular phonon mode.

  15. PdSi focal-plane array detectors for short-wave infrared Raman spectroscopy of biological tissue: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, James F., III; Beattie, Mark E.; Wang, Yang; Cantella, Michael J.; Tsaur, Bor-Yeu; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    1996-10-01

    We have used a PdSi focal-plane array detector to measure short-wave infrared Raman spectra of pure compounds and human tissue. Raman bands of the pure compounds are clearly visible in the spectra, and a calcification feature at 960 cm -1 is readily identifiable in the spectra of diseased human aorta. The performance characteristics of our detection device were good; dark noise contributed approximately 60 (electrons/s)/pixel, and the read noise was approximately 50 rms electrons/pixel. The primary noise in the spectra was due to fixed-pattern noise, which is the variation in measured signal across a detector when it is uniformly illuminated.

  16. An Introductory Infrared Spectroscopy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Kenneth R.; Smith, Wendy D.; Thomsen, Marcus W.; Yoder, Claude H.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a project designed to introduce infrared spectroscopy as a structure-determination technique. Students are introduced to infrared spectroscopy fundamentals then try to determine the identity of an unknown liquid from its infrared spectrum and molecular weight. The project demonstrates that only rarely can the identity of even simple…

  17. Transient infrared emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.W.; McClelland, J.F.

    1989-04-01

    Transient infrared emission spectroscopy (TIRES) is a new method that produces analytically useful emission spectra from optically thick, solid samples by greatly reducing self-absorption of emitted radiation. The method reduces self-absorption by creating a thin, short-lived, heated layer at the sample surface and collecting the transient emission from this layer. The technique requires no sample preparation and may be applied to both moving and stationary samples. The single-ended, noncontact TIRES measurement geometry is ideal for on-line and other remote-sensing applications. TIRES spectra acquired via a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer on moving samples of coal, plastic, and paint are presented and compared to photoacoustic absorption spectra of these materials. The TIRES and photoacoustic results are in close agreement as predicted by Kirchhoff's law.

  18. Water and magmas: insights about the water solution mechanisms in alkali silicate melts from infrared, Raman, and 29Si solid-state NMR spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Mysen, Bjorn O.; Cody, George D.

    2015-12-01

    Degassing of water during the ascent of hydrous magma in a volcanic edifice produces dramatic changes in the magma density and viscosity. This can profoundly affect the dynamics of volcanic eruptions. The water exsolution history, in turn, is driven by the water solubility and solution mechanisms in the silicate melt. Previous studies pointed to dissolved water in silicate glasses and melts existing as molecules (H2Omol species) and hydroxyl groups, OH. These latter OH groups commonly are considered bonded to Si4+ but may form other bonds, such as with alkali or alkaline-earth cations, for instance. Those forms of bonding influence the structure of hydrous melts in different ways and, therefore, their properties. As a result, exsolution of water from magmas may have different eruptive consequences depending on the initial bonding mechanisms of the dissolved water. However, despite their importance, the solution mechanisms of water in silicate melts are not clear. In particular, how chemical composition of melts affects water solubility and solution mechanism is not well understood. In the present experimental study, components of such information are reported via determination of how water interacts with the cationic network of alkali (Li, Na, and K) silicate quenched melts. Results from 29Si single-pulse magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si SP MAS NMR), infrared, and Raman spectroscopies show that decreasing the ionic radius of alkali metal cation in silicate melts results in decreasing fraction of water dissolved as OH groups. The nature of OH bonding also changes as the alkali ionic radius changes. Therefore, as the speciation and bonding of water controls the degree of polymerization of melts, water will have different effects on the transport properties of silicate melts depending on their chemical composition. This conclusion, in turn, may affect volcanic phenomena related to the viscous relaxation of hydrous magmas, such as for instance the

  19. Characterization of the Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases onto Ferrihydrite via Fourier Transform Infrared and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Canhisares-Filho, José E; Carneiro, Cristine E A; de Santana, Henrique; Urbano, Alexandre; da Costa, Antonio C S; Zaia, Cássia T B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2015-09-01

    Minerals could have played an important role in concentration, protection, and polymerization of biomolecules. Although iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust, there are few works in the literature that describe the use of iron oxide-hydroxide in prebiotic chemistry experiments. In the present work, the interaction of adenine, thymine, and uracil with ferrihydrite was studied under conditions that resemble those of prebiotic Earth. At acidic pH, anions in artificial seawater decreased the pH at the point of zero charge (pHpzc) of ferrihydrite; and at basic pH, cations increased the pHpzc. The adsorption of nucleic acid bases onto ferrihydrite followed the order adenine > uracil > thymine. Adenine adsorption peaked at neutral pH; however, for thymine and uracil, adsorption increased with increasing pH. Electrostatic interactions did not appear to play an important role on the adsorption of nucleic acid bases onto ferrihydrite. Adenine adsorption onto ferrihydrite was higher in distilled water compared to artificial seawater. After ferrihydrite was mixed with artificial seawaters or nucleic acid bases, X-ray diffractograms and Fourier transform infrared spectra did not show any change. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy showed that the interaction of adenine with ferrihydrite was not pH-dependent. In contrast, the interactions of thymine and uracil with ferrihydrite were pH-dependent such that, at basic pH, thymine and uracil lay flat on the surface of ferrihydrite, and at acidic pH, thymine and uracil were perpendicular to the surface. Ferrihydrite adsorbed much more adenine than thymine; thus adenine would have been better protected against degradation by hydrolysis or UV radiation on prebiotic Earth. PMID:26393397

  20. Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, R.; Tatsumi, Y.; Huang, S.; Ling, X.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is reviewed based on our recent theoretical and experimental works. First, we discuss the semi-classical and quantum mechanical description for the polarization dependence of Raman spectra of TMDs in which the optical dipole transition matrix elements as a function of laser excitation energy are important for understanding the polarization dependence of the Raman intensity and Raman tensor. Overviewing the symmetry of TMDs, we discuss the dependence of the Raman spectra of TMDs on layer thickness, polarization, laser energy and the structural phase. Furthermore, we discuss the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer and heterostructures of TMDs. Finally, we give our perspectives on the Raman spectroscopy of TMDs.

  1. Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Saito, R; Tatsumi, Y; Huang, S; Ling, X; Dresselhaus, M S

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is reviewed based on our recent theoretical and experimental works. First, we discuss the semi-classical and quantum mechanical description for the polarization dependence of Raman spectra of TMDs in which the optical dipole transition matrix elements as a function of laser excitation energy are important for understanding the polarization dependence of the Raman intensity and Raman tensor. Overviewing the symmetry of TMDs, we discuss the dependence of the Raman spectra of TMDs on layer thickness, polarization, laser energy and the structural phase. Furthermore, we discuss the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer and heterostructures of TMDs. Finally, we give our perspectives on the Raman spectroscopy of TMDs. PMID:27388703

  2. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  3. Correlation between Active Center Structure and Enhanced Dioxygen Binding in Co(salen) Nanoparticles: Characterization by In Situ Infrared, Raman, and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson,C.; Long, B.; Nguyen, J.; Day, V.; Borovik, A.; Subramaniam, B.; Guzman, J.

    2008-01-01

    The structure and ligand environment of Co(salen) nanoparticles and unprocessed Co(salen) have been determined by the combined application of infrared, Raman, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments before and during interaction with O2. The Co(salen) nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation with compressed antisolvent (PCA) technique using commercially obtained Co(salen) [denoted as unprocessed Co(salen)] as the parent compound. The unprocessed Co(salen) particles exist as dimer species with a square-pyramidal coordination geometry that display no measurable O2 binding at room temperature. In sharp contrast, the Co(salen) nanoparticles show near-stoichiometric O2 adsorption, as demonstrated by microbalance gas binding experiments. The spectroscopy results indicate the presence of CoII centers with distorted tetrahedral geometry in the Co(salen) nanoparticles with no evidence of metallic Co clusters, confirmed by the lack of Co-Co contributions at bonding distances in the EXAFS spectra and the presence of characteristic features of CoII in the XANES spectra. The EXAFS data also indicate that there are on average two Co-N and two Co-O bonds with a distance of 1.81 {+-} 0.02 and 1.90 {+-} 0.02 Angstroms, respectively, consistent with typical metal salen structures. Upon O2 binding on the Co(salen) nanoparticles, the XANES results indicate oxidation of the CoII to CoIII, consistent with the vibrational data showing new bands associated with oxygen species bonded to Co centers and the increase in the oxygen coordination number from 1.8 to 2.9 in the EXAFS data. The results indicate that the enhanced O2 binding properties of Co(salen) nanoparticles are related to the unique distorted tetrahedral geometry, which is not observed in the unprocessed samples that contain mainly dimers with square planar geometry. The results presented here provide a

  4. Proximal and point detection of contaminated surfaces using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason A.; Christesen, Steven D.; Tripathi, Ashish; Emmons, Erik D.; Wilcox, Phillip G.; Emge, Darren K.; Pardoe, Ian J.; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-11-01

    We are actively investigating the use of Raman spectroscopy for proximal standoff detection of chemicals and explosive materials on surfaces. These studies include Raman Chemical Imaging of contaminated fingerprints for forensic attribution and the assessments of commercial handheld or portable Raman instruments operating with near-infrared (IR) as well as ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation specifically developed for on-the-move reconnaissance of chemical contamination. As part of these efforts, we have measured the Raman cross sections of chemical agents, toxic industrial chemicals, and explosives from the UV to NIR. We have also measured and modeled the effect interrogation angle has on the Raman return from droplets on man-made surfaces. Realistic droplet distributions have been modeled and tested against variations in surface scan patterns and laser spot size for determining the optimum scan characteristics for detection of relevant surface contamination.

  5. Probing nanoscale ferroelectricity by ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenne, Dmitri

    2007-03-01

    Conventional vibrational spectroscopies operating in visible and infrared range fail to measure the phonon spectra of nanoscale ferroelectric structures because of extremely weak signals and the overwhelming substrate contribution. In this talk, application of ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy for studies of lattice dynamics and ferroelectric phase transitions in nanoscale ferroelectrics will be presented. We demonstrate that UV Raman spectroscopy is an effective technique allowing the observation of phonons and determination of the ferroelectric phase transition temperature (Tc) in nanoscale ferroelectrics, specifically, BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices having the ferroelectric BaTiO3 layers as thin as 1 unit cell, and single BaTiO3 layers as thin as 4 nm. BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices and ultrathin BaTiO3 films studied were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on SrTiO3 as well as GdScO3 and DyScO3 substrates. Excellent epitaxial quality and atomically abrupt interfaces are evidenced by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. UV Raman results show that one-unit-cell thick BaTiO3 layers in BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices are ferroelectric with the Tc as high as 250 K, and induce the polarization in much thicker SrTiO3 layers adjacent to them. The Tc in superlattices was tuned by hundreds of degrees from ˜170 to 650 K by varying the thicknesses of BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 layers. Using scandate substrates enables growth of superlattices with systematically changed coherent strain, thus allowing studying the stress effect on the ferroelectric phase transitions. UV Raman data are supported by the thermodynamic calculations of polarization in superlattices as a function of temperature. The work was done in collaboration with A. Soukiassian, W. Tian, D.G. Schlom, Y.L. Li, L.-Q. Chen, X.X. Xi (Pennsylvania State University), A. Bruchhausen, A. Fainstein (Centro Atomico Bariloche & Instituto Balseiro, Argentina), R. S. Katiyar (University of Puerto Rico), A

  6. Raman spectroscopy: the gateway into tomorrow's virology.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Phelps J; Whitman, Audy G; Dyson, Ossie F; Akula, Shaw M

    2006-01-01

    In the molecular world, researchers act as detectives working hard to unravel the mysteries surrounding cells. One of the researchers' greatest tools in this endeavor has been Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique that measures the unique Raman spectra for every type of biological molecule. As such, Raman spectroscopy has the potential to provide scientists with a library of spectra that can be used to unravel the makeup of an unknown molecule. However, this technique is limited in that it is not able to manipulate particular structures without disturbing their unique environment. Recently, a novel technology that combines Raman spectroscopy with optical tweezers, termed Raman tweezers, evades this problem due to its ability to manipulate a sample without physical contact. As such, Raman tweezers has the potential to become an incredibly effective diagnostic tool for differentially distinguishing tissue, and therefore holds great promise in the field of virology for distinguishing between various virally infected cells. This review provides an introduction for a virologist into the world of spectroscopy and explores many of the potential applications of Raman tweezers in virology. PMID:16805914

  7. Raman spectroscopy: the gateway into tomorrow's virology

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Phelps J; Whitman, Audy G; Dyson, Ossie F; Akula, Shaw M

    2006-01-01

    In the molecular world, researchers act as detectives working hard to unravel the mysteries surrounding cells. One of the researchers' greatest tools in this endeavor has been Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique that measures the unique Raman spectra for every type of biological molecule. As such, Raman spectroscopy has the potential to provide scientists with a library of spectra that can be used to unravel the makeup of an unknown molecule. However, this technique is limited in that it is not able to manipulate particular structures without disturbing their unique environment. Recently, a novel technology that combines Raman spectroscopy with optical tweezers, termed Raman tweezers, evades this problem due to its ability to manipulate a sample without physical contact. As such, Raman tweezers has the potential to become an incredibly effective diagnostic tool for differentially distinguishing tissue, and therefore holds great promise in the field of virology for distinguishing between various virally infected cells. This review provides an introduction for a virologist into the world of spectroscopy and explores many of the potential applications of Raman tweezers in virology. PMID:16805914

  8. Study of virus by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, K.; Kitamura, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Sawa, M.; Andriana, B. B.; Ohtani, K.; Yagura, T.; Sato, H.

