Science.gov

Sample records for infrastructure committee including

  1. 77 FR 67028 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... Space Administration announce a meeting for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee (ITIC... the meeting will include: Information Technology--The Effects on and Utilization in Earth...

  2. 76 FR 64386 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... Space Administration announce a meeting for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee of the... Information Technology Infrastructure Committee, National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

  3. 77 FR 6825 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... Space Administration announces a meeting of the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee of the... Information Technology Infrastructure Committee, National Aeronautics and Space Administration,...

  4. 75 FR 57079 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee.... Tereda J. Frazier, Executive Secretary for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee,...

  5. 78 FR 72718 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... Space Administration announce a meeting of the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee (ITIC) of... page ``Public Admission to the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee of the NASA...

  6. 75 FR 55616 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announce a meeting for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee.... Tereda J. Frazier, Executive Secretary for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee,...

  7. 77 FR 38092 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee... the purpose of soliciting from the information technology community and other persons,...

  8. 78 FR 42553 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... Space Administration announce a meeting for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee (ITIC... Headquarters, Room 7Q48, 300 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20546. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms....

  9. 76 FR 18800 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... Space Administration announces a meeting for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee of the... CONTACT: Ms. Tereda J. Frazier, Executive Secretary for the Information Technology...

  10. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (29th) : administrative report including Technical Report nos. 752 to 773

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1948-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  11. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (44th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1342 to 1366

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  12. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (36th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 951 to 1002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1951-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  13. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (40th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1158-1209

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  14. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (38th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1059 to 1110

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  15. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (42nd). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1254 to 1295

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  16. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (41st). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1210 to 1253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  17. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (34th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 892 to 921

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1951-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  18. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (35th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 922 to 950

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1951-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  19. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (39th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1111 to 1134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  20. Environmental assessment of passenger transportation should include infrastructure and supply chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, Mikhail V.; Horvath, Arpad

    2009-04-01

    To appropriately mitigate environmental impacts from transportation, it is necessary for decision makers to consider the life-cycle energy use and emissions. Most current decision-making relies on analysis at the tailpipe, ignoring vehicle production, infrastructure provision, and fuel production required for support. We present results of a comprehensive life-cycle energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and selected criteria air pollutant emissions inventory for automobiles, buses, trains, and airplanes in the US, including vehicles, infrastructure, fuel production, and supply chains. We find that total life-cycle energy inputs and greenhouse gas emissions contribute an additional 63% for onroad, 155% for rail, and 31% for air systems over vehicle tailpipe operation. Inventorying criteria air pollutants shows that vehicle non-operational components often dominate total emissions. Life-cycle criteria air pollutant emissions are between 1.1 and 800 times larger than vehicle operation. Ranges in passenger occupancy can easily change the relative performance of modes.

  1. The Information Infrastructure: Reaching Society's Goals. A Report of the Information Infrastructure Task Force Committee on Applications and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

    Intended for public comment and discussion, this document is the second volume of papers in which the Information Infrastructure Task Force has attempted to articulate in clear terms, with sufficient detail, how improvements in the National Information Infrastructure (NII) can help meet other social goals. These are not plans to be enacted, but…

  2. Estuarine wetland evolution including sea-level rise and infrastructure effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jose Fernando; Trivisonno, Franco; Rojas, Steven Sandi; Riccardi, Gerardo; Stenta, Hernan; Saco, Patricia Mabel

    2015-04-01

    Estuarine wetlands are an extremely valuable resource in terms of biotic diversity, flood attenuation, storm surge protection, groundwater recharge, filtering of surface flows and carbon sequestration. On a large scale the survival of these systems depends on the slope of the land and a balance between the rates of accretion and sea-level rise, but local man-made flow disturbances can have comparable effects. Climate change predictions for most of Australia include an accelerated sea level rise, which may challenge the survival of estuarine wetlands. Furthermore, coastal infrastructure poses an additional constraint on the adaptive capacity of these ecosystems. Numerical models are increasingly being used to assess wetland dynamics and to help manage some of these situations. We present results of a wetland evolution model that is based on computed values of hydroperiod and tidal range that drive vegetation preference. Our first application simulates the long term evolution of an Australian wetland heavily constricted by infrastructure that is undergoing the effects of predicted accelerated sea level rise. The wetland presents a vegetation zonation sequence mudflats - mangrove - saltmarsh from the seaward margin and up the topographic gradient but is also affected by compartmentalization due to internal road embankments and culverts that effectively attenuates tidal input to the upstream compartments. For this reason, the evolution model includes a 2D hydrodynamic module which is able to handle man-made flow controls and spatially varying roughness. It continually simulates tidal inputs into the wetland and computes annual values of hydroperiod and tidal range to update vegetation distribution based on preference to hydrodynamic conditions of the different vegetation types. It also computes soil accretion rates and updates roughness coefficient values according to evolving vegetation types. In order to explore in more detail the magnitude of flow attenuation due to

  3. Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (1st). [Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 1 to 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1916-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, problems, recommendations, and a compilation of technical reports produced.

  4. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? A rural water supply project may include, but is...

  5. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? A rural water supply project may include, but is...

  6. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? A rural water supply project may include, but is...

  7. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview §...

  8. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (15th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 309 to 336

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  9. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (30th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 774 to 803

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of Committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  10. Annual report for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (12th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 233 to 256

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1927-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  11. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (7th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 111 to 132

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, and expenditures.

  12. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (3rd).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 13 to 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1918-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, and problems.

  13. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (22nd).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 542 to 576

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1937-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  14. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (32nd).administative report including Technical Report nos. 834 to 862

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  15. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (25th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 645 to 680

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  16. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (33rd).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 863 to 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  17. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (8th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 133 to 158

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, and expenditures.

  18. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (23rd).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 577 to 611

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1937-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  19. Annual report for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (11th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 210 to 232

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  20. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (28th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 727 to 751

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1946-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  1. Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (27Th).Administrative Report Including Technical Report Nos. 704 to 726

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1942-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  2. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (17th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 365 to 400

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  3. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (24th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 612 to 644

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  4. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (13th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 257 to 282

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1928-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  5. Annual report for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (10th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 186 to 209

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1925-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  6. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (18th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 401 to 440

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1933-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  7. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (19th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 441 to 474

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  8. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (16th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 337 to 364

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  9. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (26th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 681 to 703

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1941-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  10. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (14th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 283 to 308

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  11. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (21st).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 508 to 541

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1936-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  12. Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (9Th).Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 159 to 185

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1924-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, and expenditures.

  13. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (20th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 475 to 507

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  14. 43 CFR 404.10 - Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Are there certain types of infrastructure... RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.10 Are there certain types of infrastructure and... not include: (a) Any infrastructure or facilities that would deliver water for commercial...

  15. 43 CFR 404.10 - Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Are there certain types of infrastructure... RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.10 Are there certain types of infrastructure and... not include: (a) Any infrastructure or facilities that would deliver water for commercial...

  16. 43 CFR 404.10 - Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Are there certain types of infrastructure... RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.10 Are there certain types of infrastructure and... not include: (a) Any infrastructure or facilities that would deliver water for commercial...

  17. 43 CFR 404.10 - Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Are there certain types of infrastructure... RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.10 Are there certain types of infrastructure and... not include: (a) Any infrastructure or facilities that would deliver water for commercial...

  18. Practical Nursing Curriculum Advisory Committee Report Including Suggested Philosophy, Suggested Competencies, Geriatric Care Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    A study was made of the current and future role of practical nurses and the curricula used to prepare these nurses in the 16 programs in Iowa. A statewide committee of 14 persons involved in hiring, employing, and controlling practical nurse practice was formed. Between Fall 1987 and Spring 1989, the committee gathered and analyzed information and…

  19. A case for integrity: gains from including more than animal welfare in animal ethics committee deliberations.

    PubMed

    Röcklinsberg, H; Gamborg, C; Gjerris, M

    2014-01-01

    From January 2013, a new EU Directive 63/2010/EU requires that research using animals must undergo a harm-benefit analysis, which takes ethical considerations into account (Art. 38 (2) d) - a so-called 'project authorization' (Art. 36). A competent authority in each member state has to ensure that no project is carried out without such a project validation process, but often delegates the actual assessment to an animal ethics committee (AEC) or its equivalent. The core task of the AEC is to formulate a justifiable balance between the animals' suffering caused by research and the potential human benefit. AECs traditionally focus on animal welfare issues, but according to the new directive other public concerns must also be taken into account. Taking the new EU Directive as a point of departure, the central aim of this paper is to discuss the evaluation process in relation to animal welfare and animal ethics through the concept of animal integrity. A further aim is to elaborate on possible improvements to project evaluation by considering animal integrity. We argue that concepts like animal integrity are often left out of project authorization processes within AECs, because animal ethics is often interpreted narrowly to include only certain aspects of animal welfare. Firstly, we describe the task of an AEC and discuss what has typically been regarded as ethically relevant in the assessment process. Secondly, we categorize four notions of integrity found in the literature to show the complexity of the concept and furthermore to indicate its strengths. Thirdly, we discuss how certain interpretations of integrity can be included in AEC assessments to encapsulate wider ethical concerns and, perhaps even increase the democratic legitimacy of AECs. PMID:24367033

  20. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (4th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 24 to 50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1920-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, problems, recommendations, and a compilation of technical reports produced.

  1. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (5th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 51 to 82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1920-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, and a compilation of technical reports produced.

  2. Summary of Changes Related to the Individualized Education Program (IEP): Current Law and 1997 IDEA Amendments, Including Congressional Committee Comments. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrag, Judy; Ahearn, Eileen M.

    This report summarizes provisions and highlights changes for the Individualized Education Program (IEP) within the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Amendments of 1997. Also included are references from the two Congressional Committee Reports--those of the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee and the House Committee on…

  3. Putting the Information Infrastructure to Work. Report of the Information Infrastructure Task Force Committee on Applications and Technology. NIST Special Publication 857.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

    An interconnection of computer networks, telecommunications services, and applications, the National Information Infrastructure (NII) can open up new vistas and profoundly change much of American life. This report explores some of the opportunities and obstacles to the use of the NII by people and organizations. The goal is to express how…

  4. Services and the National Information Infrastructure. Report of the Information Infrastructure Task Force Committee on Applications and Technology, Technology Policy Working Group. Draft for Public Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Science and Technology Policy, Washington, DC.

    In this report, the National Information Infrastructure (NII) services issue is addressed, and activities to advance the development of NII services are recommended. The NII is envisioned to grow into a seamless web of communications networks, computers, databases, and consumer electronics that will put vast amounts of information at users'…

  5. Infrastructure sensing.

    PubMed

    Soga, Kenichi; Schooling, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    Design, construction, maintenance and upgrading of civil engineering infrastructure requires fresh thinking to minimize use of materials, energy and labour. This can only be achieved by understanding the performance of the infrastructure, both during its construction and throughout its design life, through innovative monitoring. Advances in sensor systems offer intriguing possibilities to radically alter methods of condition assessment and monitoring of infrastructure. In this paper, it is hypothesized that the future of infrastructure relies on smarter information; the rich information obtained from embedded sensors within infrastructure will act as a catalyst for new design, construction, operation and maintenance processes for integrated infrastructure systems linked directly with user behaviour patterns. Some examples of emerging sensor technologies for infrastructure sensing are given. They include distributed fibre-optics sensors, computer vision, wireless sensor networks, low-power micro-electromechanical systems, energy harvesting and citizens as sensors. PMID:27499845

  6. 43 CFR 404.10 - Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural water supply project? 404.10 Section 404.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY...

  7. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (6th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 83 to 110

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, House of Representatives bill 14061, a copy of the bill introduced to the House of Representatives to regulate air navigation, and a compilation of technical reports produced.

  8. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gwyn P.; Revesz, Peter; Arp, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    Conference Chairs NameOrganization Gwyn Williams Jefferson Lab Peter ReveszCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source Uwe ArpSynchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility Programme Committee NameOrganization Alastair MacDowellAdvanced Light Source Tom ToellnerAdvanced Photon Source Amitava D RoyCenter for Advanced Microstructures and Devices Tom EllisCanadian Light Source Roberta SantarosaLaboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron Jerry (Jerome) HastingsLinac Coherent Light Source Steven HulbertNational Synchrotron Light Source Thomas A RabedeauStanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Mark BissenSynchrotron Radiation Center Gwyn WilliamsJefferson Lab Peter ReveszCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source Uwe ArpSynchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility

  9. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-11-01

    Leadership Team of the IAHR Committee for Hydraulic Machinery and Systems Eduard EGUSQUIZA, UPC Barcelona, Spain, Chair François AVELLAN, EPFL-LMH, Switzerland, Past Chair Richard K FISHER, Voith Hydro Inc., USA, Past Chair Fidel ARZOLA, Edelca, Venezuela Michel COUSTON, Alstom Hydro, France Niklas DAHLBÄCKCK, Vatenfall, Sweden Normand DESY, Andritz VA TECH Hydro Ltd., Canada Chisachi KATO, University of Tokyo, Japan Andrei LIPEJ, Turboinstitut, Slovenija Torbjørn NIELSEN, NTNU, Norway Romeo SUSAN-RESIGA, 'Politehnica' University Timisoara, Romania Stefan RIEDELBAUCH, Stuggart University, Germany Albert RUPRECHT, Stuttgart University, Germany Qing-Hua SHI, Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co., China Geraldo TIAGO, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Brazil International Advisory Committee Shouqi YUAN (principal) Jiangsu University China QingHua SHI (principal) Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co. China Fidel ARZOLA EDELCA Venezuela Thomas ASCHENBRENNER Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Anton BERGANT Litostroj Power doo Slovenia B C BHAOYAL Research & Technology Centre India Hermod BREKKE NTNU Norway Stuart COULSON Voith Hydro Inc. USA Paul COOPER Fluid Machinery Research Inc USA V A DEMIANOV Power Machines OJSC Russia Bart van ESCH Technische Universiteit Eindhoven Netherland Arno GEHRER Andritz Hydro Graz Austria Akira GOTO Ebara Corporation Japan Adiel GUINZBURG The Boeing Company USA D-H HELLMANN KSB AG Germany Ashvin HOSANGADI Combustion Research and Flow Technology USA Byung-Sun HWANG Korea Institute of Material Science Korea Toshiaki KANEMOTO Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan Mann-Eung KIM Korean Register of Shipping Korea Jiri KOUTNIK Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Jinkook LEE Eaton Corporation USA Young-Ho LEE Korea Maritime University Korea Woo-Seop LIM Hyosung Goodsprings Inc Korea Jun MATSUI Yokohama National University Japan Kazuyoshi Mitsubishi H I Ltd, Japan MIYAGAWA Christophe NICOLET Power Vision Engineering Srl Switzerland Maryse PAGE Hydro

  10. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-11-01

    Leadership Team of the IAHR Committee for Hydraulic Machinery and Systems Eduard EGUSQUIZA, UPC Barcelona, Spain, Chair François AVELLAN, EPFL-LMH, Switzerland, Past Chair Richard K FISHER, Voith Hydro Inc., USA, Past Chair Fidel ARZOLA, Edelca, Venezuela Michel COUSTON, Alstom Hydro, France Niklas DAHLBÄCKCK, Vatenfall, Sweden Normand DESY, Andritz VA TECH Hydro Ltd., Canada Chisachi KATO, University of Tokyo, Japan Andrei LIPEJ, Turboinstitut, Slovenija Torbjørn NIELSEN, NTNU, Norway Romeo SUSAN-RESIGA, 'Politehnica' University Timisoara, Romania Stefan RIEDELBAUCH, Stuggart University, Germany Albert RUPRECHT, Stuttgart University, Germany Qing-Hua SHI, Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co., China Geraldo TIAGO, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Brazil International Advisory Committee Shouqi YUAN (principal) Jiangsu University China QingHua SHI (principal) Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co. China Fidel ARZOLA EDELCA Venezuela Thomas ASCHENBRENNER Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Anton BERGANT Litostroj Power doo Slovenia B C BHAOYAL Research & Technology Centre India Hermod BREKKE NTNU Norway Stuart COULSON Voith Hydro Inc. USA Paul COOPER Fluid Machinery Research Inc USA V A DEMIANOV Power Machines OJSC Russia Bart van ESCH Technische Universiteit Eindhoven Netherland Arno GEHRER Andritz Hydro Graz Austria Akira GOTO Ebara Corporation Japan Adiel GUINZBURG The Boeing Company USA D-H HELLMANN KSB AG Germany Ashvin HOSANGADI Combustion Research and Flow Technology USA Byung-Sun HWANG Korea Institute of Material Science Korea Toshiaki KANEMOTO Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan Mann-Eung KIM Korean Register of Shipping Korea Jiri KOUTNIK Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Jinkook LEE Eaton Corporation USA Young-Ho LEE Korea Maritime University Korea Woo-Seop LIM Hyosung Goodsprings Inc Korea Jun MATSUI Yokohama National University Japan Kazuyoshi Mitsubishi H I Ltd, Japan MIYAGAWA Christophe NICOLET Power Vision Engineering Srl Switzerland Maryse PAGE Hydro

  11. Committee Opinion No. 646 Summary: Ethical Considerations for Including Women as Research Participants.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Inclusion of women in research studies is necessary for valid inferences about health and disease in women. The generalization of results from trials conducted in men may yield erroneous conclusions that fail to account for the biologic differences between men and women. Although significant changes in research design and practice have led to an increase in the proportion of women included in research trials, knowledge gaps remain because of a continued lack of inclusion of women, especially those who are pregnant, in premarketing research trials. This document provides a historical overview of issues surrounding women as participants in research trials, followed by an ethical framework and discussion of the issues of informed consent, contraception requirements, intimate partner consent, and the appropriate inclusion of pregnant women in research studies. PMID:27548418

  12. Committee Opinion No. 646: Ethical Considerations for Including Women as Research Participants.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Inclusion of women in research studies is necessary for valid inferences about health and disease in women. The generalization of results from trials conducted in men may yield erroneous conclusions that fail to account for the biologic differences between men and women. Although significant changes in research design and practice have led to an increase in the proportion of women included in research trials, knowledge gaps remain because of a continued lack of inclusion of women, especially those who are pregnant, in premarketing research trials. This document provides a historical overview of issues surrounding women as participants in research trials, followed by an ethical framework and discussion of the issues of informed consent, contraception requirements, intimate partner consent, and the appropriate inclusion of pregnant women in research studies. PMID:27548420

  13. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER... eligible rural water supply project? A rural water supply project may include, but is not limited to,...

