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Sample records for inherited antithrombin deficiency

  1. Inherited antithrombin deficiency and anabolic steroids: a risky combination.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hannah; Elfil, Mohamed; DeSancho, Maria T

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old male with asymptomatic inherited type 1 antithrombin deficiency and a family history of thrombosis started injecting himself with testosterone 250 mg intramuscularly twice weekly for 5 weeks. He presented to the hospital with progressive dyspnea on exertion, chest pain and hemoptysis. Workup revealed bilateral submassive pulmonary embolism and proximal right lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. He was treated with intravenous (IV) unfractionated heparin and underwent catheter-directed thrombolysis with alteplase to the main pulmonary arteries. Postprocedure, he remained on IV alteplase infusion for 24 h and unfractionated heparin in the intensive care unit. Concomitantly he received plasma-derived antithrombin concentrate. He was transitioned to subcutaneous enoxaparin twice daily and discharged from the hospital on oral rivaroxaban 15 mg twice a day. This case highlights the heightened thrombogenic effect of anabolic steroids in the setting of underlying thrombophilia especially in younger subjects. PMID:26588446

  2. Antithrombin deficiency in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Durai, Shivani; Tan, Lay Kok; Lim, Serene

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 39-year-old, gravida 3 para 2, Chinese female with a history of inherited type 1 Antithrombin deficiency and multiple prior episodes of venous thromboembolism. She presented at 29+4 weeks' gestation with severe pre-eclampsia complicated by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome. She subsequently underwent an emergency caesarean section for non-reassuring fetal status, which was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony, requiring a B-Lynch suture intraoperatively. PMID:27207982

  3. Circulating microparticles and the risk of thrombosis in inherited deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C and protein S.

    PubMed

    Campello, Elena; Spiezia, Luca; Radu, Claudia M; Bulato, Cristiana; Gavasso, Sabrina; Tormene, Daniela; Woodhams, Barry; Dalla Valle, Fabio; Simioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Many subjects carrying inherited thrombophilic defects will never experience venous thromboembolism (VTE) while other individuals developed recurrent VTE with no known additional risk factors. High levels of circulating microparticles (MP) have been associated with increased risk of VTE in patients with factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutation, suggesting a possible contribution of MP in the hypercoagulability of mild genetic thrombophilia. The role of MP as additional risk factor of VTE in carriers of natural clotting inhibitors defects (severe thrombophilia) has never been assessed. Plasma levels of annexin V-MP, endothelial-derived MP (EMP), platelet-derived MP (PMP), tissue factor-bearing MP (TF+) and the MP procoagulant activity (PPL) were measured in 132 carriers of natural anticoagulant deficiencies (25 antithrombin, 63 protein C and 64 protein S defect) and in 132 age and gender-matched healthy controls. Carriers of natural anticoagulant deficiencies, overall and separately considered, presented with higher median levels of annexin V-MP, EMP, PMP, TF+MP and PPL activity than healthy controls (p< 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.01, 0.025 and 0.03, respectively). Symptomatic carriers with a previous episode of VTE had significantly higher median levels of annexin-V MP than those without VTE (p=0.027). Carriers with high levels of annexin V-MP, EMP and PMP had an adjusted OR for VTE of 3.36 (95% CI, 1.59 to 7.11), 9.26 (95% CI, 3.55 to 24.1) and 2.72 (95%CI, 1.16 to 6.38), respectively. Elevated levels of circulating MP can play a role in carriers of mild and severe inherited thrombophilia. The clinical implications of this association remain to be defined. PMID:26354831

  4. Acquired antithrombin III deficiency: laboratory diagnosis, incidence, clinical implications, and treatment with antithrombin III concentrate.

    PubMed

    Büller, H R; ten Cate, J W

    1989-09-11

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is the predominant naturally occurring inhibitor of serine proteases generated during blood coagulation [Rosenberg RD: Annu Rev Med 1978; 29: 367-378]. Since 1965, several assays have been developed that allow rapid and precise determination of ATIII in plasma. As a consequence, the existence of acquired ATIII deficiency in many pathologic conditions has been described. Acquired ATIII deficiency is based on decreased synthesis, increased loss or increased consumption, or induced by drugs. An inherited ATIII deficiency is associated with a lifelong tendency to venous thromboembolism. In contrast, the clinical significance of acquired ATIII deficiency has been less well defined. A precise estimate of the risk of thromboembolism in the acquired ATIII deficiency state cannot easily be provided, owing to the lack of studies in consecutive patients. In 1978, a purified human ATIII concentrate became available for clinical investigation. Despite numerous small studies, the value of ATIII replacement therapy in patients with acquired deficiency remains to be demonstrated. PMID:2679070

  5. Neuraxial anesthesia for labor and cesarean delivery in a parturient with hereditary antithrombin deficiency on recombinant human antithrombin infusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Pamnani, Anup; Rosenstein, Megan; Darwich, Alaeldin; Wolfson, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    A recombinant human antithrombin (rhAT; generic name: antithrombin Alfa) has recently been developed. A 37 year-old parturient with hereditary antithrombin deficiency, receiving rhAT infusion therapy, who successfully received an epidural catheter for analgesia and anesthesia during labor and cesarean delivery, is presented. PMID:20868967

  6. Antithrombin Dublin (p.Val30Glu): a relatively common variant with moderate thrombosis risk of causing transient antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Fernández, José; de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Padilla, José; Miñano, Antonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Águila, Sonia; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Sevivas, Teresa S; de Cos, Carmen; Fernández-Mosteirín, Nuria; Llamas, Pilar; Asenjo, Susana; Medina, Pilar; Souto, Juan Carlos; Overvad, Kim; Kristensen, Søren R; Corral, Javier; Vicente, Vicente

    2016-07-01

    The key haemostatic role of antithrombin and the risk of thrombosis associated with its deficiency support that the low incidence of antithrombin deficiency among patients with thrombosis might be explained by underestimation of this disorder. It was our aim to identify mutations in SERPINC1 causing transient antithrombin deficiency. SERPINC1 was sequenced in 214 cases with a positive test for antithrombin deficiency, including 67 with no deficiency in the sample delivered to our laboratory. The p.Val30Glu mutation (Antithrombin Dublin) was identified in five out of these 67 cases, as well as in three out of 127 cases with other SERPINC1 mutations. Genotyping in 1593 patients with venous thrombosis and 2592 controls from two populations, revealed a low prevalent polymorphism (0.3 %) that moderately increased the risk of venous thrombosis (OR: 2.9; 95 % CI: 1.07-8.09; p= 0.03) and identified one homozygous patient with an early thrombotic event. Carriers had normal anti-FXa activity, and plasma antithrombin was not sensitive to heat stress or proteolytic cleavage. Analysis of one sample with transient deficit revealed a type I deficiency, without aberrant or increased latent forms. The recombinant variant, which lacked the two amino-terminal residues, had reduced secretion from HEK-EBNA cells, formed hyperstable disulphide-linked polymers, and had negligible activity. In conclusion, p.Val30Glu by affecting the cleavage of antithrombin's signal peptide, results in a mature protein lacking the N-terminal dipeptide with no functional consequences in normal conditions, but that increases the sensitivity to be folded intracellularly into polymers, facilitating transient antithrombin deficiency and the subsequent risk of thrombosis. PMID:27098529

  7. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... legs. This type of clot is called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Affected individuals also have an increased risk of ... III Deficiency Health Topic: Blood Clots Health Topic: Deep Vein Thrombosis Health Topic: Pulmonary Embolism Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  8. Recombinant Human Antithrombin in Pregnant Patients with Hereditary Antithrombin Deficiency: Integrated Analysis of Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Paidas, Michael J; Triche, Elizabeth W; James, Andra H; DeSancho, Maria; Robinson, Christopher; Lazarchick, John; Ornaghi, Sara; Frieling, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Objectives The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the use of recombinant human antithrombin (rhAT) in preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pregnant patients with hereditary AT deficiency (HATD). Study Design Data from two clinical trials were pooled. Dosing of rhAT was based on body weight and baseline AT activity, started up to 24 hours before scheduled induction or cesarean delivery, or at the onset of labor. Results A total of 21 pregnant HATD patients were enrolled. Mean rhAT therapy duration was 4.3 days and dose was 245.1 IU/kg/day. All patients achieved target mean AT activity (80-120% of normal) during rhAT therapy. There were no confirmed VTEs during rhAT treatment or within 7 ( ± 1) days after dosing. Two VTE events (one deep vein thrombosis and one pulmonary embolism) occurred 11 and 14 days after discontinuation of rhAT, in patients managed with prophylactic doses of heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin following delivery. Conclusion rhAT was safe and effective in pregnant HATD patients when administered during the peripartum period, the period of highest VTE risk and a time when anticoagulation therapy is normally withheld. Pregnant HATD patients may benefit from therapeutic, rather than prophylactic, doses of anticoagulation after delivery to protect against postpartum VTE. PMID:26461927

  9. Acquired antithrombin III deficiency in patients with glomerular proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Thaler, E; Balzar, E; Kopsa, H; Pinggera, W F

    1978-01-01

    Antithrombin III (AT II/III) was determined immunologically and by means of a heparin cofactor assay in plasma samples and 24-hour urine of 15 patients with various degrees of proteinuria, being predominantly of glomerular origin. In urine the AT II/III concentrations were significantly correlated to the concentrations of albumin, plasminogen and IgG. One third of the patients had AT II/III plasma levels below the normal range. The plasma levels showed a significant inverse correlation to the AT II/III and albumin clearance rates. Similarily, the plasminogen concentrations in plasma were decreased in two thirds of the patients, being inversely correlated to the renal plasminogen clearance values. It is proposed that AT II/III deficiency in the nephrotic syndrome is an important pathogenetic factor in venous thrombosis. PMID:689489

  10. Identification of Regulatory Mutations in SERPINC1 Affecting Vitamin D Response Elements Associated with Antithrombin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Toderici, Mara; de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Padilla, José; Miñano, Antonia; Antón, Ana Isabel; Iniesta, Juan Antonio; Herranz, María Teresa; Fernández, Nuria; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a crucial anticoagulant serpin whose even moderate deficiency significantly increases the risk of thrombosis. Most cases with antithrombin deficiency carried genetic defects affecting exons or flanking regions of SERPINC1.We aimed to identify regulatory mutations inSERPINC1 through sequencing the promoter, intron 1 and 2 of this gene in 23 patients with antithrombin deficiency but without known genetic defects. Three cases with moderate antithrombin deficiency (63–78%) carried potential regulatory mutations. One located 200 bp before the initiation ATG and two in intron 1. These mutations disrupted two out of five potential vitamin D receptor elements (VDRE) identified in SERPINC1 with different software. One genetic defect, c.42-1060_-1057dupTTGA, was a new low prevalent polymorphism (MAF: 0.01) with functional consequences on plasma antithrombin levels. The relevance of the vitamin D pathway on the regulation of SERPINC1 was confirmed in a cell model. Incubation of HepG2 with paricalcitol, a vitamin D analog, increased dose-dependently the levels of SERPINC1transcripts and antithrombin released to the conditioned medium. This study shows further evidence of the transcriptional regulation of SERPINC1 by vitamin D and first describes the functional and pathological relevance of mutations affecting VDRE of this gene. Our study opens new perspectives in the search of new genetic defects involved in antithrombin deficiency and the risk of thrombosis as well as in the design of new antithrombotic treatments. PMID:27003919

  11. Antithrombin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency. (For more about excessive clotting (such as deep vein thrombosis, DVT) and antithrombin deficiency, see the " ... affected person may bleed and/or clot. DVT (deep vein thrombosis – a blood clot usually in a ...

  12. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the patient with multiple sclerosis associated with congenital antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Yuhei; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Shimoe, Yutaka; Niimi, Hideki; Kitajima, Isao; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-04-28

    We report the case of a 25-year-old man with multiple sclerosis (MS) who had severe headache and unconsciousness. He suffered from optic neuritis that had started at age 6. From the age of 12 years, he had suffered from multiple sclerosis (MS) cerebral lesions that relapsed three times over for 5 years. At age 25, he showed a new lesion in the cerebellar cortex, suggesting an exacerbation of the MS. However, magnetic resonance imaging findings the next day showed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. His laboratory findings showed low antithrombin activity. Genetic analysis revealed a single-base substitution (C>T) at the codon 359 (Arg to STOP) in the 5th exon portion of the antithrombin gene, heterozygote. In the literature review, 17 cases of multiple sclerosis associated with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, which occurred after the lumbar puncture and the treatment with high-dose methylpredonisolone in 11 of these cases. In our case, antithrombin deficiency, hyperhomocystinemia, infection, and lumbar puncture were suggested as the risk factors. PMID:27010094

  13. Genetics Home Reference: inherited thyroxine-binding globulin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Although inherited thyroxine-binding globulin deficiency does not cause any health problems, it can be mistaken for more serious thyroid disorders (such as hypothyroidism). Therefore, it is important to diagnose inherited thyroxine- ...

  14. Deep Dermatophytosis and Inherited CARD9 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Quentin B.; Liu, Luyan; Cypowyj, Sophie; Prando, Carolina; Migaud, Mélanie; Taibi, Lynda; Ammar-Khodja, Aomar; Stambouli, Omar Boudghene; Guellil, Boumediene; Jacobs, Frederique; Goffard, Jean-Christophe; Schepers, Kinda; del Marmol, Véronique; Boussofara, Lobna; Denguezli, Mohamed; Larif, Molka; Bachelez, Hervé; Michel, Laurence; Lefranc, Gérard; Hay, Rod; Jouvion, Gregory; Chretien, Fabrice; Fraitag, Sylvie; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Boudia, Merad

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Deep dermatophytosis is a severe and sometimes life-threatening fungal infection caused by dermatophytes. It is characterized by extensive dermal and subcutaneous tissue invasion and by frequent dissemination to the lymph nodes and, occasionally, the central nervous system. The condition is different from common superficial dermatophyte infection and has been reported in patients with no known immunodeficiency. Patients are mostly from North African, consanguineous, multiplex families, which strongly suggests a mendelian genetic cause. METHODS We studied the clinical features of deep dermatophytosis in 17 patients with no known immunodeficiency from eight unrelated Tunisian, Algerian, and Moroccan families. Because CARD9 (caspase recruitment domain–containing protein 9) deficiency has been reported in an Iranian family with invasive fungal infections, we also sequenced CARD9 in the patients. RESULTS Four patients died, at 28, 29, 37, and 39 years of age, with clinically active deep dermatophytosis. No other severe infections, fungal or otherwise, were reported in the surviving patients, who ranged in age from 37 to 75 years. The 15 Algerian and Tunisian patients, from seven unrelated families, had a homozygous Q289X CARD9 allele, due to a founder effect. The 2 Moroccan siblings were homozygous for the R101C CARD9 allele. Both alleles are rare deleterious variants. The familial segregation of these alleles was consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance and complete clinical penetrance. CONCLUSIONS All the patients with deep dermatophytosis had autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency. Deep dermatophytosis appears to be an important clinical manifestation of CARD9 deficiency. (Funded by Agence Nationale pour la Recherche and others.) PMID:24131138

  15. Inherited IL-12p40 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Prando, Carolina; Samarina, Arina; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Cobat, Aurelie; Picard, Capucine; AlSum, Zobaida; Al-Jumaah, Suliman; Al-Hajjar, Sami; Frayha, Husn; Al-Mousa, Hamoud; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Adimi, Parisa; Feinberg, Jacqueline; de Suremain, Maylis; Jannière, Lucile; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Mansouri, Nahal; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Nallusamy, Revathy; Kumararatne, Dinakantha S.; Bloorsaz, Mohamad Reza; Ben-Ali, Meriem; Elloumi-Zghal, Houda; Chemli, Jalel; Bouguila, Jihene; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Alaki, Emadia; AlFawaz, Tariq S.; Al Idrissi, Eman; ElGhazali, Gehad; Pollard, Andrew J.; Murugasu, Belinda; Wah Lee, Bee; Halwani, Rabih; Al-Zahrani, Mohammed; Al Shehri, Mohammed A.; Al-Zahrani, Mofareh; Bin-Hussain, Ibrahim; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Parvaneh, Nima; Abel, Laurent; Mansouri, Davood; Barbouche, Ridha; Al-Muhsen, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal recessive interleukin (IL)-12 p40 (IL-12p40) deficiency is a rare genetic etiology of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD). We report the genetic, immunologic, and clinical features of 49 patients from 30 kindreds originating from 5 countries (India, Iran, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and Tunisia). There are only 9 different mutant alleles of the IL12B gene: 2 small insertions, 3 small deletions, 2 splice site mutations, and 1 large deletion, each causing a frameshift and leading to a premature stop codon, and 1 nonsense mutation. Four of these 9 variants are recurrent, affecting 25 of the 30 reported kindreds, due to founder effects in specific countries. All patients are homozygous and display complete IL-12p40 deficiency. As a result, the patients lack detectable IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 and have low levels of interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The clinical features are characterized by childhood onset of bacille Calmette-Guérin (attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain) (BCG) and Salmonella infections, with recurrences of salmonellosis (36.4%) more common than recurrences of mycobacterial disease (25%). BCG vaccination led to BCG disease in 40 of the 41 patients vaccinated (97.5%). Multiple mycobacterial infections were rare, observed in only 3 patients, whereas the association of salmonellosis and mycobacteriosis was observed in 9 patients. A few other infections were diagnosed, including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (n = 3), nocardiosis (n = 2), and klebsiellosis (n = 1). IL-12p40 deficiency has a high but incomplete clinical penetrance, with 33.3% of genetically affected relatives of index cases showing no symptoms. However, the prognosis is poor, with mortality rates of up to 28.6%. Overall, the clinical phenotype of IL-12p40 deficiency closely resembles that of interleukin 12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1) deficiency. In conclusion, IL-12p40 deficiency is more common than initially thought and should be considered worldwide in patients

  16. Overview of Inherited Zinc Deficiency in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Taiho; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Ishida, Riko; Miyazaki, Shiho

    2015-01-01

    Zinc nutrition is of special practical importance in infants and children. Poor zinc absorption causes zinc deficiency, which leads to a broad range of consequences such as alopecia, diarrhea, skin lesions, taste disorders, loss of appetite, impaired immune function and neuropsychiatric changes and growth retardation, thus potentially threatening life in infants and children. In addition to dietary zinc deficiency, inherited zinc deficiency, which rarely occurs, is found during the infant stage and early childhood. Recent molecular genetic studies have identified responsible genes for two inherited zinc deficiency disorders, acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) and transient neonatal zinc deficiency (TNZD), clarifying the pathological mechanisms. Both of these zinc deficiencies are caused by mutations of zinc transporters, although the mechanisms are completely different. AE is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the ZIP4 gene, consequently resulting in defective absorption of zinc in the small intestine. In contrast, TNZD is a disorder caused by mutations of the ZnT2 gene, which results in low zinc breast milk in the mother, consequently causing zinc deficiency in the breast-fed infant. In both cases, zinc deficiency symptoms are ameliorated by a daily oral zinc supplementation for the patients. Zinc is definitely one of the key factors for the healthy growth of infants and children, and thus zinc nutrition should receive much attention. PMID:26598882

  17. Inherited BCL10 deficiency impairs hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity.

    PubMed

    Torres, Juan Manuel; Martinez-Barricarte, Rubén; García-Gómez, Sonia; Mazariegos, Marina S; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Rholvarez, Rita; Jiménez-Reinoso, Anaïs; del Pino, Lucia; Rodríguez-Pena, Rebeca; Ferreira, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Toledano, Victor; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Díaz-Almirón, Mariana; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Unzueta-Roch, José L; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Regueiro, Jose R; López-Granados, Eduardo; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pérez de Diego, Rebeca

    2014-12-01

    Heterotrimers composed of B cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1), and caspase recruitment domain-containing (CARD) family adaptors play a role in NF-κB activation and have been shown to be involved in both the innate and the adaptive arms of immunity in murine models. Moreover, individuals with inherited defects of MALT1, CARD9, and CARD11 present with immunological and clinical phenotypes. Here, we characterized a case of autosomal-recessive, complete BCL10 deficiency in a child with a broad immunodeficiency, including defects of both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity. The patient died at 3 years of age and was homozygous for a loss-of-expression, loss-of-function BCL10 mutation. The effect of BCL10 deficiency was dependent on the signaling pathway, and, for some pathways, the cell type affected. Despite the noted similarities to BCL10 deficiency in mice, including a deficient adaptive immune response, human BCL10 deficiency in this patient resulted in a number of specific features within cell populations. Treatment of the patient's myeloid cells with a variety of pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (PAMPs) elicited a normal response; however, NF-κB-mediated fibroblast functions were dramatically impaired. The results of this study indicate that inherited BCL10 deficiency should be considered in patients with combined immunodeficiency with B cell, T cell, and fibroblast defects. PMID:25365219

  18. Inherited BCL10 deficiency impairs hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Juan Manuel; Martinez-Barricarte, Rubén; García-Gómez, Sonia; Mazariegos, Marina S.; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; ρlvarez, Rita; Jiménez-Reinoso, Anaïs; del Pino, Lucia; Rodríguez-Pena, Rebeca; Ferreira, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Toledano, Victor; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Díaz-Almirón, Mariana; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Unzueta-Roch, José L.; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Regueiro, Jose R.; López-Granados, Eduardo; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pérez de Diego, Rebeca

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimers composed of B cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1), and caspase recruitment domain–containing (CARD) family adaptors play a role in NF-κB activation and have been shown to be involved in both the innate and the adaptive arms of immunity in murine models. Moreover, individuals with inherited defects of MALT1, CARD9, and CARD11 present with immunological and clinical phenotypes. Here, we characterized a case of autosomal-recessive, complete BCL10 deficiency in a child with a broad immunodeficiency, including defects of both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity. The patient died at 3 years of age and was homozygous for a loss-of-expression, loss-of-function BCL10 mutation. The effect of BCL10 deficiency was dependent on the signaling pathway, and, for some pathways, the cell type affected. Despite the noted similarities to BCL10 deficiency in mice, including a deficient adaptive immune response, human BCL10 deficiency in this patient resulted in a number of specific features within cell populations. Treatment of the patient’s myeloid cells with a variety of pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (PAMPs) elicited a normal response; however, NF-κB–mediated fibroblast functions were dramatically impaired. The results of this study indicate that inherited BCL10 deficiency should be considered in patients with combined immunodeficiency with B cell, T cell, and fibroblast defects. PMID:25365219

  19. Thromboembolic events in patients with severe inherited fibrinogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rottenstreich, Amihai; Lask, Avigal; Schliamser, Lilliana; Zivelin, Ariella; Seligsohn, Uri; Kalish, Yosef

    2016-08-01

    Inherited afibrinogenemia and hypofibrinogenemia are rare bleeding disorders characterized by markedly reduced levels of fibrinogen in blood. Thrombotic complications in these disorders have been rarely described. We performed a multicenter retrospective study and reviewed the occurrence of thrombotic complications among patients with inherited fibrinogen deficiency. Cases were identified during a review of medical records of all patients with inherited fibrinogen deficiency followed at three different university hospitals in Israel. Nine patients were included in this study: five were afibrinogenemic and four hypofibrinogenemic. There were seven thrombotic events, mostly venous, that occurred in four out of nine patients (44 %). All thrombotic events occurred in afibrinogenemic patients. Mean age at the time of thrombosis was 45 (range 28-61) years. Thrombophilic evaluation performed was negative in all cases. At the time of thrombosis in five out of seven (71.4 %) events, fibrinogen replacement therapy was concurrently given. Therapeutic approach was different among patients ranging from supportive therapy alone, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulant therapy with the concurrent administration of fibrinogen replacement therapy. This study discloses a high rate of thrombosis in patients with afibrinogenemia. Events were both venous and arterial and may be recurrent. Management is highly problematic due to the precarious balance between bleeding and thrombotic risk in these patients. Fibrinogen replacement therapy should be cautiously used in these patients as most thrombotic events followed the administration of fibrinogen replacement therapy. Larger cohorts are warranted to better characterize the best management strategy in these paradoxical events. PMID:26712130

  20. Congenital antithrombin III deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Nanda, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL. Review ...

  1. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be due to: Bone marrow transplant Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) AT III deficiency, an inherited condition Liver ... Schmaier AH, Miller JL. Coagulation and fibrinolysis. In: McPherson ... Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  2. Heterogeneity of the molecular lesions in inherited phosphofructokinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Vora, S; Davidson, M; Seaman, C; Miranda, A F; Noble, N A; Tanaka, K R; Frenkel, E P; Dimauro, S

    1983-01-01

    Human phosphofructokinase (PFK; EC 2.7.1.11) exists in tetrameric isozymic forms. Muscle and liver contain the homotetramers M4 and L4, whereas erythrocytes contain five isozymes composed of M (muscle) and L (liver) subunits, i.e., M4, M3L, M2L2, ML3, and L4. Inherited defects of erythrocyte PFK are usually partial and are described in association with heterogeneous clinical syndromes. To define the molecular basis and pathogenesis of this enzymopathy, we investigated four unrelated individuals manifesting myopathy and hemolysis (glycogenosis type VII), isolated hemolysis, or no symptoms at all. The three symptomatic patients showed high-normal hemoglobin levels, despite hemolysis and early-onset hyperuricemia. They showed total lack of muscle-type PFK and suffered from exertional myopathy of varying severity. In the erythrocytes, a metabolic crossover was evident at the PFK step: the levels of hexose monophosphates were elevated and those of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) were depressed, causing strikingly increased hemoglobin-oxygen affinity. In all cases, the residual erythrocyte PFK consisted exclusively of L4 isozyme, indicating homozygosity for the deficiency of the catalytically active M subunit. However, presence of immunoreactive M subunit was shown in cultured fibroblasts by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal anti-M antibody. The fourth individual was completely asymptomatic, had normal erythrocyte metabolism, and had no evidence of hemolysis. His residual erythrocyte PFK showed a striking decrease of the L4, ML3, and M2L2 isozymes, secondary to a mutant unstable L subunit. Identical alterations of erythrocyte PFK were found in his asymptomatic son, indicating heterozygosity for the mutant unstable L subunit in this kindred. These studies show that, except for the varying severity of the myopathic symptoms, glycogenosis type VII has highly uniform clinical and biochemical features and results from homozygosity for mutant inactive M subunit

  3. Inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liatsikos, Spyros A.; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Manav, Bachar; Csorba, Roland; von Tempelhoff, Georg Friedrich; Galazios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Apart from its established role in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE), inherited thrombophilia has been proposed as a possible cause of pregnancy loss and vascular gestational complications. There is a lot of controversy in the literature on the relationship between inherited prothrombotic defects and these obstetric complications. This is a review of the literature on inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders. Factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutation, and protein S deficiency seem to be associated with late and recurrent early pregnancy loss, while their impact on other pregnancy complications is conflicting. No definite association has been established between protein C and antithrombin deficiency and adverse pregnancy outcome, primarily due to their low prevalence. Screening is suggested only for women with early recurrent loss or late pregnancy loss. Anticoagulant treatment during pregnancy should be considered for women with complications who were tested positive for thrombophilia. PMID:27026779

  4. Inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Liatsikos, Spyros A; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Manav, Bachar; Csorba, Roland; von Tempelhoff, Georg Friedrich; Galazios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Apart from its established role in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE), inherited thrombophilia has been proposed as a possible cause of pregnancy loss and vascular gestational complications. There is a lot of controversy in the literature on the relationship between inherited prothrombotic defects and these obstetric complications. This is a review of the literature on inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders. Factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutation, and protein S deficiency seem to be associated with late and recurrent early pregnancy loss, while their impact on other pregnancy complications is conflicting. No definite association has been established between protein C and antithrombin deficiency and adverse pregnancy outcome, primarily due to their low prevalence. Screening is suggested only for women with early recurrent loss or late pregnancy loss. Anticoagulant treatment during pregnancy should be considered for women with complications who were tested positive for thrombophilia. PMID:27026779

  5. Molecular characterization of inherited carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Taroni, F; Verderio, E; Fiorucci, S; Cavadini, P; Finocchiaro, G; Uziel, G; Lamantea, E; Gellera, C; DiDonato, S

    1992-01-01

    Deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTase II; palmitoyl-CoA:L-carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.21) is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder of energy metabolism. We studied the molecular basis of CPTase II deficiency in an early-onset patient presenting with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and cardiomyopathy. cDNA and genomic DNA analysis demonstrated that the patient was homozygous for a mutant CPTase II allele (termed ICV), which carried three missense mutations: a G-1203----A transition, predicting a Val-368----Ile substitution (V368I); a C-1992----T transition, predicting an Arg-631----Cys substitution (R631C); and an A-2040----G transition, predicting a Met-647----Val substitution (M647V). Genomic DNA analysis of family members showed that the mutations cosegregated with the disease in the family. However, screening of 59 healthy controls demonstrated that both the V368I and M647V mutations are sequence polymorphisms with allele frequencies of 0.5 and 0.25, respectively. By contrast, the R631C substitution was not detected in 22 normal individuals or in 12 of 14 CPTase II-deficient patients with the adult muscular form. Notably, 2 adult CPTase II-deficient patients were heterozygous for the ICV allele, thus suggesting compound heterozygosity for this and a different mutant allele. The consequences of the three mutations on enzyme activity were investigated by expressing normal and mutated CPTase II cDNAs in COS cells. The R631C substitution drastically depressed the catalytic activity of CPTase II, thus confirming that this is the crucial mutation. Interestingly, the V368I and M647V substitutions, which did not affect enzyme activity alone, exacerbated the effects of the R631C substitution. Biochemical characterization of mutant CPTase II in patient's cells showed that the mutations are associated with (i) severe reduction of Vmax (approximately 90%), (ii) normal apparent Km values, and (iii) decreased protein stability

  6. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder. PMID:25896882

  7. Inherited catalase deficiency: is it benign or a factor in various age related disorders?

    PubMed

    Góth, László; Nagy, Teréz

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was - and is still - considered toxic for a wide range of living organisms. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an excess of pro-oxidants over antioxidants and it has been implicated in several diseases. Catalase is involved in hydrogen peroxide catabolism and is important in defense against oxidative stress. Acatalasemia means the inherited near-total deficiency of catalase activity, usually in reference to red cell catalase. Acatalasemia was thought at first to be an asymptotic disorder. In the absence of catalase, neither the Japanese, or Hungarian acatalasemics nor acatalasemic mice had significantly increased blood glutathione peroxidase activity. In animal models, catalase deficient tissues show much slower rates of removal of extracellular hydrogen peroxide. In catalase knock-out mice, a decreased hydrogen peroxide removing capacity and increased reactive oxygen species formation were reported. Hydrogen peroxide may cause methemoglobinemia in patients with catalase deficiency. During anesthesia for a Japanese acatalasemic patient the disinfection with hydrogen peroxide solution caused severe methemoglobinemia. Patients with inherited catalase deficiency, who are treated with uric acid oxidase (rasburicase) may experience very high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and may suffer from methemoglobinemia and hemolysis. The high (18.5%) prevalence of diabetes mellitus in inherited catalase deficient individuals and the earlier (10 years) manifestation of the disease may be attributed to the oxidative damage of oxidant sensitive, insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. Ninety-seven of 114 acatalasemics had diseases related to oxidative stress and aging. The oxidative stress due to catalase deficiency could contribute to the manifestation of diabetes while for the other diseases it may be one of the factors in their causations. In summary, inherited catalase deficiency is associated with clinical features, pathologic laboratory test results

  8. Prevention of bleeding and hemorrhagic complications in surgical patients with inherited factor VII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Adam; Szczepanik, Andrzej; Misiak, Andrzej; Bykowska, Ksenia; Szopiński, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive hemorrhagic disorder. The major clinical symptoms include: bleeding from the oral cavity, epistaxis, menorrhagia, spontaneous hemarthros, bleeding to the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, and perioperative bleeding. The aim of this study was to present our experience in preventing bleeding and hemorrhagic disorders in surgical patients with inherited FVII deficiency by using recombinant activated FVIIa (rFVIIa), and with prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs). In 2002-2011, 17 patients with inherited FVII deficiency underwent surgery. Thirteen patients had isolated FVII deficiency below 10%, and four patients 10-25. To prevent bleeding and hemorrhagic complications, we administered small single doses of rFVIIa (Novo-Seven) at 12-h intervals to 15 patients on surgery day and on day 1 following surgery, then every 24 h; PCCs were administered (Prothromplex, Beriplex) to two patients. No symptoms of bleeding, hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications were observed in the perioperative and 1-month observation period in surgical patients treated with rFVIIa. One patient treated with PCC (Prothromplex) developed distal deep vein thrombosis on postoperative day 7. The results suggest that small, single, every 12-h doses of rFVIIa (NovoSeven) and in next days after surgery one time every 24 h are well tolerated and effective for prevention of thromboembolic, bleeding and hemorrhagic complications in FVII-deficient patients. Antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin should be applied in patients using PCCs. PMID:25688458

  9. Mutations in PIGY: expanding the phenotype of inherited glycosylphosphatidylinositol deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Ilkovski, Biljana; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; O'Grady, Gina L.; Kinoshita, Taroh; Howard, Malcolm F.; Lek, Monkol; Thomas, Brett; Turner, Anne; Christodoulou, John; Sillence, David; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Popitsch, Niko; Keays, David A.; Anzilotti, Consuelo; Goriely, Anne; Waddell, Leigh B.; Brilot, Fabienne; North, Kathryn N.; Kanzawa, Noriyuki; Macarthur, Daniel G.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Kini, Usha; Murakami, Yoshiko; Clarke, Nigel F.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are ubiquitously expressed in the human body and are important for various functions at the cell surface. Mutations in many GPI biosynthesis genes have been described to date in patients with multi-system disease and together these constitute a subtype of congenital disorders of glycosylation. We used whole exome sequencing in two families to investigate the genetic basis of disease and used RNA and cellular studies to investigate the functional consequences of sequence variants in the PIGY gene. Two families with different phenotypes had homozygous recessive sequence variants in the GPI biosynthesis gene PIGY. Two sisters with c.137T>C (p.Leu46Pro) PIGY variants had multi-system disease including dysmorphism, seizures, severe developmental delay, cataracts and early death. There were significantly reduced levels of GPI-anchored proteins (CD55 and CD59) on the surface of patient-derived skin fibroblasts (∼20–50% compared with controls). In a second, consanguineous family, two siblings had moderate development delay and microcephaly. A homozygous PIGY promoter variant (c.-540G>A) was detected within a 7.7 Mb region of autozygosity. This variant was predicted to disrupt a SP1 consensus binding site and was shown to be associated with reduced gene expression. Mutations in PIGY can occur in coding and non-coding regions of the gene and cause variable phenotypes. This article contributes to understanding of the range of disease phenotypes and disease genes associated with deficiencies of the GPI-anchor biosynthesis pathway and also serves to highlight the potential importance of analysing variants detected in 5′-UTR regions despite their typically low coverage in exome data. PMID:26293662

  10. A novel PIGN mutation and prenatal diagnosis of inherited glycosylphosphatidylinositol deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Taku; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Murakami, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Shota; Motooka, Daisuke; Emoto, Tomomi; Satake, Wataru; Nishiyama, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Daisaku; Morisada, Naoya; Takada, Satoshi; Tairaku, Shinya; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Morioka, Ichiro; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Toda, Tatsushi; Kinoshita, Taroh; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors tether proteins to the extracellular face of eukaryotic plasma membranes. Defects in the human GPI anchor biosynthetic pathway cause inherited GPI deficiencies (IGDs) characterized by multiple congenital anomalies: dysmorphic faces, developmental delay, hypotonia, and epilepsy. We report the case of a 6-year-old boy with severe psychomotor developmental delay, epilepsy, and decreased granulocyte surface expression of GPI-anchored protein that suggested autosomal recessive GPI deficiency. The case underwent target exome sequencing to screen for IGDs. Target exome sequencing of the proband identified an apparently homozygous c.808T > C (p.Ser270Pro) mutation in PIGN, a gene involved in the GPI anchor biosynthetic pathway. As his parents were expecting another child, genetic carrier screening was conducted for the parents. Direct sequencing of the parents identified a heterozygous c.808T > C PIGN mutation in the father but none in the mother. To identify the mother's mutation, we performed semi-quantitative real-time PCR of the PIGN exons and long PCR, identifying a microdeletion in PIGN (del exons 2-14). The proband had inherited this microdeletion from his mother. Prenatal diagnosis of the fetus revealed that it was a heterozygous carrier of the mother's pathogenic allele. Here, we report a sporadic case of inherited GPI deficiency with a PIGN mutation and the first case of prenatal diagnosis for GPI deficiency. PMID:26419326

  11. A Novel Mechanism of Inherited TBG Deficiency: Mutation in a Liver-Specific Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano; Pappa, Theodora; Fu, Jiao; Brown, Christopher D.; Peterson, April; Moeller, Lars C.; Wyne, Kathleen; White, Kevin P.; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Trubetskoy, Vassily; Nobrega, Marcelo; Weiss, Roy E.; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: T4-binding globulin (TBG), a protein secreted by the liver, is the main thyroid hormone (TH) transporter in human serum. TBG deficiency is characterized by reduced serum TH levels, but normal free TH and TSH and absent clinical manifestations. The inherited form of TBG deficiency is usually due to a mutation in the TBG gene located on the X-chromosome. Objective: Among the 75 families with X-chromosome-linked TBG deficiency identified in our laboratory, no mutations in the TBG gene were found in four families. The aim of the study was to identify the mechanism of TBG deficiency in these four families using biochemical and genetic studies. Design: Observational cohort, prospective. Setting: University research center. Patients: Four families with inherited TBG deficiency and no mutations in the TBG gene. Intervention: Clinical evaluation, thyroid function tests, and targeted resequencing of 1 Mb of the X-chromosome. Results: Next-generation sequencing identified a novel G to A variant 20 kb downstream of the TBG gene in all four families. In silico analysis predicted that the variant resides within a liver-specific enhancer. In vitro studies confirmed the enhancer activity of a 2.2-kb fragment of genomic DNA containing the novel variant and showed that the mutation reduces the activity of this enhancer. The affected subjects share a haplotype of 8 Mb surrounding the mutation, and the most recent common ancestor among the four families was estimated to be 19.5 generations ago (95% confidence intervals, 10.4–37). Conclusions: To our knowledge, the present study is the first report of an inherited endocrine disorder caused by a mutation in an enhancer region. PMID:25361180

  12. [Inherited GPI deficiencies:a new disease with intellectual disability and epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiko; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a glycolipid, which anchors 150 or more types of proteins to the cell surface. There are at least 26 genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs). Many inherited GPI deficiencies (IGDs) have been recently found using whole-exome sequencing. Patients with IGD have only a partial deficiency because complete GPI deficiency causes embryonic death. The major symptoms of IGDs include intellectual disability, epilepsy, coarse facial features, and multiple organ anomalies. These symptoms vary in severity depending upon the degree of the defect and/or position in the pathway of the affected gene. We clarified a mechanism of hyperphosphatasia, which is characterized by elevated release of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase. Hyperphosphatasia is observed in some patients with IGDs, such as hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome or Mabry syndrome, caused by mutations in genes in the later stage of GPI biosynthesis. The possibility of IGD should be considered in patients with seizures and intellectual disability. The presence of hyperphosphatasia is strong evidence of IGD. Flow cytometric analysis of GPI-APs on granulocytes is also useful for the detection of IGD. PMID:25803904

  13. Inherited CARD9 Deficiency in 2 Unrelated Patients With Invasive Exophiala Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Barbati, Elisa; Meinzer, Ulrich; Liu, Luyan; Pedergnana, Vincent; Migaud, Mélanie; Héritier, Sébastien; Chomton, Maryline; Frémond, Marie-Louise; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Galeotti, Caroline; Romana, Serge; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Angoulvant, Adela; Bidault, Valeska; Canioni, Danielle; Lachenaud, Julie; Mansouri, Davood; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Adimi, Parvaneh; Mansouri, Nahal; Jamshidi, Mahin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Abel, Laurent; Lortholary, Olivier; Blanche, Stéphane; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background. Exophiala species are mostly responsible for skin infections. Invasive Exophiala dermatitidis disease is a rare and frequently fatal infection, with 42 cases reported. About half of these cases had no known risk factors. Similarly, invasive Exophiala spinifera disease is extremely rare, with only 3 cases reported, all in patients with no known immunodeficiency. Autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency has recently been reported in otherwise healthy patients with severe fungal diseases caused by Candida species, dermatophytes, or Phialophora verrucosa. Methods. We investigated an 8-year-old girl from a nonconsanguineous Angolan kindred, who was born in France and developed disseminated E. dermatitidis disease and a 26 year-old woman from an Iranian consaguineous kindred, who was living in Iran and developed disseminated E. spinifera disease. Both patients were otherwise healthy. Results. We sequenced CARD9 and found both patients to be homozygous for loss-of-function mutations (R18W and E323del). The first patient had segmental uniparental disomy of chromosome 9, carrying 2 copies of the maternal CARD9 mutated allele. Conclusions. These are the first 2 patients with inherited CARD9 deficiency and invasive Exophiala disease to be described. CARD9 deficiency should thus be considered in patients with unexplained invasive Exophiala species disease, even in the absence of other infections. PMID:25057046

  14. [Inherited GPI deficiency; a new disease with intellectual disability and epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiko; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2015-07-01

    Recently, many cases of inherited GPI deficiency(IGD) are found among individuals with intellectual disability and intractable seizures. To date, about twenty patients have been reported in Japan and up to a hundred in the world. GPI is the glycolipid which anchors 150 kinds of proteins to the plasma membrane. We have found that there are at least 26 genes involved in the biosynthesis or modification of GPI-anchored proteins. IGDs caused by mutations in 12 genes were reported until now. IGD shows a variety of symptoms according to the affected genes and the severity of the mutations. Some patients have hyperphosphatasia and most patients can be diagnosed by the flow cytometric analysis of the blood cells. Early diagnosis and treatment are desirable because the disease progresses even after birth and vitamin B6(pyridoxine) is very effective for some patients with intractable seizures. PMID:26165085

  15. Mycobacterial disease and impaired IFN-γ immunity in humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Byun, Minji; Durfee, Larissa A; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Salem, Sandra; Radovanovic, Irena; Grant, Audrey V; Adimi, Parisa; Mansouri, Nahal; Okada, Satoshi; Bryant, Vanessa L; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Kreins, Alexandra; Velez, Marcela Moncada; Boisson, Bertrand; Khalilzadeh, Soheila; Ozcelik, Ugur; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schoggins, John W; Rice, Charles M; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Behr, Marcel; Vogt, Guillaume; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Gros, Philippe; Huibregtse, Jon M; Abel, Laurent; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-09-28

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible, ubiquitin-like intracellular protein. Its conjugation to various proteins (ISGylation) contributes to antiviral immunity in mice. Here, we describe human patients with inherited ISG15 deficiency and mycobacterial, but not viral, diseases. The lack of intracellular ISG15 production and protein ISGylation was not associated with cellular susceptibility to any viruses that we tested, consistent with the lack of viral diseases in these patients. By contrast, the lack of mycobacterium-induced ISG15 secretion by leukocytes-granulocyte, in particular-reduced the production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes, including natural killer cells, probably accounting for the enhanced susceptibility to mycobacterial disease. This experiment of nature shows that human ISGylation is largely redundant for antiviral immunity, but that ISG15 plays an essential role as an IFN-γ-inducing secreted molecule for optimal antimycobacterial immunity. PMID:22859821

  16. Mycobacterial disease and impaired IFN-γ immunity in humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Byun, Minji; Durfee, Larissa A.; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Salem, Sandra; Radovanovic, Irena; Grant, Audrey V.; Adimi, Parisa; Mansouri, Nahal; Okada, Satoshi; Bryant, Vanessa L.; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Kreins, Alexandra; Velez, Marcela Moncada; Boisson, Bertrand; Khalilzadeh, Soheila; Ozcelik, Ugur; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schoggins, John W.; Rice, Charles M.; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Behr, Marcel; Vogt, Guillaume; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Gros, Philippe; Huibregtse, Jon M.; Abel, Laurent; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible, ubiquitin-like intracellular protein. Its conjugation to various proteins (ISGylation) contributes to antiviral immunity in mice. We describe human patients with inherited ISG15 deficiency and mycobacterial, but not viral diseases. The lack of intracellular ISG15 production and protein ISGylation was not associated with cellular susceptibility to any viruses tested, consistent with the lack of viral diseases in these patients. By contrast, the lack of mycobacterium-induced ISG15 secretion by leukocytes — granulocytes in particular — reduced the production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes, including natural killer cells, probably accounting for the enhanced susceptibility to mycobacterial disease. This experiment of Nature shows that human ISGylation is largely redundant for antiviral immunity, but that ISG15 plays an essential role as an IFN-γ-inducing secreted molecule for optimal antimycobacterial immunity. PMID:22859821

  17. Antithrombin activities in childhood malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, R A; Jiménez, E; Ingram, G I; Mora, L A; Atmetlla, F; Carrillo, J M; Vargas, W

    1979-01-01

    Antithrombin activities in 30 severely malnourished children and 40 normal children were estimated in clotting tests by thrombin neutralisation as anti-Xa and by a heparin antithrombin assay; and by immunodiffusion as alpha 2-globulin and alpha 1-antitrypsin. The patients' mean alpha 2-globulin was severely depressed, and there were less marked depletions in mean values for thrombin neutralisation, anti-Xa, and in the heparin antithrombin assay (which showed the flat curve thought to reflect a thrombotic tendency). The alpha 1-antitrypsin values were normal. The findings support the concept of antithrombin as the summation of alpha 2-globulin and alpha 1-antitrypsin (with alpha 2-macroglobulin); and the low values may be related to the high incidence of thrombosis reported in childhood malnutrition, although it was not seen in these patients. PMID:118190

  18. Inherited protein C deficiency and coumarin-responsive chronic relapsing purpura fulminans in a newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Branson, H E; Katz, J; Marble, R; Griffin, J H

    1983-11-19

    A coumarin-responsive chronic relapsing purpura fulminans syndrome is described in a protein-C-deficient newborn infant. Episodes of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and cutaneous gangrene, which first appeared at age 11 h, were effectively controlled for 28 months with transfusions of fresh-frozen plasma. Cryoprecipitate and cryoprecipitate-poor plasma induced remissions as long as those induced by fresh-frozen plasma (less than or equal to 72 h). Coumarins sustained a cryoprecipitate-induced remission for 19 days: they were then electively discontinued and 17 h later the patient had an acute exacerbation of DIC with haemorrhaging. Family studies showed protein C levels of 31-40% in the subject's symptom-free mother and full and half brothers. DIC, the coumarin effect, and the inherited protein C abnormality appear to have contributed to the extremely low plasma levels (less than or equal to 6%) of protein C in the patient. This experience suggests that protein C deficiency may greatly compromise the ability of newborn infants to control consumptive disorders. PMID:6139528

  19. Factor VIIa-antithrombin complexes in patients with arterial and venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Spiezia, Luca; Rossetto, Valeria; Campello, Elena; Gavasso, Sabrina; Woodhams, Barry; Tormene, Daniela; Simioni, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    Antithrombin (AT), in the presence of heparin, is able to inhibit the catalytic activity of factor VIIa bound to tissue factor (TF) on cell surfaces. The clinical meaning of FVIIa-AT complexes plasma levels is unknown. It was the objective of this study to evaluate FVIIa-AT complexes in subjects with thrombosis. Factor VIIa-AT complexes plasma levels in 154 patients consecutively referred to our Department with arterial or venous thrombosis and in a group of 154 healthy subjects, were measured. Moreover, FVIIa-AT complexes were determined in: i) n = 53 subjects belonging to 10 families with inherited factor VII deficiency; ii) n = 58 subjects belonging to seven families with AT deficiency; iii) n = 49 patients undergoing oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT). Factor VIIa-AT levels were determined by a specific ELISA kit (R&D, Diagnostica Stago, Gennevilliers, France). Factor VIIa-AT complexes mean plasma levels were lower in patients with either acute arterial (136 +/- 40 pM) or venous (142 +/- 53 pM) thrombosis than subjects with previous thrombosis (arterial 164 +/- 33 pM and venous 172 +/- 61 pM, respectively) and than healthy controls (156 +/- 63 pM). Differences between acute and previous thrombosis, were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Subjects with inherited and acquired (under OAT) factor VII deficiency had statistically significant lower FVIIa-AT complexes plasma levels (80 +/- 23 pM and 55 +/- 22 pM, respectively) than controls (150 +/- 51 pM, p < 0.0001 and 156 +/- 63 pM, p < 0.00001, respectively). Factor VIIa-AT complexes are positively correlated with plasma factor VII/VIIa levels. Further investigations are needed to verify the possible role of higher FVIIa-AT complex plasma levels in predicting hypercoagulable states and thrombosis. PMID:20431847

  20. Inherited human cPLA2α deficiency is associated with impaired eicosanoid biosynthesis, small intestinal ulceration, and platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David H.; Cogan, Joy D.; Phillips, John A.; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie; Milne, Ginger L.; Iverson, Tina; Stein, Jeffrey A.; Brenner, David A.; Morrow, Jason D.; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) hydrolyzes arachidonic acid from cellular membrane phospholipids, thereby providing enzymatic substrates for the synthesis of eicosanoids, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. Considerable understanding of cPLA2α function has been derived from investigations of the enzyme and from cPLA2α-null mice, but knowledge of discrete roles for this enzyme in humans is limited. We investigated a patient hypothesized to have an inherited prostanoid biosynthesis deficiency due to his multiple, complicated small intestinal ulcers despite no use of cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Levels of thromboxane B2 and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid produced by platelets and leukotriene B4 released from calcium ionophore–activated blood were markedly reduced, indicating defective enzymatic release of the arachidonic acid substrate for the corresponding cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenases. Platelet aggregation and degranulation induced by adenosine diphosphate or collagen were diminished but were normal in response to arachidonic acid. Two heterozygous single base pair mutations and a known SNP were found in the coding regions of the patient’s cPLA2α genes (p.[Ser111Pro]+[Arg485His; Lys651Arg]). The total PLA2 activity in sonicated platelets was diminished, and the urinary metabolites of prostacyclin, prostaglandin E2, prostaglandin D2, and thromboxane A2 were also reduced. These findings characterize what we believe is a novel inherited deficiency of cPLA2. PMID:18451993

  1. Inherited IL-17RC deficiency in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yun; Cypowyj, Sophie; Aytekin, Caner; Galicchio, Miguel; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Nepesov, Serdar; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Dogu, Figen; Belkadi, Aziz; Levy, Romain; Migaud, Mélanie; Boisson, Bertrand; Bolze, Alexandre; Itan, Yuval; Goudin, Nicolas; Cottineau, Julien; Picard, Capucine; Abel, Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2015-05-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is characterized by recurrent or persistent infections of the skin, nail, oral, and genital mucosae with Candida species, mainly C. albicans. Autosomal-recessive (AR) IL-17RA and ACT1 deficiencies and autosomal-dominant IL-17F deficiency, each reported in a single kindred, underlie CMC in otherwise healthy patients. We report three patients from unrelated kindreds, aged 8, 12, and 37 yr with isolated CMC, who display AR IL-17RC deficiency. The patients are homozygous for different nonsense alleles that prevent the expression of IL-17RC on the cell surface. The defect is complete, abolishing cellular responses to IL-17A and IL-17F homo- and heterodimers. However, in contrast to what is observed for the IL-17RA- and ACT1-deficient patients tested, the response to IL-17E (IL-25) is maintained in these IL-17RC-deficient patients. These experiments of nature indicate that human IL-17RC is essential for mucocutaneous immunity to C. albicans but is otherwise largely redundant. PMID:25918342

  2. Inherited IL-17RC deficiency in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Yun; Cypowyj, Sophie; Aytekin, Caner; Galicchio, Miguel; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Nepesov, Serdar; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Dogu, Figen; Belkadi, Aziz; Levy, Romain; Migaud, Mélanie; Boisson, Bertrand; Bolze, Alexandre; Itan, Yuval; Goudin, Nicolas; Cottineau, Julien; Picard, Capucine; Abel, Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is characterized by recurrent or persistent infections of the skin, nail, oral, and genital mucosae with Candida species, mainly C. albicans. Autosomal-recessive (AR) IL-17RA and ACT1 deficiencies and autosomal-dominant IL-17F deficiency, each reported in a single kindred, underlie CMC in otherwise healthy patients. We report three patients from unrelated kindreds, aged 8, 12, and 37 yr with isolated CMC, who display AR IL-17RC deficiency. The patients are homozygous for different nonsense alleles that prevent the expression of IL-17RC on the cell surface. The defect is complete, abolishing cellular responses to IL-17A and IL-17F homo- and heterodimers. However, in contrast to what is observed for the IL-17RA– and ACT1-deficient patients tested, the response to IL-17E (IL-25) is maintained in these IL-17RC–deficient patients. These experiments of nature indicate that human IL-17RC is essential for mucocutaneous immunity to C. albicans but is otherwise largely redundant. PMID:25918342

  3. PROS1 genotype phenotype relationships in a large cohort of adults with suspicion of inherited quantitative protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Alhenc-Gelas, Martine; Plu-Bureau, Genevieve; Horellou, Marie Hélène; Rauch, Antoine; Suchon, Pierre

    2016-02-29

    Inherited protein S deficiency (PSD) is an established risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, data are conflicting concerning risk of VTE associated with decreased free PS level (FPS) and information on PROS1 genotype-phenotype relationship is sparse. In a retrospective cohort of 579 patients with inherited type I/III deficiency suspicion, PROS1 genotyping was performed and the effect of genotype on FPS and on VTE risk was investigated. We found 116 (including 65 novel) detrimental mutations (DM) in 222 (type I/III in 194, type II in 28), PS Heerlen in 74, possibly non DM in 38 and no mutation in 245 subjects. Among DMs, type I/IIIDMs only were found in subjects with FPS< 30 %. Prevalence of type I/III DM decreased with increasing FPS level. Risk of VT associated with FPS level and genotype was studied in the 467 subjects with personal or family history of thrombosis. Only type I/IIIDM carriers presented with an increased risk of VTE [1.41 (95 %CI (1.05-1.89)] compared to subjects with no mutation. Among the group of type I/IIIDM heterozygotes and subjects with no mutation, the optimal FPS cut-off point for identifying subjects at increased VTE risk was searched for. We found that only subjects with FPS< 30 % and type I/IIIDM presented with an increased risk [1.48 (95 %CI 1.08-2.04)]. Our findings confirm the value of a cut-off FPS level for identifying subjects at increased VTE risk far below the lower limit of the normal range and suggest a place for PROS1 genotyping in PSD diagnosis strategy. PMID:26466767

  4. Purine oversecretion in cultured murine lymphoma cells deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase: genetic model for inherited hyperuricemia and gout.

