Science.gov

Sample records for inherited arrhythmia clinic

  1. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise. PMID:26927864

  2. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms “Long QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Short QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Brugada Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia” (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  3. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms "Long QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Short QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Brugada Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia" (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  4. Inherited Arrhythmias - Where do we Stand?

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Gersh, Bernard J; Camm, A John

    2014-08-01

    This review discusses inherited arrhythmias and conduction disturbances due to genetic disorders. Known channel mutations that are responsible for these conditions are presented, the indications and value of genetic testing are discussed, and a glossary of terms related to the discipline of genetic cardiology has been compiled. PMID:26835071

  5. Channelopathies - Emerging Trends in The Management of Inherited Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Priya; Mizusawa, Yuka; Wilde, Arthur A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their relative rarity, inheritable arrhythmias have come to the forefront as a group of potentially fatal but preventable cause of sudden cardiac death in children and (young) adults. Comprehensive management of inherited arrhythmias includes diagnosing and treating the proband and identifying and protecting affected family members. This has been made possible by the vast advances in the field of molecular biology enabling better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of some of these disease groups, namely congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and Brugada syndrome. The ensuing knowledge of the genotype-phenotype correlations enables us to risk-stratify, prognosticate and treat based on the genetic test results. The various diagnostic modalities currently available to us, including clinical tools and genetic technologies, have to be applied judiciously in order to promptly identify those affected and to spare the emotional burden of a potentially lethal disease in the unaffected individuals. The therapeutic armamentarium of inherited arrhythmias includes pharmacological agents, device therapies and surgical interventions. A treatment strategy keeping in mind the risk profile of the patients, the local availability of drugs and the expertise of the treating personnel is proving effective. While opportunities for research are numerous in this expanding field of medicine, there is also tremendous scope for incorporating the emerging trends in managing patients and families with inherited arrhythmias in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:25852242

  6. Channelopathies - emerging trends in the management of inherited arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Chockalingam, Priya; Mizusawa, Yuka; Wilde, Arthur Am

    2015-01-01

    In spite of their relative rarity, inheritable arrhythmias have come to the forefront as a group of potentially fatal but preventable cause of sudden cardiac death in children and (young) adults. Comprehensive management of inherited arrhythmias includes diagnosing and treating the proband and identifying and protecting affected family members. This has been made possible by the vast advances in the field of molecular biology enabling better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of some of these disease groups, namely congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and Brugada syndrome. The ensuing knowledge of the genotype-phenotype correlations enables us to risk-stratify, prognosticate and treat based on the genetic test results. The various diagnostic modalities currently available to us, including clinical tools and genetic technologies, have to be applied judiciously in order to promptly identify those affected and to spare the emotional burden of a potentially lethal disease in the unaffected individuals. The therapeutic armamentarium of inherited arrhythmias includes pharmacological agents, device therapies and surgical interventions. A treatment strategy keeping in mind the risk profile of the patients, the local availability of drugs and the expertise of the treating personnel is proving effective. While opportunities for research are numerous in this expanding field of medicine, there is also tremendous scope for incorporating the emerging trends in managing patients and families with inherited arrhythmias in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:25852242

  7. Genetics of inherited primary arrhythmia disorders

    PubMed Central

    Spears, Danna A; Gollob, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    A sudden unexplained death is felt to be due to a primary arrhythmic disorder when no structural heart disease is found on autopsy, and there is no preceding documentation of heart disease. In these cases, death is presumed to be secondary to a lethal and potentially heritable abnormality of cardiac ion channel function. These channelopathies include congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, and short QT syndrome. In certain cases, genetic testing may have an important role in supporting a diagnosis of a primary arrhythmia disorder, and can also provide prognostic information, but by far the greatest strength of genetic testing lies in the screening of family members, who may be at risk. The purpose of this review is to describe the basic genetic and molecular pathophysiology of the primary inherited arrhythmia disorders, and to outline a rational approach to genetic testing, management, and family screening. PMID:26425105