  14. Annual Report to Membership, 1987. The President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    This annual report updates membership data for the President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, recaps the members' creed, and lists appointments to the executive committee. Committee infrastructure and personnel are discussed. The year's activities of the Public Affairs Section included work on: National Employ the Handicapped Week,…

  15. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-08-01

    Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1930, Alberto Sirlin studied at the University of Buenos Aires from 1948-52, where he carried out research work in classical nonlinear physics, under the guidance of Richard Gans, and in 1953 received the degree of doctor in Physical-Mathematical Sciences. In 1953 he held a fellowship at the Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where he did research work and attended some graduate courses, including a memorable and highly influential one taught by Richard Feynman. He spent the academic year 1954-55 at UCLA, where he initiated his work on electroweak physics in collaboration with Robert Finkelstein and Ralph Behrends. His next move was to Cornell University in 1955, earning his PhD there in 1958 for research in electroweak physics in collaboration with Toichiro Kinoshita. Sirlin spent 1957-59 as a research associate at Columbia University, becoming an Assistant Professor of Physics at New York University in 1959, an Associate Professor in 1961, and a full Professor in 1968. It is a remarkable coincidence that one of his fellow post-docs, Steven Weinberg, was to become one of the founders of the Standard Model, which in turn has provided the natural setting for Sirlin's work. During his formative years, he was extremely fortunate to receive guidance and advice from an extraordinary group of distinguished scientists, including R Gans, R P Feynman, R J Finkelstein, H A Bethe and E E Salpeter. He also enjoyed close and fruitful long-term collaborations with a number of brilliant theorists, including R E Behrends, T Kinoshita, T D Lee, M A B Beg, W J Marciano, P Langacker, G Degrassi, P Gambino and B A Kniehl, and has had fourteen excellent, interesting, and highly enterprising graduate students, who have remained close friends. Sirlin's main research interests have been in precision electroweak physics, other topics in weak interaction theory, the search for higher symmetries of the strong interactions

  16. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (2nd) together with the message of the President of the United States transmitting the report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1916. administrative report including technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1917-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, problems, recommendations and a compilation of technical reports produced.

  17. How Data Mining Threatens Student Privacy. Joint Hearing before the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives Serial No. 113-76 and the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives Serial No. 113-61, House of Representatives, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, Second Session (June 25, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US House of Representatives, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the first joint hearing of the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies of the Committee on Homeland Security and the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. The subcommittees met to examine data collection…

  18. Montgomery GI Bill Amendments. Parts 1-2. Report To Accompany H.R. 1358, Which on March 9, 1989 Was Referred Jointly to the Committees on Veterans' Affairs and Armed Services. Including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Veterans' Affairs.

    This document contains the text of the Montgomery G.I. Bill Amendments as reported from the Committee on Veterans' Affairs (May 25, 1989) and the Committee on Armed Services (September 26, 1989). Each part includes the changes to the G.I. Bill as recommended by that committee, a history of the proposed amendments to the bill, major provisions of…

  19. Effective committees.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jannette

    2012-03-01

    A committee is a group of people officially delegated to perform a function, such as investigating, considering, reporting, or acting on a matter. Some committees function like task forces and work on specific, time-limited projects. When the work is finished, the committees are no longer needed. These committees are called ad hoc committees. Other committees are standing committees. They are created by the standing orders, rules, by-laws, or regulations of an organization and exist and function indefinitely (eg, finance, membership, education, nomination). Both types of committees can form subcommittees if the workloads are heavy or complex in nature. Committees can be among the most important working forces of an organization. They serve as work units of the organization, taking work and breaking it into meaningful and manageable chunks. They efficiently carry out the work of the organization. Committee work should be a rewarding experience for both the members and the organization. Committees represent, involve, and serve members, as well as provide an important training ground for future leaders of an organization. New or inexperienced members can gain valuable insight into an organization and develop confidence by serving on committees. There are several key elements of effective committees, including (1) a clear, written purpose; (2) an effective committee chair; (3) thoughtfully appointed members; and (4) well-run meetings. PMID:22386164

  20. COMMITTEES: Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    TAUP STEERING COMMITTEE F T Avignone, University of South Carolina B C Barish, CALTECH E Bellotti, University of Milano, INFN J Bernabeu, University of Valencia A Bottino (Chair), University of Torino, INFN N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN T Kajita, ICRR University of Tokyo C W Kim, Johns Hopkins University, KIAS V Matveev, INR Moscow J Morales, University of Zaragoza G Raffelt, MPI Munchen D Sinclair, University of Carleton M Spiro, IN2P3 TAUP 2009 INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE J J Aubert, CNRS Marseille M Baldo-Ceolin, University of Padova, INFN G Bellini, University of Milano, INFN L Bergstrom, University of Stockholm R Bernabei, University of Roma Tor Vergata, INFN A Bettini, University of Padova, INFN, LSC S Bilenky, JINR Dubna D O Caldwell, UCSB J Cronin, University of Chicago A Dar, Technion Haifa G Domogatsky, INR Moscow J Ellis, CERN E Fernandez, IFAE Barcelona E Fiorini, University of Milano, INFN T Gaisser, University of Delaware G Gelmini, UCLA G Gerbier, CEA Saclay A Giazotto, INFN Pisa F Halzen, University of Wisconsin W Haxton, University of Washington T Kirsten MPI Heidelberg L Maiani, University of Roma La Sapienza, INFN A McDonald, Queen's University K Nakamura, KEK R Petronzio, INFN, University of Roma Tor Vergata L Resvanis, University of Athens F Ronga INFN, LNF C Rubbia INFN, LNGS A Smirnov, ICTP Trieste C Spiering, DESY N Spooner, University of Sheffield A Suzuki, KEK S Ting MIT, CERN M S Turner, FNAL, University of Chicago J W F Valle, IFIC Valencia D Vignaud, APC Paris G Zatsepin, INR Moscow TAUP 2009 ORGANIZING COMMITTEE R Aloisio, LNGS R Antolini, LNGS F Arneodo, LNGS Z Berezhiani, University of L'Aquila, INFN V Berezinsky, LNGS R Cerulli, LNGS E Coccia [Chair], LNGS/INFN, U of Roma Tor Vergata N D'Ambrosio, LNGS N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN M Laubenstein, LNGS O Palamara, LNGS L Pandola [Scientific Secretary], LNGS

  1. Libraries and Their Role in the Information Infrastructure. Hearing on Examining the Role of Libraries in Developing America's New Information Infrastructure, before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts and Humanities of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    The purpose of this congressional hearing was to determine how libraries fit into the emerging national information infrastructure (NII). Testimony and prepared statements include those from Howard F. McGinn, Director, Emporia Public Library, Emporia, Kansas; James H. Billington, Librarian of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington D.C.,…

  2. Green Infrastructure 101

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green Infrastructure 101 • What is it? What does it do? What doesn’t it do? • Green Infrastructure as a stormwater and combined sewer control • GI Controls and Best Management Practices that make sense for Yonkers o (Include operations and maintenance requirements for each)

  3. The Investment Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an AGB series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices included in this text support the objectives of board committees:…

  4. Forty-Fourth Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 1342 to 1392

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    In accordance with act of Congress, approved March 3, 1915, as amended (U.S.C., title 50, .sw 151), which established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the Committee submits its Forty-fourth Annual Report for the fiscal year 1958. This is the Committee's final report to the Congress. The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) provides in section 301 that the NACA "shall cease to exist" and "all functions, powers, duties, and obligations, and all real and personal property, personnel (other than members of the Committee), funds, and records of the NACA shall be transferred to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The aforesaid act provides that "this section shall take effect 90 days after the date of the enactment of this act, or on any earlier date on which the Administrator shall determining and announce by proclamation published in the Federal Register, that the Administration has been organized and is prepared to discharge the duties and exercise the power conferred upon it by this act." The Administrator, Hon. T. Keith Glennan has advised the Committee of his intention to issue such proclamation, effective October 1,1958.

  5. Green Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large paved surfaces keep rain from infiltrating the soil and recharging groundwater supplies. Alternatively, Green infrastructure uses natural processes to reduce and treat stormwater in place by soaking up and storing water. These systems provide many environmental, social, an...

  6. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method ofmore » Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.« less

  7. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method of Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.

  8. 75 FR 22757 - Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal... renewing the charter for the Army Education Advisory Committee (hereafter referred to as the Committee... include the U.S. Army's joint professional military education programs, educational policies,...

  9. Advisory Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

    This chapter of "The Best of the Best of ERIC," Volume 2, contains 14 summaries of documents and journal articles on citizen advisory committees, all of which are indexed in either "Resources in Education" or "Current Index to Journals in Education." The materials included deal with various aspects of this topic, such as the role of the school…

  10. 78 FR 24749 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Appointment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Appointment AGENCY: Government Accountability... Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee to make recommendations on the implementation of a nationwide health information technology infrastructure to the...

  11. Thirty-Seventh Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics: Administrative Report Including Technical Report Nos. 1003 to 1958

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1952-01-01

    In accordance with the act of Congress, approved March 3,1915 (U.S. C. title 50, sec. 151), which established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics the Committee submits its thirty-seventh annual report for the fiscal year 1951. The United States is engaged in expanding military aviation to levels never before reached except in the midst of a major war. In Korea, our military aircraft are engaged in combat with airplanes of an unfriendly nation evidently able to build military aircraft of increasing capabilities. In this environment, the NACA is responsible for conducting an adequate program of scientific research to open the way for the design of aircraft and missile of superior performance. Since World War II the pace of technical development has increased. Until then, improvement in aircraft performance as a result of the application of scientific research proceeded at what. now seems to be a relatively slow and orderly rate. Modest increases in speed, climb, range, or altitude were set as reasonable goals. Compressibility effects at high speeds were just beginning to be encountered and indicated a formidable barrier near the velocity of sound. This barrier has been found by research and experiment to be lees formidable than supposed, and we now see the possibility of radical gains in airplane performance that are of great military significance. Such gains are ak attainable by a potential enemy. The increased complexity of modern high performance

  12. Thirty-Ninth Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics: Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 1111 to 1157

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    This is the fiftieth year since Wilbur and Orville Wright at Kitty Hawk N. C., made their powered flight. That airplane was a fragile and unsteady machine of no immediate utility. It flew for only a minute but it disclosed the solution of the age-old problem of human flight. The Wrights were the first in the history of man to fly. There was no one to teach them. They had to discover principles and to learn the art by cautious and methodical experimenting. From their own research they obtained the practical information needed to design their successful flying machine. The Wrights received no effective aid from the theoretical studies of flight made by the mathematicians of the nineteenth century. The science of aerodynamics was developed in response to the practical demands of aeronautics in the years to follow. In 1908, the Wrights demonstrated at Fort Myer, Va., a vastly improved flyer, the first military airplane. It carried a passenger and flew for more than an hour. Following this public demonstration, the development of the airplane was taken up vigorously. At first France and Germany took the lead, then Great Britain, but the United States lagged behind in the furthering of this greatest American development of the century. With war clouds in view in 1915, the Congress established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to undertake the scientific study of the problems of fight with a view to their practical solution. President Wilson appointed the members of the first Committee, consisting of the heads of the military and civil agencies of the Government concerned with aeronautics and experts from private life.

  13. Making green infrastructure healthier infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, Mare; Balbus, John

    2015-01-01

    Increasing urban green and blue structure is often pointed out to be critical for sustainable development and climate change adaptation, which has led to the rapid expansion of greening activities in cities throughout the world. This process is likely to have a direct impact on the citizens' quality of life and public health. However, alongside numerous benefits, green and blue infrastructure also has the potential to create unexpected, undesirable, side-effects for health. This paper considers several potential harmful public health effects that might result from increased urban biodiversity, urban bodies of water, and urban tree cover projects. It does so with the intent of improving awareness and motivating preventive measures when designing and initiating such projects. Although biodiversity has been found to be associated with physiological benefits for humans in several studies, efforts to increase the biodiversity of urban environments may also promote the introduction and survival of vector or host organisms for infectious pathogens with resulting spread of a variety of diseases. In addition, more green connectivity in urban areas may potentiate the role of rats and ticks in the spread of infectious diseases. Bodies of water and wetlands play a crucial role in the urban climate adaptation and mitigation process. However, they also provide habitats for mosquitoes and toxic algal blooms. Finally, increasing urban green space may also adversely affect citizens allergic to pollen. Increased awareness of the potential hazards of urban green and blue infrastructure should not be a reason to stop or scale back projects. Instead, incorporating public health awareness and interventions into urban planning at the earliest stages can help insure that green and blue infrastructure achieves full potential for health promotion. PMID:26615823

  14. Making green infrastructure healthier infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Lõhmus, Mare; Balbus, John

    2015-01-01

    Increasing urban green and blue structure is often pointed out to be critical for sustainable development and climate change adaptation, which has led to the rapid expansion of greening activities in cities throughout the world. This process is likely to have a direct impact on the citizens’ quality of life and public health. However, alongside numerous benefits, green and blue infrastructure also has the potential to create unexpected, undesirable, side-effects for health. This paper considers several potential harmful public health effects that might result from increased urban biodiversity, urban bodies of water, and urban tree cover projects. It does so with the intent of improving awareness and motivating preventive measures when designing and initiating such projects. Although biodiversity has been found to be associated with physiological benefits for humans in several studies, efforts to increase the biodiversity of urban environments may also promote the introduction and survival of vector or host organisms for infectious pathogens with resulting spread of a variety of diseases. In addition, more green connectivity in urban areas may potentiate the role of rats and ticks in the spread of infectious diseases. Bodies of water and wetlands play a crucial role in the urban climate adaptation and mitigation process. However, they also provide habitats for mosquitoes and toxic algal blooms. Finally, increasing urban green space may also adversely affect citizens allergic to pollen. Increased awareness of the potential hazards of urban green and blue infrastructure should not be a reason to stop or scale back projects. Instead, incorporating public health awareness and interventions into urban planning at the earliest stages can help insure that green and blue infrastructure achieves full potential for health promotion. PMID:26615823