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, B; Wormsted, M A; Cohen, M B; Martin, D W

    1982-01-01

    Alterations in several specific enzymes have been associated with increased rates of purine synthesis de novo in human and other mammalian cells. However, these recognized abnormalities in humans account for only a few percent of the clinical cases of hyperuricemia and gout. We have examined in detail the rates of purine production de novo and purine excretion by normal and by mutant (AU-100) murine lymphoma T cells (S49) 80% deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase [IMP:L-aspartate ligase (GDP-forming), EC 6.3.4.4]. The intracellular ATP concentration of the mutant cells is slightly diminished, but their GTP is increased 50% and their IMP, four-fold. Compared to wild-type cells, the AU-100 cells excrete into the culture medium 30- to 50-fold greater amounts of purine metabolites consisting mainly of inosine. Moreover, the AU-100 cell line overproduces total purines. In an AU-100-derived cell line, AU-TG50B, deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8), purine nucleoside excretion is increased 50- to 100-fold, and de novo synthesis is even greater than that for AU-100 cells. The overexcretion of purine metabolites by the AU-100 cells seems to be due to the primary genetic deficiency of adenylosuccinate synthetase, a deficiency that requires the cell to increase intracellular IMP in an attempt to maintain ATP levels. As a consequence of elevated IMP pools, large amounts of inosine are secreted into the culture medium. We propose that a similar primary genetic defect may account for the excessive purine excretion in some patients with dominantly inherited hyperuricemia and gout. Images PMID:6957854

  5. Inherited DOCK2 Deficiency in Patients with Early-Onset Invasive Infections.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Kerry; Domínguez Conde, Cecilia; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Parolini, Silvia; Audry, Magali; Chou, Janet; Haapaniemi, Emma; Keles, Sevgi; Bilic, Ivan; Okada, Satoshi; Massaad, Michel J; Rounioja, Samuli; Alwahadneh, Adel M; Serwas, Nina K; Capuder, Kelly; Çiftçi, Ergin; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Ohsumi, Toshiro K; Pedergnana, Vincent; Boisson, Bertrand; Haskoloğlu, Şule; Ensari, Arzu; Schuster, Michael; Moretta, Alessandro; Itan, Yuval; Patrizi, Ornella; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Saarela, Janna; Knip, Mikael; Petrovski, Slavé; Goldstein, David B; Parrott, Roberta E; Savas, Berna; Schambach, Axel; Tabellini, Giovanna; Bock, Christoph; Chatila, Talal A; Comeau, Anne Marie; Geha, Raif S; Abel, Laurent; Buckley, Rebecca H; İkincioğulları, Aydan; Al-Herz, Waleed; Helminen, Merja; Doğu, Figen; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Boztuğ, Kaan; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2015-06-18

    Background Combined immunodeficiencies are marked by inborn errors of T-cell immunity in which the T cells that are present are quantitatively or functionally deficient. Impaired humoral immunity is also common. Patients have severe infections, autoimmunity, or both. The specific molecular, cellular, and clinical features of many types of combined immunodeficiencies remain unknown. Methods We performed genetic and cellular immunologic studies involving five unrelated children with early-onset invasive bacterial and viral infections, lymphopenia, and defective T-cell, B-cell, and natural killer (NK)-cell responses. Two patients died early in childhood; after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, the other three had normalization of T-cell function and clinical improvement. Results We identified biallelic mutations in the dedicator of cytokinesis 2 gene (DOCK2) in these five patients. RAC1 activation was impaired in the T cells. Chemokine-induced migration and actin polymerization were defective in the T cells, B cells, and NK cells. NK-cell degranulation was also affected. Interferon-α and interferon-λ production by peripheral-blood mononuclear cells was diminished after viral infection. Moreover, in DOCK2-deficient fibroblasts, viral replication was increased and virus-induced cell death was enhanced; these conditions were normalized by treatment with interferon alfa-2b or after expression of wild-type DOCK2. Conclusions Autosomal recessive DOCK2 deficiency is a new mendelian disorder with pleiotropic defects of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity. Children with clinical features of combined immunodeficiencies, especially with early-onset, invasive infections, may have this condition. (Supported by the National Institutes of Health and others.). PMID:26083206

  6. Antigen-specific immune responses in cattle with inherited beta2-integrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Müller, K E; Hoek, A; Rutten, V P; Bernadina, W E; Wentink, G H

    1997-08-01

    The significance of beta2-integrins for the generation of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo was studied employing the bovine model of beta2-integrin deficiency. To that end four cattle with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) and healthy age-matched controls were immunized with tetanus toxoid (TT) and rabies virus (RV) vaccines three times in monthly intervals. In addition, two animals with BLAD and three controls received a fourth vaccination 8 months after the start of the study. Proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to the antigens TT and RV as well as specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were determined in intervals for up to 10 months after primary vaccination. Proliferative responses of PBMC to TT and RV were substantially lower in cattle with BLAD than in controls, although PBMC from cattle with BLAD were shown to have the capacity to proliferate in the response to the mitogen concanavalin A. Occurrence of antigen-specific IgG titers was delayed and they were considerably lower in cattle with BLAD compared to controls. Finally, treatment of TT- and RV-stimulated PBMC from an immunized control with different concentrations of the anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody R15.7 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation to almost 100%. The results of the present study show that beta2-integrin deficiency leads to delayedand severely impaired immune responsiveness in vivo. The observations that antibody production, although considerably delayed and impaired, does occur and that apparently class-switching takes place in BLAD indicate T-cell reactivity in vivo. PMID:9343338

  7. The inheritance pattern of factor XII (Hageman) deficiency in domestic cats.

    PubMed Central

    Kier, A B; Bresnahan, J F; White, F J; Wagner, J E

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of coagulation factor XII levels in F1 progeny of a cat having factor XII deficiency revealed an autosomal recessive pattern similar to that reported in humans (Hageman trait). A study of the pedigree of the colony revealed that F1 kittens had approximately 50% factor XII activity while kittens produced by backcrossing with an F1 progeny possessed an average of 50% and a less than 2% factor XII activity in an approximate 1:1 ratio. Kittens having an average of 50% factor XII activity were postulated heterozygous for the trait while progeny with less than 2% activity were considered genetically homozygous. PMID:7427778

  8. [Role of antithrombin iii in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Muedra, V; Barettino, D; D'Ocón, P

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation of blood is of multidisciplinary interest. Cardiac surgery produces major changes in the delicate balance between pro-and anti-coagulant serum factors. The role of antithrombin iii has been analysed after finding evidence that associated decreased levels of protein activity to postoperative morbidity and mortality. Supplementing exogenous antithrombin is considered with the aim of optimising outcomes. Its intrinsic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties have stimulated a growing interest, and suggests new lines of research. PMID:23228672

  9. Intracellular Evaluation of ER Targeting Elucidates a Mild Form of Inherited Coagulation Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rizzotto, Lara; Pinotti, Mirko; Pinton, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario; Bernardi, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Missense mutations reduce protein levels through several molecular mechanisms. Among them, altered targeting to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and its relationship with clinical phenotypes in patients have been poorly investigated. To address this point, we studied the prepeptide mutations (L-48P, L-42P) associated with mild deficiency of factor VII (FVII), the serine-protease triggering blood coagulation. Mutations were introduced into the native FVII to evaluate secreted and intracellular protein levels, and into a chimeric FVII-GFP to study ER targeting in living cells. In conditioned medium from stably or transiently transfected cells, expression levels of the −48PFVII (9% and 55%, respectively) and particularly those of the −42PFVII (2% and 12%) were decreased compared with those of WtFVII, indicating the causative nature of mutations. Markedly reduced protein levels were observed in cell organelles for −48PFVII (10.5 ± 4.9 ng/mL; Wt-FVII, 130 ± 43.4 ng/mL) and −42PFVII (~5 ng/mL), thus suggesting impaired ER targeting. Fluorescence of the −−48PFVII-GFP and −42PFVII-GFP was diffuse, covered the nucleus, and declined upon plasma membrane permeabilization with digitonin, which demonstrated mislocalization of variants in the cytosol. Noticeably, the residual fluorescence of −48PFVII-GFP (10%) and −42PFVII-GFP (20%) in organelles was fairly compatible with FVII levels in patients’ plasma. The studies with the native and chimeric proteins indicated that both prepeptide mutations were associated with residual expression of normal FVII, which explained the mild form of FVII deficiency in patients. This approach, extendable to other coagulation serine proteases, clearly contributed to elucidate the relationship of genotype with plasma and clinical phenotype. PMID:17088945

  10. Platelet storage pool deficiency associated with inherited abnormalities of the inner ear in the mouse pigment mutants muted and mocha.

    PubMed

    Swank, R T; Reddington, M; Howlett, O; Novak, E K

    1991-10-15

    Several inherited human syndromes have combined platelet, auditory, and/or pigment abnormalities. In the mouse the pallid pigment mutant has abnormalities of the otoliths of the inner ear together with a bleeding abnormality caused by platelet storage pool deficiency (SPD). To determine if this association is common, two other mouse pigment mutants, muted and mocha, which are known to have inner ear abnormalities, were examined for hematologic abnormalities. Both mutants had prolonged bleeding times accompanied by abnormalities of dense granules as determined by whole mount electron microscopy of platelets and by labeling platelets with mepacrine. When mutant platelets were treated with collagen, there was minimal secretion of adenosine triphosphate and aggregation was reduced. Lysosomal enzyme secretion in response to thrombin treatment was partially reduced in muted platelets and markedly reduced in mocha platelets. Similar reductions in constitutive lysosomal enzyme secretion from kidney proximal tubule cells were noted in the two mutants. These studies show that several mutations that cause pigment dilution and platelet SPD are associated with abnormalities of the inner ear. Also, these mutants, like previously described mouse pigment mutants, are models for human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and provide additional examples of single genes that simultaneously affect melanosomes, lysosomes, and platelet dense granules. PMID:1912584

  11. Antithrombin, an Important Inhibitor in Blood Clots.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Cong, Qing-Wei; Liu, Yue; Wan, Chun-Ling; Yu, Tao; He, Guang; He, Lin; Cai, Lei; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Blood coagulation is healthy and lifesaving because it can stop bleeding. It can, however, be a troublemaker as well, causing serious medical problems including heart attack and stroke. Body has complex blood coagulation cascade to modulate the blood clots. In the environment of plasma, the blood coagulation cascade is regulated by antithrombin, which is deemed one of the most important serine protease inhibitors. It inhibits thrombin; it can inhibit factors IXa and Xa as well. Interestingly, its inhibitory ability will be significantly increased with the existence of heparin. In this minireview paper, we are to summarize the structural features of antithrombin, as well as its heparin binding modes and anti-coagulation mechanisms, in hopes that the discussion and analysis presented in this paper can stimulate new strategies to find more effective approaches or compounds to modulate the antithrombin. PMID:26411319

  12. A novel heterozygous missense mutation (His127Arg) in a family with inherited cross-reacting material positive factor XI deficiency.

    PubMed

    Castaman, Giancarlo; Giacomelli, Sofia H; Tagliaferri, Annarita; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Factor XI (FXI) deficiency is an autosomal inherited coagulation disorder, characterized by an inconsistent bleeding tendency, mainly associated with injury or surgery. Although most of the F11 gene mutations cause a true quantitative deficiency of FXI (cross-reacting material-negative, CRM-), very few variants characterized by a qualitative abnormality resulting in a discrepant FXI activity/FXI antigen ratio (CRM positive, CRM+) have been reported. We describe here a novel CRM+ mutation (His127Arg) identified in an asymptomatic woman from Indonesia and in her two sons. PMID:23571684

  13. Prevalence of inherited prothrombotic abnormalities and central venous catheter-related thrombosis in haematopoietic stem cell transplants recipients.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, A; Ben Romdhane, N; Kriaa, A; Chelli, M; Torjman, L; Ladeb, S; Ben Othman, T; Lakhal, A; Guermazi, S; Ben Hassen, A; Ladeb, F; Ben Abdeladhim, A

    2005-11-01

    In this prospective study, we assessed the incidence of central venous catheter (CVC)-related thrombosis in haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. We determined the contribution of inherited prothrombotic abnormalities in blood coagulation to CVC-related thrombosis in these patients. The study was conducted between May 2002 and September 2004. CVCs were externalized, nontunneled, polyurethane double lumen catheters. Before catheter insertion, laboratory prothrombotic markers included factor V Leiden, the prothrombin gene Gly20210A mutation, plasma antithrombin levels, and protein C and S activity. All patients were systematically examined by ultrasonography just before, or <24 h after, catheter removal, and in case of clinical signs of thrombosis. A total of 171 patients were included during the 28-month study period. Five (2.9%) and three (1.7%) patients had evidence of protein C and protein S deficiency, respectively. Only one patient had an antithrombin deficiency (0.6%). In total, 10 patients (5.8%) were heterozygous for the factor V Leiden mutation, and one patient had heterozygous prothrombin G20210A mutation (0.6%). We observed a CVC-related thrombosis in 13 patients (7.6%). Thrombosis was diagnosed in four out of 20 patients (20%) with a inherited prothrombotic abnormality compared to nine of 151 patients (6%) who did not have a thrombophilic marker (relative risk 3.3 CI 95% 1.1-9.9). Our results suggest that inherited prothrombotic abnormalities contribute substantially to CVC-related thrombosis in HSCT recipients. In view of physicians' reluctance to prescribe prophylactic anticoagulant treatment in these patients, a priori determination of inherited prothrombotic abnormalities may form a basis to guide these treatment decisions. PMID:16151418

  14. Inherited CARD9 deficiency in otherwise healthy children and adults with meningo-encephalitis and/or colitis caused by Candida

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Barbati, Elisa; Chaussade, Hélène; Koumar, Yatrika; Levy, Romain; Denis, Blandine; Brunel, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Sophie; Loop, Michèle; Peeters, Julie; de Selys, Ariel; Vanclaire, Jean; Vermylen, Christiane; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Chatzis, Olga; Liu, Luyan; Migaud, Mélanie; Pedergnana, Vincent; Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Jouvion, Gregory; Chretien, Fabrice; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Netea, Mihai G.; De Bruycker, Jean-Jacques; Bernard, Louis; Reynes, Jacques; Amazrine, Noureddine; Abel, Laurent; Van der Linden, Dimitri; Harrison, Tom; Picard, Capucine; Lortholary, Olivier; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Invasive infections of the central nervous system or digestive tract caused by commensal fungi of the genus Candida are rare and life-threatening. The known risk factors include acquired and inherited immunodeficiencies, with patients often displaying a history of multiple infections. Cases of meningo-encephalitis and/or colitis caused by Candida remain unexplained. We studied five previously healthy children and adults with unexplained invasive disease of the central nervous system, or the digestive tract, or both, caused by Candida spp. The patients were aged 39, 7, 17 37, and 26 years at the time of infection and were unrelated but each born to consanguineous parents of Turkish (two patients), Iranian, Moroccan or Pakistani origin. Meningo-encephalitis was isolated in three patients, associated with colitis in a fourth patient, and the fifth patient suffered from isolated colitis. Inherited CARD9 deficiency was recently reported in otherwise healthy patients with other forms of severe disease caused by Candida, Trichophyton, Phialophora, and Exophiala, including meningo-encephalitis, but not colitis, caused by Candida and Exophiala. We therefore sequenced CARD9 in the five patients. All were found to be homozygous for rare and deleterious mutant CARD9 alleles: R70W and Q289* for the three patients with isolated C. albicans meningo-encephalitis, R35Q for the patient with meningo-encephalitis and colitis caused by C. glabrata, and Q295* for the patient with C. albicans colitis. Regardless of their levels of mutant CARD9 protein, the patients’ monocyte-derived dendritic cells responded poorly to CARD9-dependent fungal agonists (curdlan, heat-killed C. albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Exophiala dermatitidis). Invasive infections of the CNS or digestive tract caused by Candida in previously healthy children and even adults may be caused by inherited CARD9 deficiency. PMID:25702837

  15. Lack of Association between Recurrent Pregnancy Loss and Inherited Thrombophilia in a Group of Colombian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Henry; Castañeda, Serguei A.; Cardona Maya, Wálter; Alvarez, Leonor; Gómez, Joaquín; Gómez, Jorge; Torres, José; Tobón, Luis; Bedoya, Gabriel; Cadavid, Ángela P.

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown an association between recurrent pregnancy loss and inherited thrombophilia in Caucasian populations, but there is insufficient knowledge concerning triethnic populations such as the Colombian. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether inherited thrombophilia is associated with recurrent pregnancy loss. Methods. We conducted a case-control study of 93 patients with recurrent pregnancy loss (cases) and 206 healthy multiparous women (controls) in a Colombian subpopulation. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) markers of the inherited thrombophilias factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T were genotyped by PCR-RFLP. Activated protein C resistance and plasma levels of antithrombin, protein C, and protein S were also measured. Results. The frequency of thrombophilia-associated SNPs, activated protein C resistance, and anticoagulant protein deficiencies, was low overall, except for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T SNP. The differences between patients and controls had no statistical significance. Conclusion. Our study confirms the low prevalence of inherited thrombophilias in non-Caucasian populations and it is unlikely that the tested thrombophilias play a role in the pathogenesis of recurrent pregnancy loss in this Colombian population. PMID:22577540

  16. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin...

  1. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an inherited disease. "Inherited" ... have AAT deficiency inherit two faulty AAT genes, one from each parent. These genes tell cells in ...

  2. Mycobacterium simiae infection in two unrelated patients with different forms of inherited IFN-γR2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Megged, Orli; Stepensky, Polina; Casimir, Pierre; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Averbuch, Diana; Assous, Marc Victor; Abuzaitoun, Omar; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Pedergnana, Vincent; Deswarte, Caroline; Migaud, Mélanie; Rose-John, Stefan; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Belkadi, Aziz; Conti, Francesca; Abel, Laurent; Vogt, Guillaume; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFN-γR2) deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency characterized by predisposition to infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as environmental mycobacteria and BCG vaccines. We describe here two children with IFN-γR2 deficiency, from unrelated, consanguineous kindreds of Arab and Israeli descent. The first patient was a boy who died at the age of 4.5 years, from recurrent, disseminated disease caused by Mycobacterium simiae. His IFN-γR2 defect was autosomal recessive and complete. The second patient was a girl with multiple disseminated mycobacterial infections, including infection with M. simiae. She died at the age of five years, a short time after the transplantation of umbilical cord blood cells from an unrelated donor. Her IFN-γR2 defect was autosomal recessive and partial. Autosomal recessive IFN-γR2 deficiency is life-threatening, even in its partial form, and genetic diagnosis and familial counseling are therefore particularly important for this condition. These two cases are the first of IFN-γR2 deficiency associated with M simiae infection to be described. PMID:25135595

  3. Mycobacterium simiae infection in two unrelated patients with different forms of inherited IFN-γR2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Megged, Orli; Stepensky, Polina; Casimir, Pierre; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Averbuch, Diana; Assous, Marc Victor; Abuzaitoun, Omar; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Pedergnana, Vincent; Deswarte, Caroline; Migaud, Mélanie; Rose-John, Stefan; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Belkadi, Aziz; Conti, Francesca; Abel, Laurent; Vogt, Guillaume; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta

    2014-11-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFN-γR2) deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency characterized by predisposition to infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as environmental mycobacteria and BCG vaccines. We describe here two children with IFN-γR2 deficiency, from unrelated, consanguineous kindreds of Arab and Israeli descent. The first patient was a boy who died at the age of 4.5 years, from recurrent, disseminated disease caused by Mycobacterium simiae. His IFN-γR2 defect was autosomal recessive and complete. The second patient was a girl with multiple disseminated mycobacterial infections, including infection with M. simiae. She died at the age of 5 years, a short time after the transplantation of umbilical cord blood cells from an unrelated donor. Her IFN-γR2 defect was autosomal recessive and partial. Autosomal recessive IFN-γR2 deficiency is life-threatening, even in its partial form, and genetic diagnosis and familial counseling are therefore particularly important for this condition. These two cases are the first of IFN-γR2 deficiency associated with M. simiae infection to be described. PMID:25135595

  4. Inhibition of thrombin generation in plasma by fibrin formation (Antithrombin I).

    PubMed

    de Bosch, N B; Mosesson, M W; Ruiz-Sáez, A; Echenagucia, M; Rodriguez-Lemoin, A

    2002-08-01

    The adsorption of thrombin to fibrin during clotting defines "Antithrombin I" activity. We confirmed that thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or in Reptilase defibrinated normal plasma was higher than in normal plasma. Repletion of these fibrinogen-deficient plasmas with fibrinogen 1 (gamma A/gamma A), whose fibrin has two "low affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding sites, resulted in moderately reduced thrombin generation by 29-37%. Repletion with fibrinogen 2 (gamma'/gamma A), which in addition to low affinity thrombin-binding sites in fibrin, has a "high affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding site in the carboxy-terminal region of its gamma' chain, was even more effective and reduced thrombin generation by 57-67%. Adding peptides that compete for thrombin binding to fibrin [S-Hir53-64 (hirugen) or gamma'414-427] caused a transient delay in the onset of otherwise robust thrombin generation, indicating that fibrin formation is necessary for full expression of Antithrombin I activity. Considered together, 1) the increased thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or fibrinogen-depleted normal plasma that is mitigated by fibrinogen replacement; 2) evidence that prothrombin activation is increased in afibrinogenemia and normalized by fibrinogen replacement; 3) the severe thrombophilia that is associated with defective thrombin-binding in dysfibrinogenemias Naples I and New York I, and 4) the association of afibrinogenemia or hypofibrinogenemia with venous or arterial thromboembolism, indicate that Antithrombin I (fibrin) modulates thromboembolic potential by inhibiting thrombin generation in blood. PMID:12195697

  5. Characterization of Thrombate III®, a pasteurized and nanofiltered therapeutic human antithrombin concentrate.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kang; Osheroff, Wendy P; Buczynski, Greg; Hotta, JoAnn; Lang, John; Elliott, Eric; Lee, Douglas C; Roth, Nathan J

    2014-05-01

    Thrombate III(®) is a highly purified antithrombin concentrate that has been used by clinicians worldwide for more than two decades for the treatment of hereditary antithrombin deficiency. The manufacturing process is based on heparin-affinity chromatography and pasteurization. To modernize the process and to further enhance the pathogen safety profile of the final product, despite the absence of infectious disease transmission, a nanofiltration step was added. The biochemical characterization and pathogen safety evaluation of Thrombate III(®) manufactured using the modernized process are presented. Bioanalytical data demonstrate that the incorporation of nanofiltration has no impact on the antithrombin content, potency, and purity of the product. Scaledown models of the manufacturing process were used to assess virus and prion clearance under manufacturing setpoint conditions. Additionally, robustness of virus clearance was evaluated at or slightly outside the manufacturing operating limits. The results demonstrate that pasteurization inactivated both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses. The addition of nanofiltration substantially increased clearance capacities for both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses by approximately 4-6 log10. In addition, the process achieves 6.0 log10 ID50 prion infectivity clearance. Thus, the introduction of nanofiltration increased the pathogen safety margin of the manufacturing process without impacting the key biochemical characteristics of the product. PMID:24477183

  6. A recurrent deletion in the antithrombin gene, AT106-108(-6 bp), identified by DNA heteroduplex detection

    SciTech Connect

    Olds, R.J.; Thein, S.L. ); Lane, D.A. ); Beresford, C.H.; Hughes, P.M. ); Abildgaard, U. )

    1993-04-01

    Antithrombin is the major physiological inhibitor of the activated serine proteinases of the coagulation system. Hereditary deficiency of the inhibitor is transmitted in an autosomal dominant pattern and is associated with a risk of venous thromboembotic disease in affected individuals. In the classical form of deficiency, type Ia, plasma antithrombin is reduced to approximately half normal in both functional and immunological assays. The authors report here the identification of a recurrent mutation as the basis for type Ia deficiency in two independent kindreds, one from New Zealand and the other from Norway, and demonstrate the utility of DNA heteroduplex detection as a method for screening for the presence of mutations. Standard functional and immunological assays for plasma antithrombin showed levels of approximately half normal in several members of both kindreds, consistent with the classification as type Ia deficiency. The plasma of the proband from the Norwegian kindred was examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis, in the presence or absence of heparin in the first dimension, and an abnormal component that may have represented a variant form of the inhibitor was not identified. In both families affected members have had episodes of venous thrombosis, although some carriers of the abnormal allele, as confirmed in the current study, so far have not had clinical thrombotic disease. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Inherited deficiency of second component of complement and HLA haplotype A10,B18 associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Slade, J D; Luskin, A T; Gewurz, H; Kraft, S C; Kirsner, J B; Zeitz, H J

    1978-06-01

    A patient with inflammatory bowel disease and sacroiliitis had haplotypes A10,B18 and Aw32,b18 at the major histocompatibility locus. Serum total complement and C2 hemolytic complement activities were undetectable; levels of the remaining C1-C9 components were normal. The parents, both siblings, and a child each had half-normal levels of C2 and either the A10,B18 or the Aw32,b18 hla haplotype. In a second unrelated family, an only child and both parents developed inflammatory bowel disease. The father and child had HLA haplotype A10,B18, but, along with the mother, each had normal serum levels of hemolytic C and C2. Homozygous C2 deficiency, often in association with the A10,B18 haplotype, has previously been linked with various autoimmune diseases and with propensity to infection. Our findings suggest that C2 deficiency or this haplotype also may predispose to inflammatory diseases of the intestine. PMID:666136

  8. Gaucher disease due to saposin C deficiency is an inherited lysosomal disease caused by rapidly degraded mutant proteins.

    PubMed

    Motta, Marialetizia; Camerini, Serena; Tatti, Massimo; Casella, Marialuisa; Torreri, Paola; Crescenzi, Marco; Tartaglia, Marco; Salvioli, Rosa

    2014-11-01

    Saposin (Sap) C is an essential cofactor for the lysosomal degradation of glucosylceramide (GC) by glucosylceramidase (GCase) and its functional impairment underlies a rare variant form of Gaucher disease (GD). Sap C promotes rearrangement of lipid organization in lysosomal membranes favoring substrate accessibility to GCase. It is characterized by six invariantly conserved cysteine residues involved in three intramolecular disulfide bonds, which make the protein remarkably stable to acid environment and degradation. Five different mutations (i.e. p.C315S, p.342_348FDKMCSKdel, p.L349P, p.C382G and p.C382F) have been identified to underlie Sap C deficiency. The molecular mechanism by which these mutations affect Sap C function, however, has not been delineated in detail. Here, we characterized biochemically and functionally four of these gene lesions. We show that all Sap C mutants are efficiently produced, and exhibit lipid-binding properties, modulatory behavior on GCase activity and subcellular localization comparable with those of the wild-type protein. We then delineated the structural rearrangement of these mutants, documenting that most proteins assume diverse aberrant disulfide bridge arrangements, which result in a substantial diminished half-life, and rapid degradation via autophagy. These findings further document the paramount importance of disulfide bridges in the stability of Sap C and provide evidence that accelerated degradation of the Sap C mutants is the underlying pathogenetic mechanism of Sap C deficiency. PMID:24925315

  9. Deficiencies of Natural Anticoagulants, Protein C, Protein S, and Antithrombin

    MedlinePlus

    ... V Leiden . Circulation . 2003 ; 107 : e94 – e97 FREE Full Text 2. ↵ Varga EA , Moll S . Prothrombin 20210 mutation (factor II mutation) . Circulation . 2004 ; 110 : e15 – e18 FREE Full Text CiteULike Delicious Digg Facebook Google+ Mendeley Reddit StumbleUpon ...

  10. Erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. A recessive inherited ferrochelatase deficiency with anemia, photosensitivity, and liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tutois, S; Montagutelli, X; Da Silva, V; Jouault, H; Rouyer-Fessard, P; Leroy-Viard, K; Guénet, J L; Nordmann, Y; Beuzard, Y; Deybach, J C

    1991-01-01

    A viable autosomal recessive mutation (named fch, or ferrochelatase deficiency) causing jaundice and anemia in mice arose in a mutagenesis experiment using ethylnitrosourea. Homozygotes (fch/fch) display a hemolytic anemia, photosensitivity, cholestasis, and severe hepatic dysfunction. Protoporphyrin is found at high concentration in erythrocytes, serum, and liver. Ferrochelatase activity in various tissues is 2.7-6.3% of normal. Heterozygotes (+/fch) are not anemic and have normal liver function; they are not sensitive to light exposure; ferrochelatase activity is 45-65% of normal. Southern blot analysis using a ferrochelatase cDNA probe reveals no gross deletion of the ferrochelatase gene. This is the first spontaneous form of erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. Despite the presence in the mouse of clinical and biochemical features infrequent in the human, this mutation may represent a model for the human disease, especially in its severe form. Images PMID:1939658

  11. Antithrombin in the treatment of burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Kowal-Vern, Areta; Orkin, Bruce A

    2016-02-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a natural anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory properties that has demonstrated value in sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and in burn and inhalation injury. With high doses, AT may decrease blood loss during eschar excision, reducing blood transfusion requirements. There are no human randomized, placebo-controlled studies, which have tested the true benefit of this agent in these conditions. Two main forms of AT are either plasma-derived AT (phAT) and recombinant AT (rhAT). Major ovine studies in burn and smoke inhalation injury have utilized rhAT. There have been no studies which have either translated the basic rhAT research in burn trauma, or determined the tolerance and pharmacokinetics of rhAT concentrate infusions in burn patients. Advantages of rhAT infusions are no risk of blood borne diseases and lower cost. However, the majority of human burn patient studies have been conducted utilizing phAT. Recent Japanese clinical trials have started using phAT in abdominal sepsis successfully. This review examines the properties of both phAT and rhAT, and analyzes studies in which they have been utilized. We believe that it is time to embark on a randomized placebo-controlled multi-center trial to establish the role of AT in both civilian and military patients with burn trauma. PMID:26855890

  12. Antithrombin in the treatment of burn trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kowal-Vern, Areta; Orkin, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a natural anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory properties that has demonstrated value in sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and in burn and inhalation injury. With high doses, AT may decrease blood loss during eschar excision, reducing blood transfusion requirements. There are no human randomized, placebo-controlled studies, which have tested the true benefit of this agent in these conditions. Two main forms of AT are either plasma-derived AT (phAT) and recombinant AT (rhAT). Major ovine studies in burn and smoke inhalation injury have utilized rhAT. There have been no studies which have either translated the basic rhAT research in burn trauma, or determined the tolerance and pharmacokinetics of rhAT concentrate infusions in burn patients. Advantages of rhAT infusions are no risk of blood borne diseases and lower cost. However, the majority of human burn patient studies have been conducted utilizing phAT. Recent Japanese clinical trials have started using phAT in abdominal sepsis successfully. This review examines the properties of both phAT and rhAT, and analyzes studies in which they have been utilized. We believe that it is time to embark on a randomized placebo-controlled multi-center trial to establish the role of AT in both civilian and military patients with burn trauma. PMID:26855890

  13. Magnetic particles as affinity matrix for purification of antithrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercês, A. A. D.; Maciel, J. C.; Carvalho Júnior, L. B.

    2015-11-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto insoluble supports is an important tool for the fabrication of a diverse range of functional materials. It provides advantages: enhanced stability and easy separation. In this work two different magnetic composites were synthesized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) to human antithrombin purification. The magnetic particles (MAG) were obtained by co-precipitation method of iron salts II and III and subsequently coated with polyaniline (MAG-PANI particles). Dacron (polyethylene terephthalate) suffered a hydrazinolysis reaction to obtain a powder (Dacron hydrazide) which was subsequently magnetized (mDAC particles) also by co-precipitation method. Heparan sulfate (HS) was immobilized to MAG-PANI and mDAC retained respectively 35μg and 38.6μg per of support. The magnetic composite containing HS immobilized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) was incubated with human blood plasma (1mL) and then washed with NaCl gradients. Electrophoresis of proteins present in eluates showed bands of antithrombin (58kDa). A reduction in the antithrombin activity was detected in plasma that were incubated in the composites magnetic with HS immobilized, suggesting that the antithrombin was removed of the human blood plasma and then purified. Therefore, the above results suggest that both preparations: MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS are able to affinity purify antithrombin, an important component of blood coagulation.

  14. Inherited Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    With a prevalence of 1 in 2500 people, inherited peripheral nerve diseases, collectively called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are among the most common inherited neurologic disorders. Patients with CMT typically present with chronic muscle weakness and atrophy in limbs, sensory loss in the feet and hands, and foot deformities. Clinical similarities between patients often require genetic testing to achieve a precise diagnosis. In this article, the author reviews the clinical and pathologic features of CMT, and demonstrates how electrodiagnostic and genetic tools are used to assist in the diagnosis and symptomatic management of the diseases. Several cases are presented to illustrate the diagnostic processes. PMID:23117945

  15. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I.; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule. PMID:27270881

  16. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase.

    PubMed

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule. PMID:27270881

  17. Factor XI replacement for inherited factor XI deficiency in routine clinical practice: results of the HEMOLEVEN prospective 3-year postmarketing study

    PubMed Central

    Bauduer, F; de Raucourt, E; Boyer-Neumann, C; Trossaert, M; Beurrier, P; Faradji, A; Peynet, J; Borg, J-Y; Chamouni, P; Chatelanaz, C; Henriet, C; Bridey, F; Goudemand, J

    2015-01-01

    Factor XI (FXI)-deficient patients may develop excessive bleeding after trauma or surgery. Replacement therapy should be considered in high-risk situations, especially when FXI levels are below 20 IU dL−1. HEMOLEVEN is a human plasma-derived factor XI concentrate available in France since 1992, but there are few data regarding its use by physicians. This prospective study assessed the use, efficacy and safety of HEMOLEVEN in common clinical practice. HEMOLEVEN was evaluated in FXI-deficient patients in 13 French centres in a 3-year postmarketing study. Forty-four patients (30 females, 14 males) received 67 treatments. The median age was 37 years (8 months–91 years). Basal FXI levels were <1 to 51 IU dL−1 (median: 5.5); 29 patients were severely FXI-deficient (<20 IU dL−1). FXI was administered prophylactically before 43 surgical procedures, 10 invasive procedures, 8 vaginal deliveries, or as curative treatment for six bleeds. The efficacy was assessed as excellent/good in 63, moderate in two and undetermined in two treatments. Seven patients experienced seven adverse effects, including two rated as serious: one sudden massive pulmonary embolism with fatal outcome and one case of inhibitor to FXI. HEMOLEVEN is effective for bleeding prevention in FXI deficiency. However, considering the benefit/risk ratio observed in relation to dosage in this study; firstly, it should be used sparingly due to its potential prothrombotic effect; secondly, new prescription procedures should be defined to adapt the dosage, especially in patients with intrinsic and/or acquired risk factors for thrombosis. PMID:25817556

  18. Inherited Pain

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O.; Kist, Andreas M.; Lampe, Anne K.; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited “paroxysmal extreme pain disorder” (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079–11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T

  19. Inherited disorders of GABA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L; Hartka, Thomas R; Cabalza, Jessica L; Taylor, Jacob; Gibson, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    The inherited disorders of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism require an increased index of clinical suspicion. The known genetic disorders are GABA-transaminase deficiency, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency and homocarnosinosis. A recent link has also been made between impaired GABA synthesis and nonsyndromic cleft lip, with or without cleft palate. SSADH deficiency is the most commonly occurring of the inherited disorders of neurotransmitters. The disorder has a nonspecific phenotype with myriad neurological and psychiatric manifestations, and usually has a nonprogressive temporal course. Diagnosis is made by the detection of γ-hydroxybutyrate excretion on urine organic acid testing. The most consistent magnetic resonance imaging abnormality is an increased signal in the globus pallidus. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has demonstrated the first example of increased endogenous GABA in human brain parenchyma in this disorder. GABA-transaminase deficiency and homocarnosinosis appear to be very rare, but require cerebrospinal fluid for detection, thus allowing for the possibility that these entities, as in the other inherited neurotransmitter disorders, are under-recognized. PMID:23842532

  20. Inherit Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.; Jenks, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin development of a unique educational tool targeted at educating and inspiring young people 12-16 years old about NASA and the Space Program. Since these young people are the future engineers, scientists and space pioneers, the nurturing of their enthusiasm and interest is of critical importance to the Nation. This summer the basic infrastructure of the tool was developed in the context of an educational game paradigm. The game paradigm has achieved remarkable success in maintaining the interest of young people in a self-paced, student-directed learning environment. This type of environment encourages student exploration and curiosity which are exactly the traits that future space pioneers need to develop to prepare for the unexpected. The Inherit Space Educational Tool is an open-ended learning environment consisting of a finite-state machine classic adventure game paradigm. As the young person explores this world, different obstacles must be overcome. Rewards will be offered such as using the flight simulator to fly around and explore Titan. This simulator was modeled on conventional Earth flight simulators but has been considerably enhanced to add texture mapping of Titan's atmosphere utilizing the latest information from the NASA Galileo Space Probe. Additional scenery was added to provide color VGA graphics of a futuristic research station on Titan as well as an interesting story to keep the youngster's attention. This summer the game infrastructure has been developed as well as the Titan Flight Simulator. A number of other enhancements are planned.

  1. Metabolism of thyroxine-binding globulin in man. Abnormal rate of synthesis in inherited thyroxine-binding globulin deficiency and excess.

    PubMed Central

    Refetoff, S; Fang, V S; Marshall, J S; Robin, N I

    1976-01-01

    It has been previously suggested that inherited thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) abnormalities in man may be due to mutations at a single X-chromosome-linked locus controlling TBG synthesis. However, abnormalities in TBG degradation have not been excluded. The availability of purified human TBG and its successful labeling with radioiodide allowed us to examine such possibility. Human TBG was purified by affinity chromatography, labeled under sterile conditions with 131I or 125I,, and mixed with [125I]thyroxine (T4) or [131I]T4, respectively, before their intravenous injection. Blood and urine samples were collected over a 10-day period, and the turnover parameters were calculated. In eight normal volunteers mean values +/-SD for TBG and T4 respectively, were as follows: Half time (t1/2) 5.3 +/- 0.4 and 7.0 +/- 0.6 days; distribution space (DS) 7.2 +/- 1.0 and 10.8 +/- 1.2 liters; and total daily degradation (D) 0.211 +/- 0.053 and 0.088 +/- 0.011 mumol/day. In all subjects, t1/2 of TBG was shorter than that of T4; and the DS was smaller. 2.4 mol of TBG was degraded for each mole of T4. In five of six subjects from four families, comprising hemizygous and heterozygous carriers of TBG absence, decrease, and excess, the t1/2 and DS for TBG were within the normal range. The D of TBG was proportional to the serum concentration of the protein. Changes in the T4 kinetics in these patients were compatible with euthyroidism and with the known alterations in the extrathyroidal T4 pool associated with the changes in serum TBG concentration. A striking decrease in the t1/2 of TBG was found only in a patient with acquired diminution in TBG concentration and in patients with thyrotoxicosis or other conditions apparently unrelated to thyroid dysfunction. TBG t1/2 was 2.5 days in a patient with multiple myeloma and 3.6 days in two patients with thyrotoxicosis. Decreased TBG t1/2 was also observed in three of six patients with nonthyroidal pathology and was associated with an

  2. Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... takes longer than normal to clot in a test tube. Factor XII deficiency is a rare inherited disorder. Symptoms There are usually no symptoms. Exams and Tests Factor XII deficiency is most often found when ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder ...

  4. How Can Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevented? You can't prevent alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency because the condition is inherited (passed from ... children through genes). If you inherit two faulty AAT genes, you'll have AAT deficiency. Even so, ...

  5. Heparanase Activates Antithrombin through the Binding to Its Heparin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Águila, Sonia; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that participates in morphogenesis, tissue repair, heparan sulphates turnover and immune response processes. It is over-expressed in tumor cells favoring the metastasis as it penetrates the endothelial layer that lines blood vessels and facilitates the metastasis by degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix. Heparanase may also affect the hemostatic system in a non-enzymatic manner, up-regulating the expression of tissue factor, which is the initiator of blood coagulation, and dissociating tissue factor pathway inhibitor on the cell surface membrane of endothelial and tumor cells, thus resulting in a procoagulant state. Trying to check the effect of heparanase on heparin, a highly sulphated glycosaminoglycan, when it activates antithrombin, our results demonstrated that heparanase, but not proheparanase, interacted directly with antithrombin in a non-covalent manner. This interaction resulted in the activation of antithrombin, which is the most important endogenous anticoagulant. This activation mainly accelerated FXa inhibition, supporting an allosteric activation effect. Heparanase bound to the heparin binding site of antithrombin as the activation of Pro41Leu, Arg47Cys, Lys114Ala and Lys125Alaantithrombin mutants was impaired when it was compared to wild type antithrombin. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis showed that heparanase induced an activating conformational change in antithrombin similar to that induced by heparin and with a KD of 18.81 pM. In conclusion, under physiological pH and low levels of tissue factor, heparanase may exert a non-enzymatic function interacting and activating the inhibitory function of antithrombin. PMID:27322195

  6. Antithrombin Attenuates Vascular Leakage via Inhibiting Neutrophil Activation in Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rehberg, Sebastian; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Sousse, Linda E.; Jonkam, Collette; Zhu, Yong; Traber, Lillian D.; Cox, Robert A.; Prough, Donald S.; Traber, Daniel L.; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that restoration of antithrombin plasma concentrations attenuates vascular leakage by inhibiting neutrophil activation through syndecan-4 receptor inhibition in an established ovine model of acute lung injury. Design Randomized controlled laboratory experiment. Setting University animal research facility. Subjects Eighteen chronically instrumented sheep. Interventions Following combined burn and smoke inhalation injury (40% of total body surface area, third-degree flame burn; 4 × 12 breaths of cold cotton smoke), chronically instrumented sheep were randomly assigned to receive an IV infusion of 6 IU/kg/hr recombinant human antithrombin III or normal saline (n = 6 each) during the 48-hour study period. In addition, six sham animals (not injured, continuous infusion of vehicle) were used to obtain reference values for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Measurements and Main Results Compared to control animals, recombinant human antithrombin III reduced the number of neutrophils per hour in the pulmonary lymph (p < 0.01 at 24 and 48 hr), alveolar neutrophil infiltration (p = 0.04), and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activity (p = 0.026). Flow cytometric analysis revealed a significant reduction of syndecan-4-positive neutrophils (p = 0.002 vs control at 24 hr). Treatment with recombinant human antithrombin III resulted in a reduction of pulmonary nitrosative stress (p = 0.002), airway obstruction (bronchi: p = 0.001, bronchioli: p = 0.013), parenchymal edema (p = 0.044), and lung bloodless wet-to-dry-weight ratio (p = 0.015). Clinically, recombinant human antithrombin III attenuated the increased pulmonary transvascular fluid flux (12–48 hr: p ≤ 0.001 vs control each) and the deteriorated pulmonary gas exchange (12–48 hr: p < 0.05 vs control each) without increasing the risk of bleeding. Conclusions The present study provides evidence for the interaction between antithrombin and neutrophils in vivo, its pathophysiological

  7. Clinical Severity of PGK1 Deficiency Due To a Novel p.E120K Substitution Is Exacerbated by Co-inheritance of a Subclinical Translocation t(3;14)(q26.33;q12), Disrupting NUBPL Gene.

    PubMed

    David, Dezső; Almeida, Lígia S; Maggi, Maristella; Araújo, Carlos; Imreh, Stefan; Valentini, Giovanna; Fekete, György; Haltrich, Irén

    2015-01-01

    Carriers of cytogenetically similar, apparently balanced familial chromosome translocations not always exhibit the putative translocation-associated disease phenotype. Additional genetic defects, such as genomic imbalance at breakpoint regions or elsewhere in the genome, have been reported as the most plausible explanation.By means of comprehensive molecular and functional analyses, additional to careful dissection of the t(3;14)(q26.33;q12) breakpoints, we unveil a novel X-linked PGK1 mutation and examine the contribution of these to the extremely severe clinical phenotype characterized by hemolytic anemia and neuromyopathy.The 3q26.33 breakpoint is 40 kb from the 5' region of tetratricopeptide repeat domain 14 gene (TTC14), whereas the 14q12 breakpoint is within IVS6 of nucleotide-binding protein-like gene (NUBPL) that encodes a mitochondrial complex I assembly factor. Disruption of NUBPL in translocation carriers leads to a decrease in the corresponding mRNA accompanied by a decrease in protein level. Exclusion of pathogenic genomic imbalance and reassessment of familial clinical history indicate the existence of an additional causal genetic defect. Consequently, by WES a novel mutation, c.358G>A, p.E120K, in the X-linked phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) was identified that segregates with the phenotype. Specific activity, kinetic properties, and thermal stability of this enzyme variant were severely affected. The novel PGK1 mutation is the primary genetic alteration underlying the reported phenotype as the translocation per se only results in a subclinical phenotype. Nevertheless, its co-inheritance presumably exacerbates PGK1-deficient phenotype, most likely due to a synergistic interaction of the affected genes both involved in cell energy supply. PMID:25814383

  8. Small Molecule Probes That Perturb A Protein-protein Interface In Antithrombin.

    PubMed

    Xin, Dongyue; Holzenburg, Andreas; Burgess, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    Small molecule probes for perturbing protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in vitro can be useful if they cause the target proteins to undergo biomedically relevant changes to their tertiary and quaternary structures. Application of the Exploring Key Orientations (EKO) strategy (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 167 - 173) to a piperidinone-piperidine chemotype 1 indicated specific derivatives were candidates to perturb a protein-protein interface in the α-antithrombin dimer; those particular derivatives of 1 were prepared and tested. In the event, most of them significantly accelerated oligomerization of monomeric α-antithrombin, which is metastable in its oligomeric state. This assertion is supported by data from gel electrophoresis (non-denaturing PAGE; throughout) and probe-induced loss of α-antithrombin's inhibitor activity in a reaction catalyzed by thrombin. Kinetics of α-antithrombin oligomerization induced by the target compounds were examined. It was found that probes with O-benzyl-protected serine side-chains are the most active catalysts in the series, and reasons for this, based on modeling experiments, are proposed. Overall, this study reveals one of the first examples of small molecules designed to act at a protein-protein interface relevant to oligomerization of a serpin (ie α-antithrombin). The relevance of this to formation of oligomeric serpin fibrils, associated with the disease states known as "serpinopathies", is discussed. PMID:25396040

  9. Antithrombin is protective against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingying; Wang, Yanqing; Wang, Jinli; Gao, Junjie; Tong, Chao; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Li, Ji; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Antithrombin (AT) is a plasma serpin inhibitor that regulates the proteolytic activity of procoagulant proteases of the clotting cascade. In addition to its anticoagulant activity, AT also possesses potent antiinflammatory properties. Objectives The objective of this study is to investigate the antiinflammatory activity of wild-type AT (AT-WT) and a reactive center loop mutant of AT (AT-RCL) which is not capable of inhibiting thrombin. Methods Cardioprotective activities of AT-WT and AT-RCL were monitored in a mouse model of ischemia/reperfusion injury in which the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded and then released. Results We demonstrate that AT markedly reduces myocardial infarct size by a mechanism that is independent of its anticoagulant activity. Thus, AT-RCL attenuated myocardial infarct size to the same extent as AT-WT in this acute injury model. Further studies revealed that AT binds to vascular heparan sulfate proteoglycans via its heparin-binding domain to exert its protective activity as evidenced by the therapeutic AT-binding pentasaccharide (fondaparinux) abrogating the cardioprotective activity of AT and a heparin-site mutant of AT exhibiting no cardioprotective property. We further demonstrate that AT up-regulates production of prostacyclin in myocardial tissues and inhibits expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in vivo by attenuating ischemia/reperfusion-induced JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Conclusions Our results suggest that both AT and the non-anticoagulant AT-RCL, through their antiinflammatory signaling effects, elicit potent cardioprotective responses. Thus, AT may have therapeutic potential for treating cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:23582062

  10. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Inherited Emphysema)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 protein in the blood with normal alpha-1 antitrypsin from healthy plasma donors. It is given in a vein (IV). The dose is adjusted based on body weight. This treatment is often given once a week. There are three ... the management of Alpha-1 related emphysema includes: • Exercise and a healthy lifestyle ...

  11. Small Molecule Probes That Perturb A Protein-protein Interface In Antithrombin

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Dongyue; Holzenburg, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Small molecule probes for perturbing protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in vitro can be useful if they cause the target proteins to undergo biomedically relevant changes to their tertiary and quaternary structures. Application of the Exploring Key Orientations (EKO) strategy (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 167 – 173) to a piperidinone-piperidine chemotype 1 indicated specific derivatives were candidates to perturb a protein-protein interface in the α-antithrombin dimer; those particular derivatives of 1 were prepared and tested. In the event, most of them significantly accelerated oligomerization of monomeric α-antithrombin, which is metastable in its oligomeric state. This assertion is supported by data from gel electrophoresis (non-denaturing PAGE; throughout) and probe-induced loss of α-antithrombin’s inhibitor activity in a reaction catalyzed by thrombin. Kinetics of α-antithrombin oligomerization induced by the target compounds were examined. It was found that probes with O-benzyl-protected serine side-chains are the most active catalysts in the series, and reasons for this, based on modeling experiments, are proposed. Overall, this study reveals one of the first examples of small molecules designed to act at a protein-protein interface relevant to oligomerization of a serpin (ie α-antithrombin). The relevance of this to formation of oligomeric serpin fibrils, associated with the disease states known as “serpinopathies”, is discussed. PMID:25396040

  12. Genetics Home Reference: 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is an inherited disorder that affects the adrenal glands . The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys and ... body. In people with 21-hydroxylase deficiency , the adrenal glands produce excess androgens, which are male sex hormones. ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  14. Acceleration of thrombin-antithrombin complex formation in rat hindquarters via heparinlike molecules bound to the endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Marcum, J A; McKenney, J B; Rosenberg, R D

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the role of heparinlike molecules in the regulation of coagulation by perfusing rat hindquarters with purified human thrombin and with its plasma inhibitor, antithrombin. Our data indicate that contact of the hemostatic components with the endothelium enhances the rate of thrombin-antithrombin complex formation by as much as 19-fold over the uncatalyzed rate of enzyme-inhibitor interaction. Heparinlike molecules are responsible for the antithrombin accelerating activity. The amount of thrombin-antithrombin complex generated within the hindlimb preparation after pretreatment of the vasculature with purified Flavobacterium heparinase or with addition of platelet Factor IV to the hemostatic components, was equal to the uncatalyzed levels. These heparinlike molecules appear to be tightly bound to the luminal surface of the endothelium, since they could not be detected within the physiologic buffer that was perfused through the animal. The above mucopolysaccharides function in a manner similar to commercial heparin, since modification of antithrombin at a site critical for heparin-dependent acceleration of the protease inhibitor resulted in a level of interaction product identical to the uncatalyzed amount. Finally, addition of diisofluorophosphate-thrombin to the enzyme perfusion stream reduced the amount of thrombin-antithrombin complex formed in the animal by 30-40%, which suggested that thrombin bound to the endothelium as well as enzyme free in solution are accessible to antithrombin that has interacted with heparinlike molecules present on the endothelium. PMID:6746897

  15. The Impact of Inherited Thrombophilia Types and Low Molecular Weight Heparin Treatment on Pregnancy Complications in Women with Previous Adverse Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Aracic, Nada; Roje, Damir; Jakus, Ivana Alujevic; Bakotin, Marinela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the distribution of births and spontaneous abortions, first-trimester abortion (FTA) and mid-trimester abortion (MTA), in untreated (n=128) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) treated pregnancies (n=50) of the same women with inherited thrombophilias and adverse pregnancy outcome (APO) in previous pregnancies. We particularly investigated the impact of LMWH on reducing the pregnancy complications in two thrombophilia types, "Conventional" and "Novel". Materials and Methods 50 women with inherited thrombophilia (26 Conventional and 24 Novel) and APO in previous pregnancies were included in the study. Conventional group included factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin G20210A (PT) mutations and antithrombin (AT), protein S (PS), and protein C (PC) deficiency, while the Novel group included methylentetrahydrofolate-reductase (MTHFR), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphism. APO was defined as one of the following: preterm birth (PTB), fetal growth restriction (FGR), preeclampsia (PE), intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), placental abruption (PA) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Results There was no difference in distribution of births and spontaneous abortions between Conventional and Novel thrombophilia in untreated pregnancies (χ2=2.7; p=0.100) and LMWH treated pregnancies (χ2=0.442; p=0.506). In untreaed pregnancies thrombophilia type did not have any impact on the frequency of FTA and MTA (χ2=0.14; p=0.711). In birth-ended pregnancies LMWH treatement reduced the incidence of IUFD (p=0.011) in Conventional and FGR, IUFD, and PTB in Novel thrombophilia group. Conclusion The equal impact of two thrombophilia types on the pregnancy outcomes and a more favorable effect of LMWH therapy on pregnancy complications in Novel thrombophilia group point the need for Novel thrombophilias screening and the future studies on this issue should be recommended. PMID:27401656

  16. Regions flanking exon 1 regulate constitutive expression of the human antithrombin gene.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rachubinski, F A; Weiner, J H; Blajchman, M A

    1996-11-15

    We have identified cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors that regulate constitutive expression of the human antithrombin gene. The activity of the sequences flanking the first exon of the gene was investigated using a luciferase-based reporter assay in transiently transfected HepG2, COS1, BSC40, and HeLa cells. Deletion analysis allowed the mapping of two elements able to promote antithrombin gene transcription in HepG2 and COS1 cells. The first element is located upstream of the first exon (-150/+68 nucleotides). The second element is in the first intervening sequence (+300/+700 nucleotides) and functions in an orientation opposite to that of the first. Footprint analysis showed three protected areas in the 5' upstream element at -92/-68 (element A), -14/+37 (element B), and -126/-100 nucleotides (element C). These elements acted as enhancers in luciferase reporter assays. Gel retardation analysis demonstrated that two liver-enriched transcription factors, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPa), bound to the 5' upstream element. HNF4 bound to elements A and C, whereas C/EBPa bound to element B. Element A also interacted with the ubiquitous nuclear hormone receptors chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor 1 (COUP-TF1), thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRalpha), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha(PPARalpha), and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha). In HepG2 and BSC40 cells, HNF4, C/EBPalpha, and RXRalpha activated luciferase expression from a reporter construct containing the 5'-upstream minimal antithrombin gene promoter, while COUP-TF1, TRalpha, and HNF3 (alpha or beta) repressed such expression. Our results show that constitutive expression of the human antithrombin gene depends in part upon the interplay of these transcription factors and suggest that signaling pathways regulated by these factors can modulate antithrombin gene transcription. PMID:8910619

  17. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  18. Genetics Home Reference: arginase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes the amino acid arginine (a building block of proteins) and ammonia ... links) Encyclopedia: Hereditary urea cycle abnormality Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Genetic Brain Disorders Health ...

  19. The foundation of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Rudolf

    2010-03-01

    In 1909 two papers by Correns and by Baur published in volume 1 of Zeitschrift für induktive Abstammungs- und Vererbungslehre (now Molecular Genetics and Genomics) reported on the non-Mendelian inheritance of chlorophyll deficiencies. These papers, reporting the very first cases of extranuclear inheritance, laid the foundation for a new field: non-Mendelian or extranuclear genetics. Correns observed a purely maternal inheritance (in Mirabilis), whereas Baur found a biparental inheritance (in Pelargonium). Correns suspected the non-Mendelian factors in the cytoplasm, while Baur believed that the plastids carry these extranuclear factors. In the following years, Baur's hypothesis was proved to be correct. Baur subsequently developed the theory of plastid inheritance. In many genera the plastids are transmitted only uniparentally by the mother, while in a few genera there is a biparental plastid inheritance. Commonly there is random sorting of plastids during ontogenetic development. Renner and Schwemmle as well as geneticists in other countries added additional details to this theory. Pioneering studies on mitochondrial inheritance in yeast started in 1949 in the group of Ephrussi and Slonimski; respiration-deficient cells (petites in yeast, poky in Neurospora) were demonstrated to be due to mitochondrial mutations. Electron microscopical and biochemical studies (1962-1964) showed that plastids and mitochondria contain organelle-specific DNA molecules. These findings laid the molecular basis for the two branches of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics. PMID:20140454

  20. Mechanism of poly(acrylic acid) acceleration of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin: implications for the design of novel heparin mimics.