  8. Unveiling specific triggers and precipitating factors for fatal cardiac events in inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tadashi; Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes, such as long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, early repolarization syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and their latent forms, are at risk for fatal arrhythmias. These diseases are typically associated with genetic mutations that perturb cardiac ionic currents. The analysis of cardiac events by genotype-phenotype correlation studies has revealed that fatal arrhythmias in some genotypes are triggered by physical or emotional stress, and those in the others are more likely to occur during sleep or at rest. Thus, the risk stratification and management of affected patients differ strikingly according to the genetic variant of the inherited arrhythmia syndrome. Risk stratification may be further refined by considering the precipitating factors, such as drugs, bradycardia, electrolyte disturbances, fever, and cardiac memory. Moreover, an increasing number of studies imply that the susceptibility of fatal arrhythmias in patients with acute coronary syndrome or takotsubo cardiomyopathy is at least partly ascribed to the genetic variants causing inherited arrhythmia syndromes. In this article, we review the recent advances in the understanding of the molecular genetics and genotype-phenotype correlations in inherited arrhythmia syndromes and consider the triggers and precipitating factors for fatal arrhythmias in these disorders. Further studies to explore the triggers and precipitating factors specific to the genotypes and diseases are needed for better clinical management. PMID:25925977

  9. The Brugada Syndrome: A Rare Arrhythmia Disorder with Complex Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Barc, Julien; Thollet, Aurélie; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Le Marec, Hervé; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Redon, Richard; Probst, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    For the last 10 years, applying new sequencing technologies to thousands of whole exomes has revealed the high variability of the human genome. Extreme caution should thus be taken to avoid misinterpretation when associating rare genetic variants to disease susceptibility. The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare inherited arrhythmia disease associated with high risk of sudden cardiac death in the young adult. Familial inheritance has long been described as Mendelian, with autosomal dominant mode of transmission and incomplete penetrance. However, all except 1 of the 23 genes previously associated with the disease have been identified through a candidate gene approach. To date, only rare coding variants in the SCN5A gene have been significantly associated with the syndrome. However, the genotype/phenotype studies conducted in families with SCN5A mutations illustrate the complex mode of inheritance of BrS. This genetic complexity has recently been confirmed by the identification of common polymorphic alleles strongly associated with disease risk. The implication of both rare and common variants in BrS susceptibility implies that one should first define a proper genetic model for BrS predisposition prior to applying molecular diagnosis. Although long remains the way to personalized medicine against BrS, the high phenotype variability encountered in familial forms of the disease may partly find an explanation into this specific genetic architecture. PMID:27200363

  10. Family and population strategies for screening and counselling of inherited cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    van Langen, I M; Hofman, N; Tan, H L; Wilde, A A M

    2004-01-01

    Family screening in inherited cardiac arrhythmias has been performed in The Netherlands since 1996, when diagnostic DNA testing in long QT syndrome (LQTS) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) became technically possible. In multidisciplinary outpatient academic clinics, an adjusted protocol for genetic counselling, originally derived from predictive testing in Huntington's disease, is being used. 1110 individuals, including 842 relatives of index patients, were informed about their risks, and most were tested molecularly and/or clinically for carriership of the disease present in their family. Of 345 relatives who were referred for cardiologic follow-up, 189 are being treated, because of an increased risk of life-threatening arrhythmias. Evaluation of the psychological and social consequences of family screening for inherited arrhythmias can be performed by using the adapted criteria of Wilson and Jüngner, i.e., from a point of view of public health. Preliminary results of psychological research show that parents of children at risk for LQTS show high levels of distress. Many other aspects have to be evaluated yet, making final conclusions about the feasibility of family screening difficult, particularly in HCM. Clinical guidelines are urgently needed. Population screening by molecular testing, for instance in athletic preparticipation screening, will become possible in the future and has its own prerequisites for success. PMID:15176433

  11. Diagnosis and management of patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Hocini, Mélèze; Pison, Laurent; Proclemer, Alessandro; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Madrid, Antonio; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-04-01

    Inherited arrhythmia disorders associated with structurally normal heart (i.e. long and short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, early repolarization syndrome, idiopathic ventricular fibrillation) cause 10% of 1.1 million sudden deaths in Europe and the USA. The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) electrophysiology wire survey was to assess the European clinical practice adopted for the diagnosis and management of these disorders. The survey was based on an electronic questionnaire sent out to the EHRA Research Network centres. Responses were received from 50 centres in 23 countries. The results of the survey show that inherited arrhythmia syndromes have a relatively low burden and are diagnosed and managed in accordance with the current guidelines. However, more than 50% of centres do not participate in any existing registry underlining the need for establishing a pan-European registry of these disorders. PMID:24711616

  12. Disclosing Genetic Information to Family Members About Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmias: An Obligation or a Choice?