  15. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, D.; Barron, E. J.; Fine, R. A.; Bellingham, J. G.; Boss, E.; Boyle, E. A.; Edwards, M.; Johnson, K. S.; Kelley, D. S.; Kite-Powell, H.; Ramberg, S. E.; Rudnick, D. L.; Schofield, O.; Tamburri, M.; Wiebe, P. H.; Wright, D. J.; Committee on an Ocean Infrastructure StrategyU. S. Ocean Research in 2030

    2011-12-01

    At the request of the Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, an expert committee was convened by the National Research Council to identify major research questions anticipated to be at the forefront of ocean science in 2030, define categories of infrastructure that should be included in planning, provide advice on criteria and processes that could be used to set priorities, and recommend ways to maximize the value of investments in ocean infrastructure. The committee identified 32 future ocean research questions in four themes: enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant now and are likely to take decades to solve. U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations and autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. A coordinated national plan for making future strategic investments will be needed and should be based upon known priorities and reviewed every 5-10 years. After assessing trends in ocean infrastructure and technology development, the committee recommended implementing a comprehensive, long-term research fleet plan in order to retain access to the sea; continuing U.S. capability to access fully and partially ice-covered seas; supporting innovation, particularly the development of biogeochemical sensors; enhancing computing and modeling capacity and capability; establishing broadly accessible data management facilities; and increasing interdisciplinary education and promoting a technically-skilled workforce. They also recommended that development, maintenance, or replacement of ocean research infrastructure assets should be prioritized in terms of societal benefit. Particular consideration should be given to

  16. The dependence of educational infrastructure on clinical infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Cimino, C

    1998-01-01

    The Albert Einstein College of Medicine needed to assess the growth of its infrastructure for educational computing as a first step to determining if student needs were being met. Included in computing infrastructure are space, equipment, software, and computing services. The infrastructure was assessed by reviewing purchasing and support logs for a six year period from 1992 to 1998. This included equipment, software, and e-mail accounts provided to students and to faculty for educational purposes. Student space has grown at a constant rate (averaging 14% increase each year respectively). Student equipment on campus has grown by a constant amount each year (average 8.3 computers each year). Student infrastructure off campus and educational support of faculty has not kept pace. It has either declined or remained level over the six year period. The availability of electronic mail clearly demonstrates this with accounts being used by 99% of students, 78% of Basic Science Course Leaders, 38% of Clerkship Directors, 18% of Clerkship Site Directors, and 8% of Clinical Elective Directors. The collection of the initial descriptive infrastructure data has revealed problems that may generalize to other medical schools. The discrepancy between infrastructure available to students and faculty on campus and students and faculty off campus creates a setting where students perceive a paradoxical declining support for computer use as they progress through medical school. While clinical infrastructure may be growing, it is at the expense of educational infrastructure at affiliate hospitals. PMID:9929262

  17. Rapid Arctic Changes due to Infrastructure and Climate (RATIC) in the Russian North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. A.; Kofinas, G.; Raynolds, M. K.; Kanevskiy, M. Z.; Shur, Y.; Ambrosius, K.; Matyshak, G. V.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Kumpula, T.; Forbes, B. C.; Khukmotov, A.; Leibman, M. O.; Khitun, O.; Lemay, M.; Allard, M.; Lamoureux, S. F.; Bell, T.; Forbes, D. L.; Vincent, W. F.; Kuznetsova, E.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Shiklomanov, N. I.; Fondahl, G.; Petrov, A.; Roy, L. P.; Schweitzer, P.; Buchhorn, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Rapid Arctic Transitions due to Infrastructure and Climate (RATIC) initiative is a forum developed by the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) Terrestrial, Cryosphere, and Social & Human working groups for developing and sharing new ideas and methods to facilitate the best practices for assessing, responding to, and adaptively managing the cumulative effects of Arctic infrastructure and climate change. An IASC white paper summarizes the activities of two RATIC workshops at the Arctic Change 2014 Conference in Ottawa, Canada and the 2015 Third International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP III) meeting in Toyama, Japan (Walker & Pierce, ed. 2015). Here we present an overview of the recommendations from several key papers and posters presented at these conferences with a focus on oil and gas infrastructure in the Russian north and comparison with oil development infrastructure in Alaska. These analyses include: (1) the effects of gas- and oilfield activities on the landscapes and the Nenets indigenous reindeer herders of the Yamal Peninsula, Russia; (2) a study of urban infrastructure in the vicinity of Norilsk, Russia, (3) an analysis of the effects of pipeline-related soil warming on trace-gas fluxes in the vicinity of Nadym, Russia, (4) two Canadian initiatives that address multiple aspects of Arctic infrastructure called Arctic Development and Adaptation to Permafrost in Transition (ADAPT) and the ArcticNet Integrated Regional Impact Studies (IRIS), and (5) the effects of oilfield infrastructure on landscapes and permafrost in the Prudhoe Bay region, Alaska.

  18. Higher Education Amendments of 1998. Report of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives on H.R. 6, Together with Additional and Dissenting Views (Including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office). House of Representatives, 105th Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This volume presents the report of the Committee on Education and the Workforce regarding the Higher Education Amendments of 1998, including additional and dissenting views. The report, which features both the text of the amendments and the Committee's review of them, covers the following sections of the proposed legislation (H.R. 6), set to go…

  19. 76 FR 36137 - National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... SECURITY National Infrastructure Advisory Council AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS... the committee has completed its business. For additional information, please consult the NIAC Web site.... Written comments may be sent to Nancy Wong, Department of Homeland Security, National Protection...

  20. AGU Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Administrative Committees are responsible for those functions required for the overall performance or well-being of AGU as an organization. These committees are Audit and Legal Affairs, Budget and Finance*, Development, Nominations*, Planning, Statutes and Bylaws*, Tellers.Operating Committees are responsible for the policy direction and operational oversight of AGU's primary programs. The Operating Committees are Education and Human Resources, Fellows*, Information Technology, International Participation*, Meetings, Public Affairs, Public Information, Publications*.

  1. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations

  2. Technology Deployment and Interoperability in the National Information Infrastructure. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Technology, Environment and Aviation of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

    This document presents the proceedings of a Congressional hearing on private sector initiatives to develop the National Information Infrastructure (NII) with a focus on understanding the nature of industry investment in the NII and how those investments will contribute to the Administration's goals for NII. Statements are provided by the following…

  3. S. 2195. The National Public Telecommunications Infrastructure Act of 1994. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Communications of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Subcommittee on Communications.

    This hearing focused on S. 2195, the National Public Telecommunications Infrastructure Act of 1994, which would guarantee that noncommercial and public interest groups would have a place reserved on the information superhighway for the provision of free educational, informational, cultural, civic, or charitable services to the public. It was noted…

  4. Infrastructure dynamics: A selected bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dajani, J. S.; Bencosme, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    The term infrastructure is used to denote the set of life support and public service systems which is necessary for the development of growth of human settlements. Included are some basic references in the field of dynamic simulation, as well as a number of relevant applications in the area of infrastructure planning. The intent is to enable the student or researcher to quickly identify such applications to the extent necessary for initiating further work in the field.

  5. 17 CFR 39.40 - Consistency with the Principles for Financial Market Infrastructures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Principles for Financial Market Infrastructures. 39.40 Section 39.40 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Market Infrastructures. This subpart C is intended to establish standards which, together with subparts A... Market Infrastructures published by the Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems and the Board of...

  6. Committee Meeting of Assembly Education Committee "To Receive Testimony from the Commissioner of Education, Mary Lee Fitzgerald, Department Staff, and Others Concerning the Department's Skills Testing Program, Including the Early Warning Test and High School Proficiency Test, Pursuant to Assembly Resolution No. 113."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Office of Legislative Services, Trenton. Assembly Education Committee.

    The Assembly Education Committee of the New Jersey Office of Legislative Services held a hearing pursuant to Assembly Resolution 113, a proposal directing the Committee to investigate the skills testing program developed and administered to New Jersey children by the State Department of Education. The Committee was interested in the eighth-grade…

  7. Conference Committees: Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    International Programm Committee (IPC) Harald Ade NCSU Sadao Aoki University Tsukuba David Attwood Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/CXRO Christian David Paul Scherrer Institut Peter Fischer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Adam Hitchcock McMaster University Chris Jacobsen SUNY, Stony Brook Denis Joyeux Lab Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique Yasushi Kagoshima University of Hyogo Hiroshi Kihara Kansai Medical University Janos Kirz SUNY Stony Brook Maya Kiskinova ELETTRA Ian McNulty Argonne National Lab/APS Alan Michette Kings College London Graeme Morrison Kings College London Keith Nugent University of Melbourne Zhu Peiping BSRF Institute of High Energy Physics Francois Polack Soleil Christoph Quitmann Paul Scherrer Institut Günther Schmahl University Göttingen Gerd Schneider Bessy Hyun-Joon Shin Pohang Accelerator Lab Jean Susini ESRF Mau-Tsu Tang NSRRC Tony Warwick Lawrence Berkeley Lab/ALS Local Organizing Committee Christoph Quitmann Chair, Scientific Program Charlotte Heer Secretary Christian David Scientific Program Frithjof Nolting Scientific Program Franz Pfeiffer Scientific Program Marco Stampanoni Scientific Program Robert Rudolph Sponsoring, Financials Alfred Waser Industry Exhibition Robert Keller Public Relation Markus Knecht Computing and WWW Annick Cavedon Proceedings and Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Margrit Eichler Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Kathy Eikenberry Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Marlies Locher Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program

  8. Water Supply Infrastructure System Surety

    SciTech Connect

    EKMAN,MARK E.; ISBELL,DARYL

    2000-01-06

    The executive branch of the United States government has acknowledged and identified threats to the water supply infrastructure of the United States. These threats include contamination of the water supply, aging infrastructure components, and malicious attack. Government recognition of the importance of providing safe, secure, and reliable water supplies has a historical precedence in the water works of the ancient Romans, who recognized the same basic threats to their water supply infrastructure the United States acknowledges today. System surety is the philosophy of ''designing for threats, planning for failure, and managing for success'' in system design and implementation. System surety is an alternative to traditional compliance-based approaches to safety, security, and reliability. Four types of surety are recognized: reactive surety; proactive surety, preventative surety; and fundamental, inherent surety. The five steps of the system surety approach can be used to establish the type of surety needed for the water infrastructure and the methods used to realize a sure water infrastructure. The benefit to the water industry of using the system surety approach to infrastructure design and assessment is a proactive approach to safety, security, and reliability for water transmission, treatment, distribution, and wastewater collection and treatment.

  9. Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-05-27

    This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

  10. Aging Water Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Aging Water Infrastructure (AWI) research program is part of EPA’s larger effort called the Sustainable Water Infrastructure (SI) initiative. The SI initiative brings together drinking water and wastewater utility managers; trade associations; local watershed protection organ...

  11. New Assistance for Low-Income Areas and Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in federal policy affecting rural development in economically distressed areas in 2001 include new markets initiatives, establishment of the (Mississippi River) Delta Regional Authority, and increased infrastructure funding. Infrastructure priorities include highway construction, airport improvements, public works grants, rural…

  12. Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Liebrock, Lorie M.; Duggan, David Patrick

    2009-10-01

    This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

  13. SPR Awards Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    The SPR Awards Committee has been formed for the next 2-year period (July 1, 1990-June 30, 1992). It consists of Marty Lee (chair), University of New Hampshire, tel. 603-862-3509; Nancy Crooker (ex-officio), University of California at Los Angeles; Bill Kurth, University of Iowa; Tom Moore, Marshall Space Flight Center; Ed Roelof, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory; Bob Schunk, Utah State University; and Dan Winske, Los Alamos National Laboratory.The SPR Awards Committee has several responsibilities, including solicitation and development of proposals for potential AGU Fellows from the SPR section; the AGU Fellows Committee makes the final selections. The awards committee also reviews SPR student papers at the Fall and Spring AGU Meetings and nominates outstanding papers for AGU recognition.

  14. 21 CFR 14.25 - Portions of advisory committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... committee meetings. An advisory committee meeting has the following portions: (a) The open public hearing. Every committee meeting includes an open portion, which constitutes a public hearing during which... in accordance with § 14.29. (b) The open committee discussion. A committee discusses any...

  15. 21 CFR 14.25 - Portions of advisory committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... committee meetings. An advisory committee meeting has the following portions: (a) The open public hearing. Every committee meeting includes an open portion, which constitutes a public hearing during which... in accordance with § 14.29. (b) The open committee discussion. A committee discusses any...

  16. The Articulation Committee Companion: 2011 Edition--A Resource for BC's Articulation Committees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Finola, Ed.; Orum, Jennifer, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The Articulation Committee Companion is designed to serve as both an introductory resource for new articulation committee members and as an ongoing reference for committees. The Companion includes a brief overview of the province's articulation committees and their essential role in the post-secondary system. In addition, the Companion outlines…

  17. 78 FR 16357 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal... Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. Name: Research, Engineering & Development... agenda will include receiving from the Committee guidance for FAA's research and development...

  18. Tools for 21st Century infrastructure protection

    SciTech Connect

    Trost, S.R.

    1997-07-01

    The President`s Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection (PCCEP) was formed under Executive Order 13010 to recommend a national strategy for protecting and assuring critical infrastructures. Eight critical infrastructure elements have been identified. This paper provides an overview of tools necessary to conduct in depth analysis and characterization of threats, vulnerabilities, and interdependencies of critical infrastructure subsystems, and their interaction with each other. Particular emphasis is placed on research requirements necessary to develop the next generation of tools. In addition to tools, a number of system level research suggestions are made including developing a system architecture, data flow models, national level resources, and a national test bed.

  19. LCG/AA build infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkins, Alex Liam; Diez, Victor; Hegner, Benedikt

    2012-12-01

    The Software Process & Infrastructure (SPI) project provides a build infrastructure for regular integration testing and release of the LCG Applications Area software stack. In the past, regular builds have been provided using a system which has been constantly growing to include more features like server-client communication, long-term build history and a summary web interface using present-day web technologies. However, the ad-hoc style of software development resulted in a setup that is hard to monitor, inflexible and difficult to expand. The new version of the infrastructure is based on the Django Python framework, which allows for a structured and modular design, facilitating later additions. Transparency in the workflows and ease of monitoring has been one of the priorities in the design. Formerly missing functionality like on-demand builds or release triggering will support the transition to a more agile development process.

  20. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    SciTech Connect

    National Research Council

    2011-04-22

    The United States has jurisdiction over 3.4 million square miles of ocean expanse greater than the land area of all fifty states combined. This vast marine area offers researchers opportunities to investigate the ocean's role in an integrated Earth system, but also presents challenges to society, including damaging tsunamis and hurricanes, industrial accidents, and outbreaks of waterborne diseases. The 2010 Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill and 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami are vivid reminders that a broad range of infrastructure is needed to advance our still-incomplete understanding of the ocean. The National Research Council (NRC)'s Ocean Studies Board was asked by the National Science and Technology Council's Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, comprised of 25 U.S. government agencies, to examine infrastructure needs for ocean research in the year 2030. This request reflects concern, among a myriad of marine issues, over the present state of aging and obsolete infrastructure, insufficient capacity, growing technological gaps, and declining national leadership in marine technological development; issues brought to the nation's attention in 2004 by the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. A 15-member committee of experts identified four themes that encompass 32 future ocean research questions enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions in the report (e.g., sea level rise, sustainable fisheries, the global water cycle) reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant today, and are likely to take decades of effort to solve. As such, U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations or autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. Consequently, a

  1. Michigan E85 Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Matthew M.

    2012-03-30

    This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced

  2. Development of a Water Infrastructure Knowledge Database

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a methodology for developing a national database, as applied to water infrastructure systems, which includes both drinking water and wastewater. The database is branded as "WATERiD" and can be accessed at www.waterid.org. Water infrastructure in the U.S. is ag...

  3. 77 FR 12641 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... certificates. --Formalities connected with the arrival, stay and departure of persons, including: A. Shipboard... direction and work of the Committee, including potential future work items. --Election of Chairman and...