    PubMed

    Monien, Bernhard H; Cheang, Kai I; Desai, Umesh R

    2005-08-11

    The bridging mechanism of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin is a dominant mechanism contributing a massive approximately 2500-fold acceleration in the reaction rate and is also a key reason for the clinical usage of heparin. Our recent study of the antithrombin-activating properties of a carboxylic acid-based polymer, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), demonstrated a surprisingly high acceleration in thrombin inhibition (Monien, B. H.; Desai, U. R. J. Med. Chem. 2005, 48, 1269). To better understand this interesting phenomenon, we have studied the mechanism of PAA-dependent acceleration in antithrombin inhibition of thrombin. Competitive binding studies with low-affinity heparin and a heparin tetrasaccharide suggest that PAA binds antithrombin in both the pentasaccharide- and the extended heparin-binding sites, and these results are corroborated by molecular modeling. The salt-dependence of the K(D) of the PAA-antithrombin interaction shows the formation of five ionic interactions. In contrast, the contribution of nonionic forces is miniscule, resulting in an interaction that is significantly weaker than that observed for heparins. A bell-shaped profile of the observed rate constant for antithrombin inhibition of thrombin as a function of PAA concentration was observed, suggesting that inhibition proceeds through the "bridging" mechanism. The knowledge gained in this mechanistic study highlights important rules for the rational design of orally available heparin mimics. PMID:16078853

  1. Inherited interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Christine Kim; Raghu, Ganesh

    2004-09-01

    This article focuses on recent advances in the identification of genes and genetic polymorphisms that have been implicated in the development of human interstitial lung diseases. It focuses on the inherited mendelian diseases in which pulmonary fibrosis is part of the clinical phenotype and the genetics of familial idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other rare inherited interstitial lung diseases. The article also reviews the association studies that have been published to date regarding the genetics of sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The reader is directed to recent reviews on human genetic predisposition of sarcoidosis, environmental-related, drug-related, connective tissue related pulmonary fibrosis, and genetic predisposition of fibrosis in animal models. PMID:15331184

  2. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  3. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  4. Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III: effect of single amino acid substitutions and relationship with functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, V; Leone, G; Mastrangelo, S; Lane, D A; Girolami, A; de Moerloose, P; Sas, G; Abildgaard, U; Blajchman, M; Rodeghiero, F

    1994-02-01

    Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III (AT-III) was investigated by crossed immunoelectrofocusing (CIEF) on eleven molecular variants. A normal pattern was found in five variants while two different abnormal CIEF patterns were found in the other four and two variants, respectively. Point mutations causing a major pI change (exceeding 4.0) of the amino acid substituted lead to alterations in the overall microheterogeneity. The variants thus substituted share a first type of abnormal CIEF pattern with alterations throughout the pH range, regardless of the location of the mutation (reactive site and adjacent regions or heparin binding region). Minor amino acid pI changes in these regions do not alter the AT-III overall microheterogeneity, whatever the resulting functional defect. However, if the mutation is placed in the region around positions 404 or 429, then even minor changes of the amino acid pI seem able to alter the overall charge, leading to a second type of abnormal CIEF pattern with the main alteration at pH 4.8-4.6. Neuraminidase treatment leads to disappearance of microheterogeneity except for the variants with the Arg393 to Cys substitution. Addition of thrombin induces CIEF modifications specifically related to the functional defect. A normal formation of thrombin-antithrombin complexes induces a shift towards the more acid pH range, whereas in the variants substituted at the reactive site the CIEF pattern is substantially unaffected by thrombin; variants substituted at positions 382-384 show a maximal thrombin-induced increase of the isoforms at pI 4.8-4.6. Therefore mutant antithrombins with different functional abnormalities but sharing a common CIEF pattern were well distinguished.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8180341

  5. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Sandrock-Lang, Kirstin; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Santoso, Sentot; Zieger, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Inherited platelet disorders may be the cause of bleeding symptoms of varying severity as platelets fail to fulfil their haemostatic role after vessel injury. Platelet disorders may be difficult to diagnose (and are likely to be misdiagnosed) and raise problems in therapy and management. This review explores the clinical and molecular genetic phenotype of several inherited disorders. Inherited platelet disorders can be classified according to their platelet defects: receptor defects (adhesion or aggregation), secretion disorder, and cytoskeleton defects. The best characterized platelet receptor defects are Glanzmann thrombasthenia (integrin αIIbβ3 defect) and Bernard-Soulier syndrome (defect of GPIb/IX/V). Detailed case reports of patients suffering from Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) or Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) showing the bleeding diathesis as well as investigation of platelet aggregation/agglutination and platelet receptor expression will complement this review. In addition, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) as an important defect of δ-granule secretion is extensively described together with a case report of a patient suffering from HPS type 1. PMID:25707719

  6. Decrease in antithrombin III and prothrombin serum levels contribute to coagulation disorders during leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luis G V; Filho, Antonio F S; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2016-08-01

    Pathogenic bacteria of the genus Leptospira are the causative agent of leptospirosis, an emergent infectious disease that affects humans and animals worldwide. Severe forms of the disease in humans include jaundice, multiple organ failure and intense haemorrhage. Up to now, mechanisms associated with the haemorrhage foci are poorly understood. We report in this work that, despite the low levels of antithrombin III in convalescent human serum samples, virulent, culture-attenuated and saprophyte strains of Leptospira are unable to bind and/or degrade this thrombin inhibitor, suggesting an indirect mechanism of pathogenesis. Lower levels of prothrombin were found in serum samples at the onset and convalescent phase of the disease when compared to normal human sera. The concomitant decreased levels of antithrombin III and prothrombin suggest a process of stimulated coagulation, which is corroborated by the increase of prothrombin fragment F1+2 in the serum samples. Data obtained with hamsters experimentally infected with virulent Leptospira interrogans serovars Kennewicki and Canicola strongly point out that haemorrhage is correlated with decreased levels of thrombin inhibitors and prothrombin. Activated coagulation might lead to an overconsumption of coagulation factors ultimately leading to bleeding and organ failure. PMID:27260249

  7. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise. PMID:26927864

  8. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate carboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... carboxylase deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes lactic acid and other potentially toxic compounds to accumulate in ... features include developmental delay and a buildup of lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis). Increased acidity in ...

  9. Inheritance of Cytosine Methylation.

    PubMed

    Tillo, Desiree; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Vinson, Charles

    2016-11-01

    There are numerous examples of parental transgenerational inheritance that is epigenetic. The informational molecules include RNA, chromatin modifications, and cytosine methylation. With advances in DNA sequencing technologies, the molecular and epigenetic mechanisms mediating these effects are now starting to be uncovered. This mini-review will highlight some of the examples of epigenetic inheritance, the establishment of cytosine methylation in sperm, and recent genomic studies linking sperm cytosine methylation to epigenetic effects on offspring. A recent paper examining changes in diet and sperm cytosine methylation from pools of eight animals each, found differences between a normal diet, a high fat diet, and a low protein diet. However, epivariation between individuals within a group was greater than the differences between groups obscuring any potential methylation changes linked to diet. Learning more about epivariation may help unravel the mechanisms that regulate cytosine methylation. In addition, other experimental and genetic systems may also produce more dramatic changes in the sperm methylome, making it easier to unravel potential transgenerational phenomena. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2346-2352, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26910768

  10. Inherited mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Though inherited mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are most well known for their syndromic forms, for which widely known acronyms (MELAS, MERRF, NARP, LHON etc.) have been coined, the vast majority of inherited MIDs presents in a non-syndromic form. Since MIDs are most frequently multisystem disorders already at onset or during the disease course, a MID should be suspected if there is a combination of neurological and non-neurological abnormalities. Neurological abnormalities occurring as a part of a MID include stroke-like episodes, epilepsy, migraine-like headache, movement disorders, cerebellar ataxia, visual impairment, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment, dementia, psychosis, hypopituitarism, aneurysms, or peripheral nervous system disease, such as myopathy, neuropathy, or neuronopathy. Non-neurological manifestations concern the ears, the endocrine organs, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, the kidneys, the bone marrow, and the skin. Whenever there is an unexplained combination of neurological and non-neurological disease in a patient or kindred, a MID should be suspected and appropriate diagnostic measures initiated. Genetic testing should be guided by the phenotype, the biopsy findings, and the biochemical results. PMID:22399423

  11. Safety and Proof-of-Concept Study of Oral QLT091001 in Retinitis Pigmentosa Due to Inherited Deficiencies of Retinal Pigment Epithelial 65 Protein (RPE65) or Lecithin:Retinol Acyltransferase (LRAT)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yuquan; Fishman, Gerald A.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Bittner, Ava; Bowles, Kristen; Fletcher, Emily C.; Collison, Frederick T.; Dagnelie, Gislin; Degli Eposti, Simona; Michaelides, Michel; Saperstein, David A.; Schuchard, Ronald A.; Barnes, Claire; Zein, Wadih; Zobor, Ditta; Birch, David G.; Mendola, Janine D.; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2015-01-01

    Restoring vision in inherited retinal degenerations remains an unmet medical need. In mice exhibiting a genetically engineered block of the visual cycle, vision was recently successfully restored by oral administration of 9-cis-retinyl acetate (QLT091001). Safety and visual outcomes of a once-daily oral dose of 40 mg/m2/day QLT091001 for 7 consecutive days was investigated in an international, multi-center, open-label, proof-of-concept study in 18 patients with RPE65- or LRAT-related retinitis pigmentosa. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed a ≥20% increase and 4 of 18 (22%) showed a ≥40% increase in functional retinal area determined from Goldmann visual fields; 12 (67%) and 5 (28%) of 18 patients showed a ≥5 and ≥10 ETDRS letter score increase of visual acuity, respectively, in one or both eyes at two or more visits within 2 months of treatment. In two patients who underwent fMRI, a significant positive response was measured to stimuli of medium contrast, moving, pattern targets in both left and right hemispheres of the occipital cortex. There were no serious adverse events. Treatment-related adverse events were transient and the most common included headache, photophobia, nausea, vomiting, and minor biochemical abnormalities. Measuring the outer segment length of the photoreceptor layer with high-definition optical coherence tomography was highly predictive of treatment responses with responders having a significantly larger baseline outer segment thickness (11.7 ± 4.8 μm, mean ± 95% CI) than non-responders (3.5 ± 1.2 μm). This structure-function relationship suggests that treatment with QLT091001 is more likely to be efficacious if there is sufficient photoreceptor integrity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014052 PMID:26656277

  12. Antithrombin III-beta associates more readily than antithrombin III-alpha with uninjured and de-endothelialized aortic wall in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Witmer, M.R.; Hatton, M.W. )

    1991-05-01

    The properties of two isoforms, alpha and beta, of rabbit antithrombin III (ATIII) were compared in the presence of undamaged or de-endothelialized rabbit aortic wall. Similar quantities of ATIII-alpha and ATIII-beta bound to and rapidly saturated the endothelium in vitro, but the rate of transendothelial passage of ATIII-beta exceeded that of ATIII-alpha by 22%. Furthermore, ATIII-beta was adsorbed approximately twice as rapidly as ATIII-alpha by the subendothelium of the de-endothelialized aorta. Binding of both isoforms was decreased (ATIII-beta more than ATIII-alpha) by pretreating the subendothelial surface with heparitinase. Also, subendothelium-bound ATIII-beta was desorbed more readily than bound ATIII-alpha by thrombin. In vivo, the rate of uptake of iodine-131-labeled ATIII-beta from the circulation by the aortic wall and the major organs was 30-50% faster than that of iodine-125-labeled ATIII-alpha. In contrast, the uptake of {sup 131}I-ATIII-beta by the de-endothelialized aorta in vivo was three times faster than that of {sup 125}I-ATIII-alpha. By these criteria, ATIII-beta is the more active of the two isoforms. We surmise that plasma and, consequently, vessel wall levels of ATIII-beta may be vital for controlling thrombogenic events caused by injury to the vascular wall.

  13. Impaired clot lysis in copper-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, S.M.; Klevay, L.M. )

    1991-03-15

    Cu-deficient mice exhibit atrial thrombosis but have significantly lowered plasma coagulation factor V and VIII activities. To investigate the effects of a dietary Cu deficiency on clot lysis, groups of adult male and female Swiss-Webster mice were fed Cu-supplemented or -deficient diets with deionized water for 49 days. Animals were exsanguinated under pentobarbital anesthesia; platelet-poor plasma prepared and assayed for euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT) and antithrombin III activity. A protamine sulfate test was also performed. The highly significant ECLT prolongation in Cu-deficient mice clearly demonstrates that critical components of the physiological clot-lysing mechanism must be severely impaired in these animals. These results may help to explain the thrombotic sequelae of a dietary Cu deficiency in mice.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of antithrombin-heparin regulation of blood clotting proteinases. a paradigm for understanding proteinase regulation by serpin family protein proteinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Steven T.; Richard, Benjamin; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Gettins, Peter G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Serpin family protein proteinase inhibitors regulate the activity of serine and cysteine proteinases by a novel conformational trapping mechanism that may itself be regulated by cofactors to provide a finely-tuned time and location-dependent control of proteinase activity. The serpin, antithrombin, together with its cofactors, heparin and heparan sulfate, perform a critical anticoagulant function by preventing the activation of blood clotting proteinases except when needed at the site of a vascular injury. Here, we review the detailed molecular understanding of this regulatory mechanism that has emerged from numerous X-ray crystal structures of antithrombin and its complexes with heparin and target proteinases together with mutagenesis and functional studies of heparin-antithrombin-proteinase interactions in solution. Like other serpins, antithrombin achieves specificity for its target blood clotting proteinases by presenting recognition determinants in an exposed reactive center loop as well as in exosites outside the loop. Antithrombin reactivity is repressed in the absence of its activator because of unfavorable interactions that diminish the favorable RCL and exosite interactions with proteinases. Binding of a specific heparin or heparan sulfate pentasaccharide to antithrombin induces allosteric activating changes that mitigate the unfavorable interactions and promote template bridging of the serpin and proteinase. Antithrombin has thus evolved a sophisticated means of regulating the activity of blood clotting proteinases in a time and location-dependent manner that exploits the multiple conformational states of the serpin and their differential stabilization by glycosaminoglycan cofactors. PMID:20685328

  15. Inherited renal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Akira; Young, Scott W; Takahashi, Naoki; King, Bernard F; Atwell, Thomas D

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary forms of kidney carcinoma account for 5-8% of all malignant kidney neoplasms. The renal tumors are often multiple and bilateral and occur at an earlier age. Each of the hereditary kidney carcinoma syndromes is associated with specific gene mutations as well as a specific histologic type of kidney carcinoma. The presence of associated extrarenal manifestations may suggest a hereditary kidney cancer syndrome. Radiology is most commonly used to screen and manage patients with hereditary kidney cancer syndromes. This manuscript reviews the clinical and imaging findings of well-defined inherited kidney cancer syndromes including von Hippel-Lindau disease, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, hereditary papillary renal carcinoma syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and RCC syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex, and Lynch syndrome. PMID:27108134

  16. Dynamic properties of the native free antithrombin from molecular dynamics simulations: computational evidence for solvent- exposed Arg393 side chain.

    PubMed

    Tóth, László; Fekete, Attila; Balogh, Gábor; Bereczky, Zsuzsanna; Komáromi, István

    2015-09-01

    While antithrombin (AT) has small basal inhibitory activity, it reaches its full inhibitory potential against activated blood coagulation factors, FXa, FIXa, and FIIa (thrombin), via an allosteric and/or template (bridging) mechanism by the action of heparin, heparan sulfate, or heparin-mimetic pentasaccharides (PS). From the numerous X-ray structures available for different conformational states of AT, only indirect and incomplete conclusions can be drawn on the inherently dynamic properties of AT. As a typical example, the basal inhibitory activity of AT cannot be interpreted on the basis of "non-activated" free antithrombin X-ray structures since the Arg393 side chain, playing crucial role in antithrombin-proteinase interaction, is not exposed. In order to reveal the intrinsic dynamic properties and the reason of basal inhibitory activity of antithrombin, 2 μs molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on its native free-forms. It was shown from the simulation trajectories that the reactive center loop which is functioning as "bait" for proteases, even without any biasing potential can populate conformational state in which the Arg393 side chain is solvent exposed. It is revealed from the trajectory analysis that the peptide sequences correspond to the helix D extension, and new helix P formation can be featured with especially large root-mean-square fluctuations. Mutual information analyses of the trajectory showed remarkable (generalized) correlation between those regions of antithrombin which changed their conformations as the consequence of AT-PS complex formation. This suggests that allosteric information propagation pathways are present even in the non-activated native form of AT. PMID:25483839

  17. Low molecular weight heparin restores antithrombin III activity from hyperglycemia induced alterations.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Marchi, E; Palazzni, E; Quatraro, A; Giugliano, D

    1990-01-01

    Alteration of antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, glycemia level dependent, exists in diabetes mellitus. In this study the ability of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (Fluxum, Alfa-Wassermann S.p.A., Bologna, Italy), as well as unfractioned héparin, to preserve ATIII activity from glucose-induced alterations, both in vitro and in vivo, is reported. The subcutaneous and intravenous LMWH and heparin administration increases basal depressed ATIII activity in diabetic patients. Heparin shows an equivalent effect on both anti-IIa and anti-Xa activity of ATIII, while LMWH is more effective in preserving the anti-Xa activity. Similarity, heparin preserves ATIII activity from hyperglycemia-induced alterations, during hyperglycemic clamp, and LMWH infusion is able to preserve a significant amount of anti-Xa activity from glucose-induced alterations. Since diabetic patients show a high incidence of thrombotic accidents, LMWH appears to be a promising innovation for the prevention of diabetic thrombophylia. PMID:2196192

  18. Inherited mitochondrial neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) occasionally manifest as polyneuropathy either as the dominant feature or as one of many other manifestations (inherited mitochondrial neuropathy). MIDs in which polyneuropathy is the dominant feature, include NARP syndrome due to the transition m.8993T>, CMT2A due to MFN2 mutations, CMT2K and CMT4A due to GDAP1 mutations, and axonal/demyelinating neuropathy with external ophthalmoplegia due to POLG1 mutations. MIDs in which polyneuropathy is an inconstant feature among others is the MELAS syndrome, MERRF syndrome, LHON, Mendelian PEO, KSS, Leigh syndrome, MNGIE, SANDO; MIRAS, MEMSA, AHS, MDS (hepato-cerebral form), IOSCA, and ADOA syndrome. In the majority of the cases polyneuropathy presents in a multiplex neuropathy distribution. Nerve conduction studies may reveal either axonal or demyelinated or mixed types of neuropathies. If a hereditary neuropathy is due to mitochondrial dysfunction, the management of these patients is at variance from non-mitochondrial hereditary neuropathies. Patients with mitochondrial hereditary neuropathy need to be carefully investigated for clinical or subclinical involvement of other organs or systems. Supportive treatment with co-factors, antioxidants, alternative energy sources, or lactate lowering agents can be tried. Involvement of other organs may require specific treatment. Mitochondrial neuropathies should be included in the differential diagnosis of hereditary neuropathies. PMID:21402391

  19. Acquired Zinc Deficiency in an Adult Female

    PubMed Central

    Saritha, Mohanan; Gupta, Divya; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Thappa, Devinder M; Rajesh, Nachiappa G

    2012-01-01

    Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of zinc absorption. Acquired cases are reported occasionally in patients with eating disorders or Crohn's disease. We report a 24-year-old housewife with acquired isolated severe zinc deficiency with no other comorbidities to highlight the rare occurrence of isolated nutritional zinc deficiency in an otherwise normal patient. PMID:23248371

  20. Effects of Preoperative Glycyrrhizin Infusion for the Prevention of Venous Thrombosis on the Tissue Expression of Antithrombin in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Kira, Yukimi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Using a thrombus model prepared by ligation of the inferior vena cava (IVC), the influences of the glycoside, glycyrrhizin, on plasma antithrombin levels and antithrombin mRNA expression levels in the liver and IVC with the inhibition of venous thrombosis were investigated. Materials and Methods: The rat IVC was exposed and ligated for 24 h immediately after the intravenous administration of 300 mg/kg glycyrrhizin. Among antithrombotic drugs, the Xa inhibitor, fondaparinux sodium, was used as a control drug. Results: The mean thrombus weight was significantly smaller in the glycyrrhizin-treated group (18.3 mg) than in the saline-treated group (34.3 mg). In contrast, the inhibition of thrombosis was not observed in the fondaparinux-treated group. Antithrombin mRNA expression levels in the liver were significantly higher in the ligated groups than in the baseline control group. The mean plasma antithrombin level was significantly lower in the glycyrrhizin group (96.6%) than in the saline group (114.4%), but was not significantly different from that in the baseline control group (102.4%). Conclusion: The pretreatment with glycyrrhizin inhibited venous thrombosis, and antithrombin mRNA expression levels in the liver and IVC as well as plasma antithrombin levels were significantly lower than those in the saline group. PMID:27375802

  1. Molecular-size-dependent variations in the proportions of chains with high binding affinities for antithrombin in rat skin heparin proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, A A

    1989-01-01

    Approximately half of all rat skin heparin proteoglycans have polysaccharide chains that have no sites with high binding affinity for antithrombin. The rest have chains with high-affinity antithrombin-binding-site densities ranging from zero to five sites per chain, with a high degree of variation. Proteoglycans vary in size because of diversity in the number of chains per molecule; the relationship between proteoglycan size and high-affinity antithrombin-binding-site density has not been studied previously. Polydisperse heparin proteoglycans from rat skin, labelled biosynthetically with 35S, were fractionated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel A-150m and arbitrarily divided into five fractions of decreasing average molecular size. Fractionation of these products on antithrombin-agarose showed that the proportion of proteoglycans with high affinity for antithrombin decreased from 39% to 25% as molecular size decreased. However, as the molecular size of high-affinity proteoglycans decreased, the proportion of their chains that had high affinity increased from 29% to 59%. Therefore molecular size is a significant factor in determining the proportion of high-affinity chains in heparin proteoglycans. A model of heparin biosynthesis is proposed in which areas of specific enzyme activity that control the synthesis of the antithrombin-binding-site sequence are sparsely and nonrandomly distributed on mast-cell Golgi membranes. It is postulated that the likelihood of a developing proteoglycan encountering one of these hypothetical areas is molecular-size-dependent. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2590178

  2. Basement-membrane heparan sulphate with high affinity for antithrombin synthesized by normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pejler, G; David, G

    1987-01-01

    Basement-membrane proteoglycans, biosynthetically labelled with [35S]sulphate, were isolated from normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells. Proteoglycans synthesized by normal cells contained mainly heparan sulphate and, in addition, small amounts of chondroitin sulphate chains, whereas transformed cells synthesized a relatively higher proportion of chondroitin sulphate. Polysaccharide chains from transformed cells were of lower average Mr and of lower anionic charge density compared with chains isolated from the untransformed counterparts, confirming results reported previously [David & Van den Berghe (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 7338-7344]. A large proportion of the chains isolated from normal cells bound with high affinity to immobilized antithrombin, and the presence of 3-O-sulphated glucosamine residues, previously identified as unique markers for the antithrombin-binding region of heparin [Lindahl, Bäckström, Thunberg & Leder (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 6551-6555], could be demonstrated. A significantly lower proportion of the chains derived from transformed cells bound with high affinity to antithrombin, and a corresponding decrease in the amount of incorporated 3-O-sulphate was observed. PMID:2963617

  3. Purpura Fulminans Due to Acquired Protein C Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Devdeep; Pal, Priyankar; Kundu, Ritabrata

    2015-01-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) may be the presenting symptom in a patient with protein C (PC) deficiency. It is a hematological emergency and presents with extensive areas of hemorrhagic necrosis of the skin. PC deficiency is usually genetically inherited. However, we report a 1 year and 4 months boy, who presented with acquired PC deficiency possibly of postinfectious etiology and developed PF. PMID:26677306

  4. Structural peculiarity and antithrombin binding region profile of mucosal bovine and porcine heparins.

    PubMed

    Naggi, Annamaria; Gardini, Cristina; Pedrinola, Giacomo; Mauri, Lucio; Urso, Elena; Alekseeva, Anna; Casu, Benito; Cassinelli, Giuseppe; Guerrini, Marco; Iacomini, Marcello; Baigorria, Valentina; Torri, Giangiacomo

    2016-01-25

    The major compositional differences between bovine mucosal heparin (BMH) and the currently employed porcine mucosal heparin (PMH) have been reported to essentially consist of reduced 6-O-sulfation of the glucosamine residues in BMH and somewhat lower 2-O-sulfation of the iduronate residues in PMH. The present work is based on direct comparison of several BMH and PMH commercial preparations. A combined study by 2D (heteronuclear single quantum coherence, HSQC) NMR and ion-pair reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (IPRP-HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) on the heparins, extended to the analysis of their heparinases digests and fractions separated by affinity chromatography on antithrombin (AT), confirmed the previously reported lower degree of 6-O-sulfation and showed lower 3-O-sulfated glucosamine content in BMH. More detailed studies allowed the identification of structural variants of AT-binding region (ATBR) structural variants, showing higher content of the N-sulfated components in BMH than in PMH. PMID:26512999

  5. Antithrombin III and fibrinogen degradation product (fragment E) in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Chan, V; Yeung, C K; Chan, T K

    1982-06-01

    Plasma antithrombin III (AtIII), serum fragment E (FgE) and urine AtIII and FgE were measured in 25 diabetic patients with proteinuria above 1 g per day and compared to that in 25 patients with non-diabetic nephropathy, matched for the degree of proteinuria. Plasma AtIII concentrations were normal in both groups but FgE concentrations were increased. The level of plasma AtIII was directly related to HbA1 concentrations in the diabetics. For the same degree of proteinuria, the diabetic patients lost more AtIII and FgE in the urine. Urine AtIII was found to be mostly bound to activated procoagulants. Both urine AtIII and urine FgE correlated inversely with creatinine clearance. It was concluded that intraglomerular thrombosis probably contributes to the deteriorating renal function in diabetic nephropathy and is reflected in the concentrations of urine AtIII and FgE. PMID:7085916

  6. Antithrombin III and fibrinogen degradation product (fragment E) in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, V; Yeung, C K; Chan, T K

    1982-01-01

    Plasma antithrombin III (AtIII), serum fragment E (FgE) and urine AtIII and FgE were measured in 25 diabetic patients with proteinuria above 1 g per day and compared to that in 25 patients with non-diabetic nephropathy, matched for the degree of proteinuria. Plasma AtIII concentrations were normal in both groups but FgE concentrations were increased. The level of plasma AtIII was directly related to HbA1 concentrations in the diabetics. For the same degree of proteinuria, the diabetic patients lost more AtIII and FgE in the urine. Urine AtIII was found to be mostly bound to activated procoagulants. Both urine AtIII and urine FgE correlated inversely with creatinine clearance. It was concluded that intraglomerular thrombosis probably contributes to the deteriorating renal function in diabetic nephropathy and is reflected in the concentrations of urine AtIII and FgE. Images PMID:7085916

  7. Heparin binding domain of antithrombin III: Characterization using a synthetic peptide directed polyclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.W.; Dey, B.; Knauer, D.J. )

    1990-09-25

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a plasma-borne serine protease inhibitor that apparently forms covalent complexes with thrombin. The interaction between ATIII and thrombin is enhanced several thousandfold by the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. The authors have previously proposed that the heparin binding site of ATIII residues within a region extending from amino acid residues 114-156. Computer-assisted analysis of this region revealed the presence of a 22 amino acid domain (residues 124-145), part of which shows a strong potential for the formation of an amphipathic helix: hydrophobic on one face and highly positively charged on the other. In the presence studies, polyclonal antisera were generated against a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 124-145 in native human ATIII. Affinity-purified IgG from these antisera, as well as monovalent Fab's derived from them, specifically blocked the binding of heparin to ATIII. Additionally, occupancy of the heparin binding site by these same monovalent and bivalent IgG's at least partially substituted for heparin, accelerating linkage formation between ATIII and thrombin. These results provide the first immunological evidence that region 124-145 is directly involved in the binding of heparin to ATIII and that an antibody-induced conformational change within this region can mediate ATIII activation.

  8. A capillary zone electrophoresis method to detect conformers and dimers of antithrombin in therapeutic preparations.

    PubMed

    Marie, Anne-Lise; Tran, Nguyet Thuy; Saller, François; Abdou, Youmna Mohamed; Zeau, Pascal; Plantier, Jean-Luc; Urbain, Rémi; Borgel, Delphine; Taverna, Myriam

    2016-07-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a human plasma glycoprotein that possesses anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the native (active) form of AT is unstable and undergoes conformational changes, leading to latent, cleaved, and heterodimeric forms. The presence of these alternative forms mostly inactive can highly impact the quality and therapeutic activity of pharmaceutical AT preparations. We developed a capillary zone electrophoresis method, based on a neutral polyethylene oxide-coated capillary and a buffer close to physiological conditions, enabling the separation of more than eight forms of AT. Several peaks were identified as native, latent, and heterodimeric forms. The CZE method was reproducible with intraday relative standard deviations less than 0.5 and 2% for migration times and peak areas, respectively. The method was applied to the comparison of AT preparations produced by five competitive pharmaceutical companies, and statistical tests were performed. Important differences in the proportion of each form were highlighted. In particular, one AT preparation was shown to contain a high quantity of heterodimer, and two preparations contained high quantities of latent form. In addition, one AT preparation exhibited additional forms, not yet identified. PMID:26989842

  9. Targeted mutagenesis of zebrafish antithrombin III triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombosis, revealing insight into function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Kretz, Colin A.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Richter, Catherine E.; Tsao, Philip; Vo, Andy H.; Huarng, Michael C.; Rode, Thomas; Hu, Zhilian; Mehra, Rohit; Olson, Steven T.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic blood clotting is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, underlying deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Genetic predisposition to thrombosis is still poorly understood, and we hypothesize that there are many additional risk alleles and modifying factors remaining to be discovered. Mammalian models have contributed to our understanding of thrombosis, but are low throughput and costly. We have turned to the zebrafish, a tool for high-throughput genetic analysis. Using zinc finger nucleases, we show that disruption of the zebrafish antithrombin III (at3) locus results in spontaneous venous thrombosis in larvae. Although homozygous mutants survive into early adulthood, they eventually succumb to massive intracardiac thrombosis. Characterization of null fish revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation in larvae secondary to unopposed thrombin activity and fibrinogen consumption, which could be rescued by both human and zebrafish at3 complementary DNAs. Mutation of the human AT3-reactive center loop abolished the ability to rescue, but the heparin-binding site was dispensable. These results demonstrate overall conservation of AT3 function in zebrafish, but reveal developmental variances in the ability to tolerate excessive clot formation. The accessibility of early zebrafish development will provide unique methods for dissection of the underlying mechanisms of thrombosis. PMID:24782510

  10. Different duplex/quadruplex junctions determine the properties of anti-thrombin aptamers with mixed folding.

    PubMed

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Spiridonova, Vera; Pica, Andrea; Napolitano, Valeria; Sica, Filomena

    2016-01-29

    Mixed duplex/quadruplex oligonucleotides have attracted great interest as therapeutic targets as well as effective biomedical aptamers. In the case of thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA), the addition of a duplex motif to the G-quadruplex module improves the aptamer resistance to biodegradation and the affinity for thrombin. In particular, the mixed oligonucleotide RE31 is significantly more effective than TBA in anticoagulation experiments and shows a slower disappearance rate in human plasma and blood. In the crystal structure of the complex with thrombin, RE31 adopts an elongated structure in which the duplex and quadruplex regions are perfectly stacked on top of each other, firmly connected by a well-structured junction. The lock-and-key shape complementarity between the TT loops of the G-quadruplex and the protein exosite I gives rise to the basic interaction that stabilizes the complex. However, our data suggest that the duplex motif may have an active role in determining the greater anti-thrombin activity in biological fluids with respect to TBA. This work gives new information on mixed oligonucleotides and highlights the importance of structural data on duplex/quadruplex junctions, which appear to be varied, unpredictable, and fundamental in determining the aptamer functional properties. PMID:26673709

  11. Different duplex/quadruplex junctions determine the properties of anti-thrombin aptamers with mixed folding

    PubMed Central

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Spiridonova, Vera; Pica, Andrea; Napolitano, Valeria; Sica, Filomena

    2016-01-01

    Mixed duplex/quadruplex oligonucleotides have attracted great interest as therapeutic targets as well as effective biomedical aptamers. In the case of thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA), the addition of a duplex motif to the G-quadruplex module improves the aptamer resistance to biodegradation and the affinity for thrombin. In particular, the mixed oligonucleotide RE31 is significantly more effective than TBA in anticoagulation experiments and shows a slower disappearance rate in human plasma and blood. In the crystal structure of the complex with thrombin, RE31 adopts an elongated structure in which the duplex and quadruplex regions are perfectly stacked on top of each other, firmly connected by a well-structured junction. The lock-and-key shape complementarity between the TT loops of the G-quadruplex and the protein exosite I gives rise to the basic interaction that stabilizes the complex. However, our data suggest that the duplex motif may have an active role in determining the greater anti-thrombin activity in biological fluids with respect to TBA. This work gives new information on mixed oligonucleotides and highlights the importance of structural data on duplex/quadruplex junctions, which appear to be varied, unpredictable, and fundamental in determining the aptamer functional properties. PMID:26673709

  12. Formation of thrombin-antithrombin III complex using polyamide and hemophan dialyzers.

    PubMed

    Schultze, G; Hollmann, S; Sinah, P

    1992-06-01

    The recently developed ELISA for the thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT) is a sensitive, specific, and simplified means of detecting intravascular coagulation. For further evaluation of the thrombogenicity of a polyamide (P) and a Hemophan (H) hollow-fibre dialyzer a cross-over study was done in ten stable patients on maintenance hemodialysis. At the same doses of heparin (mean bolus of 30 U/kg bw and maintenance doses of 86 U/kg bw), thrombin time and partial thromboplastin time were significantly lower using H. At the end of dialysis TAT was significantly higher in H (mean +/- SEM before HD 3.57 +/- .56, at 240 min 14.9 +/- 6.5 ng/ml, p less than 0.05, Wilcoxon-test) than in P (before HD 4.36 +/- .98, at 240 min 8.95 +/- 3.0 ng/ml, p less than 0.05 H 240 vs. P 240, Wilcoxon-test). Visible clotting was more pronounced in the H filter. Among other favourable features of blood compatibility the polyamide/polyvinylpyrrolidone copolymer with a hydrophilic/hydrophobic microdomain structure has less thrombogenicity. The modified cellulosic membrane H has advantages in complement activation and leukocyte depression, but thrombogenicity seems less favourable since the incorporated diethyl-amino-ethyl groups with their positive charge bind and inactivate negatively charged heparin. PMID:1639530

  13. Genetics Home Reference: myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    ... sulfur cluster assembly enzyme myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme Enable Javascript to view ... All Close All Description Myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme is an inherited disorder ...

  14. TYROSINASE INHERITANCE IN STREPTOMYCES SCABIES II.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Kenneth F.; Huang, Jay C. C.

    1964-01-01

    Gregory, Kenneth F. (Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, Ontario, Canada), and Jay C. C. Huang. Tyrosinase inheritance in Streptomyces scabies. II. Induction of tyrosinase deficiency by acridine dyes. J. Bacteriol. 87:1287–1294. 1964.—Growth in minimal medium containing 1 μg of acriflavine per ml resulted in a large increase (up to 62%) in the frequency of tyrosinase-deficient (tye−) mutants in all of ten strains of Streptomyces scabies and eight unidentified streptomycetes studied. This increased frequency did not result from the selection of preformed mutants, since tye− clones were usually inhibited by lower concentrations of acriflavine than were tyrosinase-producing (tye+) clones, and no significant difference in mycelial yields occurred between the two types growing in a 1 μg/ml concentration of the dye. The mutations induced by X rays and acriflavine were either allelic or closely linked. This tye− phenotype was not caused by the production of an enzyme inhibitor, lack of a cofactor, or defect in the conversion of a protyrosinase to tyrosinase. Tye− mutants formed no detectable tyrosinase under a variety of conditions, including the presence of possible inducers. Mutants were able to oxidize glucose and succinate. The S. scabies tyrosinase was heat-labile (half-life at 59 C = 1.6 min) and not particle-bound. We conclude that acriflavine induces the loss of, or alteration in, a structural gene for tyrosinase production present as an extrachromosomal factor. PMID:14188704

  15. [Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes].

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yusuke

    2016-02-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes comprise a series of disorders caused by various gene mutations. Genetic tests were formerly difficult to perform because of the large size and number of causative genes. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing has enabled simultaneous testing of all causative genes to be performed at an acceptable cost. We collaboratively conducted a series of whole-exome sequencing studies of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes and discovered RPS27/RPL27 and FANCT as causative genes of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Fanconi anemia, respectively. Furthermore, we established a target gene sequencing system to cover 189 genes associated with pediatric blood diseases to assist genetic diagnoses in clinical practice. In this review, discovery of new causative genes and possible roles of next-generation sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are discussed. PMID:26935625

  16. Nongenetic inheritance and transgenerational epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Szyf, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The idea that inherited genotypes define phenotypes has been paramount in modern biology. The question remains, however, whether stable phenotypes could be also inherited from parents independently of the genetic sequence per se. Recent data suggest that parental experiences can be transmitted behaviorally, through in utero exposure of the developing fetus to the maternal environment, or through either the male or female germline. The challenge is to delineate a plausible mechanism. In the past decade it has been proposed that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in multigenerational transmission of phenotypes and transgenerational inheritance. The prospect that ancestral experiences are written in our epigenome has immense implications for our understanding of human behavior, health, and disease. PMID:25601643

  17. Basic mechanisms of monogenic inheritance.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, A

    1999-01-01

    To revive the appreciation of the importance of genetic studies for the understanding of neurologic diseases inherited in a monogenic fashion. After a description of the basic patterns of monogenic inheritance, the importance of linkage studies for the mapping of a disease gene is mentioned. Furthermore, the term linkage disequilibrium is introduced. Finally, several procedures used in current linkage analyses are briefly mentioned, with the aim of identifying the disease gene. The importance of genetic studies of disease families with many members, preferably from isolated surroundings to favor homogeneity, is stressed. However, such analyses can be performed only as a consequence of a close cooperation between clinicians and research scientists. PMID:10446743

  18. Relationships of plasma factor VIIa-antithrombin complexes to manifest and future cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Angela; Scanavini, Daniela; Boquist, Susanna; Ericsson, Carl-Göran; Hellénius, Mai-Lis; Leander, Karin; de Faire, Ulf; Öhrvik, John; Woodhams, Barry; Morrissey, James H.; Hamsten, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Background Low levels of free activated coagulation factor VII (VIIa) are normally present in plasma to prime the coagulation of blood in normal hemostasis and during thrombus formation. VIIa also circulates in inactive form, in complex with antithrombin (VIIaAT) formed when VIIa is bound to tissue factor (TF). This study evaluated VIIaAT in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods We determined the plasma VIIaAT concentration in samples from the Stockholm Coronary Atherosclerosis Risk Factor (SCARF) study, a population-based case-control study of myocardial infarction (MI) and in samples from the Stockholm study of 60-years-old individuals, a prospective study of CVD. VIIaAT was measured with a sandwich ELISA that captures the complex between a monoclonal antibody to VIIa and a polyclonal antibody to AT. Results In the SCARF study (200 post-MI cases, 340 controls), VIIaAT was statistically significantly associated with patient status [odds ratio (95% confidence interval (CI)] 1.51 (1.09–2.08), p=0.0126). The case-control differences were however small, with VIIaAT values that largely overlap between the two groups. When a nested case-control design (211 incident CVD cases and 633 matched controls) was applied on 5- to 7-year follow-up results of the Stockholm prospective study of 60-year-olds, plasma VIIaAT concentration was not associated with incident CVD (odds ratio (95% CI) 1.001 (0.997–1.005), p=0.5447). Conclusions Plasma VIIaAT concentration had no predictive value for future CVD in our study population. Slightly increased plasma VIIaAT concentrations observed after MI may reflect processes that occur in connection with the acute event when TF and VIIa availability is increased. PMID:21925715

  19. Antithrombin Up-regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase Signaling during Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yina; Wang, Jinli; Gao, Junjie; Yang, Hui; Wang, Yanqing; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Li, Ji; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Antithrombin (AT) is a protein of the serpin superfamily involved in regulation of the proteolytic activity of the serine proteases of the coagulation system. AT is known to exhibit anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective properties when it binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on vascular cells. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays an important cardioprotective role during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). To determine whether the cardioprotective signaling function of AT is mediated through the AMPK pathway, we evaluated the cardioprotective activities of wild-type AT and its two derivatives, one having high affinity and the other no affinity for heparin, in an acute I/R injury model in C57BL/6J mice in which the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded. The serpin derivatives were given 5 min before reperfusion. The results showed that AT-WT can activate AMPK in both in vivo and ex vivo conditions. Blocking AMPK activity abolished the cardioprotective function of AT against I/R injury. The AT derivative having high affinity for heparin was more effective in activating AMPK and in limiting infraction, but the derivative lacking affinity for heparin was inactive in eliciting AMPK-dependent cardioprotective activity. Activation of AMPK by AT inhibited the inflammatory c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway during I/R. Further studies revealed that the AMPK activity induced by AT also modulates cardiac substrate metabolism by increasing glucose oxidation but inhibiting fatty acid oxidation during I/R. These results suggest that AT binds to HSPGs on heart tissues to invoke a cardioprotective function by triggering cardiac AMPK activation, thereby attenuating JNK inflammatory signaling pathways and modulating substrate metabolism during I/R. PMID:25230600

  20. Biological Variations of Lupus Anticoagulant, Antithrombin, Protein C, Protein S, and von Willebrand Factor Assays.

    PubMed

    Shou, Weiling; Chen, Qian; Wu, Wei; Cui, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The results of lupus anticoagulant (LA), antithrombin (AT), protein C (PC), and protein S (PS) testing, and the values of von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) are important in diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of thrombosis and hemostasis diseases. Till now, no published study has focused on the biological variations in LA testing, and only a few studies have examined the biological variations of AT, PC, PS, and VWF:Ag. With the latest fully automated instruments and improved reagents, the analytical, within-subject, and between-subject biological variations were estimated for these five coagulant parameters in a cohort of 25 apparently healthy subjects. Blood specimens were collected at 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5. The analytical biological variation (CV(A)) values of all the parameters were less than 3%. The within-subject biological variation (CV(W)) and between-subject biological variation (CV(G)) values of the LA normalized ratio were 4.64 and 6.83%, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the intraday and interday biological variations of LA tests, or in AT, PC, PS, and VWF:Ag values. Additionally, the utility of the conventional population-based reference intervals of the five coagulation parameters was evaluated by the index of individuality, and data on CV(W) and CV(A) were used to calculate the reference change value to identify the significance of changes in serial results from the same individual. PMID:26516946

  1. Disialotransferrin developmental deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansson, B; Andersson, M; Tonnby, B; Hagberg, B

    1989-01-01

    Seven mentally deficient children and adolescents (three pairs of siblings and one singleton) were studied. A peculiar external appearance, a characteristic neurohepatosubcutaneous tissue impairment syndrome and, as a biological marker, an abnormal sialic acid transferrin pattern were characteristic features. All seven seemed odd from birth and prone to acute cerebral dysfunction during catabolic states. Abnormal lower neurone, cerebellar, and retinal functions dominated from later childhood. The disialotransferrin pattern found in serum and cerebrospinal fluid is thought to be the biological marker of a newly discovered inborn error of glycoprotein metabolism with autosomal recessive inheritance. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 p74-b PMID:2466439

  2. Transgenerational Inheritance of Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from C. elegans to M. musculus to S. scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment. PMID:25937492

  3. Rickets–vitamin D deficiency and dependency

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Rickets is an important problem even in countries with adequate sun exposure. The causes of rickets/osteomalacia are varied and include nutritional deficiency, especially poor dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium. Non-nutritional causes include hypophosphatemic rickets primarily due to renal phosphate losses and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis. In addition, some varieties are due to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism and are called vitamin D dependent rickets. This chapter highlights rickets/osteomalacia related to vitamin D deficiency or to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism. Hypophosphatemic rickets and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis are discussed in other sections of the journal. PMID:22470851

  4. Epigenetic Inheritance in Rice Plants

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Keiko; Katakami, Hatsue; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ogawa, Emiko; Sano, Cecile M.; Wada, Yuko; Sano, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Epigenetics is defined as mechanisms that regulate gene expression without base sequence alteration. One molecular basis is considered to be DNA cytosine methylation, which reversibly modifies DNA or chromatin structures. Although its correlation with epigenetic inheritance over generations has been circumstantially shown, evidence at the gene level has been limited. The present study aims to find genes whose methylation status directly correlates with inheritance of phenotypic changes. Methods DNA methylation in vivo was artificially reduced by treating rice (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica) seeds with 5-azadeoxycytidine, and the progeny were cultivated in the field for > 10 years. Genomic regions with changed methylation status were screened by the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphysm (MSAP) method, and cytosine methylation was directly scanned by the bisulfite mapping method. Pathogen infection with Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, race PR2 was performed by the scissors-dip method on mature leaf blades. Key Results The majority of seedlings were lethal, but some survived to maturity. One line designated as Line-2 showed a clear marker phenotype of dwarfism, which was stably inherited by the progeny over nine generations. MSAP screening identified six fragments, among which two were further characterized by DNA blot hybridization and direct methylation mapping. One clone encoding a retrotransposon gag–pol polyprotein showed a complete erasure of 5-methylcytosines in Line-2, but neither translocation nor expression of this region was detectable. The other clone encoded an Xa21-like protein, Xa21G. In wild-type plants, all cytosines were methylated within the promoter region, whereas in Line-2, corresponding methylation was completely erased throughout generations. Expression of Xa21G was not detectable in wild type but was constitutive in Line-2. When infected with X. oryzae pv. oryzae, against which Xa21 confers resistance in a gene

  5. An Update on Laboratory Diagnosis of Liver Inherited Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Elce, Ausilia; Amato, Felice

    2013-01-01

    Liver inherited diseases are a group of genetically determined clinical entities that appear with an early chronic liver involvement. They include Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration), hereditary hemochromatosis, and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. In addition, cystic fibrosis, although it is not specifically a liver disease, may cause a severe liver involvement in a significant percentage of cases. For all these pathologies, the disease gene is known, and molecular analysis may contribute to the unequivocal diagnosis. This approach could avoid the patient invasive procedures and limit complications associated with a delay in diagnosis. We review liver inherited diseases on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the contribution of molecular analysis in the multistep diagnostic workup. PMID:24222913

  6. Symmetry inheritance of scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolić, Ivica

    2015-07-01

    Matter fields do not necessarily have to share the symmetries with the spacetime they live in. When this happens, we speak of the symmetry inheritance of fields. In this paper we classify the obstructions of symmetry inheritance by the scalar fields, both real and complex, and look more closely at the special cases of stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes. Since the symmetry noninheritance is present in the scalar fields of boson stars and may enable the existence of the black hole scalar hair, our results narrow the possible classes of such solutions. Finally, we define and analyse the symmetry noninheritance contributions to the Komar mass and angular momentum of the black hole scalar hair.

  7. [Inherited amino acid transport disorders].

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Y; Tada, K

    1992-07-01

    Disorders due to inherited amino acids transport defect are reviewed. The disorders were categorized into three types of transport defects, namely, brush-border membrane of epithelial cells of small intestine and kidney tubules (Hartnup disease, blue diaper syndrome, cystinuria, iminoglycinuria and lysine malabsorption syndrome), basolateral membrane (lysinuric protein intolerance) and membrane of intracellular organelles (cystinosis and hyperornitinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome). Pathogenesis, clinical feature, laboratory findings, diagnosis, genetics and treatment of these disorders are described, briefly. There is not much data for the transport systems themselves, so that further investigation in molecular and gene levels for transport systems is necessary to clarify the characteristics of the transport and heterogeneity of phenotypes in inherited amino acids transport disorders. PMID:1404888

  8. Mitochondrial deficiency in Cockayne syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by accelerated aging, cachectic dwarfism and many other features. Recent work has implicated mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of this disease. This is particularly interesting since mitochondrial deficiencies are believed to be important in the aging process. In this review, we will discuss recent findings of mitochondrial pathology in Cockayne syndrome and suggest possible mechanisms for the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23435289

  9. A Novel Serpin with Antithrombin-Like Activity in Branchiostoma japonicum: Implications for the Presence of a Primitive Coagulation System

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yeqing; Fan, Chunxin; Liang, Yujun; Gao, Bei; Zhang, Shicui

    2012-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors, or serpins, are a group of widely distributed proteins with similar structures that use conformational change to inhibit proteases. Antithrombin (AT) is a member of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily and a major coagulation inhibitor in all vertebrates, but its evolutionary origin remains elusive. In this study we isolated for the first time a cDNA encoding an antithrombin homolog, BjATl, from the protochordate Branchiostoma japonicum. The deduced protein BjATl consisted of 338 amino acids sharing 36.7% to 41.1% identity to known vertebrate ATs. BjATl contains a potential N-linked glycosylation site, two potential heparin binding sites and the reactive center loop with the absolutely conserved sequence Gly-Arg-Ser; all of these are features characteristic of ATs. All three phylogenetic trees constructed using Neighbor-Joining, Maximum-Likelihood and Bayesian-Inference methods also placed BjATl together with ATs. Moreover, BjATl expressed in yeast cells was able to inhibit bovine thrombin activity by forming a SDS-stable BjATl-thrombin complex. It also displays a concentration-dependent inhibition of thrombin that is accelerated by heparin. Furthermore, BjATl was predominantly expressed in the hepatic caecum and hind-gut, agreeing with the expression pattern of AT in mammalian species. All these data clearly demonstrate that BjATl is an ortholog of vertebrate ATs, suggesting that a primitive coagulation system emerged in the protochordate. PMID:22427833

  10. Utilizing inheritance in requirements engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaindl, Hermann

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the utilization of inheritance for requirements specification, i.e., the tasks of analyzing and modeling the domain, as well as forming and defining requirements. Our approach and the tool supporting it are named RETH (Requirements Engineering Through Hypertext). Actually, RETH uses a combination of various technologies, including object-oriented approaches and artificial intelligence (in particular frames). We do not attempt to exclude or replace formal representations, but try to complement and provide means for gradually developing them. Among others, RETH has been applied in the CERN (Conseil Europeen pour la Rechereche Nucleaire) Cortex project. While it would be impossible to explain this project in detail here, it should be sufficient to know that it deals with a generic distributed control system. Since this project is not finished yet, it is difficult to state its size precisely. In order to give an idea, its final goal is to substitute the many existing similar control systems at CERN by this generic approach. Currently, RETH is also tested using real-world requirements for the Pastel Mission Planning System at ESOC in Darmstadt. First, we outline how hypertext is integrated into a frame system in our approach. Moreover, the usefulness of inheritance is demonstrated as performed by the tool RETH. We then summarize our experiences of utilizing inheritance in the Cortex project. Lastly, RETH will be related to existing work.

  11. Animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MARTINI, RUDOLF

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in human genetics and neurobiology has led to the identification of various mutations in particular myelin genes as the cause for many of the known inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in 3 distinct myelin genes, PMP22, P0, and connexin 32 cause the 3 major demyelinating subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A, CMT1B and CMTX, respectively. In addition, a reduction in the gene dosage of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), while particular point mutations in PMP22 and P0 cause the severe Dejerine-Sottas (DS) neuropathy. A series of spontaneous and genetically engineered rodent mutants for genes for the above-mentioned myelin constituents are now available and their suitability to serve as models for these still untreatable diseases is an issue of particular interest. The spontaneous mutants Trembler-J and Trembler, with point mutations in PMP22, reflect some of the pathological alterations seen in CMT1A and DS patients, respectively. Furthermore, engineered mutants that either over or underexpress particular myelin genes are suitable models for patients who are similarly compromised in the gene dosage of the corresponding genes. In addition, engineered mutants heterozygously or homozygously deficient in the myelin component P0 show the pathology of distinct CMT1B and DS patients, respectively, while Cx32 deficient mice develop pathological abnormalities similar to those of CMTX patients. Mutants that mimic human peripheral neuropathies might allow the development of strategies to alleviate the symptoms of the diseases, and help to define environmental risk factors for aggravation of the disease. In addition, such mutants might be instrumental in the development of strategies to cure the diseases by gene therapy. PMID:9418989

  12. Animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Martini, R

    1997-10-01

    Recent progress in human genetics and neurobiology has led to the identification of various mutations in particular myelin genes as the cause for many of the known inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in 3 distinct myelin genes, PMP22, P0, and connexin 32 cause the 3 major demyelinating subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A, CMT1B and CMTX, respectively. In addition, a reduction in the gene dosage of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), while particular point mutations in PMP22 and P0 cause the severe Dejerine-Sottas (DS) neuropathy. A series of spontaneous and genetically engineered rodent mutants for genes for the above-mentioned myelin constituents are now available and their suitability to serve as models for these still untreatable diseases is an issue of particular interest. The spontaneous mutants Trembler-J and Trembler, with point mutations in PMP22, reflect some of the pathological alterations seen in CMT1A and DS patients, respectively. Furthermore, engineered mutants that either over or underexpress particular myelin genes are suitable models for patients who are similarly compromised in the gene dosage of the corresponding genes. In addition, engineered mutants heterozygously or homozygously deficient in the myelin component P0 show the pathology of distinct CMT1B and DS patients, respectively, while Cx32 deficient mice develop pathological abnormalities similar to those of CMTX patients. Mutants that mimic human peripheral neuropathies might allow the development of strategies to alleviate the symptoms of the diseases, and help to define environmental risk factors for aggravation of the disease. In addition, such mutants might be instrumental in the development of strategies to cure the diseases by gene therapy. PMID:9418989

  13. Ataxias with autosomal, X-chromosomal or maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2009-07-01

    Heredoataxias are a group of genetic disorders with a cerebellar syndrome as the leading clinical manifestation. The current classification distinguishes heredoataxias according to the trait of inheritance into autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and maternally inherited heredoataxias. The autosomal dominant heredoataxias are separated into spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA1-8, 10-15, 17-23, 25-30, and dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy), episodic ataxias (EA1-7), and autosomal dominant mitochondrial heredoataxias (Leigh syndrome, MIRAS, ADOAD, and AD-CPEO). The autosomal recessive ataxias are separated into Friedreich ataxia, ataxia due to vitamin E deficiency, ataxia due to Abeta-lipoproteinemia, Refsum disease, late-onset Tay-Sachs disease, cerebrotendineous xanthomatosis, spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy, ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia telangiectasia-like disorder, ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1 and 2, spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay, Cayman ataxia, Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, and autosomal recessive mitochondrial ataxias (AR-CPEO, SANDO, SCAE, AHS, IOSCA, MEMSA, LBSL CoQ-deficiency, PDC-deficiency). Only two of the heredoataxias, fragile X/tremor/ataxia syndrome, and XLSA/A are transmitted via an X-linked trait. Maternally inherited heredoataxias are due to point mutations in genes encoding for tRNAs, rRNAs, respiratory chain subunits or single large scale deletions/duplications of the mitochondrial DNA and include MELAS, MERRF, KSS, PS, MILS, NARP, and non-syndromic mitochondrial disorders. Treatment of heredoataxias is symptomatic and supportive and may have a beneficial effect in single patients. **Please see page 424 for abbreviation list. PMID:19650351

  14. Acquired zinc deficiency in association with anorexia nervosa: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Van Voorhees, A S; Riba, M

    1992-09-01

    Zinc deficiency, whether a result of an acquired or inherited abnormality of zinc metabolism, is associated with characteristic cutaneous findings. The inherited variety is known as acrodermatitis enteropathica. We present a case of zinc deficiency secondary to starvation induced by anorexia nervosa. Since the cutaneous stigmata of zinc deficiency and anorexia nervosa can initially be subtle and occasionally overlap, we believe that screening zinc levels in patients with anorexia nervosa with prominent cutaneous findings should be considered. PMID:1488378

  15. Antithrombin III and its interaction with heparin. Comparison of the human, bovine, and porcine proteins by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gettins, P.

    1987-03-10

    /sup 1/H NMR has been used to characterize and compare the structures of antithrombin III from human, bovine, and porcine plasma as well as to investigate the interactions of each of these proteins with heparin fragments of defined length. The amino acid compositions of the three proteins are very similar, which is reflected in the gross features of their /sup 1/H NMR spectra. Human antithrombin III has five histidine residues, bovine has six, and porcine has five. The C(2) proton from each of these residues gives a narrow resonance and titrates with pH; the pK/sub a/'s are in the range 5.15-7.25. It is concluded that all histidines in each protein are surface residues with considerable independent mobility. The carbohydrate chains in each protein also give sharp resonances consistent with a surface location and motional flexibility. The /sup 1/H spectra are sensitive to heparin binding. Although heparin resonances obscure protein resonances in the region 3.2-6.0 ppm, difference spectra between antithrombin III with and without heparin show clear perturbation of a small number of aromatic and aliphatic protein protons. For human antithrombin III, it was shown that heparin fragments 8, 10, and 16 sugar residues in length result in almost identical perturbations to the protein. In contrast, tetrasaccharide results in fewer perturbations. Significantly, intact high molecular weight heparin causes the same spectral perturbations as the 16-residue fragment. These data are discussed in terms of requirements for heparin binding.

  16. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates. PMID:24717430

  17. Inherited Disorders of Bilirubin Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Naureen; Weinberger, Barry I; Hegyi, Thomas; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-01-01

    Inherited disorders of hyperbilirubinemia may be caused by increased bilirubin production or decreased bilirubin clearance. Reduced hepatic bilirubin clearance can be due to defective 1) unconjugated bilirubin uptake and intrahepatic storage, 2) conjugation of glucuronic acid to bilirubin (e.g. Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, breast milk jaundice), 3) bilirubin excretion into bile (Dubin-Johnson syndrome), or 4) conjugated bilirubin re-uptake (Rotor syndrome). In this review, the molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of these conditions are described, as well as current approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26595536

  18. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable. PMID:26501689

  19. Digenic inheritance in medical genetics

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Alejandro A

    2013-01-01

    Digenic inheritance (DI) is the simplest form of inheritance for genetically complex diseases. By contrast with the thousands of reports that mutations in single genes cause human diseases, there are only dozens of human disease phenotypes with evidence for DI in some pedigrees. The advent of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has made it simpler to identify monogenic disease causes and could similarly simplify proving DI because one can simultaneously find mutations in two genes in the same sample. However, through 2012, I could find only one example of human DI in which HTS was used; in that example, HTS found only the second of the two genes. To explore the gap between expectation and reality, I tried to collect all examples of human DI with a narrow definition and characterise them according to the types of evidence collected, and whether there has been replication. Two strong trends are that knowledge of candidate genes and knowledge of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have been helpful in most published examples of human DI. By contrast, the positional method of genetic linkage analysis, has been mostly unsuccessful in identifying genes underlying human DI. Based on the empirical data, I suggest that combining HTS with growing networks of established PPIs may expedite future discoveries of human DI and strengthen the evidence for them. PMID:23785127

  20. Disorders of GABA metabolism: SSADH and GABA-transaminase deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Parviz, Mahsa; Vogel, Kara; Gibson, K. Michael; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical disorders known to affect inherited gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism are autosomal recessively inherited succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and GABA-transaminase deficiency. The clinical presentation of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency includes intellectual disability, ataxia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and epilepsy with a nonprogressive course in typical cases, although a progressive form in early childhood as well as deterioration in adulthood with worsening epilepsy are reported. GABA-transaminase deficiency is associated with a severe neonatal-infantile epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:25485164

  1. Resolution of preoperative portal vein thrombosis after administration of antithrombin III in living donor liver transplantation: case report.