    PubMed

    Vavolizza, Rick D; Kalia, Isha; Erskine Aaron, Kathleen; Silverstein, Louise B; Barlevy, Dorit; Wasserman, David; Walsh, Christine; Marion, Robert W; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2015-08-01

    Inherited cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome, present clinical as well as ethical, legal, and social challenges. Many individuals who carry a deleterious mutation are largely asymptomatic and therefore may not be diagnosed until after the occurrence of a personal or family member's cardiac event. The familial nature of inherited genetic information raises numerous ethical, legal, and social issues regarding the sharing of genetic information, particularly when an individual found to carry a deleterious mutation refuses to disclose his or her results to at-risk family members who could benefit from life-saving treatments. This qualitative study sought to understand the experiences with genetic testing for individuals (n = 50) with a personal or family history of cardiac events or sudden death. Unstructured in-person focus groups or interviews were conducted for each participant in the study. The recordings of these interviews were transcribed verbatim and subsequently analyzed and coded. Participants' comments regarding sharing of genetic information centered around four main themes: (1) motivation to disclose; (2) extent of disclosure; (3) effect of disclosure on family dynamics; and (4) reasons for not sharing genetic information. The majority of individuals believed that affected individuals are obligated to disclose genetic information to family members. In the era of personalized medicine, the disclosure of genetic information provides individuals the opportunities to learn about the genetics, disease characteristics, and treatment options in order to reduce morbidity and mortality in themselves and their family members. Further research is necessary to identify and explore the barriers to sharing genetic information with at-risk family members. PMID:25400212

  13. Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat. It means that your heart beats ... is called bradycardia. The most common type of arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which causes an irregular and ...

  14. Arrhythmias

    MedlinePlus

    A change in the heart's normal electrical conduction system can result in an arrhythmia or irregular heartbeat. An arrhythmia can be an abnormally slow heartbeat, or an abnormally fast heartbeat. In ...

  15. Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Arrhythmia? Español An arrhythmia (ah-RITH-me-ah) is a problem with ... rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, ...

  16. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  17. Inherited arrhythmia syndromes leading to sudden cardiac death in the young: A global update and an Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Priya; Wilde, Arthur A.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited primary arrhythmias, namely congenital long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, account for a significant proportion of sudden cardiac deaths in young and apparently healthy individuals. Genetic testing plays an integral role in the diagnosis, risk-stratification and treatment of probands and family members. It is increasingly obvious that collaborative efforts are required to understand and manage these relatively rare but potentially lethal diseases. This article aims to update readers on the recent developments in our knowledge of inherited arrhythmias and to lay the foundation for a national synergistic effort to characterize them in the Indian population. PMID:24568830

  18. Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... beats too quickly, too slowly, or with an irregular pattern. When the heart beats faster than normal, ... of arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which causes an irregular and fast heart beat. Many factors can affect ...

  19. [Arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Misaki, Takuro; Fukahara, Kazuaki