  4. Improving Educational Opportunities for Low-Income Children. Hearing on Examining Proposals to Improve Educational Opportunities for Low-Income Children, Including Provisions of S. 847, to Provide Scholarship Assistance for District of Columbia Elementary and Secondary School Students, Hearing of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    The Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources met to hear two panels of witnesses discuss improving educational opportunities for low-income children, including provisions of Senate 847, to provide scholarship assistance for District of Columbia elementary and secondary school students. Opening remarks by Senators Coats, Lieberman, Reed, and…

  5. Improving the Quality of Child Care. Hearing of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources on Examining Proposals To Improve the Quality of Child Care in the United States, Including the Proposed Creating Improved Delivery of Child Care: Affordable, Reliable, and Educational Act of 1997. United States Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress. First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    These hearings transcripts present testimony on proposals to improve the quality of child care in the United States. Both oral and submitted written statements are included. Contributors are: Representative Peter Deutsch (Florida); Senator James M. Jeffords, committee chairman; Senator Mike Enzi (Wyoming); Senator Edward M. Kennedy…

  6. Employment, Training, and Literacy Enhancement Act of 1997. Report of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives, on H.R. 1385 Together with Additional and Dissenting Views [Including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office], 105th Congress, 1st Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This document contains the text of the Employment, Training, and Literacy Enhancement Act of 1997, as amended by committee, including the titles that cover the following: general provisions; employment and training programs for disadvantaged youth; federally administered programs; adult education programs; miscellaneous provisions; the State Human…

  7. Energy Transmission and Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mathison, Jane

    2012-12-31

    The objective of Energy Transmission and Infrastructure Northern Ohio (OH) was to lay the conceptual and analytical foundation for an energy economy in northern Ohio that will: • improve the efficiency with which energy is used in the residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation sectors for Oberlin, Ohio as a district-wide model for Congressional District OH-09; • identify the potential to deploy wind and solar technologies and the most effective configuration for the regional energy system (i.e., the ratio of distributed or centralized power generation); • analyze the potential within the district to utilize farm wastes to produce biofuels; • enhance long-term energy security by identifying ways to deploy local resources and building Ohio-based enterprises; • identify the policy, regulatory, and financial barriers impeding development of a new energy system; and • improve energy infrastructure within Congressional District OH-09. This objective of laying the foundation for a renewable energy system in Ohio was achieved through four primary areas of activity: 1. district-wide energy infrastructure assessments and alternative-energy transmission studies; 2. energy infrastructure improvement projects undertaken by American Municipal Power (AMP) affiliates in the northern Ohio communities of Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; 3. Oberlin, OH-area energy assessment initiatives; and 4. a district-wide conference held in September 2011 to disseminate year-one findings. The grant supported 17 research studies by leading energy, policy, and financial specialists, including studies on: current energy use in the district and the Oberlin area; regional potential for energy generation from renewable sources such as solar power, wind, and farm-waste; energy and transportation strategies for transitioning the City of Oberlin entirely to renewable resources and considering pedestrians, bicyclists, and public transportation as well as drivers

  8. Smart Valley Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maule, R. William

    1994-01-01

    Discusses prototype information infrastructure projects in northern California's Silicon Valley. The strategies of the public and private telecommunications carriers vying for backbone services and industries developing end-user infrastructure technologies via office networks, set-top box networks, Internet multimedia, and "smart homes" are…

  9. Infrastructure Survey 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Group of Eight (Go8) conducted a survey on the state of its buildings and infrastructure. The survey is the third Go8 Infrastructure survey, with previous surveys being conducted in 2007 and 2009. The current survey updated some of the information collected in the previous surveys. It also collated data related to aspects of the…

  10. 18 CFR 388.112 - Requests for privileged treatment and Critical Energy Infrastructure Information (CEII) treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... treatment and Critical Energy Infrastructure Information (CEII) treatment for documents submitted to the... treatment and Critical Energy Infrastructure Information (CEII) treatment for documents submitted to the... of exemption from disclosure under FOIA, including critical energy infrastructure information...

  11. 18 CFR 388.112 - Requests for privileged treatment and Critical Energy Infrastructure Information (CEII) treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... treatment and Critical Energy Infrastructure Information (CEII) treatment for documents submitted to the... treatment and Critical Energy Infrastructure Information (CEII) treatment for documents submitted to the... of exemption from disclosure under FOIA, including critical energy infrastructure information...

  12. How a policy requiring all highways infrastructure projects to consider climate change was born

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, T. Q.; Sobie, S. R.; Nyland, D.; Wolf, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium has provided projected climate change scenarios including for use in several adaptation case studies by the British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure. Subsequent to these individual case studies throughout the Province, a sub-committee consisting of engineers, adaptation experts, and climate scientists was formed to provide input on forming a Province-wide requirement for all design projects to consider climate change. The work of this committee has recently culminated in the release of Technical Circular T06-15 (http://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/driving-and-transportation/transportation-infrastructure/engineering-standards-and-guidelines/technical-circulars/2015/t06-15.pdf). A collaboration with the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of British Columbia has resulted in the development of Professional Practice Guidelines. These guidelines are meant to assist engineers without special climate adaptation training to make appropriate use of climate information in accordance with the Technical Circular. An overview of the process that led to this concrete policy decision will be presented. Lessons learned include pitfalls to avoid as well as what worked well. In particular, successful aspects of the process include active involvement of climate scientists in regional climate adaptation case studies, an emphasis on cross-discipline (engineer-climate scientist) communication, and consultation with professionals who would be affected by the policy.

  13. Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    2007-10-15

    The report provides an overview of the development of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). Metering has historically served as the cash register for the utility industry. It measured the amount of energy used and supported the billing of customers for that usage. However, utilities are starting to look at meters in a whole different way, viewing them as the point of contact with customers in supporting a number of operational imperatives. The combination of smart meters and advanced communications has opened up a variety of methods for utilities to reduce operating costs while offering new services to customers. A concise look is given at what's driving interest in AMI, the components of AMI, and the creation of a business case for AMI. Topics covered include: an overview of AMI including the history of metering and development of smart meters; a description of the key technologies involved in AMI; a description of key government initiatives to support AMI; an evaluation of the current market position of AMI; an analysis of business case development for AMI; and, profiles of 21 key AMI vendors.

  14. 76 FR 48117 - Committee on Rulemaking

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ...Notice is hereby given of a public meeting of the Committee on Rulemaking of the Assembly of the Administrative Conference of the United States. The committee will meet to discuss a recommendation, concerning agency innovations in e-Rulemaking, for consideration by the full Conference. Complete details regarding the committee meeting, a related research report, how to attend (including......

  15. Report of the Technical Committee for Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This committee report identifies the skills and knowledge required by employees in the marketing occupational area. It also provides performance objectives from which competencies and instructional objectives may be developed. Introductory materials include a list of committee members, statement of the marketing committee, information on marketing…

  16. Modeling and Managing Risk in Billing Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiardi, Fabrizio; Telmon, Claudio; Sgandurra, Daniele

    This paper discusses risk modeling and risk management in information and communications technology (ICT) systems for which the attack impact distribution is heavy tailed (e.g., power law distribution) and the average risk is unbounded. Systems with these properties include billing infrastructures used to charge customers for services they access. Attacks against billing infrastructures can be classified as peripheral attacks and backbone attacks. The goal of a peripheral attack is to tamper with user bills; a backbone attack seeks to seize control of the billing infrastructure. The probability distribution of the overall impact of an attack on a billing infrastructure also has a heavy-tailed curve. This implies that the probability of a massive impact cannot be ignored and that the average impact may be unbounded - thus, even the most expensive countermeasures would be cost effective. Consequently, the only strategy for managing risk is to increase the resilience of the infrastructure by employing redundant components.

  17. Powering the Network: The Forgotten Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learn, Larry L., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses systems that power the telecommunications infrastructure. Highlights include power for central telephone company offices; private branch exchange systems; power interruptions and power irregularities; uninterruptible power systems; problems in the systems; and photovoltaic systems. (LRW)

  18. Green infrastructure monitoring in Camden, NJ

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority (CCMUA) installed green infrastructure Stormwater Control Measures (SCMs) at multiple locations around the city of Camden, NJ. The SCMs include raised downspout planter boxes, rain gardens, and cisterns. The cisterns capture water ...

  19. LANDSAT Committee appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    At its June 7-8 meeting, the 15-member LANDSAT advisory committee passed a resolution that calls for testing the feasibility of transferring the land remote sensing satellite system to private ownership. The committee, appointed last month to advise Commerce Secretary Malcolm Baldrige on the management of Landsat, includes representatives of industry, the academic community, and state and local governments.The committee, chaired by Michel T. Halbouty, consulting geologist and petroleum engineer at the Houston-based Halbouty Center, reports to Baldrige through the administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NOAA will become responsible for LANDSAT operations in January 1983. The National Earth Satellite Service will manage these LANDSAT operations and will provide support services for the advisory committee's quarterly meetings. The resolution that the committee passed at its first meeting outlined a four-step process by which the Commerce Department can evaluate the feasibility of transferring the operational land remote sensing satellite system to private industry. The possible transfer is in keeping with the Reagan administration's policy to shift some government-supported activities to the private sector.

  20. [Biobanks European infrastructure].

    PubMed

    Kinkorová, Judita; Topolčan, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Biobanks are structured repositories of human tissue samples connected with specific information. They became an integral part of personalized medicine in the new millennium. At the European research area biobanks are isolated not well coordinated and connected to the network. European commission supports European infrastructure BBMRI-ERIC (Biobanks and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure European Research Infrastructure Consortium), consortium of 54 members with more than 225 associated organizations, largely biobanks from over 30 countries. The aim is to support biomedical research using stored samples. Czech Republic is a member of the consortium as a national node BBMRI_CZ, consisting of five partners. PMID:27256149

  1. African electricity infrastructure, interconnections and exchanges

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, T.J.; Taher, F.; Gulstone, A.B.; Blyden, B.K.; Johnston, R.; Isekemanga, E.; Paluku, K.; Calitz, A.C.; Simanga, N.N.

    1997-01-01

    A 1996 IEEE PES Summer Meeting panel session focused on African Electricity Infrastructure, Interconnections, and Electricity Exchanges. The session was sponsored by the PES Energy Development and Power Generation Committee and organized/moderated by T.J. Hammons, chair of the International Practices Subcommittee. Panelists discussed energy resources, feasibility studies to interconnect power systems, the present state of the electric power sector, future expansion of African power systems, interconnections and power exchanges, and the impact of the private sector on electricity supply. The presentations were as follows: Prospects of the Evolution of a Unified Interconnection Power System in Africa, Fouad Taher; The World Bank`s Involvement with African Electricity Infrastructure, Alfred Gulstone; Towards the implementation of an Integrated African Grid, Bai K. Blyden, Raymond Johnston; Grand Inga Interconnection Projects, Elese Isekemanga, K. Paluku; The Innovative Southern African Kilowatt Hour, Andries C. Calitz; Report on Burundi, Rwanda, and Zaire, Ngove-Ngulu Simanga.

  2. Vision for a 21st Century Information Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Competitiveness, Washington, DC.

    In order to ensure that the United States maintains an advanced information infrastructure, the Council on Competitiveness has started a project on the 21st century infrastructure. Participating in this project are the many different parties who are providing and using the infrastructure, including cable companies, regional Bell companies, long…

  3. Planned infrastructure serving NAOMI site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartleib, Rodney D.; Bennett, Harold E.

    1995-04-01

    The National Advanced Optics Mission Initiative (NAOMI) consists of two proposed programs, the SpacE Laser ENErgy (SELENE) which includes the site, and the Advanced Telescope Technology Integrated Large Array (ATTILA). The infrastructure of the SELENE facility requires a systems engineering approach. There are several large scale projects for the water, power, access, and communications all of which are interactive elements. These projects need to be designed and constructed concurrently while taking environmental concerns into account before the SELENE facility becomes operational.

  4. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  5. Distributed Data Integration Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlow, T; Ludaescher, B; Vouk, M; Pu, C

    2003-02-24

    The Internet is becoming the preferred method for disseminating scientific data from a variety of disciplines. This can result in information overload on the part of the scientists, who are unable to query all of the relevant sources, even if they knew where to find them, what they contained, how to interact with them, and how to interpret the results. A related issue is keeping up with current trends in information technology often taxes the end-user's expertise and time. Thus instead of benefiting from this information rich environment, scientists become experts on a small number of sources and technologies, use them almost exclusively, and develop a resistance to innovations that can enhance their productivity. Enabling information based scientific advances, in domains such as functional genomics, requires fully utilizing all available information and the latest technologies. In order to address this problem we are developing a end-user centric, domain-sensitive workflow-based infrastructure, shown in Figure 1, that will allow scientists to design complex scientific workflows that reflect the data manipulation required to perform their research without an undue burden. We are taking a three-tiered approach to designing this infrastructure utilizing (1) abstract workflow definition, construction, and automatic deployment, (2) complex agent-based workflow execution and (3) automatic wrapper generation. In order to construct a workflow, the scientist defines an abstract workflow (AWF) in terminology (semantics and context) that is familiar to him/her. This AWF includes all of the data transformations, selections, and analyses required by the scientist, but does not necessarily specify particular data sources. This abstract workflow is then compiled into an executable workflow (EWF, in our case XPDL) that is then evaluated and executed by the workflow engine. This EWF contains references to specific data source and interfaces capable of performing the desired

  6. Global information infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, D A

    1994-01-01

    The High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCC) is a multiagency federal initiative under the leadership of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, established by the High Performance Computing Act of 1991. It has been assigned a critical role in supporting the international collaboration essential to science and to health care. Goals of the HPCC are to extend USA leadership in high performance computing and networking technologies; to improve technology transfer for economic competitiveness, education, and national security; and to provide a key part of the foundation for the National Information Infrastructure. The first component of the National Institutes of Health to participate in the HPCC, the National Library of Medicine (NLM), recently issued a solicitation for proposals to address a range of issues, from privacy to 'testbed' networks, 'virtual reality,' and more. These efforts will build upon the NLM's extensive outreach program and other initiatives, including the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), MEDLARS, and Grateful Med. New Internet search tools are emerging, such as Gopher and 'Knowbots'. Medicine will succeed in developing future intelligent agents to assist in utilizing computer networks. Our ability to serve patients is so often restricted by lack of information and knowledge at the time and place of medical decision-making. The new technologies, properly employed, will also greatly enhance our ability to serve the patient. PMID:8125625

  7. LIGA Micromachining: Infrastructure Establishment

    SciTech Connect

    Alfredo M. Morales; Barry V. Hess; Dale R. Boehme; Jill M. Hruby; John S. Krafcik; Robert H. Nilson; Stewart K. Griffiths; William D. Bonivert

    1999-02-01

    LIGA is a micromachining technology that uses high energy x-rays from a synchrotron to create patterns with small lateral dimensions in a deep, non-conducting polymeric resist. Typical dimensions for LIGA parts are microns to tens of microns in lateral size, and hundreds of microns to millimeters in depth. Once the resist is patterned, metal is electrodeposited in the features to create metal microparts, or to create a metal mold for subsequent replication. The acronym LIGA comes from the German words for lithography, electroforming, and molding, and the technology has been under worldwide development for more than a decade. over the last five years, a full-service capability to produce metal microparts using the LIGA process has been established at Sandia national Laboratories, California. This report describes the accomplishments made during the past two years in infrastructure establishment funded by a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''LIGA Micromachining.'' Specific topics include photoresist processing for LIGA mask making, x-ray scanning equipment, plating bath instrumentation, plating uniformity, and software architecture.

  8. MFC Communications Infrastructure Study

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Cannon; Terry Barney; Gary Cook; George Danklefsen, Jr.; Paul Fairbourn; Susan Gihring; Lisa Stearns

    2012-01-01

    Unprecedented growth of required telecommunications services and telecommunications applications change the way the INL does business today. High speed connectivity compiled with a high demand for telephony and network services requires a robust communications infrastructure.   The current state of the MFC communication infrastructure limits growth opportunities of current and future communication infrastructure services. This limitation is largely due to equipment capacity issues, aging cabling infrastructure (external/internal fiber and copper cable) and inadequate space for telecommunication equipment. While some communication infrastructure improvements have been implemented over time projects, it has been completed without a clear overall plan and technology standard.   This document identifies critical deficiencies with the current state of the communication infrastructure in operation at the MFC facilities and provides an analysis to identify needs and deficiencies to be addressed in order to achieve target architectural standards as defined in STD-170. The intent of STD-170 is to provide a robust, flexible, long-term solution to make communications capabilities align with the INL mission and fit the various programmatic growth and expansion needs.