    2013-02-01

    Problem of viruses is very actual for nowadays. Some viruses, which are responsible for human of all tumors, are about 15 %. Main purposes this study, early detection virus in live cell without labeling and in the real time by Raman spectroscopy. Micro Raman spectroscopy (mRs) is a technique that uses a Raman spectrometer to measure the spectra of microscopic samples. According to the Raman spectroscopy, it becomes possible to study the metabolites of a live cultured cell without labeling. We used mRs to detect the virus via HEK 293 cell line-infected adenovirus. We obtained raman specters of lives cells with viruses in 24 hours and 7 days after the infection. As the result, there is some biochemical changing after the treatment of cell with virus. One of biochemical alteration is at 1081 cm-1. For the clarification result, we use confocal fluorescent microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  9. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of kamphaugite-(Y)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    We have studied the carbonate mineral kamphaugite-(Y)(CaY(CO3)2(OH)·H2O), a mineral which contains yttrium and specific rare earth elements. Chemical analysis shows the presence of Ca, Y and C. Back scattering SEM appears to indicate a single pure phase. The vibrational spectroscopy of kamphaugite-(Y) was obtained using a combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Two distinct Raman bands observed at 1078 and 1088 cm-1 provide evidence for the non-equivalence of the carbonate anion in the kamphaugite-(Y) structure. Such a concept is supported by the number of bands assigned to the carbonate antisymmetric stretching mode. Multiple bands in the ν4 region offers further support for the non-equivalence of carbonate anions in the structure. Vibrational spectroscopy enables aspects of the structure of the mineral kamphaugite-(Y) to be assessed.

  10. Silver nanoparticle based surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy of diabetic and normal rat pancreatic tissue under near-infrared laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Shi, H.; Feng, S.; Lin, J.; Chen, W.; Huang, Z.; Li, Y.; Yu, Y.; Lin, D.; Xu, Q.; Chen, R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the use of high spatial resolution silver nanoparticle based near-infrared surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from rat pancreatic tissue to obtain biochrmical information about the tissue. A high quality SERS signal from a mixture of pancreatic tissues and silver nanoparticles can be obtained within 10 s using a Renishaw micro-Raman system. Prominent SERS bands of pancreatic tissue were assigned to known molecular vibrations, such as the vibrations of DNA bases, RNA bases, proteins and lipids. Different tissue structures of diabetic and normal rat pancreatic tissues have characteristic features in SERS spectra. This exploratory study demonstrated great potential for using SERS imaging to distinguish diabetic and normal pancreatic tissues on frozen sections without using dye labeling of functionalized binding sites.

  11. Inverse Raman bands in ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xueqiong; Li, Xiuting; Niu, Kai; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2011-10-01

    Ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy (URLS) is equivalent to anti-Stokes femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), using a broadband probe pulse that extends to the blue of the narrow bandwidth Raman pump, and can be described as inverse Raman scattering (IRS). Using the Feynman dual time-line diagram, the third-order polarization for IRS with finite pulses can be written down in terms of a four-time correlation function. An analytic expression is obtained for the latter in the harmonic approximation which facilitates computation. We simulated the URLS of crystal violet (CV) for various resonance Raman pump excitation wavelengths using the IRS polarization expression with finite pulses. The calculated results agreed well with the experimental results of S. Umapathy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 024505 (2010). In the limit of monochromatic Raman pump and probe pulses, we obtain the third-order susceptibility for multi-modes, and for a single mode we recover the well-known expression for the third-order susceptibility, χ _{IRS}^{(3)}, for IRS. The latter is used to understand the mode dependent phase changes as a function of Raman pump excitation in the URLS of CV.

  12. Emerging Dental Applications of Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael G.

    Until recently, the application of Raman spectroscopy to investigate dental tissues has primarily focused on using microspectroscopy to characterize dentin and enamel structures as well as to understand the adhesive interface of various resin and bonding agents used in restorative procedures. With the advent of improved laser, imaging/mapping and fibre optic technologies, the applications have expanded to investigate various biomedical problems ranging from oral cancer, bacterial identification and early dental caries detection. The overall aim of these applications is to develop Raman spectroscopy into a tool for use in the dental clinic. This chapter presents the recent dental applications of Raman spectroscopy as well as discusses the potential, strengths and limitations of the technology in comparison with alternative techniques. In addition, a discussion and rationale about combining Raman spectroscopy with other optical techniques will be included.

  13. Assessment of bone healing on tibial fractures treated with wire osteosynthesis associated or not with infrared laser light and biphasic ceramic bone graft (HATCP) and guided bone regeneration (GBR): Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos de Carvalho, Fabíola; Aciole, Gilberth Tadeu S.; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Nunes dos Santos, Jean; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, through Raman spectroscopy, the repair of complete tibial fracture in rabbits fixed with wire osteosynthesis - WO, treated or not with infrared laser light (λ 780nm, 50mW, CW) associated or not to the use of HATCP and GBR. Surgical fractures were created under general anesthesia (Ketamine 0.4ml/Kg IP and Xilazine 0.2ml/Kg IP), on the tibia of 15 rabbits that were divided into 5 groups and maintained on individual cages, at day/night cycle, fed with solid laboratory pelted diet and had water ad libidum. On groups II, III, IV and V the fracture was fixed with WO. Animals of groups III and V were grafted with hydroxyapatite + GBR technique. Animals of groups IV and V were irradiated at every other day during two weeks (16J/cm2, 4 x 4J/cm2). Observation time was that of 30 days. After animal death the specimens were kept in liquid nitrogen for further analysis by Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed significant differences between groups (p<0.001). It is concluded that IR laser light was able to accelerate fracture healing and the association with HATCP and GBR resulted on increased deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite.

  14. Micro-mirror arrays for Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, W. M.

    2015-03-01

    In this research we study Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies as non-destructive and noninvasive methods for probing biological material and "living systems." Particularly for a living material any probe need be non-destructive and non-invasive, as well as provide real time measurement information and be cost effective to be generally useful. Over the past few years the components needed to measure weak and complex processes such as Raman scattering have evolved substantially with the ready availability of lasers, dichroic filters, low noise and sensitive detectors, digitizers and signal processors. A Raman spectrum consists of a wavelength or frequency spectrum that corresponds to the inelastic (Raman) photon signal that results from irradiating a "Raman active" material. Raman irradiation of a material usually and generally uses a single frequency laser. The Raman fingerprint spectrum that results from a Raman interaction can be determined from the frequencies scattered and received by an appropriate detector. Spectra are usually "digitized" and numerically matched to a reference sample or reference material spectra in performing an analysis. Fortunately today with the many "commercial off-the-shelf" components that are available, weak intensity effects such as Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy can be used for a number of analysis applications. One of the experimental limitations in Raman measurement is the spectrometer itself. The spectrometer is the section of the system that either by interference plus detection or by dispersion plus detection that "signal" amplitude versus energy/frequency signals are measured. Particularly in Raman spectroscopy, optical signals carrying desired "information" about the analyte are extraordinarily weak and require special considerations when measuring. We will discuss here the use of compact spectrometers and a micro-mirror array system (used is the digital micro-mirror device (DMD) supplied by the DLP® Products group of

  15. Raman, infrared and near-infrared spectroscopic characterization of the herderite-hydroxylherderite mineral series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Queiroz, Camila de Siqueira; Belotti, Fernanda M.; Filho, Mauro Cândido

    2014-01-01

    Natural single-crystal specimens of the herderite-hydroxylherderite series from Brazil, with general formula CaBePO4(F,OH), were investigated by electron microprobe, Raman, infrared and near-infrared spectroscopies. The minerals occur as secondary products in granitic pegmatites. Herderite and hydroxylherderite minerals show extensive solid solution formation. The Raman spectra of hydroxylherderite are characterized by bands at around 985 and 998 cm-1, assigned to ν1 symmetric stretching mode of the HOPO33- and PO43- units. Raman bands at around 1085, 1128 and 1138 cm-1 are attributed to both the HOP and PO antisymmetric stretching vibrations. The set of Raman bands observed at 563, 568, 577, 598, 616 and 633 cm-1 are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4 and H2PO4 units. The OH Raman stretching vibrations of hydroxylherderite were observed ranging from 3626 cm-1 to 3609 cm-1. The infrared stretching vibrations of hydroxylherderites were observed between 3606 cm-1 and 3599 cm-1. By using a Libowitzky type function, hydrogen bond distances based upon the OH stretching bands were calculated. Characteristic NIR bands at around 6961 and 7054 cm-1 were assigned to the first overtone of the fundamental, whilst NIR bands at 10,194 and 10,329 cm-1 are assigned to the second overtone of the fundamental OH stretching vibration. Insight into the structure of the herderite-hydroxylherderite series is assessed by vibrational spectroscopy.

  16. Tunable infrared source employing Raman mixing

    DOEpatents

    Byer, Robert L.; Herbst, Richard L.

    1980-01-01

    A tunable source of infrared radiation is obtained by irradiating an assemblage of Raman active gaseous atoms or molecules with a high intensity pumping beam of coherent radiation at a pump frequency .omega..sub.p to stimulate the generation of Stokes wave energy at a Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s and to stimulate the Raman resonant mode at the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R within the irradiated assemblage where the pump frequency .omega..sub.p minus the Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s is equal to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R. The stimulated assemblage is irradiated with a tunable source of coherent radiation at a frequency .omega..sub.i to generate the output infrared radiation of the frequency .omega..sub.0 which is related to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R and the input wave .omega..sub.i by the relation .omega..sub.0 =.omega..sub.i .+-..omega..sub.R. In one embodiment the interaction between the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i is collinear and the ratio of the phase velocity mismatch factor .DELTA.k to the electric field exponential gain coefficient T is within the range of 0.1 to 5. In another embodiment the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i have velocity vectors k.sub.p and k.sub.i which cross at an angle to each other to compensate for phase velocity mismatches in the medium. In another embodiment, the Stokes wave energy .omega..sub.s is generated by pump energy .omega..sub.p in a first Raman cell and .omega..sub.s, .omega..sub.i and .omega..sub.p are combined in a second Raman mixing cell to produce the output at .omega..sub.i.

  17. Occlusal caries detection using polarized Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, I.; Bulou, A.

    2008-02-01

    The tooth enamel, because of its hydroxyapatite composition, must present a Raman spectrum with strong polarization anisotropy. Carious lesions of the enamel will produce an alteration of local symmetry and will increase much more scattering of light. This will reduce the anisotropy of the Raman spectra. Because of the difference between high sensitivity to polarization of the 959 cm -1 Raman peak in sound enamel and low sensitivity in carried enamel, Raman polarized spectroscopy could be a useful method to early detect teeth caries.

  18. Two-Dimensional Heterospectral Correlation Analysis of the Redox-Induced Conformational Transition in Cytochrome c Using Surface-Enhanced Raman and Infrared Absorption Spectroscopies on a Two-Layer Gold Surface

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The heme protein cytochrome c adsorbed to a two-layer gold surface modified with a self-assembled monolayer of 2-mercaptoethanol was analyzed using a two-dimensional (2D) heterospectral correlation analysis that combined surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Stepwise increasing electric potentials were applied to alter the redox state of the protein and to induce conformational changes within the protein backbone. We demonstrate herein that 2D heterospectral correlation analysis is a particularly suitable and useful technique for the study of heme-containing proteins as the two spectroscopies address different portions of the protein. Thus, by correlating SERS and SEIRAS data in a 2D plot, we can obtain a deeper understanding of the conformational changes occurring at the redox center and in the supporting protein backbone during the electron transfer process. The correlation analyses are complemented by molecular dynamics calculations to explore the intramolecular interactions. PMID:23930980

  19. Raman spectroscopy and polarization: Selected case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossikovski, Razvigor; Picardi, Gennaro; Ndong, Gérald; Chaigneau, Marc

    2012-10-01

    We show, through several selected case studies, the potential benefits that can be obtained by controlling the polarization states of the exciting and scattered radiations in a Raman scattering experiment. When coupled with polarization control, Raman spectroscopy is thus capable of providing extra information on the structural properties of the materials under investigation. The experimental examples presented in this work are taken from the area of both conventional, i.e., far-field, as well as from near-field Raman spectroscopy. They cover topics such as the stress tensor measurement in strained semiconductor structures, the vibration mode assignment in pentacene thin films and the Raman scattering tensor determination from near-field measurements on azobenzene monolayers. The basic theory necessary for modelling the far- and near-field polarized Raman responses is also given and the model efficiency is illustrated on the experimental data.

  20. Applications of Raman spectroscopy to gemology.

    PubMed

    Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Being nondestructive and requiring short measurement times, a low amount of material, and no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is used for routine investigation in the study of gemstone inclusions and treatments and for the characterization of mounted gems. In this work, a review of the use of laboratory Raman and micro-Raman spectrometers and of portable Raman systems in the gemology field is given, focusing on gem identification and on the evaluation of the composition, provenance, and genesis of gems. Many examples are shown of the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of imitations, synthetic gems, and enhancement treatments in natural gemstones. Some recent developments are described, with particular attention being given to the semiprecious stone jade and to two important organic materials used in jewelry, i.e., pearls and corals. PMID:20419294

  1. Infrared spectroscopy with visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A.; Paterova, Anna V.; Kulik, Sergei P.; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral measurements in the infrared optical range provide unique fingerprints of materials, which are useful for material analysis, environmental sensing and health diagnostics. Current infrared spectroscopy techniques require the use of optical equipment suited for operation in the infrared range, components of which face challenges of inferior performance and high cost. Here, we develop a technique that allows spectral measurements in the infrared range using visible-spectral-range components. The technique is based on nonlinear interference of infrared and visible photons, produced via spontaneous parametric down conversion. The intensity interference pattern for a visible photon depends on the phase of an infrared photon travelling through a medium. This allows the absorption coefficient and refractive index of the medium in the infrared range to be determined from the measurements of visible photons. The technique can substitute and/or complement conventional infrared spectroscopy and refractometry techniques, as it uses well-developed components for the visible range.