    PubMed

    Imai, H; Egawa, H; Kajiwara, M; Nakajima, A; Ogura, Y; Hatano, E; Ueda, M; Kawaguchi, Y; Kaido, T; Takada, Y; Uemoto, S

    2009-11-01

    A 59-year-old man with hepatitis C virus-associated liver cirrhosis was transferred to our hospital to undergo living donor liver transplantation. Coagulation was impaired (prothrombin time [International Normalized Ratio], 3.27), and antithrombin III (AT-III) activity was 23% (normal, 87%-115%). Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans revealed portal vein thrombosis (PVT) from the junction between the splenic and superior mesenteric vein to the porta hepatica; the portal vein was completely obstructed (PVT). To prevent further development of PVT, 1500 U of AT-III was administered for 3 days, elevating the AT-III activity to 50%. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan obtained 9 days after AT-III administration showed resolution of PVT. Living donor liver transplantation was safely performed without portal vein grafting. Thus, a low AT-III concentration may have an important role in the pathogenesis of PVT in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:19917415

  2. A theoretical argument for inherited thiamine insensitivity as one possible biological cause of familial alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Manzardo, Ann M; Penick, Elizabeth C

    2006-09-01

    Thiamine deficiency has been specifically linked to the development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WK)--a degenerative brain disorder that is typically associated with alcoholic drinking. Alcoholism-related thiamine deficiency is a major cause of WK. However, an inherited abnormality in thiamine utilization has been identified in some WK patients that may predispose heavy drinkers to this severe neurological syndrome. Individuals who possess this variant require more thiamine throughout their lives to prevent them from experiencing thiamine deficiency. Recent prospective studies have implicated early childhood nutritional and environmental influences in the etiology of alcoholism in adults. These studies have suggested that developmental abnormalities involving brain white matter growth might precipitate the later development of alcoholism possibly by altering the emerging reward-related brain systems. Brain white matter growth is highly sensitive to nutritional deficiency (including thiamine deficiency) and oxidative injury, especially during the perinatal period. The proposed model of familial alcoholism hypothesizes that an inherited insensitivity to thiamine can precipitate brain abnormalities very early in life that will greatly increase the risk of developing alcoholism in adulthood. This paper offers a heuristic model of a possible mechanism by which both inherited and environmental factors related to thiamine utilization might coaggregate to cause alcoholism. PMID:16930217

  3. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  4. Epigenetic Inheritance: A Contributor to Species Differentiation?

    PubMed Central

    Boffelli, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Multiple epigenetic states can be associated with the same genome, and transmitted through the germline for generations, to create the phenomenon of epigenetic inheritance. This form of inheritance is mediated by complex and highly diverse components of the chromosome that associate with DNA, control its transcription, and are inherited alongside it. But, how extensive, and how stable, is the information carried in the germline by the epigenome? Several known examples of epigenetic inheritance demonstrate that it has the ability to create selectable traits, and thus to mediate Darwinian evolution. Here we discuss the possibility that epigenetic inheritance is responsible for some stable characteristics of species, focusing on a recent comparison of the human and chimpanzee methylomes which reveals that somatic methylation states are related to methylation states in the germline. Interpretation of this finding highlights the potential significance of germline epigenetic states, as well as the challenge of investigating a form of inheritance with complex and unfamiliar rules. PMID:22966965

  5. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue. PMID:27040960

  6. Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony in Biotinidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a disorder inherited autosomal recessively showing evidence of hearing loss and optic atrophy in addition to seizures, hypotonia, and ataxia. In the present study, a 2-year-old boy with Biotinidase deficiency is presented in which clinical symptoms have been reported with auditory neuropathy/auditory dyssynchrony (AN/AD). In this case, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions showed bilaterally normal responses representing normal function of outer hair cells. In contrast, acoustic reflex test showed absent reflexes bilaterally, and visual reinforcement audiometry and auditory brainstem responses indicated severe to profound hearing loss in both ears. These results suggest AN/AD in patients with Biotinidase deficiency. PMID:27144235

  7. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26411603

  8. Genetics Home Reference: succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency is an inherited ...

  9. Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes (IBMFS)

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI IBMFS Cohort Study consists of affected individuals and their immediate families in North America who have an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS)-either one that has been specifically identified and defined, or bone marrow failure that appears to be inherited but has not yet been clearly identified as having a genetic basis.

  10. Legal Portion in Russian Inheritance Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inshina, Roza; Murzalimova, Lyudmila

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the right to inherit as one of the basic human rights guaranteed by the Constitution of the Russian Federation. The state has set rules according to which after a person's death, his or her property is inherited by other persons. The Russian civil legislation establishes the institution of legal portions that is…

  11. 76 FR 75825 - Streamlining Inherited Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ...The Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (the Bureau) is requesting specific suggestions from the public for streamlining regulations it recently inherited from other Federal agencies. This document asks the public to identify provisions of the inherited regulations that the Bureau should make the highest priority for updating, modifying, or eliminating because they are outdated, unduly......

  12. 25 CFR 213.13 - Inherited lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inherited lands. 213.13 Section 213.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING How to Acquire Leases § 213.13 Inherited lands. Except...

  13. Inheritance of grain proteins in wheat.

    PubMed

    Kraljević-Balalić, M; Stajner, D; Gašić, O

    1982-06-01

    Diallel crosses between five divergent vulgare wheat cultivars were made in order to evaluate the mode of inheritance and combining ability of grain proteins. Significant differences in grain protein content were found between cultivars and their hybrids. It was established that the inheritance of seed protein in the F1 generation included both additive and non-additive gene action. PMID:24270758

  14. Prenatal Detection of Inherited Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    1981-01-01

    The following is a review of current concepts of prenatal detection. Transabdominal amniocentesis is recognized to be an integral adjunct to prenatal care. The analysis of cultured amniotic fluid cells collected at about 16 weeks of gestation provides in utero diagnosis of nearly all chromosomal aberration syndromes, several metabolic disorders which are due to a specific enzymic deficiency due to single gene disorders, and some multifactorial disorders, such as prenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects by estimation of alphafeto protein in amniotic fluid. Various aspects of amniocentesis are discussed. PMID:7205985

  15. Paternity and inheritance of wealth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, John

    1981-06-01

    One of the oldest conjectures in anthropology is that men transfer wealth to their sister's son when the biological paternity of their `own' children is in doubt1-12. Because maternity is certain, a man is necessarily related to his sister's son and his brother (see Fig. 1). It is argued here that relatedness to male heirs can be assured by passing wealth to sister's sons or down a line of brothers, whether the prevailing kinship system reckons those brothers matrilineally or patrilineally. It is also argued that when several transfers of wealth are considered, a man's likelihood of being cuckolded need not be unrealistically high13 for his successive matrilineal heirs to be more related to him than his successive patrilineal heirs (see Fig. 2). Cross-cultural data on sister's son/brother inheritance14 and frequency of extramarital sex for females15 support the hypothesis that men tend to transmit wealth to their sister's son and/or brother when the probability that their putative children are their genetic children is relatively low.

  16. [Inherited thrombopathia in Simmental cattle].

    PubMed

    Aebi, M; Wiedemar, N; Drögemüller, C; Zanolari, R

    2016-02-01

    During the years 2012 to 2014, a total of 5 affected Simmental cattle showing persistent bleeding after minor or unknown trauma, were presented at the Clinic for Ruminants or at the Institute for Genetics of the Vetsuisse-Faculty, University of Berne. The homozygous mutation RASGRP2, initially reported in 2007, was present in all these cases and all available parents were heterozygous carriers thus confirming the recessive mode of inheritance. Three affected animals died as a result of persistent bleeding. One animal was stabilized at the Clinic for Ruminants and was slaughtered one month later. Another case showing persistent bleeding and several hematomas was euthanized after genotyping. A frequency of 10% carriers for the associated mutation was detected in a sample of 145 Simmental sires which were used 2013 for artificial insemination in Switzerland. These bulls are designated as TP carriers and should not be used uncontrolled. Breeding organizations in Switzerland make use of the gene test to select bulls which do not carry the mutation. PMID:27145685

  17. Inherited cardiomyopathies--Novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Leviner, Dror B; Hochhauser, Edith; Arad, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies arising due to a single gene defect represent various pathways that evoke adverse remodeling and cardiac dysfunction. While the gene therapy approach is slowly evolving and has not yet reached clinical "prime time" and gene correction approaches are applicable at the bench but not at the bedside, major advances are being made with molecular and drug therapies. This review summarizes the contemporary drugs introduced or being tested to help manage these unique disorders bearing a major impact on the quality of life and survival of the affected individuals. The restoration of the RNA reading frame facilitates the expression of partly functional protein to salvage or alleviate the disease phenotype. Chaperones are used to prevent the degradation of abnormal but still functional proteins, while other molecules are given for pathogen silencing, to prevent aggregation or to enhance clearance of protein deposits. The absence of protein may be managed by viral gene delivery or protein therapy. Enzyme replacement therapy is already a clinical reality for a series of metabolic diseases. The progress in molecular biology, based on the knowledge of the gene defect, helps generate small molecules and pharmaceuticals targeting the key events occurring in the malfunctioning element of the sick organ. Cumulatively, these tools augment the existing armamentarium of phenotype oriented symptomatic and evidence-based therapies for patients with inherited cardiomyopathies. PMID:26297672

  18. Leading the Team You Inherit.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Most leaders don't have the luxury of building their teams from scratch. Instead they're put in charge of an existing group, and they need guidance on the best way to take over and improve performance. Watkins, an expert on transitions, suggests a three-step approach: Assess. Act quickly to size up the personnel you've inherited, systematically gathering data from one-on-one chats, team meetings, and other sources. Reflect, too, on the business challenges you face, the kinds of people you want in various roles, and the degree to which they need to collaborate. Reshape. Adjust the makeup of the team by moving people to new positions, shifting their responsibilities, or replacing them. Make sure that everyone is aligned on goals and how to achieve them--you may need to change the team's stated direction. Consider also making changes in the way the team operates (reducing the frequency of meetings, for example, or creating new subteams). Then establish ground rules and processes to sustain desired behaviors, and revisit those periodically. Accelerate team development. Set your people up for some early wins. Initial successes will boost everyone's confidence and reinforce the value of your new operating model, thus paving the way for ongoing growth. PMID:27491196

  19. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world. PMID:1745900

  20. Ketogenic diets in patients with inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Scholl-Bürgi, S; Höller, A; Pichler, K; Michel, M; Haberlandt, E; Karall, D

    2015-07-01

    Ketogenic diets (KDs) are diets that bring on a metabolic condition comparable to fasting, usually without catabolism. Since the mid-1990s such diets have been widely used in patients with seizures/epilepsies, mostly children. This review focuses on the use of KDs in patients with various inherited metabolic disorders (IMD). In glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) deficiency, KDs are deemed the therapy of choice and directly target the underlying metabolic disorder. Moreover, in other IMD, mainly of intermediary metabolism such as glycogen storage diseases and disorders of mitochondrial energy supply, KDs may ameliorate clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters. KDs have also been used successfully to treat symptoms such as seizures/epilepsy in IMD, e.g. in urea cycle disorders and non-ketotic hyperglycinemia. As a note of caution, catabolism may cause the condition of patients with IMD to deteriorate and should thus be avoided during KDs. For this reason, careful monitoring (clinical, laboratory and apparatus-supported) is warranted. In some IMDs specific macronutrient supply is critical. Therefore, in cases of PDHc deficiency the carbohydrate intake tolerated without lactate increase and in urea cycle disorders the protein tolerance should be determined. Considering this, it is particularly important in patients with IMD that the use of KDs be individualized and well documented. PMID:26109259

  1. Inheritance of seed color in Capsicum.

    PubMed

    Zewdie, Y; Bosland, P W

    2003-01-01

    The mode of seed color inheritance in Capsicum was studied via an interspecific hybridization between C. pubescens Ruiz and Pav. (black seed color) and C. eximium Hunz. (yellow seed color). Black seed color was dominant over yellow seed color. The F(2) segregation pattern showed continuous variation. The generation means analysis indicated the presence of a significant effect of additive [d], dominance [h], and additive x additive [i] interaction for seed color inheritance. The estimate for a minimum number of effective factors (genes) involved in seed color inheritance was approximately 3. PMID:12920108

  2. [INHERITANCE OF EPIDERMIS PIGMENTATION IN SUNFLOWER ACHENES].

    PubMed

    Gorohivets, N A; Vedmedeva, E V

    2016-01-01

    Inheritance of epidermis pigmentation in the pericarp of sunflower seeds was studied. Inheritance of pigmentation was confirmed by three alleles Ew (epidermis devoid of pigmentation), Estr (epidermal pigmentation in strips), Edg (solid pigmentation). Dominance of the lack of epidermis pigmentation over striped epidermis and striped epidermis over solid pigmentation was established. It was shown that the striped epidermis pigmentation and the presence of testa layer are controlled by two genes, expression of which is independent from each other. Yellowish hypodermis was discovered in the sample I2K2218, which is inherited monogenically dominantly. PMID:27281924

  3. Sulfamate proton solvent exchange in heparin oligosaccharides: evidence for a persistent hydrogen bond in the antithrombin-binding pentasaccharide Arixtra.

    PubMed

    Langeslay, Derek J; Young, Robert P; Beni, Szabolcs; Beecher, Consuelo N; Mueller, Leonard J; Larive, Cynthia K

    2012-09-01

    Sulfamate groups (NHSO(3)(-)) are important structural elements in the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) heparin and heparan sulfate (HS). In this work, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) line-shape analysis is used to explore the solvent exchange properties of the sulfamate NH groups within heparin-related mono-, di-, tetra- and pentasaccharides as a function of pH and temperature. The results of these experiments identified a persistent hydrogen bond within the Arixtra (fondaparinux sodium) pentasaccharide between the internal glucosamine sulfamate NH and the adjacent 3-O-sulfo group. This discovery provides new insights into the solution structure of the Arixtra pentasaccharide and suggests that 3-O-sulfation of the heparin N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS) residues pre-organize the secondary structure in a way that facilitates binding to antithrombin-III. NMR studies of the GlcNS NH groups can provide important information about heparin structure complementary to that available from NMR spectral analysis of the carbon-bound protons. PMID:22593556

  4. Effect of the oral contraceptive pill on protein S and antithrombin-III levels in Malaysian women.

    PubMed

    Wong, K K; Ng, S C; Koong, P L

    Studies focusing on the relationship between oral contraceptive (OC) usage and occurrence of thromboembolism have been conducted for over 3 decades. Those studies centered on the effects OC use has on blood proteins and on measurable physiological changes that occurred in women with venous thrombosis. This article reports the findings of a study that investigated the effects of OC use on the levels of the anticoagulants antithrombin-III (AT-III), protein C (PC), and protein S (PS) in a group of Asian women. Previous studies had mostly been based on Caucasian women. Of the 21 women studied, 16 were Malaysian, 3 were Chinese, and 2 were Indian. Low-dose OCs containing 30 mcg of ethinyl estradiol and 150 mcg of either desogestrel or levonorgestrel were used. Blood was tested before OC use and 3 and 6 months after starting OC use. Levels of AT-III and PS were measured using the Laurell rocket immunoelectrophoresis technique. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student's t-test and an analysis of variance test. No statistically significant differences were found for the mean levels of AT-III and total PS when comparing the pre-OC with the 3- and 6-month post-OC values. Earlier studies based mostly on Caucasian women have reported lower levels of both total PS and free PS in OC users. PMID:12288974

  5. Localization of anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate proteoglycans in vascular endothelium: Antithrombin binding on cultured endothelial cells and perfused rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    de Agostini, A.I.; Watkins, S.C.; Slayter, H.S.; Youssoufian, H.; Rosenberg, R.D. )

    1990-09-01

    We have studied the interaction of {sup 125}I-antithrombin ({sup 125}I-AT) with microvascular endothelial cells (RFPEC) to localize the cellular site of anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). The radiolabeled protease inhibitor bound specifically to the above HSPG with a Kd of approximately 50 nM. Confluent monolayer RFPEC cultures exhibited a linear increase in the amount of AT bound per cell for up to 16 d, whereas suspension RFPEC cultures possessed a constant number of protease inhibitor binding sites per cell for up to 5 d. These results suggest that monolayer RFPEC cultures secrete anticoagulantly active HSPG, which then accumulate in the extracellular matrix. This hypothesis was confirmed by quantitative light and EM level autoradiography which demonstrated that the AT binding sites are predominantly located in the extracellular matrix with only small quantities of protease inhibitor complexed to the cell surface. We have also pinpointed the in vivo position of anticoagulantly active HSPG within the blood vessel wall. Rat aortas were perfused, in situ, with {sup 125}I-AT, and bound labeled protease inhibitor was localized by light and EM autoradiography. The anticoagulantly active HSPG were concentrated immediately beneath the aortic and vasa vasorum endothelium with only a very small extent of labeling noted on the luminal surface of the endothelial cells. Based upon the above data, we propose a model whereby luminal and abluminal anticoagulantly active HSPG regulate coagulation mechanism activity.

  6. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity. PMID:26472066

  7. Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR)

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) Program at The Johns Hopkins University provides high-quality next generation sequencing and genotyping services to investigators working to discover genes that contribute to common diseases.

  8. Developmental origins of epigenetic transgenerational inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Mark A.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental factors can induce epigenetic alterations in the germ cells that can potentially be transmitted transgenerationally. This non-genetic form of inheritance is termed epigenetic transgenerational inheritance and has been shown in a variety of species including plants, flies, worms, fish, rodents, pigs, and humans. This phenomenon operates during specific critical windows of exposure, linked to the developmental biology of the germ cells (sperm and eggs). Therefore, concepts of the developmental origins of transgenerational inheritance of phenotypic variation and subsequent disease risk need to include epigenetic processes affecting the developmental biology of the germ cell. These developmental impacts on epigenetic transgenerational inheritance, in contrast to multigenerational exposures, are the focus of this Perspective. PMID:27390622

  9. Paternally Inherited IGF2 Mutation and Growth Restriction.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Matthias; Zirn, Birgit; Santen, Gijs; Wirthgen, Elisa; Soellner, Lukas; Büttel, Hans-Martin; Schweizer, Roland; van Workum, Wilbert; Binder, Gerhard; Eggermann, Thomas

    2015-07-23

    In humans, mutations in IGF1 or IGF1R cause intrauterine and postnatal growth restriction; however, data on mutations in IGF2, encoding insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II, are lacking. We report an IGF2 variant (c.191C→A, p.Ser64Ter) with evidence of pathogenicity in a multigenerational family with four members who have growth restriction. The phenotype affects only family members who have inherited the variant through paternal transmission, a finding that is consistent with the maternal imprinting status of IGF2. The severe growth restriction in affected family members suggests that IGF-II affects postnatal growth in addition to prenatal growth. Furthermore, the dysmorphic features of affected family members are consistent with a role of deficient IGF-II levels in the cause of the Silver-Russell syndrome. (Funded by Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung and the European Union.). PMID:26154720

  10. Inherited Metabolic Disorders: Aspects of Chronic Nutritional Management

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, SW; Barclay, LJ; Burrage, LC

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of newborn screening and the development of new therapies have led to an expanding population of patients with inherited metabolic disorders, and these patients are now entering adulthood. Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for many of these disorders and thus, trained metabolic dietitians are critical members of the multidisciplinary team required for management of such patients. The main goals of dietary therapy in inborn errors of metabolism are the maintenance of normal growth and development while limiting offending metabolites and providing deficient products. Typically, the offending metabolite is either significantly reduced or removed completely from the diet and then reintroduced in small quantities until blood levels are within the normal range. Such treatment is required in infancy, childhood and adulthood and requires careful monitoring of micronutrient and macronutrient intake throughout the lifespan. The goal of this review is to highlight the basic principles of chronic nutritional management of the inborn errors of protein, carbohydrate and fat metabolism. PMID:26079521

  11. Respiratory involvement in inherited primary muscle conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shahrizaila, N; Kinnear, W J M; Wills, A J

    2006-01-01

    Patients with inherited muscle disorders can develop respiratory muscle weakness leading to ventilatory failure. Predicting the extent of respiratory involvement in the different types of inherited muscle disorders is important, as it allows clinicians to impart prognostic information and offers an opportunity for early interventional management strategies. The approach to respiratory assessment in patients with muscle disorders, the current knowledge of respiratory impairment in different muscle disorders and advice on the management of respiratory complications are summarised. PMID:16980655

  12. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Senard, Jean-Michel; Rouet, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH) deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS). Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance. PMID:16722595

  13. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  14. Comparison of biological activities of human antithrombins with high-mannose or complex-type nonfucosylated N-linked oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Kanda, Yutaka; Takayama, Makoto; Hashimoto, Akitoshi; Sugihara, Tsutomu; Satoh-Kubota, Ai; Suzuki-Takanami, Eri; Yano, Keiichi; Iida, Shigeru; Satoh, Mitsuo

    2016-05-01

    The structure of the N-linked oligosaccharides attached to antithrombin (AT) has been shown to affect its anticoagulant activity and pharmacokinetics. Human AT has biantennary complex-type oligosaccharides with the unique feature of lacking a core fucose, which affects its biological activities by changing its heparin-binding affinity. In human plasma, AT circulates as a mixture of the α-form bearing four oligosaccharides and the β-form lacking an oligosaccharide at Asn135. However, it remains unclear how the immature high-mannose-type oligosaccharides produced by mammalian cells affect biological activities of AT. Here, we succeeded in directly comparing the activities between the high-mannose and complex types. Interestingly, although there were no substantial differences in thrombin inhibitory activity, the high-mannose type showed higher heparin-binding affinity. The anticoagulant activities were increased by heparin and correlated with the heparin-binding affinity, resulting in the strongest anticoagulant activity being displayed in the β-form with the high-mannose type. In pharmacokinetic profiling, the high-mannose type showed a much shorter plasma half-life than the complex type. The β-form was found to have a prolonged plasma half-life compared with the α-form for the high-mannose type; conversely, the α-form showed a longer half-life than the β-form for the complex-type. The present study highlights that AT physiological activities are strictly controlled not only by a core fucose at the reducing end but also by the high-mannose-type structures at the nonreducing end. The β-form with the immature high-mannose type appears to function as a more potent anticoagulant than the AT typically found in human plasma, once it emerges in the blood. PMID:26747427

  15. Use of quantitative affinity chromatography for characterizing high-affinity interactions: binding of heparin to antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Hogg, P J; Jackson, C M; Winzor, D J

    1991-02-01

    The versatility of quantitative affinity chromatography (QAC) for evaluating the binding of macromolecular ligands to macromolecular acceptors has been increased substantially as a result of the derivation of the equations which describe the partitioning of acceptor between matrix-bound and soluble forms in terms of total, rather than free, ligand concentrations. In addition to simplifying the performance of the binding experiments, this development makes possible the application of the technique to systems characterized by affinities higher than those previously amenable to investigation by QAC. Addition of an on-line data acquisition system to monitor the concentration of partitioning solute in the liquid phase as a function of time has permitted the adoption of an empirical approach for determining the liquid-phase concentration of acceptor in the system at partition equilibrium, a development which decreases significantly the time required to obtain a complete binding curve by QAC. The application of these new QAC developments is illustrated by the determination of binding constants for the interactions of high-affinity heparin (Mr 20,300) with antithrombin III at three temperatures. Association constants of 8.0 +/- 2.2 x 10(7), 3.4 +/- 0.3 x 10(7), and 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(7) M-1 were observed at 15, 25, and 35 degrees C, respectively. The standard enthalpy change of -4.2 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol that is calculated from these data is in good agreement with a reported value obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements. PMID:2035830

  16. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life. PMID:19820803

  17. Coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with protein S deficiency: perioperative implications.

    PubMed

    Balan, Baskaran; Chengode, Suresh; Al Sabti, Hilal; Rao, Ram Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Protein S (PS) along with activated protein C plays an important role in the down-regulation of in vivo thrombin generation. Its deficiency can cause abnormal and inappropriate clot formation within the circulation necessitating chronic anticoagulation therapy. The risk of developing thrombotic complications is heightened in the perioperative period in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Heparin resistance is very rare in these patients, especially when antithrombin levels are near normal. Management of CPB in this scenario is quite challenging. We report the perioperative management, particularly the CPB management, of a patient with type I PS deficiency and incidentally detected heparin resistance, who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting with CPB. PMID:24994735

  18. A neurodystrophic syndrome resembling carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type III.

    PubMed

    Stibler, H; Gylje, H; Uller, A

    1999-04-01

    A 10-month old girl is described with a serum transferrin isoform abnormality of the same kind as in two previously reported girls with carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type III. This patient presented with joint abnormalities and rapidly developing hypsarrhythmia, hypotonia, psychomotor delay and growth retardation. Fingers, toes, nails and local skin were dysmorphic. She had pale optic discs, thoracic syringomyelia and frontal lobe atrophy at three months. The CDT value in serum was greatly elevated. Several carbohydrate-deficient isoforms were found in transferrin (four), alpha1-antitrypsin (three), antithrombin (two) and thyroxine-binding globulin (four). Mutations in the CDGS 1-gene were excluded. The CDGS III glycoprotein abnormality most probably represents a distinct disorder of glycoprotein metabolism, and needs to be considered in unclear hypsarrhythmia with developmental delay. Dysmorphic features may be added to this syndrome. PMID:10401691

  19. Inherited anaemias in the Greek community of Cape Town.

    PubMed Central

    Bonafede, R P; Botha, M C; Beighton, P

    1979-01-01

    Cape Town has a Greek community of about 5000, of whom approximately 75% originate from the island of Lesbos. In a survey of inherited haematological conditions in this population, 250 unrelated volunteers were investigated. The prevalence of heterozygous beta-thalassaemia was found to be 6.4%, with a gene frequency of 0.033. G6PD deficiency was detected in 10 males and it can be estimated that the prevalence in the male members of this population is 6.7%, with a gene frequency of 0.067. Hereditary spherocytosis was found in three respondents and this represents a prevalence of 1.2%, with a gene frequency of 0.006. One subject was heterozygous for the sickle cell trait (HbS) and another volunteer had haemoglobin Lepore, which had already been diagnosed in Greece. Our findings with respect to beta-thalassaemia and G6PD deficiency are similar to those reported from regions in Greece where malaria is not highly endemic. PMID:469897

  20. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor anti-thrombin III complexes are decreased in bladder cancer patient serum: complex formation as a mechanism of inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Siegler, Katherine L.; Cox, Jacob; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Vera, Pedro L.

    2009-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) may serve as an important link between chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis as evidenced by the increase in serum MIF found in patients with various cancers. The present study identifies anti-thrombin III (ATIII) as an endogenous MIF binding protein, which reduces MIF biological activity. Serum MIF in bladder cancer patients (TCC stage II, n=50) was increased when compared to normal patients (n=50), while ATIII-MIF complexes were decreased in bladder cancer patient serum. These data suggest that increased circulating levels of bioactive MIF are present in bladder cancer patient serum. PMID:19762145

  1. Gene amplification as a cause of inherited thyroxine-binding globulin excess in two Japanese families

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yuichi; Miura, Yoshitaka; Saito, Hidehiko

    1995-12-01

    T{sub 4}-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid hormone transport protein in man. Inherited abnormalities in the level of serum TBG have been classified as partial deficiency, complete deficiency, and excess. Sequencing analysis of the TBG gene, located on Xq21-22, has uncovered the molecular defects causing partial and complete deficiency. However, the mechanism leading to inherited TBG excess remains unknown. In this study, two Japanese families, F-A and F-T, with inherited TBG excess were analyzed. Serum TBG levels in hemizygous males were 58 and 44 {mu}g/mL, 3- and 2-fold the normal value, respectively. The molecule had normal properties in terms of heat stability and isoelectric focussing pattern. The sequence of the coding region and the promoter activity of the TBG gene were also indistinguishable between hemizygotes and normal subjects. The gene dosage of TBG relative to that of {beta}-globin, which is located on chromosome 11, and Duchenne muscular dystropy, which is located on Xp, was evaluated by coamplification of these target genes using polymerase chain reaction and subsequent quantitation by HPLC. The TBG/{beta}-globin ratios of the affected male and female of F-A were 3.13 and 4.13 times, respectively, that in the normal males. The TBG/Duchenne muscular dystrophy ratios were 2.92 and 2.09 times the normal value, respectively. These results are compatible with three copies of TBG gene on the affected X-chromosome. Similarly, a 2-fold increase in gene dosage was demonstrated in the affected hemizygote of F-T. A 3-fold tandem amplification of the TBG gene was shown by in situ hybridization of prometaphase and interphase chromosomes from the affected male with a biotinylated genomic TBG probe, confirming the gene dosage results. Gene amplification of TBG is the cause of inherited TBG excess in these two families. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Chromatin insulators: regulatory mechanisms and epigenetic inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Bushey, Ashley M.; Dorman, Elizabeth R.; Corces, Victor G.

    2008-01-01

    Enhancer-blocking insulators are DNA elements that disrupt the communication between a regulatory sequence, such as an enhancer or a silencer, and a promoter. Insulators participate in both transcriptional regulation and global nuclear organization, two features of chromatin that are thought to be maintained from one generation to the next through epigenetic mechanisms. Furthermore, there are many regulatory mechanisms in place that enhance or hinder insulator activity. These modes of regulation could be used to establish cell-type specific insulator activity that is epigenetically inherited along a cell and/or organismal lineage. This review will discuss the evidence for epigenetic inheritance and regulation of insulator function. PMID:18851828

  3. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa: clinical and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Boeira, Vanessa Lys Simas Yamakawa; Souza, Erica Sales; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rêgo, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida; Follador, Ivonise

    2013-01-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that present with skin and, in some cases, mucosal fragility, predisposing patients to the development of blisters and/or erosions after minimal trauma or friction. Children with a recurrent history of these kinds of lesions or neonates that present them in the absence of another reasonable explanation should be investigated. Diagnosis must be based on clinical and histopathological findings. To date, management of inherited EB basically consists in avoiding traumas that trigger lesions, as well as preventing infection and facilitating healing of the wounds with the systematic use of bandages. PMID:23739692

  4. Hypoglycaemia related to inherited metabolic diseases in adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In non-diabetic adult patients, hypoglycaemia may be related to drugs, critical illness, cortisol or glucagon insufficiency, non-islet cell tumour, insulinoma, or it may be surreptitious. Nevertheless, some hypoglycaemic episodes remain unexplained, and inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) should be considered, particularly in cases of multisystemic involvement. In children, IEM are considered a differential diagnosis in cases of hypoglycaemia. In adulthood, IEM-related hypoglycaemia can persist in a previously diagnosed childhood disease. Hypoglycaemia may sometimes be a presenting sign of the IEM. Short stature, hepatomegaly, hypogonadism, dysmorphia or muscular symptoms are signs suggestive of IEM-related hypoglycaemia. In both adults and children, hypoglycaemia can be clinically classified according to its timing. Postprandial hypoglycaemia can be an indicator of either endogenous hyperinsulinism linked to non-insulinoma pancreatogenic hypoglycaemia syndrome (NIPHS, unknown incidence in adults) or very rarely, inherited fructose intolerance. Glucokinase-activating mutations (one family) are the only genetic disorder responsible for NIPH in adults that has been clearly identified so far. Exercise-induced hyperinsulinism is linked to an activating mutation of the monocarboxylate transporter 1 (one family). Fasting hypoglycaemia may be caused by IEM that were already diagnosed in childhood and persist into adulthood: glycogen storage disease (GSD) type I, III, 0, VI and IX; glucose transporter 2 deficiency; fatty acid oxidation; ketogenesis disorders; and gluconeogenesis disorders. Fasting hypoglycaemia in adulthood can also be a rare presenting sign of an IEM, especially in GSD type III, fatty acid oxidation [medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), ketogenesis disorders (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) lyase deficiency, and gluconeogenesis disorders (fructose-1,6-biphosphatase deficiency)]. PMID:22587661

  5. α1-Antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Greene, Catherine M; Marciniak, Stefan J; Teckman, Jeffrey; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Brantly, Mark L; Lomas, David A; Stoller, James K; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is an inherited disorder caused by mutations in SERPINA1, leading to liver and lung disease. It is not a rare disorder but frequently goes underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or cryptogenic liver disease. The most frequent disease-associated mutations include the S allele and the Z allele of SERPINA1, which lead to the accumulation of misfolded α1-antitrypsin in hepatocytes, endoplasmic reticulum stress, low circulating levels of α1-antitrypsin and liver disease. Currently, there is no cure for severe liver disease and the only management option is liver transplantation when liver failure is life-threatening. A1ATD-associated lung disease predominately occurs in adults and is caused principally by inadequate protease inhibition. Treatment of A1ATD-associated lung disease includes standard therapies that are also used for the treatment of COPD, in addition to the use of augmentation therapy (that is, infusions of human plasma-derived, purified α1-antitrypsin). New therapies that target the misfolded α1-antitrypsin or attempt to correct the underlying genetic mutation are currently under development. PMID:27465791

  6. PGK deficiency.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) deficiency is one of the relatively uncommon causes of hereditary non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia (HNSHA). The gene encoding the erythrocyte enzyme PGK1, is X-linked. Mutations of this gene may cause chronic haemolysis with or without mental retardation and they may cause myopathies, often with episodes of myoglobinuria, or a combination of these clinical manifestations. Twenty-six families have been described and in 20 of these the mutations are known. The reason for different clinical manifestations of mutations of the same gene remains unknown. PMID:17222195

  7. 25 CFR 213.13 - Inherited lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... prevent loss or waste, leases on undivided inherited lands will not be approved until the heirship... necessary to lease the lands to prevent loss or waste, the Area Director will report the facts to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and ask for instructions. Minor heirs can lease or joint adult heirs in...

  8. 25 CFR 213.13 - Inherited lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... prevent loss or waste, leases on undivided inherited lands will not be approved until the heirship... necessary to lease the lands to prevent loss or waste, the Area Director will report the facts to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and ask for instructions. Minor heirs can lease or joint adult heirs in...

  9. Difficulties in Learning Inheritance and Polymorphism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberman, Neomi; Beeri, Catriel; Kolikant, Yifat Ben-David

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on difficulties related to the concepts of inheritance and polymorphism, expressed by a group of 22 in-service CS teachers with an experience with the procedural paradigm, as they coped with a course on OOP. Our findings are based on the analysis of tests, questionnaires that the teachers completed in the course, as well as on…

  10. Inherited Oral Cancer: A Rare Reality.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Gargi S; Sarode, Sachin C; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-01-01

    Majority of oral cancers (around 90-95%) found today are caused by various environmental factors. These generally include the chemical and physical carcinogens, like tobacco, diet, microorganisms, radiations, etc. The remaining 5% of the cases are caused by inherited mutated genes carrying the defect. PMID:27018035

  11. Epigenetic Inheritance of Disease and Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bohacek, Johannes; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic marks in an organism can be altered by environmental factors throughout life. Although changes in the epigenetic code can be positive, some are associated with severe diseases, in particular, cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent evidence has indicated that certain epigenetic marks can be inherited, and reshape developmental and cellular features over generations. This review examines the challenging possibility that epigenetic changes induced by environmental factors can contribute to some of the inheritance of disease and disease risk. This concept has immense implications for the understanding of biological functions and disease etiology, and provides potential novel strategies for diagnosis and treatment. Examples of epigenetic inheritance relevant to human disease, such as the detrimental effects of traumatic stress or drug/toxic exposure on brain functions, are reviewed. Different possible routes of transmission of epigenetic information involving the germline or germline-independent transfer are discussed, and different mechanisms for the maintenance and transmission of epigenetic information like chromatin remodeling and small noncoding RNAs are considered. Future research directions and remaining major challenges in this field are also outlined. Finally, the adaptive value of epigenetic inheritance, and the cost and benefit of allowing acquired epigenetic marks to persist across generations is critically evaluated. PMID:22781843

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of inherited metabolic diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Diukman, R; Goldberg, J D

    1993-01-01

    Advances in the prenatal diagnosis of inherited metabolic disease have provided new reproductive options to at-risk couples. These advances have occurred in both sampling techniques and methods of analysis. In this review we present an overview of the currently available prenatal diagnostic approaches for the diagnosis of metabolic disease in a fetus. Images PMID:8236980

  13. Phylogenetics Exercise Using Inherited Human Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuimala, Jarno

    2006-01-01

    A bioinformatics laboratory exercise based on inherited human morphological traits is presented. It teaches how morphological characters can be used to study the evolutionary history of humans using parsimony. The exercise can easily be used in a pen-and-paper laboratory, but if computers are available, a more versatile analysis can be carried…

  14. Understanding Genetics and Inheritance in Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibuka-Sebitosi, Esther

    2007-01-01

    Conducted in urban and rural schools in two provinces of South Africa, the present study reports biology learners' understanding of concepts about genetics and inheritance. Participants were Grade 11 and 12 learners, aged 15-16 years. The tools included a written questionnaire, interviews, pre- and post-paper and pencil tests and focus group…

  15. Inherited Arrhythmias - Where do we Stand?

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Gersh, Bernard J; Camm, A John

    2014-08-01

    This review discusses inherited arrhythmias and conduction disturbances due to genetic disorders. Known channel mutations that are responsible for these conditions are presented, the indications and value of genetic testing are discussed, and a glossary of terms related to the discipline of genetic cardiology has been compiled. PMID:26835071

  16. Fractional populations in sex-linked inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo Lee, Seung; Chung, Myung-Hoon; Koo Kim, Chul; Nahm, Kyun

    2001-03-01

    We study the fractional populations in chromosome inherited diseases. The governing equations for the fractional populations are found and solved in the presence of mutation and selection. The physical fixed points obtained are used to discuss the cases of color blindness and hemophilia.

  17. Ethnogenetics: Interpreting Ideas about Diabetes and Inheritance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Diane

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with American Indian tribal members in California and Arizona and their physicians revealed different beliefs about the causes and inheritance of diabetes. These differences in understanding are examined in terms of differences between physician and client communication practices and between professional medical education and lay health…

  18. ONLINE MENDELIAN INHERITANCE IN MAN (OMIM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Welcome to OMIM(TM), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. This database is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders authored and edited by Dr. Victor McKusick and his colleagues at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere, and developed for the World Wide Web by NCBI, the National Cent...

  19. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  20. Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency: A Lethal Entity.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sushma; Paldiwal, Ashutosh Abhimanyu; Korday, Charusheela Sujit; Jadhav, Shruti Sudhir

    2015-10-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a rare disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three classic forms of CPT II deficiency have been described namely the lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form and the myopathic form. We present a three-day-old female child, admitted to us for lethargy, icterus, low sugars and convulsions. Persistent non ketotic hypoglycaemia, hyperammonemia, raised liver enzymes with hepatomegaly and cardiomyopathy led to the suspicion of fatty acid oxidation defect. Tandem mass spectrometry helped to clinch the diagnosis of CPT II Deficiency in the present case. PMID:26557586

  1. Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency: A Lethal Entity

    PubMed Central

    Paldiwal, Ashutosh Abhimanyu; Korday, Charusheela Sujit; Jadhav, Shruti Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a rare disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three classic forms of CPT II deficiency have been described namely the lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form and the myopathic form. We present a three-day-old female child, admitted to us for lethargy, icterus, low sugars and convulsions. Persistent non ketotic hypoglycaemia, hyperammonemia, raised liver enzymes with hepatomegaly and cardiomyopathy led to the suspicion of fatty acid oxidation defect. Tandem mass spectrometry helped to clinch the diagnosis of CPT II Deficiency in the present case. PMID:26557586

  2. Elusive inheritance: Transgenerational effects and epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease

    PubMed Central

    Martos, Suzanne N.; Tang, Wan-yee; Wang, Zhibin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms involving DNA methylation, histone modification, histone variants and nucleosome positioning, and noncoding RNAs regulate cell-, tissue-, and developmental stage-specific gene expression by influencing chromatin structure and modulating interactions between proteins and DNA. Epigenetic marks are mitotically inherited in somatic cells and may be altered in response to internal and external stimuli. The idea that environment-induced epigenetic changes in mammals could be inherited through the germline, independent of genetic mechanisms, has stimulated much debate. Many experimental models have been designed to interrogate the possibility of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance and provide insight into how environmental exposures influence phenotypes over multiple generations in the absence of any apparent genetic mutation. Unexpected molecular evidence has forced us to reevaluate not only our understanding of the plasticity and heritability of epigenetic factors, but of the stability of the genome as well. Recent reviews have described the difference between transgenerational and intergenerational effects; the two major epigenetic reprogramming events in the mammalian lifecycle; these two events making transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of environment-induced perturbations rare, if at all possible, in mammals; and mechanisms of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in non-mammalian eukaryotic organisms. This paper briefly introduces these topics and mainly focuses on (1) transgenerational phenotypes and epigenetic effects in mammals, (2) environment-induced intergenerational epigenetic effects, and (3) the inherent difficulties in establishing a role for epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease. PMID:25792089

  3. Elusive inheritance: Transgenerational effects and epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease.

    PubMed

    Martos, Suzanne N; Tang, Wan-Yee; Wang, Zhibin

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms involving DNA methylation, histone modification, histone variants and nucleosome positioning, and noncoding RNAs regulate cell-, tissue-, and developmental stage-specific gene expression by influencing chromatin structure and modulating interactions between proteins and DNA. Epigenetic marks are mitotically inherited in somatic cells and may be altered in response to internal and external stimuli. The idea that environment-induced epigenetic changes in mammals could be inherited through the germline, independent of genetic mechanisms, has stimulated much debate. Many experimental models have been designed to interrogate the possibility of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance and provide insight into how environmental exposures influence phenotypes over multiple generations in the absence of any apparent genetic mutation. Unexpected molecular evidence has forced us to reevaluate not only our understanding of the plasticity and heritability of epigenetic factors, but of the stability of the genome as well. Recent reviews have described the difference between transgenerational and intergenerational effects; the two major epigenetic reprogramming events in the mammalian lifecycle; these two events making transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of environment-induced perturbations rare, if at all possible, in mammals; and mechanisms of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in non-mammalian eukaryotic organisms. This paper briefly introduces these topics and mainly focuses on (1) transgenerational phenotypes and epigenetic effects in mammals, (2) environment-induced intergenerational epigenetic effects, and (3) the inherent difficulties in establishing a role for epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease. PMID:25792089

  4. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AT III) is a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of ... may mean you have an increased risk of blood clotting. This can occur when there is not enough ...

  5. 25 CFR 91.9 - Inheritance of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.9 Inheritance of improvements. (a) Upon the death of the owner of... of the county courts, State of Oklahoma, and shall be subject to inheritance or bequest in...

  6. 25 CFR 91.9 - Inheritance of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.9 Inheritance of improvements. (a) Upon the death of the owner of... of the county courts, State of Oklahoma, and shall be subject to inheritance or bequest in...

  7. 25 CFR 91.9 - Inheritance of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.9 Inheritance of improvements. (a) Upon the death of the owner of... of the county courts, State of Oklahoma, and shall be subject to inheritance or bequest in...

  8. 25 CFR 91.9 - Inheritance of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.9 Inheritance of improvements. (a) Upon the death of the owner of... of the county courts, State of Oklahoma, and shall be subject to inheritance or bequest in...

  9. 25 CFR 91.9 - Inheritance of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.9 Inheritance of improvements. (a) Upon the death of the owner of... of the county courts, State of Oklahoma, and shall be subject to inheritance or bequest in...

  10. Gene therapy for inherited muscle diseases: Where genetics meets rehabilitation medicine

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Robynne; Wang, Zejing; Mack, David L.; Childers, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    The development of clinical vectors to correct genetic mutations that cause inherited myopathies and related disorders of skeletal muscle is advancing at an impressive rate. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are attractive for clinical use because (i) AAVs do not cause human disease, and (ii) these vectors are able to persist for years. New vectors are now becoming available as gene therapy delivery tools, and recent preclinical experiments have demonstrated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of gene therapy with AAV for long-term correction of muscle pathology and weakness in myotubularin-deficient canine and murine disease models. In this review, we present recent advances in the application of gene therapies to treat inherited muscle disorders including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and X-linked Myotubular Myopathy. Potential areas for therapeutic synergies between rehabilitation medicine and genetics are also discussed. PMID:25313664

  11. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for inherited neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Tur-Kaspa, Ilan; Jeelani, Roohi; Doraiswamy, P Murali

    2014-07-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an option for couples at risk of having offspring with an inherited debilitating or fatal neurological disorder who wish to conceive a healthy child. PGD has been carried out for conditions with various modes of inheritance, including spinal muscular atrophy, Huntington disease, fragile X syndrome, and chromosomal or mitochondrial disorders, and for susceptibility genes for cancers with nervous system involvement. Most couples at risk of transmitting a genetic mutation would opt for PGD over prenatal testing and possible termination of a pregnancy. The aim of this Perspectives article is to assist neurologists in counselling and treating patients who wish to explore the option of PGD to enable conception of an unaffected child. PGD can be accomplished for most disorders in which the genetic basis is known, and we argue that it is time for clinicians and neurological societies to consider the evidence and to formulate guidelines for the responsible integration of PGD into modern preventative neurology. PMID:24866878

  12. Pregnancy in women with inherited metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of women with rare inherited disorders of metabolism are becoming pregnant. Whilst, in general, outcomes for women and their children are good, there are issues that need to be considered. Due to the rarity of many conditions, there is limited specific guidance available on best management. Prepregnancy counselling with information on inheritance, options for reproduction, teratogenicity risk, potential impact on maternal health and long-term health of children should be offered. With appropriate specialist management, the teratogenic risk of conditions such as maternal phenylketonuria (PKU) can be eliminated, and the risk of metabolic decompensation in other disorders of intoxication or energy metabolism significantly reduced. Newer therapies, such as enzyme replacement therapy, appear to be safe in pregnancy, but specific advice should be sought. Multidisciplinary management, and close liaison between obstetricians and other specialists is required for women in whom there is cardiac, renal, respiratory, joint or other organ involvement.

  13. Evolutionary inheritance of elemental stoichiometry in phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Quigg, Antonietta; Irwin, Andrew J.; Finkel, Zoe V.

    2011-01-01

    The elemental composition of phytoplankton is a fusion of the evolutionary history of the host and plastid, resulting in differences in genetic constraints and selection pressures associated with environmental conditions. The evolutionary inheritance hypothesis predicts similarities in elemental composition within related taxonomic lineages of phytoplankton. To test this hypothesis, we measured the elemental composition (C, N, P, S, K, Mg, Ca, Sr, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Cd and Mo) of 14 phytoplankton species and combined these with published data from 15 more species from both marine and freshwater environments grown under nutrient-replete conditions. The largest differences in the elemental profiles of the species distinguish between the prokaryotic Cyanophyta and primary endosymbiotic events that resulted in the green and red plastid lineages. Smaller differences in trace element stoichiometry within the red and green plastid lineages are consistent with changes in trace elemental stoichiometry owing to the processes associated with secondary endosymbioses and inheritance by descent with modification. PMID:20826483

  14. Medical Problems in Obstetrics: Inherited Metabolic Disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Elaine

    2015-07-01

    An increasing number of women with rare inherited disorders of metabolism are becoming pregnant. Although, in general, outcomes for women and their children are good, there are a number of issues that need to be considered. Currently, limited specific guidance on the management of these conditions in pregnancy is available. Prepregnancy counselling with information on inheritance, options for reproduction, teratogenicity risk, potential impact on maternal health and long-term health of children should be offered. With appropriate specialist management, the teratogenic risk of conditions such as maternal phenylketonuria (PKU) can be eliminated, and the risk of metabolic decompensation in disorders of energy metabolism or intoxication significantly reduced. Multidisciplinary management, and close liaison between obstetricians and other specialists, is required for those women in whom there is cardiac, renal, respiratory, joint or other organ involvement. PMID:26088792

  15. Inheritance is where physiology meets evolution

    PubMed Central

    Danchin, Étienne; Pocheville, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Physiology and evolutionary biology have developed as two separated disciplines, a separation that mirrored the hypothesis that the physiological and evolutionary processes could be decoupled. We argue that non-genetic inheritance shatters the frontier between physiology and evolution, and leads to the coupling of physiological and evolutionary processes to a point where there exists a continuum between accommodation by phenotypic plasticity and adaptation by natural selection. This approach is also profoundly affecting the definition of the concept of phenotypic plasticity, which should now be envisaged as a multi-scale concept. We further suggest that inclusive inheritance provides a quantitative way to help bridging infra-individual (i.e. physiology) with supra-individual (i.e. evolution) approaches, in a way that should help building the long sough inclusive evolutionary synthesis. PMID:24882815

  16. Systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the birth prevalence of five inherited metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Moorthie, Sowmiya; Cameron, Louise; Sagoo, Gurdeep S; Bonham, Jim R; Burton, Hilary

    2014-11-01

    Many newborn screening programmes now use tandem mass spectrometry in order to screen for a variety of diseases. However, countries have embraced this technology with a differing pace of change and for different conditions. This has been facilitated by the ability of this diagnostic method to limit analysis to specific metabolites of interest, enabling targeted screening for particular conditions. MS/MS was introduced in 2009 in England to implement newborn bloodspot screening for medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) raising the possibility of screening for other inherited metabolic disorders. Recently, a pilot screening programme was conducted in order to evaluate the health and economic consequences of screening for five additional inherited metabolic disorders in England. As part of this study we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the birth prevalence of these conditions: maple syrup urine disease, homocystinuria (pyridoxine unresponsive), glutaric aciduria type I, isovaleric acidaemia and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency including trifunctional protein deficiency. We identified a total of 99 studies that were able to provide information on the prevalence of one or more of the disorders. The vast majority of studies were of screening programmes with some reporting on clinically detected cases. PMID:25022222

  17. Dog models for blinding inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Komáromy, András M

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  18. Problem of technological inheritance in machine engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenstein, Valery; Rakhimyanov, Kharis; Heifetz, Mikhail; Kleptzov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This article demonstrates the importance of the research study with regard to the technological inheritance of the properties, which characterize the surface layer, at different stages of a part's life cycle. It looks back at the major achievements and gives the findings relating to the technological inheritance of the parameters of the surface layer strength and quality as well as to how they affect the performance properties of machine parts. It demonstrates that high rates of machine engineering development, occurrence of new materials and more complicated machine operation environment require a shorter period for design-to-manufacture facility by reducing experiments and increasing design work. That, in its turn, generates the necessity in more complex but also more accurate models of metal behavior under stressing. It is especially critical for strengthening treatment. Among them are the models developed within the mechanics of technological inheritance. It is assumed that at the stages of a part's life cycle deformation accumulates on a continuous basis and the plasticity reserve of the metal, which the surface layer is made of, depletes. The research study of technological inheritance and the discovery of physical patterns of the evolution and degradation of the structures in a thin surface layer, which occur during machining and operational stressing of parts made from existing and unique including nanopatterned metals, is a crucial scientific challenge. This leads to the acquisition of new knowledge in the plasticity of state-of-the-art metals in the conditions of complex non monotonous stressing and to the development of efficient integrated and combined methods of technological impact.

  19. Mouse models of Inherited Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Jahid, Sohail; Lipkin, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Animal models of cancer have been instrumental in understanding the progression and therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes. The ability to alter the genome of individual mouse cell types in both constitutive and inducible approaches has led to many novel insights into their human disease counterparts. In this review, conventional, conditional and inducible knockout mouse models of inherited human cancer syndromes are presented and insights from the study of these models are highlighted. PMID:21075289

  20. Dog Models for Blinding Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Komáromy, András M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  1. 26 CFR 1.102-1 - Gifts and inheritances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gifts and inheritances. 1.102-1 Section 1.102-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Excluded from Gross Income § 1.102-1 Gifts and inheritances... inheritances. The income from any property received as a gift, or under a will or statute of descent...

  2. 26 CFR 1.102-1 - Gifts and inheritances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gifts and inheritances. 1.102-1 Section 1.102-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Excluded from Gross Income § 1.102-1 Gifts and inheritances... inheritances. The income from any property received as a gift, or under a will or statute of descent...

  3. Gene therapies for inherited skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Qasim, Waseem; McGrath, John A

    2014-06-01

    Skin is an amenable organ for gene replacement and gene editing therapeutics. Its accessibility makes it well-suited for direct topical gene delivery, grafting of genetically corrected cells, and monitoring of possible adverse events. Monogenic recessive disorders with a clinically severe or life-threatening phenotype provide the best candidate diseases for the introduction of a single normal copy of the gene into the target cell, usually keratinocytes. Preclinical studies have shown impressive results in terms of gene correction using both in vivo and ex vivo approaches. The clinical application of gene replacement or genomic editing as potential therapies for inherited skin disorders, however, has been held back by the inadequacy of delivery vectors and concerns from regulatory agencies regarding safety; thus translation to clinical trials has been slow. Over the past 15 years, cell culture and animal models have shown efficient gene correction techniques as preludes to treat inherited skin disorders such as junctional epidermolysis bullosa, dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, xeroderma pigmentosum, lamellar ichthyosis and Netherton syndrome, but so far only one patient has been treated in a clinical trial. This article reviews the current status of gene therapies for patients with inherited skin diseases and explores future perspectives. PMID:25085667

  4. Paternal inheritance in mealybugs (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kol-Maimon, Hofit; Mendel, Zvi; Franco, José Carlos; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-10-01

    Mealybugs have a haplodiploid reproduction system, with paternal genome elimination (PGE); the males are diploid soon after fertilization, but during embryogenesis, the male paternal set of chromosomes becomes heterochromatic (HC) and therefore inactive. Previous studies have suggested that paternal genes can be passed on from mealybug males to their sons, but not necessarily by any son, to the next generation. We employed crosses between two mealybug species— Planococcus ficus (Signoret) and Planococcus citri (Risso)—and between two populations of P. ficus, which differ in their mode of pheromone attraction, in order to demonstrate paternal inheritance from males to F2 through F1 male hybrids. Two traits were monitored through three generations: mode of male pheromone attraction (pherotype) and sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) gene segment (genotype). Our results demonstrate that paternal inheritance in mealybugs can occur from males to their F2 offspring, through F1 males (paternal line). F2 backcrossed hybrid males expressed paternal pherotypes and ITS2 genotypes although their mother originated through a maternal population. Further results revealed other, hitherto unknown, aspects of inheritance in mealybugs, such as that hybridization between the two species caused absence of paternal traits in F2 hybrid females produced by F1 hybrid females. Furthermore, hybridization between the two species raised the question of whether unattracted males have any role in the interactions between P. ficus and P. citri.