    2004-07-01

    The success of the radiofrequency catheter ablation procedure for most types of supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia largely eliminated the role of surgical therapy of arrhythmias. However, there remains a subset of arrhythmia patients in whom urgent surgical treatments are required. In this review we mention recent developments of the urgent surgical treatment for arrhythmias. In cases with complete atrioventricular (AV) block and ventricular fibrillation which associated with sudden death, temporary cardiac pacing and cardiac defibrillation using direct current (DC) cardioversion must be immediately induced and followed by implantation of permanent cardiac pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), if necessary. In addition to usual cardiac pacing therapy, novel pacing therapy has been developed recently for the patients with symptomatic heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) using biventricular pacing is an emerging therapy for improvement of cardiac function in patients with heart failure in association with intraventricular conduction delay. To prevent the sudden death in patients with heart failure, biventricular pacing combined with ICD are also implanted and its efficacy are reported. With the exception of the pacing therapy, curative surgical treatments are limited in drug-refractory atrial fibrillation and ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia after myocardial infarction requiring Dor's type operation. In any case surgical treatment must be performed promptly and suitably with lower invasive methods. PMID:15362552

  20. Ventricular arrhythmias in Rhodesian Ridgebacks with a family history of sudden death and results of a pedigree analysis for potential inheritance patterns.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Weidman, Jess A; Rosenthal, Steven L; Lahmers, Kevin K; Friedenberg, Steven G

    2016-05-15

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate a group of related Rhodesian Ridgebacks with a family history of sudden death for the presence of arrhythmia and to identify possible patterns of disease inheritance among these dogs. DESIGN Prospective case series and pedigree investigation. ANIMALS 25 Rhodesian Ridgebacks with shared bloodlines. PROCEDURES Pedigrees of 4 young dogs (1 female and 3 males; age, 7 to 12 months) that died suddenly were evaluated, and owners of closely related dogs were asked to participate in the study. Dogs were evaluated by 24-hour Holter monitoring, standard ECG, echocardiography, or some combination of these to assess cardiac status. Necropsy reports, if available, were reviewed. RESULTS 31 close relatives of the 4 deceased dogs were identified. Of 21 dogs available for examination, 8 (2 males and 6 females) had ventricular tachyarrhythmias (90 to 8,700 ventricular premature complexes [VPCs]/24 h). No dogs had clinical signs of cardiac disease reported. Echocardiographic or necropsy evaluation for 7 of 12 dogs deemed affected (ie, with frequent or complex VPCs or sudden death) did not identify structural lesions. Five of 6 screened parents of affected dogs had 0 to 5 VPCs/24 h (all singlets), consistent with a normal reading. Pedigree evaluation suggested an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance, but autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance could not be ruled out. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Holter monitoring of Rhodesian Ridgebacks with a family history of an arrhythmia or sudden death is recommended for early diagnosis of disease. An autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance in the studied dogs was likely, and inbreeding should be strongly discouraged. PMID:27135669

  1. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa: clinical and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Boeira, Vanessa Lys Simas Yamakawa; Souza, Erica Sales; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rêgo, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida; Follador, Ivonise

    2013-01-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that present with skin and, in some cases, mucosal fragility, predisposing patients to the development of blisters and/or erosions after minimal trauma or friction. Children with a recurrent history of these kinds of lesions or neonates that present them in the absence of another reasonable explanation should be investigated. Diagnosis must be based on clinical and histopathological findings. To date, management of inherited EB basically consists in avoiding traumas that trigger lesions, as well as preventing infection and facilitating healing of the wounds with the systematic use of bandages. PMID:23739692

  2. Ventricular repolarization markers for predicting malignant arrhythmias in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Torres, Yaniel; Carmona-Puerta, Raimundo; Katholi, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Malignant cardiac arrhythmias which result in sudden cardiac death may be present in individuals apparently healthy or be associated with other medical conditions. The way to predict their appearance represents a challenge for the medical community due to the tragic outcomes in most cases. In the last two decades some ventricular repolarization (VR) markers have been found to be useful to predict malignant cardiac arrhythmias in several clinical conditions. The corrected QT, QT dispersion, Tpeak-Tend, Tpeak-Tend dispersion and Tp-e/QT have been studied and implemented in clinical practice for this purpose. These markers are obtained from 12 lead surface electrocardiogram. In this review we discuss how these markers have demonstrated to be effective to predict malignant arrhythmias in medical conditions such as long and short QT syndromes, Brugada syndrome, early repolarization syndrome, acute myocardial ischemia, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity and highly trained athletes. Also the main pathophysiological mechanisms that explain the arrhythmogenic predisposition in these diseases and the basis for the VR markers are discussed. However, the same results have not been found in all conditions. Further studies are needed to reach a global consensus in order to incorporate these VR parameters in risk stratification of these patients. PMID:26301231