  2. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  3. Online fluorescence suppression in modulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Anna Chiara; Mazilu, Michael; Riches, Andrew; Herrington, C Simon; Dholakia, Kishan

    2010-01-15

    Label-free chemical characterization of single cells is an important aim for biomedical research. Standard Raman spectroscopy provides intrinsic biochemical markers for noninvasive analysis of biological samples but is often hindered by the presence of fluorescence background. In this paper, we present an innovative modulated Raman spectroscopy technique to filter out the Raman spectra from the fluorescence background. The method is based on the principle that the fluorescence background does not change whereas the Raman scattering is shifted by the periodical modulation of the laser wavelength. Exploiting this physical property and importantly the multichannel lock-in detection of the Raman signal, the modulation technique fulfills the requirements of an effective fluorescence subtraction method. Indeed, once the synchronization and calibration procedure is performed, minimal user intervention is required, making the method online and less time-consuming than the other fluorescent suppression methods. We analyze the modulated Raman signal and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) signal of 2 mum-sized polystyrene beads suspended in a solution of fluorescent dye as a function of modulation rate. We show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the modulated Raman spectra at the highest modulation rate is 3 times higher than the SERDS one. To finally evaluate the real benefits of the modulated Raman spectroscopy, we apply our technique to Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). Specifically, by analyzing separate spectra from the membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus of CHO cells, we demonstrate the ability of this method to obtain localized sensitive chemical information from cells, away from the interfering fluorescence background. In particular, statistical analysis of the Raman data and classification using PCA (principal component analysis) indicate that our method allows us to distinguish between different cell locations with higher sensitivity and

  4. Difference Raman spectroscopy of DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhin, Andrey S.; Gorelik, Vladimir S.; Dovbeshko, Galina I.; Pyatyshev, Alexander Yu; Yuzyuk, Yury I.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the micro-Raman spectra of calf DNA for different points of DNA sample have been recorded. The Raman spectra were made with help of difference Raman spectroscopy technique. Raman spectra were recorded with high spatial resolution from different points of the wet and dry samples in different spectral range (100÷4000cm-1) using two lasers: argon (514.5 nm) and helium -neon (632.8 nm). The significant differences in the Raman spectra for dry and wet DNA and for different points of DNA molecules were observed. The obtained data on difference Raman scattering spectra of DNA molecules may be used for identification of DNA types and for analysis of genetic information associated with the molecular structure of this molecule.

  5. Raman spectroscopy at the tritium laboratory Karlsruhe

    SciTech Connect

    Schloesser, M.; Bornschein, B.; Fischer, S.; Kassel, F.; Rupp, S.; Sturm, M.; James, T.M.; Telle, H.H.

    2015-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy is employed successfully for analysis of hydrogen isotopologues at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). Raman spectroscopy is based on the inelastic scattering of photons off molecules. Energy is transferred to the molecules as rotational/vibrational excitation being characteristic for each type of molecule. Thus, qualitative analysis is possible from the Raman shifted light, while quantitative information can be obtained from the signal intensities. After years of research and development, the technique is now well-advanced providing fast (< 10 s), precise (< 0.1%) and true (< 3%) compositional analysis of gas mixtures of hydrogen isotopologues. In this paper, we summarize the recent achievements in the further development on this technique, and the various applications for which it is used at TLK. Raman spectroscopy has evolved as a versatile, highly accurate key method for quantitative analysis complementing the port-folio of analytic techniques at the TLK.

  6. Mobile Raman spectroscopy in astrobiology research.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Jehlička, Jan

    2014-12-13

    Raman spectroscopy has proved to be a very useful technique in astrobiology research. Especially, working with mobile instrumentation during fieldwork can provide useful experiences in this field. In this work, we provide an overview of some important aspects of this research and, apart from defining different types of mobile Raman spectrometers, we highlight different reasons for this research. These include gathering experience and testing of mobile instruments, the selection of target molecules and to develop optimal data processing techniques for the identification of the spectra. We also identify the analytical techniques that it would be most appropriate to combine with Raman spectroscopy to maximize the obtained information and the synergy that exists with Raman spectroscopy research in other research areas, such as archaeometry and forensics. PMID:25368355

  7. Ungrouped achondrite NWA 7325: Infrared and Raman study of a potential sample from Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlok, A.; Weber, I.; Ahmedi, M.; Bischoff, A.; Hiesinger, H.; Helbert, J.

    2013-09-01

    We analyzed the ungrouped achondrite NWA 7325 using Raman and FTIR spectroscopy in order to characterize the main mineralogy, and to provide infrared data for remote sensing purposes. Both Raman and FTIR results show a mineralogy dominated by anorthitic feldspar and diopside.

  8. Identification and discrimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, Edward; Szymanski, Paul; Applin, Daniel; Goltz, Douglas

    2016-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely present throughout the Solar System and beyond. They have been implicated as a contributor to unidentified infrared emission bands in the interstellar medium, comprise a substantial portion of the insoluble organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites, are expected stable components of organic matter on Mars, and are present in a wide range of terrestrial hydrocarbons and as components of biomolecules. However, PAH structures can be very complicated, making their identification challenging. Raman spectroscopy is known to be especially sensitive to the highly polarizable C-C and C=C bonds found in PAHs, and therefore, can be a powerful tool for PAH structural and compositional elucidation. This study examined Raman spectra of 48 different PAHs to determine the degree to which Raman spectroscopy could be used to uniquely identify different species, factors that control the positions of major Raman peaks, the degree to which induced fluorescence affects the intensity of Raman peaks, its usefulness for PAH discrimination, and the effects of varying excitation wavelength on some PAH Raman spectra. It was found that the arrangement and composition of phenyl (benzene) rings, and the type and position of functional groups can greatly affect fluorescence, positions and intensities of Raman peaks associated with the PAH backbone, and the introduction of new Raman peaks. Among the functional groups found on many of the PAHs that were analyzed, only a few Raman peaks corresponding to the molecular vibrations of these groups could be clearly distinguished. Comparison of the PAH Raman spectra that were acquired with both 532 and 785 nm excitation found that the longer wavelength resulted in reduced fluorescence, consistent with previous studies.

  9. Ab initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredkin, D. R.; White, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Komornicki, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that with increased computer power and improved computational techniques, such as the gradients developed in recent years, it is becoming practical to compute spectra ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature, for systems of increasing complexity. The present investigation has the objective to explore several possible ab initio approaches to spectra, giving particular attention to infrared and nonresonance Raman. Two approaches are discussed. The sequential approach, in which first the electronic part and then later the nuclear part of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is solved, is appropriate for small systems. The simultaneous approach, in which the electronic and nuclear parts are solved at the same time, is more appropriate for many-atom systems. A review of the newer quantum gradient techniques is provided, and the infrared and Raman spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed.

  10. Vibrational infrared and raman spectra of dicyanoacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, R. K.; Perera-Jarmer, M. A.; Ospina, M. J.

    The raman and infrared spectra for solid C 4N 2 are reported. New assignments are given for ˜gn 1 (2333 cm -1), ˜gn 2 (2267) and ˜gn 3 (640 cm -1). These assignments are supported by a normal coordinate Analysis using eight force constants. Extinction coefficients for the infrared active fundamentals are also reported. Our results suggest C 4N 2 to be a likely candidate to explain the 478 cm -1 band in the Titan's emission recorded by the Voyager mission.

  11. Using Raman spectroscopy to characterize biological materials.

    PubMed

    Butler, Holly J; Ashton, Lorna; Bird, Benjamin; Cinque, Gianfelice; Curtis, Kelly; Dorney, Jennifer; Esmonde-White, Karen; Fullwood, Nigel J; Gardner, Benjamin; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Walsh, Michael J; McAinsh, Martin R; Stone, Nicholas; Martin, Francis L

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the chemical composition of a sample, which can in turn be used to extract biological information. Many materials have characteristic Raman spectra, which means that Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an effective analytical approach in geology, semiconductor, materials and polymer science fields. The application of Raman spectroscopy and microscopy within biology is rapidly increasing because it can provide chemical and compositional information, but it does not typically suffer from interference from water molecules. Analysis does not conventionally require extensive sample preparation; biochemical and structural information can usually be obtained without labeling. In this protocol, we aim to standardize and bring together multiple experimental approaches from key leaders in the field for obtaining Raman spectra using a microspectrometer. As examples of the range of biological samples that can be analyzed, we provide instructions for acquiring Raman spectra, maps and images for fresh plant tissue, formalin-fixed and fresh frozen mammalian tissue, fixed cells and biofluids. We explore a robust approach for sample preparation, instrumentation, acquisition parameters and data processing. By using this approach, we expect that a typical Raman experiment can be performed by a nonspecialist user to generate high-quality data for biological materials analysis. PMID:26963630

  12. Emerging technology: applications of Raman spectroscopy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kast, Rachel E; Tucker, Stephanie C; Killian, Kevin; Trexler, Micaela; Honn, Kenneth V; Auner, Gregory W

    2014-09-01

    There is a need in prostate cancer diagnostics and research for a label-free imaging methodology that is nondestructive, rapid, objective, and uninfluenced by water. Raman spectroscopy provides a molecular signature, which can be scaled from micron-level regions of interest in cells to macroscopic areas of tissue. It can be used for applications ranging from in vivo or in vitro diagnostics to basic science laboratory testing. This work describes the fundamentals of Raman spectroscopy and complementary techniques including surface enhanced Raman scattering, resonance Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, confocal Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering, and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Clinical applications of Raman spectroscopy to prostate cancer will be discussed, including screening, biopsy, margin assessment, and monitoring of treatment efficacy. Laboratory applications including cell identification, culture monitoring, therapeutics development, and live imaging of cellular processes are discussed. Potential future avenues of research are described, with emphasis on multiplexing Raman spectroscopy with other modalities. PMID:24510129

  13. [Raman and infrared spectrograms of organic borate intercalated hydrotalcite].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Yu; Bai, Zhi-Min; Zhao, Dong

    2013-03-01

    The pattern of X-ray diffraction, the Raman and infrared spectra of organic borate intercalated hydrotalcite were discussed. The well crystallized zinc-aluminum layered double hydroxides (Zn-Al LDHs) intercalated by carbonate ions and borate ions were respectively prepared by co-precipitation method. Patterns of X-ray diffraction showed that the (003) reflection of borate-LDHs was sharp and symmetric and shifted to lower angle than that of carbonate-LDHs. The gallery height of borate-LDHs increased from 0. 28 nm to 0.42 nm after intercalation, indicating that interlayered carbonate ions were substituted by borate anions. The Raman and IR spectra showed that specific bands of carbonate ions in the borate-LDHs disappeared, but with the presence of B3O3(OH)4- X B4O5(OH)4(2-) and B(OH)4- in the interlayer galleries. The hydroxide interlayer anions had a significant influence on the band positions in Raman and infrared spectra of modes related to the hydroxyl group. Our results indicate that single phase and pure borate-pillared LDHs can be obtained using tributyl orthoborate as intercalating agents, and the change in the structure and nature of hydrotalcite can be detected precisely by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:23705437

  14. Airborne chemistry coupled to Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Sabina; Johansson, Jonas; Taylor, Lynne S; Levander, Ia; Fox, Shannon; Sepaniak, Michael; Nilsson, Staffan

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, the use of airborne chemistry (acoustically levitated drops) in combination with Raman spectroscopy is explored. We report herein the first Raman studies of crystallization processes in levitated drops and the first demonstration of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection in this medium. Crystallization studies on the model compounds benzamide and indomethacin resulted in the formation of two crystal modifications for each compound, suggesting that this methodology may be useful for investigation of polymorphs. SERS detection resulted in a signal enhancement of 27 000 for benzoic acid and 11 000 for rhodamine 6-G. The preliminary results presented here clearly indicate that several important applications of the combination between Raman spectroscopy and acoustic drop levitation can be expected in the future. PMID:12720359

  15. Multiplex coherent raman spectroscopy detector and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peter (Inventor); Joyner, Candace C. (Inventor); Patrick, Sheena T. (Inventor); Guyer, Dean R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multiplex coherent Raman spectrometer (10) and spectroscopy method rapidly detects and identifies individual components of a chemical mixture separated by a separation technique, such as gas chromatography. The spectrometer (10) and method accurately identify a variety of compounds because they produce the entire gas phase vibrational Raman spectrum of the unknown gas. This is accomplished by tilting a Raman cell (20) to produce a high-intensity, backward-stimulated, coherent Raman beam of 683 nm, which drives a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (28) to produce a broadband beam of 1100-1700 nm covering a range of more than 3000 wavenumber. This broadband beam is combined with a narrowband beam of 532 nm having a bandwidth of 0.003 wavenumbers and focused into a heated windowless cell (38) that receives gases separated by a gas chromatograph (40). The Raman radiation scattered from these gases is filtered and sent to a monochromator (50) with multichannel detection.