  5. Phenotype as Agent for Epigenetic Inheritance.

    PubMed

    Torday, John S; Miller, William B

    2016-01-01

    The conventional understanding of phenotype is as a derivative of descent with modification through Darwinian random mutation and natural selection. Recent research has revealed Lamarckian inheritance as a major transgenerational mechanism for environmental action on genomes whose extent is determined, in significant part, by germ line cells during meiosis and subsequent stages of embryological development. In consequence, the role of phenotype can productively be reconsidered. The possibility that phenotype is directed towards the effective acquisition of epigenetic marks in consistent reciprocation with the environment during the life cycle of an organism is explored. It is proposed that phenotype is an active agent in niche construction for the active acquisition of epigenetic marks as a dominant evolutionary mechanism rather than a consequence of Darwinian selection towards reproductive success. The reproductive phase of the life cycle can then be appraised as a robust framework in which epigenetic inheritance is entrained to affect growth and development in continued reciprocal responsiveness to environmental stresses. Furthermore, as first principles of physiology determine the limits of epigenetic inheritance, a coherent justification can thereby be provided for the obligate return of all multicellular eukaryotes to the unicellular state. PMID:27399791

  6. Properdin deficiency in a family with fulminant meningococcal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Sjöholm, A G; Braconier, J H; Söderström, C

    1982-01-01

    Three males in a large family showed a selective deficiency of properdin (P). One of the P deficient individuals died from a fulminant infection with Neisseria meningitidis group C. The family history revealed three previous cases of similar infections with a fatal outcome. The deficiency did not appear to be associated with repeated bacterial infections. The pattern of inheritance suggested an X-linked mode of transmittance. However, heterozygous carriers were not clearly distinguished in the family. P deficient serum supported immune haemolysis in a normal fashion. Alternative pathway functions, such as the activation of C3 by inulin or zymosan, lysis of guinea-pig erythrocytes in agarose gel and opsonization of endotoxin coated oil particles, were grossly impaired in P deficient serum while efficient C3 activation was produced by addition of cobra venom factor. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7151327

  7. Rat heparan sulphates. A study of the antithrombin-binding properties of heparan sulphate chains from rat adipose tissue, brain, carcase, heart, intestine, kidneys, liver, lungs, skin and spleen.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, A A

    1990-01-01

    Adult male rats were given [35S]sulphate intraperitoneally. Heparan [35S]sulphate (HS) chains were recovered from adipose tissue, brain, carcase, heart, intestine, kidneys, liver, lungs, skin and spleen by digestion with Pronase, precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride, digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase and DNAase and gradient elution from DEAE-Sephacel. Purity was confirmed by agarose-gel electrophoresis and degradation with HNO2. Fractionation by gradient elution from antithrombin-agarose indicated that the proportion of HS with high binding affinity for antithrombin (HA-HS) ranged from 4.7% (kidneys) to 21.5% (brain). On a mass basis the major sources of HA-HS were carcase, skin and intestine. HA-HS from intestine was arbitrarily divided into subfractions I-VI, with anticoagulant activities ranging from 1 to 60 units/mg [by amidolytic anti-(Factor IIa) assay] and from 4 to 98 units/mg [by amidolytic anti-(Factor Xa) assay], indicating that the antithrombin-binding-site densities of HA-HS chains covered a wide range, as shown previously for rat HA-heparin chains [Horner, Kusche, Lindahl & Peterson (1988) Biochem. J. 251, 141-145]. HA-HS subfractions II, IV and VI were mixed with samples of HA-[3H]heparin chains and rechromatographed on antithrombin-agarose. Affinity for matrix-bound antithrombin did not correlate with anticoagulant activity, e.g. HA-HS subfraction IV [38 anti-(Factor Xa) units/mg] was co-eluted with HA-heparin chains [127 anti-(Factor Xa) units/mg]. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2138457

  8. Integrity of the yeast mitochondrial genome, but not its distribution and inheritance, relies on mitochondrial fission and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Christof; Noriega, Thomas R.; Okreglak, Voytek; Fung, Jennifer C.; Walter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for mitochondrial and cellular function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mtDNA is organized in nucleoprotein structures termed nucleoids, which are distributed throughout the mitochondrial network and are faithfully inherited during the cell cycle. How the cell distributes and inherits mtDNA is incompletely understood although an involvement of mitochondrial fission and fusion has been suggested. We developed a LacO-LacI system to noninvasively image mtDNA dynamics in living cells. Using this system, we found that nucleoids are nonrandomly spaced within the mitochondrial network and observed the spatiotemporal events involved in mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, cells deficient in mitochondrial fusion and fission distributed and inherited mtDNA normally, pointing to alternative pathways involved in these processes. We identified such a mechanism, where we observed fission-independent, but F-actin–dependent, tip generation that was linked to the positioning of mtDNA to the newly generated tip. Although mitochondrial fusion and fission were dispensable for mtDNA distribution and inheritance, we show through a combination of genetics and next-generation sequencing that their absence leads to an accumulation of mitochondrial genomes harboring deleterious structural variations that cluster at the origins of mtDNA replication, thus revealing crucial roles for mitochondrial fusion and fission in maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:25730886

  9. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  10. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency diagnosed in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ozlem; Buyuktas, Deram; Aydin, Ahmet; Acbay, Ozer

    2011-12-01

    Urea cycle enzymes deficiencies are rare metabolic disorders. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common type. The syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme OTC which catalyses the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrulline. It shows X-linked inheritance and typically remains asymptomatic until late infancy or early childhood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the age of the patient and the duration of hyperammonemia. Female heterozygotes are more difficult to diagnose. They suffer from hyperammonemic periods which can be triggered by trauma, infections, surgery, childbirth, parenteral nutrition, and by the initiation of sodium valproate therapy. The prognosis of OTC deficiency is better for those with an onset after infancy, but morbidity from brain damage does not appear to be linked to the number of episodes of hyperammonemia that have occurred. However, early diagnosis and prompt initiation of ammonia-lowering treatment are essential for survival of these patients. This case presents a patient who was diagnosed with OTC deficiency following mental confusion during pregnancy. PMID:21736537

  11. Transgenerational Epigenetic Inheritance: myths and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Heard, Edith; Martienssen, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Since the human genome was sequenced, the term “epigenetics” is increasingly being associated with the hope that we are more than just the sum of our genes. Might what we eat, the air we breathe, or even the emotions we feel, influence not only our genes but those of descendents? The environment can certainly influence gene expression, and can lead to disease, but trans-generational consequences are another matter. While the inheritance of epigenetic characters can certainly occur - particularly in plants – how much is due to the environment and the extent to which it happens in humans, remains unclear. PMID:24679529

  12. The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chirnomas, S Deborah; Kupfer, Gary M

    2013-12-01

    Molecular pathogenesis may be elucidated for inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS). The study and presentation of the details of their molecular biology and biochemistry is warranted for appropriate diagnosis and management of afflicted patients and to identify the physiology of the normal hematopoiesis and mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Several themes have emerged within each subsection of IBMFS, including the ribosomopathies, which include ribosome assembly and ribosomal RNA processing. The Fanconi anemia pathway has become interdigitated with the familial breast cancer syndromes. In this article, the diseases that account for most IBMFS diagnoses are analyzed. PMID:24237972

  13. Extending the SSCLI to Support Dynamic Inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose Manuel; Ortin, Francisco; Perez-Schofield, J. Baltasar Garcia

    This paper presents a step forward on a research trend focused on increasing runtime adaptability of commercial JIT-based virtual machines, describing how to include dynamic inheritance into this kind of platforms. A considerable amount of research aimed at improving runtime performance of virtual machines has converted them into the ideal support for developing different types of software products. Current virtual machines do not only provide benefits such as application interoperability, distribution and code portability, but they also offer a competitive runtime performance.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Inherited Demyelinating Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    SCHERER, STEVEN S.; WRABETZ, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    The past 15 years have witnessed the identification of more than 25 genes responsible for inherited neuropathies in humans, many associated with primary alterations of the myelin sheath. A remarkable body of work in patients, as well as animal and cellular models, has defined the clinical and molecular genetics of these illnesses and shed light on how mutations in associated genes produce the heterogeneity of dysmyelinating and demyelinating phenotypes. Here, we review selected recent developments from work on the molecular mechanisms of these disorders and their implications for treatment strategies. PMID:18803325

  15. The burden and consequences of inherited blood disorders among young children in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Suchdev, Parminder S; Ruth, Laird J; Earley, Marie; Macharia, Alex; Williams, Thomas N

    2014-01-01

    Although inherited blood disorders are common among children in many parts of Africa, limited data are available about their prevalence or contribution to childhood anaemia. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 858 children aged 6-35 months who were randomly selected from 60 villages in western Kenya. Haemoglobin (Hb), ferritin, malaria, C-reactive protein (CRP) and retinol binding protein (RBP) were measured from capillary blood. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Hb type, -3.7 kb alpha-globin chain deletion, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) genotype and haptoglobin (Hp) genotype were determined. More than 2 out of 3 children had at least one measured blood disorder. Sickle cell trait (HbAS) and disease (HbSS) were found in 17.1% and 1.6% of children, respectively; 38.5% were heterozygotes and 9.6% were homozygotes for α(+) -thalassaemia. The Hp 2-2 genotype was found in 20.4% of children, whereas 8.2% of males and 6.8% of children overall had G6PD deficiency. There were no significant differences in the distribution of malaria by the measured blood disorders, except among males with G6PD deficiency who had a lower prevalence of clinical malaria than males of normal G6PD genotype (P = 0.005). After excluding children with malaria parasitaemia, inflammation (CRP > 5 mg L(-1) ), iron deficiency (ferritin < 12 μg L(-1) ) or vitamin A deficiency (RBP < 0.7 μg L(-1) ), the prevalence of anaemia among those without α(+) -thalassaemia (43.0%) remained significantly lower than that among children who were either heterozygotes (53.5%) or homozygotes (67.7%, P = 0.03). Inherited blood disorders are common among pre-school children in western Kenya and are important contributors to anaemia. PMID:22973867

  16. Ultrasound of Inherited vs. Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Zaidman, Craig M.; Harms, Matthew B.; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We compared features of nerve enlargement in inherited and acquired demyelinating neuropathies using ultrasound. Methods We measured median and ulnar nerve cross-sectional areas in proximal and distal regions in 128 children and adults with inherited (Charcot-Marie Tooth-1 (CMT-1) (n=35)) and acquired (Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) (n=55), Guillaine-Barre Syndrome (GBS) (n=21) and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN) (n=17)) demyelinating neuropathies. We classified nerve enlargement by degree and number of regions affected. We defined patterns of nerve enlargement as: none- no enlargement; mild-nerves enlarged but never more than twice normal; regional- nerves normal at at least one region and enlarged more than twice normal at atleast one region; diffuse- nerves enlarged at all four regions with atleast one region more than twice normal size. Results Nerve enlargement was commonly diffuse (89%) and generally more than twice normal size in CMT-1, but not (p<0.001) in acquired disorders which mostly had either no, mild or regional nerve enlargement (CIDP (64%), GBS (95%), and MMN (100%)). In CIDP, subjects treated within three months of disease onset had less nerve enlargement than those treated later. Discussion Ultrasound identified patterns of diffuse nerve enlargement can be used to screen patients suspected of having CMT-1. Normal, mildly, or regionally enlarged nerves in demyelinating polyneuropathy suggests an acquired etiology. Early treatment in CIDP may impede nerve enlargement. PMID:24101129

  17. Information accumulation system by inheritance and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, J. K.

    2009-09-01

    This paper suggests a new model, called as the IAS (Information Accumulation System), for the description of the dynamic process that people use to accumulate their information (knowledge or opinion) for specific issues. Using the concept of information, both the internal and the external mechanism of the opinion dynamics are treated on a unified frame. The information is quantified as a real number with fixed bounds. New concepts, such as inheritance and differential absorption, are incorporated in IAS in addition to the conventional diffusive interaction between people. Thus, the dynamics of the IAS are governed by following three factors: inheritance rate, diffusivity and absorption rate. The original set of equations was solved with an agent based modeling technique. In addition, the individual equations for each of the agents were assembled and transformed into a set of equations for the ensemble averages, which are greatly reduced in number and can be solved analytically. The example simulations showed interesting results such as the critical behavior with respect to diffusivity, the information polarization out of zero-sum news and the dependence of the solutions on the initial conditions alone. The results were speculated in relation to today’s modern society where the diffusivity of information has been greatly increased through the internet and mobile phones.

  18. Oxidative stress in inherited mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Genki; Cortopassi, Gino

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria are a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial diseases are the result of inherited defects in mitochondrially expressed genes. One potential pathomechanism for mitochondrial disease is oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can occur as the result of increased ROS production or decreased ROS protection. The role of oxidative stress in the five most common inherited mitochondrial diseases, Friedreich ataxia, LHON, MELAS, MERRF, and Leigh syndrome (LS), is discussed. Published reports of oxidative stress involvement in the pathomechanisms of these five mitochondrial diseases are reviewed. The strongest evidence for an oxidative stress pathomechanism among the five diseases was for Friedreich ataxia. In addition, a meta-analysis was carried out to provide an unbiased evaluation of the role of oxidative stress in the five diseases, by searching for "oxidative stress" citation count frequency for each disease. Of the five most common mitochondrial diseases, the strongest support for oxidative stress is for Friedreich ataxia (6.42%), followed by LHON (2.45%), MELAS (2.18%), MERRF (1.71%), and LS (1.03%). The increased frequency of oxidative stress citations was significant relative to the mean of the total pool of five diseases (p<0.01) and the mean of the four non-Friedreich diseases (p<0.0001). Thus there is support for oxidative stress in all five most common mitochondrial diseases, but the strongest, significant support is for Friedreich ataxia. PMID:26073122

  19. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic. PMID:26427454

  20. Human handedness: an inherited evolutionary trait.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Gillian S; Quaresmini, Caterina; Leavens, David A; Mareschal, Denis; Thomas, Michael S C

    2013-01-15

    Our objective was to demonstrate that human population-level, right-handedness, is not species specific, precipitated from language areas in the brain, but rather is context specific and inherited from a behavior common to both humans and great apes. In general, previous methods of assessing human handedness have neglected to consider the context of action, or employ methods suitable for direct comparison across species. We employed a bottom-up, context-sensitive method to quantitatively assess manual actions in right-handed, typically developing children during naturalistic behavior. By classifying the target to which participants directed a manual action, as animate (social partner, self) or inanimate (non-living functional objects), we found that children demonstrated a significant right-hand bias for manual actions directed toward inanimate targets, but not for manual actions directed toward animate targets. This pattern was revealed at both the group and individual levels. We used a focal video sampling, corpus data-mining approach to allow for direct comparisons with captive gorillas (Forrester et al. Animal Cognition 2011;14(6):903-7) and chimpanzees (Forrester et al. Animal Cognition, in press). Comparisons of handedness patters support the view that population-level, human handedness, and its origin in cerebral lateralization is not a new or human-unique characteristic. These data are consistent with the theory that human right-handedness is a trait developed through tool use that was inherited from an ancestor common to both humans and great apes. PMID:23022751

  1. Inherited cardiomyopathies caused by troponin mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qun-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Morimoto, Sachio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic investigations of cardiomyopathy in the recent two decades have revealed a large number of mutations in the genes encoding sarcomeric proteins as a cause of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), or restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Most functional analyses of the effects of mutations on cardiac muscle contraction have revealed significant changes in the Ca2+-regulatory mechanism, in which cardiac troponin (cTn) plays important structural and functional roles as a key regulatory protein. Over a hundred mutations have been identified in all three subunits of cTn, i.e., cardiac troponins T, I, and C. Recent studies on cTn mutations have provided plenty of evidence that HCM- and RCM-linked mutations increase cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, while DCM-linked mutations decrease it. This review focuses on the functional consequences of mutations found in cTn in terms of cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, ATPase activity, force generation, and cardiac troponin I phosphorylation, to understand potential molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms of the three types of inherited cardiomyopathy. PMID:23610579

  2. Neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kley, Rudolf A.; Fischer, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Driven by increasing numbers of newly identified genetic defects and new insights into the field of inherited muscle diseases, neuromuscular imaging in general and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular are increasingly being used to characterise the severity and pattern of muscle involvement. Although muscle biopsy is still the gold standard for the establishment of the definitive diagnosis, muscular imaging is an important diagnostic tool for the detection and quantification of dystrophic changes during the clinical workup of patients with hereditary muscle diseases. MRI is frequently used to describe muscle involvement patterns, which aids in narrowing of the differential diagnosis and distinguishing between dystrophic and non-dystrophic diseases. Recent work has demonstrated the usefulness of muscle imaging for the detection of specific congenital myopathies, mainly for the identification of the underlying genetic defect in core and centronuclear myopathies. Muscle imaging demonstrates characteristic patterns, which can be helpful for the differentiation of individual limb girdle muscular dystrophies. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of current methods and applications as well as future perspectives in the field of neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases. We also provide diagnostic algorithms that might guide us through the differential diagnosis in hereditary myopathies. PMID:20422195

  3. Analyticity of strictly static and strictly stationary, inheriting and non-inheriting Einstein-Maxwell solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tod, Paul

    2007-07-01

    Following the technique of Müller zum Hagen (Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 67: 415-421, 1970) we show that strictly static and strictly stationary solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations are analytic in harmonic coordinates. This holds whether or not the Maxwell field inherits the symmetry.

  4. Mismatch repair deficiency testing in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Buza, Natalia; Ziai, James; Hui, Pei

    2016-05-01

    Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, is caused by inactivating mutations involving DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. This leads to profound genetic instability, including microsatellite instability (MSI) and increased risk for cancer development, particularly colon and endometrial malignancies. Clinical testing of tumor tissues for the presence of MMR gene deficiency is standard practice in clinical oncology, with immunohistochemistry and PCR-based microsatellite instability analysis used as screening tests to identify potential Lynch syndrome families. The ultimate diagnosis of Lynch syndrome requires documentation of mutation within one of the four MMR genes (MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6) or EPCAM, currently achieved by comprehensive sequencing analysis of germline DNA. In this review, the genetic basis of Lynch syndrome, methodologies of MMR deficiency testing, and current diagnostic algorithms in the clinical management of Lynch syndrome, are discussed. PMID:26895074

  5. Biotinidase deficiency and our champagne legacy.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barry

    2016-09-10

    Biotinidase is the enzyme that is necessary for the recycling of the vitamin, biotin. Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder. If untreated, individuals with biotinidase deficiency usually develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms that can result in coma or death. Symptomatic individuals can be markedly improved by treating them with pharmacological doses of biotin; however, some clinical features may be irreversible. Fortunately, essentially all symptoms can be prevented if treatment is initiated at birth or before the symptoms develop. Because of this, the disorder is currently screened for in newborns in all states in the United States and in many countries around the world. This is the story of one laboratory's work in bringing basic science research from the discovery of the disorder to its translation into clinical medicine and its impact on the individuals with the disorder and their families. PMID:26456103

  6. Mechanisms of Non-Genetic Inheritance and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Miklos

    2015-01-01

    Inheritance is typically associated with the Mendelian transmission of information from parents to offspring by alleles (DNA sequence). However, empirical data clearly suggest that traits can be acquired from ancestors by mechanisms that do not involve genetic alleles, referred to as non-genetic inheritance. Information that is non-genetically transmitted across generations includes parental experience and exposure to certain environments, but also parental mutations and polymorphisms, because they can change the parental ‘intrinsic' environment. Non-genetic inheritance is not limited to the first generation of the progeny, but can involve the grandchildren and even further generations. Non-genetic inheritance has been observed for multiple traits including overall development, cardiovascular risk and metabolic symptoms, but this review will focus on the inheritance of behavioral abnormalities pertinent to psychiatric disorders. Multigenerational non-genetic inheritance is often interpreted as the transmission of epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation and chromatin modifications, via the gametes (transgenerational epigenetic inheritance). However, information can be carried across generations by a large number of bioactive substances, including hormones, cytokines, and even microorganisms, without the involvement of the gametes. We reason that this broader definition of non-genetic inheritance is more appropriate, especially in the context of psychiatric disorders, because of the well-recognized role of parental and early life environmental factors in later life psychopathology. Here we discuss the various forms of non-genetic inheritance in humans and animals, as well as rodent models of psychiatric conditions to illustrate possible mechanisms. PMID:24889369

  7. Identification of chromosome inheritance modifiers in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, K W; Kennedy, C D; Velasco, V M; McGrath, T L; Weko, J; Patterson, R W; Karpen, G H

    2001-01-01

    Faithful chromosome inheritance is a fundamental biological activity and errors contribute to birth defects and cancer progression. We have performed a P-element screen in Drosophila melanogaster with the aim of identifying novel candidate genes involved in inheritance. We used a "sensitized" minichromosome substrate (J21A) to screen approximately 3,000 new P-element lines for dominant effects on chromosome inheritance and recovered 78 Sensitized chromosome inheritance modifiers (Scim). Of these, 69 decreased minichromosome inheritance while 9 increased minichromosome inheritance. Fourteen mutations are lethal or semilethal when homozygous and all exhibit dramatic mitotic defects. Inverse PCR combined with genomic analyses identified P insertions within or close to genes with previously described inheritance functions, including wings apart-like (wapl), centrosomin (cnn), and pavarotti (pav). Further, lethal insertions in replication factor complex 4 (rfc4) and GTPase-activating protein 1 (Gap1) exhibit specific mitotic chromosome defects, discovering previously unknown roles for these proteins in chromosome inheritance. The majority of the lines represent mutations in previously uncharacterized loci, many of which have human homologs, and we anticipate that this collection will provide a rich source of mutations in new genes required for chromosome inheritance in metazoans. PMID:11290718

  8. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance: More questions than answers

    PubMed Central

    Daxinger, Lucia; Whitelaw, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are widely accepted as playing a critical role in the regulation of gene expression and thereby contributing to the determination of the phenotype of multicellular organisms. In general, these marks are cleared and re-established each generation, but there have been reports in a number of model organisms that at some loci in the genome this clearing is incomplete. This phenomenon is referred to as transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. Moreover, recent evidence shows that the environment can stably influence the establishment of the epigenome. Together, these findings suggest that an environmental event in one generation could affect the phenotype in subsequent generations, and these somewhat Lamarckian ideas are stimulating interest from a broad spectrum of biologists, from ecologists to health workers. PMID:21041414

  9. Beyond the simplicity of Mendelian inheritance.

    PubMed

    Schacherer, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the underlying rules that govern the phenotypic diversity observed in natural populations is an old but still unaccomplished goal in biology. In 1865, Gregor Mendel paved the way for the dissection of the underlying genetic basis of traits by setting out to understand the principles of heredity. To date, we still lack a global overview of the spectrum and continuum existing between Mendelian and complex traits within any natural population. In this respect, we recently performed a species-wide survey of Mendelian traits across a large population of isolates using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By analyzing the distribution and the inheritance patterns of the trait, we have clearly shown that monogenic mutations can display a significant, variable, and continuous expressivity across different genetic backgrounds. Our study also demonstrated that combining the elegancy of both classical genetics and high-throughput genomics is more than valuable to dissect the genotype-phenotype relationship in natural populations. PMID:27344551

  10. Frontometaphyseal dysplasia: evidence for autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed

    Kassner, E G; Haller, J O; Reddy, V H; Mitarotundo, A; Katz, I

    1976-12-01

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia is a syndrome that encompasses cranial hyperostosis, abnormal tubulation of cylindrical bones, and other skeletal and extraskeletal abnormalities. The most striking features are overgrowth of the supraorbital ridges which results in a Mephistophelian facial appearance and a radiographic configuration of the skull that has been likened to a soldier's helmet. Most patients have severe hearing loss, defective dentition, poorly developed musculature, and joint contractures. Dominant inheritance has been suggested in previous reports, but an appropriate pedigree has been documented in only one family. This paper describes three additional patients in two unrelated families: (1) an 8-year-old boy whose mother has mild metaphyseal dysplasia and several minor skeletal abnormalities that have occurred in patients with the syndrome; and (2) two maternal half-brothers. These cases provide additional evidence that frontometaphyseal dysplasia is an autosomal dominant trait with variable penetrance. PMID:998829

  11. Molecular basis of an inherited epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lossin, Christoph; Wang, Dao W; Rhodes, Thomas H; Vanoye, Carlos G; George, Alfred L

    2002-06-13

    Epilepsy is a common neurological condition that reflects neuronal hyperexcitability arising from largely unknown cellular and molecular mechanisms. In generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, an autosomal dominant epilepsy syndrome, mutations in three genes coding for voltage-gated sodium channel alpha or beta1 subunits (SCN1A, SCN2A, SCN1B) and one GABA receptor subunit gene (GABRG2) have been identified. Here, we characterize the functional effects of three mutations in the human neuronal sodium channel alpha subunit SCN1A by heterologous expression with its known accessory subunits, beta1 and beta2, in cultured mammalian cells. SCN1A mutations alter channel inactivation, resulting in persistent inward sodium current. This gain-of-function abnormality will likely enhance excitability of neuronal membranes by causing prolonged membrane depolarization, a plausible underlying biophysical mechanism responsible for this inherited human epilepsy. PMID:12086636

  12. Genetics of inherited primary arrhythmia disorders

    PubMed Central

    Spears, Danna A; Gollob, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    A sudden unexplained death is felt to be due to a primary arrhythmic disorder when no structural heart disease is found on autopsy, and there is no preceding documentation of heart disease. In these cases, death is presumed to be secondary to a lethal and potentially heritable abnormality of cardiac ion channel function. These channelopathies include congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, and short QT syndrome. In certain cases, genetic testing may have an important role in supporting a diagnosis of a primary arrhythmia disorder, and can also provide prognostic information, but by far the greatest strength of genetic testing lies in the screening of family members, who may be at risk. The purpose of this review is to describe the basic genetic and molecular pathophysiology of the primary inherited arrhythmia disorders, and to outline a rational approach to genetic testing, management, and family screening. PMID:26425105

  13. New thinking, innateness and inherited representation

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The New Thinking contained in this volume rejects an Evolutionary Psychology that is committed to innate domain-specific psychological mechanisms: gene-based adaptations that are unlearnt, developmentally fixed and culturally universal. But the New Thinking does not simply deny the importance of innate psychological traits. The problem runs deeper: the concept of innateness is not suited to distinguishing between the New Thinking and Evolutionary Psychology. That points to a more serious problem with the concept of innateness as it is applied to human psychological phenotypes. This paper argues that the features of recent human evolution highlighted by the New Thinking imply that the concept of inherited representation, set out here, is a better tool for theorizing about human cognitive evolution. PMID:22734066

  14. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  15. Inheritance of egusi seed type in watermelon.

    PubMed

    Gusmini, G; Wehner, T C; Jarret, R L

    2004-01-01

    An unusual seed mutant in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) has seeds with a fleshy pericarp, commonly called egusi seeds. The origin of the phenotype is unknown, but it is widely cultivated in Nigeria for the high protein and carbohydrate content of the edible seeds. Egusi seeds have a thick, fleshy pericarp that appears during the second to third week of fruit development. We studied the inheritance of this phenotype in crosses of normal seeded Charleston Gray and Calhoun Gray with two plant introduction accessions, PI 490383w and PI 560006, having the egusi seed type. We found that the egusi seed type is controlled by a single recessive gene, and the symbol eg was assigned. PMID:15220396

  16. A triad of bovine inherited diseases (abstract).

    PubMed

    Hill, F I

    2003-02-01

    Three inherited diseases of cattle seen in the past 2 years were described. Familial acantholysis of Angus cattle was seen in 9/54 calves born to cows inadvertently mated to a full sibling bull. Sloughing skin from the joints, nose and palate were seen at 1 day of age, confirmed as suprabasilar clefts on histopathology. A 2-year-old Charolais steer was noted at ante-mortem slaughter inspection with a whole body tremor and nystagmus. Histopathologically, eosinophilic plaques expanded white matter throughout the brain, consistent with a syndrome of 'progressive ataxia' of Charolais cattle. Two calves born from Red Devon cattle had marked hyperkeratosis, microtia and periocular reddening with deep fissuring of the keratin, characteristic of congenital ichthyosis. PMID:16032297

  17. Therapies for inherited skin fragility disorders.

    PubMed

    Has, Cristina; Kiritsi, Dimitra

    2015-05-01

    Inherited skin fragility comprises disorders characterized by mechanical induced blistering and erosions within the skin and mucosal membranes as a consequence of mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in intra-epidermal or dermal-epidermal adhesion. As the molecular pathology is largely known, it is a prototype group of disorders for which numerous experimental treatments have been developed. However, it became clear that single therapeutic strategies will not be able to address all molecular and clinical aspects. Significant progress has been achieved in gene, cell and protein therapies. Although the way towards clinical application seems obvious, major challenges must be addressed before these therapies become largely accessible. Until curative treatments will become available, alternative strategies which aim at increasing protein stability, amending apoptosis, inflammation and scarring may alleviate skin fragility and prevent or delay the onset of complications. PMID:25916580

  18. Molecular therapies for inherited epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Has, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises rare genetic disorders characterized by formation of blisters and erosions of skin and mucous membranes after minor mechanical trauma. The molecular basis and the pathomechanisms of the main EB types have been largely deciphered in the past decades. The burden of the disease is high and quality of life strongly affected. The treatment is still symptomatic aiming to support wound healing and resolve complications. Numerous experimental therapeutic approaches for EB have been explored in the last years, most of them dedicated to dystrophic EB. Although gene and cell therapies have been already applied in patients, molecular therapies including gene editing and repurposing of small molecules are currently very attractive. Recent data on the effect of small molecules, like aminoglycosides and angiotensin receptor blockers in preclinical models for dystrophic EB are encouraging. The efficacy in patients remains to be proven in clinical trials. Therapeutic efficacy, as well as unexpected outcomes must be carefully monitored. PMID:27149615

  19. The Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Chirnomas, S. Deborah; Kupfer, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the rarity of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS), they represent diseases for which the molecular pathogenesis may be elucidated. Their study and presentation of the details of their molecular biology and biochemistry is warranted not only for appropriate diagnosis and management of afflicted patients but also because they lend clues to the normal physiology of the normal hematopoiesis and, in many cases, mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Several themes have emerged within each subsection of IBMFS, including the ribosomopathies that entail both ribosome assembly as well as ribosomal RNA processing. The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway itself has become interdigitated with the familial breast cancer syndromes. The sections that follow present a more detailed analysis of the diseases that account for the majority of IBMFS diagnoses. PMID:24237972

  20. Epigenetic inheritance: histone bookmarks across generations.

    PubMed

    Campos, Eric I; Stafford, James M; Reinberg, Danny

    2014-11-01

    Multiple circuitries ensure that cells respond correctly to the environmental cues within defined cellular programs. There is increasing evidence suggesting that cellular memory for these adaptive processes can be passed on through cell divisions and generations. However, the mechanisms by which this epigenetic information is transferred remain elusive, largely because it requires that such memory survive through gross chromatin remodeling events during DNA replication, mitosis, meiosis, and developmental reprogramming. Elucidating the processes by which epigenetic information survives and is transmitted is a central challenge in biology. In this review, we consider recent advances in understanding mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance with a focus on histone segregation at the replication fork, and how an epigenetic memory may get passed through the paternal lineage. PMID:25242115

  1. Epigenetic Inheritance: Histone Bookmarks Across Generations

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Eric I.; Stafford, James M.; Reinberg, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Multiple circuitries ensure that cells respond correctly to the environmental cues within defined cellular programs. There is increasing evidence suggesting that cellular memory for these adaptive processes can be passed on through cell divisions and generations. However, the mechanisms by which this epigenetic information is transferred remain elusive largely because it requires that such memory survive through gross chromatin remodeling events during DNA replication, mitosis, meiosis and developmental reprogramming. Elucidating the processes by which epigenetic information survives and is transmitted is a central challenge in biology. Here we consider recent advances in understanding mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance with a focus on histone segregation at the replication fork and how an epigenetic memory may get passed through the paternal lineage. PMID:25242115

  2. Transcobalamin II Deficiency in Four Cases with Novel Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Şule; Rupar, Tony; Yetgin, Sevgi; Yaralı, Neşe; Dursun, Ali; Gürsel, Türkiz; Çetin, Mualla

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Transcobalamin II deficiency is one of the rare causes of inherited vitamin B12 disorders in which the patients have characteristically normal or high vitamin B12 levels related to the transport defect of vitamin B12 into the cell, ending up with intracellular cobalamin depletion and high homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels. Materials and Methods: Herein, we describe the findings at presentation of four patients who were diagnosed to have transcobalamin II deficiency with novel mutations. Results: These patients with transcobalamin II deficiency were found to have novel mutations, of whom 2 had the same large deletion (homozygous c.1106+1516-1222+1231del). Conclusion: Transcobalamin II deficiency should be considered in differential diagnosis of any infant with pancytopenia, failure to thrive, diarrhea, and vomiting. PMID:25914105

  3. Neuropathology in Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Knerr, Ina; Gibson, K. Michael; Murdoch, Geoffrey; Salomons, Gajja S.; Jakobs, Cornelis; Combs, Susan; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2010-01-01

    Reported here is the novel finding of neuropathology in a patient with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, an inherited disorder of γ-aminobutyric acid metabolism characterized by intellectual deficiency, hypotonia, and epilepsy, with 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria and abnormalities of the globus pallidus on neuroimaging. A 19-year-old woman of European origin with a neurodevelopmental disorder and epilepsy died unexpectedly in 1998. A postmortem examination was performed, with a final diagnosis of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients. Eight years later, her sister with a neurodevelopmental disorder presented at 13 years of age with seizures and was diagnosed with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency. In the decedent, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency was established at the molecular level, 10 years after her death, using genomic DNA from brain tissue specimens. The neuropathologic findings revealed striking discoloration of the globi pallidi, leptomeningeal congestion, and a scar in the frontal cortex. After detection of the pathogenic homozygous mutation c.1226G>A, p.Gly409Asp in the living sister, it was confirmed in the decedent. An underlying metabolic disease may be an additional risk factor for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients. PMID:20304328

  4. Rat heparins. A study of the relative sizes and antithrombin-binding characteristics of heparin proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products from rat adipose tissue, heart, lungs, peritoneal cavity and skin.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, A A

    1986-01-01

    35S-labelled heparins were recovered from adipose tissue, hearts, lungs, peritoneal cavities and skins of rats given H2(35)SO4. Their purification involved incubation with Pronase, precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride in 1.0 M-NaCl, gradient elution from DEAE-Sephacel and incubation with chondroitinase ABC. Each product was divided into proteoglycan and "depolymerization products' fractions by gel filtration on Bio-Gel A-15m. Heparin chains were released from a portion of each proteoglycan fraction by beta-elimination with NaOH. Proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products were separated by gradient elution from a column of antithrombin-agarose into fractions with no affinity, low affinity and high affinity for antithrombin. The relative sizes of the products were determined by gel filtration on columns of Bio-Gel A-50m, A-15m, A-1.5m and A-0.5m. Skin was the major source of heparin and contained the largest proteoglycans and the lowest proportion of depolymerization products. Lungs contained the smallest proteoglycans, the smallest depolymerization products and the highest proportion of depolymerization products. The highest proportions of proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products with high affinity for antithrombin were found in adipose tissue. The lowest proportions of each of these fractions were found in the peritoneal cavity. The data suggest that there was relatively little biosynthesis of sites with high affinity for antithrombin in peritoneal-cavity mast cells and that heparin catabolism was most active in lungs. Each source of heparin was unique with respect to both biosynthesis and subsequent breakdown of its proteoglycans. PMID:3827837

  5. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  6. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  7. Occupational Inheritance in Service Academy Cadets and Midshipmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Brain; Doerries, Lee E.

    2008-01-01

    Occupational inheritance refers to the phenomenon where sons and daughters follow in the career paths of their parents. Historically this has been documented in the areas of engineering, medicine and education. This study investigated the phenomenon of occupational inheritance as it pertains to military service. Archival data provided by the…

  8. Population thinking and natural selection in dual-inheritance theory.

    PubMed

    Houkes, Wybo

    2012-05-01

    A deflationary perspective on theories of cultural evolution, in particular dual-inheritance theory, has recently been proposed by Lewens. On this 'pop-culture' analysis, dual-inheritance theorists apply population thinking to cultural phenomena, without claiming that cultural items evolve by natural selection. This paper argues against this pop-culture analysis of dual-inheritance theory. First, it focuses on recent dual-inheritance models of specific patterns of cultural change. These models exemplify population thinking without a commitment to natural selection of cultural items. There are grounds, however, for doubting the added explanatory value of the models in their disciplinary context-and thus grounds for engaging in other potentially explanatory projects based on dual-inheritance theory. One such project is suggested by advocates of the theory. Some of the motivational narratives that they offer can be interpreted as setting up an adaptationist project with regard to cumulative change in cultural items. We develop this interpretation here. On it, dual-inheritance theory features two interrelated selection processes, one on the level of genetically inherited learning mechanisms, another on the level of the cultural items transmitted through these mechanisms. This interpretation identifies a need for further modelling efforts, but also offers scope for enhancing the explanatory power of dual-inheritance theory. PMID:22523438

  9. Social and Experiential Influences on the Development of Inheritance Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joanne M.; Smith, Lesley A.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored social and experiential differences in children's (aged 4 to 14 years) concepts of inheritance. The study utilized semi-structured interviews including four tasks that were designed to elicit judgements and explanations about different aspects of inheritance understanding. A variety of social and experiential factors were…

  10. Epigenetic Inheritance and the Intergenerational Transfer of Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    Currently, behavioral development is thought to result from the interplay among genetic inheritance, congenital characteristics, cultural contexts, and parental practices as they directly impact the individual. Evolutionary ecology points to another contributor, epigenetic inheritance, the transmission to offspring of parental phenotypic responses…

  11. Multiple Pathways Influence Mitochondrial Inheritance in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Rebecca L.; Okamoto, Koji; Shaw, Janet M.

    2008-01-01

    Yeast mitochondria form a branched tubular network. Mitochondrial inheritance is tightly coupled with bud emergence, ensuring that daughter cells receive mitochondria from mother cells during division. Proteins reported to influence mitochondrial inheritance include the mitochondrial rho (Miro) GTPase Gem1p, Mmr1p, and Ypt11p. A synthetic genetic array (SGA) screen revealed interactions between gem1Δ and deletions of genes that affect mitochondrial function or inheritance, including mmr1Δ. Synthetic sickness of gem1Δ mmr1Δ double mutants correlated with defective mitochondrial inheritance by large buds. Additional studies demonstrated that GEM1, MMR1, and YPT11 each contribute to mitochondrial inheritance. Mitochondrial accumulation in buds caused by overexpression of either Mmr1p or Ypt11p did not depend on Gem1p, indicating these three proteins function independently. Physical linkage of mitochondria with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has led to speculation that distribution of these two organelles is coordinated. We show that yeast mitochondrial inheritance is not required for inheritance or spreading of cortical ER in the bud. Moreover, Ypt11p overexpression, but not Mmr1p overexpression, caused ER accumulation in the bud, revealing a potential role for Ypt11p in ER distribution. This study demonstrates that multiple pathways influence mitochondrial inheritance in yeast and that Miro GTPases have conserved roles in mitochondrial distribution. PMID:18245340

  12. DOCK8 Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System ​​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned ... Scientists Identify Genetic Cause of Previously Undefined Primary Immune Deficiency Disease Signs and Symptoms DOCK8 deficiency causes persistent skin ...

  13. Sharing with your children: Mechanisms of peroxisome inheritance.

    PubMed

    Knoblach, Barbara; Rachubinski, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Organelle inheritance is the process by which eukaryotic cells actively replicate and equitably partition their organelles between mother cell and daughter cell at cytokinesis to maintain the benefits of subcellular compartmentalization. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven invaluable in helping to define the factors involved in the inheritance of different organelles and in understanding how these factors act and interact to maintain balance in the organelle populations of actively dividing cells. Inheritance factors can be classified as motors that transport organelles, tethers that retain organelles, and connectors (receptors) that mediate the attachment of organelles to motors and anchors. This article will review how peroxisomes are inherited by cells, with a focus on budding yeast, and will discuss common themes and mechanisms of action that underlie the inheritance of all membrane-enclosed organelles. PMID:26620799

  14. Preliminary study of simultaneous multi-anticoagulant deficiency diagnosis by fiber optic multi-analyte biosensor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Kang, Kyung A

    2005-01-01

    Protein C (PC), protein S (PS), antithrombin III, and plasminogen are four important anticoagulants in blood plasma. Deficiency of any of these biomolecules may lead to thrombo-embolic complications including lung embolism, heart attack, and stroke. A multi-factor sensing system is beneficial for identifying the cause of abnormal blood clotting more effectively, rapidly, and cost-effectively. As an initial effort toward simultaneous multi-anticoagulant detection, a PC and PS dual-sensing system has been under development in our research group. A fiberoptic PC biosensor utilizing fluorophore-mediated sandwich immunoassay was already developed for rapid (-5 minutes) PC deficiency diagnosis. After a single PS sensor was developed for the PS deficiency diagnosis, the two sensors were connected in series to form a dual-sensing system. The cross-reactivity between the analytes and the sensors was found to be minimal. For easier sensing operation, a mixture of fluorophore-linked anti-PC and anti-PS was applied. The results showed that the mixture can be used with a slight signal reduction. When PC and PS was mixed in a sample, the signal intensity was decreased by approximately 5% for both sensors. A study is currently being performed to overcome the signal reduction by increasing the flow velocity and incubation time. PMID:16594166

  15. Purification of proplatelet formation (PPF) stimulating factor: thrombin/antithrombin III complex stimulates PPF of megakaryocytes in vitro and platelet production in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Y; Yano, K; Ito, T; Shigematus, H; Sasaki, K; Kondo, S; Kuriya, S

    2001-02-01

    In this study, the protein which stimulates proplatelet formation (PPF) of megakaryocytes was purified from normal human plasma using 7 steps procedures. Two different protease inhibitors were identified based on their amino acid sequences, i.e. antithrombin III (AT III) and C1 inhibitor. They were included in high density lipoprotein (HDL). HDL was necessary for AT III to be active in PPF in vitro. The biological effects of the AT III/HDL or thrombin-AT III (TAT)/HDL were studied in vitro. PPF of murine megakaryocytes was stimulated by negative control (BSA) (1.8 +/- 0.3%), AT III (2.0 +/- 0.4%), HDL (1.2 +/- 0.9%), AT III/HDL (14.8 +/- 2.1%) or TAT/HDL (23.3 +/- 3.5%), respectively. TAT/HDL also had a synergistic effect with the mpl ligand, judging by the acetylcholinesterase (AchE) expression of murine megakaryocytes (2.7 fold increase). In vivo subcutaneous administration of AT III alone or TAT for 3 days significantly stimulated thrombocytosis (136% and 144%, respectively, p<0.05) and AT III/HDL showed rapid and further stimulation (150%, p <0.01). These results and the previous studies indicate that megakaryocytopoiesis is regulated by the mpl ligand, while a protease/protease inhibitor complex such as TAT, which is involved in the coagulation cascade associated with platelet consumption, might be one of the regulators in platelet production. PMID:11246559

  16. In Vivo Anti-HIV Activity of the Heparin-Activated Serine Protease Inhibitor Antithrombin III Encapsulated in Lymph-Targeting Immunoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Asmal, Mohammed; Whitney, James B.; Luedemann, Corinne; Carville, Angela; Steen, Robert; Letvin, Norman L.; Geiben-Lynn, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are anti-inflammatory mediators with multiple biologic functions. Several serpins have been reported to modulate HIV pathogenesis, or exhibit potent anti-HIV activity in vitro, but the efficacy of serpins as therapeutic agents for HIV in vivo has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, we show that heparin-activated antithrombin III (hep-ATIII), a member of the serpin family, significantly inhibits lentiviral replication in a non-human primate model. We further demonstrate greater than one log10 reduction in plasma viremia in the nonhuman primate system by loading of hep-ATIII into anti-HLA-DR immunoliposomes, which target tissue reservoirs of viral replication. We also demonstrate the utility of hep-ATIIII as a potential salvage agent for HIV strains resistant to standard anti-retroviral treatment. Finally, we applied gene-expression arrays to analyze hep-ATIII-induced host cell interactomes and found that downstream of hep-ATIII, two independent gene networks were modulated by host factors prostaglandin synthetase-2, ERK1/2 and NFκB. Ultimately, understanding how serpins, such as hep-ATIII, regulate host responses during HIV infection may reveal new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23133620

  17. Enhancement by heparin of thrombin-induced antithrombin III proteolysis: its relation to the molecular weight and anticoagulant activity of heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Marciniak, E.; Gora-Maslak, G.

    1982-11-01

    Previous findings indicated that binding of heparin to antithrombin III (AT III) facilitates thrombin-induced proteolysis of the inhibitor. Researchers now studied this property of heparin in regard to its molecular weight and anticoagulant activity. Commercial heparin was resolved on Sephadex G-200 into six fractions of decreasing molecular weight. From each fraction high affinity (HA) heparin was isolated by chromatography on AT III-Sepharose and examined in reaction of alpha-thrombin with a molar excess of /sup 125/I AT III. Proteolysis of the inhibitor was assessed by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In the presence of the HA heparin from 18% to 38% of AT III participating in reaction appeared in the form of inactive 50,000-dalton fragment, as opposed to 7% of AT III fragmented in the absence of heparin. Although the ability to potentiate proteolysis was at its peak in the medium-molecular-size heparin fraction, the amount of degraded inhibitor relative to anticoagulant activity increased with decreasing molecular weight of the polysaccharide. These findings are consistent with the possibility that the ability of bound heparin to facilitate the cleavage of AT III by thrombin is generally less contingent upon secondary characteristics of the polysaccharide than the anticoagulant activity.

  18. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, Anouk; Jacquemyn, Yves; Kinget, Kristof; Eyskens, François

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations. PMID:26113999

  19. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Anouk; Jacquemyn, Yves; Kinget, Kristof; Eyskens, François

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations. PMID:26113999

  20. Sodium channels, inherited epilepsy, and antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Catterall, William A

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate action potentials in brain neurons, mutations in sodium channels cause inherited forms of epilepsy, and sodium channel blockers-along with other classes of drugs-are used in therapy of epilepsy. A mammalian voltage-gated sodium channel is a complex containing a large, pore-forming α subunit and one or two smaller β subunits. Extensive structure-function studies have revealed many aspects of the molecular basis for sodium channel structure, and X-ray crystallography of ancestral bacterial sodium channels has given insight into their three-dimensional structure. Mutations in sodium channel α and β subunits are responsible for genetic epilepsy syndromes with a wide range of severity, including generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), Dravet syndrome, and benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures. These seizure syndromes are treated with antiepileptic drugs that offer differing degrees of success. The recent advances in understanding of disease mechanisms and sodium channel structure promise to yield improved therapeutic approaches. PMID:24392695

  1. Biotin deprivation impairs mitochondrial structure and function and has implications for inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Ruiz, Estefanía; Díaz-Ruiz, Rodrigo; Hernández-Vázquez, Alaín de J; Ibarra-González, Isabel; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Rembao, Daniel; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Viollet, Benoit; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Corella, José Ahmed; Velázquez-Arellano, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Certain inborn errors of metabolism result from deficiencies in biotin containing enzymes. These disorders are mimicked by dietary absence or insufficiency of biotin, ATP deficit being a major effect,whose responsible mechanisms have not been thoroughly studied. Here we show that in rats and cultured cells it is the result of reduced TCA cycle flow, partly due to deficient anaplerotic biotin-dependent pyruvate carboxylase. This is accompanied by diminished flow through the electron transport chain, augmented by deficient cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) activity with decreased cytochromes and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. There was also severe mitochondrial damage accompanied by decrease of mitochondria, associated with toxic levels of propionyl CoA as shown by carnitine supplementation studies, which explains the apparently paradoxical mitochondrial diminution in the face of the energy sensor AMPK activation, known to induce mitochondria biogenesis. This idea was supported by experiments on AMPK knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The multifactorial ATP deficit also provides a plausible basis for the cardiomyopathy in patients with propionic acidemia, and other diseases.Additionally, systemic inflammation concomitant to the toxic state might explain our findings of enhanced IL-6, STAT3 and HIF-1α, associated with an increase of mitophagic BNIP3 and PINK proteins, which may further increase mitophagy. Together our results imply core mechanisms of energy deficit in several inherited metabolic disorders. PMID:26343941

  2. Clinical Manifestation and a New "ISCU" Mutation in Iron-Sulphur Cluster Deficiency Myopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollberg, Gittan; Tulinius, Mar; Melberg, Atle; Darin, Niklas; Andersen, Oluf; Holmgren, Daniel; Oldfors, Anders; Holme, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Myopathy with deficiency of succinate dehydrogenase and aconitase is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by childhood-onset early fatigue, dyspnoea and palpitations on trivial exercise. The disease is non-progressive, but life-threatening episodes of widespread weakness, severe metabolic acidosis and rhabdomyolysis may occur. The…

  3. The mode of inheritance in tetraploid cut roses.

    PubMed

    Koning-Boucoiran, C F S; Gitonga, V W; Yan, Z; Dolstra, O; van der Linden, C G; van der Schoot, J; Uenk, G E; Verlinden, K; Smulders, M J M; Krens, F A; Maliepaard, C

    2012-08-01

    Tetraploid hybrid tea roses (Rosa hybrida) represent most of the commercial cultivars of cut roses and form the basis for breeding programmes. Due to intensive interspecific hybridizations, modern cut roses are complex tetraploids for which the mode of inheritance is not exactly known. The segregation patterns of molecular markers in a tetraploid mapping population of 184 genotypes, an F(1) progeny from a cross of two heterozygous parents, were investigated for disomic and tetrasomic inheritance. The possible occurrence of double reduction was studied as well. We can exclude disomic inheritance, but while our observations are more in line with a tetrasomic inheritance, we cannot exclude that there is a mixture of both inheritance modes. Two novel parental tetraploid linkage maps were constructed using markers known from literature, combined with newly generated markers. Comparison with the integrated consensus diploid map (ICM) of Spiller et al. (Theor Appl Genet 122:489-500, 2010) allowed assigning numbers to each of the linkage groups of both maps and including small linkage groups. So far, the possibility of using marker-assisted selection in breeding of tetraploid cut roses and of other species with a tetrasomic or partly tetrasomic inheritance, is still limited due to the difficulties in establishing marker-trait associations. We used these tetraploid linkage maps to determine associations between markers, two morphological traits and powdery mildew resistance. The knowledge on inheritance and marker-trait associations in tetraploid cut roses will be of direct use to cut rose breeding. PMID:22526522

  4. Creatine deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Andreas

    2003-02-01

    Since the first description of a creatine deficiency syndrome, the guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency, in 1994, the two further suspected creatine deficiency syndromes--the creatine transporter (CrT1) defect and the arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency were disclosed. GAMT and AGAT deficiency have autosomal-recessive traits, whereas the CrT1 defect is a X-linked disorder. All patients reveal developmental delay/regression, mental retardation, and severe disturbance of their expressive and cognitive speech. The common feature of all creatine deficiency syndromes is the severe depletion of creatine/phosphocreatine in the brain. Only the GAMT deficiency is in addition characterized by accumulation of guanidinoacetic acid in brain and body fluids. Guanidinoacetic acid seems to be responsible for intractable seizures and the movement disorder, both exclusively found in GAMT deficiency. Treatment with oral creatine supplementation is in part successful in GAMT and AGAT deficiency, whereas in CrT1 defect it is not able to replenish creatine in the brain. Treatment of combined arginine restriction and ornithine substitution in GAMT deficiency is capable to decrease guanidinoacetic acid permanently and improves the clinical outcome. The lack of the creatine/phosphocreatine signal in the patient's brain by means of in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is the common finding and the diagnostic clue in all three diseases. In AGAT deficiency guanidinoacetic acid is decreased, whereas creatine in blood was found to be normal. On the other hand the CrT1 defect is characterized by an increased concentration of creatine in blood and urine whereas guanidinoacetic acid concentration is normal. The increasing number of patients detected very recently suffering from a creatine deficiency syndrome and the unfavorable outcome highlights the need of further attempts in early recognition of affected individuals and in optimizing its treatment

  5. Inherited 142Nd anomalies in Eoarchean protoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Antoine S. G.; Bourdon, Bernard; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Touboul, Mathieu; Sprung, Peter; Guitreau, Martin; Blichert-Toft, Janne

    2013-01-01

    Geological records of the earliest history of the Earth are rare; rocks older than 3700 Ma comprise only a few percent of continental surfaces. Evidence is mounting, however, that vestiges of primordial planetary differentiation continued to influence the compositions of the oldest rocks during the Hadean and into the Archean. Here, we report new whole-rock 147,146Sm-143,142Nd data for the ancient Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt (NSB) in Québec (Canada) and confirm the 142Nd deficits reported by O'Neil et al. (2008). We show that the assigned (O'Neil et al., 2008) and recently revised (Kinoshita et al., 2012) 142Nd "age" of 4362-54+35 Ma claimed for NSB amphibolites is at odds with the younger 147Sm-143Nd record. This discrepancy can be reconciled by partial Nd isotope equilibration of rocks with Hadean model ages of up to 4500 Ma during magmatic and metamorphic perturbations associated with the emplacement of the NSB at ca. 3750 Ma (Cates and Mojzsis, 2009). Our model further predicts a whole-rock 147Sm-143Nd age of 3800 Ma for other NSB lithologies in agreement with U-Pb zircon chronology (Cates and Mojzsis, 2007). Hence, 146Sm-142Nd systematics for the Eoarchean NSB rocks represent inheritance of a Hadean signature that was stored either in pre-existing crust or in early-enriched mantle sources. The decoupled 147,146Sm-143,142Nd systematics of the NSB is similar but complementary to the Hadean mantle isochron preserved in Eoarchean rocks from West Greenland (Bennett et al., 2007; Rizo et al., 2011).

  6. The incidence of inherited porphyrias in Europe.

    PubMed

    Elder, George; Harper, Pauline; Badminton, Michael; Sandberg, Sverre; Deybach, Jean-Charles

    2013-09-01

    Retrospective estimates of the prevalence of porphyrias have been reported but there has been no large scale prospective study of their incidence. The European Porphyria Network collected information prospectively over a 3 year period about the number of newly diagnosed symptomatic patients with an inherited porphyria (335 patients from 11 countries). Prevalence was calculated from the incidence and mean disease duration. The incidence of hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC) in acute hepatic porphyria and the prevalence of patients with recurrent acute attacks of porphyria were also investigated. The incidence of symptomatic acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) was similar in all countries (0.13 per million per year; 95 % CI: 0.10 - 0.14) except Sweden (0.51; 95 % CI: 0.28-0.86). The incidence ratio for symptomatic AIP: variegate porphyria: hereditary coproporphyria was 1.00:0.62: 0.15. The prevalence of AIP (5.4 per million; 95 % CI: 4.5-6.3) was about half that previously reported. The prevalence of erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) was less uniform between countries and, in some countries, exceeded previous estimates. Fourteen new cases of HCC (11 from Sweden) were reported in patients with acute porphyria. Sixty seven patients (3 VP; 64 AIP: 53 females, 11 males) with recurrent attacks of acute porphyria were identified. The estimated percentage of patients with AIP that will develop recurrent acute attacks was 3-5 %. In conclusion, the prevalence of symptomatic acute porphyria may be decreasing, possibly due to improved management, whereas the prevalence of EPP may be increasing due to improved diagnosis and its greater recognition as a cause of photosensitivity. PMID:23114748

  7. Darwin's Pangenesis as a molecular theory of inherited diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongsheng; Li, Xiuju

    2016-05-10

    Darwin spent much time and effort on the study of inherited diseases and the role of environment in disease development. To explain inherited diseases and a considerable variety of other hereditary phenomena, he formulated a Pangenesis hypothesis, assuming that cells could shed many kinds of molecules capable of diffusion from cell to cell, circulation throughout the body, incorporation into recipient cells, and transmission from parents to offspring. His Pangenesis is now supported by the discovery of circulating DNA, mobile RNAs and prions, and might provide an alternative molecular mechanism underlying the inherited diseases. PMID:26836487

  8. Organelles on the move: insights from yeast vacuole inheritance.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Lois S

    2006-04-01

    Organelle inheritance is one of several processes that occur during cell division. Recent studies on yeast vacuole inheritance have indicated rules that probably apply to most organelle-inheritance pathways. They have uncovered a molecular mechanism for membrane-cargo transport that is partially conserved from yeast to humans. They have also shown that the transport complex, which is composed of a molecular motor and its receptor, regulates the destination and timing of vacuole movement and might coordinate organelle movement with several other organelle functions. PMID:16607287

  9. Hematopoietic transcription factor mutations and inherited platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Songdej, Natthapol

    2015-01-01

    The molecular and genetic mechanisms in most patients with inherited platelet dysfunction are unknown. There is increasing evidence that mutations in hematopoietic transcription factors are major players in the pathogenesis of defective megakaryopoiesis and platelet dysfunction in patients with inherited platelet disorders. These hematopoietic transcription factors include RUNX1, FLI1, GATA-1, and GFI1B. Mutations involving these transcription factors affect diverse aspects of platelet production and function at the genetic and molecular levels, culminating in clinical manifestations of thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction. This review focuses on these hematopoietic transcription factors in the pathobiology of inherited platelet dysfunction. PMID:26097739

  10. Darwin and inheritance: the influence of Prosper Lucas.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Solano, Ricardo; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Rosaura

    2009-01-01

    An important historical relation that has hardly been addressed is the influence of Prosper Lucas's Treatise on Natural Inheritance on the development of Charles Darwin's concepts related to inheritance. In this article we trace this historical connection. Darwin read Lucas's Treatise in 1856. His reading coincided with many changes concerning his prior ideas on the transmission and expression of characters. We consider that this reading led him to propose a group of principles regarding prepotency, hereditary diseases, morbid tendencies and atavism; following Lucas, he called these principles: laws of inheritance. PMID:20481127

  11. α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Umur; Stoller, James K

    2016-09-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an autosomal codominant condition that predisposes to emphysema and cirrhosis. The condition is common but grossly under-recognized. Identifying patients' α1-antitrypsin deficiency has important management implications (ie, smoking cessation, genetic and occupational counseling, and specific treatment with the infusion of pooled human plasma α1-antitrypsin). The weight of evidence suggests that augmentation therapy slows the progression of emphysema in individuals with severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:27514595

  12. Frequency of enzyme deficiency variants in erythrocytes of newborn infants

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.