  3. Calcium Transients Closely Reflect Prolonged Action Potentials in iPSC Models of Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, C. Ian; Baba, Shiro; Nakamura, Kenta; Hua, Ethan A.; Sears, Marie A.F.; Fu, Chi-cheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Balijepalli, Sadguna; Tomoda, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Yohei; Lizarraga, Paweena; Wojciak, Julianne; Scheinman, Melvin M.; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina; Makielski, Jonathan C.; January, Craig T.; Healy, Kevin E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Long-QT syndrome mutations can cause syncope and sudden death by prolonging the cardiac action potential (AP). Ion channels affected by mutations are various, and the influences of cellular calcium cycling on LQTS cardiac events are unknown. To better understand LQTS arrhythmias, we performed current-clamp and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) measurements on cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM). In myocytes carrying an LQT2 mutation (HERG-A422T), APs and [Ca2+]i transients were prolonged in parallel. APs were abbreviated by nifedipine exposure and further lengthened upon releasing intracellularly stored Ca2+. Validating this model, control iPS-CM treated with HERG-blocking drugs recapitulated the LQT2 phenotype. In LQT3 iPS-CM, expressing NaV1.5-N406K, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were markedly prolonged. AP prolongation was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and to inhibiting Na+-Ca2+ exchange. These results suggest that LQTS mutations act partly on cytosolic Ca2+ cycling, potentially providing a basis for functionally targeted interventions regardless of the specific mutation site. PMID:25254341

  4. Non-invasive cardiac mapping in clinical practice: Application to the ablation of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Rémi; Shah, Ashok J; Hocini, Mélèze; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Cochet, Hubert; Sacher, Frédéric; Bear, Laura; Duchateau, Josselin; Jais, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) started to demonstrate its efficiency in clinical settings. The initial application to localize focal ventricular arrhythmias such as ventricular premature beats was probably the easiest to challenge and validates the concept. Our clinical experience in using this non-invasive mapping technique to identify the sources of electrical disorders and guide catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats) and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome) is described here. PMID:26403066

  5. Clinical management of arrhythmias in elderly patients: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Hocini, Mélèze; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Proclemer, Alessandro; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess clinical practice in management of cardiac arrhythmias in elderly patients (age ≥75 years) in the European countries. The data are based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network members. Responses were received from 50 centres in 20 countries. The results of the survey have shown that management of cardiac arrhythmias is generally in accordance with the guidelines and consensus recommendations on management of cardiac arrhythmias, although there are some areas of variation, especially on age limit and exclusion of elderly patients for anticoagulation, ablation, and device therapy. PMID:25634939

  6. Clinical observations of supraventricular arrhythmias in patients with brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing; Guo, Chengjun; Fang, Dongping; Guo, Jinping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study various types of supraventricular arrhythmias in patients with Brugada Syndrome. Methods: Forty six patients with ECG of spontaneous type Brugada and with ventricular and/or supraventricular tachyarrhythmia, without structural heart diseases which were excluded by echocardiography, underwent 24 h-Holter recording, electrophysiological study and/or radiofrequency ablation. Results: There were thirty-nine male and seven female (mean age 37.44 years) among total forty-six patients. Twenty one patients had family histories of tachycardia, twentythree patients experienced episodes of syncope, and three patients were resuscitated from cardiac arrest. One patient had ventricular fibrillation and third degree atrioventricular block, eleven patients had polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and five patients had monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. Fourteen patients had atrial tachyarrhythmia, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia was found in five patients including four Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome, two patients hadventricular tachycardia and third degree atrioventricular block, one of them had atrial fibrillation, two patients had both supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular tachycardia, three patients had both atrial tachyarrhythmia and supraventricular tachycardia, two third degree atrioventricular block patients had atrial flutter, one patienthad both atrial tachyrhythmia and ventricular tachycardia. Radiofrequency blation was performed in thirty-nine patients and succeed in thirty-two, four patients were implanted with pacemakers, and four patients had implantable cardioverter defibrillators. Conclusion: In addition to ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, patients with Brugada syndrome exhibit various supraventricular tachyarrhythmia and third degree atrioventricular block. In patients with Brugada syndrome, the dysfunction of the cardiac ion channel, which related to mutation of cardiac sodium channelgene, is not limited in