  16. Multiplex coherent raman spectroscopy detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Peter; Joyner, Candace C.; Patrick, Sheena T.; Guyer, Dean R.

    2004-06-08

    A multiplex coherent Raman spectrometer (10) and spectroscopy method rapidly detects and identifies individual components of a chemical mixture separated by a separation technique, such as gas chromatography. The spectrometer (10) and method accurately identify a variety of compounds because they produce the entire gas phase vibrational Raman spectrum of the unknown gas. This is accomplished by tilting a Raman cell (20) to produce a high-intensity, backward-stimulated, coherent Raman beam of 683 nm, which drives a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (28) to produce a broadband beam of 1100-1700 nm covering a range of more than 3000 wavenumber. This broadband beam is combined with a narrowband beam of 532 nm having a bandwidth of 0.003 wavenumbers and focused into a heated windowless cell (38) that receives gases separated by a gas chromatograph (40). The Raman radiation scattered from these gases is filtered and sent to a monochromator (50) with multichannel detection.

  17. Identification of gemstone treatments with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefert, Lore; Haenni, Henry A.; Chalain, Jean-Pierre

    2000-09-01

    The newest gemstone treatment concerns brownish diamonds of type IIa. These can be improved to near colorless by an enhancement process developed by General Electric, USA, using high temperature and pressure. A comparison of Raman spectroscopic features in the visible area (luminescence bands) of both treated and untreated colorless diamonds is given. Finally, examples of artificially colored peals and corals and their detection with Raman spectroscopy are shown.

  18. [Measurement of nasopharyngeal carcinoma tissue ex vivo by Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Pan, Jian-ji; Chen, Rong; Li, Yong-zeng; Feng, Shang-yuan; Xie, Shu-sen; Zeng, Hai-shan

    2009-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy has shown its potential and advantages in detecting molecular changes associated with tissue pathology, which makes it possible to diagnose with optical methods non-invasively and real-time. A compact and rapid near-infrared (NIR)Raman system was developed using 785 nm diode laser, volume phase technology (VPT)holographic grating system and NIR intensified charge-coupled device (CCD)with a specially designed Raman fibre probe which can effectively reduce the interference of fluorescence and Rayleigh scattering, maximize the ability of Raman collection as well as correct the image aberration of a planar grating diffraction. Adopting this method, signal-to-noise ratio has been greatly improved and human tissue signals can be acquired in a short time. Raman signals from fat and musculature of fresh pork were measured and referenced for further optimization, then Raman spectra of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in vitro and the effect of storage time on them were measured in 1-5 s and discussed. The sensitivities and performance of the system will be further enhanced and more Raman data will be acquired and compared between normal and cancerous nasopharyngeal tissue, expecting to discover the statistical characteristics, which will benefit the diagnosis and treatment of early nasopharyngeal carcinoma or other tumors. PMID:19650477

  19. Raman spectroscopy under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Crowhurst, J C

    2004-11-05

    We report the results of Raman measurements of various materials under simultaneous conditions of high temperature and high pressure in the diamond anvil cell (DAC). High temperatures are generated by laser heating or internal resistive (ohmic) heating or a combination of both. We present Raman spectra of cubic boron nitride (cBN) to 40 GPa and up to 2300 K that show a continuous pressure and temperature shift of the frequency of the transverse optical mode. We have also obtained high-pressure Raman spectra from a new noble metal nitride, which we synthesized at approximately 50 GPa and 2000 K. We have obtained high-temperature spectra from pure nitrogen to 39 GPa and up to 2000 K, which show the presence of a hot band that has previously been observed in CARS measurements. These measurements have also allowed us to constrain the melting curve and to examine changes in the intramolecular potential with pressure.

  20. Analysis of lipsticks using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gardner, P; Bertino, M F; Weimer, R; Hazelrigg, E

    2013-10-10

    In this study, 80 lipsticks were obtained and evaluated using Raman spectroscopy at excitation wavelengths of 532 and 780 nm. Fluorescence severely limited analysis with the 532 nm line while the 780 nm line proved useful for all samples analyzed. It was possible to differentiate 95% of the lipsticks evaluated based on one or more Raman peaks. However, there were no peak trends observed that could be used to identify a manufacturer or categorize a sample. In situ analysis of lipstick smears was found to be possible even from several Raman active substrates, but was occasionally limited by background fluorescence and in extreme cases, photodegradation. PMID:24053867

  1. Raman spectroscopy investigation of magnetite nanoparticles in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavov, L.; Abrashev, M. V.; Merodiiska, T.; Gelev, Ch.; Vandenberghe, R. E.; Markova-Deneva, I.; Nedkov, I.

    2010-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to investigate magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in two types of β-cyclodextrin suspensions. An approach is presented for characterization of the magnetic core in liquid surrounding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The effect of elevating laser power on the structural stability and chemical composition of magnetite in the ferrofluids is discussed. The data are compared with data from dry by-products from the fluids. Powder samples undergo total phase transition from magnetite to hematite at laser power of 1.95 mW. The same nanoparticles in the fluid undergo transformation at 9 mW, but no hematite positions appear throughout that investigation. The Raman spectra revealed that the main phase of the magnetic core in the fluids is magnetite. That is indicated by a strong and non-diminishing in intensity peak at 670 cm -1. A second phase is present at the nanoparticle's surface with Raman spectroscopy unveiling maghemite-like and small fractions of goethite-like structures. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy investigations confirm deviations in the surface structure and also point to the fact that the oxidation process starts at an early stage after formation of the nanoparticles. The analyses of the infrared data also show that β-cyclodextrin molecules retain their cyclic character and the coating does not affect the oxidation process once the particles are evicted from the fluids. A Mössbauer spectroscopy measurement on a ferrofluidic sample is also presented.

  2. Raman and multichannel Raman spectroscopy of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoluzza, Alessandro; Caramazza, R.; Fagnano, C.

    1991-05-01

    Raman and multichannel Raman spectroscopy are molecular techniques able to monitor the bulk and surface structure of a biomaterial, in a non destructive and non invasive way, giving therefore useful information on physical and chemical aspects of biocompatibility. The same techniques can also be adequately used for the characterization of the biomaterial-host tissue interface, hence providing structural information on the biochemical aspect of biocompatibility. Moreover, multichannel Raman spectroscopy can also determine "in vivo" and "in situ" the bulk and surface structure of a biomaterial and the molecular interactions between biomaterials and tissues. Useful information at a molecular level on the biomaterial-tissue system can so be deduced. In particular, the application of traditional Paman spectroscopy to bioactive glasses (glasses derived from Hench's bioglass and meta and oligophosphates of calcium by themselves and with the addition of sodium and aluminium) useful in orthopedics and the application to hydrophobic (PMMA) and hydrophilic (PHEMA and PVP) organic polymers useful in ophthalmology are shown. Instead the applications of multichannel Paman spectroscopy are elucidated in the case of intraocular lenses (lOLs) based on PMMA and contact lenses (CLs) based on hydrophi I ic polymers.

  3. Infrared- and Raman-Spectroscopy Measurements of a Transition in the Crystal Structure and a Closing of the Energy Gap of BiTeI under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, M. K.; Levallois, J.; Lerch, P.; Teyssier, J.; Kuzmenko, A. B.; Autès, G.; Yazyev, O. V.; Ubaldini, A.; Giannini, E.; van der Marel, D.; Akrap, A.

    2014-01-01

    BiTeI is a giant Rashba spin splitting system, in which a noncentrosymmetric topological phase has recently been suggested to appear under high pressure. We investigated the optical properties of this compound, reflectivity and transmission, under pressures up to 15 GPa. The gap feature in the optical conductivity vanishes above p ˜9 GPa and does not reappear up to at least 15 GPa. The plasma edge, associated with intrinsically doped charge carriers, is smeared out through a phase transition at 9 GPa. Using high-pressure Raman spectroscopy, we follow the vibrational modes of BiTeI, providing additional clear evidence that the transition at 9 GPa involves a change of crystal structure. This change of crystal structure possibly inhibits the high-pressure topological phase from occurring.

  4. Coherent Raman spectroscopy for supersonic flow measurments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.

    1986-01-01

    In collaboration with NASA/Langley Research Center, a truly nonintrusive and nonseeding method for measuring supersonic molecular flow parameters was proposed and developed at Colorado State University. The feasibility of this Raman Doppler Velocimetry (RDV), currently operated in a scanning mode, was demonstrated not only in a laboratory environment at Colorado State University, but also in a major wind tunnel at NASA/Langley Research Center. The research progress of the RDV development is summarized. In addition, methods of coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin spectroscopy and single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy are investigated, respectively, for measurements of high-pressure and turbulent flows.

  5. Observability of localized magnetoplasmons in quantum dots: Scrutinizing the eligibility of far-infrared, Raman, and electron-energy-loss spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate a one-component, quasi-zero dimensional, quantum plasma exposed to a parabolic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. If the size of such a system as can be realized in the semiconducting quantum dots is on the order of the de-Broglie wavelength, the electronic and optical properties become highly tunable. Then the quantum size effects challenge the observation of many-particle phenomena such as the magneto-optical absorption, Raman intensity, and electron energy-loss spectrum. An exact analytical solution of the problem leads us to infer that these many-particle phenomena are, in fact, dictated by the generalized Kohn's theorem (GKT) in the long-wavelength limit. Maneuvering the confinement and/or the magnetic field furnishes the resonance energies capable of being explored with the FIR, Raman, and/or electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. This implies that either of these probes is competent in observing the localized magnetoplasmons in the system. As an application of the rigorous analytical diagnosis of the system, we have presented various pertinent single-particle, such as Fock-Darwin spectrum, Fermi energy, zigzag excitation spectrum, and magneto-optical transitions, and the many-particle phenomena, such as magneto-optical absorption, Raman intensity, and electron energy-loss probability. In the latter, the energy position of the resonance peaks is observed to be independent of the electron-electron interactions and hence of the number of electrons in the quantum dot in compliance with the GKT. It is found that both confinement potential and magnetic field play a decisive role in influencing the aforementioned many-particle phenomena. Specifically, increasing (decreasing) the strength of the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots and results into a blue (red) shift in the respective spectra. Intensifying the magnetic field has two-fold effects in the resonance

  6. Composition of Uranium Oxide Surface Layers Analyzed by m-Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Siekhaus, W J

    2003-11-24

    Oxide thickness and composition averaged over a few square millimeter has been measured with nm thickness resolution by diffuse reflectance fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. {mu}-Raman spectroscopy has been done on powders and bulk samples in the past, and can now be done on surfaces layers with {micro}m lateral and depth resolution using con-focal microscopy. Here we apply con-focal-microscopy-based {mu}-Raman spectroscopy to a freshly polished/lightly oxidized and to heavily oxidized uranium to determine its sensitivity. The spectra show that {mu}-Raman spectroscopy does detect oxide thickness and oxide composition with high sensitivity.

  7. Theory of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Y; Zhang, Donghui; McCamant, David W; Kukura, Philipp; Mathies, Richard A

    2004-08-22

    Femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is a new technique that produces high-resolution (time-resolved) vibrational spectra from either the ground or excited electronic states of molecules, free from background fluorescence. FSRS uses simultaneously a narrow bandwidth approximately 1-3 ps Raman pump pulse with a continuum approximately 30-50 fs Stokes probe pulse to produce sharp Raman gains, at positions corresponding to vibrational transitions in the sample, riding on top of the continuum Stokes probe spectrum. When FSRS is preceded by a femtosecond actinic pump pulse that initiates the photochemistry of interest, time-resolved Raman spectroscopy can be carried out. We present two theoretical approaches to FSRS: one is based on a coupling of Raman pump and probe light waves with the vibrations in the medium, and another is a quantum-mechanical description. The latter approach is used to discuss the conditions of applicability and limitations of the coupled-wave description. Extension of the quantum-mechanical description to the case where the Raman pump beam is on resonance with an excited electronic state, as well as when FSRS is used to probe a nonstationary vibrational wave packet prepared by an actinic pump pulse, is also discussed. PMID:15303930

  8. High fidelity nanohole enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Bahns, J. T.; Guo, Q.; Gray, S. K.; Jaeger, H. M.; Chen, L.; Montgomery, J. M.; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a sensitive technique that can even detect single molecules. However, in many SERS applications, the strongly inhomogeneous distribution of intense local fields makes it very difficult for a quantitive assessment of the fidelity, or reproducibility of the signal, which limits the application of SERS. Herein, we report the development of exceptionally high-fidelity hole-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HERS) from ordered, 2D hexagonal nanohole arrays. We take the fidelity f to be a measure of the percent deviation of the Raman peaks from measurement to measurement. Overall, area averaged fidelities for 12 gold array samples ranged from f {approx} 2-15% for HERS using aqueous R6G molecules. Furthermore, intensity modulations of the enhanced Raman spectra were measured for the first time as a function of polarization angle. The best of these measurements, which focus on static laser spots on the sample, could be consistent with even higher fidelities than the area-averaged results. Nanohole arrays in silver provided supporting polarization measurements and a more complete enhanced Raman fingerprint for phenylalanine molecules. We also carried out finite-difference time-domain calculations to assist in the interpretation of the experiments, identifying the polarization dependence as possibly arising from hole-hole interactions. Our results represent a step toward making quantitative and reproducible enhanced Raman measurements possible and also open new avenues for a large-scale source of highly uniform hot spots.

  9. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L.

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)2- units were observed.

  10. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals.