  9. Building safeguards infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Rebecca S; Mcclelland - Kerr, John

    2009-01-01

    Much has been written in recent years about the nuclear renaissance - the rebirth of nuclear power as a clean and safe source of electricity around the world. Those who question the nuclear renaissance often cite the risk of proliferation, accidents or an attack on a facility as concerns, all of which merit serious consideration. The integration of these three areas - sometimes referred to as 3S, for safety, security and safeguards - is essential to supporting the growth of nuclear power, and the infrastructure that supports them should be strengthened. The focus of this paper will be on the role safeguards plays in the 3S concept and how to support the development of the infrastructure necessary to support safeguards. The objective of this paper has been to provide a working definition of safeguards infrastructure, and to discuss xamples of how building safeguards infrastructure is presented in several models. The guidelines outlined in the milestones document provide a clear path for establishing both the safeguards and the related infrastructures needed to support the development of nuclear power. The model employed by the INSEP program of engaging with partner states on safeguards-related topics that are of current interest to the level of nuclear development in that state provides another way of approaching the concept of building safeguards infrastructure. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative is yet another approach that underscored five principal areas for growth, and the United States commitment to working with partners to promote this growth both at home and abroad.

  10. Climate Indicators for Energy and Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbanks, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Two of the key categories of climate indicators are energy and infrastructure. For energy supply and use, many indicators are available for energy supply and consumption; and some indicators are available to assess implications of climate change, such as changes over time in heating and cooling days. Indicators of adaptation and adaptive capacity are more elusive. For infrastructure, which includes more than a dozen different sectors, general indicators are not available, beyond counts of major disasters and such valuable contributions as the ASCE "report cards." In this case, research is needed, for example to develop credible metrics for assessing the resilience of built infrastructures to climate change and other stresses.

  11. Overview of NASA communications infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Ray J.; Fuechsel, Charles

    1991-01-01

    The infrastructure of NASA communications systems for effecting coordination across NASA offices and with the national and international research and technological communities is discussed. The offices and networks of the communication system include the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA), which manages all NASA missions, and the Office of Space Operations, which furnishes communication support through the NASCOM, the mission critical communications support network, and the Program Support Communications network. The NASA Science Internet was established by OSSA to centrally manage, develop, and operate an integrated computer network service dedicated to NASA's space science and application research. Planned for the future is the National Research and Education Network, which will provide communications infrastructure to enhance science resources at a national level.

  12. A Scalable Tools Communication Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Buntinas, Darius; Bosilca, George; Graham, Richard L; Vallee, Geoffroy R; Watson, Gregory R.

    2008-01-01

    The Scalable Tools Communication Infrastructure (STCI) is an open source collaborative effort intended to provide high-performance, scalable, resilient, and portable communications and process control services for a wide variety of user and system tools. STCI is aimed specifically at tools for ultrascale computing and uses a component architecture to simplify tailoring the infrastructure to a wide range of scenarios. This paper describes STCI's design philosophy, the various components that will be used to provide an STCI implementation for a range of ultrascale platforms, and a range of tool types. These include tools supporting parallel run-time environments, such as MPI, parallel application correctness tools and performance analysis tools, as well as system monitoring and management tools.

  13. Europlanet Research Infrastructure: Planetary Sample Analysis Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloquet, C.; Mason, N. J.; Davies, G. R.; Marty, B.

    2008-09-01

    EuroPlanet The Europlanet Research Infrastructure consortium funded under FP7 aims to provide the EU Planetary Science community greater access for to research infrastructure. A series of networking and outreach initiatives will be complimented by joint research activities and the formation of three Trans National Access distributed service laboratories (TNA's) to provide a unique and comprehensive set of analogue field sites, laboratory simulation facilities, and extraterrestrial sample analysis tools. Here we report on the infrastructure that comprises the third TNA: Planetary Sample Analysis Facilities. The modular infrastructure represents a major commitment of analytical instrumentation by three institutes and together forms a state-of-the-art analytical facility of unprecedented breadth. These centres perform research in the fields of geochemistry and cosmochemistry, studying fluids and rocks in order to better understand the keys cof the universe. Europlanet Research Infrastructure Facilities: Ion Probe facilities at CRPG and OU The Cameca 1270 Ion microprobe is a CNRS-INSU national facility. About a third of the useful analytical time of the ion probe (about 3 months each year) is allocated to the national community. French scientists have to submit their projects to a national committee for selection. The selected projects are allocated time in the following 6 months twice a year. About 15 to 20 projects are run each year. There are only two such instruments in Europe, with cosmochemistry only performed at CRPG. Different analyses can be performed on a routine basis, such as U-Pb dating on Zircon, Monazite or Pechblende, Li, B, C, O, Si isotopic ratios determination on different matrix, 26Al, 60Fe extinct radioactivity ages, light and trace elements contents . The NanoSIMS 50L - producing element or isotope maps with a spatial resolution down to ≈50nm. This is one of the cornerstone facilities of UKCAN, with 75% of available instrument time funded and

  14. Extension of the Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    This article includes a report from the Select Committee to the NCAI Convention, summarizing their activities to date, the Senate floor debate on whether to continue the committee, and the statements of Kirke Kickingbird and Charles Trimble at a hearing before the Rules Committee in support of S. Res. 405 to continue the committee. (RTS)

  15. Space Station Freedom commercial infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barquinero, Kevin; Cassidy, Jeff

    1989-01-01

    NASA policy concerning the commercial infrastructure of the Space Station is examined. Plans for receiving and evaluating unsolicited proposals to provide commercial infrastructure are outlined. The guidelines for development of the commercial infrastructure and examples of opportunities for industry are listed. Also, a program for industry feedback concerning the commercial infrastructure policy is discussed.

  16. COOPEUS - connecting research infrastructures in environmental sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop-Jakobsen, Ketil; Waldmann, Christoph; Huber, Robert

    2015-04-01

    , the first steps were taken to implement the GCI as a platform for documenting the capabilities of the COOPEUS research infrastructures. COOPEUS recognizes the potential for the GCI to become an important platform promoting cross-disciplinary approaches in the studies of multifaceted environmental challenges. Recommendations from the workshop participants also revealed that in order to attract research infrastructures to use the GCI, the registration process must be simplified and accelerated. However, also the data policies of the individual research infrastructure, or lack thereof, can prevent the use of the GCI or other portals, due to unclarities regarding data management authority and data ownership. COOPEUS shall continue to promote cross-disciplinary data exchange in the environmental field and will in the future expand to also include other geographical areas.

  17. A Science Information Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, C. A.; Hawkins, I.; Malina, R. F.; Dow, K.; Murray, S.

    1994-12-01

    We have created a partnership of science museums, research institutions, teachers, and other centers of informal science education to enable access to the rich resources of remote sensing data available from NASA and other sources and to deliver this information to the general community. We are creating science resource centers in the nation's science museums and planetarium facilities, linking them together through a national Science Information Infrastructure (SII). The SII framework is being founded on Internet connections between the resource centers, which are in turn linked to research institutions. The most up-to-date and exciting science data, related information, and interpretive material will be available from the research institutions. The science museums will present this information in appropriate ways that respond to the needs and interest of the general public and K--12 communities. The science information will be available through the World Wide Web using a Mosaic interface that individuals will use to explore the on-line materials through self-guided learning modules. K--12 teachers will have access to the materials and, in a workshop forum, learn to find and use the information to create lesson plans and curricula for their classrooms. Eventually, as the connectivity of schools and libraries improves, students and teachers will have access to the resource centers from their own locations. The core partnership of the SII includes the Center for EUV Astrophysics (CEA), and Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Exploratorium, Lawrence Hall of Science, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Science Museum of Virginia, New York Hall of Science, Adler Museum of Chicago, University of California Museum of Paleontology, Boston Museum of Science, and the Earth Observing Satellite Company (EOSAT). A demonstration of the application of resource center materials in the K--12 community is being conducted through the Science On-Line project at the Center

  18. The Articulation Committee Companion: 2009 Edition. A Resource for BC's Articulation Committees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Finola, Ed.; Orum, Jennifer, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) has designed The Articulation Committee Companion to serve as both an introductory resource for new members and as an ongoing reference for committees. The Companion includes a brief overview of the province's articulation committees and their essential role in the post-secondary…

  19. 75 FR 25212 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Audit Advisory Committee (DAAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Audit Advisory Committee (DAAC) AGENCY: Under... that the Defense Audit Advisory Committee will meet on May 17, 2010. Subject to the availability of... include financial reporting processes, systems of internal controls, audit processes, and processes...

  20. Europlanet Research Infrastructure: Planetary Sample Analysis Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloquet, C.; Mason, N. J.; Davies, G. R.; Marty, B.

    2008-09-01

    EuroPlanet The Europlanet Research Infrastructure consortium funded under FP7 aims to provide the EU Planetary Science community greater access for to research infrastructure. A series of networking and outreach initiatives will be complimented by joint research activities and the formation of three Trans National Access distributed service laboratories (TNA's) to provide a unique and comprehensive set of analogue field sites, laboratory simulation facilities, and extraterrestrial sample analysis tools. Here we report on the infrastructure that comprises the third TNA: Planetary Sample Analysis Facilities. The modular infrastructure represents a major commitment of analytical instrumentation by three institutes and together forms a state-of-the-art analytical facility of unprecedented breadth. These centres perform research in the fields of geochemistry and cosmochemistry, studying fluids and rocks in order to better understand the keys cof the universe. Europlanet Research Infrastructure Facilities: Ion Probe facilities at CRPG and OU The Cameca 1270 Ion microprobe is a CNRS-INSU national facility. About a third of the useful analytical time of the ion probe (about 3 months each year) is allocated to the national community. French scientists have to submit their projects to a national committee for selection. The selected projects are allocated time in the following 6 months twice a year. About 15 to 20 projects are run each year. There are only two such instruments in Europe, with cosmochemistry only performed at CRPG. Different analyses can be performed on a routine basis, such as U-Pb dating on Zircon, Monazite or Pechblende, Li, B, C, O, Si isotopic ratios determination on different matrix, 26Al, 60Fe extinct radioactivity ages, light and trace elements contents . The NanoSIMS 50L - producing element or isotope maps with a spatial resolution down to ≈50nm. This is one of the cornerstone facilities of UKCAN, with 75% of available instrument time funded and

  1. AGU Committee Update: Recent activities of NG Technical Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, John B.

    Beginning this year, the AGU has adopted a series of new policies designed to highlight the interdisciplinary aspects of the Union. As part of these new policies, members will soon be able to affiliate with the AGU Technical Committees, including the Nonlinear Geophysics (NG) Committee. In addition, the Technical Committees are now able to sponsor or co-sponsor technical sessions at both the Spring and Fall annual meetings, as well as make awards for best research and papers, and sponsor nominations for AGU Fellows and Union-wide awards.A website for the NG committee, with descriptions of the committee's activities and other functions, can be found via a link from the main AGU website, which is maintained by Jon Pelletier (University of Arizona). An AGU/NG listserver is maintained by the AGU staff liaison to NG, Dan Moore (DMoore@agu.org). AGU members wishing to be apprised of NG committee activities by inclusion in the listserv should either sign up through the NG web site, or send email to Dan Moore. As described, the NG committee can nominate an AGU member for election to AGU Fellow status. Don Turcotte (Cornell University) chairs the NG subcommittee on Fellow nominations.

  2. Infrastructure Ecology for Sustainable and Resilient Urban Infrastructure Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunju; Pandit, Arka; Crittenden, John; Xu, Ming; Perrings, Charles; Wang, Dali; Li, Ke; French, Steve

    2010-10-01

    and secondly, it also reduces the wastewater load to central facility. In addition, lesser dependency on the distribution network contributes to increased reliability and resiliency of the infrastructure. The goal of this research is to develop a framework which seeks an optimal combination of decentralized water and energy alternatives and centralized infrastructures based on physical and socio-economic environments of a region. Centralized and decentralized options related to water, wastewater and stormwater and distributed energy alternatives including photovoltaic (PV) generators, fuel cells and microturbines are investigated. In the context of the water-energy nexus, water recovery from energy alternatives and energy recovery from water alternatives are reflected. Alternatives recapturing nutrients from wastewater are also considered to conserve depleting resources. The alternatives are evaluated in terms of their life-cycle environmental impact and economic performance using a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) tool and cost benefit analysis, respectively. Meeting the increasing demand of a test bed, an optimal combination of the alternatives is designed to minimize environmental and economic impacts including CO2 emissions, human health risk, natural resource use, and construction and operation cost. The framework determines the optimal combination depending on urban density, transmission or conveyance distance or network, geology, climate, etc. Therefore, it will be also able to evaluate infrastructure resiliency against physical and socio-economic challenges such as population growth, severe weather, energy and water shortage, economic crisis, and so on.

  3. Critical Infrastructure Protection Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Franks, Trent [R-AZ-8

    2013-10-30

    12/02/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Fuzzy architecture assessment for critical infrastructure resilience

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, George

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an approach for the selection of alternative architectures in a connected infrastructure system to increase resilience of the overall infrastructure system. The paper begins with a description of resilience and critical infrastructure, then summarizes existing approaches to resilience, and presents a fuzzy-rule based method of selecting among alternative infrastructure architectures. This methodology includes considerations which are most important when deciding on an approach to resilience. The paper concludes with a proposed approach which builds on existing resilience architecting methods by integrating key system aspects using fuzzy memberships and fuzzy rule sets. This novel approach aids the systems architect in considering resilience for the evaluation of architectures for adoption into the final system architecture.

  5. Orbital Aggregation and Space Infrastructure Systems (OASIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troutman, Patrick A.; Mazanek, Daniel D.; Stillwagen, Frederic H.; Antol, Jeffrey; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Chato, David J.; Saucillo, Rudolf J.; Blue, Douglas R.; Carey, David; Krizan, Shawn A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a NASA lead study performed to identify synergistic opportunities and concepts between human exploration initiatives and commercialization of space. The goal of this initiative, called Orbital Aggregation & Space Infrastructure Systems (OASIS), is to develop an in-space architecture and associated concepts that provide common infrastructure for enabling a large class of space missions. The concepts include communications, navigation and power systems, propellant modules, tank farms, habitats, and in-space transportation systems using several propulsion technologies. OASIS features in-space aggregation of systems and resources in support of mission objectives. The concepts feature a high level of reusability and are supported by inexpensive launch of propellant and logistics payloads from the Earth/moon system. Industry, NASA and other users could share infrastructure costs. The anticipated benefits of synergistic utilization of space infrastructure are reduced mission costs and increased mission flexibility for future space exploration and commercialization initiatives.

  6. Controlled Structures Technology Steering Committee Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on controlled structures technology presented at the steering committee workshop on 22-23 Jan. 1992 are included. Topics addressed include: interferometer testbed; middeck 0-gravity dynamics experiment; middeck active control experiment; multivariable identification for control; strain actuated aeroelastic control; sensor/actuator technology development; input command shaping; and other research projects. A description of the organization and committee are included.

  7. An Infrastructure Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    This article invites teachers to let their students' imaginations soar as they become part of a team that will design a whole new kind of living technological museum, a facility that celebrates the world of infrastructure. In this activity, a new two-story building will be built, occupying a vacant corner parcel of land, approximately 150…

  8. Infrastructure Survey 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    In 2008 the Group of Eight (Go8) released a first report on the state of its buildings and infrastructure, based on a survey undertaken in 2007. A further survey was undertaken in 2009, updating some information about the assessed quality, value and condition of buildings and use of space. It also collated data related to aspects of the estate not…

  9. An Infrastructure Roadmap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furgeson, Steven P.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a master infrastructure plan for electrical and mechanical systems can help determine annual maintenance budgets, form annual capital-improvement budgets, take a snapshot of existing conditions, and lead to better energy management. Discusses important elements in such plans. (EV)

  10. A Messaging Infrastructure for WLCG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, James; Cons, Lionel; Lapka, Wojciech; Paladin, Massimo; Skaburskas, Konstantin

    2011-12-01

    During the EGEE-III project operational tools such as SAM, Nagios, Gridview, the regional Dashboard and GGUS moved to a communication architecture based on ActiveMQ, an open-source enterprise messaging solution. LHC experiments, in particular ATLAS, developed prototypes of systems using the same messaging infrastructure, validating the system for their use-cases. In this paper we describe the WLCG messaging use cases and outline an improved messaging architecture based on the experience gained during the EGEE-III period. We show how this provides a solid basis for many applications, including the grid middleware, to improve their resilience and reliability.