  7. Clinical neurogenetics: behavioral management of inherited neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Psychiatric symptoms often manifest years before overt neurologic signs in patients with inherited neurodegenerative disease. The most frequently cited example of this phenomenon is the early onset of personality changes in "presymptomatic" Huntington patients. In some cases the changes in mood and cognition are even more debilitating than their neurologic symptoms. The goal of this article is to provide the neurologist with a concise primer that can be applied in a busy clinic or private practice. PMID:24176427

  8. Iatrogenic QT Abnormalities and Fatal Arrhythmias: Mechanisms and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Cubeddu, Luigi X

    2009-01-01

    Severe and occasionally fatal arrhythmias, commonly presenting as Torsade de Pointes [TdP] have been reported with Class III-antiarrhythmics, but also with non-antiarrhythmic drugs. Most cases result from an action on K+ channels encoded by the HERG gene responsible for the IKr repolarizing current, leading to a long QT and repolarization abnormalities. The hydrophobic central cavity of the HERG-K+ channels, allows a large number of structurally unrelated drugs to bind and cause direct channel inhibition. Some examples are dofetilide, quinidine, sotalol, erythromycin, grepafloxacin, cisapride, dolasetron, thioridazine, haloperidol, droperidol and pimozide. Other drugs achieve channel inhibition indirectly by impairing channel traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing channel membrane density (pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol). Whereas, ketoconazole, fluoxetine and norfluoxetine induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Congenital long QT syndrome, subclinical ion-channel mutations, subjects and relatives of subjects with previous history of drug-induced long QT or TdP, dual drug effects on cardiac repolarization [long QT plus increased QT dispersion], increased transmural dispersion of repolarization and T wave abnormalities, use of high doses, metabolism inhibitors and/or combinations of QT prolonging drugs, hypokalemia, structural cardiac disease, sympathomimetics, bradycardia, women and older age, have been shown to increase the risk for developing drug-induced TdP. Because most of these reactions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drugs use associated with repolarization abnormalities is strongly recommended. Future genetic testing and development of practical and simple provocation tests are in route to prevent iatrogenic TdP. PMID:20676275

  9. Clinical characteristics and current therapies for inherited retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-02-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations (IRDs) encompass a large group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that affect approximately 1 in 3000 people (>2 million people worldwide) (Bessant DA, Ali RR, Bhattacharya SS. 2001. Molecular genetics and prospects for therapy of the inherited retinal dystrophies. Curr Opin Genet Dev 11: 307-316.). IRDs may be inherited as Mendelian traits or through mitochondrial DNA, and may affect the entire retina (e.g., rod-cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa, cone dystrophy, cone-rod dystrophy, choroideremia, Usher syndrome, and Bardet-Bidel syndrome) or be restricted to the macula (e.g., Stargardt disease, Best disease, and Sorsby fundus dystrophy), ultimately leading to blindness. IRDs are a major cause of severe vision loss, with profound impact on patients and society. Although IRDs remain untreatable today, significant progress toward therapeutic strategies for IRDs has marked the past two decades. This progress has been based on better understanding of the pathophysiological pathways of these diseases and on technological advances. PMID:25324231

  10. Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network: facilitating research and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Moulder, Krista L; Snider, B Joy; Mills, Susan L; Buckles, Virginia D; Santacruz, Anna M; Bateman, Randall J; Morris, John C

    2013-01-01

    The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) is an international registry of individuals at risk for developing autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (AD). Its primary aims are to investigate the temporal ordering of AD pathophysiological changes that occur in asymptomatic mutation carriers and to identify those markers that herald the transition from cognitive normality to symptomatic AD. DIAN participants undergo longitudinal evaluations, including clinical and cognitive assessments and measurements of molecular and imaging AD biomarkers. This review details the unique attributes of DIAN as a model AD biomarker study and how it provides the infrastructure for innovative research projects, including clinical trials. The recent design and launch of the first anti-amyloid-beta secondary prevention trial in AD, led by the related DIAN Trials Unit, also are discussed. PMID:24131566