    PubMed

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)(2-) units were observed. PMID:25956330

  11. Disposable sheath that facilitates endoscopic Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Short, Michael; Tai, Isabella T.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    In vivo endoscopic Raman spectroscopy of human tissue using a fiber optic probe has been previously demonstrated. However, there remain several technical challenges, such as a robust control over the laser radiation dose and measurement repeatability during endoscopy. A decrease in the signal to noise was also observed due to aging of Raman probe after repeated cycles of harsh reprocessing procedures. To address these issues, we designed and tested a disposable, biocompatible, and sterile sheath for use with a fiber optic endoscopic Raman probe. The sheath effectively controls contamination of Raman probes between procedures, greatly reduces turnaround time, and slows down the aging of the Raman probes. A small optical window fitted at the sheath cap maintained the measurement distance between Raman probe end and tissue surface. To ensure that the sheath caused a minimal amount of fluorescence and Raman interference, the optical properties of materials for the sheath, optical window, and bonding agent were studied. The easy-to-use sheath can be manufactured at a moderate cost. The sheath strictly enforced a maximum permissible exposure standard of the tissue by the laser and reduced the spectral variability by 1.5 to 8.5 times within the spectral measurement range.

  12. Use of total internal reflection Raman (TIR) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to analyze component separation in thin offset ink films after setting on coated paper surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kivioja, Antti; Hartus, Timo; Vuorinen, Tapani; Gane, Patrick; Jääskeläinen, Anna-Stiina

    2013-06-01

    The interactive behavior of ink constituents with porous substrates during and after the offset print process has an important effect on the quality of printed products. To help elucidate the distribution of ink components between the retained ink layer and the substrate, a variety of spectroscopic and microscopic analysis techniques have been developed. This paper describes for the first time the use of total internal reflection (TIR) Raman spectroscopy to analyze the penetration behavior of separated offset ink components (linseed oil, solid color pigment) in coated papers providing chemically intrinsic information rapidly, nondestructively, and with minimal sample preparation. In addition, the already widely applied technique of attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) was evaluated in parallel and compared. The results of the ATR-IR Raman clearly revealed an improvement in uppermost depth resolution compared with values previously published from other nondestructive techniques, and the method is shown to be capable of providing new knowledge of the setting of thin (0.25-2 μm) offset ink films, allowing the spreading and the penetration behavior on physically different paper coating surfaces to be studied. PMID:23735252

  13. Applications of high resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Owyoung, A.; Esherick, P.

    1980-01-01

    The use of high-power, narrow-band lasers has significantly improved the resolving power and sensitivity of inverse Raman spectroscopy of gases. In this paper we shall describe this technique, illustrate its capabilities by showing some Q-branch spectra of heavy spherical tops, and survey some possible future applications.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy Cell-based Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Notingher, Ioan

    2007-01-01

    One of the main challenges faced by biodetection systems is the ability to detect and identify a large range of toxins at low concentrations and in short times. Cell-based biosensors rely on detecting changes in cell behaviour, metabolism, or induction of cell death following exposure of live cells to toxic agents. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique for studying cellular biochemistry. Different toxic chemicals have different effects on living cells and induce different time-dependent biochemical changes related to cell death mechanisms. Cellular changes start with membrane receptor signalling leading to cytoplasmic shrinkage and nuclear fragmentation. The potential advantage of Raman spectroscopy cell-based systems is that they are not engineered to respond specifically to a single toxic agent but are free to react to many biologically active compounds. Raman spectroscopy biosensors can also provide additional information from the time-dependent changes of cellular biochemistry. Since no cell labelling or staining is required, the specific time dependent biochemical changes in the living cells can be used for the identification and quantification of the toxic agents. Thus, detection of biochemical changes of cells by Raman spectroscopy could overcome the limitations of other biosensor techniques, with respect to detection and discrimination of a large range of toxic agents. Further developments of this technique may also include integration of cellular microarrays for high throughput in vitro toxicological testing of pharmaceuticals and in situ monitoring of the growth of engineered tissues.

  15. Raman Spectroscopy of Bone and Cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Michael

    This chapter will reviews the Raman spectroscopy of the subject tissues. After a brief introduction to the structure, biology, and function of these tissues, we will describe the spectra and band assignments of the tissues and then summarize applications to studies of tissue development, mechanical function and competence, and pathology. Both metabolic diseases and genetic disorders will be covered.

  16. Tissue measurement using 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, Chad A.; Wu, Huawen; Yang, William

    2013-03-01

    The use of Raman spectroscopy to provide characterization and diagnosis of biological tissues has shown increasing success in recent years. Most of this work has been performed using near-infrared laser sources such as 785 or 830 nm, in a balance of reduced intrinsic fluorescence in the tissues and quantum efficiency in the silicon detectors often used. However, even at these wavelengths, many tissues still exhibit strong or prohibitive fluorescence, and these wavelengths still cause autofluorescence in many common sampling materials, such as glass. In this study, we demonstrate the use of 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy for the study of biological tissues. A number of tissues are evaluated using the 1064 nm system and compared with the spectra obtained from a 785 nm system. Sampling materials are similarly compared. These results show that 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy provides a viable solution for measurement of highly fluorescent biological tissues such as liver and kidney, which are difficult or impossible to extract Raman at 785 nm.

  17. Raman spectroscopy of shocked water

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Graham, W.B.; Walrafen, G.E.

    1985-08-01

    We describe a new technique for recording spontaneous Raman spectra from molecules during the passage of strong shock waves. We have used this technique to study the OH-stretch band of liquid H/sub 2/O shocked to pressure up to 26 GPa and 1700 K. The shape of the band changes over the range 7.5-26 GPa, and is described well by a two-component mixture model, implying changes in the intermolecular coupling of shock compressed water molecules. We discuss the implications of the spectra on the mechanism responsible for the electrical conductivity of shocked H/sub 2/O. 22 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Nonlinear microscopy, infrared, and Raman microspectroscopy for brain tumor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Tobias; Bergner, Norbert; Bielecki, Christiane; Krafft, Christoph; Akimov, Denis; Romeike, Bernd F. M.; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen

    2011-02-01

    Contemporary brain tumor research focuses on two challenges: First, tumor typing and grading by analyzing excised tissue is of utmost importance for choosing a therapy. Second, for prognostication the tumor has to be removed as completely as possible. Nowadays, histopathology of excised tissue using haematoxylin-eosine staining is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis of surgical pathology specimens. However, it is neither applicable in vivo, nor does it allow for precise tumor typing in those cases when only nonrepresentative specimens are procured. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy allow for very precise cancer analysis due to their molecular specificity, while nonlinear microscopy is a suitable tool for rapid imaging of large tissue sections. Here, unstained samples from the brain of a domestic pig have been investigated by a multimodal nonlinear imaging approach combining coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, second harmonic generation, and two photon excited fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, a brain tumor specimen was additionally analyzed by linear Raman and Fourier transform infrared imaging for a detailed assessment of the tissue types that is required for classification and to validate the multimodal imaging approach. Hence label-free vibrational microspectroscopic imaging is a promising tool for fast and precise in vivo diagnostics of brain tumors.

  19. Raman, infrared and near-infrared spectroscopic characterization of the herderite-hydroxylherderite mineral series.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Queiroz, Camila de Siqueira; Belotti, Fernanda M; Cândido Filho, Mauro

    2014-01-24

    Natural single-crystal specimens of the herderite-hydroxylherderite series from Brazil, with general formula CaBePO4(F,OH), were investigated by electron microprobe, Raman, infrared and near-infrared spectroscopies. The minerals occur as secondary products in granitic pegmatites. Herderite and hydroxylherderite minerals show extensive solid solution formation. The Raman spectra of hydroxylherderite are characterized by bands at around 985 and 998 cm(-1), assigned to ν1 symmetric stretching mode of the HOPO3(3-) and PO4(3-) units. Raman bands at around 1085, 1128 and 1138 cm(-1) are attributed to both the HOP and PO antisymmetric stretching vibrations. The set of Raman bands observed at 563, 568, 577, 598, 616 and 633 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4 and H2PO4 units. The OH Raman stretching vibrations of hydroxylherderite were observed ranging from 3626 cm(-1) to 3609 cm(-1). The infrared stretching vibrations of hydroxylherderites were observed between 3606 cm(-1) and 3599 cm(-1). By using a Libowitzky type function, hydrogen bond distances based upon the OH stretching bands were calculated. Characteristic NIR bands at around 6961 and 7054 cm(-1) were assigned to the first overtone of the fundamental, whilst NIR bands at 10,194 and 10,329 cm(-1) are assigned to the second overtone of the fundamental OH stretching vibration. Insight into the structure of the herderite-hydroxylherderite series is assessed by vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:24076459

  20. Raman spectroscopy of saliva as a perspective method for periodontitis diagnostics Raman spectroscopy of saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Minaeva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In view of its potential for biological tissues analyses at a molecular level, Raman spectroscopy in optical range has been the object of biomedical research for the last years. The main aim of this work is the development of Raman spectroscopy for organic content identifying and determination of biomarkers of saliva at a molecular level for periodontitis diagnostics. Four spectral regions were determined: 1155 and 1525 cm-1, 1033 and 1611 cm-1, which can be used as biomarkers of this widespread disease.

  1. Detection Of Biochips By Raman And Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantarovich, Keren; Tsarfati, Inbal; Gheber, Levi A.; Haupt, Karsten; Bar, Ilana

    2010-08-01

    Biochips constitute a rapidly increasing research field driven by the versatility of sensing devices and the importance of their applications in the bioanalytical field, drug development, environmental monitoring, food analysis, etc. Common strategies used for creating biochips and for reading them have extensive limitations, motivating development of miniature biochips and label-free formats. To achieve these goals we combined the nano fountain pen method, for printing microscale features with Raman spectroscopy or surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for reading droplets of synthetic receptors. These receptors include molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), which are obtained by polymerization of suitable functional and cross-linking monomers around molecular templates. MIPs are characterized by higher physical and chemical stability than biomacromolecules, and therefore are potentially very suitable as recognition elements for biosensors, or biochips. The monitored bands in the Raman and SERS spectra could be related to the taken up compound, allowing direct detection of the template, i.e., the β-blocking drug propranolol in the imprinted droplets, as well as imaging of individual and multiple dots in an array. This study shows that the combination of nanolithography techniques with SERS might open the possibility of miniaturized arrayed MIP sensors with label-free, specific and quantitative detection.

  2. Raman spectroscopy of Alzheimer's diseased tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Krasner, Neville

    2004-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common forms of dementia, and causes steady memory loss and mental regression. It is also accompanied by severe atrophy of the brain. However, the pathological biomarkers of the disease can only be confirmed and examined upon the death of the patient. A commercial (Renishaw PLC, UK) Raman system with an 830 nm NIR diode laser was used to analyse brain samples, which were flash frozen at post-mortem. Ethical approval was sought for these samples. The Alzheimer's diseased samples contained a number of biomarkers, including neuritic plaques and tangles. The Raman spectra were examined by order to differentiate between normal and Alzheimer's diseased brain tissues. Preliminary results indicate that Alzheimer's diseased tissues can be differentiated from control tissues using Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra differ in terms of peak intensity, and the presence of a stronger amide I band in the 1667 cm-1 region which occurs more prominently in the Alzheimer's diseased tissue. These preliminary results indicate that the beta-amyloid protein originating from neuritic plaques can be identified with Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, K. M.; Ridgway, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of IR techniques in stellar classification, studies of stellar photospheres, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the nature of remnant and ejected matter in near-circumstellar regions. Qualitative IR spectral classification of cool and hot stars is discussed, along with IR spectra of peculiar composite star systems and of obscured stars, and IR characteristics of stellar populations. The use of IR spectroscopy in theoretical modeling of stellar atmospheres is examined, IR indicators of stellar atmospheric composition are described, and contributions of IR spectroscopy to the study of stellar recycling of interstellar matter are summarized. The future of IR astronomy is also considered.

  4. Raman spectroscopy of 'Bisphenol A'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Ramzan; Zheng, Yuxiang

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectra (95 - 3000 cm-1) of 'Bisphenol A' are presented. Absorption peaks have been assigned by Density Functional Theory (DFT) with B3LYP 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) and wB97XD 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd). B3LYP 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) gives frequencies which are nearer to experimental frequencies than wB97XD 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) which involves empirical dispersion. Scale factor for wB97XD 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) is found out to be 0.95008 by least squares fit.

  5. Raman spectroscopy in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in the use of optical diagnostics in cancer detection. Early diagnosis of cancer affords early intervention and greatest chance of cure. Raman spectroscopy is based on the interaction of photons with the target material producing a highly detailed biochemical 'fingerprint' of the sample. It can be appreciated that such a sensitive biochemical detection system could confer diagnostic benefit in a clinical setting. Raman has been used successfully in key health areas such as cardiovascular diseases, and dental care but there is a paucity of literature on Raman spectroscopy in Head and Neck cancer. Following the introduction of health care targets for cancer, and with an ever-aging population the need for rapid cancer detection has never been greater. Raman spectroscopy could confer great patient benefit with early, rapid and accurate diagnosis. This technique is almost labour free without the need for sample preparation. It could reduce the need for whole pathological specimen examination, in theatre it could help to determine margin status, and finally peripheral blood diagnosis may be an achievable target. PMID:20923567

  6. Raman and infrared studies of synthetic Maya Blue pigment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, Layra; Manciu, Felicia; Ramirez, Alejandra; Chianelli, Russell

    2008-10-01

    A fascinating aspect of Maya pigments is that despite the environmentally harsh humidity and high temperatures they resist fading and they have unprecedented stability. In this investigation, we address the question of how organic dye binds to inorganic palygorskite to form a pigment similar to Maya Blue. We also address how such binding might be affected by varying the proportion of dye relative to that of the mineral, and by varying the length of heating time used in preparation of the pigment. Our analysis by Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopies proves the partial elimination of the selection rules for the centrosymmetric indigo, and shows the disappearance of the indigo N-H bonding, as the organic molecules incorporate into palygorskite material. Infrared data confirm the loss of zeolitic water and a partial removal of structural water after the heating process. Evidence of bonding between palygorskite and indigo through oxygen is revealed by both spectroscopic measurements.