  11. Creating an Oversight Infrastructure for Electronic Health Record-Related Patient Safety Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep; Classen, David C.; Sittig, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have potential quality and safety benefits. However, reports of EHR-related safety hazards are now emerging. The Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information Technology (HIT) recently sponsored an Institute of Medicine committee to evaluate how HIT use affects patient safety. In this paper, we propose the creation of a national EHR oversight program to provide dedicated surveillance of EHR-related safety hazards and to promote learning from identified errors, close calls, and adverse events. The program calls for data gathering, investigation/analysis and regulatory components. The first two functions will depend on institution-level EHR safety committees that will investigate all known EHR-related adverse events and near-misses and report them nationally using standardized methods. These committees should also perform routine safety self-assessments to proactively identify new risks. Nationally, we propose the long-term creation of a centralized, non-partisan board with an appropriate legal and regulatory infrastructure to ensure the safety of EHRs. We discuss the rationale of the proposed oversight program and its potential organizational components and functions. These include mechanisms for robust data collection and analyses of all safety concerns using multiple methods that extend beyond reporting; multidisciplinary investigation of selected high-risk safety events; and enhanced coordination with other national agencies in order to facilitate broad dissemination of hazards information. Implementation of this proposed infrastructure can facilitate identification of EHR-related adverse events and errors and potentially create a safer and more effective EHR-based health care delivery system. PMID:22080284

  12. 77 FR 58133 - Environmental Financial Advisory Committee; Request for Nominations of Candidates to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... technology investments; commercial banking, local utility management and finance, green infrastructure... AGENCY Environmental Financial Advisory Committee; Request for Nominations of Candidates to the Environmental Financial Advisory Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice....

  13. 75 FR 29762 - HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee... Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meetings. This notice announces forthcoming subcommittee... health information technology infrastructure that permits the electronic exchange and use of...

  14. 78 FR 17395 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board; Notification of Public Advisory Committee Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... environmental infrastructure issues in the U.S.- Mexico border region. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: If you wish to... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board; Notification of Public Advisory Committee Teleconference...

  15. Research infrastructure support to address ecosystem dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, Wouter

    2014-05-01

    Predicting the evolution of ecosystems to climate change or human pressures is a challenge. Even understanding past or current processes is complicated as a result of the many interactions and feedbacks that occur within and between components of the system. This talk will present an example of current research on changes in landscape evolution, hydrology, soil biogeochemical processes, zoological food webs, and plant community succession, and how these affect feedbacks to components of the systems, including the climate system. Multiple observations, experiments, and simulations provide a wealth of data, but not necessarily understanding. Model development on the coupled processes on different spatial and temporal scales is sensitive for variations in data and of parameter change. Fast high performance computing may help to visualize the effect of these changes and the potential stability (and reliability) of the models. This may than allow for iteration between data production and models towards stable models reducing uncertainty and improving the prediction of change. The role of research infrastructures becomes crucial is overcoming barriers for such research. Environmental infrastructures are covering physical site facilities, dedicated instrumentation and e-infrastructure. The LifeWatch infrastructure for biodiversity and ecosystem research will provide services for data integration, analysis and modeling. But it has to cooperate intensively with the other kinds of infrastructures in order to support the iteration between data production and model computation. The cooperation in the ENVRI project (Common operations of environmental research infrastructures) is one of the initiatives to foster such multidisciplinary research.

  16. Executive Committee. AGB Standing Committee Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Richard T.

    1985-01-01

    The structure and functions of the college executive committee are discussed. This committee is pivotal to the effective functioning of the board and to the support of the chairperson and the chief executive in their leadership roles. The committee can act on its own provided it does not assume powers specifically reserved for the board. The…

  17. Development Model for Research Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wächter, Joachim; Hammitzsch, Martin; Kerschke, Dorit; Lauterjung, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    Research infrastructures (RIs) are platforms integrating facilities, resources and services used by the research communities to conduct research and foster innovation. RIs include scientific equipment, e.g., sensor platforms, satellites or other instruments, but also scientific data, sample repositories or archives. E-infrastructures on the other hand provide the technological substratum and middleware to interlink distributed RI components with computing systems and communication networks. The resulting platforms provide the foundation for the design and implementation of RIs and play an increasing role in the advancement and exploitation of knowledge and technology. RIs are regarded as essential to achieve and maintain excellence in research and innovation crucial for the European Research Area (ERA). The implementation of RIs has to be considered as a long-term, complex development process often over a period of 10 or more years. The ongoing construction of Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs) provides a good example for the general complexity of infrastructure development processes especially in system-of-systems environments. A set of directives issued by the European Commission provided a framework of guidelines for the implementation processes addressing the relevant content and the encoding of data as well as the standards for service interfaces and the integration of these services into networks. Additionally, a time schedule for the overall construction process has been specified. As a result this process advances with a strong participation of member states and responsible organisations. Today, SDIs provide the operational basis for new digital business processes in both national and local authorities. Currently, the development of integrated RIs in Earth and Environmental Sciences is characterised by the following properties: • A high number of parallel activities on European and national levels with numerous institutes and organisations participating

  18. Development Model for Research Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wächter, Joachim; Hammitzsch, Martin; Kerschke, Dorit; Lauterjung, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    Research infrastructures (RIs) are platforms integrating facilities, resources and services used by the research communities to conduct research and foster innovation. RIs include scientific equipment, e.g., sensor platforms, satellites or other instruments, but also scientific data, sample repositories or archives. E-infrastructures on the other hand provide the technological substratum and middleware to interlink distributed RI components with computing systems and communication networks. The resulting platforms provide the foundation for the design and implementation of RIs and play an increasing role in the advancement and exploitation of knowledge and technology. RIs are regarded as essential to achieve and maintain excellence in research and innovation crucial for the European Research Area (ERA). The implementation of RIs has to be considered as a long-term, complex development process often over a period of 10 or more years. The ongoing construction of Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs) provides a good example for the general complexity of infrastructure development processes especially in system-of-systems environments. A set of directives issued by the European Commission provided a framework of guidelines for the implementation processes addressing the relevant content and the encoding of data as well as the standards for service interfaces and the integration of these services into networks. Additionally, a time schedule for the overall construction process has been specified. As a result this process advances with a strong participation of member states and responsible organisations. Today, SDIs provide the operational basis for new digital business processes in both national and local authorities. Currently, the development of integrated RIs in Earth and Environmental Sciences is characterised by the following properties: • A high number of parallel activities on European and national levels with numerous institutes and organisations participating

  19. Executive committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guoqing; Cai, Xiaohong; Ding, Dajun; Ma, Xinwen; Zhao, Yongtao

    2014-04-01

    ChairVice Chair Toshiyuki AzumaRoberto Rivarola Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics LabUniversidad Nacional de Rosario and Advanced Science InstituteInstituto de Fisica Rosario RIKEN, JapanRosario, Argentina SecretaryMembers Dominique VernhetJoachim Burgdörfer, Austria Institut des NanoSciences de Paris Birgit Lohmann, Australia Université Pierre et Marie Curie Hossein Sadeghpour, USA Paris, FranceThomas Stöhlker, Germany Past ChairJim McCann, UK Barry DunningGuoqing Xiao, China Physics & AstronomyXiaohong Cai, China Rice University, HoustonXinwen Ma, China Texas, USAYongtao Zhao, China TreasurerFernando Martin, Spain Henrik CederquistLuis Mendez, Spain Alba Nova University CenterAnatoli Kheifets, Australia Stockholm University Stockholm, Sweden Details of the general committee are available in the PDF

  20. Launch facilities as infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trial, Mike

    The idea is put forth that launch facilities in the U.S. impose inefficiencies on launch service providers due to the way they have been constructed. Rather than constructing facilities for a specific program, then discarding them when the program is complete, a better use of the facilities investment would be in constructing facilities flexible enough for use by multiple vehicle types over the course of a 25-year design lifetime. The planned National Launch System (NLS) program offers one possible avenue for the federal government to provide a nucleus of launch infrastructure which can improve launch efficiencies. The NLS goals are to develop a new space launch system to meet civil and national needs. The new system will be jointly funded by DOD and NASA but will actively consider commercial space needs. The NLS will improve reliability, responsiveness, and mission performance, and reduce operating costs. The specifics of the infrastructure concept are discussed.

  1. EPA NRMRL green Infrastructure research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green Infrastructure is an engineering approach to wet weather flow management that uses infiltration, evapotranspiration, capture and reuse to better mimic the natural drainage processes than traditional gray systems. Green technologies supplement gray infrastructure to red...

  2. DRINKING WATER INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conducted every 4 years, the Drinking Water Infrastructure Needs Survey (DWINS) is an EPA-conducted statistically-based survey of the infrastructure investment needs of the Nation's drinking water systems for the next 20 years.

  3. Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-11-01

    Scientific Committee Silvia Arrese-Igor Irigoyen (CFM, CSIC - UPV/EHU, Donostia), Javier Campo (ICMA-CSIC, Zaragoza), Carlos Frontera (ICMAB-CSIC, Barcelona), Victoria García Sakai (ISIS, Chilton), Cristina Gómez-Polo (UPNa, Pamplona), Miguel Ángel González (ILL, Grenoble), Pedro Gorría (Universidad Oviedo), Jon Gutiérrez Echevarría (EHU/UPV, Bilbao), J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal (UPNa, Pamplona), Vicente Recarte (UPNa, Pamplona), Jesús Ruíz Hervías (UPM, Madrid), Vicente Sánchez-Alarcos (UPNa, Pamplona), Antonio Urbina (UPC, Cartagena) Organizing Committee J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal (Co-Chair), Vicente Recarte ( Co-Chair), Cristina Gómez-Polo, Silvia Larumbe Abuin, Vicente Sánchez-Alarcos Editors of the Proceedings J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal, Vicente Recarte Plenary speakers Charles Simon (Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France), Miguel Angel Alario Franco (Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain), Dieter Richter (Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Jülich, Germany), James Yeck (European Spallation Source, Lund, Sweden) Invited speakers Manu Barandiarán (BCMaterials & EHU/UPV), Arantxa Arbe (MFC, CSIC- UPV/EHU), José Luis Martínez (Consorcio ESS-Bilbao), Marta Castellote, IETcc-CSIC), Josep Lluis Tamarit (UPC), Diego Alba-Venero (ISIS), Elizabeth Castillo (CIC Energigune), Josu M. Igartua (EHU/UPV), Antonio Dos Santos (UPM), Alex Masalles (Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya), José Abad (UPCT), Claudia Mondelli (ILL), Oscar Fabelo (ILL), Aurora Nogales (IEM-CSIC), Jesús Rodríguez (UC), Gerardo

  4. The contribution of advisory committees and public involvement to large studies: case study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many large studies have complex advisory committee structures, yet there is no empirical evidence regarding their optimal composition, scope and contribution. The aim of this study was to inform the committee and advice infrastructure for future research studies. Methods In the context of a five-year study funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research, three advisory committees were formed. In addition, advice was obtained from individual experts. All recommendations received in the start-up phase (first seven months) of the study were recorded, along with the decision about implementation of the recommendation. A particular focus was on the impact of public involvement. Results A total of 172 recommendations were made, including 70 from 20 individual experts. The recommendations were grouped into five emergent themes: Scientific, Pragmatic, Resources, Committee and Collaboration. Most recommendations related to strengthening existing components or adding new components to the study protocol. Very few recommendations either proposed removing study components or contradicted other recommendations. Three 'implementation criteria' were identified: scientific value, pragmatic feasibility, and paradigmatic consistency. 103 (60%) of recommendations were implemented and 25 (15%) were not implemented. The benefits identified by the research team were improved quality and confidence, and the costs were increased cognitive demands, protocol revision time, and slower progress. Conclusions The findings are discussed in the context of the wider literature on public involvement in research. Six recommendations are identified. First, have a clear rationale for each advisory committee expressed as terms of reference, and consider the best balance between committees and individual consultation with experts. Second, an early concern of committees is inter-committee communication, so consider cross-representation and copying minutes between committees. Third

  5. Purple Level - 1 Milestone Review Committee I/O and Archive Follow-up Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, M R

    2006-12-05

    On July 7th 2006, the Purple Level-1 Review Committee convened and was presented with evidence of the completion of Level-2 Milestone 461 (Deploy First Phase of I/O Infrastructure for Purple) which was performed in direct support of the Purple Level-1 milestone. This evidence included a short presentation and the formal documentation of milestone No.461 (see UCRL-TR-217288). Following the meeting, the Committee asked for the following additional evidence: (1) Set a speed measurement/goal/target assuming a number of files that the user needs to get into the archives. Then redo the benchmark using whatever tool(s) the labs prefer (HTAR, for example). Document how long the process takes. (2) Develop a test to read files back to confirm that what the user gets out of the archive is what the user put into the archive. This evidence has been collected and is presented here.

  6. In Situ Nuclear Characterization Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; J. Rory Kennedy

    2011-11-01

    To be able to evolve microstructure with a prescribed in situ process, an effective measurement infrastructure must exist. This interdisciplinary infrastructure needs to be developed in parallel with in situ sensor technology. This paper discusses the essential elements in an effective infrastructure.

  7. Securing energy assets and infrastructure 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-15

    This report describes in detail the energy industry's challenges and solutions for protecting critical assets including oil and gas infrastructure, transmission grids, power plants, storage, pipelines, and all aspects of strategic industry assets. It includes a special section on cyber-terrorism and protecting control systems. Contents: Section I - Introduction; U.S Energy Trends; Vulnerabilities; Protection Measures. Section II - Sector-wise Vulnerabilities Assessments and Security Measures: Coal, Oil and Petroleum, Natural Gas, Electric Power, Cybersecurity and Control Systems, Key Recommendations; Section III - Critical Infrastructure Protection Efforts: Government Initiatives, Agencies, and Checklists.

  8. Citizen Advisory Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Leann R.

    This guide, describing community involvement through citizen advisory committees, is a summary of the literature on such committees. Its main concern is district committees created by school boards. Citations in the bibliography contain all points of view on committees and present many alternatives on most of the topics covered in the guide.…

  9. American Academy of Pediatrics Guidelines for Infant Bioethics Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and University, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Examples are given of points hospitals must consider when adopting and implementing infant bioethics committees, including committee functions (educational, policy development, and consultative), structure, membership, jurisdiction, recordkeeping, and legal issues. (MSE)

  10. 77 FR 45345 - DOE/Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... Update from Committee of Visitors for Computer Science activities Facilities update including early science efforts ] Early Career technical talks Recompetition results for Scientific Discovery through.../Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy....

  11. Operational models of infrastructure resilience.

    PubMed

    Alderson, David L; Brown, Gerald G; Carlyle, W Matthew

    2015-04-01

    We propose a definition of infrastructure resilience that is tied to the operation (or function) of an infrastructure as a system of interacting components and that can be objectively evaluated using quantitative models. Specifically, for any particular system, we use quantitative models of system operation to represent the decisions of an infrastructure operator who guides the behavior of the system as a whole, even in the presence of disruptions. Modeling infrastructure operation in this way makes it possible to systematically evaluate the consequences associated with the loss of infrastructure components, and leads to a precise notion of "operational resilience" that facilitates model verification, validation, and reproducible results. Using a simple example of a notional infrastructure, we demonstrate how to use these models for (1) assessing the operational resilience of an infrastructure system, (2) identifying critical vulnerabilities that threaten its continued function, and (3) advising policymakers on investments to improve resilience. PMID:25808298

  12. Cyber Threats to Nuclear Infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Anderson; Paul Moskowitz; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Curtis St. Michel

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear facility personnel expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against both natural and man-made threats. Historically, most attention has been placed on physical security. Recently however, the threat of cyber-related attacks has become a recognized and growing world-wide concern. Much attention has focused on the vulnerability of the electric grid and chemical industries to cyber attacks, in part, because of their use of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. Lessons learned from work in these sectors indicate that the cyber threat may extend to other critical infrastructures including sites where nuclear and radiological materials are now stored. In this context, this white paper presents a hypothetical scenario by which a determined adversary launches a cyber attack that compromises the physical protection system and results in a reduced security posture at such a site. The compromised security posture might then be malevolently exploited in a variety of ways. The authors conclude that the cyber threat should be carefully considered for all nuclear infrastructures.