  11. Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network: facilitating research and clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) is an international registry of individuals at risk for developing autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Its primary aims are to investigate the temporal ordering of AD pathophysiological changes that occur in asymptomatic mutation carriers and to identify those markers that herald the transition from cognitive normality to symptomatic AD. DIAN participants undergo longitudinal evaluations, including clinical and cognitive assessments and measurements of molecular and imaging AD biomarkers. This review details the unique attributes of DIAN as a model AD biomarker study and how it provides the infrastructure for innovative research projects, including clinical trials. The recent design and launch of the first anti-amyloid-beta secondary prevention trial in AD, led by the related DIAN Trials Unit, also are discussed. PMID:24131566

  12. Next Generation Sequencing for the Diagnosis of Cardiac Arrhythmia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, Steven A.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes are collectively associated with substantial morbidity, yet our understanding of the genetic architecture of these conditions remains limited. Recent technological advances in DNA sequencing have led to the commercialization of genetic testing now widely available in clinical practice. In particular, next generation sequencing allows the large-scale and rapid assessment of entire genomes. Although next generation sequencing represents a major technological advance, it has introduced numerous challenges with respect to the interpretation of genetic variation, and has opened a veritable floodgate of biological data of unknown clinical significance to practitioners. In this review, we discuss current genetic testing indications for inherited arrhythmia syndromes, broadly outline characteristics of next generation sequencing techniques, and highlight challenges associated with such testing. We further summarize future directions that will be necessary to address to enable the widespread adoption of next generation sequencing in the routine management of patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes. PMID:25625719

  13. Ventricular arrhythmias in congestive heart failure: clinical significance and management.

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, G R; Massumi, A

    1999-01-01

    The benefit of defibrillator therapy has been well established for patients with LV dysfunction (ejection fraction less than 35%), coronary artery disease, NSVT, and inducible and nonsuppressible ventricular tachycardia. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy is also indicated for all CHF patients in NYHA functional classes I, II, and III who present with aborted sudden cardiac death, or ventricular fibrillation, or hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia--and also in patients with syncope with no documented ventricular tachycardia but with inducible ventricular tachycardia at electrophysiology study. The ongoing MADIT II trial was designed to evaluate the benefit of prophylactic ICD implantation in these patients (ejection fraction less than 30%, coronary artery disease, and NSVT) without prior risk stratification by PES. The CABG Patch trial concluded that prophylactic placement of an ICD during coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with low ejection fraction and abnormal SAECG is not justifiable. Except for the indications described above, ICD implantation has not been proved to be beneficial as primary or secondary therapy. Until more data are available, patients should be encouraged to enroll in the ongoing clinical trials. PMID:10217470

  14. Clinical Genetic Testing for the Cardiomyopathies and Arrhythmias: A Systematic Framework for Establishing Clinical Validity and Addressing Genotypic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, John; Tahiliani, Jackie; Johnson, Nicole Marie; Aguilar, Sienna; Beltran, Daniel; Daly, Amy; Decker, Emily; Haverfield, Eden; Herrera, Blanca; Murillo, Laura; Nykamp, Keith; Topper, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing have made large, diagnostic gene panels affordable and efficient. Broad adoption of such panels has begun to deliver on the promises of personalized medicine, but has also brought new challenges such as the presence of unexpected results, or results of uncertain clinical significance. Genetic analysis of inherited cardiac conditions is particularly challenging due to the extensive genetic heterogeneity underlying cardiac phenotypes, and the overlapping, variable, and incompletely penetrant nature of their clinical presentations. The design of effective diagnostic tests and the effective use of the results depend on a clear understanding of the relationship between each gene and each considered condition. To address these issues, we developed simple, systematic approaches to three fundamental challenges: (1) evaluating the strength of the evidence suggesting that a particular condition is caused by pathogenic variants in a particular gene, (2) evaluating whether unusual genotype/phenotype observations represent a plausible expansion of clinical phenotype associated with a gene, and (3) establishing a molecular diagnostic strategy to capture overlapping clinical presentations. These approaches focus on the systematic evaluation of the pathogenicity of variants identified in clinically affected individuals, and the natural history of disease in those individuals. Here, we applied these approaches to the evaluation of more than 100 genes reported to be associated with inherited cardiomyopathies and arrhythmias including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia or cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and to a set of related syndromes such as Noonan Syndrome and Fabry disease. These approaches provide a framework for delivering meaningful and accurate genetic test results to individuals with hereditary