  7. Identification and characterization of colorectal cancer using Raman spectroscopy and feature selection techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoxin; Chen, Gong; Zhang, Yanjiao; Guo, Zhouyi; Liu, Zhiming; Xu, Junfa; Li, Xueqiang; Lin, Lin

    2014-10-20

    This study aims to detect colorectal cancer with near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and feature selection techniques. A total of 306 Raman spectra of colorectal cancer tissues and normal tissues are acquired from 44 colorectal cancer patients. Five diagnostically important Raman bands in the regions of 815-830, 935-945, 1131-1141, 1447-1457 and 1665-1675 cm(-1) related to proteins, nucleic acids and lipids of tissues are identified with the ant colony optimization (ACO) and support vector machine (SVM). The diagnostic models built with the identified Raman bands provide a diagnostic accuracy of 93.2% for identifying colorectal cancer from normal Raman spectroscopy. The study demonstrates that the Raman spectroscopy associated with ACO-SVM diagnostic algorithms has great potential to characterize and diagnose colorectal cancer. PMID:25401621

  8. Raman Spectroscopy of Soft Musculoskeletal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Tendon, ligament, and joint tissues are important in maintaining daily function. They can be affected by disease, age, and injury. Slow tissue turnover, hierarchical structure and function, and nonlinear mechanical properties present challenges to diagnosing and treating soft musculoskeletal tissues. Understanding these tissues in health, disease, and injury is important to improving pharmacologic and surgical repair outcomes. Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in the examination of soft musculoskeletal tissues. This article highlights exciting basic science and clinical/translational Raman studies of cartilage, tendon, and ligament. PMID:25286106

  9. Candida parapsilosis Biofilm Identification by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, Katarina; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Mahelová, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Colonies of Candida parapsilosis on culture plates were probed directly in situ using Raman spectroscopy for rapid identification of specific strains separated by a given time intervals (up to months apart). To classify the Raman spectra, data analysis was performed using the approach of principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis of the data sets generated during the scans of individual colonies reveals that despite the inhomogeneity of the biological samples unambiguous associations to individual strains (two biofilm-positive and two biofilm-negative) could be made. PMID:25535081

  10. Candida parapsilosis biofilm identification by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, Katarina; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Mahelová, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Colonies of Candida parapsilosis on culture plates were probed directly in situ using Raman spectroscopy for rapid identification of specific strains separated by a given time intervals (up to months apart). To classify the Raman spectra, data analysis was performed using the approach of principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis of the data sets generated during the scans of individual colonies reveals that despite the inhomogeneity of the biological samples unambiguous associations to individual strains (two biofilm-positive and two biofilm-negative) could be made. PMID:25535081

  11. Raman spectroscopy of triolein under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefelski, D. B.; Jastrzębski, C.; Wierzbicki, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.; Wieja, K.; Kościesza, R.

    2010-03-01

    This article presents results of the high pressure Raman spectroscopy of triolein. Triolein, a triacylglyceride (TAG) of oleic acid, is an unsaturated fat, present in natural oils such as olive oil. As a basic food component and an energy storage molecule, it has considerable importance for food and fuel industries. To generate pressure in the experiment, we used a high-pressure cylindrical chamber with sapphire windows, presented in (R.M. Siegoczyński, R. Kościesza, D.B. Tefelski, and A. Kos, Molecular collapse - modification of the liquid structure induced by pressure in oleic acid, High Press. Res. 29 (2009), pp. 61-66). Pressure up to 750 MPa was applied. A Raman spectrometer in "macro"-configuration was employed. Raman spectroscopy provides information on changes of vibrational modes related to structural changes of triolein under pressure. Interesting changes in the triglyceride C‒H stretching region at 2650-3100 cm-1 were observed under high-pressures. Changes were also observed in the ester carbonyl (C˭ O) stretching region 1700-1780 cm-1 and the C‒C stretching region at 1050-1150 cm-1. The overall luminescence of the sample decreased under pressure, making it possible to set longer spectrum acquisition time and obtain more details of the spectrum. The registered changes suggest that the high-pressure solid phase of triolein is organized as β-polymorphic, as was reported in (C. Akita, T. Kawaguchi, and F. Kaneko, Structural study on polymorphism of cis-unsaturated triacylglycerol: Triolein, J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006), pp. 4346-4353; E. Da Silva and D. Rousseau, Molecular order and thermodynamics of the solid-liquid transition in triglycerides via Raman spectroscopy, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10 (2008), pp. 4606-4613) (with temperature-induced phase transitions). The research has shown that Raman spectroscopy in TAGs under pressure reveals useful information about its structural changes.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF ROBUST CALIBRATION MODELS FOR PROTEIN AND AMYLOSE IN RICE FLOUR USING FT-RAMAN AND NIR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spectroscopic analysis has been investigated with the aim of developing a database for the evaluation of rice quality. The purpose of this study is to develop robust Near infrared Fourier transform Raman (NIR-FT/Raman) and Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy calibration models for determining the prot...

  13. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic features of plant cuticles: a review

    PubMed Central

    Heredia-Guerrero, José A.; Benítez, José J.; Domínguez, Eva; Bayer, Ilker S.; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Heredia, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The cuticle is one of the most important plant barriers. It is an external and continuous lipid membrane that covers the surface of epidermal cells and whose main function is to prevent the massive loss of water. The spectroscopic characterization of the plant cuticle and its components (cutin, cutan, waxes, polysaccharides and phenolics) by infrared and Raman spectroscopies has provided significant advances in the knowledge of the functional groups present in the cuticular matrix and on their structural role, interaction and macromolecular arrangement. Additionally, these spectroscopies have been used in the study of cuticle interaction with exogenous molecules, degradation, distribution of components within the cuticle matrix, changes during growth and development and characterization of fossil plants. PMID:25009549

  14. Ab initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredkin, Donald R.; Komornicki, Andrew; White, Steven R.; Wilson, Kent R.

    1983-06-01

    We discuss several ways in which molecular absorption and scattering spectra can be computed ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature. These methods can be divided into two general categories. In the first, or sequential, type of approach, one first solves the electronic part of the Schrödinger equation in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, mapping out the potential energy, dipole moment vector (for infrared absorption) and polarizability tensor (for Raman scattering) as functions of nuclear coordinates. Having completed the electronic part of the calculation, one then solves the nuclear part of the problem either classically or quantum mechanically. As an example of the sequential ab initio approach, the infrared and Raman rotational and vibrational-rotational spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed in the simplest rigid rotor, normal mode approximation. Quantum techniques are used to calculate the necessary potential energy, dipole moment, and polarizability information at the equilibrium geometry. A new quick, accurate, and easy to program classical technique involving no reference to Euler angles or special functions is developed to compute the infrared and Raman band contours for any rigid rotor, including asymmetric tops. A second, or simultaneous, type of ab initio approach is suggested for large systems, particularly those for which normal mode analysis is inappropriate, such as liquids, clusters, or floppy molecules. Then the curse of dimensionality prevents mapping out in advance the complete potential, dipole moment, and polarizability functions over the whole space of nuclear positions of all atoms, and a solution in which the electronic and nuclear parts of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation are simultaneously solved is needed. A quantum force classical trajectory (QFCT) molecular dynamic method, based on linear response theory, is described, in which the forces, dipole moment, and polarizability are computed quantum

  15. Characterization of Kevlar Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the characterization of Kevlar composite materials using Raman spectroscopy. The goal of the research is to develop and understand the Raman spectrum of Kevlar materials to provide a foundation for the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies based on the interaction of laser light with the polymer Kevlar. The paper discusses the fundamental aspects of experimental characterization of the spectrum of Kevlar, including the effects of incident wavelength, polarization and laser power. The effects of environmental exposure of Kevlar materials on certain characteristics of its Raman spectrum are explored, as well as the effects of applied stress. This data may provide a foundation for the development of NDE technologies intended to detect the in-situ deterioration of Kevlar materials used for engineering applications that can later be extended to other materials such as carbon fiber composites.

  16. Remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe

    DOEpatents

    Schmucker, John E.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Archer, William B.

    1999-01-01

    A remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe allows for analyzing Raman scattered light from a point of interest external probe. An environmental barrier including at least one window separates the probe from the point of interest. An optical tube is disposed adjacent to the environmental barrier and includes a long working length compound lens objective next to the window. A beam splitter and a mirror are at the other end. A mechanical means is used to translated the prove body in the X, Y, and Z directions resulting in a variable focus optical apparatus. Laser light is reflected by the beam splitter and directed toward the compound lens objective, then through the window and focused on the point of interest. Raman scattered light is then collected by the compound lens objective and directed through the beam splitter to a mirror. A device for analyzing the light, such as a monochrometer, is coupled to the mirror.

  17. Drug Stability Analysis by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Chetan; Smith, Wayne; Brouillette, Carl; Farquharson, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical drugs are available to astronauts to help them overcome the deleterious effects of weightlessness, sickness and injuries. Unfortunately, recent studies have shown that some of the drugs currently used may degrade more rapidly in space, losing their potency before their expiration dates. To complicate matters, the degradation products of some drugs can be toxic. Here, we present a preliminary investigation of the ability of Raman spectroscopy to quantify mixtures of four drugs; acetaminophen, azithromycin, epinephrine, and lidocaine, with their primary degradation products. The Raman spectra for the mixtures were replicated by adding the pure spectra of the drug and its degradant to determine the relative percent contributions using classical least squares. This multivariate approach allowed determining concentrations in ~10 min with a limit of detection of ~4% of the degradant. These results suggest that a Raman analyzer could be used to assess drug potency, nondestructively, at the time of use to ensure crewmember safety. PMID:25533308

  18. Characterization of diatomaceous silica by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, P; He, H P; Wu, D Q; Wang, D Q; Chen, L J

    2004-10-01

    The network characteristic of a selection of diatomaceous silica derived from China has been investigated using Raman spectroscopy. Before any thermal treatment of the sample, two prominent bands of 607 and circa 493 cm(-1) are resolved in the Raman spectra of diatomaceous silica, corresponding to the (SiO)3-ring breathing mode of D2-line and the O3SiOH tetrahedral vibration mode of D1-line, respectively. This is more similar to the pyrogenic silica rather than the silica gel. For the latter, to obtain a (SiO)3-ring, the sample must be heated between 250 and 450 degrees C. Significant difference is also found between the diatomaceous silica and other natural silicas, e.g. in the Raman spectra of sedimentary and volcanic opals, neither D1 nor D2 band is detected in previous reports. PMID:15350933

  19. Characterization of diatomaceous silica by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, P.; He, H. P.; Wu, D. Q.; Wang, D. Q.; Chen, L. J.

    2004-10-01

    The network characteristic of a selection of diatomaceous silica derived from China has been investigated using Raman spectroscopy. Before any thermal treatment of the sample, two prominent bands of 607 and circa 493 cm -1 are resolved in the Raman spectra of diatomaceous silica, corresponding to the (SiO) 3-ring breathing mode of D 2-line and the O 3SiOH tetrahedral vibration mode of D 1-line, respectively. This is more similar to the pyrogenic silica rather than the silica gel. For the latter, to obtain a (SiO) 3-ring, the sample must be heated between 250 and 450 °C. Significant difference is also found between the diatomaceous silica and other natural silicas, e.g. in the Raman spectra of sedimentary and volcanic opals, neither D 1 nor D 2 band is detected in previous reports.

  20. Drug stability analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shende, Chetan; Smith, Wayne; Brouillette, Carl; Farquharson, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical drugs are available to astronauts to help them overcome the deleterious effects of weightlessness, sickness and injuries. Unfortunately, recent studies have shown that some of the drugs currently used may degrade more rapidly in space, losing their potency before their expiration dates. To complicate matters, the degradation products of some drugs can be toxic. Here, we present a preliminary investigation of the ability of Raman spectroscopy to quantify mixtures of four drugs; acetaminophen, azithromycin, epinephrine, and lidocaine, with their primary degradation products. The Raman spectra for the mixtures were replicated by adding the pure spectra of the drug and its degradant to determine the relative percent contributions using classical least squares. This multivariate approach allowed determining concentrations in ~10 min with a limit of detection of ~4% of the degradant. These results suggest that a Raman analyzer could be used to assess drug potency, nondestructively, at the time of use to ensure crewmember safety. PMID:25533308

  1. A Quantitative Infrared Spectroscopy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahling, Mark D.; Eliason, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Although infrared spectroscopy is used primarily for qualitative identifications, it is possible to use it as a quantitative tool as well. The use of a standard curve to determine percent methanol in a 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol sample is described. Background information, experimental procedures, and results obtained are provided. (JN)

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy of Deuterated Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCarthy, Patrick

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment (based on the potassium bromide pressed-pellet method) involving the infrared spectroscopy of deuterated compounds. Deuteration refers to deuterium-hydrogen exchange at active hydrogen sites in the molecule. (JN)

  3. [Research Progress of Raman Spectroscopy on Dyestuff Identification of Ancient Relics and Artifacts].