    1981-08-01

    The frequency of enzyme deficiency variants, defined as alleles whose products are either absent or almost devoid of normal activity in erythrocytes, was determined for nine erythrocyte enzymes in some 675 newborn infants and in approximately 200 adults. Examples of this type of genetic abnormality, which in the homozygous condition are often associated with significant health consequences, were detected for seven of the nine enzymes studied. Fifteen inherited enzyme deficiency variants in 1809 determinations from adults were identified. Seven of the deficiency variants involved triosephosphate isomerase, a frequency of 0.01 in the newborn population. The average frequency of 2.4/1000 is 2 to 3 times the frequency observed for rare electrophoretic variants of erythrocyte enzymes in this same population.

  13. Kawasaki disease with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency, case report.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Hesham Radi; Al-Dossary, Sahar; Asseri, Abdulsalam

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of unknown etiology that occurs predominantly in infants and children younger than 5 years of age. Coronary artery abnormalities are the most serious complication. Based on the literatures infusion of Intravenous Immunoglobulin of 2 g/kg and a high dose of oral aspirin up to 100 mg/kg/day are the standard treatment for Kawasaki disease in the acute stage, and should be followed by antiplatelet dose of aspirin for thrombocytosis. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an inherited X-linked hereditary disorder, and aspirin can induce hemolysis in patients with G6PD deficiency. We report a case of a 5 year and 8 month old male with KD and G6PD deficiency. PMID:27134550

  14. Tissue polarity: PCP inheritance ensured by selective mitotic endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Founounou, Nabila; Le Borgne, Roland

    2011-09-27

    Recent findings report the selective internalization of core planar cell polarity components during mitosis followed by cell-non-autonomous polarized recycling. This novel mechanistic model explains how tissue polarity is inherited in daughter cells of proliferative tissue. PMID:21959155

  15. Endocrine Disruptor Induction of Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposures such as toxicants, nutrition and stress have been shown to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease susceptibility. Endocrine disruptors are one of the largest groups of specific toxicants shown to promote this form of epigenetic inheritance. These environmental compounds that interfere with normal endocrine signaling are one of the largest classes of toxicants we are exposed to on a daily level. The ability of ancestral exposures to promote disease susceptibility significantly increases the potential biohazards of these toxicants. Therefore, what your great-grandmother was exposed to during pregnancy may influence your disease development, even in the absence of any exposure, and you are going to pass this on to your grandchildren. This non-genetic form of inheritance significantly impacts our understanding of biology from the origins of disease to evolutionary biology. The current review will describe the previous studies and endocrine disruptors shown to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. PMID:25088466

  16. Interventions needed to help families with inherited conditions.

    PubMed

    Chudleigh, Jane

    2016-07-01

    The authors comment that this is the first intervention for facilitating better communication for families affected by, or at risk of, inherited genetic conditions (IGCs). Therefore the study provides an important contribution to the literature. PMID:27387631

  17. The role of inheritance in structuring hyperextended rift systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manatschal, Gianreto; Lavier, Luc; Chenin, Pauline

    2015-04-01

    A long-standing question in Earth Sciences is related to the importance of inheritance in controlling tectonic processes. In contrast to physical processes that are generally applicable, assessing the role of inheritance suffers from two major problems: firstly, it is difficult to appraise without having insights into the history of a geological system; and secondly all inherited features are not reactivated during subsequent deformation phases. Therefore, the aim of our presentation is to give some conceptual framework about how inheritance may control the architecture and evolution of hyperextended rift systems. We use the term inheritance to refer to the difference between an "ideal" layer-cake type lithosphere and a "real" lithosphere containing heterogeneities and we define 3 types of inheritance, namely structural, compositional and thermal inheritance. Moreover, we assume that the evolution of hyperextended rift systems reflects the interplay between their inheritance (innate/"genetic code") and the physical processes at play (acquired/external factors). Thus, by observing the architecture and evolution of hyperextended rift systems and integrating the physical processes, one my get hints on what may have been the original inheritance of a system. Using this approach, we focus on 3 well-studied rift systems that are the Alpine Tethys, Pyrenean-Bay of Biscay and Iberia-Newfoundland rift systems. For the studied examples we can show that: 1) strain localization on a local scale and during early stages of rifting is controlled by inherited structures and weaknesses 2) the architecture of the necking zone seems to be influenced by the distribution and importance of ductile layers during decoupled deformation and is consequently controlled by the thermal structure and/or the inherited composition of the curst 3) the location of breakup in the 3 examples is not significantly controlled by the inherited structures 4) inherited mantle composition and rift

  18. De novo and inherited deletions of the 5q13 region in spinal muscular atrophies

    SciTech Connect

    Melki, J.; Lefebvre, S.; Burglen, L.; Burlet, P.; Clermont, O.; Reboullet, S.; Benichou, B.; Zeviani, M. ); Millasseau, P. ); Le Paslier, D. )

    1994-06-03

    Spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) represent the second most common fatal autosomal recessive disorder after cystic fibrosis. Childhood spinal muscular atrophies are divided into severe (type I) and mild forms (types II and III). By a combination of genetic and physical mapping, a yeast artificial chromosome contig of the 5q13 region spanning the disease locus was constructed that showed the presence of low copy repeats in this region. Allele segregation was analyzed at the closest genetic loci detected by markers C212 and C272 in 201 SMA families. Inherited and de novo deletions were observed in nine unrelated SMA patients. Moreover, deletions were strongly suggested in at least 18 percent of SMA type I patients by the observation of marked heterozygosity deficiency for the loci studied. These results indicate that deletion events are statistically associated with the severe form of spinal muscular atrophy. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  19. SDH mutations in tumorigenesis and inherited endocrine tumours: lesson from the phaeochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pasini, B; Stratakis, C A

    2009-07-01

    A genetic predisposition for paragangliomas and adrenal or extra-adrenal phaeochromocytomas was recognized years ago. Beside the well-known syndromes associated with an increased risk of adrenal phaeochromocytoma, Von Hippel Lindau disease, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 and neurofibromatosis type 1, the study of inherited predisposition to head and neck paragangliomas led to the discovery of the novel 'paraganglioma-phaeochromocytoma syndrome' caused by germline mutations in three genes encoding subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme (SDHB, SDHC and SDHD) thus opening an unexpected connection between mitochondrial tumour suppressor genes and neural crest-derived cancers. Germline mutations in SDH genes are responsible for 6% and 9% of sporadic paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas, respectively, 29% of paediatric cases, 38% of malignant tumours and more than 80% of familial aggregations of paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma. The disease is characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance with a peculiar parent-of-origin effect for SDHD mutations. Life-time tumour risk seems higher than 70% with variable clinical manifestantions depending on the mutated gene. In this review we summarize the most recent knowledge about the role of SDH deficiency in tumorigenesis, the spectrum and prevalence of SDH mutations derived from several series of cases, the related clinical manifestantions including rare phenotypes, such as the association of paragangliomas with gastrointestinal stromal tumours and kidney cancers, and the biological hypotheses attempting to explain genotype to phenotype correlation. PMID:19522823

  20. Familial mental retardation in a family with an inherited chromosome rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Chudley, A. E.; Bauder, F.; Ray, M.; McAlpine, Phyllis J.; Pena, S. D. J.; Hamerton, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A family of three generations has been described with an insertional type of chromosome rearrangement involving chromosomes 11 and 18[46,XX or XY, ins(11;18)(p15;q11q21)] detected by G-banding using a trypsin digestion method. Four members of this family with clinical features of 18q− have inherited the der(18) from their father and are thus deficient for (18)(q11q21). Three other family members have inherited the der(11) and thus have a duplication of the same segment [(18)(q11q21)]. Genetic marker studies on this family, show no significant segregation of any of the markers studied with either the der(11) or der(18). Eight family members had the PepA8PepA1 genotype and four of these were carrying the der(18), indicating that the PepA locus which had been previously assigned to chromosome 18, does not lie in the segment q11→q21. Images PMID:4140909

  1. Pathogenesis of permeability barrier abnormalities in the ichthyoses: inherited disorders of lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Williams, Mary L.; Holleran, Walter M.; Jiang, Yan J.; Schmuth, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Many of the ichthyoses are associated with inherited disorders of lipid metabolism. These disorders have provided unique models to dissect physiologic processes in normal epidermis and the pathophysiology of more common scaling conditions. In most of these disorders, a permeability barrier abnormality “drives” pathophysiology through stimulation of epidermal hyperplasia. Among primary abnormalities of nonpolar lipid metabolism, triglyceride accumulation in neutral lipid storage disease as a result of a lipase mutation provokes a barrier abnormality via lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation within the extracellular matrix of the stratum corneum (SC). Similar mechanisms account for the barrier abnormalities (and subsequent ichthyosis) in inherited disorders of polar lipid metabolism. For example, in recessive X-linked ichthyosis (RXLI), cholesterol sulfate (CSO4) accumulation also produces a permeability barrier defect through lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation. However, in RXLI, the desquamation abnormality is in part attributable to the plurifunctional roles of CSO4 as a regulator of both epidermal differentiation and corneodesmosome degradation. Phase separation also occurs in type II Gaucher disease (GD; from accumulation of glucosylceramides as a result of to β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency). Finally, failure to assemble both lipids and desquamatory enzymes into nascent epidermal lamellar bodies (LBs) accounts for both the permeability barrier and desquamation abnormalities in Harlequin ichthyosis (HI). The barrier abnormality provokes the clinical phenotype in these disorders not only by stimulating epidermal proliferation, but also by inducing inflammation. PMID:18245815

  2. Inherited variation in OATP1B1 is associated with treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Drenberg, C D; Paugh, S W; Pounds, S B; Shi, L; Orwick, S J; Li, L; Hu, S; Gibson, A A; Ribeiro, R C; Rubnitz, J E; Evans, W E; Sparreboom, A; Baker, S D

    2016-06-01

    Using broad interrogation of clinically relevant drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) genes on the DMET platform, we identified a genetic variant in SLCO1B1 (rs2291075; c.597C>T), encoding the transporter OATP1B1, associated with event-free (P = 0.006, hazard ratio = 1.74) and overall survival (P = 0.012, hazard ratio = 1.85) in children with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Lack of SLCO1B1 expression in leukemic blasts suggested the association might be due to an inherited rather than a somatic effect. rs2291075 was in strong linkage with known functional variants rs2306283 (c.388A>G) and rs4149056 (c.521T>C). Functional studies in vitro determined that four AML-directed chemotherapeutics (cytarabine, daunorubicin, etoposide, and mitoxantrone) are substrates for OATP1B1 and the mouse ortholog Oatp1b2. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies using Oatp1b2-deficient mice further confirmed our results. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an important role for OATP1B1 in the systemic pharmacokinetics of multiple drugs used in the treatment of AML and suggest that inherited variability in host transporter function influences the effectiveness of therapy. PMID:26663398

  3. Dominant inheritance of overo spotting in paint horses.

    PubMed

    Bowling, A T

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of selected studbook records of the American Paint Horse Association, consisting of 687 foals sired by 13 overo stallions from non-overo mares, supports the inheritance of overo spotting as an autosomal dominant gene. More than one gene may control patterns registered as overo. Additional studies are necessary to explain the sporadic occurrence of overo spotting from nonspotted quarter horse parents and to confirm the inheritance of overo spotting in other breeds. PMID:8014463

  4. A comparative evaluation of assays for markers of activated coagulation and/or fibrinolysis: thrombin-antithrombin complex, D-dimer and fibrinogen/fibrin fragment E antigen.

    PubMed

    Boisclair, M D; Lane, D A; Wilde, J T; Ireland, H; Preston, F E; Ofosu, F A

    1990-04-01

    Measurements were made of levels of D-dimer in plasma and serum, thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) in plasma and fibrinogen/fibrin fragment E antigen (FgE) in serum in a normal healthy control group and in patients with a range of disorders associated with hypercoagulability. Levels were determined in 31 normal healthy controls, 30 patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), 21 patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 27 patients with myocardial infarction (MI), 26 patients with acute leukaemia and 56 patients with liver disease. Considering all subjects, significant correlations were established between the results of all assays. Notably high correlations (r greater than 0.9) were established between plasma and serum levels of D-dimer, between plasma levels of D-dimer and serum levels of FgE, and between serum levels of D-dimer and FgE. All assays showed very high discrimination (sensitivity) between the normal control group and patients with DIC (97-100%), but there were marked differences between the assays in sensitivity for DVT and MI. In general, the FgE assay was more sensitive than the D-dimer assay, whilst both the FgE and D-dimer assays were more sensitive than the TAT assay. The same trends were apparent in the capability of the assays to discriminate between the normal control group and patients with acute leukaemia and liver disease: disorders with an unknown prevalence of activation of coagulation/fibrinolysis. Our results indicated that measurements of fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products (FDPs) in serum were almost unaffected by artefacts. The data further suggested that the broad-spectrum FgE assay was better than the more specific D-dimer assay in detecting clinical hypercoagulability. Our study showed that, in the clinical conditions examined, FDPs were more effective markers of hypercoagulability than TAT. PMID:2189490

  5. Analytical comparison of a US generic enoxaparin with the originator product: The focus on comparative assessment of antithrombin-binding components.

    PubMed

    Mourier, Pierre A J; Herman, Fréderic; Sizun, Philippe; Viskov, Christian

    2016-09-10

    Enoxaparin sodium, a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) prepared from porcine intestinal heparin, is widely used for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism. The antithrombotic activity of heparin is mediated mainly through its activation of antithrombin (AT) and subsequent inhibition of coagulation factors. Heparin is a complex heteropolymer and the sulfation pattern of its alternating uronic acid and glucosamine sugar units is a major factor influencing its biological activity. The manufacturing process itself is associated with the introduction of exogenous microheterogeneities that may further affect its biological efficacy. This is important since enoxaparin is prepared by depolymerizing the heparin with the aim of optimizing its biological activity and safety. Changes during its manufacture could thus affect its biological activity and safety. The current study was performed to assess potential differences between the originator enoxaparin and a new generic enoxaparin commercialized by Teva. Heparinase digestion, AT affinity chromatography, gel permeation chromatography, anion exchange chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance methodologies were used. The results indicated differences in oligosaccharides related to the cleavage selectivity around the heparin AT-binding sequences of the Teva Enoxaparin Sodium Injection, USP and the originator Sanofi enoxaparin. These differences influence the strength of the AT-binding affinity of the individual oligosaccharides, their ability to activate AT and, therefore, the inhibitory potency on the proteases of the coagulation cascade. This study, together with other published analytical reports, describes specific compositional differences between generics and originator LWMHs. However, it is yet to be established whether such variations might have any clinical relevance. PMID:27497655

  6. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Have Innate Procoagulant Activity and Cause Microvascular Obstruction Following Intracoronary Delivery: Amelioration by Antithrombin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Birgitta M; Martin, Kenneth; Ali, Mohammed T; Kumar, Arun H S; Pillai, M Gopala-Krishnan; Kumar, Sujith P G; O'Sullivan, John F; Whelan, Derek; Stocca, Alessia; Khider, Wisam; Barry, Frank P; O'Brien, Timothy; Caplice, Noel M

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently under investigation as tools to preserve cardiac structure and function following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, concerns have emerged regarding safety of acute intracoronary (IC) MSC delivery. This study aimed to characterize innate prothrombotic activity of MSC and identify means of its mitigation toward safe and efficacious therapeutic IC MSC delivery post-AMI. Expression of the initiator of the coagulation cascade tissue factor (TF) on MSC was detected and quantified by immunofluorescence, FACS, and immunoblotting. MSC-derived TF antigen was catalytically active and capable of supporting thrombin generation in vitro. Addition of MSCs to whole citrated blood enhanced platelet thrombus deposition on collagen at arterial shear, an effect abolished by heparin coadministration. In a porcine AMI model, IC infusion of 25 × 10(6) MSC during reperfusion was associated with a decrease in coronary flow reserve but not when coadministered with an antithrombin agent (heparin). Heparin reduced MSC-associated thrombosis incorporating platelets and VWF within the microvasculature. Heparin-assisted therapeutic MSC delivery also reduced apoptosis in the infarct border zone at 24 hours, significantly improved infarct size, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, LV volumes, wall motion, and attenuated histologic evidence of scar formation at 6 weeks post-AMI. Heparin alone or heparin-assisted fibroblast control cell delivery had no such effect. Procoagulant TF activity of therapeutic MSCs is associated with reductions in myocardial perfusion when delivered IC may be successfully managed by heparin coadministration. This study highlights an important mechanistic insight into safety concerns associated with therapeutic IC MSC delivery for AMI. PMID:25969127

  7. Failure to thrive and life-threatening complications due to inherited selective cobalamin malabsorption effectively managed in a juvenile Australian shepherd dog

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ashley J.; Scott, Michael A.; Fyfe, John C.

    2015-01-01

    A juvenile Australian shepherd dog exhibited failure to grow, inappetence, weakness, nonregenerative anemia, neutropenia, and cobalamin deficiency. DNA testing confirmed homozygosity of an amnionless mutation (AMN c.3G > A). Clinical signs resolved with supportive care and parenteral cobalamin supplementation. Inherited selective intestinal cobalamin malabsorption requiring lifelong parenteral supplementation should be considered in Australian shepherds, giant schnauzers, border collies, and beagles that fail to thrive. PMID:26483576

  8. A maternally inherited autosomal point mutation in human phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) leads to male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Kashir, Junaid; Konstantinidis, Michalis; Jones, Celine; Lemmon, Bernadette; Chang Lee, Hoi; Hamer, Rebecca; Heindryckx, Bjorn; Deane, Charlotte M.; De Sutter, Petra; Fissore, Rafael A.; Parrington, John; Wells, Dagan; Coward, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Male factor and idiopathic infertility contribute significantly to global infertility, with abnormal testicular gene expression considered to be a major cause. Certain types of male infertility are caused by failure of the sperm to activate the oocyte, a process normally regulated by calcium oscillations, thought to be induced by a sperm-specific phospholipase C, PLCzeta (PLCζ). Previously, we identified a point mutation in an infertile male resulting in the substitution of histidine for proline at position 398 of the protein sequence (PLCζH398P), leading to abnormal PLCζ function and infertility. METHODS AND RESULTS Here, using a combination of direct-sequencing and mini-sequencing of the PLCζ gene from the patient and his family, we report the identification of a second PLCζ mutation in the same patient resulting in a histidine to leucine substitution at position 233 (PLCζH233L), which is predicted to disrupt local protein interactions in a manner similar to PLCζH398P and was shown to exhibit abnormal calcium oscillatory ability following predictive 3D modelling and cRNA injection in mouse oocytes respectively. We show that PLCζH233L and PLCζH398P exist on distinct parental chromosomes, the former inherited from the patient's mother and the latter from his father. Neither mutation was detected utilizing custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism assays in 100 fertile males and females, or 8 infertile males with characterized oocyte activation deficiency. CONCLUSIONS Collectively, our findings provide further evidence regarding the importance of PLCζ at oocyte activation and forms of male infertility where this is deficient. Additionally, we show that the inheritance patterns underlying male infertility are more complex than previously thought and may involve maternal mechanisms. PMID:22095789

  9. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance: resolving uncertainty and evolving biology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhay

    2015-04-01

    Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in animals has increasingly been reported in recent years. Controversies, however, surround this unconventional mode of heredity, especially in mammals, for several reasons. First, its existence itself has been questioned due to perceived insufficiency of available evidence. Second, it potentially implies transfer of hereditary information from soma to germline, against the established principle in biology. Third, it inherently requires survival of epigenetic memory across reprogramming, posing another fundamental challenge in biology. Fourth, evolutionary significance of epigenetic inheritance has also been under debate. This article pointwise addresses all these concerns on the basis of recent empirical, theoretical and conceptual advances. 1) Described here in detail are the key experimental findings demonstrating the occurrence of germline epigenetic inheritance in mammals. 2) Newly emerging evidence supporting soma to germline communication in transgenerational inheritance in mammals, and a role of exosome and extracellular microRNA in this transmission, is thoroughly discussed. 3) The plausibility of epigenetic information propagation across reprogramming is highlighted. 4) Analyses supporting evolutionary significance of epigenetic inheritance are briefly mentioned. Finally, an integrative model of 'evolutionary transgenerational systems biology' is proposed to provide a framework to guide future advancements in epigenetic inheritance. PMID:25898397

  10. Compositional Inheritance: Comparison of Self-assembly and Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng; Higgs, Paul G.

    2008-10-01

    Genetic inheritance in modern cells is due to template-directed replication of nucleic acids. However, the difficulty of prebiotic synthesis of long information-carrying polymers like RNA raises the question of whether some other form of heredity is possible without polymers. As an alternative, the lipid world theory has been proposed, which considers non-covalent assemblies of lipids, such as micelles and vesicles. Assemblies store information in the form of a non-random molecular composition, and this information is passed on when the assemblies divide, i.e . the assemblies show compositional inheritance. Here, we vary several important assumptions of previous lipid world models and show that compositional inheritance is relevant more generally than the context in which it was originally proposed. Our models assume that interaction occurs between nearest neighbour molecules only, and account for spatial segregation of molecules of different types within the assembly. We also draw a distinction between a self-assembly model, in which the composition is determined by mutually favourable interaction energies between the molecules, and a catalytic model, in which the composition is determined by mutually favourable catalysis. We show that compositional inheritance occurs in both models, although the self-assembly case seems more relevant if the molecules are simple lipids. In the case where the assemblies are composed of just two types of molecules, there is a strong analogy with the classic two-allele Moran model from population genetics. This highlights the parallel between compositional inheritance and genetic inheritance.

  11. Maternal inheritance of severe hypertriglyceridemia impairs glucose metabolism in offspring.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya-Hong; Yu, Caiguo; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Guo, Xin; Ji, Zhili; Liu, George

    2015-04-01

    Maternally inherited familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) impairs glucose metabolism and increases cardiovascular risks in the offspring to a greater degree than paternal inherited FH. However, it remains unknown whether hypertriglyceridemia affects glucose metabolism via inheritance. In this study, we sought to compare the impact of maternally and paternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia on glucose and lipid metabolism in mice. ApoCIII transgenic mice with severe hypertriglyceridemia were mated with non-transgenic control mice to obtain 4 types of offspring: maternal non-transgenic control and maternal transgenic offspring, and paternal control and paternal transgenic offspring. Plasma triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting insulin (FINS) were measured. ApoCIII overexpression caused severe hypertriglyceridemia, but the transgenic female mice had unaltered fertility with normal pregnancy and birth of pups. The 4 groups of offspring had similar birth weight and growth rate. The plasma TG of maternal and paternal transgenic offspring were nearly 40-fold higher than maternal and paternal control mice, but there was no difference in plasma TG between maternal and paternal transgenic offspring. Although the FPG of the 4 groups of animals had no difference, the maternal transgenic mice showed impaired glucose tolerance, increased FINS levels and higher homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) than the other 3 groups. In conclusion, maternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia in ApoCIII transgenic mice displayed impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia and increased HOMA-R, while paternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia did not have such impacts. PMID:25859267

  12. New developments in the management of congenital Factor XIII deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fadoo, Zehra; Merchant, Quratulain; Rehman, Karim Abdur

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency is a rare, inherited, autosomal recessive coagulation disorder. Most mutations of this condition are found in the A-subunit with almost half these being missense mutations. Globally, approximately one in three million people suffer from this deficiency. Factor XIII deficiency is associated with severe life threatening bleeding, intracranial hemorrhage, impaired wound healing, and recurrent pregnancy losses. FXIII is known to have a potential role in mediating inflammatory processes, insulin resistance, bone metabolism, neoplasia, and angiogenesis. The algorithm provided for FXIII diagnosis and classification will enable prompt identification and early intervention for controlling potential life threatening complications. Prophylactic replacement therapy using blood products containing FXIII such as fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, or using FXIII concentrate remains the mainstay for the management of FXIII deficiency. In most parts of the world, cryoprecipitate and plasma transfusions are the only treatments available. Management developments have revealed the effectiveness and safety of recombinant FXIII concentrate for prophylaxis and treatment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of advancements made in the management of FXIII deficiency from the time it was first detected, highlighting novel developments made in recent years. Greater research is warranted in identifying novel approaches to manage FXIII deficiency in light of its underlying pathophysiology. PMID:23761984

  13. Hereditary respiration deficiency in Saccharomycodes ludwigii.

    PubMed

    Nagai, S; Kané, N; Ochi, S; Kawai, K; Yamazaki, T

    1976-01-01

    Saccharomycodes ludwigii, supposed to be "petite-negative," gave rise to respiration-deficient mutants when acriflavine and ultraviolet irradiation, respectively, were applied to this yeast, strain IFO 1194. The frequency of such mutants was very low as compared with that in Saccharomyces cervisiae and other "petite-positive" yeasts. Cytochrome composition was characterized by spectrophotometry at the temperature of liquid nitrogen. The respiratory mutants examined contained cytochrome c unaltered in quality and quantity. Cytochrome b was often present only in small amounts though never absent, while cytochrome a + a3 was either present or absent. The respiratory mutants could form zygotes after conjugation with a wild-type culture of opposite mating type (alpha vs. a). The hybridization and segregation analysis of spore tetrads showed the inheritance of respiratory mutant character to be either Mendelian or non-Mendelian and similar to that of pet (nuclear) and rho- (cytoplasmic) mutants, respectively, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:1087863

  14. Dissecting Epigenetic Dysregulation of Primary Antibody Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cortez, Virginia C; Del Pino-Molina, Lucia; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; López-Granados, Eduardo; Ballestar, Esteban

    2016-05-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies (PADs), the most prevalent inherited primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs), are associated with a wide range of genetic alterations (both monogenic or polygenic) in B cell-specific genes. However, correlations between the genotype and clinical manifestations are not evident in all cases indicating that genetic interactions, environmental and epigenetic factors may have a role in PAD pathogenesis. The recent identification of key defects in DNA methylation in common variable immunodeficiency as well as the multiple evidences on the role of epigenetic control during B cell differentiation, activation and during antibody formation highlight the importance of investing research efforts in dissecting the participation of epigenetic defects in this group of diseases. This review focuses on the role of epigenetic control in B cell biology which can provide clues for the study of potential novel pathogenic defects involved in PADs. PMID:26984849

  15. Iodine-deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Jooste, Pieter L; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2008-10-01

    2 billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficiency disorders. Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. Assessment methods include urinary iodine concentration, goitre, newborn thyroid-stimulating hormone, and blood thyroglobulin. In nearly all countries, the best strategy to control iodine deficiency is iodisation of salt, which is one of the most cost-effective ways to contribute to economic and social development. When iodisation of salt is not possible, iodine supplements can be given to susceptible groups. Introduction of iodised salt to regions of chronic iodine-deficiency disorders might transiently increase the proportion of thyroid disorders, but overall the small risks of iodine excess are far outweighed by the substantial risks of iodine deficiency. International efforts to control iodine-deficiency disorders are slowing, and reaching the third of the worldwide population that remains deficient poses major challenges. PMID:18676011

  16. Vitamin deficiencies and excesses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamins are essential nutrients that must be supplied exogenously either as part of a well balanced diet or as supplements. Deficiency states are uncommon in developed countries except, perhaps, among some food insecure families. In contrast, deficiency states are quite common in many developing ...

  17. Testosterone deficiency myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, R W; Woodrow, D F; Barrett, M C; Press, M; Dick, D J; Rowe, R C; Lane, R J

    1995-01-01

    Testosterone is recognized to have a positive effect on nitrogen balance and muscle development in hypogonadal men, but significantly myopathy secondary to testosterone deficiency has been reported only rarely. We describe a patient who presented with a myopathy associated with testosterone deficiency, and who demonstrated a significant functional and myometric response to treatment. PMID:7562829

  18. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  19. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  20. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  1. Factor X deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Factor X (ten) deficiency is a disorder caused by a lack of a protein called factor X in the blood. It leads to problems with ... or are not functioning like they should. Factor X is one such coagulation factor. Factor X deficiency ...

  2. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  3. G6PD Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  4. Management of menorrhagia in women with inherited bleeding disorders: general principles and use of desmopressin.

    PubMed

    Rodeghiero, F

    2008-01-01

    The haemostatic system has a central role in controlling the amount and the duration of menstrual bleeding, thus abnormally prolonged or profuse bleeding does occur in most women affected by inherited bleeding disorders. Whereas irregular, premenarchal or postmenopausal uterine bleeding is unusual in inherited or acquired heamorrhagic disorders, severe acute bleeding and menorrhagia at menarche and chronic menorrhagia during the entire reproductive life are common manifestations. Prevalence and morbidity of menorrhagia in inherited bleeding disorders have been poorly investigated. It can be estimated that 40% to 60% of currently menstruating women with type 1 or 2 and more than 60% of women with type 3 VWD complain of menorrhagia with a significant impact on their quality of life. Menorrhagia may be particularly distressing in adolescents because of their delicate emotional equilibrium. Similar epidermiology has been described in other inherited disorders like factor XI deficiency, platelet functional defects and in carriers of haemophilia A and B. Women presenting with ''isolated'' menorrhagia, that is without significant additional bleeding symptoms, a situation reported by up to 15% of healthy women, do not demand investigation to exclude an occult bleeding disorder. A multidisciplinary approach is required for diagnosis and treatment. Gynaecological supervision is always required to exclude organic causes unmasked by the bleeding disorder. Treatment options are similar to those for menorrhagia in general with the addition of desmopressin and replacement therapy and the exclusion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The therapeutic plan should take into consideration the patient's preferences, age and severity of bleeding. Iron supplementation is of paramount importance. Remedies used in clinical practice for menorrhagia in general (tranexamic acid, combined oral contraceptives [COC], levonorgestrel intrauterine system [LNG-IUS]) are first tried. In case of

  5. Immune deficiencies due to defects in cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John; Leonard, Warren J

    2003-09-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) represents a syndrome comprising the most severe forms of inherited immunodeficiencies. Defects in cytokine signaling pathways can result in impaired development of lymphoid cells and/or defective functioning of these cells, and most cases of SCID result from defective signaling through the common cytokine receptor g chain (g(c)) or associated molecules and signaling pathways. Studies of these patients and the analysis of gene-targeted mice provide insight into the underlying signaling defects in inherited immunodeficiencies. The identification of the genetic defects in humans with SCID provides the basis for future therapies for these patients. More subtle deficiencies in cytokine signaling have also been found as causes of other forms of immunodeficiency, and the knowledge learned could lead to novel approaches to antimicrobial therapy. PMID:12906775

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G-6-PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Churchill Livingston; 2008:chap 45. Golan DER. Hemolytic anemias: red cell membrane and metabolic defects. In: Goldman ...

  7. Betaine deficiency in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Lerma, C. ); Rich, P.J.; Ju, G.C.; Yang, Wenju; Rhodes, D. ); Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency. This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline {r arrow} betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde.

  8. Alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, also known as alpha 1-antiprotease inhibitor deficiency, is a disease caused by genetically determined AAT deficiency. It occurs as a result of inheritance of two protease inhibitor (PI) deficiency alleles from the AAT gene locus (designated PI) on chromosomal segment 14q32.1. The most common deficiency allele is PI*Z and a large majority of individuals with severe AAT deficiency are PI type ZZ. The disease occurs predominantly in white persons of European origin and its frequency in Europe and North America is comparable to that of cystic fibrosis (1 in 2000 to 1 in 7000.) Persons with AAT deficiency may have no clinical manifestations. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a high frequency of panacinar emphysema is the most prevalent clinical disorder associated with AAT deficiency and the most frequent cause of disability and death. Tobacco smoking is the major risk factor for developing COPD, which generally begins by the third decade of life, much earlier than "usual" COPD that occurs in AAT-replete individuals. Liver disease, the second most frequent clinical manifestation of AAT deficiency, typically presents as cholestasis in infancy but is usually not severe and generally remits by adolescence. Chronic liver disease develops infrequently, although AAT deficiency is the commonest cause of chronic liver disease in childhood. Cirrhosis and carcinoma of the liver affect at least 25% of AAT-deficient adults over the age of 50 years. AAT deficiency appears to be widely underdiagnosed and based on predicted gene frequencies even in the most intensely studied populations, only a small proportion of those predicted to have AAT deficiency have been diagnosed. Human AAT is available in limited quantity for augmentation therapy. This Memorandum summarizes the discussions and recommendations made by participants at a WHO meeting held in Geneva on 18-20 March 1996 to review existing knowledge about this highly prevalent

  9. Excess of rare, inherited truncating mutations in autism

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Niklas; Turner, Tychele N.; Baker, Carl; Vives, Laura; Mohajeri, Kiana; Witherspoon, Kali; Raja, Archana; Coe, Bradley P.; Stessman, Holly A.; He, Zong-Xiao; Leal, Suzanne M.; Bernier, Raphael; Eichler, Evan E.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relative impact of inherited and de novo variants on autism risk, we generated a comprehensive set of exonic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs) from 2,377 autism families. We find that private, inherited truncating SNVs in conserved genes are enriched in probands (odds ratio=1.14, p=0.0002) compared to unaffected siblings, an effect with significant maternal transmission bias to sons. We also observe a bias for inherited CNVs, specifically for small (<100 kbp), maternally inherited events (p=0.01) that are enriched in CHD8 target genes (p=7.4×10−3). Using a logistic regression model, we show that private truncating SNVs and rare, inherited CNVs are statistically independent autism risk factors, with odds ratios of 1.11 (p=0.0002) and 1.23 (p=0.01), respectively. This analysis identifies a second class of candidate genes (e.g., RIMS1, CUL7, and LZTR1) where transmitted mutations may create a sensitized background but are unlikely to be completely penetrant. PMID:25961944

  10. Mitochondrial fusion and inheritance of the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hiroyoshi; Onoue, Kenta; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2010-03-01

    Although maternal or uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial genomes is a general rule, biparental inheritance is sometimes observed in protists and fungi,including yeasts. In yeast, recombination occurs between the mitochondrial genomes inherited from both parents.Mitochondrial fusion observed in yeast zygotes is thought to set up a space for DNA recombination. In the last decade,a universal mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been uncovered, using yeast as a model. On the other hand, an alternative mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been identified in the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum.A specific mitochondrial plasmid, mF, has been detected as the genetic material that causes mitochondrial fusion in P. polycephalum. Without mF, fusion of the mitochondria is not observed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that Physarum has no constitutive mitochondrial fusion mechanism.Conversely, mitochondria fuse in zygotes and during sporulation with mF. The complete mF sequence suggests that one gene, ORF640, encodes a fusogen for Physarum mitochondria. Although in general, mitochondria are inherited uniparentally, biparental inheritance occurs with specific sexual crossing in P. polycephalum.An analysis of the transmission of mitochondrial genomes has shown that recombinations between two parental mitochondrial genomes require mitochondrial fusion,mediated by mF. Physarum is a unique organism for studying mitochondrial fusion. PMID:20196232

  11. Maternal telomere length inheritance in the king penguin

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, S; Rojas, E R; Zahn, S; Robin, J-P; Criscuolo, F; Massemin, S

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are emerging as a biomarker for ageing and survival, and are likely important in shaping life-history trade-offs. In particular, telomere length with which one starts in life has been linked to lifelong survival, suggesting that early telomere dynamics are somehow related to life-history trajectories. This result highlights the importance of determining the extent to which telomere length is inherited, as a crucial factor determining early life telomere length. Given the scarcity of species for which telomere length inheritance has been studied, it is pressing to assess the generality of telomere length inheritance patterns. Further, information on how this pattern changes over the course of growth in individuals living under natural conditions should provide some insight on the extent to which environmental constraints also shape telomere dynamics. To fill this gap partly, we followed telomere inheritance in a population of king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus). We tested for paternal and maternal influence on chick initial telomere length (10 days old after hatching), and how these relationships changed with chick age (at 70, 200 and 300 days old). Based on a correlative approach, offspring telomere length was positively associated with maternal telomere length early in life (at 10 days old). However, this relationship was not significant at older ages. These data suggest that telomere length in birds is maternally inherited. Nonetheless, the influence of environmental conditions during growth remained an important factor shaping telomere length, as the maternal link disappeared with chicks' age. PMID:25052413

  12. Emulating Multiple Inheritance in Fortran 2003/2008

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morris, Karla

    2015-01-01

    Although the high-performance computing (HPC) community increasingly embraces object-oriented programming (OOP), most HPC OOP projects employ the C++ programming language. Until recently, Fortran programmers interested in mining the benefits of OOP had to emulate OOP in Fortran 90/95. The advent of widespread compiler support for Fortran 2003 now facilitates explicitly constructing object-oriented class hierarchies via inheritance and leveraging related class behaviors such as dynamic polymorphism. Although C++ allows a class to inherit from multiple parent classes, Fortran and several other OOP languages restrict or prohibit explicit multiple inheritance relationships in order to circumvent several pitfalls associated with them. Nonetheless, whatmore » appears as an intrinsic feature in one language can be modeled as a user-constructed design pattern in another language. The present paper demonstrates how to apply the facade structural design pattern to support a multiple inheritance class relationship in Fortran 2003. The design unleashes the power of the associated class relationships for modeling complicated data structures yet avoids the ambiguities that plague some multiple inheritance scenarios.« less

  13. Congenital limb deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, William R; Coulter, Colleen P; Schmitz, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Congenital limb deficiency disorders (LDDs) are birth defects characterized by the aplasia or hypoplasia of bones of the limbs. Limb deficiencies are classified as transverse, those due to intrauterine disruptions of previously normal limbs, or longitudinal, those that are isolated or associated with certain syndromes as well as chromosomal anomalies. Consultation with a medical geneticist is advisable. Long-term care should occur in a specialized limb deficiency center with expertise in orthopedics, prosthetics, and occupational and physical therapy and provide emotional support and contact with other families. With appropriate care, most children with LDDs can lead productive lives. PMID:26042905

  14. Iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of diagnostic testing and therapeutic recommendations for dogs and cats with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:22942439

  15. Thiamine deficiency and delirium.

    PubMed

    Osiezagha, Kenneth; Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C; Barker, Narviar C; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K

    2013-04-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  16. A Defect in Dolichol Phosphate Biosynthesis Causes a New Inherited Disorder with Death in Early Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, Christian; Jungeblut, Christoph; Denecke, Jonas; Erlekotte, Anne; Sohlbach, Christina; Debus, Volker; Kehl, Hans Gerd; Harms, Erik; Reith, Anna; Reichel, Sonja; Gröbe, Helfried; Hammersen, Gerhard; Schwarzer, Ulrich; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2007-01-01

    The following study describes the discovery of a new inherited metabolic disorder, dolichol kinase (DK1) deficiency. DK1 is responsible for the final step of the de novo biosynthesis of dolichol phosphate. Dolichol phosphate is involved in several glycosylation reactions, such as N-glycosylation, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor biosynthesis, and C- and O-mannosylation. We identified four patients who were homozygous for one of two mutations (c.295T→A [99Cys→Ser] or c.1322A→C [441Tyr→Ser]) in the corresponding hDK1 gene. The residual activity of mutant DK1 was 2%–4% when compared with control cells. The mutated alleles failed to complement the temperature-sensitive phenotype of DK1-deficient yeast cells, whereas the wild-type allele restored the normal growth phenotype. Affected patients present with a very severe clinical phenotype, with death in early infancy. Two of the patients died from dilative cardiomyopathy. PMID:17273964

  17. Diagnosis and Management of Congenital and Acquired FXIII Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Muszbek, László; Katona, Éva

    2016-06-01

    Inherited deficiency of FXIII A subunit (FXIII-A) is a rare (1:2,000,000) but very severe bleeding diathesis. The incidence is much higher in communities where the practice of consanguineous marriage is combined with founder effect mutation. Because of the high risk of intracranial bleeding, life-long prophylaxis, preferably using FXIII concentrate, is mandatory. In FXIII-B subunit deficiency the bleeding diathesis is mild to moderate. FXIII deficiency is frequently associated with impaired wound healing. Women suffering from FXIII deficiency cannot carry pregnancies to term; in severe cases spontaneous abortion occurs in the first trimester. Plasma-derived heat-inactivated FXIII concentrate and recombinant FXIII-A are available for prophylaxis; a 4 weekly dose of 35 to 40 U/kg is recommended and a trough level of greater than 5% FXIII activity should be aimed for. During pregnancy, 2 weekly prophylaxis with a target trough level of greater than 10% is recommended, and during labor FXIII activity should exceed 30%. During surgical procedures, the target should be higher than 50% FXIII activity. Alloantibodies make FXIII deficiency difficult to manage, but fortunately they are extremely rare. Acquired FXIII deficiency may involve both subunits. Autoantibodies against FXIII subunits also manifest in severe bleeding complication with a relatively high mortality rate. The first-line test in the diagnosis of FXIII deficiency should be a quantitative functional assay based on the measurement of ammonia release or amine incorporation. The sensitivity of the traditional clot solubility assay is not sufficiently robust to enable proper screening. Antigen assays are needed for the classification of FXIII deficiencies. In the case of anti-FXIII antibodies, the diagnostic armory should be supplemented by a mixing test/Bethesda-type inhibitor assay and by assays that detect/measure the binding of antibodies to FXIII and to its subunits. PMID:27071048

  18. Investigating changes in the gas-phase conformation of Antithrombin III upon binding of Arixtra using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J; Xu, Yongmei; Liu, Jian; Woods, Robert J; Amster, I Jonathan

    2015-10-21

    We validate the utility of ion mobility to measure protein conformational changes induced by the binding of glycosaminoglycan ligands, using the well characterized system of Antithrombin III (ATIII) and Arixtra, a pharmaceutical agent with heparin (Hp) activity. Heparin has been used as a therapeutic anticoagulant drug for several decades through its interaction with ATIII, a serine protease inhibitor that plays a central role in the blood coagulation cascade. This interaction induces conformational changes within ATIII that dramatically enhance the ATIII-mediated inhibition rate. Arixtra is the smallest synthetic Hp containing the specific pentasaccharide sequence required to bind with ATIII. Here we report the first travelling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS) investigation of the conformational changes in ATIII induced by its interaction with Arixtra. Native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed the gentle transfer of the native topology of ATIII and ATIII-Arixtra complex. IM measurements of ATIII and ATIII-Arixtra complex showed a single structure, with well-defined collisional cross section (CCS) values. An average 3.6% increase in CCS of ATIII occurred as a result of its interaction with Arixtra, which agrees closely with the theoretical estimation of the change in CCS based on protein crystal structures. A comparison of the binding behavior of ATIII under both denaturing and non-denaturing conditions confirmed the significance of a folded tertiary structure of ATIII for its biological activity. A Hp oligosaccharide whose structure is similar to Arixtra but missing the 3-O sulfo group on the central glucosamine residue showed a dramatic decrease in binding affinity towards ATIII, but no change in the mobility behavior of the complex, consistent with prior studies that suggested that 3-O sulfation affects the equilibrium constant for binding to ATIII, but not the mode of interaction. In contrast, nonspecific binding by a Hp

  19. Investigating changes in the gas-phase conformation of Antithrombin III upon binding of Arixtra using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Xu, Yongmei; Liu, Jian; Woods, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    We validate the utility of ion mobility to measure protein conformational changes induced by the binding of glycosaminoglycan ligands, using the well characterized system of Antithrombin III (ATIII) and Arixtra, a pharmaceutical agent with heparin (Hp) activity. Heparin has been used as a therapeutic anticoagulant drug for several decades through its interaction with ATIII, a serine protease inhibitor that plays a central role in the blood coagulation cascade. This interaction induces conformational changes within ATIII that dramatically enhance the ATIII-mediated inhibition rate. Arixtra is the smallest synthetic Hp containing the specific pentasaccharide sequence required to bind with ATIII. Here we report the first travelling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS) investigation of the conformational changes in ATIII induced by its interaction with Arixtra. Native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed the gentle transfer of the native topology of ATIII and ATIII–Arixtra complex. IM measurements of ATIII and ATIII–Arixtra complex showed a single structure, with well-defined collisional cross section (CCS) values. An average 3.6% increase in CCS of ATIII occurred as a result of its interaction with Arixtra, which agrees closely with the theoretical estimation of the change in CCS based on protein crystal structures. A comparison of the binding behavior of ATIII under both denaturing and non-denaturing conditions confirmed the significance of a folded tertiary structure of ATIII for its biological activity. A Hp oligosaccharide whose structure is similar to Arixtra but missing the 3-O sulfo group on the central glucosamine residue showed a dramatic decrease in binding affinity towards ATIII, but no change in the mobility behavior of the complex, consistent with prior studies that suggested that 3-O sulfation affects the equilibrium constant for binding to ATIII, but not the mode of interaction. In contrast, nonspecific binding by a Hp

  20. Age-associated mosaic respiratory chain deficiency causes trans-neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Eric; Terzioglu, Mügen; Sterky, Fredrik Hansson; Sörensen, Lene; Galter, Dagmar; Olson, Lars; Wilbertz, Johannes; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2008-05-15

    Heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations (mutations present only in a subset of cellular mtDNA copies) arise de novo during the normal ageing process or may be maternally inherited in pedigrees with mitochondrial disease syndromes. A pathogenic mtDNA mutation causes respiratory chain deficiency only if the fraction of mutated mtDNA exceeds a certain threshold level. These mutations often undergo apparently random mitotic segregation and the levels of normal and mutated mtDNA can vary considerably between cells of the same tissue. In human ageing, segregation of somatic mtDNA mutations leads to mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in a variety of tissues, such as brain, heart and skeletal muscle. A similar pattern of mutation segregation with mosaic respiratory chain deficiency is seen in patients with mitochondrial disease syndromes caused by inherited pathogenic mtDNA mutations. We have experimentally addressed the role of mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in ageing and mitochondrial disease by creating mouse chimeras with a mixture of normal and respiratory chain-deficient neurons in cerebral cortex. We report here that a low proportion (>20%) of respiratory chain-deficient neurons in the forebrain are sufficient to cause symptoms, whereas premature death of the animal occurs only if the proportion is high (>60-80%). The presence of neurons with normal respiratory chain function does not only prevent mortality but also delays the age at which onset of disease symptoms occur. Unexpectedly, respiratory chain-deficient neurons have adverse effect on normal adjacent neurons and induce trans-neuronal degeneration. In summary, our study defines the minimal threshold level of respiratory chain-deficient neurons needed to cause symptoms and also demonstrate that neurons with normal respiratory chain function ameliorate disease progression. Finally, we show that respiratory chain-deficient neurons induce death of normal neurons by a trans-neuronal degeneration

  1. Thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: an inherited risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, S S; Wong, P W; Susmano, A; Sora, J; Norusis, M; Ruggie, N

    1991-01-01

    Severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency with less than 2% of normal enzyme activity is characterized by neurological abnormalities, atherosclerotic changes, and thromboembolism. We have discovered a "new" variant of MTHFR deficiency which is characterized by the absence of neurological abnormalities, an enzyme activity of about 50% of the normal value, and distinctive thermolability under specific conditions of heat inactivation. In this study, lymphocyte MTHFR specific activities in the thermolabile variant and control groups were 5.58 +/- 0.91 and 10.33 +/- 2.89 nmol formaldehyde formed/mg protein/h, respectively. The difference was significant (P less than .01). However, there was overlap among the individual values from the two groups. On the other hand, residual MTHFR activity after heat inactivation was 11.2 +/- 1.43% in the thermolabile variant and 36.3 +/- 5.18% in the controls. There was no overlap. Enzyme studies in 10 subjects with thermolabile MTHFR and their family members support the hypothesis that thermolabile MTHFR is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. To elucidate the association of thermolabile MTHFR with the development of coronary artery disease, we determined the thermostability of lymphocyte MTHFR in 212 patients with proven coronary artery disease and in 202 controls without clinical evidence of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Thermolabile MTHFR was found in 36 (17.0%) cardiac patients and 10 (5.0%) controls. The difference in incidence between the two groups was statistically significant (P less than .01). The average age at onset of clinical coronary artery disease in 36 patients with thermolabile MTHFR was 57.3 +/- 7.6 years (35-72 years). The mean total plasma homocysteine concentration in patients with thermolabile MTHFR was 13.19 +/- 5.32 nmol/ml and was significantly different from the normal mean of 8.50 +/- 2.80 nmol/ml (P less than .05). There was no association between thermolabile MTHFR and other

  2. Initial experience in the treatment of inherited mitochondrial disease with EPI-743.

    PubMed

    Enns, Gregory M; Kinsman, Stephen L; Perlman, Susan L; Spicer, Kenneth M; Abdenur, Jose E; Cohen, Bruce H; Amagata, Akiko; Barnes, Adam; Kheifets, Viktoria; Shrader, William D; Thoolen, Martin; Blankenberg, Francis; Miller, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Inherited mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are progressive, life-threatening conditions for which there are limited supportive treatment options and no approved drugs. Because of this unmet medical need, as well as the implication of mitochondrial dysfunction as a contributor to more common age-related and neurodegenerative disorders, mitochondrial diseases represent an important therapeutic target. Thirteen children and one adult with genetically-confirmed mitochondrial disease (polymerase γ deficiency, n=4; Leigh syndrome, n=4; MELAS, n=3; mtDNA deletion syndrome, n=2; Friedreich ataxia, n=1) at risk for progressing to end-of-life care within 90 days were treated with EPI-743, a novel para-benzoquinone therapeutic, in a subject controlled, open-label study. Serial measures of safety and efficacy were obtained that included biochemical, neurological, quality-of-life, and brain redox assessments using technetium-99m-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclide imaging. Twelve patients treated with EPI-743 have survived; one polymerase γ deficiency patient died after developing pneumonia and one patient with Surf-1 deficiency died after completion of the protocol. Of the 12 survivors, 11 demonstrated clinical improvement, with 3 showing partial relapse, and 10 of the survivors also had an improvement in quality-of-life scores at the end of the 13-week emergency treatment protocol. HMPAO SPECT scans correlated with clinical response; increased regional and whole brain HMPAO uptake was noted in the clinical responders and the one subject who did not respond clinically had decreased regional and whole brain HMPAO uptake. EPI-743 has modified disease progression in >90% of patients in this open-label study as assessed by clinical, quality-of-life, and non-invasive brain imaging parameters. Data obtained herein suggest that EPI-743 may represent a new drug for the treatment of inherited mitochondrial

  3. Rare inherited kidney diseases: challenges, opportunities, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Devuyst, Olivier; Knoers, Nine V A M; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Schaefer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    At least 10% of adults and nearly all children who receive renal-replacement therapy have an inherited kidney disease. These patients rarely die when their disease progresses and can remain alive for many years because of advances in organ-replacement therapy. However, these disorders substantially decrease their quality of life and have a large effect on health-care systems. Since the kidneys regulate essential homoeostatic processes, inherited kidney disorders have multisystem complications, which add to the usual challenges for rare disorders. In this review, we discuss the nature of rare inherited kidney diseases, the challenges they pose, and opportunities from technological advances, which are well suited to target the kidney. Mechanistic insights from rare disorders are relevant for common disorders such as hypertension, kidney stones, cardiovascular disease, and progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:24856029

  4. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and white-colored blood vessels in the retinas Pancreatitis that keeps returning Yellowing of the eyes and ... discuss your diet needs with a registered dietitian. Pancreatitis that is related to lipoprotein lipase deficiency responds ...

  5. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  6. Vitamin D Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency can lead to a loss of bone density (size and strength), broken bones (fractures), muscle weakness, ... get too much calcium in their blood or urine. Careful monitoring of blood vitamin D levels will ...

  7. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... as many as 20 different proteins in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor ... You will be given fresh blood plasma or fresh frozen plasma infusions ... These treatments will correct the deficiency temporarily.