  13. Government Services Information Infrastructure Management

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallini, J.S.; Aiken, R.J.

    1995-04-01

    The Government Services Information Infrastructure (GSII) is that portion of the NII used to link Government and its services, enables virtual agency concepts, protects privacy, and supports emergency preparedness needs. The GSII is comprised of the supporting telecommunications technologies, network and information services infrastructure and the applications that use these. The GSII is an enlightened attempt by the Clinton/Gore Administration to form a virtual government crossing agency boundaries to interoperate more closely with industry and with the public to greatly improve the delivery of government services. The GSII and other private sector efforts, will have a significant impact on the design, development, and deployment of the NII, even if only through the procurement of such services. The Federal Government must adopt new mechanisms and new paradigms for the management of the GSII, including improved acquisition and operation of GSII components in order to maximize benefits. Government requirements and applications will continue to evolv. The requirements from government services and users of form affinity groups that more accurately and effectively define these common requirements, that drive the adoption and use of industry standards, and that provide a significant technology marketplace.

  14. Agile Infrastructure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Ascenso, J.; Fedorko, I.; Fiorini, B.; Paladin, M.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2014-06-01

    At the present time, data centres are facing a massive rise in virtualisation and cloud computing. The Agile Infrastructure (AI) project is working to deliver new solutions to ease the management of CERN data centres. Part of the solution consists in a new "shared monitoring architecture" which collects and manages monitoring data from all data centre resources. In this article, we present the building blocks of this new monitoring architecture, the different open source technologies selected for each architecture layer, and how we are building a community around this common effort.

  15. 75 FR 8953 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee... committee of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). The meeting... and adoption of a nationwide health information technology infrastructure that permits the...

  16. 76 FR 30739 - Notice of Public Meeting, Salem District Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972... quality, land health, forest ecosystems, and infrastructure. Miles R. Brown, BLM Salem District Manager... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Salem District Resource Advisory Committee...

  17. 75 FR 31464 - Notice of Public Meeting, Salem District Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972..., land health, forest ecosystems, and infrastructure. Aaron G. Horton, District Manager. BILLING CODE... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Salem District Resource Advisory Committee...

  18. Toward Developing Genetic Algorithms to Aid in Critical Infrastructure Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-05-01

    Today’s society relies upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, telecommunication, financial and energy. Understanding these interdependencies is necessary in order to protect our critical infrastructure. The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System, CIMS©, examines the interrelationships between infrastructure networks. CIMS© development is sponsored by the National Security Division at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in its ongoing mission for providing critical infrastructure protection and preparedness. A genetic algorithm (GA) is an optimization technique based on Darwin’s theory of evolution. A GA can be coupled with CIMS© to search for optimum ways to protect infrastructure assets. This includes identifying optimum assets to enforce or protect, testing the addition of or change to infrastructure before implementation, or finding the optimum response to an emergency for response planning. This paper describes the addition of a GA to infrastructure modeling for infrastructure planning. It first introduces the CIMS© infrastructure modeling software used as the modeling engine to support the GA. Next, the GA techniques and parameters are defined. Then a test scenario illustrates the integration with CIMS© and the preliminary results.

  19. Infrastructure: A technology battlefield in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Drucker, H.

    1997-12-31

    A major part of technological advancement has involved the development of complex infrastructure systems, including electric power generation, transmission, and distribution networks; oil and gas pipeline systems; highway and rail networks; and telecommunication networks. Dependence on these infrastructure systems renders them attractive targets for conflict in the twenty-first century. Hostile governments, domestic and international terrorists, criminals, and mentally distressed individuals will inevitably find some part of the infrastructure an easy target for theft, for making political statements, for disruption of strategic activities, or for making a nuisance. The current situation regarding the vulnerability of the infrastructure can be summarized in three major points: (1) our dependence on technology has made our infrastructure more important and vital to our everyday lives, this in turn, makes us much more vulnerable to disruption in any infrastructure system; (2) technologies available for attacking infrastructure systems have changed substantially and have become much easier to obtain and use, easy accessibility to information on how to disrupt or destroy various infrastructure components means that almost anyone can be involved in this destructive process; (3) technologies for defending infrastructure systems and preventing damage have not kept pace with the capability for destroying such systems. A brief review of these points will illustrate the significance of infrastructure and the growing dangers to its various elements.

  20. Composition and function of ethical committees

    PubMed Central

    May, William W

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the need for review (ethical) committees is elaborated to include a discussion of their composition and function. In some institutions more than one such committee may be set up, a departmental ethical committee and one which studies the projects of all the departments concerned. By considering proposed research before it is started patients or volunteers are protected from injury, discomfort, and inconvenience, and the scientific validity of a clinical experiment can be scrutinized. A list of possible criteria for the work of ethical committees is given. PMID:1100830

  1. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  2. Local Legal Infrastructure and Population Health

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Dana J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We explored the association between the legal infrastructure of local public health, as expressed in the exercise of local fiscal and legislative authority, and local population health outcomes. Methods. Our unit of analysis was public health jurisdictions with at least 100 000 residents. The dependent variable was jurisdiction premature mortality rates obtained from the Mobilize Action Toward Community Health (MATCH) database. Our primary independent variables represented local public health’s legal infrastructure: home rule status, board of health power, county government structure, and type of public health delivery system. Several control variables were included. We used a regression model to test the relationship between the varieties of local public health legal infrastructure identified and population health status. Results. The analyses suggested that public health legal infrastructure, particularly reformed county government, had a significant effect on population health status as a mediator of social determinants of health. Conclusions. Because states shape the legal infrastructure of local public health through power-sharing arrangements, our findings suggested recommendations for state legislation that positions local public health systems for optimal impact. Much more research is needed to elucidate the complex relationships among law, social capital, and population health status. PMID:22897523

  3. Settlement characteristics of major infrastructures in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, X.; Yan, X. X.; Wang, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    Critical infrastructures in Shanghai have undergone uneven settlement since their operation, which plays an important role in affecting the security of Shanghai. This paper, taking rail transportation as example, investigates settlement characteristics and influencing factors of this linear engineering, based on long-term settlement monitoring data. Results show that rail settlement is related to geological conditions, regional ground subsidence, surrounding construction activities and structural differences in the rail systems. In order to effectively decrease the impact of regional ground subsidence, a monitoring and early-warning mechanism for critical infrastructure is established by the administrative department and engineering operators, including monitoring network construction, settlement monitoring, information sharing, settlement warning, and so on.

  4. The Necessity and Desirability of Including Recipients of Federal Grants Other Than from the Veterans Administration in the 85-15 Ratio Computation. (Prepared in Compliance With Section 305, Public Law 95-202). House Committee Print No. 168.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings and recommendations of a study by the Veterans Administration concerning the necessity for including in the computation of the 85-15 ratio those students in receipt of grants from federal agencies other than the Veterans Administration. The problems incurred by educational institutions in the implementation of the…

  5. A conference on polymer composites: Infrastructure renewal and economic development

    SciTech Connect

    Creese, R.C.; GangaRao, H.

    1999-01-01

    Infrastructure Renewal and Economic Development identifies new applications of composites in areas that include: mining operations; civil infrastructure and its renewal (highways, bridges, sewers and water pipes); offshore exploration and off-shore dwellings; and power transmission. The papers in this new volume assess these areas' critical needs, delineate how composites meet these needs, estimate economic development that could result, explore the technical and regulatory barriers to progress, and identify agencies capable of enabling composite use expansion in infrastructure renewal. They also identify the materials and processes most relevant to infrastructure renewal, and discuss product and process improvements as well as specifications and standardization.

  6. Infrastructure Analysis Tools: A Focus on Cash Flow Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M.; Penev, M.

    2012-09-01

    NREL has developed and maintains a variety of infrastructure analysis models for the U.S. Department of Energy. Business case analysis has recently been added to this tool set. This presentation focuses on cash flow analysis. Cash flows depend upon infrastructure costs, optimized spatially and temporally, and assumptions about financing and revenue. NREL has incorporated detailed metrics on financing and incentives into the models. Next steps in modeling include continuing to collect feedback on regional/local infrastructure development activities and 'roadmap' dynamics, and incorporating consumer preference assumptions on infrastructure to provide direct feedback between vehicles and station rollout.

  7. Building the Digital Library Infrastructure: A Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tebbetts, Diane R.

    1999-01-01

    Provides a framework for examining the complex infrastructure needed to successfully implement a digital library. Highlights include database development, online public-access catalogs, interactive technical services, full-text documents, hardware and wiring, licensing, access, and security issues. (Author/LRW)

  8. The ICT Infrastructure: A Driver of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Richard N.

    2002-01-01

    Explores the influence of information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure changes on higher education. Addresses issues such as ICT hardware, networks, and leadership and skills; budgets; policy (including access to information, information privacy, information security, and ownership of faculty course materials); changes in…

  9. The National Information Infrastructure: Agenda for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Microcomputers for Information Management, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the National Information Infrastructure and the role of the government. Topics include private sector investment; universal service; technological innovation; user orientation; information security and network reliability; management of the radio frequency spectrum; intellectual property rights; coordination with other levels of…

  10. Telecommunications Infrastructure Objectives and Implementation Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Government Information, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Presents objectives and implementation goals formulated by the Information Industry Association for the anticipated rapid expansion of the telecommunications infrastructure. Highlights include market forces; the role of state, national, and international governments; competition versus regulation; maintenance of reasonable rates; worldwide public…

  11. ACRF Data Collection and Processing Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Macduff, M; Egan, D

    2004-12-01

    We present a description of the data flow from measurement to long-term archive. We also discuss data communications infrastructure. The data handling processes presented include collection, transfer, ingest, quality control, creation of Value-Added Products (VAP), and data archiving.

  12. Infrastructure of the Gemini Observatory control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, Kim K.; Walker, Shane

    1998-07-01

    Construction of the first Gemini 8-m telescope is well underway. The software that provides the user interface and high-level control of the observatory, the observatory control system (OCS), is also proceeding on track. The OCS provides tools that assist the astronomer from the proposal submission phase through planning, observation execution, and data review. A capable and flexible software infrastructure is required to support this comprehensive approach. New software technologies and industry standards have played a large part in the implementation of this infrastructure. For instance, the use of CORBA has provided many benefits in the software including object distribution, an interface definition language, and implementation language independence. In this paper, we describe the infrastructure of the OCS that supports observation planning and execution. Important software decisions and interfaces that allow Internet access and the ability to substitute alternate implementations easily are discussed as a model for other similar projects.

  13. 12 CFR 1273.9 - Audit Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... internal audit activities, including the selection, evaluation, compensation and, where appropriate, replacement of the internal auditor. The internal auditor shall report directly to the Audit Committee and... board of directors and the internal and external auditors. (12) The Audit Committee shall conduct...

  14. SUPPORT FOR USEPA'S PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will discuss recommended and new resources for the USEPA's Pathogen Equivalency Committee including: 1) Committee's creation in 1985 and its purpose 2) Drexel University Professor Chuck Haas' 2001 report (Assessment of the PEC Process) and its findings 3) NAS/NR...

  15. Correcting Systemic Deficiencies in Our Scientific Infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Scientific method is inherently self-correcting. When different hypotheses are proposed, their study would result in the rejection of the invalid ones. If the study of a competing hypothesis is prevented because of the faith in an unverified one, scientific progress is stalled. This has happened in the study of low dose radiation. Though radiation hormesis was hypothesized to reduce cancers in 1980, it could not be studied in humans because of the faith in the unverified linear no-threshold model hypothesis, likely resulting in over 15 million preventable cancer deaths worldwide during the past two decades, since evidence has accumulated supporting the validity of the phenomenon of radiation hormesis. Since our society has been guided by scientific advisory committees that ostensibly follow the scientific method, the long duration of such large casualties is indicative of systemic deficiencies in the infrastructure that has evolved in our society for the application of science. Some of these deficiencies have been identified in a few elements of the scientific infrastructure, and remedial steps suggested. Identifying and correcting such deficiencies may prevent similar tolls in the future. PMID:24910580

  16. Are search committees really searching?

    PubMed

    Hoffmeir, Patricia A

    2003-02-01

    Academic chair searches are admittedly a labor-intensive process, but they are made more difficult and often lead to less-than-optimal outcomes because search committees spend their time "advertising," "looking," but not truly searching for academic chairs. At the onset, certain "realities" must be acknowledged, including (1) understanding that unless your organization is renowned in the specialty for which you are conducting the search, candidates won't be pounding at your door for a job, (2) searches that fail to include an overall assessment of the department in question are likely to miss the mark, (3) chairs must have demonstrated not only clinical expertise but also business savvy, (4) the best candidate is not necessarily someone who is already a department chair, (5) when it comes to chair searches, it's a buyer's market, and (6) the search process is inextricably linked to the success of the search. Key to the process of conducting an academic chair search are the judicious formation of the search committee; committee members' willingness to do their homework, attend all committee meeting, and keep the committee's activities confidential; crafting, not revising, the current job description for the open chair position; interviewing viable candidates rather than all candidates and adhering to a coordinated interviewing process; and evaluating internal and external candidates according to the same parameters. PMID:12584089

  17. 77 FR 16316 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an... . Dated: March 9, 2012. Brian Robinson, Executive Secretary, Shipping Coordinating Committee,...

  18. MOEMS industrial infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heeren, Henne; Paschalidou, Lia

    2004-08-01

    Forecasters and analysts predict the market size for microsystems and microtechnologies to be in the order of 68 billion by the year 2005 (NEXUS Market Study 2002). In essence, the market potential is likely to double in size from its 38 billion status in 2002. According to InStat/MDR the market for MOEMS (Micro Optical Electro Mechanical Systems) in optical communication will be over $1.8 billion in 2006 and WTC states that the market for non telecom MOEMS will be even larger. Underpinning this staggering growth will be an infrastructure of design houses, foundries, package/assembly providers and equipment suppliers to cater for the demand in design, prototyping, and (mass-) production. This infrastructure is needed to provide an efficient route to commercialisation. Foundries, which provide the infrastructure to prototype, fabricate and mass-produce the designs emanating from the design houses and other companies. The reason for the customers to rely on foundries can be diverse: ranging from pure economical reasons (investments, cost-price) to technical (availability of required technology). The desire to have a second source of supply can also be a reason for outsourcing. Foundries aim to achieve economies of scale by combining several customer orders into volume production. Volumes are necessary, not only to achieve the required competitive cost prices, but also to attain the necessary technical competence level. Some products that serve very large markets can reach such high production volumes that they are able to sustain dedicated factories. In such cases, captive supply is possible, although outsourcing is still an option, as can be seen in the magnetic head markets, where captive and non-captive suppliers operate alongside each other. The most striking examples are: inkjet heads (>435 million heads per year) and magnetic heads (>1.5 billion heads per year). Also pressure sensor and accelerometer producers can afford their own facilities to produce the

  19. The EPOS e-Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Keith; Bailo, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is integrating geoscientific information concerning earth movements in Europe. We are approaching the end of the PP (Preparatory Project) phase and in October 2014 expect to continue with the full project within ESFRI (European Strategic Framework for Research Infrastructures). The key aspects of EPOS concern providing services to allow homogeneous access by end-users over heterogeneous data, software, facilities, equipment and services. The e-infrastructure of EPOS is the heart of the project since it integrates the work on organisational, legal, economic and scientific aspects. Following the creation of an inventory of relevant organisations, persons, facilities, equipment, services, datasets and software (RIDE) the scale of integration required became apparent. The EPOS e-infrastructure architecture has been developed systematically based on recorded primary (user) requirements and secondary (interoperation with other systems) requirements through Strawman, Woodman and Ironman phases with the specification - and developed confirmatory prototypes - becoming more precise and progressively moving from paper to implemented system. The EPOS architecture is based on global core services (Integrated Core Services - ICS) which access thematic nodes (domain-specific European-wide collections, called thematic Core Services - TCS), national nodes and specific institutional nodes. The key aspect is the metadata catalog. In one dimension this is described in 3 levels: (1) discovery metadata using well-known and commonly used standards such as DC (Dublin Core) to enable users (via an intelligent user interface) to search for objects within the EPOS environment relevant to their needs; (2) contextual metadata providing the context of the object described in the catalog to enable a user or the system to determine the relevance of the discovered object(s) to their requirement - the context includes projects, funding, organisations

  20. 77 FR 52105 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... include: --Harmful aquatic organisms in ballast water; --Recycling of ships; --Air pollution and energy...; --Reports of sub-committees; --Work of other bodies; --Status of conventions; --Harmful anti-fouling systems...; --Noise from commercial shipping and its adverse impacts on marine life; --Work program of the...