    PubMed

    He, Qiu-ju; Wang, Li-qin

    2016-02-01

    As the birthplace of Silk Road, China has a long dyeing history. The valuable information about the production time, the source of dyeing material, dyeing process and preservation status were existed in organic dyestuff deriving from cultural relics and artifacts. However, because of the low contents, complex compositions and easily degraded of dyestuff, it is always a challenging task to identify the dyestuff in relics analyzing field. As a finger-print spectrum, Raman spectroscopy owns unique superiorities in dyestuff identification. Thus, the principle, characteristic, limitation, progress and development direction of micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS/µ-Raman), near infrared reflection and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (NIR-FT-Raman), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonance raman spectroscopy (RRS) have been introduced in this paper. Furthermore, the features of Raman spectra of gardenia, curcumin and other natural dyestuffs were classified by MRS technology, and then the fluorescence phenomena of purpurin excitated with different wavelength laser was compared and analyzed. At last, gray green silver colloidal particles were made as the base, then the colorant of madder was identified combining with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separation technology and SERS, the result showed that the surface enhancement effect of silver colloidal particles could significantly reduce fluorescence background of the Raman spectra. It is pointed out that Raman spectroscopy is a rapid and convenient molecular structure qualitative methodology, which has broad application prospect in dyestuff analysis of cultural relics and artifacts. We propose that the combination of multi-Raman spectroscopy, separation technology and long distance transmission technology are the development trends of Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27209739

  4. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Groot, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years visible pump/mid-infrared (IR) probe spectroscopy has established itself as a key technology to unravel structure-function relationships underlying the photo-dynamics of complex molecular systems. In this contribution we review the most important applications of mid-infrared absorption difference spectroscopy with sub-picosecond time-resolution to photosynthetic complexes. Considering several examples, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic antennas and electron transfer in reaction centers and even more intact structures, we show that the acquisition of ultrafast time resolved mid-IR spectra has led to new insights into the photo-dynamics of the considered systems and allows establishing a direct link between dynamics and structure, further strengthened by the possibility of investigating the protein response signal to the energy or electron transfer processes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:24973600

  5. Detecting changes during pregnancy with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargis, Elizabeth; Robertson, Kesha; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Reese, Jeff; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    Preterm labor is the second leading cause of neonatal mortality and leads to a myriad of complications like delayed development and cerebral palsy. Currently, there is no way to accurately predict preterm labor, making its prevention and treatment virtually impossible. While there are some at-risk patients, over half of all preterm births do not fall into any high-risk category. This study seeks to predict and prevent preterm labor by using Raman spectroscopy to detect changes in the cervix during pregnancy. Since Raman spectroscopy has been used to detect cancers in vivo in organs like the cervix and skin, it follows that spectra will change over the course of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that fluorescence decreased during pregnancy and increased during post-partum exams to pre-pregnancy levels. We believe significant changes will occur in the Raman spectra obtained during the course of pregnancy. In this study, Raman spectra from the cervix of pregnant mice and women will be acquired. Specific changes that occur due to cervical softening or changes in hormonal levels will be observed to understand the likelihood that a female mouse or a woman will enter labor.

  6. Raman spectroscopy for analysis of thorium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Johnson, Timothy J.; Olsen, Khris B.

    2016-05-01

    The thorium fuel cycle is an alternative to the uranium fuel cycle in that when 232Th is irradiated with neutrons it is converted to 233U, another fissile isotope. There are several chemical forms of thorium which are used in the Th fuel cycle. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has become a very portable and facile analytical technique useful for many applications, including e.g. determining the chemical composition of different materials such as for thorium compounds. The technique continues to improve with the development of ever-more sensitive instrumentation and better software. Using a laboratory Fourier-transform (FT)-Raman spectrometer with a 785 nm wavelength laser, we were able to obtain Raman spectra from a series of thorium-bearing compounds of unknown origin. These spectra were compared to the spectra of in-stock-laboratory thorium compounds including e.g. ThO2, ThF4, Th(CO3)2 and Th(C2O4)2. The unknown spectra showed very good agreement to the known standards, demonstrating the applicability of Raman spectroscopy for detection and identification of these nuclear materials.

  7. Raman spectroscopy of ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tuschel, D.D.; Lavine, J.P.

    1997-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to characterize silicon implanted with boron at a dose of 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2} or less and thermally annealed. The Raman scattering strengths and band shapes of the first-order optical mode at 520 cm{sup {minus}1} and of the second-order phonon modes are investigated to determine which modes are sensitive to the boron implant. The as-implanted samples show diminishing Raman scattering strength as the boron dose increases when the incident laser beam is 60{degree} with respect to the sample normal. Thermal annealing restores some of the Raman scattering strength. Three excitation wavelengths are used and the shortest, 457.9 nm, yields the greatest spectral differences from unimplanted silicon. The backscattering geometry shows a variety of changes in the Raman spectrum upon boron implantation. These involve band shifts of the first-order optical mode, bandwidth variations of the first-order optical mode, and the intensity of the second-order mode at 620 cm{sup {minus}1}.

  8. Bond and charge-density waves in (DI-DCNQI)2Ag (DI-DCNQI=2,5-diiodo-N,N'-dicyanoquinediimine) studied by single-crystal infrared and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yakushi, Kyuya; Pecile, Cesare; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2005-01-01

    The charge distribution and molecular arrangement of a quarter-filled quasi-one-dimensional system (DI-DCNQI)2Ag (DI-DCNQI=2,5-diiodo-dicyanoquinediimine) has been studied by IR and Raman spectroscopy. The charge localization of this material was believed to be a one-dimensional generalization of a Wigner crystal driven by intersite Coulomb repulsion. While charge disproportionation is confirmed via the splitting of bu modes in the infrared spectrum, the appearance of intense IR vibronic bands of ag modes strongly suggests the presence of the dimerization that is not expected by the proposed 1010 charge ordering model. In addition, the selection rules for the IR and Raman signals cannot be explained without a further symmetry reduction of the unit cell. To explain the vibrational behavior observed for a single crystal, we show that a more appropriate model for the charge ordering is 0110 ( 2kF charge-density wave and 4kF bond-order wave).

  9. Raman Spectroscopy of Irradiated Tissue Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexa, P.; Synytsya, A.; Volka, K.; de Boer, J.; Besserer, J.; Froschauer, S.; Loewe, M.; Moosburger, M.; Würkner, M.

    2003-06-01

    Tissue samples (skin of mice, normal and tumor, skin of a woman, normal and tumor) were irradiated by protons from the Munich tandem accelerator. The samples were analysed using Raman spectroscopy at the Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague by measuring the intensity of signals sensitive to radiation damage. Effects depending on the delivered dose were found. Proton-irradiation effects are then compared to those of gamma-irradiation.

  10. Challenges Analyzing Gypsum on Mars by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Craig P; Olcott Marshall, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy can provide chemical information about organic and inorganic substances quickly and nondestructively with little to no sample preparation, thus making it an ideal instrument for Mars rover missions. The ESA ExoMars planetary mission scheduled for launch in 2018 will contain a miniaturized Raman spectrometer (RLS) as part of the Pasteur payload operating with a continuous wave (CW) laser emitting at 532 nm. In addition, NASA is independently developing two miniaturized Raman spectrometers for the upcoming Mars 2020 rover mission, one of which is a remote (stand-off) Raman spectrometer that uses a pulse-gated 532 nm excitation system (SuperCam). The other is an in situ Raman spectrometer that employs a CW excitation laser emitting at 248.6 nm (SHERLOC). Recently, it has been shown with analyses by Curiosity that Gale Crater contains significantly elevated concentrations of transition metals such as Cr and Mn. Significantly, these transition metals are known to undergo fluorescence emission in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Consequently, samples containing these metals could be problematic for the successful acquisition of fluorescence-free Raman spectra when using a CW 532 nm excitation source. Here, we investigate one analog environment, with a similar mineralogy and sedimentology to that observed in martian environments, as well as elevated Cr contents, to ascertain the best excitation wavelength to successfully collect fluorescence-free spectra from Mars-like samples. Our results clearly show that CW near-infrared laser excitation emitting at 785 nm is better suited to the collection of fluorescence-free Raman spectra than would be a CW laser emitting at 532 nm. PMID:26317670

  11. The Impact of Array Detectors on Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Stephen C.; Pommier, Carolyn J. S.; Denton, M. Bonner

    2007-01-01

    The impact of array detectors in the field of Raman spectroscopy and all low-light-level spectroscopic techniques is examined. The high sensitivity of array detectors has allowed Raman spectroscopy to be used to detect compounds at part per million concentrations and to perform Raman analyses at advantageous wavelengths.

  12. Raman Spectroscopy: Incorporating the Chemical Dimension into Dermatological Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amit; Sharma, Shruti; Zarrow, Anna; Schwartz, Robert A; Lambert, W Clark

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides chemical analysis of tissue in vivo. By measuring the inelastic interactions of light with matter, Raman spectroscopy can determine the chemical composition of a sample. Diseases that are visually difficult to visually distinguish can be delineated based on differences in chemical composition of the affected tissue. Raman spectroscopy has successfully found spectroscopic signatures for skin cancers and differentiated those of benign skin growths. With current and on-going advances in optics and computing, inexpensive and effective Raman systems may soon be available for clinical use. Raman spectroscopy provides direct analyses of skin lesions, thereby improving both disease diagnosis and management. PMID:26955087

  13. Raman spectroscopy of C-irradiated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Hembree, D.M. Jr.; Pedraza, D.F.; Romanoski, G.R.; Withrow, S.P.; Annis, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite samples were irradiated with C{sup +} ions at 35 keV in a direction normal to the basal plane and subsequently annealed up to 1373 K. Substantial surface topography changes were observed at fluences of 5 {times} 10{sup 18} ions/m{sup 2} and higher using scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. Intricate networks of surface cracks and ridges developed after high dose implantation. A systematic study of the irradiation effects was conducted using Raman spectroscopy. Microstructural changes in irradiated regions were first detected at a dose of 1 {times} 10{sup 17} ions/m{sup 2} through the appearance of the Raman D-line at {approx}1360 cm{sup {minus}1}. The intensity of this line increases while that of the Raman G-line at 1580 cm{sup {minus}1} decreases as the irradiation dose is increased or the irradiation temperature is decreased. After irradiation at 280K to a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 19} ions/m{sup 2} or higher the first order spectrum exhibits one single line at a wavelength intermediate between the D- and G-lines. Damage recovery upon thermal annealing depends not only on the initial damage state but also on the annealing temperature sequence. Samples irradiated to a damage level where two distinct Raman peaks are no longer resolvable exhibited upon direct annealing at a high temperature two distinct Raman lines. By contrast, pre-annealing these highly irradiated specimens at lower temperatures produced less pronounced changes in the Raman spectra. Pre-annealing appears to stabilize damage structures that are more resistant to high-temperature annealing than those induced by irradiation.

  14. Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Candace Elise

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most fatal malignant brain tumor, is highly infiltrative and incurable. Although improved prognosis has been demonstrated by surgically resecting the bulk tumor, a lack of clear borders at the tumor margins complicates the selection decision during surgery. This dissertation investigates the potential of Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing between normal and malignant brain tissue and sets the groundwork for a surgical diagnostic guide for resection of gross malignant gliomas. These studies revealed that Raman spectroscopy was capable of discriminating between normal scid mouse brain tissue and human xenograft tumors induced in those mice. The spectra of normal and malignant tissue were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1440 cm -1. Spectral differences include the shape of the broad peaks near 1440 cm-1 and 1660 cm-1 and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1264 cm-1, 1287 cm-1, 1297 cm-1, 1556 cm -1, 1586 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, and 1683 cm-1. From these studies emerged questions regarding how to objectively normalize and compare spectra for future automation. Some differences in the Raman spectra were shown to be inherent in the disease states of the cells themselves via differences in the Raman spectra of normal human astrocytes in culture and cultured cells derived from GBM tumors. The spectra of astrocytes and glioma cells were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1450 cm-1. The differences between the Raman spectra of normal and transformed cells include the ratio of the 1450 cm-1/1650 cm-1 peaks and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1181 cm-1, 1191 cm-1, 1225 cm-1, 1263 cm -1, 1300 cm-1, 1336 cm-1, 1477 cm-1, 1494 cm-1, and 1695 cm -1. Previous Raman spectroscopic studies of biological cells have shown that the magnitude of the Raman signal decreases over time, indicating sample damage. Cells exposed to laser excitation at similar power

  15. Applications of Raman Spectroscopy to Virology and Microbial Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harz, Michaela; Stöckel, Stephan; Ciobotă, Valerian; Cialla, Dana; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    This chapter reports from the utilization of Raman spectroscopic techniques like Raman microscopy, Raman optical activity (ROA), UV-resonance Raman (UVRR)-spectroscopy, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) for the investigation of viruses and microorganisms, especially bacteria and yeasts for medical and pharmaceutical applications. The application of these Raman techniques allows for the analysis of chemical components of cells and subcellular regions, as well as the monitoring of chemical differences occurring as a result of the growth of microorganisms. In addition, the interaction of microorganisms with active pharmaceutical agents can be investigated. In combination with chemometric methods Raman spectroscopy can also be applied to identify microorganisms both in micro colonies and even on single cells.