  8. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  9. Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David B; Link, Daniel C; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica

    2014-09-01

    The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are a diverse group of genetic diseases associated with inadequate production of one or more blood cell lineages. Examples include Fanconi anemia, dyskeratosis congenita, Diamond-Blackfan anemia, thrombocytopenia absent radii syndrome, severe congenital neutropenia, and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. The management of these disorders was once the exclusive domain of pediatric subspecialists, but increasingly physicians who care for adults are being called upon to diagnose or treat these conditions. Through a series of patient vignettes, we highlight the clinical manifestations of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes in adolescents and young adults. The diagnostic and therapeutic challenges posed by these diseases are discussed. PMID:24888387

  10. Developmental Systems Theory Formulated as a Claim about Inherited Representations*

    PubMed

    Shea, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Developmental systems theory (DST) is often dismissed on the basis that the causal indispensability of nongenetic factors in evolution and development has long been appreciated. A reformulation makes a more substantive claim: that the special role played by genes is also played by some (but not all) nongenetic resources. That special role can be captured by Shea's 'inherited representation'. Formulating DST as the claim that there are nongenetic inherited representations turns it into a striking, empirically testable hypothesis. DST's characteristic rejection of a gene versus environment dichotomy is preserved but without dissolving into an interactionist casual soup, as some have alleged. PMID:22075936

  11. THE GENETICS OF EPIGENETIC INHERITANCE: MODES, MOLECULES, AND MECHANISMS.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Sabine; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2015-12-01

    Organisms adapt developmental and physiological features to local and transient conditions in part by modulating transcription, translation, and protein functions, usually without changing DNA sequences. Remarkably, these epigenetic changes sometimes endure through meiosis and gametogenesis, thereby affecting phenotypic variation across generations, long after epigenetic changes were triggered. Transgenerational effects challenge our traditional understanding of inheritance. In this review, we focus on patterns of inheritance, molecular features, mechanisms that lead from environmental and genetic perturbations to phenotypic variation in later generations, and issues about study design and replication. PMID:26714351

  12. Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David B.; Link, Daniel C.; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are a diverse group of genetic diseases associated with inadequate production of one or more blood cell lineages. Examples include Fanconi anemia, dyskeratosis congenita, Diamond-Blackfan anemia, thrombocytopenia absent radii syndrome, severe congenital neutropenia, and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. The management of these disorders was once the exclusive domain of pediatric subspecialists, but increasingly physicians who care for adults are being called upon to diagnose or treat these conditions. Through a series of patient vignettes, we highlight the clinical manifestations of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes in adolescents and young adults. The diagnostic and therapeutic challenges posed by these diseases are discussed. PMID:24888387

  13. Developmental Systems Theory Formulated as a Claim about Inherited Representations*

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Developmental systems theory (DST) is often dismissed on the basis that the causal indispensability of nongenetic factors in evolution and development has long been appreciated. A reformulation makes a more substantive claim: that the special role played by genes is also played by some (but not all) nongenetic resources. That special role can be captured by Shea’s ‘inherited representation’. Formulating DST as the claim that there are nongenetic inherited representations turns it into a striking, empirically testable hypothesis. DST’s characteristic rejection of a gene versus environment dichotomy is preserved but without dissolving into an interactionist casual soup, as some have alleged. PMID:22075936

  14. Genetic disorders coupled to ROS deficiency.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Sharon; Brault, Julie; Stasia, Marie-Jose; Knaus, Ulla G

    2015-12-01

    Maintaining the redox balance between generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for health. Disturbances such as continuously elevated ROS levels will result in oxidative stress and development of disease, but likewise, insufficient ROS production will be detrimental to health. Reduced or even complete loss of ROS generation originates mainly from inactivating variants in genes encoding for NADPH oxidase complexes. In particular, deficiency in phagocyte Nox2 oxidase function due to genetic variants (CYBB, CYBA, NCF1, NCF2, NCF4) has been recognized as a direct cause of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), an inherited immune disorder. More recently, additional diseases have been linked to functionally altered variants in genes encoding for other NADPH oxidases, such as for DUOX2/DUOXA2 in congenital hypothyroidism, or for the Nox2 complex, NOX1 and DUOX2 as risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease. A comprehensive overview of novel developments in terms of Nox/Duox-deficiency disorders is presented, combined with insights gained from structure-function studies that will aid in predicting functional defects of clinical variants. PMID:26210446

  15. Genetic disorders coupled to ROS deficiency

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Sharon; Brault, Julie; Stasia, Marie-Jose; Knaus, Ulla G.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining the redox balance between generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for health. Disturbances such as continuously elevated ROS levels will result in oxidative stress and development of disease, but likewise, insufficient ROS production will be detrimental to health. Reduced or even complete loss of ROS generation originates mainly from inactivating variants in genes encoding for NADPH oxidase complexes. In particular, deficiency in phagocyte Nox2 oxidase function due to genetic variants (CYBB, CYBA, NCF1, NCF2, NCF4) has been recognized as a direct cause of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), an inherited immune disorder. More recently, additional diseases have been linked to functionally altered variants in genes encoding for other NADPH oxidases, such as for DUOX2/DUOXA2 in congenital hypothyroidism, or for the Nox2 complex, NOX1 and DUOX2 as risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease. A comprehensive overview of novel developments in terms of Nox/Duox-deficiency disorders is presented, combined with insights gained from structure–function studies that will aid in predicting functional defects of clinical variants. PMID:26210446

  16. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia associated with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ermertcan, Aylin Türel; Yaşar, Ali; Kayhan, Tuba Çelebı; Gülen, Hüseyin; Ertan, Pelin

    2011-09-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a syndrome characterized by hypodontia, hypotrichosis, and partial or total ecrine sweat gland deficiency. The most prevalent form of HED is inherited as an X linked pattern. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive disease, which leads to hemolytic anemia and jaundice. It is expressed in males, while heterozygous females are usually clinically normal. A 12-year-old boy with the complaints of hair and eyebrow disturbances, teeth disfigurement, decreased sweating, and xerosis presented to the outpatient clinic. Dermatological examination revealed sparse hair and eyebrows, conical-shaped teeth, xerosis, syndactylia, transverse grooves, and discoloration of nails. Laboratory findings indicated anemia. His 3-year-old sister also had sparse hair and eyebrows, xerosis, and syndactylia. We learned that the patient had a previous history of neonatal jaundice and a diagnosis of G-6-PD deficiency. Although it has been shown that loci of ectodermal dysplasia and G-6-PD deficiency genes are near to one another, we did not find any case study reporting on occurrence of these two genetic diseases together. With the aspect of this rare and interesting case, the relationship between HED and G-6-PD deficiency was defined. PMID:22028581

  17. Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia Associated with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yaşar, Ali; Kayhan, Tuba Çelebİ; Gülen, Hüseyin; Ertan, Pelin

    2011-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a syndrome characterized by hypodontia, hypotrichosis, and partial or total ecrine sweat gland deficiency. The most prevalent form of HED is inherited as an X linked pattern. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive disease, which leads to hemolytic anemia and jaundice. It is expressed in males, while heterozygous females are usually clinically normal. A 12-year-old boy with the complaints of hair and eyebrow disturbances, teeth disfigurement, decreased sweating, and xerosis presented to the outpatient clinic. Dermatological examination revealed sparse hair and eyebrows, conical-shaped teeth, xerosis, syndactylia, transverse grooves, and discoloration of nails. Laboratory findings indicated anemia. His 3-year-old sister also had sparse hair and eyebrows, xerosis, and syndactylia. We learned that the patient had a previous history of neonatal jaundice and a diagnosis of G-6-PD deficiency. Although it has been shown that loci of ectodermal dysplasia and G-6-PD deficiency genes are near to one another, we did not find any case study reporting on occurrence of these two genetic diseases together. With the aspect of this rare and interesting case, the relationship between HED and G-6-PD deficiency was defined. PMID:22028581

  18. VERMILION-DEFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    Bridges, C B

    1919-07-20

    In May, 1916, a culture of Drosophila melanogaster showed that a new sex-linked lethal had arisen. The linkage relations indicated that the position of the lethal was in the neighborhood of the sex-linked recessive "vermilion," whose locus in the X chromosome is at 33.0. When females heterozygous for the lethal were outcrossed to vermilion males, all the daughters that received the lethal-bearing chromosome showed vermilion eye-color, though, from the pedigree, vermilion was known to be absent from the ancestry of the mother. The lethal action and the unexpected appearance of vermilion both suggested that this was another instance of the phenomenon called "deficiency;" that is, the loss or "inactivation" of the genes of a section of the X chromosome. The lethal action would then be due to the deficient region including one or more genes necessary for the life of the individual. The appearance of vermilion in females carrying only one vermilion gene would be explainable on the ground that the deficient-bearing females are virtually haploid for the region including the vermilion locus. Linkage tests showed that the amount of crossing over in the neighborhood of the deficiency was cut down by about five units. Part of this may be attributed to the actual length of the "deficient" region, within which it is probable that no crossing over occurs, and part (probably most) to an alteration in the synaptic relations in the regions immediately adjacent. In more remote regions there was no disturbance or perhaps a slight rise in the frequency of crossing over. Both the local fall and the possible rise in more distant regions would seem to argue that a "pucker" at synapsis had been caused by an actual shortening of the deficient chromosome. That the deficient region extends to the left of the locus of vermilion was indicated by a test in which it was observed that the presence of an extra piece of chromosome including the loci for vermilion and sable ("vermilion

  19. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  20. The Puzzle of Inheritance: Genetics and the Methods of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutter, Mary Ann G.; Drexler, Edward; Friedman, B. Ellen; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Rossiter, Belinda; Zola, John

    This instructional module contains a description of the Human Genome Project (HGP). A discussion of issues in the philosophy of science and some of the ethical, legal, and social implications of research in genetics, and a survey of fundamental genetics concepts and of new, nontraditional concepts of inheritance are also included. Six…

  1. Learning about Inheritance in an Out-of-School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dairianathan, Anne; Subramaniam, R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate primary students' learning through participation in an out-of-school enrichment programme, held in a science centre, which focused on DNA and genes and whether participation in the programme led to an increased understanding of inheritance as well as promoted interest in the topic. The sample consisted…

  2. Channelopathies - emerging trends in the management of inherited arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Chockalingam, Priya; Mizusawa, Yuka; Wilde, Arthur Am

    2015-01-01

    In spite of their relative rarity, inheritable arrhythmias have come to the forefront as a group of potentially fatal but preventable cause of sudden cardiac death in children and (young) adults. Comprehensive management of inherited arrhythmias includes diagnosing and treating the proband and identifying and protecting affected family members. This has been made possible by the vast advances in the field of molecular biology enabling better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of some of these disease groups, namely congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and Brugada syndrome. The ensuing knowledge of the genotype-phenotype correlations enables us to risk-stratify, prognosticate and treat based on the genetic test results. The various diagnostic modalities currently available to us, including clinical tools and genetic technologies, have to be applied judiciously in order to promptly identify those affected and to spare the emotional burden of a potentially lethal disease in the unaffected individuals. The therapeutic armamentarium of inherited arrhythmias includes pharmacological agents, device therapies and surgical interventions. A treatment strategy keeping in mind the risk profile of the patients, the local availability of drugs and the expertise of the treating personnel is proving effective. While opportunities for research are numerous in this expanding field of medicine, there is also tremendous scope for incorporating the emerging trends in managing patients and families with inherited arrhythmias in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:25852242

  3. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in mammals: how good is the evidence?

    PubMed

    van Otterdijk, Sanne D; Michels, Karin B

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetics plays an important role in orchestrating key biologic processes. Epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation, histones, chromatin structure, and noncoding RNAs, are modified throughout life in response to environmental and behavioral influences. With each new generation, DNA methylation patterns are erased in gametes and reset after fertilization, probably to prevent these epigenetic marks from being transferred from parents to their offspring. However, some recent animal studies suggest an apparent resistance to complete erasure of epigenetic marks during early development, enabling transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. Whether there are similar mechanisms in humans remains unclear, with the exception of epigenetic imprinting. Nevertheless, a distinctly different mechanism-namely, intrauterine exposure to environmental stressors that may affect establishment of the newly composing epigenetic patterns after fertilization-is often confused with transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. In this review, we delineate the definition of and requirement for transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, differentiate it from the consequences of intrauterine exposure, and discuss the available evidence in both animal models and humans.-Van Otterdijk, S. D., Michels, K. B. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in mammals: how good is the evidence? PMID:27037350

  4. PROBABLE QUALITATIVE INHERITANCE OF FULL RED SKIN COLOR IN PEACH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red skin color is a desirable trait contributing to the attractiveness of a peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch]. Previous reports on the expression and inheritance of red skin color have concluded that it was under the control of multiple genes. However, we recently observed hybrid populations whic...

  5. Inheritance of fresh-cut fruit quality attributes in Capsicum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fresh-cut fruit and vegetable industry has expanded rapidly during the past decade, due to freshness, convenience and the high nutrition that fresh-cut produce offers to consumers. The current report evaluates the inheritance of postharvest attributes that contribute to pepper fresh-cut product...

  6. Concepts of Kinship Relations and Inheritance in Childhood and Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joanne M.; Smith, Lesley A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the development and consistency of children's (4, 7, 10, and 14 years) naive concepts of inheritance using three tasks. A modified adoption task asked participants to distinguish between biological and social parentage in their predictions and explanations of the origins of different feature types (physical characteristics,…

  7. Uniparental Inheritance and Replacement of Mitochondrial DNA in Neurospora Tetrasperma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. B.; Taylor, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    This study tested mechanisms proposed for maternal uniparental mitochondrial inheritance in Neurospora: (1) exclusion of conidial mitochondria by the specialized female reproductive structure, trichogyne, due to mating locus heterokaryon incompatibility and (2) mitochondrial input bias favoring the larger trichogyne over the smaller conidium. These mechanisms were tested by determining the modes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance and transmission in the absence of mating locus heterokaryon incompatibility following crosses of uninucleate strains of Neurospora tetrasperma with trichogyne (trichogyne inoculated by conidia) and without trichogyne (hyphal fusion). Maternal uniparental mitochondrial inheritance was observed in 136 single ascospore progeny following both mating with and without trichogyne using mtDNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms to distinguish parental types. This suggests that maternal mitochondrial inheritance following hyphal fusions is due to some mechanism other than those that implicate the trichogyne. Following hyphal fusion, mututally exclusive nuclear migration permitted investigation of reciprocal interactions. Regardless of which strain accepted nuclei following seven replicate hyphal fusion matings, acceptor mtDNA was the only type detected in 34 hyphal plug and tip samples taken from the contact and acceptor zones. No intracellular mtDNA mixtures were detected. Surprisingly, 3 days following hyphal fusion, acceptor mtDNA replaced donor mtDNA throughout the entire colony. To our knowledge, this is the first report of complete mitochondrial replacement during mating in a filamentous fungus. PMID:8104158

  8. Epigenetic inheritance and evolution: A paternal perspective on dietary influences.

    PubMed

    Soubry, Adelheid

    2015-07-01

    The earliest indications for paternally induced transgenerational effects from the environment to future generations were based on a small number of long-term epidemiological studies and some empirical observations. Only recently have experimental animal models and a few analyses on human data explored the transgenerational nature of phenotypic changes observed in offspring. Changes include multiple metabolic disorders, cancer and other chronic diseases. These phenotypes cannot always be explained by Mendelian inheritance, DNA mutations or genetic damage. Hence, a new compelling theory on epigenetic inheritance is gaining interest, providing new concepts that extend Darwin's evolutionary theory. Epigenetic alterations or "epimutations" are being considered to explain transgenerational inheritance of parentally acquired traits. The responsible mechanisms for these epimutations include DNA methylation, histone modification, and RNA-mediated effects. This review explores the literature on a number of time-dependent environmentally induced epigenetic alterations, specifically those from dietary exposures. We suggest a role for the male germ line as one of nature's tools to capture messages from our continuously changing environment and to transfer this information to subsequent generations. Further, we open the discussion that the paternally inherited epigenetic information may contribute to evolutionary adaptation. PMID:25769497

  9. Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: a dominantly inherited isolated defect.

    PubMed

    Braddock, S R; Jones, K L; Bird, L M; Villegas, I; Jones, M C

    1995-02-13

    We present a sporadic case of nonsyndromal anterior cervical hypertrichosis and review the literature. Based on prior documentation of dominant inheritance it is suggested that this case may be the result of a fresh mutation associated with older paternal age. PMID:7762594

  10. Channelopathies - Emerging Trends in The Management of Inherited Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Priya; Mizusawa, Yuka; Wilde, Arthur A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their relative rarity, inheritable arrhythmias have come to the forefront as a group of potentially fatal but preventable cause of sudden cardiac death in children and (young) adults. Comprehensive management of inherited arrhythmias includes diagnosing and treating the proband and identifying and protecting affected family members. This has been made possible by the vast advances in the field of molecular biology enabling better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of some of these disease groups, namely congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and Brugada syndrome. The ensuing knowledge of the genotype-phenotype correlations enables us to risk-stratify, prognosticate and treat based on the genetic test results. The various diagnostic modalities currently available to us, including clinical tools and genetic technologies, have to be applied judiciously in order to promptly identify those affected and to spare the emotional burden of a potentially lethal disease in the unaffected individuals. The therapeutic armamentarium of inherited arrhythmias includes pharmacological agents, device therapies and surgical interventions. A treatment strategy keeping in mind the risk profile of the patients, the local availability of drugs and the expertise of the treating personnel is proving effective. While opportunities for research are numerous in this expanding field of medicine, there is also tremendous scope for incorporating the emerging trends in managing patients and families with inherited arrhythmias in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:25852242

  11. Darwin's Invention: Inheritance & the "Mad Dream" of Pangenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McComas, William F.

    2012-01-01

    This article recounts the story of the development of pangenesis, a principle proposed by Charles Darwin to describe the rules of inheritance and the source of new variation, two concepts vital to his proposal of evolution by natural selection. Historical accounts such as this are infrequently included in texts and classroom discussions but can…

  12. PHENYLKETONURIA, AN INHERITED METABOLIC DISORDER ASSOCIATED WITH MENTAL RETARDATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CENTERWALL, WILLARD R.; CENTERWALL, SIEGRIED A.

    ADDRESSED TO PUBLIC HEALTH WORKERS AND PHYSICIANS IN GENERAL PRACTICE, THE PAMPHLET INTRODUCES METHODS OF DETECTING AND MANAGING PHENYLKETONURIA, AN INHERITED METABOLIC DISORDER ASSOCIATED WITH MENTAL RETARDATION. INFORMATION, UPDATED FROM THE 1961 EDITION, IS INCLUDED ON THE INCIDENCE AND GENETICS, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND CLINICAL COURSE OF THE…

  13. Heterogeneity of variances for carcass traits by percentage Brahman inheritance.

    PubMed

    Crews, D H; Franke, D E

    1998-07-01

    Heterogeneity of carcass trait variances due to level of Brahman inheritance was investigated using records from straightbred and crossbred steers produced from 1970 to 1988 (n = 1,530). Angus, Brahman, Charolais, and Hereford sires were mated to straightbred and crossbred cows to produce straightbred, F1, back-cross, three-breed cross, and two-, three-, and four-breed rotational crossbred steers in four non-overlapping generations. At weaning (mean age = 220 d), steers were randomly assigned within breed group directly to the feedlot for 200 d, or to a backgrounding and stocker phase before feeding. Stocker steers were fed from 70 to 100 d in generations 1 and 2 and from 60 to 120 d in generations 3 and 4. Carcass traits included hot carcass weight, subcutaneous fat thickness and longissimus muscle area at the 12-13th rib interface, carcass weight-adjusted longissimus muscle area, USDA yield grade, estimated total lean yield, marbling score, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. Steers were classified as either high Brahman (50 to 100% Brahman), moderate Brahman (25 to 49% Brahman), or low Brahman (0 to 24% Brahman) inheritance. Two types of animal models were fit with regard to level of Brahman inheritance. One model assumed similar variances between pairs of Brahman inheritance groups, and the second model assumed different variances between pairs of Brahman inheritance groups. Fixed sources of variation in both models included direct and maternal additive and nonadditive breed effects, year of birth, and slaughter age. Variances were estimated using derivative free REML procedures. Likelihood ratio tests were used to compare models. The model accounting for heterogeneous variances had a greater likelihood (P < .001) than the model assuming homogeneous variances for hot carcass weight, longissimus muscle area, weight-adjusted longissimus muscle area, total lean yield, and Warner-Bratzler shear force, indicating improved fit with percentage Brahman inheritance

  14. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment. PMID:26314490

  15. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K; Keshari, Amit K; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta; Saha, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  16. Characteristic kidney pathology, gene abnormality and treatments in LCAT deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hirashio, Shuma; Ueno, Toshinori; Naito, Takayuki; Masaki, Takao

    2014-04-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is a key enzyme involved in reverse cholesterol transport from the peripheral tissues to the liver. LCAT deficiency, in which this enzyme is congenitally absent, is a genetic disease that impairs the esterification of free cholesterol in the plasma, leading to accumulation of phospholipids, including lecithin, in the organs of the body; the clinical manifestations include corneal opacities, normochromic anemia, renal disorder, etc. The prognosis is determined by the degree of renal dysfunction, and renal biopsy specimens reveal characteristic light- and electron-microscopic findings. The disease, transmitted by autosomal recessive inheritance, is extremely rare. There have only been 88 gene mutations of the LCAT gene reported around the world, and 13 of them are from Japan. One of the characteristics of LCAT deficiency is the strong correlations among the patterns, extent and phenotypes of these gene mutations. PMID:24174160

  17. Nucleotide excision repair deficient mouse models and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Niedernhofer, Laura J

    2008-07-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a highly conserved mechanism to remove helix-distorting DNA base damage. A major substrate for NER is DNA damage caused by environmental genotoxins, most notably ultraviolet radiation. Xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy are three human diseases caused by inherited defects in NER. The symptoms and severity of these diseases vary dramatically, ranging from profound developmental delay to cancer predisposition and accelerated aging. All three syndromes include neurological disease, indicating an important role for NER in protecting against spontaneous DNA damage as well. To study the pathophysiology caused by DNA damage, numerous mouse models of NER-deficiency were generated by knocking-out genes required for NER or knocking-in disease-causing human mutations. This review explores the utility of these mouse models to study neurological disease caused by NER-deficiency. PMID:18272436

  18. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K.; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  19. Lentiviral Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy in Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract After more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme deficiencies, especially Pompe disease. PMID:25184354

  20. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left. PMID:25759629

  1. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  2. Natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer, and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of individuals who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically-defined congenital immunodeficiency of which there are over forty presently known to impair NK cells. The abnormality of NK cells, however, in certain cases represents the majority immunological defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in three different genes that can cause NK cell deficiency as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation. PMID:23993353

  3. Thiamine Deficiency and Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C.; Barker, Narviar C.; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K.

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke’s encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  4. Inherited cobalamin malabsorption. Mutations in three genes reveal functional and ethnic patterns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inherited malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl) causes hematological and neurological abnormalities that can be fatal. Three genes have been implicated in Cbl malabsorption; yet, only about 10% of ~400-500 reported cases have been molecularly studied to date. Recessive mutations in CUBN or AMN cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (IGS), while recessive mutations in GIF cause Intrinsic Factor Deficiency (IFD). IGS and IFD differ in that IGS usually presents with proteinuria, which is not observed in IFD. The genetic heterogeneity and numerous differential diagnoses make clinical assessment difficult. Methods We present a large genetic screening study of 154 families or patients with suspected hereditary Cbl malabsorption. Patients and their families have been accrued over a period spanning >12 years. Systematic genetic testing of the three genes CUBN, AMN, and GIF was accomplished using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA and RNA sequencing. In addition, six genes that were contenders for a role in inherited Cbl malabsorption were studied in a subset of these patients. Results Our results revealed population-specific mutations, mutational hotspots, and functionally distinct regions in the three causal genes. We identified mutations in 126/154 unrelated cases (82%). Fifty-three of 126 cases (42%) were mutated in CUBN, 45/126 (36%) were mutated in AMN, and 28/126 (22%) had mutations in GIF. We found 26 undescribed mutations in CUBN, 19 in AMN, and 7 in GIF for a total of 52 novel defects described herein. We excluded six other candidate genes as culprits and concluded that additional genes might be involved. Conclusions Cbl malabsorption is found worldwide and genetically complex. However, our results indicate that population-specific founder mutations are quite common. Consequently, targeted genetic testing has become feasible if ethnic ancestry is considered. These results will facilitate clinical and molecular genetic testing of

  5. A heterozygous 21-bp deletion in CAPN3 causes dominantly inherited limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Vissing, John; Barresi, Rita; Witting, Nanna; Van Ghelue, Marijke; Gammelgaard, Lise; Bindoff, Laurence A; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Hudson, Judith; Wahl, Christoph M; Arnardottir, Snjolaug; Dahlbom, Kathe; Jonsrud, Christoffer; Duno, Morten

    2016-08-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A is the most common limb girdle muscular dystrophy form worldwide. Although strict recessive inheritance is assumed, patients carrying a single mutation in the calpain 3 gene (CAPN3) are reported. Such findings are commonly attributed to incomplete mutation screening. In this investigation, we report 37 individuals (age range: 21-85 years, 21 females and 16 males) from 10 families in whom only one mutation in CAPN3 could be identified; a 21-bp, in-frame deletion (c.643_663del21). This mutation co-segregated with evidence of muscle disease and autosomal dominant transmission in several generations. Evidence of muscle disease was indicated by muscle pain, muscle weakness and wasting, significant fat replacement of muscles on imaging, myopathic changes on muscle biopsy and loss of calpain 3 protein on western blotting. Thirty-one of 34 patients had elevated creatine kinase or myoglobin. Muscle weakness was generally milder than observed in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, but affected the same muscle groups (proximal leg, lumbar paraspinal and medial gastrocnemius muscles). In some cases, the weakness was severely disabling. The 21-bp deletion did not affect mRNA maturation. Calpain 3 expression in muscle, assessed by western blot, was below 15% of normal levels in the nine mutation carriers in whom this could be tested. Haplotype analysis in four families from three different countries suggests that the 21-bp deletion is a founder mutation. This study provides strong evidence that heterozygosity for the c.643_663del21 deletion in CAPN3 results in a dominantly inherited muscle disease. The normal expression of mutated mRNA and the severe loss of calpain 3 on western blotting, suggest a dominant negative effect with a loss-of-function mechanism affecting the calpain 3 homodimer. This renders patients deficient in calpain 3 as in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, albeit in a milder form in most cases. Based on findings

  6. Quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum: lessons from hereditary myeloperoxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nauseef, W M

    1999-09-01

    The optimal level of oxygen-dependent microbicidal activity in human neutrophils depends on the generation of highly toxic products, including hypochlorous acid, by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of chloride anion and the neutrophil granule protein myeloperoxidase (MPO). The biosynthesis of MPO is normally restricted to the promyelocytic stage of myeloid development and includes N-linked glycosylation, heme insertion, proteolytic processing, subunit dimerization, and eventual targeting to the azurophilic granule. In the endoplasmic reticulum, MPO precursors interact transiently with calreticulin and calnexin, presumably in their capacity as molecular chaperones. In light of the important role of the MPO-H2O2-chloride system in human host defense, the relatively high prevalence of inherited MPO deficiency was an unanticipated insight provided by the widespread use of automated flow cytometry for the enumeration of leukocytes in clinical specimens. In many cases of inherited MPO deficiency, affected neutrophils have immunochemical evidence of precursor protein but lack the subunits of mature MPO, peroxidase activity, or the ability to chlorinate target proteins. To date, four genotypes have been reported to cause inherited MPO deficiency, each of which results in missense mutations. In the genotype Y173C, the mutant precursor is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum by virtue of its prolonged interaction with calnexin, and it eventually undergoes degradation in the 20S proteasome. In this way, the quality control system operating in the endoplasmic reticulum retrieves malfolded MPO precursors from the biosynthetic pathway and creates the biochemical phenotype of MPO deficiency. Thus MPO deficiency caused by Y173C joins the ranks of cystic fibrosis, protein C deficiency, and other genetic disorders that reflect abnormalities in protein folding. PMID:10482305

  7. Color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannorren, D.

    1982-04-01

    Congenital and acquired color vision defects are described in the context of physiological data. Light sources, photometry, color systems and test methods are described. A list of medicines is also presented. The practical social consequences of color vision deficiencies are discussed.

  8. Arginase-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Baron, Garrett; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Arginase-1 (ARG1) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects the liver-based urea cycle, leading to impaired ureagenesis. This genetic disorder is caused by 40+ mutations found fairly uniformly spread throughout the ARG1 gene, resulting in partial or complete loss of enzyme function, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. ARG1-deficient patients exhibit hyperargininemia with spastic paraparesis, progressive neurological and intellectual impairment, persistent growth retardation, and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, a clinical pattern that differs strikingly from other urea cycle disorders. This review briefly highlights the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of ARG1 deficiency derived from clinical case reports and therapeutic strategies stretching over several decades and reports on several exciting new developments regarding the pathophysiology of the disorder using ARG1 global and inducible knockout mouse models. Gene transfer studies in these mice are revealing potential therapeutic options that can be exploited in the future. However, caution is advised in extrapolating results since the lethal disease phenotype in mice is much more severe than in humans indicating that the mouse models may not precisely recapitulate human disease etiology. Finally, some of the functions and implications of ARG1 in non-urea cycle activities are considered. Lingering questions and future areas to be addressed relating to the clinical manifestations of ARG1 deficiency in liver and brain are also presented. Hopefully, this review will spark invigorated research efforts that lead to treatments with better clinical outcomes. PMID:26467175

  9. Diamond-Blackfan anemia and nutritional deficiency-induced anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Gelbart, David

    2014-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, inherited disease that characteristically presents as a chronic, normochromic macrocytosis due to red cell lineage bone marrow failure. Although studies are elaborating on the genetic basis for its associated comorbidities, little has been published comparing this anemia to other chronic anemias that have similar laboratory results in children. This article offers a global perspective of the disease and compares it with anemia due to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in children. PMID:24662257

  10. Exosomal Protein Deficiencies: How Abnormal RNA Metabolism Results in Childhood-Onset Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Juliane S.; Giunta, Michele; Horvath, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Defects of RNA metabolism have been increasingly identified in various forms of inherited neurological diseases. Recently, abnormal RNA degradation due to mutations in human exosome subunit genes has been shown to cause complex childhood onset neurological presentations including spinal muscular atrophy, pontocerebellar hypoplasia and myelination deficiencies. This paper summarizes our current knowledge about the exosome in human neurological disease and provides some important insights into potential disease mechanisms. PMID:27127732

  11. A new case of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency with mild clinical features.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Tan, Dongqiong; Han, Lianshu; Ye, Jun; Qiu, Wenjuan; Gu, Xuefan; Zhang, Huiwen

    2016-05-01

    Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive inborn error of fatty acid metabolism. It usually follows a severe disease course and presents poor prognosis without treatment. Here, we report an affected female juvenile with a mild clinical and biochemical phenotype who mainly featured poor schooling without cardiomyopathy and metabolic acidosis. She was suspected of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency due to a 57-kb deletion in 16q23.3 encompassing the MLCYD gene revealed by chromosome microarray. Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency was then confirmed by acylcarnitine analysis and organic acid analysis. Real-time PCR analysis of the patient revealed the first three exon deletion of the MLYCD gene, which was maternally inherited. DNA sequencing of the MLYCD gene of the patient identified a novel heterozygous mutation (c.911G>A, p.G304E) in exon 4 that was paternally inherited. The patient urine malonic acid dissolved and had a better school record in 6 month after initiation of fat-limited diet. At 1 year post treatment, the blood malonylcarnitine level decreased remarkably. Our result expands the phenotype of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency and suggests attentions should be paid to the mild form of disorders, for example, malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency, which usually present a severe disease course. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26858006

  12. Purine nucleoside metabolism in the erythrocytes of patients with adenosine deaminase deficiency and severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, R P; Crabtree, G W; Parks, R E; Nelson, J A; Keightley, R; Parkman, R; Rosen, F S; Stern, R C; Polmar, S H

    1976-01-01

    Deficiency of erythrocytic and lymphocytic adenosine deaminase (ADA) occurs in some patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). SCID with ADA deficiency is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. ADA is markedly reduced or undetectable in affected patients (homozygotes), and approximately one-half normal levels are found in individuals heterozygous for ADA deficiency. The metabolism of purine nucleosides was studied in erythrocytes from normal individuals, four ADA-deficiency patients, and two heterozygous individuals. ADA deficiency in intake erythrocytes was confirmed by a very sensitive ammonia-liberation technique. Erythrocytic ADA activity in three heterozygous individuals (0.07,0.08, and 0.14 mumolar units/ml of packed cells) was between that of the four normal controls (0.20-0.37 mumol/ml) and the ADA-deficient patients (no activity). In vitro, adenosine was incorporated principally into IMP in the heterozygous and normal individuals but into the adenosine nucleotides in the ADa-deficient patients. Coformycin (3-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-6,7,8-trihydroimidazo[4,5-4] [1,3] diazepin-8 (R)-ol), a potent inhibitor of ADA, made possible incorporation of adenosine nucleotides in the ADA-deficient patients... PMID:947948

  13. [Myopathy in the course of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency].

    PubMed

    Durka-Kęsy, Marta; Stępień, Adam; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Fidziańska, Anna; Niebrój-Dobosz, Irena; Pastuszak, Zanna

    2012-01-01

    Congenital deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II is a disease with an autosomal recessive inheritance of phenotypic variability which depends on age at the onset of symptoms. Three entities associated with deficiency of CPT II are known: the perinatal, the infantile and the adult form. The perinatal disease is the most severe form and is invariably fatal. On the other hand, the adult CPT II clinical phenotype is benign and requires additional external triggers such as high-intensity exercise to provoke myopathic symptoms. We report a case of adult CPT II deficiency presenting with the subtle symptoms of myopathy. A 32-year-old man was admitted to the hospital complaining of muscle pain after exercise. Athletic appearance drew attention, because the patient denied practicing sport. Neurological examination revealed marked tiredness during the single-leg hop test without other abnormalities. Electromyography (EMG) and serum biochemistry were not typical for myopathy. Routine histopathological examination did not reveal any abnormalities of structure of muscle fibers. Diagnosis was established after ultrastructural and biochemical analysis which revealed changes typical for CPT II deficiency. PMID:23319229

  14. Congenital vocal cord paralysis with possible autosomal recessive inheritance: Case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, R.; Friedman, S.; Fallet, S.

    1996-08-23

    We describe an infant with congenital vocal cord paralysis born to consanguineous parents. While autosomal dominant and X-linked inheritance have been previously reported in this condition, we conclude that the degree of parental consanguinity in this case strongly suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Although we cannot exclude X-linked inheritance, evidence from animal studies demonstrates autosomal recessive inheritance and provides a possible molecular basis for congenital vocal cord paralysis. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Inheritance for software reuse: The good, the bad, and the ugly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitaraman, Murali; Eichmann, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Inheritance is a powerful mechanism supported by object-oriented programming languages to facilitate modifications and extensions of reusable software components. This paper presents a taxonomy of the various purposes for which an inheritance mechanism can be used. While some uses of inheritance significantly enhance software reuse, some others are not as useful and in fact, may even be detrimental to reuse. The paper discusses several examples, and argues for a programming language design that is selective in its support for inheritance.

  16. Lamarck, evolution, and the inheritance of acquired characters.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Richard W

    2013-08-01

    Scientists are not always remembered for the ideas they cherished most. In the case of the French biologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, his name since the end of the nineteenth century has been tightly linked to the idea of the inheritance of acquired characters. This was indeed an idea that he endorsed, but he did not claim it as his own nor did he give it much thought. He took pride instead in advancing the ideas that (1) nature produced successively all the different forms of life on earth, and (2) environmentally induced behavioral changes lead the way in species change. This article surveys Lamarck's ideas about organic change, identifies several ironies with respect to how his name is commonly remembered, and suggests that some historical justice might be done by using the adjective "Lamarckian" to denote something more (or other) than a belief in the inheritance of acquired characters. PMID:23908372

  17. Using whole exome sequencing to identify inherited causes of autism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, T.W.; Chahrour, M.H.; Coulter, M.E.; Jiralerspong, S.; Okamura-Ikeda, K.; Ataman, B.; Schmitz-Abe, K.; Harmin, D.A.; Adli, M.; Malik, A.N.; D’Gama, A.M.; Lim, E.T.; Sanders, S.J.; Mochida, G.H.; Partlow, J.N.; Sunu, C.M.; Felie, J.M.; Rodriguez, J.; Nasir, R.H.; Ware, J.; Joseph, R.M.; Hill, R.S.; Kwan, B.Y.; Al-Saffar, M.; Mukaddes, N.M.; Hashmi, A.; Balkhy, S.; Gascon, G.G.; Hisama, F.M.; LeClair, E.; Poduri, A.; Oner, O.; Al-Saad, S.; Al-Awadi, S.A.; Bastaki, L.; Ben-Omran, T.; Teebi, A.; Al-Gazali, L.; Eapen, V.; Stevens, C.R.; Rappaport, L.; Gabriel, S.B.; Markianos, K.; State, M.W.; Greenberg, M.E.; Taniguchi, H.; Braverman, N.E.; Morrow, E.M.; Walsh, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite significant heritability of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), their extreme genetic heterogeneity has proven challenging for gene discovery. Studies of primarily simplex families have implicated de novo copy number changes and point mutations, but are not optimally designed to identify inherited risk alleles. We apply whole exome sequencing (WES) to ASD families enriched for inherited causes due to consanguinity and find familial ASD associated with biallelic mutations in disease genes (AMT, PEX7, SYNE1, VPS13B, PAH, POMGNT1), some implicated for the first time in ASD. At least some of these genes show biallelic mutations in nonconsanguineous families as well. These mutations are often only partially disabling or present atypically, with patients lacking diagnostic features of the Mendelian disorders with which these genes are classically associated. Our study shows the utility of WES for identifying specific genetic conditions not clinically suspected and the importance of partial loss of gene function in ASDs. PMID:23352163

  18. Social inheritance can explain the structure of animal social networks.

    PubMed

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Akçay, Erol

    2016-01-01

    The social network structure of animal populations has major implications for survival, reproductive success, sexual selection and pathogen transmission of individuals. But as of yet, no general theory of social network structure exists that can explain the diversity of social networks observed in nature, and serve as a null model for detecting species and population-specific factors. Here we propose a simple and generally applicable model of social network structure. We consider the emergence of network structure as a result of social inheritance, in which newborns are likely to bond with maternal contacts, and via forming bonds randomly. We compare model output with data from several species, showing that it can generate networks with properties such as those observed in real social systems. Our model demonstrates that important observed properties of social networks, including heritability of network position or assortative associations, can be understood as consequences of social inheritance. PMID:27352101

  19. Social inheritance can explain the structure of animal social networks

    PubMed Central

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Akçay, Erol

    2016-01-01

    The social network structure of animal populations has major implications for survival, reproductive success, sexual selection and pathogen transmission of individuals. But as of yet, no general theory of social network structure exists that can explain the diversity of social networks observed in nature, and serve as a null model for detecting species and population-specific factors. Here we propose a simple and generally applicable model of social network structure. We consider the emergence of network structure as a result of social inheritance, in which newborns are likely to bond with maternal contacts, and via forming bonds randomly. We compare model output with data from several species, showing that it can generate networks with properties such as those observed in real social systems. Our model demonstrates that important observed properties of social networks, including heritability of network position or assortative associations, can be understood as consequences of social inheritance. PMID:27352101

  20. Lamarck, Evolution, and the Inheritance of Acquired Characters

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Scientists are not always remembered for the ideas they cherished most. In the case of the French biologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, his name since the end of the nineteenth century has been tightly linked to the idea of the inheritance of acquired characters. This was indeed an idea that he endorsed, but he did not claim it as his own nor did he give it much thought. He took pride instead in advancing the ideas that (1) nature produced successively all the different forms of life on earth, and (2) environmentally induced behavioral changes lead the way in species change. This article surveys Lamarck’s ideas about organic change, identifies several ironies with respect to how his name is commonly remembered, and suggests that some historical justice might be done by using the adjective “Lamarckian” to denote something more (or other) than a belief in the inheritance of acquired characters. PMID:23908372

  1. Epigenetics and inheritance of phenotype variation in livestock.

    PubMed

    Triantaphyllopoulos, Kostas A; Ikonomopoulos, Ioannis; Bannister, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic inheritance plays a crucial role in many biological processes, such as gene expression in early embryo development, imprinting and the silencing of transposons. It has recently been established that epigenetic effects can be inherited from one generation to the next. Here, we review examples of epigenetic mechanisms governing animal phenotype and behaviour, and we discuss the importance of these findings in respect to animal studies, and livestock in general. Epigenetic parameters orchestrating transgenerational effects, as well as heritable disorders, and the often-overlooked areas of livestock immunity and stress, are also discussed. We highlight the importance of nutrition and how it is linked to epigenetic alteration. Finally, we describe how our understanding of epigenetics is underpinning the latest cancer research and how this can be translated into directed efforts to improve animal health and welfare. PMID:27446239

  2. Transcriptomic analyses of genes and tissues in inherited sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sapio, Matthew R; Goswami, Samridhi C; Gross, Jacklyn R; Mannes, Andrew J; Iadarola, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Inherited sensory neuropathies are caused by mutations in genes affecting either primary afferent neurons, or the Schwann cells that myelinate them. Using RNA-Seq, we analyzed the transcriptome of human and rat DRG and peripheral nerve, which contain sensory neurons and Schwann cells, respectively. We subdivide inherited sensory neuropathies based on expression of the mutated gene in these tissues, as well as in mouse TRPV1 lineage DRG nociceptive neurons, and across 32 human tissues from the Human Protein Atlas. We propose that this comprehensive approach to neuropathy gene expression leads to better understanding of the involved cell types in patients with these disorders. We also characterize the genetic "fingerprint" of both tissues, and present the highly tissue-specific genes in DRG and sciatic nerve that may aid in the development of gene panels to improve diagnostics for genetic neuropathies, and may represent specific drug targets for diseases of these tissues. PMID:27343803

  3. Clinical neurogenetics: behavioral management of inherited neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Psychiatric symptoms often manifest years before overt neurologic signs in patients with inherited neurodegenerative disease. The most frequently cited example of this phenomenon is the early onset of personality changes in "presymptomatic" Huntington patients. In some cases the changes in mood and cognition are even more debilitating than their neurologic symptoms. The goal of this article is to provide the neurologist with a concise primer that can be applied in a busy clinic or private practice. PMID:24176427

  4. Inheritance of type 2 Crigler-Najjar hyperbilirubinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, J. O.; Thompson, R. P. H.; Dunn, P. M.; Williams, Roger

    1973-01-01

    The families of three patients with Crigler-Najjar hyperbilirubinaemia, type 2, whose plasma bilirubin levels had responded to phenobarbitone treatment, were investigated. All the parents and several relatives had mildly raised bilirubin levels. It is suggested that this condition may be an example of genetic heterogeneity and that the propositi had inherited two different abnormal genes. The separation of the Gilbert and type 2 Crigler-Najjar syndromes is at present arbitrary. PMID:4692254

  5. Ricci inheritance collineations in Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tahir; Musharaf, Aisha; Khan, Suhail

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate Ricci Inheritance Collineations (RICs) in Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes. RICs are discussed in detail when Ricci tensor is degenerate and nondegenerate. In both the cases, RICs are obtained and it turns out that the dimension of Lie algebra of RICs is finite when Ricci tensor is nondegenerate. In the case when Ricci tensor is degenerate, we get finite as well as infinite dimensional group of RICs.

  6. [Netherton syndrome--a rare form of inherited ichtyosis].

    PubMed

    Marttila, Riitta; Tuomiranta, Mirja

    2012-01-01

    Netherton syndrome is a rare skin disease classified into ichtyoses. It has a recessive pattern of inheritance. It is associated with scaly erythrodermia, bamboo hair defect, immunological abnormalities of varying severity, IgE-mediated allergic reactions, infections and defective temperature regulation that often leads to retarded growth and development of a newborn. The phenotype of the disease varies from mild skin symptoms to lethal forms of the disease. We describe two Finnish families, whose children were diagnosed with this disease. PMID:22312831

  7. Window panes of eternity. Health, disease, and inherited risk.

    PubMed Central

    Scriver, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Personal health reflects harmony between individual and experience; it is optimal homeostasis. Disease is an outcome of incongruity leading to dishomeostasis. Relative to earlier times, disease in modern society has higher "heritability" (in the broad meaning of the term). Inherited risks are facts compatible with anticipation and prevention of disease. This viewpoint has major implications for medical practice, deployment of health services, themes of research, and education of health care personnel and citizens. PMID:6763817

  8. Inheriting, marrying, and founding farms: women's place on the land.

    PubMed

    Osterud, Grey

    2011-01-01

    This article considers rural women's place on the land in south-central New York during the first half of the twentieth century. Based on a community history and ethnographic study conducted during the 1980s, the article draws on women's oral narratives to explore the connections between women's sense of agency and their relationship to the land through descent and inheritance, marriage into a landowning family, founding a farm in partnership, and the experience of dispossession. PMID:21751479

  9. Strategies for Gene Mapping in Inherited Ophthalmic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Srilekha, Sundar; Rao, Bhavna; Rao, Divya M; Sudha, D; Chandrasekar, Sathya Priya; Pandian, A J; Soumittra, N; Sripriya, S

    2016-01-01

    Gene mapping of inherited ophthalmic diseases such as congenital cataracts, retinal degeneration, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, myopia, optic atrophy, and eye malformations has shed more light on the disease pathology, identified targets for research on therapeutics, earlier detection, and treatment options for disease management and patient care. This article details the different approaches to gene identification for both Mendelian and complex eye disorders. PMID:27488070

  10. Genetics Home Reference: biotinidase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aydin HI, Sennaroğlu L, Belgin E, Jensen K, Wolf B. Hearing loss in biotinidase deficiency: genotype-phenotype ... corrected to Aydin, Halil Ibrahim]. Citation on PubMed Wolf B. Biotinidase deficiency: "if you have to have ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: pseudocholinesterase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is a condition that results in increased sensitivity to certain muscle relaxant drugs used during general ... People with pseudocholinesterase deficiency may also have increased sensitivity to certain other drugs, including the local anesthetic ...

  12. Familial multiple lipomatosis with clear autosomal dominant inheritance and onset in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Hiang; Spence, Roy A J; Upadhyaya, Meena; Morrison, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    Familial multiple lipomatosis is rare. Several modes of inheritance have been proposed but no conclusive evidence shown, although some families have suggested autosomal dominant inheritance. The authors describe a family with multiple lipomatosis showing clear autosomal dominant inheritance, and no mutations within the NF1, SPRED1 or Cowden disease (PTEN) genes. Familial autosomal dominant lipomatosis is a rare but distinct entity. PMID:22707495

  13. The Effects of an Age-appropriate Intervention on Young Children's Understanding of Inheritance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joanne M.; Affleck, Gillian

    1999-01-01

    Investigates 4- and 7-year-olds' understanding of biological inheritance of physical characteristics for cows and horses. Explores the effects of an intervention technique to improve children's understanding of inheritance. Reveals significant age differences in judgments and explanations of inheritance. No significant improvements resulted from…

  14. Ancient origin and maternal inheritance of blue cuckoo eggs.

    PubMed

    Fossøy, Frode; Sorenson, Michael D; Liang, Wei; Ekrem, Torbjørn; Moksnes, Arne; Møller, Anders P; Rutila, Jarkko; Røskaft, Eivin; Takasu, Fugo; Yang, Canchao; Stokke, Bård G

    2016-01-01

    Maternal inheritance via the female-specific W chromosome was long ago proposed as a potential solution to the evolutionary enigma of co-existing host-specific races (or 'gentes') in avian brood parasites. Here we report the first unambiguous evidence for maternal inheritance of egg colouration in the brood-parasitic common cuckoo Cuculus canorus. Females laying blue eggs belong to an ancient (∼2.6 Myr) maternal lineage, as evidenced by both mitochondrial and W-linked DNA, but are indistinguishable at nuclear DNA from other common cuckoos. Hence, cuckoo host races with blue eggs are distinguished only by maternally inherited components of the genome, which maintain host-specific adaptation despite interbreeding among males and females reared by different hosts. A mitochondrial phylogeny suggests that blue eggs originated in Asia and then expanded westwards as female cuckoos laying blue eggs interbred with the existing European population, introducing an adaptive trait that expanded the range of potential hosts. PMID:26754355

  15. Inheritance of DNA Transferred from American Trypanosomes to Human Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Mariana M.; Nitz, Nadjar; Araujo, Perla F.; Sousa, Alessandro O.; de Cássia Rosa, Ana; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Leonardecz, Eduardo; Teixeira, Antonio R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Interspecies DNA transfer is a major biological process leading to the accumulation of mutations inherited by sexual reproduction among eukaryotes. Lateral DNA transfer events and their inheritance has been challenging to document. In this study we modified a thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR by using additional targeted primers, along with Southern blots, fluorescence techniques, and bioinformatics, to identify lateral DNA transfer events from parasite to host. Instances of naturally occurring human infections by Trypanosoma cruzi are documented, where mitochondrial minicircles integrated mainly into retrotransposable LINE-1 of various chromosomes. The founders of five families show minicircle integrations that were transferred vertically to their progeny. Microhomology end-joining of 6 to 22 AC-rich nucleotide repeats in the minicircles and host DNA mediates foreign DNA integration. Heterogeneous minicircle sequences were distributed randomly among families, with diversity increasing due to subsequent rearrangement of inserted fragments. Mosaic recombination and hitchhiking on retrotransposition events to different loci were more prevalent in germ line as compared to somatic cells. Potential new genes, pseudogenes, and knockouts were identified. A pathway of minicircle integration and maintenance in the host genome is suggested. Thus, infection by T. cruzi has the unexpected consequence of increasing human genetic diversity, and Chagas disease may be a fortuitous share of negative selection. This demonstration of contemporary transfer of eukaryotic DNA to the human genome and its subsequent inheritance by descendants introduces a significant change in the scientific concept of evolutionary biology and medicine. PMID:20169193

  16. The Brugada Syndrome: A Rare Arrhythmia Disorder with Complex Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Barc, Julien; Thollet, Aurélie; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Le Marec, Hervé; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Redon, Richard; Probst, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    For the last 10 years, applying new sequencing technologies to thousands of whole exomes has revealed the high variability of the human genome. Extreme caution should thus be taken to avoid misinterpretation when associating rare genetic variants to disease susceptibility. The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare inherited arrhythmia disease associated with high risk of sudden cardiac death in the young adult. Familial inheritance has long been described as Mendelian, with autosomal dominant mode of transmission and incomplete penetrance. However, all except 1 of the 23 genes previously associated with the disease have been identified through a candidate gene approach. To date, only rare coding variants in the SCN5A gene have been significantly associated with the syndrome. However, the genotype/phenotype studies conducted in families with SCN5A mutations illustrate the complex mode of inheritance of BrS. This genetic complexity has recently been confirmed by the identification of common polymorphic alleles strongly associated with disease risk. The implication of both rare and common variants in BrS susceptibility implies that one should first define a proper genetic model for BrS predisposition prior to applying molecular diagnosis. Although long remains the way to personalized medicine against BrS, the high phenotype variability encountered in familial forms of the disease may partly find an explanation into this specific genetic architecture. PMID:27200363

  17. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of somatic transcriptomes and epigenetic control regions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease involves a variety of phenotypic changes, suggesting a general alteration in genome activity. Results Investigation of different tissue transcriptomes in male and female F3 generation vinclozolin versus control lineage rats demonstrated all tissues examined had transgenerational transcriptomes. The microarrays from 11 different tissues were compared with a gene bionetwork analysis. Although each tissue transgenerational transcriptome was unique, common cellular pathways and processes were identified between the tissues. A cluster analysis identified gene modules with coordinated gene expression and each had unique gene networks regulating tissue-specific gene expression and function. A large number of statistically significant over-represented clusters of genes were identified in the genome for both males and females. These gene clusters ranged from 2-5 megabases in size, and a number of them corresponded to the epimutations previously identified in sperm that transmit the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease phenotypes. Conclusions Combined observations demonstrate that all tissues derived from the epigenetically altered germ line develop transgenerational transcriptomes unique to the tissue, but common epigenetic control regions in the genome may coordinately regulate these tissue-specific transcriptomes. This systems biology approach provides insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of a variety of adult onset disease phenotypes. PMID:23034163

  18. Clinical characteristics and current therapies for inherited retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-02-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations (IRDs) encompass a large group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that affect approximately 1 in 3000 people (>2 million people worldwide) (Bessant DA, Ali RR, Bhattacharya SS. 2001. Molecular genetics and prospects for therapy of the inherited retinal dystrophies. Curr Opin Genet Dev 11: 307-316.). IRDs may be inherited as Mendelian traits or through mitochondrial DNA, and may affect the entire retina (e.g., rod-cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa, cone dystrophy, cone-rod dystrophy, choroideremia, Usher syndrome, and Bardet-Bidel syndrome) or be restricted to the macula (e.g., Stargardt disease, Best disease, and Sorsby fundus dystrophy), ultimately leading to blindness. IRDs are a major cause of severe vision loss, with profound impact on patients and society. Although IRDs remain untreatable today, significant progress toward therapeutic strategies for IRDs has marked the past two decades. This progress has been based on better understanding of the pathophysiological pathways of these diseases and on technological advances. PMID:25324231

  19. Qualitative inheritance of rind pattern and flesh color in watermelon.

    PubMed

    Gusmini, Gabriele; Wehner, Todd C

    2006-01-01

    Watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai var. lanatus] is a diverse species, with fruits of different sizes, shapes, rind patterns, and flesh colors. This study measured the inheritance of novel rind phenotypes and verified the genetics of white, red, salmon yellow, and canary yellow flesh colors. For each of the 11 crosses, six generations (P(a)S1, P(b)S1, F1, F2, BC1P(a), and BC1P(b)) were produced to form 11 families. Three new genes were identified and designated as follows: Scr for the scarlet red flesh color of Dixielee and Red-N-Sweet, Yb for the yellow belly (ground spot) of Black Diamond Yellow Belly, and ins for the intermittent stripes of Navajo Sweet. The inheritance of the C gene for the canary yellow flesh color was verified as single dominant, and a new inbred type line was developed possessing that gene. Aberrations in the segregation of red, white, and salmon yellow flesh colors were recorded, raising questions on the inheritance of these traits. Finally, the spotted phenotype from Moon and Stars was combined with light green and gray rind patterns for the development of novel cultivars with distinctive rind patterns. PMID:16489140

  20. Comprehensive analysis of Arabidopsis expression level polymorphisms with simple inheritance.

    PubMed

    Plantegenet, Stephanie; Weber, Johann; Goldstein, Darlene R; Zeller, Georg; Nussbaumer, Cindy; Thomas, Jérôme; Weigel, Detlef; Harshman, Keith; Hardtke, Christian S

    2009-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, gene expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) between natural accessions that exhibit simple, single locus inheritance are promising quantitative trait locus (QTL) candidates to explain phenotypic variability. It is assumed that such ELPs overwhelmingly represent regulatory element polymorphisms. However, comprehensive genome-wide analyses linking expression level, regulatory sequence and gene structure variation are missing, preventing definite verification of this assumption. Here, we analyzed ELPs observed between the Eil-0 and Lc-0 accessions. Compared with non-variable controls, 5' regulatory sequence variation in the corresponding genes is indeed increased. However, approximately 42% of all the ELP genes also carry major transcription unit deletions in one parent as revealed by genome tiling arrays, representing a >4-fold enrichment over controls. Within the subset of ELPs with simple inheritance, this proportion is even higher and deletions are generally more severe. Similar results were obtained from analyses of the Bay-0 and Sha accessions, using alternative technical approaches. Collectively, our results suggest that drastic structural changes are a major cause for ELPs with simple inheritance, corroborating experimentally observed indel preponderance in cloned Arabidopsis QTL. PMID:19225455

  1. Oral Cancer-related Inherited Cancer Syndromes: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Gargi S; Batra, Akshit; Sarode, Sachin C; Yerawadekar, Sujata; Patil, Shankargouda

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the oral cavity, which is usually preceded by a myriad of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs). In the classification of OPMDs, inherited cancer syndromes (ICSs) were proposed as one of the categories. Inherited cancer syndromes are genetic disorders in which inherited genetic mutation in one or more genes predispose the affected individuals to the development of cancer and may also cause its early onset. Many of these syndromes are caused by mutations in tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and genes involved in angiogenesis. General dental practitioners frequently come across OPMDs in their day-to-day practice. It becomes of paramount importance to have knowledge about these rare but prognostically important OPMDs. With this view in mind, in this article, efforts have been made to comprehensively discuss about various ICSs that have higher potential of transformation into oral cancer. The ICSs discussed in this article are xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Bloom syndrome (BS), Fanconi's anemia (FA), and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), with special emphasis on signs, symptoms, and genetic considerations. PMID:27484606

  2. Inherited disorders of brain neurotransmitters: pathogenesis and diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Krystyna; Kuśmierska, Katarzyna; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters (NTs) play a central role in the efficient communication between neurons necessary for normal functioning of the nervous system. NTs can be divided into two groups: small molecule NTs and larger neuropeptide NTs. Inherited disorders of NTs result from a primary disturbance of NTs metabolism or transport. This group of disorders requires sophisticated diagnostic procedures. In this review we discuss disturbances in the metabolism of tetrahydrobiopterin, biogenic amines, γ-aminobutyric acid, foliate, pyridoxine-dependent enzymes, and also the glycine-dependent encephalopathy. We point to pathologic alterations of proteins involved in synaptic neurotransmission that may cause neurological and psychiatric symptoms. We postulate that synaptic receptors and transporter proteins for neurotransmitters should be investigated in unresolved cases. Patients with inherited neurotransmitters disorders present various clinical presentations such as mental retardation, refractory seizures, pyramidal and extrapyramidal syndromes, impaired locomotor patterns, and progressive encephalopathy. Every patient with suspected inherited neurotransmitter disorder should undergo a structured interview and a careful examination including neurological, biochemical, and imaging. PMID:25310959

  3. Vector platforms for gene therapy of inherited retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Puppo, Agostina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IR) are common untreatable blinding conditions. Most of them are inherited as monogenic disorders, due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PR) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The retina’s compatibility with gene transfer has made transduction of different retinal cell layers in small and large animal models via viral and non-viral vectors possible. The ongoing identification of novel viruses as well as modifications of existing ones based either on rational design or directed evolution have generated vector variants with improved transduction properties. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in IR animal models with both viral and non-viral vectors, and some of them have been relayed to clinical trials. To date, recombinant vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) represent the most promising tool for retinal gene therapy, given their ability to efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to both PR and RPE and their excellent safety and efficacy profiles in humans. However, AAVs’ limited cargo capacity has prevented application of the viral vector to treatments requiring transfer of genes with a coding sequence larger than 5 kb. Vectors with larger capacity, i.e. nanoparticles, adenoviral and lentiviral vectors are being exploited for gene transfer to the retina in animal models and, more recently, in humans. This review focuses on the available platforms for retinal gene therapy to fight inherited blindness, highlights their main strengths and examines the efforts to overcome some of their limitations. PMID:25124745

  4. Ancient origin and maternal inheritance of blue cuckoo eggs

    PubMed Central

    Fossøy, Frode; Sorenson, Michael D; Liang, Wei; Ekrem, Torbjørn; Moksnes, Arne; Møller, Anders P; Rutila, Jarkko; Røskaft, Eivin; Takasu, Fugo; Yang, Canchao; Stokke, Bård G

    2016-01-01

    Maternal inheritance via the female-specific W chromosome was long ago proposed as a potential solution to the evolutionary enigma of co-existing host-specific races (or ‘gentes') in avian brood parasites. Here we report the first unambiguous evidence for maternal inheritance of egg colouration in the brood-parasitic common cuckoo Cuculus canorus. Females laying blue eggs belong to an ancient (∼2.6 Myr) maternal lineage, as evidenced by both mitochondrial and W-linked DNA, but are indistinguishable at nuclear DNA from other common cuckoos. Hence, cuckoo host races with blue eggs are distinguished only by maternally inherited components of the genome, which maintain host-specific adaptation despite interbreeding among males and females reared by different hosts. A mitochondrial phylogeny suggests that blue eggs originated in Asia and then expanded westwards as female cuckoos laying blue eggs interbred with the existing European population, introducing an adaptive trait that expanded the range of potential hosts. PMID:26754355

  5. Genetics Home Reference: mevalonate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... cytoskeleton), gene activity (expression), and protein production and modification. Most MVK gene mutations that cause mevalonate kinase ... What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic ...

  6. Transient partial growth hormone deficiency due to zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Aihara, K; Fujie, A; Kihara, M

    1989-04-01

    We present here a 13-year-old boy with partial growth hormone deficiency due to chronic mild zinc deficiency. When zinc administration was started, his growth rate, growth hormone levels, and plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly. His poor dietary intake resulted in chronic mild zinc deficiency, which in turn could be the cause of a further loss of appetite and growth retardation. There was also a possibility of renal zinc wasting which may have contributed to zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency should be carefully ruled out in patients with growth retardation. PMID:2708733

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G6PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Gallagher PG. Hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Janz ...