  1. 77 FR 54648 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... include: --Harmful aquatic organisms in ballast water; --Recycling of ships; --Air pollution and energy...; --Reports of sub-committees; --Work of other bodies; --Status of conventions; --Harmful anti-fouling systems...; --Noise from commercial shipping and its adverse impacts on marine life; --Work program of the...

  2. The Student Affairs Committee. Effective Committees. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodale, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    Responsibilities of the college or university governing board's student affairs committee include representing students' interests in all policy decisions, ensuring provision of adequate financial resources to support a comprehensive student affairs program, ensuring that board policies keep pace with students' diverse and changing needs, and…

  3. Remembering History: The Work of the Information Services Sub-Committee of the Joint Information Systems Committee in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Derek

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to record the work of the committee and its interaction with the much better known Electronic Libraries (eLib) Programme. It also examines the principles that underlay the development of content acquisition and supporting infrastructure in UK university libraries in the 1990s. Design/methodology/approach: A historical…

  4. 75 FR 59680 - El Dorado County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ...The El Dorado County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Placerville, California. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The Agenda for the meeting includes review of the October field trip, administrative costs update and a report out on......

  5. 76 FR 33701 - Agricultural Technical Advisory Committees for Trade; Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... the Secretary and the USTR concerning agricultural trade policy. The committees are intended to ensure..., Congress established a private sector advisory committee system to ensure that U.S. trade policy and... Trade and Policy Negotiations; Five general policy advisory committees, including the...

  6. Advisory Committees. The Best of ERIC, Number 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

    This annotated bibliography contains selected sources on advisory committees indexed in the ERIC system. The 11 documents and journal articles deal with various aspects of this topic, including the utilization of advisory committees for vocational and occupational education, the role of the school principal as committee leader, and how to obtain…

  7. 77 FR 74052 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee (MSAAC or Committee). DATES: A public meeting of the MSAAC... 8:30 a.m. EST. Agenda items include a discussion of the status of the mutual savings...

  8. The Investment Committee. Effective Committees. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, John H.

    1997-01-01

    The investment committee of the college or university governing board is charged with determining, overseeing, and assessing the policies and processes by which institutional funds are invested. The committee has fiduciary duty to ensure that the terms of investment of donors' gifts are met and to maximize investment returns within an appropriate…

  9. The Executive Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legon, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  10. The Audit Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staisloff, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  11. The Compensation Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  12. The Facilities Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Harvey H.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  13. ARM Standards Policy Committee Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cialella, A; Jensen, M; Koontz, A; McFarlane, S; McCoy, R; Monroe, J; Palanisamy, G; Perez, R; Sivaraman, C

    2012-09-19

    Data and metadata standards promote the consistent recording of information and are necessary to ensure the stability and high quality of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility data products for scientific users. Standards also enable automated routines to be developed to examine data, which leads to more efficient operations and assessment of data quality. Although ARM Infrastructure agrees on the utility of data and metadata standards, there is significant confusion over the existing standards and the process for allowing the release of new data products with exceptions to the standards. The ARM Standards Policy Committee was initiated in March 2012 to develop a set of policies and best practices for ARM data and metadata standards.

  14. 78 FR 59751 - Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) Program; Agency Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... Office of the Secretary Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) Program... Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) program to pay the subsidy cost of supporting Federal credit..., including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological...

  15. Lists of committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    Lists of the members of the International Programme Advisory Committee of the 21st IAEA Technical Meeting on Research using Small Fusion Devices(RUSFD), the International Advisory Committee of the 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP) and the Local Organizing Committee of the Joint RUSFD, LAWPP Meeting can be found in the PDF.

  16. Advisory Committee Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Hawk Coll., Moline, IL.

    An advisory committee is generally comprised of persons outside the education profession who have specialized knowledge in a given area. The committee advises, makes recommendations, and gives service to the college and its students, instructors, and administrators. At Black Hawk College, there are four types of advisory committees: community,…

  17. Recommendations for conducting controlled clinical studies of dental restorative materials. Science Committee Project 2/98--FDI World Dental Federation study design (Part I) and criteria for evaluation (Part II) of direct and indirect restorations including onlays and partial crowns.

    PubMed

    Hickel, Reinhard; Roulet, Jean-François; Bayne, Stephen; Heintze, Siegward D; Mjör, Ivar A; Peters, Mathilde; Rousson, Valentin; Randall, Ros; Schmalz, Gottfried; Tyas, Martin; Vanherle, Guido

    2007-01-01

    clinical trial designs, guidelines for design, randomization, number of subjects, characteristics of participants, clinical assessment, standards and calibration, categories for assessment, criteria for evaluation, and supplemental documentation. Part 2 of the review considers categories of assessment for esthetic evaluation, functional assessment, biological responses to restorative materials, and statistical analysis of results. The overall review represents a considerable effort to include a range of clinical research interests over the past years. As part of the recognition of the importance of these suggestions, the review is being published simultaneously in identical form in both the Journal of Adhesive Dentistry and Clinical Oral Investigations. Additionally, an extended abstract will be published in the International Dental Journal, giving a link to the web full version. This should help to introduce these considerations more quickly to the scientific community. PMID:18341239

  18. Education, Infrastructure and America's Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley-Braun, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Senator Carol Moseley-Braun, D-Ill., a recognized advocate for federal funding of educational facilities, describes the strategy of placing school infrastructure in the same category as commercial and transportation infrastructure. Three researchers in the facilities field present empirical evidence that facility conditions directly affect…

  19. Multi-Scale Infrastructure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) multi-scale infrastructure assessment project supports both water resource adaptation to climate change and the rehabilitation of the nation’s aging water infrastructure by providing tools, scientific data and information to progra...

  20. The 1990 direct support infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The airport and cargo terminal were individually analyzed in depth as the principal direct infrastructure components having cross impacts with aircraft carrying cargo. Containerization was also addressed in depth as an infrastructure component since it categorically is linked with and cross impacted by the aircraft, the cargo terminal, the surface transport system, the shipper and consignee, and the actual cargo being moved.

  1. Cyber and physical infrastructure interdependencies.

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Kelic, Andjelka; Warren, Drake E.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of the work discussed in this document is to understand the risk to the nation of cyber attacks on critical infrastructures. The large body of research results on cyber attacks against physical infrastructure vulnerabilities has not resulted in clear understanding of the cascading effects a cyber-caused disruption can have on critical national infrastructures and the ability of these affected infrastructures to deliver services. This document discusses current research and methodologies aimed at assessing the translation of a cyber-based effect into a physical disruption of infrastructure and thence into quantification of the economic consequences of the resultant disruption and damage. The document discusses the deficiencies of the existing methods in correlating cyber attacks with physical consequences. The document then outlines a research plan to correct those deficiencies. When completed, the research plan will result in a fully supported methodology to quantify the economic consequences of events that begin with cyber effects, cascade into other physical infrastructure impacts, and result in degradation of the critical infrastructure's ability to deliver services and products. This methodology enables quantification of the risks to national critical infrastructure of cyber threats. The work addresses the electric power sector as an example of how the methodology can be applied.

  2. Cyberwarfare on the Electricity Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Murarka, N.; Ramesh, V.C.

    2000-03-20

    The report analyzes the possibility of cyberwarfare on the electricity infrastructure. The ongoing deregulation of the electricity industry makes the power grid all the more vulnerable to cyber attacks. The report models the power system information system components, models potential threats and protective measures. It therefore offers a framework for infrastructure protection.

  3. 11 CFR 116.2 - Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and authorized committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and authorized committees. 116.2 Section 116.2 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL DEBTS OWED BY CANDIDATES AND POLITICAL COMMITTEES § 116.2 Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and...

  4. Progress and Challenges in Developing Reference Data Layers for Human Population Distribution and Built Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. S.; Yetman, G.; de Sherbinin, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the interactions between environmental and human systems, and in particular supporting the applications of Earth science data and knowledge in place-based decision making, requires systematic assessment of the distribution and dynamics of human population and the built human infrastructure in conjunction with environmental variability and change. The NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) operated by the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) at Columbia University has had a long track record in developing reference data layers for human population and settlements and is expanding its efforts on topics such as intercity roads, reservoirs and dams, and energy infrastructure. SEDAC has set as a strategic priority the acquisition, development, and dissemination of data resources derived from remote sensing and socioeconomic data on urban land use change, including temporally and spatially disaggregated data on urban change and rates of change, the built infrastructure, and critical facilities. We report here on a range of past and ongoing activities, including the Global Human Settlements Layer effort led by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC), the Global Exposure Database for the Global Earthquake Model (GED4GEM) project, the Global Roads Open Access Data Working Group (gROADS) of the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA), and recent work with ImageCat, Inc. to improve estimates of the exposure and fragility of buildings, road and rail infrastructure, and other facilities with respect to selected natural hazards. New efforts such as the proposed Global Human Settlement indicators initiative of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) could help fill critical gaps and link potential reference data layers with user needs. We highlight key sectors and themes that require further attention, and the many significant challenges that remain in developing comprehensive, high quality

  5. The EPOS e-Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Keith; Bailo, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is integrating geoscientific information concerning earth movements in Europe. We are approaching the end of the PP (Preparatory Project) phase and in October 2014 expect to continue with the full project within ESFRI (European Strategic Framework for Research Infrastructures). The key aspects of EPOS concern providing services to allow homogeneous access by end-users over heterogeneous data, software, facilities, equipment and services. The e-infrastructure of EPOS is the heart of the project since it integrates the work on organisational, legal, economic and scientific aspects. Following the creation of an inventory of relevant organisations, persons, facilities, equipment, services, datasets and software (RIDE) the scale of integration required became apparent. The EPOS e-infrastructure architecture has been developed systematically based on recorded primary (user) requirements and secondary (interoperation with other systems) requirements through Strawman, Woodman and Ironman phases with the specification - and developed confirmatory prototypes - becoming more precise and progressively moving from paper to implemented system. The EPOS architecture is based on global core services (Integrated Core Services - ICS) which access thematic nodes (domain-specific European-wide collections, called thematic Core Services - TCS), national nodes and specific institutional nodes. The key aspect is the metadata catalog. In one dimension this is described in 3 levels: (1) discovery metadata using well-known and commonly used standards such as DC (Dublin Core) to enable users (via an intelligent user interface) to search for objects within the EPOS environment relevant to their needs; (2) contextual metadata providing the context of the object described in the catalog to enable a user or the system to determine the relevance of the discovered object(s) to their requirement - the context includes projects, funding, organisations

  6. A COSPAR/ILWS roadmap towards advanced space weather science to protect society's technological infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, K.; Kauristie, K.

    2014-12-01

    With the rapid development of the technological infrastructure upon which modern society depends comes a growing appreciation of the hazards presented by the phenomena around our home planet that we call space weather. The complexity of the coupled Sun-Earth system, the sparseness by which it can be covered by remote-sensing and in-situ instrumentation, and the costs of the required observational and computational infrastructure warrant an international approach with feasible, affordable solutions. COSPAR and the steering committee of the International Living With a Star program tasked a multi-disciplinary, international team with the development of a roadmap with the goal of demonstrably improving our observational capabilities for, scientific understanding of, and ability to forecast the various aspects of space weather. We summarize the roadmap, its top-priority recommendations to achieve its goals, and their underlying rationale. More information on the roadmap, including the team's full membership, can be found at http://www.lmsal.com/~schryver/COSPARrm.

  7. The development of a cislunar space infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, C. A.; Johnson, A. S.; Mcglinchey, J. M.; Ryan, K. D.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective of this Advanced Mission Design Program is to define the general characteristics and phased evolution of a near-Earth space infrastructure. The envisioned foundation includes a permanently manned, self-sustaining base on the lunar surface, a space station at the Libration Point between earth and the moon (L1), and a transportation system that anchors these elements to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) station. The implementation of this conceptual design was carried out with the idea that the infrastructure is an important step in a larger plan to expand man's capabilities in space science and technology. Such expansion depends on low cost, reliable, and frequent access to space for those who wish to use the multiple benefits of this environment. The presence of a cislunar space infrastructure would greatly facilitate the staging of future planetary missions, as well as the full exploration of the lunar potential for science and industry. The rationale for, and a proposed detailed scenario in support of, the cislunar space infrastructure are discussed.

  8. Green Infrastructure, Ecosystem Services, and Human Health.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Christopher; Hahn, Micah

    2015-08-01

    Contemporary ecological models of health prominently feature the natural environment as fundamental to the ecosystem services that support human life, health, and well-being. The natural environment encompasses and permeates all other spheres of influence on health. Reviews of the natural environment and health literature have tended, at times intentionally, to focus on a limited subset of ecosystem services as well as health benefits stemming from the presence, and access and exposure to, green infrastructure. The sweeping influence of green infrastructure on the myriad ecosystem services essential to health has therefore often been underrepresented. This survey of the literature aims to provide a more comprehensive picture-in the form of a primer-of the many simultaneously acting health co-benefits of green infrastructure. It is hoped that a more accurately exhaustive list of benefits will not only instigate further research into the health co-benefits of green infrastructure but also promote consilience in the many fields, including public health, that must be involved in the landscape conservation necessary to protect and improve health and well-being. PMID:26295249

  9. Green Infrastructure, Ecosystem Services, and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Coutts, Christopher; Hahn, Micah

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary ecological models of health prominently feature the natural environment as fundamental to the ecosystem services that support human life, health, and well-being. The natural environment encompasses and permeates all other spheres of influence on health. Reviews of the natural environment and health literature have tended, at times intentionally, to focus on a limited subset of ecosystem services as well as health benefits stemming from the presence, and access and exposure to, green infrastructure. The sweeping influence of green infrastructure on the myriad ecosystem services essential to health has therefore often been underrepresented. This survey of the literature aims to provide a more comprehensive picture—in the form of a primer—of the many simultaneously acting health co-benefits of green infrastructure. It is hoped that a more accurately exhaustive list of benefits will not only instigate further research into the health co-benefits of green infrastructure but also promote consilience in the many fields, including public health, that must be involved in the landscape conservation necessary to protect and improve health and well-being. PMID:26295249

  10. The Interplanetary Internet: A Communications Infrastructure for Mars Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleigh, S.; Cerf, V.; Durst, R.; Fall, K.; Hooke, A.; Scott, K.; Weiss, H.

    2002-01-01

    A successful program of Mars Exploration will depend heavily on a robust and dependable space communications infrastructure that is well integrated with the terrestrial Internet. In the same way that the underpinnings of the Internet are the standardized "TCP/IP" suite of protocols, an "Interplanetary Internet" will need a similar set of capabilities that can support reliable communications across vast distances and highly stressed communications environments. For the past twenty years, the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) has been developing standardized long- haul space link communications techniques that are now in use by over two hundred missions within the international space community. New CCSDS developments, shortly to be infused into Mars missions, include a proximity link standard and a store-and- forward file transfer protocol. As part of its `Next Generation Internet' initiative, the U.S. Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) recently supported an architectural study of a future "InterPlaNetary Internet" (IPN). The IPN architecture assumes that in short-delay environments - such as on and around Mars - standard Internet technologies will be adapted to the locally harsh environment and deployed within surface vehicles and orbiting relays. A long-haul interplanetary backbone network that includes Deep Space Network (DSN) gateways into the terrestrial Internet will interconnect these distributed internets that are scattered across the Solar System. Just as TCP/IP unites the Earth's "network of networks" to become the Internet, a new suite of protocols known as "Bundling" will enable the IPN to become a "network of internets" to support true interplanetary dialog. An InterPlaNetary Internet Research Group has been established within the Internet community to coordinate this research and NASA has begun to support the further development of the IPN architecture and the Bundling protocols. A strategy is being developed whereby the