  16. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  17. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process. PMID:26728791

  18. Noninvasive glucose sensing by transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Wei-Chuan; Bechtel, Kate L.; Rebec, Mihailo V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present the development of a transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy system and analysis algorithm for noninvasive glucose sensing. The instrument and algorithm were tested in a preclinical study in which a dog model was used. To achieve a robust glucose test system, the blood levels were clamped for periods of up to 45 min. Glucose clamping and rise/fall patterns have been achieved by injecting glucose and insulin into the ear veins of the dog. Venous blood samples were drawn every 5 min and a plasma glucose concentration was obtained and used to maintain the clamps, to build the calibration model, and to evaluate the performance of the system. We evaluated the utility of the simultaneously acquired Raman spectra to be used to determine the plasma glucose values during the 8-h experiment. We obtained prediction errors in the range of ∼1.5−2  mM. These were in-line with a best-case theoretical estimate considering the limitations of the signal-to-noise ratio estimates. As expected, the transition regions of the clamp study produced larger predictive errors than the stable regions. This is related to the divergence of the interstitial fluid (ISF) and plasma glucose values during those periods. Two key contributors to error beside the ISF/plasma difference were photobleaching and detector drift. The study demonstrated the potential of Raman spectroscopy in noninvasive applications and provides areas where the technology can be improved in future studies. PMID:25688542

  19. Noninvasive glucose sensing by transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Wei-Chuan; Bechtel, Kate L.; Rebec, Mihailo V.

    2015-05-01

    We present the development of a transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy system and analysis algorithm for noninvasive glucose sensing. The instrument and algorithm were tested in a preclinical study in which a dog model was used. To achieve a robust glucose test system, the blood levels were clamped for periods of up to 45 min. Glucose clamping and rise/fall patterns have been achieved by injecting glucose and insulin into the ear veins of the dog. Venous blood samples were drawn every 5 min and a plasma glucose concentration was obtained and used to maintain the clamps, to build the calibration model, and to evaluate the performance of the system. We evaluated the utility of the simultaneously acquired Raman spectra to be used to determine the plasma glucose values during the 8-h experiment. We obtained prediction errors in the range of ˜1.5-2 mM. These were in-line with a best-case theoretical estimate considering the limitations of the signal-to-noise ratio estimates. As expected, the transition regions of the clamp study produced larger predictive errors than the stable regions. This is related to the divergence of the interstitial fluid (ISF) and plasma glucose values during those periods. Two key contributors to error beside the ISF/plasma difference were photobleaching and detector drift. The study demonstrated the potential of Raman spectroscopy in noninvasive applications and provides areas where the technology can be improved in future studies.

  20. Diagnosing breast cancer by using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Shafer-Peltier, Karen E.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Crowe, Joseph; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2005-08-01

    We employ Raman spectroscopy to diagnose benign and malignant lesions in human breast tissue based on chemical composition. In this study, 130 Raman spectra are acquired from ex vivo samples of human breast tissue (normal, fibrocystic change, fibroadenoma, and infiltrating carcinoma) from 58 patients. Data are fit by using a linear combination model in which nine basis spectra represent the morphologic and chemical features of breast tissue. The resulting fit coefficients provide insight into the chemical/morphological makeup of the tissue and are used to develop diagnostic algorithms. The fit coefficients for fat and collagen are the key parameters in the resulting diagnostic algorithm, which classifies samples according to their specific pathological diagnoses, attaining 94% sensitivity and 96% specificity for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal and benign tissues. The excellent results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy has the potential to be applied in vivo to accurately classify breast lesions, thereby reducing the number of excisional breast biopsies that are performed. Author contributions: M.F., J.C., R.R.D., and M.S.F. designed research; A.S.H. and K.E.S.-P. performed research; A.S.H. and M.F. analyzed data; and A.S.H. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: DEH, ductal epithelial hyperplasia; ROC, receiver operating characteristic; N/C, nuclear-to-cytoplasm.

  1. Applications of Group Theory: Infrared and Raman Spectra of the Isomers of 1,2-Dichloroethylene: A Physical Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Norman C.; Lacuesta, Nanette N.

    2004-01-01

    A study of the vibrational spectroscopy of the cis and trans isomers of 1,2-dichloroethylene provides an excellent opportunity to learn the applications group theory in laboratories. The necessity of using infrared (IR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy in making full vibrational assignments is illustrated.

  2. The application of Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy (FTR) to the evaluation of structural changes in wool fibre keratin after deuterium exchange and modification by the orthosilicic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowska, Elżbieta; Włochowicz, Andrzej; Wysocki, Marian; Pielesz, Anna; Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra

    2002-09-01

    An injury of hair macrostructure and substantial alkalinity of the water-lipid shield medium on wool fibre surface is conducive to a transition of heavy metal elements into ion forms. It also helps SiO 2 in a transition into a colloidal form of orthosilicic acid and its penetration in this form of the wool fibre structure. Consequently, it leads to the biomineralization of the wool fibre [J. Mol. Struct. 511-512 (1999) 307; J. Mol. Struct. 511-512 (2000) 397]. Changes taking place in the process of biomineralization, mainly in the amorphous region, may be responsible for the effectiveness of the technological processes and the properties of ready wool products [3]. Wool fibres obtained from Polish Merino sheep were treated with solution of orthosilicic acid (H 4SiO 4· nH 2O) in experimental conditions during which fibres first underwent extraction with methylene chloride and them with asolution of orthosilicic acid in alkaline medium. Studies of deuterium exchange in the wool fibre keratin were applied to study changes in the structure of wool fibre keratin in the process of orthosilicic acid treatment. The changes in the structure of wool fibre were studied by means of infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy (FTR).

  3. Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, De

    Raman scattering is an inelastic collision between the vibrating molecules inside the sample and the incident photons. During this process, energy exchange takes place between the photon and the scattering molecule. By measuring the energy change of the photon, the molecular vibration mode can be probed. The vibrational spectrum contains valuable information about the disposition of atomic nuclei and chemical bonds within a molecule, the chemical compositions and the interactions between the molecule and its surroundings. In this dissertation, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) technique is applied for the analysis of biological cells and human cells at single cell level. In LTRS, an individual cell is trapped in aqueous medium with laser tweezers, and Raman scattering spectra from the trapped cell are recorded in real-time. The Raman spectra of these cells can be used to reveal the dynamical processes of cell growth, cell response to environment changes, and can be used as the finger print for the identification of a bacterial cell species. Several biophysical experiments were carried out using LTRS: (1) the dynamic germination process of individual spores of Bacillus thuringiensis was detected via Ca-DPA, a spore-specific biomarker molecule; (2) inactivation and killing of Bacillus subtilis spores by microwave irradiation and wet heat were studied at single cell level; (3) the heat shock activation process of single B. subtilis spores were analyzed, in which the reversible transition from glass-like state at low temperature to liquid-like state at high temperature in spore was revealed at the molecular level; (4) the kinetic processes of bacterial cell lysis of E. coli by lysozyme and by temperature induction of lambda phage were detected real-time; (5) the fixation and rehydration of human platelets were quantitatively evaluated and characterized with Raman spectroscopy method, which provided a rapid way to quantify the quality of freeze-dried therapeutic

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of pterins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Ciarán A.; Mirza, Inam; Lunney, James G.; McCabe, Eithne M.

    2012-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a useful technique in the identification and characterisation of compounds, but in terms of sensitivity its application is limited. With respect to this the discovery of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) phenomenon has proved monumental, and much research has been carried out over the past 30 years developing the technique. Pterins are biological compounds that are found in nature in colour pigmentation and in mammalian metabolic pathways. Moreover, they have been identified in abnormal concentrations in cancer patients, suggesting potential applications in cancer diagnostics. SERS is an ideal technique to identify these compounds, and both nanoparticle suspensions and pulsed laser deposited nanoparticle substrates have been used to examine the spectra of xanthopterin, both in aqueous solution and in different pH environments.

  5. Lignin analysis by FT-Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, U.P.; Obst, J.R.; Cannon, A.B.

    1996-10-01

    Traditional methods of lignin analysis, such as Klason (acid insoluble) lignin determinations, give satisfactory results, are widely accepted, and often are considered as standard analyses. However, the Klason lignin method is laborious and time consuming; it also requires a fairly large-amount of isolated analyte. FT-Raman spectroscopy offers an opportunity to simplify and speed up lignin analyses. FT-Raman data for a number of hardwoods (angiosperms) and softwoods (gymnosperms) are compared with data obtained using other analytical methods, including Klason lignin (with corrections for acid soluble lignin), acetyl bromide, and FT-IR determinations. In addition, 10 different specimens of Nothofagus dombeyii (chosen because of the widely varying syringyl:guaiacyl monomer compositions of their lignins) were also analyzed. Lignin monomer compositions were determined by thioacidolysis of by nitrobenzene oxidation.

  6. Raman spectroscopy study of calcium oxalate extracted from cacti stems.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, Claudio; Loza-Cornejo, Sofia; Terrazas, Teresa; Terrazas, Tania; Miranda-Beltrán, María de la Luz; Aparicio-Fernández, Xóchitl; López-Macías, Brenda M; Morales-Martínez, Sandra E; Ortiz-Morales, Martín

    2014-01-01

    To find markers that distinguish the different Cactaceae species, by using near infrared Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we studied the occurrence, in the stem, of solid deposits in five Cactaceae species (Coryphantha clavata, Ferocactus latispinus, Opuntia ficus-indica, O. robusta, and O. strepthacantha) collected from their natural habitats from a region of México. The deposits in the tissues usually occurred as spheroidal aggregates, druses, or prismatic crystals. From the Raman spectra, the crystals were identified either as calcium oxalate monohydrate (CaC2O4·H2O) or calcium oxalate dihydrate (CaC2O4·2H2O). Opuntia species (subfamily Opuntioideae) showed the presence of CaC2O4·H2O, and the deposition of CaC2O4·2H2O was present in C. clavata and F. latispinus (subfamily Cactoideae, Cacteae tribe). As a punctual technique, Raman spectroscopy seems to be a useful tool to identify crystal composition. In addition to allowing the analysis of crystal morphology, this spectroscopic technique can be used to identify Cactaceae species and their chemotaxonomy. PMID:25280368

  7. Raman and Infrared Absorption Study of Indigoid-based Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia; Durrer, William; Reza, Layra; Ramirez, Alejandra; Chianelli, Russell

    2009-04-01

    A fascinating aspect of Maya pigments is that despite the environmentally harsh humidity and high temperatures they resist fading and they have unprecedented stability. In this investigation, we address the question of how organic dye binds to inorganic palygorskite to form pigments. Our analysis by Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopies proves that different processes are taking place for the indigo-palygorskite system as compared with the thioindigo-palygorskite complex. While partial elimination of the selection rules for the centrosymmetric indigo and disappearance of the indigo N-H bonding, with conversion to dehydroindigo, is observed for the first compound, the latter shows no evident structure modification. The interaction between indigo and palygorskite is likely through oxygen and nitrogen. Only oxygen plays this role for the thioindigo-palygorskite complex.

  8. Simultaneous Conoscopic Holography and Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    A new instrument was developed for chemical characterization of surfaces that combines the analytical power of Raman spectroscopy with the three-dimensional topographic information provided by conoscopic holography. The figure schematically depicts the proposed hybrid instrument. The output of the conoscopic holographic portion of the instrument is a topographical map of the surface; the output of the Raman portion of the instrument is hyperspectral Raman data, from which the chemical and/or biological composition of the surface would be deduced. By virtue of the basic principles of design and operation of the instrument, the hyperspectral image data would be inherently spatially registered with the topographical data. In conoscopic holography, the object and reference beams of classical holography are replaced by the ordinary and extraordinary components generated by a single beam traveling through a birefringent, uniaxial crystal. In the basic conoscopic configuration, a laser light is projected onto a specimen and the resulting illuminated spot becomes a point source of diffuse light that propagates in every direction. The laser beam is rasterscanned in two dimensions (x and y) perpendicular to the beam axis (z), and at each x,y location, the pattern of interference between the ordinary and extraordinary rays is recorded. The recorded interferogram constitutes the conoscopic hologram. Of particular significance for the proposed instrument is that the conoscopic hologram contains information on the z coordinate (height) of the illuminated surface spot. Hence, a topographical map of the specimen is constructed point-by-point by rastering the laser beam in the x and y directions and correlating the x and y coordinates with the z information obtained from the interferograms. Conoscopic imaging is an established method, and conoscopic laboratory instruments for surface metrology are commercially available. In Raman spectroscopy of a surface, one measures the spectrum

  9. Characterization of Thalidomide using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, Penelope; Smith, Candace Y.

    2008-02-01

    Thalidomide is a potent anticancer therapeutic drug whose mechanism of action has not yet been elucidated. In this report, experimental Raman spectroscopy is used to determine and characterize the vibrational frequencies of the drug. These normal modes are then compared to their quantum mechanical counterparts, which have been computed using density functional theory. Upon analysis of the spectra, we found that there was a high level of agreement between the wavenumbers. As such, this spectroscopic technique may be a viable tool for examining the way in which this drug interacts with its target molecules.

  10. Chemical analysis of acoustically levitated drops by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Puskar, Ljiljana; Zavabeti, Mahta; Sekine, Ryo; McNaughton, Don

    2009-07-01

    An experimental apparatus combining Raman spectroscopy with acoustic levitation, Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy (RALS), is investigated in the field of physical and chemical analytics. Whereas acoustic levitation enables the contactless handling of microsized samples, Raman spectroscopy offers the advantage of a noninvasive method without complex sample preparation. After carrying out some systematic tests to probe the sensitivity of the technique to drop size, shape, and position, RALS has been successfully applied in monitoring sample dilution and preconcentration, evaporation, crystallization, an acid-base reaction, and analytes in a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy colloidal suspension. PMID:19418043