  8. Msh2 deficiency leads to dysmyelination of the corpus callosum, impaired locomotion, and altered sensory function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Barthelemy; Devaraju, Prakash; Janke, Laura J.; Fan, Yiping; Frase, Sharon; Eddins, Donnie; Peters, Jennifer L.; Kim, Jieun; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Evans, William E.

    2016-01-01

    A feature in patients with constitutional DNA-mismatch repair deficiency is agenesis of the corpus callosum, the cause of which has not been established. Here we report a previously unrecognized consequence of deficiency in MSH2, a protein known primarily for its function in correcting nucleotide mismatches or insertions and deletions in duplex DNA caused by errors in DNA replication or recombination. We documented that Msh2 deficiency causes dysmyelination of the axonal projections in the corpus callosum. Evoked action potentials in the myelinated corpus callosum projections of Msh2-null mice were smaller than wild-type mice, whereas unmyelinated axons showed no difference. Msh2-null mice were also impaired in locomotive activity and had an abnormal response to heat. These findings reveal a novel pathogenic consequence of MSH2 deficiency, providing a new mechanistic hint to previously recognized neurological disorders in patients with inherited DNA-mismatch repair deficiency. PMID:27476972

  9. Orogenic structural inheritance and rifted passive margin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Mora, Claudio A.; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Structural inheritance is related to mechanical weaknesses in the lithosphere due to previous tectonic events, e.g. rifting, subduction and collision. The North and South Atlantic rifted passive margins that formed during the breakup of Western Gondwana, are parallel to the older Caledonide and the Brasiliano-Pan-African orogenic belts. In the South Atlantic, 'old' mantle lithospheric fabric resulting from crystallographic preferred orientation of olivine is suggested to play a role during rifted margin formation (Tommasi and Vauchez, 2001). Magnetometric and gravimetric mapping of onshore structures in the Camamu and Almada basins suggest that extensional faults are controlled by two different directions of inherited older Brasiliano structures in the upper lithosphere (Ferreira et al., 2009). In the South Atlantic Campos Basin, 3D seismic data indicate that inherited basement structures provide a first order control on basin structure (Fetter, 2009). Here we investigate the role of structural inheritance on the formation of rifted passive margins with high-resolution 2D thermo-mechanical numerical experiments. The numerical domain is 1200 km long and 600 km deep and represents the lithosphere and the sublithospheric mantle. Model experiments were carried out by creating self-consistent orogenic inheritance where a first phase of orogen formation is followed by extension. We focus in particular on the role of varying amount of orogenic shortening, crustal rheology, contrasting styles of orogen formation on rifted margin style, and the time delay between orogeny and subsequent rifted passive formation. Model results are compared to contrasting structural styles of rifted passive margin formation as observed in the South Atlantic. Ferreira, T.S., Caixeta, J.M., Lima, F.D., 2009. Basement control in Camamu and Almada rift basins. Boletim de Geociências da Petrobrás 17, 69-88. Fetter, M., 2009. The role of basement tectonic reactivation on the structural evolution

  10. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) is a severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism first described in 1978. It is characterized by a neonatal presentation of intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, microcephaly with brain atrophy and coarse facial features. MoCD results in deficiency of the molybdenum cofactor dependent enzymes sulfite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. The resultant accumulation of sulfite, taurine, S-sulfocysteine and thiosulfate contributes to the severe neurological impairment. Recently, initial evidence has demonstrated early treatment with cyclic PMP can turn MoCD type A from a previously neonatal lethal condition with only palliative options, to near normal neurological outcomes in affected patients. We review MoCD and focus on describing the currently published evidence of this exciting new therapeutic option for MoCD type A caused by pathogenic variants in MOCD1. PMID:26653176

  11. Epigenetic Inheritance of Transcriptional Silencing and Switching Competence in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G.; Friis, T.

    1997-01-01

    Epigenetic events allow the inheritance of phenotypic changes that are not caused by an alteration in DNA sequence. Here we characterize an epigenetic phenomenon occuring in the mating-type region of fission yeast. Cells of fission yeast switch between the P and M mating-type by interconverting their expressed mating-type cassette between two allelic forms, mat1-P and mat1-M. The switch results from gene conversions of mat1 by two silent cassettes, mat2-P and mat3-M, which are linked to each other and to mat1. GREWAL and KLAR observed that the ability to both switch mat1 and repress transcription near mat2-P and mat3-M was maintained epigenetically in a strain with an 8-kb deletion between mat2 and mat3. Using a strain very similar to theirs, we determined that interconversions between the switching-and silencing-proficient state and the switching and silencing-deficient state occurred less frequently than once per 1000 cell divisions. Although transcriptional silencing was alleviated by the 8-kb deletion, it was not abolished. We performed a mutant search and obtained a class of trans-acting mutations that displayed a strong cumulative effect with the 8-kb deletion. These mutations allow to assess the extent to which silencing is affected by the deletion and provide new insights on the redundancy of the silencing mechanism. PMID:9055078

  12. Salt handling in the distal nephron: lessons learned from inherited human disorders.

    PubMed

    Jeck, Nikola; Schlingmann, Karl P; Reinalter, Stephan C; Kömhoff, Martin; Peters, Melanie; Waldegger, Siegfried; Seyberth, Hannsjörg W

    2005-04-01

    The molecular basis of inherited salt-losing tubular disorders with secondary hypokalemia has become much clearer in the past two decades. Two distinct segments along the nephron turned out to be affected, the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and the distal convoluted tubule, accounting for two major clinical phenotypes, hyperprostaglandin E syndrome and Bartter-Gitelman syndrome. To date, inactivating mutations have been detected in six different genes encoding for proteins involved in renal transepithelial salt transport. Careful examination of genetically defined patients ("human knockouts") allowed us to determine the individual role of a specific protein and its contribution to the overall process of renal salt reabsorption. The recent generation of several genetically engineered mouse models that are deficient in orthologous genes further enabled us to compare the human phenotype with the animal models, revealing some unexpected interspecies differences. As the first line treatment in hyperprostaglandin E syndrome includes cyclooxygenase inhibitors, we propose some hypotheses about the mysterious role of PGE(2) in the etiology of renal salt-losing disorders. PMID:15793031

  13. Antisense Mediated Splicing Modulation For Inherited Metabolic Diseases: Challenges for Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Belen; Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, research in targeted mutation therapies has experienced significant advances, especially in the field of rare diseases. In particular, the efficacy of antisense therapy for suppression of normal, pathogenic, or cryptic splice sites has been demonstrated in cellular and animal models and has already reached the clinical trials phase for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In different inherited metabolic diseases, splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been used with success in patients' cells to force pseudoexon skipping or to block cryptic splice sites, in both cases recovering normal transcript and protein and correcting the enzyme deficiency. However, future in vivo studies require individual approaches for delivery depending on the gene defect involved, given the different patterns of tissue and organ expression. Herein we review the state of the art of antisense therapy targeting RNA splicing in metabolic diseases, grouped according to their expression patterns—multisystemic, hepatic, or in central nervous system (CNS)—and summarize the recent progress achieved in the field of in vivo delivery of oligonucleotides to each organ or system. Successful body-wide distribution of SSOs and preferential distribution in the liver after systemic administration have been reported in murine models for different diseases, while for CNS limited data are available, although promising results with intratechal injections have been achieved. PMID:24506780

  14. Antisense mediated splicing modulation for inherited metabolic diseases: challenges for delivery.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Belen; Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel; Desviat, Lourdes R

    2014-02-01

    In the past few years, research in targeted mutation therapies has experienced significant advances, especially in the field of rare diseases. In particular, the efficacy of antisense therapy for suppression of normal, pathogenic, or cryptic splice sites has been demonstrated in cellular and animal models and has already reached the clinical trials phase for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In different inherited metabolic diseases, splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been used with success in patients' cells to force pseudoexon skipping or to block cryptic splice sites, in both cases recovering normal transcript and protein and correcting the enzyme deficiency. However, future in vivo studies require individual approaches for delivery depending on the gene defect involved, given the different patterns of tissue and organ expression. Herein we review the state of the art of antisense therapy targeting RNA splicing in metabolic diseases, grouped according to their expression patterns-multisystemic, hepatic, or in central nervous system (CNS)-and summarize the recent progress achieved in the field of in vivo delivery of oligonucleotides to each organ or system. Successful body-wide distribution of SSOs and preferential distribution in the liver after systemic administration have been reported in murine models for different diseases, while for CNS limited data are available, although promising results with intratechal injections have been achieved. PMID:24506780

  15. Management of pregnancy and delivery in women with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, Flora; Bidlingmaier, Christoph; Garagiola, Isabella

    2011-12-01

    Women with inherited bleeding disorders present a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms that vary from mild or moderate bleeding tendency to severe episodes. Monthly haemostatic changes affect these women during menstruation and ovulation. These events may be associated with significant bleeding and pain leading to the limitations in conducting daily activities and adverse effect on quality of life. Likewise, pregnancy and delivery are critical times for affected women. During pregnancy, they may be at greater risk of miscarriage and bleeding complications. In particular, recurrent miscarriage was observed in women with type 3 von Willebrand disease, afibrinogenaemia and severe factor XIII deficiency, and an optimal therapeutic plan is required during their pregnancy. Precautions must be taken at delivery in these women, since they could be at risk of bleeding. The lack of adequate information makes it very difficult to prepare evidence-based guidelines for the prevention of bleedings in affected women and their treatment. A multidisciplinary team of obstetricians, haematologists and paediatricians is required with a good knowledge of these disorders and an awareness of the potential maternal neonatal complications. PMID:21852211

  16. Role of genetic testing in the management of patients with inherited porphyria and their families.

    PubMed

    Whatley, S D; Badminton, M N

    2013-05-01

    The porphyrias are a group of mainly inherited metabolic conditions that result from partial deficiency of individual enzymes in the haem biosynthesis pathway. Clinical presentation is either with acute neurovisceral attacks, skin photosensitivity or both, and is due to overproduction of pathway intermediates. The primary diagnosis in the proband is based on biochemical testing of appropriate samples, preferably during or soon after onset of symptoms. The role of genetic testing in the autosomal dominant acute porphyrias (acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria and variegate porphyria) is to identify presymptomatic carriers of the family specific pathogenic mutation so that they can be counselled on how to minimize their risk of suffering an acute attack. At present the additional genetic factors that influence penetrance are not known, and all patients are treated as equally at risk. Genetic testing in the erythropoietic porphyrias (erythropoietic protoporphyria, congenital erythropoietic porphyria and X-linked dominant protoporphyria) is focused on predictive and preconceptual counselling, prenatal testing and genotype-phenotype correlation. Recent advances in analytical technology have resulted in increased sensitivity of mutation detection with success rates of greater than 90% for most of the genes. The ethical and consent issues are discussed. Current research into genetic factors that affect penetrance is likely to lead to a more refined approach to counselling for presymptomatic gene carriers. PMID:23605133

  17. Compassionate Use of Triheptanoin (C7) for Inherited Disorders of Energy Metabolism

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Very Long-chain acylCoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency; Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase Deficiencies (CPT1, CPT2); Mitochondrial Trifunctional Protein Deficiency; Long-chain Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Glycogen Storage Disorders; Pyruvate Carboxylase Deficiency Disease; ACYL-CoA DEHYDROGENASE FAMILY, MEMBER 9, DEFICIENCY of; Barth Syndrome

  18. Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Erin K; Colman, Roberta F; Patterson, David

    2006-01-01

    Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency is a disease of purine metabolism which affects patients both biochemically and behaviorally. The symptoms are variable and include psychomotor retardation, autistic features, hypotonia, and seizures. Patients also accumulate the substrates of ADSL in body fluids. Both the presence of normal levels of ADSL enzyme activities in some patient tissues and the absence of a clear correlation between mutations, biochemistry, and behavior show that the system has unexplored biochemical and/or genetic complexity. It is unclear whether the pathological mechanisms of this disease result from a deficiency of purines, a toxicity of intermediates, or perturbation of another pathway or system. A patient with autistic features and mild psychomotor delay carries two novel mutations in this gene, E80D and D87E. The creation of a mouse model of this disease will be an important step in elucidating the in vivo mechanisms of the disease. Mice carrying mutations that cause ADSL deficiency in humans will be informative as to the effects of these mutations both during embryogenesis and on the brain, possibly leading to therapies for this disease in the future. PMID:16839792

  19. Primary antibody deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wood, P

    2009-03-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are a group of rare disorders characterized by an inability to produce clinically effective immunoglobulin responses. Some of these disorders result from genetic mutations in genes involved in B cell development, whereas others appear to be complex polygenic disorders. They most commonly present with recurrent infections due to encapsulated bacteria, although in the most common antibody deficiency, Common Variable Immunodeficiency, systemic and organ-specific autoimmunity can be a presenting feature. Diagnostic delay in this group of disorders remains a problem, and the laboratory has a vital role in the detection of abnormalities in immunoglobulin concentration and function. It is critical to distinguish this group of disorders from secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinaemia, in particular lymphoid malignancy, and appropriate laboratory investigations are of critical importance. Treatment of primary antibody deficiencies involves immunoglobulin replacement therapy, either via the intravenous or subcutaneous route. Patients remain at risk of a wide variety of complications, not all linked to diagnostic delay and inadequate therapy. In common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) in particular, patients remain at significantly increased risk of lymphoid malignancy, and regular clinical and laboratory monitoring is required. This review aims to give an overview of these conditions for the general reader, covering pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory investigation, therapy and clinical management. PMID:19151170

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  1. Selection against Heteroplasmy Explains the Evolution of Uniparental Inheritance of Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Joshua R.; Schaerf, Timothy M.; Beekman, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    Why are mitochondria almost always inherited from one parent during sexual reproduction? Current explanations for this evolutionary mystery include conflict avoidance between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, clearing of deleterious mutations, and optimization of mitochondrial-nuclear coadaptation. Mathematical models, however, fail to show that uniparental inheritance can replace biparental inheritance under any existing hypothesis. Recent empirical evidence indicates that mixing two different but normal mitochondrial haplotypes within a cell (heteroplasmy) can cause cell and organism dysfunction. Using a mathematical model, we test if selection against heteroplasmy can lead to the evolution of uniparental inheritance. When we assume selection against heteroplasmy and mutations are neither advantageous nor deleterious (neutral mutations), uniparental inheritance replaces biparental inheritance for all tested parameter values. When heteroplasmy involves mutations that are advantageous or deleterious (non-neutral mutations), uniparental inheritance can still replace biparental inheritance. We show that uniparental inheritance can evolve with or without pre-existing mating types. Finally, we show that selection against heteroplasmy can explain why some organisms deviate from strict uniparental inheritance. Thus, we suggest that selection against heteroplasmy explains the evolution of uniparental inheritance. PMID:25880558

  2. Molecular Characterization of G6PD Deficient Variants in Nineveh Province, Northwestern Iraq.

    PubMed

    Kashmoola, Muna A; Eissa, Adil A; Al-Takay, Dahlia T; Al-Allawi, Nasir A S

    2015-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency considered to be the commonest inherited enzymopathies disorders worldwide including Iraq. Studies have addressed its prevalence and molecular characterization in several parts of the country, but no data were available from Nineveh province, northwestern-Iraq regarding molecular basis of this inherited enzymopathy. To determine the molecular basis of G6PD deficient variants in Nineveh province. A total of 61 G6PD deficient male individuals from Nineveh province were enrolled in this study. DNA from all enrolled individuals were extracted and analyzed for four deficient molecular variants using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment polymorphism method. These deficient variants were G6PD-Mediterranean (563 C→T), G6PD-Chatham (1003 G→A), G6PD-A-(202 G→A) and G6PD-Cosenza (1376 G→C). Also enrolled individuals were screened for silent 1311 (C→T) mutation. It was found that 46 (75.41 %) were G6PD-Mediterranean, 1(1.64 %) were G6PD-Chatham, another 1(1.64 %) were G6PD-A-, and 13 (21.31 %) were remained uncharacterized. Also all G6PD-Mediterranean as well as one uncharacterized individuals were carriers of silent 1311 (C→T) mutation. This study documented that G6PD-Mediterranean constitute the bulk of G6PD deficient variants in this province and G6PD-Chatham and A- were encountered less frequently. Also that silent 1311 (C→T) mutation were common among G6PD-Mediterranean deficient variants individuals. PMID:25548459

  3. Neonatal mass screening for 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Toshihiro; Fukushi, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia(CAH)due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder. Its incidence is 1 in 10,000 to 20,000 worldwide. This disease shows phenotypic differences, and it is divided into three forms i.e., the salt wasting (SW), simple virilizing (SV), and nonclassic (NC) forms. The most severe form of SW manifests in the first months of life with life-threatening adrenal insufficiency, leading to death. To prevent death by adrenal insufficiency in neonates with the SW form and wrong gender assignment of 46,XX female patients with SW and SV, neonatal mass screening of 21-OHD is performed in several countries including Japan. However, the positive predictive value (PPV) remains low, especially in preterm infants. To reduce the false positive rate and increase the PPV, liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) as a second-tier test may be useful. In this review, the current knowledge on neonatal mass screening of 21-OHD is summarized. PMID:26865749

  4. Analysis of the transgenerational iron deficiency stress memory in Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Irene; Giacometti, Sonia; Balestrazzi, Alma; Paparella, Stefania; Pagliano, Cristina; Morandini, Piero

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the existence of the transgenerational memory of iron (Fe) deficiency stress, in Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants were grown under Fe deficiency/sufficiency, and so were their offspring. The frequency of somatic homologous recombination (SHR) events, of DNA strand breaks as well as the expression of the transcription elongation factor TFIIS-like gene increase when plants are grown under Fe deficiency. However, SHR frequency, DNA strand break events, and TFIIS-like gene expression do not increase further when plants are grown for more than one generation under the same stress, and furthermore, they decrease back to control values within two succeeding generations grown under control conditions, regardless of the Fe deficiency stress history of the mother plants. Seedlings produced from plants grown under Fe deficiency evolve more oxygen than control seedlings, when grown under Fe sufficiency: however, this trait is not associated with any change in the protein profile of the photosynthetic apparatus and is not transmitted to more than one generation. Lastly, plants grown for multiple generations under Fe deficiency produce seeds with greater longevity: however, this trait is not inherited in offspring generations unexposed to stress. These findings suggest the existence of multiple-step control of mechanisms to prevent a genuine and stable transgenerational transmission of Fe deficiency stress memory, with the tightest control on DNA integrity. PMID:26442058

  5. Analysis of the transgenerational iron deficiency stress memory in Arabidopsis thaliana plants

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Irene; Giacometti, Sonia; Balestrazzi, Alma; Paparella, Stefania; Pagliano, Cristina; Morandini, Piero

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the existence of the transgenerational memory of iron (Fe) deficiency stress, in Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants were grown under Fe deficiency/sufficiency, and so were their offspring. The frequency of somatic homologous recombination (SHR) events, of DNA strand breaks as well as the expression of the transcription elongation factor TFIIS-like gene increase when plants are grown under Fe deficiency. However, SHR frequency, DNA strand break events, and TFIIS-like gene expression do not increase further when plants are grown for more than one generation under the same stress, and furthermore, they decrease back to control values within two succeeding generations grown under control conditions, regardless of the Fe deficiency stress history of the mother plants. Seedlings produced from plants grown under Fe deficiency evolve more oxygen than control seedlings, when grown under Fe sufficiency: however, this trait is not associated with any change in the protein profile of the photosynthetic apparatus and is not transmitted to more than one generation. Lastly, plants grown for multiple generations under Fe deficiency produce seeds with greater longevity: however, this trait is not inherited in offspring generations unexposed to stress. These findings suggest the existence of multiple-step control of mechanisms to prevent a genuine and stable transgenerational transmission of Fe deficiency stress memory, with the tightest control on DNA integrity. PMID:26442058

  6. Willingness to pay for genetic testing for inherited retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Tubeuf, Sandy; Willis, Thomas A; Potrata, Barbara; Grant, Hilary; Allsop, Matthew J; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Hewison, Jenny; McKibbin, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the willingness of adults with inherited retinal disease to undergo and pay for diagnostic genetic testing in three hypothetical scenarios and to explore the factors that influence decision making. Fifty patients were presented with three scenarios whereby genetic testing provided increasing information: confirming the diagnosis and inheritance pattern alone, providing additional information on future visual function, and identifying in addition a new treatment which could stabilise their condition. Willingness to pay (WTP) was elicited using an iterative bidding game. Regression analysis was used to investigate the probability of agreeing to and paying for testing. Qualitative data were also reviewed to provide a comprehensive understanding of WTP and decision making. The majority of participants agreed to undergo genetic testing in each of the three scenarios. Scenario 2 was the least acceptable with 78% of participants agreeing to genetic testing. The probability of agreeing to genetic testing decreased with age. Between 72 and 96% of participants reported a WTP for genetic testing. Average WTP was £539, £1516, and £6895 for scenarios 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Older participants and participants with higher incomes were willing to pay more for testing. Qualitative data provided additional detail about the rationale behind participants' decisions. The study suggests that patients with inherited retinal disease were willing to undergo and to pay for diagnostic genetic testing, suggesting that they valued the information it may provide. However, several patients preferred not to receive prognostic information and were less willing to pay for genetic testing that yielded such detail. PMID:24916649

  7. Association between inherited monogenic liver disorders and chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Piekuse, Linda; Kreile, Madara; Zarina, Agnese; Steinberga, Zane; Sondore, Valentina; Keiss, Jazeps; Lace, Baiba; Krumina, Astrida

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequencies of mutations that cause inherited monogenic liver disorders in patients with chronic hepatitis C. METHODS: This study included 86 patients with chronic hepatitis C (55 men, 31 women; mean age at diagnosis, 38.36 ± 14.52 years) who had undergone antiviral therapy comprising pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Viral load, biochemical parameter changes, and liver biopsy morphological data were evaluated in all patients. The control group comprised 271 unrelated individuals representing the general population of Latvia for mutation frequency calculations. The most frequent mutations that cause inherited liver disorders [gene (mutation): ATP7B (H1069Q), HFE (C282Y, H63D), UGT1A1 (TA)7, and SERPINA1 (PiZ)] were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), bidirectional PCR allele-specific amplification, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and sequencing. RESULTS: The viral genotype was detected in 80 of the 86 patients. Viral genotypes 1, 2, and 3 were present in 61 (76%), 7 (9%), and 12 (15%) patients, respectively. Among all 86 patients, 50 (58%) reached an early viral response and 70 (81%) reached a sustained viral response. All 16 patients who did not reach a sustained viral response had viral genotype 1. Case-control analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in only the H1069Q mutation between patients and controls (patients, 0.057; controls, 0.012; odds ratio, 5.514; 95%CI: 1.119-29.827, P = 0.022). However, the H1069Q mutation was not associated with antiviral treatment outcomes or biochemical indices. The (TA) 7 mutation of the UGT1A1 gene was associated with decreased ferritin levels (beta regression coefficient = -295.7, P = 0.0087). CONCLUSION: Genetic mutations that cause inherited liver diseases in patients with hepatitis C should be studied in detail. PMID:24575168

  8. Inherited and noninherited risk factors in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Weyand, C M; Goronzy, J J

    1995-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is likely the result of a concerted action of several inherited and noninherited factors. Although there is a high suspicion that environmental factors are important, proof is missing. Most information has been collected on genetic risk factors. The inheritance pattern for RA is complex, and there is good evidence that HLA as well as non-HLA genes are involved. Almost all racial-ethnic groups share the association of RA with the HLA-DRB1-encoded sequence motif QKRAA or QRRAA. However, the completeness of the association varies significantly in different ethnic cohorts, as can be expected in a multigene model. The sequence motif translates into a pocket in the antigen-binding site of the HLA-DR molecule. The "rheumatoid pocket" accommodates peptide side chains and has distinct binding characteristics. Epidemiologic evidence points toward a role for non-HLA genes. Candidate genes, such as transporter in antigen processing (TAP) genes are currently explored. Major advances in defining and understanding the contribution of inherited and noninherited factors in RA may come from abandoning the concept of RA as a single entity and accepting a heterogeneity model for RA. Distributions of HLA-DR genes indicate that several subsets of RA patients exist. Seronegative (prognostically good) and seropositive (prognostically worse) patients can be distinguished by the arginine versus lysine substitution at position 71 of the HLA-DRB1 gene. A different dimension of disease, rheumatoid organ disease, appears to be reached in patients with two HLA-DRB1*0401 alleles. Identification of distinct RA subsets may allow us to stratify patients into categories that differ with respect to etiology, disease course, clinical pattern, and treatment response. PMID:7612412

  9. Human mitochondrial DNA: roles of inherited and somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Eric A.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial genome are known to cause an array of diverse disorders, most of which are maternally inherited, and all of which are associated with defects in oxidative energy metabolism. It is now emerging that somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are also linked to other complex traits, including neurodegenerative diseases, ageing and cancer. Here we discuss insights into the roles of mtDNA mutations in a wide variety of diseases, highlighting the interesting genetic characteristics of the mitochondrial genome and challenges in studying its contribution to pathogenesis. PMID:23154810

  10. Waddington's widget: Hsp90 and the inheritance of acquired characters.

    PubMed

    Ruden, Douglas M; Garfinkel, Mark D; Sollars, Vincent E; Lu, Xiangyi

    2003-10-01

    Conrad Waddington published an influential model for evolution in his 1942 paper, Canalization of Development and Inheritance of Acquired Characters. In this classic, albeit controversial, paper, he proposed that an unknown mechanism exists that conceals phenotypic variation until the organism is stressed. Recent studies have proposed that the highly conserved chaperone Hsp90 could function as a "capacitor," or an "adaptively inducible canalizer," that masks silent phenotypic variation of either genetic or epigenetic origin. This review will discuss evidence for, and arguments against, the role of Hsp90 as a capacitor for morphological evolution, and as a key component of what we call "Waddington's widget." PMID:14986860

  11. Elastic Moduli Inheritance and Weakest Link in Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Wang, Xun-Li; Lu, Z.P.; Clausen, Bjorn; Brown, Donald

    2012-01-01

    We show that a variety of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) inherit their Young s modulus and shear modulus from the solvent components. This is attributed to preferential straining of locally solvent-rich configurations among tightly bonded atomic clusters, which constitute the weakest link in an amorphous structure. This aspect of inhomogeneous deformation, also revealed by our in-situ neutron diffraction studies of an elastically deformed BMG, suggests a scenario of rubber-like viscoelasticity owing to a hierarchy of atomic bonds in BMGs.

  12. Biochemical screening for inherited metabolic disorders in the mentally retarded.

    PubMed

    Henderson, H E; Goodman, R; Schram, J; Diamond, E; Daneel, A

    1981-11-01

    A biochemical screening programme for the detection of inherited metabolic disease was carried out on urine and blood samples from inmates of the Alexandra Institute for the mentally retarded, Cape Town. Of the 1087 patients screened, positive results for phenylketonuria were obtained in 3, for cystinuria in 2 and for Hartnup disease in 1. The overall frequency of metabolic disorders was 0,6%. It is evident that genetic metabolic disease as detected by current screening procedures makes only a small contribution to the overall burden of mental retardation. PMID:6795726

  13. Ricci inheritance collineations in Bianchi type II spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tahir; Akhtar, Sumaira Saleem; Bokhari, Ashfaque H.; Khan, Suhail

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a complete classification of Bianchi type II spacetime according to Ricci inheritance collineations (RICs). The RICs are classified considering cases when the Ricci tensor is both degenerate as well as non-degenerate. In case of non-degenerate Ricci tensor, it is found that Bianchi type II spacetime admits 4-, 5-, 6- or 7-dimensional Lie algebra of RICs. In the case when the Ricci tensor is degenerate, majority cases give rise to infinitely many RICs, while remaining cases admit finite RICs given by 4, 5 or 6.

  14. Stroke following Glenn anastomosis in a child with inherited thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Germanakis, Ioannis; Sfyridaki, Caterina; Papadopoulou, Eleftheria; Raissaki, Maria; Rammos, Spyridon; Sarris, George; Kalmanti, Maria

    2006-08-28

    The optimal anticoagulation following Fontan operation and its modifications remain controversial and it is even less well defined as regards patients with inherited thrombophilia. We present a case of a child with bidirectional Glenn anastomosis for double inlet left ventricle that suffered a stroke despite aspirin prophylaxis; the patient was combined homozygous for prothrombin G20210A mutation and for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation as well. The family history was positive for fetal loss and premature cardiovascular disease. Large-scale studies are needed to evaluate whether carriers of thrombophilia mutations need more intense thromboprophylaxis. PMID:16209893

  15. Successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a boy with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis deficiency presenting with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming-Yan; Guo, Xia; Sun, Shu-Wen; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) deficiency, also known as X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2 (XLP2), is a rare inherited primary immunodeficiency resulting from the XIAP (also known as BIRC4) mutation. XIAP deficiency is mainly associated with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) phenotypes, and genetic testing is crucial in diagnosing this syndrome. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently the only successful strategy for the treatment of this disease; however, a limited number of studies has been published concerning the outcomes of allogeneic HSCT in patients with XIAP deficiency. The present study reported a successful allogeneic HSCT performed to treat XIAP deficiency in a Chinese boy presenting with HLH. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing were performed to confirm the diagnosis of XIAP deficiency, and allogeneic HSCT was performed. Genetic tests revealed a two-nucleotide deletion (c.1021_1022delAA) in the patient, which was inherited from his mother, and resulted in frameshift mutation and premature stop codon (p.N341fsX348); this is considered to be a disease-causing mutation. The XIAP deficiency patient underwent allogeneic HSCT, receiving busulfan-containing reduced intensity myeloablative conditioning regimen, with a good intermediate follow-up result obtained. Therefore, genetic testing is essential to confirm the diagnosis of XIAP deficiency and detect the carrier of mutation. The present case study may promote the investigation of allogeneic HSCT in patients with XIAP deficiency. PMID:27602064

  16. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  17. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  18. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  19. Role of Genetic Factors in the Pathogenesis of Radial Deficiencies in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Elmakky, Amira; Stanghellini, Ilaria; Landi, Antonio; Percesepe, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Radial deficiencies (RDs), defined as under/abnormal development or absence of any of the structures of the forearm, radial carpal bones and thumb, occur with a live birth incidence ranging from 1 out of 30,000 to 1 out 6,000 newborns and represent about one third/one fourth of all the congenital upper limb anomalies. About half of radial disorders have a mendelian cause and pattern of inheritance, whereas the remaining half appears sporadic with no known gene involved. In sporadic forms certain anomalies, such as thumb or radial hypoplasia, may occur either alone or in association with systemic conditions, like vertebral abnormalities or renal defects. All the cases with a mendelian inheritance are syndromic forms, which include cardiac defects (in Holt-Oram syndrome), bone marrow failure (in Fanconi anemia), platelet deficiency (in thrombocytopenia-absent-radius syndrome), ocular motility impairment (in Okihiro syndrome). The genetics of radial deficiencies is complex, characterized by genetic heterogeneity and high inter- and intra-familial clinical variability: this review will analyze the etiopathogenesis and the genotype/phenotype correlations of the main radial deficiency disorders in humans. PMID:26962299

  20. Clinical, Biochemical and Outcome Profile of Biotinidase Deficient Patients from Tertiary Centre in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ankur; Lomash, Avinash; Pandey, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Biotinidase deficiency is an inherited metabolic disorder with estimated birth incidence of 1 in 61,000 for profound and partial deficiency. Estimated incidence of profound and partial biotinidase deficiency is 1 in 1, 37,000 and 1 in 1, 10,000 respectively. The carrier frequency in general population is 1 in 120. We attempt to study clinical, biochemical and outcome from 10 Biotinidase deficient patients. Materials and Methods A retrospective case record study was conducted to record Clinical, biochemical and outcome profile from genetic records. Biotinidase level was measured using spectrophotometric method. Results Study group comprised of 8 males and 2 females with median age of presentation 6 (2-45.75) months. Median (interquartile range) Biotinidase level in study group 0.3 (0.08—1.5) nmol/ml/min. Study group was further divided in to early onset group (< 12 months, n-6) and late onset group (> 12 months, n-4). Seizure, alopecia and hearing loss were predominant phenotypes in study group. The other rare presentations were: hypotonia, ataxia, skin rash, seborrhoea. The most common seizure type was focal seizure. Control of seizure activity was important immediate outcome measured in study group. Median duration (interquartile range) of seizure control in early onset group was 3 (2-4)days against 13.5 (12.25-14.75) days in late onset group. Conclusion This study highlights the need of early diagnosis for favourable outcome for a potentially treatable inherited metabolic disorder. PMID:26816961

  1. Nasal Tip Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cerkes, Nazim

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tip deficiency can be congenital or secondary to previous nasal surgeries. Underdeveloped medial crura usually present with underprojected tip and lack of tip definition. Weakness or malposition of lateral crura causes alar rim retraction and lateral nasal wall weakness. Structural grafting of alar cartilages strengthens the tip framework, reinforces the disrupted support mechanisms, and controls the position of the nasal tip. In secondary cases, anatomic reconstruction of the weakened or interrupted alar cartilages and reconstitution of a stable nasal tip tripod must be the goal for a predictable outcome. PMID:26616702

  2. Selenium deficiency mitigates hypothyroxinemia in iodine-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Vanderpas, J B; Contempré, B; Duale, N L; Deckx, H; Bebe, N; Longombé, A O; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Dumont, J E

    1993-02-01

    Studies were performed to assess the role of combined selenium and iodine deficiency in the etiology of endemic myxedematous cretinism in a population in Zaire. One effect of selenium deficiency may be to lower glutathione peroxidase activity in the thyroid gland, thus allowing hydrogen peroxide produced during thyroid hormone synthesis to be cytotoxic. In selenium-and-iodine-deficient humans, selenium supplementation may aggravate hypothyroidism by stimulating thyroxin metabolism by the selenoenzyme type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase. Selenium supplementation is thus not indicated without iodine or thyroid hormone supplementation in cases of combined selenium and iodine deficiencies. PMID:8427203

  3. Severe scoliosis in a patient with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Tatiana; Patel, Jinesh; Badilla-Porras, Ramses; Kronick, Jonathan; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2015-01-01

    Severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessively inherited inborn error of folate metabolism. We report a new patient with severe MTHFR deficiency who presented at age 4 months with early onset severe scoliosis associated with severe hypotonia. Markedly decreased MTHFR enzyme activity (0.3 nmoles CHO/mg protein/h; reference range>9) and compound heterozygous mutations (c. 1304T>C; p.Phe435Ser and c.1539dup; p.Glu514Argfs∗24) in the MTHFR gene confirmed the diagnosis. She was treated with vitamin B12, folic acid and betaine supplementation and showed improvements in her developmental milestones and hypotonia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first patient with MTHFR deficiency reported with severe early onset scoliosis. Despite the late diagnosis and treatment initiation, she showed favorable short-term neurodevelopmental outcome. This case suggests that homocysteine measurement should be included in the investigations of patients with developmental delay, hypotonia and scoliosis within first year of life prior to organizing genetic investigations. PMID:24726568

  4. Molecular analysis of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatocardiomuscular expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefont, J. P.; Taroni, F.; Cavadini, P.; Cepanec, C.; Brivet, M.; Saudubray, J. M.; Leroux, J. P.; Demaugre, F.

    1996-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency, an inherited disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty-acid (LCFA) oxidation, results in two distinct clinical phenotypes, namely, an adult (muscular) form and an infantile (hepatocardiomuscular) form. The rationale of this phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. The adult form of the disease is commonly ascribed to the Ser-113-Leu substitution in CPT II. Only few data are available regarding the molecular basis of the infantile form of the disease. We report herein a homozygous A-2399-C transversion predicting a Tyr-628-Ser substitution in a CPT II-deficient infant. In vitro expression of mutant cDNA in COS-1 cells demonstrated the responsibility of this mutation for the disease. Metabolic consequences of the SER-113-Leu and Tyr-628-Ser substitutions were studied in fibroblasts. The Tyr-628-Ser substitution (infantile form) resulted in a 10% CPT II residual activity, markedly impairing LCFA oxidation, whereas the Ser-113-Leu substitution (adult form) resulted in a 20% CPT II residual activity, with out consequence on LCFA oxidation. These data show that CPT II activity has to be reduced below a critical threshold in order for LCFA oxidation in fibroblasts to be impaired. The hypothesis that this critical threshold differs among tissues could provide a basis to explain phenotypic heterogeneity of CPT II deficiency. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8651281

  5. Rapid SAR target modeling through genetic inheritance mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Jerzy; Pachowicz, Peter W.; Vafaie, Halleh

    1997-07-01

    The paper presents a methodology and GETP experimental system for rapid SAR target signature generation from limited initial sensory data. The methodology exploits and integrates the following four processes: (1) analysis of initial SAR image signatures and their transformation into higher-level blob representation, (2) blob modeling, (3) genetic inheritance modeling to generate new instances of a target model in blob representation, and (4) synthesis of new SAR signatures from genetically evolved blob data. The GETP system takes several SAR signatures of the target and transforms each signature into more general scattered blob graphs, where each blob represents local energy cluster. A single graph node is describe by blob relative position, confidence, and iconic data. Graph data is forwarded to the genetic modeling process while blob image is stored in a catalog. Genetic inheritance is applied to the initial population of graph data. New graph models of the target are generated and evaluated. Selected graph variations are forwarded to the synthesis process. The synthesis process restores target signature from a given graph and a catalog of blobs. The background is synthesized to complement the signature. Initial experimental results are illustrated with 64 X 32 image sections of a tank.

  6. Malignant skin tumours in patients with inherited ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Natsuga, K; Akiyama, M; Shimizu, H

    2011-08-01

    Inherited ichthyoses are rare genodermatoses caused by mutations in the genes involved in epidermal development. Although there have been case reports on patients with ichthyosis who developed skin malignancies, it is still unknown whether or not patients with ichthyosis have an increased risk of skin malignancies. Here, we review case series of skin malignancies in patients with ichthyosis and show biological findings which might lead to cancer susceptibility. A survey of the literature revealed 28 cases of inherited ichthyoses with skin malignancy, including 12 cases of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome, seven of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, three of Netherton syndrome and six of miscellaneous ichthyosis. Twenty-four of the 28 cases developed single or multiple squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). The age at diagnosis of the first skin malignancy ranged from 15 to 54 years. As patients with these particular subtypes of ichthyosis seem to be prone to skin malignancies, including SCC, at an unusually young age, routine cancer surveillance of these patients is strongly recommended. PMID:21517795

  7. Epigenetic modification and inheritance in sexual reversal of fish

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Changwei; Li, Qiye; Chen, Songlin; Zhang, Pei; Lian, Jinmin; Hu, Qiaomu; Sun, Bing; Jin, Lijun; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Zongji; Zhao, Hongmei; Jin, Zonghui; Liang, Zhuo; Li, Yangzhen; Zheng, Qiumei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Guojie

    2014-01-01

    Environmental sex determination (ESD) occurs in divergent, phylogenetically unrelated taxa, and in some species, co-occurs with genetic sex determination (GSD) mechanisms. Although epigenetic regulation in response to environmental effects has long been proposed to be associated with ESD, a systemic analysis on epigenetic regulation of ESD is still lacking. Using half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) as a model—a marine fish that has both ZW chromosomal GSD and temperature-dependent ESD—we investigated the role of DNA methylation in transition from GSD to ESD. Comparative analysis of the gonadal DNA methylomes of pseudomale, female, and normal male fish revealed that genes in the sex determination pathways are the major targets of substantial methylation modification during sexual reversal. Methylation modification in pseudomales is globally inherited in their ZW offspring, which can naturally develop into pseudomales without temperature incubation. Transcriptome analysis revealed that dosage compensation occurs in a restricted, methylated cytosine enriched Z chromosomal region in pseudomale testes, achieving equal expression level in normal male testes. In contrast, female-specific W chromosomal genes are suppressed in pseudomales by methylation regulation. We conclude that epigenetic regulation plays multiple crucial roles in sexual reversal of tongue sole fish. We also offer the first clues on the mechanisms behind gene dosage balancing in an organism that undergoes sexual reversal. Finally, we suggest a causal link between the bias sex chromosome assortment in the offspring of a pseudomale family and the transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of sexual reversal in tongue sole fish. PMID:24487721

  8. COSMIC INHERITANCE RULES: IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH CARE AND SCIENCE1

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, F.; Cornélissen, G.; Katinas, G. S.; Watanabe, Y.; Siegelová, J.

    2010-01-01

    Countering the trend in specialization, we advocate the trans-disciplinary monitoring of blood pressure and heart rate for signatures of environmental cyclic and other variabilities in space as well as terrestrial weather on the one hand, and for surveillance of personal and societal health on the other hand. New rules (if confirmed novel laws) emerge as we recognize our inheritance from the cosmos of cycles that constitute and characterize life and align them with inheritance from parents. In so doing, we happen to follow the endeavors of Gregor Mendel, who recognized the segregation and independent assortment of what became known as genes. Circadians, rhythms with periods, τ, between 20 and 28 hours, and cycles with frequencies that are higher (ultradian) or lower (infradian) than circadian, are genetically anchored. An accumulating long list of very important but aeolian (nonstationary) infradian cycles, characterizing the incidence patterns of sudden cardiac death, suicide and terrorism, with drastically different τs, constitutes the nonphotic (corpuscular emission from the sun, heliogeomagnetics, ultraviolet flux, gravitation) Cornélissen-series. PMID:21603087

  9. X-linked Inheritance in Females with Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Elaine L.; Rholl, Kenneth S.; Quie, Paul G.

    1980-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease in males is familial and its transmission is is usually clearly x-linked. The mode of inheritance in females with the syndrome is unknown and the carrier state difficult to identify. Defective polymorphonuclear leukocyte bactericidal activity in this disease is associated with an absence of the respiratory burst generated in stimulated phagocytes and may be detected by the chemiluminescence assay. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes from three of four females with chronic granulomatous disease had extremely low chemiluminescence production, their asymptomatic mothers had intermediate values, and their fathers were normal. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils of two affected males in these kinships generated no chemiluminescence, whereas two of seven female relatives had intermediate values, and all nonaffected males had normal values. In the three families in which leukocytes were studied by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, two populations of neutrophils were demonstrated for the female patients and/or their mothers. The wide phenotypic variability for clinical disease, evidence of two leukocyte populations in the patients or their mothers, and low but detectable leukocyte chemiluminescence in the affected females is consistent with the Lyon hypothesis of x-chromosome inactivation in these families. The findings suggest an x-linked inheritance in these females with chronic granulomatous disease. Images PMID:7400319

  10. Inherited platelet disorders: toward DNA-based diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lentaigne, Claire; Freson, Kathleen; Laffan, Michael A.; Turro, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Variations in platelet number, volume, and function are largely genetically controlled, and many loci associated with platelet traits have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs).1 The genome also contains a large number of rare variants, of which a tiny fraction underlies the inherited diseases of humans. Research over the last 3 decades has led to the discovery of 51 genes harboring variants responsible for inherited platelet disorders (IPDs). However, the majority of patients with an IPD still do not receive a molecular diagnosis. Alongside the scientific interest, molecular or genetic diagnosis is important for patients. There is increasing recognition that a number of IPDs are associated with severe pathologies, including an increased risk of malignancy, and a definitive diagnosis can inform prognosis and care. In this review, we give an overview of these disorders grouped according to their effect on platelet biology and their clinical characteristics. We also discuss the challenge of identifying candidate genes and causal variants therein, how IPDs have been historically diagnosed, and how this is changing with the introduction of high-throughput sequencing. Finally, we describe how integration of large genomic, epigenomic, and phenotypic datasets, including whole genome sequencing data, GWASs, epigenomic profiling, protein–protein interaction networks, and standardized clinical phenotype coding, will drive the discovery of novel mechanisms of disease in the near future to improve patient diagnosis and management. PMID:27095789

  11. A mitotically inheritable unit containing a MAP kinase module

    PubMed Central

    Kicka, Sébastien; Bonnet, Crystel; Sobering, Andrew K.; Ganesan, Latha P.; Silar, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Prions are novel kinds of hereditary units, relying solely on proteins, that are infectious and inherited in a non-Mendelian fashion. To date, they are either based on autocatalytic modification of a 3D conformation or on autocatalytic cleavage. Here, we provide further evidence that in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina, a MAP kinase cascade is probably able to self-activate and generate C, a hereditary unit that bears many similarities to prions and triggers cell degeneration. We show that in addition to the MAPKKK gene, both the MAPKK and MAPK genes are necessary for the propagation of C, and that overexpression of MAPK as that of MAPKKK facilitates the appearance of C. We also show that a correlation exists between the presence of C and localization of the MAPK inside nuclei. These data emphasize the resemblance between prions and a self-positively regulated cascade in terms of their transmission. This thus further expands the concept of protein-base inheritance to regulatory networks that have the ability to self-activate. PMID:16938837

  12. Inheritance and heritability of resistance to citrus leprosis.

    PubMed

    Bastianel, Marinês; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos; Cristofani, Mariângela; Filho, Oliveiro Guerreiro; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana; Rodrigues, Vandeclei; Astúa-Monge, Gustavo; Machado, Marcos Antônio

    2006-10-01

    ABSTRACT The genetic inheritance of resistance to leprosis, the most important viral disease of citrus in Brazil, was characterized through the phenotypic assessment of 143 hybrids resulting from crosses between tangor 'Murcott' (Citrus sinensis x C. reticulata) and sweet orange 'Pêra' (C. sinensis), considered to be resistant and susceptible to the disease, respectively. All plants were grafted onto Rangpur lime (C. limonia) and inoculated with Citrus leprosis virus, cytoplasmic type through the infestation with viruliferous mites, Brevipalpus phoenicis. The experiments were arranged in a completely randomized block design with 10 replicates. Incidence and severity of the disease in leaves and stems as well as plant growth parameters (plant height and stem diameter) were recorded for 3 years after the infestation with the viruliferous mites. The average values of all variables were analyzed using principal component analysis, discriminant factorial analysis, estimation of the clonal repeatability coefficients, and frequency of the distributions of the average values for each measured variable. The principal component analysis resulted in the identification of at least two groups with resistance and susceptibility to leprosis, respectively. About 99% of all hybrids were correctly classified according to the discriminant factorial analysis. The broad-sense heritability coefficients for characteristics associated with incidence and severity of leprosis ranged from 0.88 to 0.96. The data suggest that the inheritance of resistance to leprosis may be controlled by only a few genes. PMID:18943497

  13. Inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying tuberculosis in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Bustamante, Jacinta; El-Baghdadi, Jamila; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Parvaneh, Nima; Azbaoui, Safaa El; Agader, Aomar; Hassani, Amal; Hafidi, Naima El; Mrani, Nidal Alaoui; Jouhadi, Zineb; Ailal, Fatima; Najib, Jilali; Reisli, Ismail; Zamani, Adil; Yosunkaya, Sebnem; Gulle-Girit, Saniye; Yildiran, Alisan; Cipe, Funda Erol; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Metin, Ayse; Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Hatipoglu, Nevin; Aydogmus, Cigdem; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Dogu, Figen; Karaca, Neslihan; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil; Keser-Emiroglu, Melike; Somer, Ayper; Tanir, Gonul; Aytekin, Caner; Adimi, Parisa; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Mamishi, Setareh; Bousfiha, Aziz; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and a few related mycobacteria, is a devastating disease, killing more than a million individuals per year worldwide. However, its pathogenesis remains largely elusive, as only a small proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease either during primary infection or during reactivation from latency or secondary infection. Subacute, hematogenous, and extrapulmonary disease tends to be more frequent in infants, children, and teenagers than in adults. Life-threatening primary TB of childhood can result from known acquired or inherited immunodeficiencies, although the vast majority of cases remain unexplained. We review here the conditions conferring a predisposition to childhood clinical diseases caused by mycobacteria, including not only M.tb but also weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria. Infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria are much rarer than TB, but the inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying these infections are much better known. Their study has also provided genetic and immunological insights into childhood TB, as illustrated by the discovery of single-gene inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlying severe cases of TB. Novel findings are expected from ongoing and future human genetic studies of childhood TB in countries that combine a high proportion of consanguineous marriages, a high incidence of TB, and an excellent clinical care, such as Iran, Morocco, and Turkey. PMID:25703555

  14. Inherited platelet disorders: toward DNA-based diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lentaigne, Claire; Freson, Kathleen; Laffan, Michael A; Turro, Ernest; Ouwehand, Willem H

    2016-06-01

    Variations in platelet number, volume, and function are largely genetically controlled, and many loci associated with platelet traits have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs).(1) The genome also contains a large number of rare variants, of which a tiny fraction underlies the inherited diseases of humans. Research over the last 3 decades has led to the discovery of 51 genes harboring variants responsible for inherited platelet disorders (IPDs). However, the majority of patients with an IPD still do not receive a molecular diagnosis. Alongside the scientific interest, molecular or genetic diagnosis is important for patients. There is increasing recognition that a number of IPDs are associated with severe pathologies, including an increased risk of malignancy, and a definitive diagnosis can inform prognosis and care. In this review, we give an overview of these disorders grouped according to their effect on platelet biology and their clinical characteristics. We also discuss the challenge of identifying candidate genes and causal variants therein, how IPDs have been historically diagnosed, and how this is changing with the introduction of high-throughput sequencing. Finally, we describe how integration of large genomic, epigenomic, and phenotypic datasets, including whole genome sequencing data, GWASs, epigenomic profiling, protein-protein interaction networks, and standardized clinical phenotype coding, will drive the discovery of novel mechanisms of disease in the near future to improve patient diagnosis and management. PMID:27095789

  15. The elucidation of stress memory inheritance in Brassica rapa plants

    PubMed Central

    Bilichak, Andriy; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Wóycicki, Rafal; Kepeshchuk, Nina; Fogen, Dawson; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Plants are able to maintain the memory of stress exposure throughout their ontogenesis and faithfully propagate it into the next generation. Recent evidence argues for the epigenetic nature of this phenomenon. Small RNAs (smRNAs) are one of the vital epigenetic factors because they can both affect gene expression at the place of their generation and maintain non-cell-autonomous gene regulation. Here, we have made an attempt to decipher the contribution of smRNAs to the heat-shock-induced transgenerational inheritance in Brassica rapa plants using sequencing technology. To do this, we have generated comprehensive profiles of a transcriptome and a small RNAome (smRNAome) from somatic and reproductive tissues of stressed plants and their untreated progeny. We have demonstrated that the highest tissue-specific alterations in the transcriptome and smRNAome profile are detected in tissues that were not directly exposed to stress, namely, in the endosperm and pollen. Importantly, we have revealed that the progeny of stressed plants exhibit the highest fluctuations at the smRNAome level but not at the transcriptome level. Additionally, we have uncovered the existence of heat-inducible and transgenerationally transmitted tRNA-derived small RNA fragments in plants. Finally, we suggest that miR168 and braAGO1 are involved in the stress-induced transgenerational inheritance in plants. PMID:25653665

  16. More evidence for non-maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA?

    PubMed Central

    Bandelt, H; Kong, Q; Parson, W; Salas, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: A single case of paternal co-transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in humans has been reported so far. Objective: To find potential instances of non-maternal inheritance of mtDNA. Methods: Published medical case studies (of single patients) were searched for irregular mtDNA patterns by comparing the given haplotype information for different clones or tissues with the worldwide mtDNA database as known to date—a method that has proved robust and reliable for the detection of flawed mtDNA sequence data. Results: More than 20 studies were found reporting clear cut instances with mtDNAs of different ancestries in single individuals. As examples, cases are reviewed from recent published reports which, at face value, may be taken as evidence for paternal inheritance of mtDNA or recombination. Conclusions: Multiple types (or recombinant types) of quite dissimilar mitochondrial DNA from different parts of the known mtDNA phylogeny are often reported in single individuals. From re-analyses and corrigenda of forensic mtDNA data, it is apparent that the phenomenon of mixed or mosaic mtDNA can be ascribed solely to contamination and sample mix up. PMID:15923271

  17. Experimental Analysis of a Paternally Inherited Extrachromosomal Factor

    PubMed Central

    Werren, John H.; van den Assem, Johannes

    1986-01-01

    Virtually all known cases of extrachromosomal inheritance involve cytoplasmic inheritance through the maternal line. Recently, a paternally transmitted factor that causes the production of all-male families has been discovered in a parasitic wasp. The wasp has haplodiploid sex determination: male offspring are haploid and usually develop from unfertilized eggs, whereas females are diploid and usually develop from fertilized eggs. It has been postulated that this paternal sex-ratio factor (psr) is either (1) an infectious agent (a venereal disease) that is transmitted to the female reproductive tract during copulation with an infected male and, subsequently, causes all-male families or (2) a male cytoplasmic factor that is transmitted by sperm to eggs upon egg fertilization and, somehow, causes loss of the paternal set of chromosomes.—Experimental evidence is presented which shows that the factor requires egg fertilization for transmission to the next generation; therefore, it is likely to be a cytoplasmic factor. Significant potential intragenomic conflict results from the presence of this factor and two other sex-ratio distorters in this wasp species. PMID:17246344

  18. COSMIC INHERITANCE RULES: IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH CARE AND SCIENCE.

    PubMed

    Halberg, F; Cornélissen, G; Katinas, G S; Watanabe, Y; Siegelová, J

    2010-01-01

    Countering the trend in specialization, we advocate the trans-disciplinary monitoring of blood pressure and heart rate for signatures of environmental cyclic and other variabilities in space as well as terrestrial weather on the one hand, and for surveillance of personal and societal health on the other hand. New rules (if confirmed novel laws) emerge as we recognize our inheritance from the cosmos of cycles that constitute and characterize life and align them with inheritance from parents. In so doing, we happen to follow the endeavors of Gregor Mendel, who recognized the segregation and independent assortment of what became known as genes. Circadians, rhythms with periods, τ, between 20 and 28 hours, and cycles with frequencies that are higher (ultradian) or lower (infradian) than circadian, are genetically anchored. An accumulating long list of very important but aeolian (nonstationary) infradian cycles, characterizing the incidence patterns of sudden cardiac death, suicide and terrorism, with drastically different τs, constitutes the nonphotic (corpuscular emission from the sun, heliogeomagnetics, ultraviolet flux, gravitation) Cornélissen-series. PMID:21603087

  19. Nongenetic Inheritance of Induced Resistance in a Wild Annual Plant.

    PubMed

    Lankinen, Åsa; Abreha, Kibrom B; Alexandersson, Erik; Andersson, Stefan; Andreasson, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Nongenetic inheritance (e.g., transgenerational epigenetic effects) has received increasing interest in recent years, particularly in plants. However, most studies have involved a few model species and relatively little is known about wild species in these respects. We investigated transgenerational induced resistance to infection by the devastating oomycete Phytophthora infestans in Solanum physalifolium, a wild relative of cultivated potato. We treated plants with β-aminobutyric acid (BABA), a nontoxic compound acting as an inducing agent, or infected plants with P. infestans. BABA treatment reduced lesion size in detached-leaf assays inoculated by P. infestans in two of three tested genotypes, suggesting that resistance to oomycetes can be induced by BABA within a generation not only in crops or model species but also in wild species directly collected from nature. Both BABA treatment and infection in the parental generation reduced lesions in the subsequent generation in one of two genotypes, indicating a transgenerational influence on resistance that varies among genotypes. We did not detect treatment effects on seed traits, indicating the involvement of a mechanism unrelated to maternal effects. In conclusion, our study provides data on BABA induction and nongenetic inheritance of induced resistance in a wild relative of cultivated potato, implying that this factor might be important in the ecological and agricultural landscape. PMID:27070426

  20. Maintaining Epigenetic Inheritance During DNA Replication in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Francisco M.; Cerdán, Pablo D.

    2016-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses alter the pattern of gene expression in plants. Depending on the frequency and duration of stress events, the effects on the transcriptional state of genes are “remembered” temporally or transmitted to daughter cells and, in some instances, even to offspring (transgenerational epigenetic inheritance). This “memory” effect, which can be found even in the absence of the original stress, has an epigenetic basis, through molecular mechanisms that take place at the chromatin and DNA level but do not imply changes in the DNA sequence. Many epigenetic mechanisms have been described and involve covalent modifications on the DNA and histones, such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation and methylation, and RNAi dependent silencing mechanisms. Some of these chromatin modifications need to be stable through cell division in order to be truly epigenetic. During DNA replication, histones are recycled during the formation of the new nucleosomes and this process is tightly regulated. Perturbations to the DNA replication process and/or the recycling of histones lead to epigenetic changes. In this mini-review, we discuss recent evidence aimed at linking DNA replication process to epigenetic inheritance in plants. PMID:26870059