  15. Clinical Genetic Testing for the Cardiomyopathies and Arrhythmias: A Systematic Framework for Establishing Clinical Validity and Addressing Genotypic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Garcia, John; Tahiliani, Jackie; Johnson, Nicole Marie; Aguilar, Sienna; Beltran, Daniel; Daly, Amy; Decker, Emily; Haverfield, Eden; Herrera, Blanca; Murillo, Laura; Nykamp, Keith; Topper, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing have made large, diagnostic gene panels affordable and efficient. Broad adoption of such panels has begun to deliver on the promises of personalized medicine, but has also brought new challenges such as the presence of unexpected results, or results of uncertain clinical significance. Genetic analysis of inherited cardiac conditions is particularly challenging due to the extensive genetic heterogeneity underlying cardiac phenotypes, and the overlapping, variable, and incompletely penetrant nature of their clinical presentations. The design of effective diagnostic tests and the effective use of the results depend on a clear understanding of the relationship between each gene and each considered condition. To address these issues, we developed simple, systematic approaches to three fundamental challenges: (1) evaluating the strength of the evidence suggesting that a particular condition is caused by pathogenic variants in a particular gene, (2) evaluating whether unusual genotype/phenotype observations represent a plausible expansion of clinical phenotype associated with a gene, and (3) establishing a molecular diagnostic strategy to capture overlapping clinical presentations. These approaches focus on the systematic evaluation of the pathogenicity of variants identified in clinically affected individuals, and the natural history of disease in those individuals. Here, we applied these approaches to the evaluation of more than 100 genes reported to be associated with inherited cardiomyopathies and arrhythmias including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia or cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and to a set of related syndromes such as Noonan Syndrome and Fabry disease. These approaches provide a framework for delivering meaningful and accurate genetic test results to individuals with hereditary

  16. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26459200

  17. [Reperfusion arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Jurkovicová, O; Cagán, S

    1998-01-01

    recanalization of infarction-related coronary artery. However, they are also a sign of reperfusion injury and a finding which may limit the favourable effect of reperfusion. In account of that, there is a very intensive search for pharmacologic interventions which could protect or attenuate the reperfusion injury and thereby also the genesis of reperfusion arrthythmias. Although promising results were obtained with many substances antagonizing the effects of mediators of reperfusion injury, there is no definite recommendation for their use under clinical conditions. However, the results from the latest clinical trials with ACE inhibitors are very promising. These trials render relative conclusive evidence, that ACE inhibitors could have a protective effect against reperfusion arrhythmias. (Ref. 89, Tab. 1.) PMID:9919746

  18. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wolbrom, Daniel H.; Rahman, Aleef; Tschabrunn, Cory M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis) and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma. PMID:26981308

  19. Usefulness of an Implantable Loop Recorder to Detect Clinically Relevant Arrhythmias in Patients With Advanced Fabry Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Frank; Maier, Sebastian K G; Störk, Stefan; Brunner, Thomas; Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Seydelmann, Nora; Schneider, Andreas; Becher, Jan; Canan-Kühl, Sima; Blaschke, Daniela; Bijnens, Bart; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Nordbeck, Peter

    2016-07-15

    Patients with genetic cardiomyopathy that involves myocardial hypertrophy often develop clinically relevant arrhythmias that increase the risk of sudden death. Consequently, guidelines for medical device therapy were established for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but not for conditions with only anecdotal evidence of arrhythmias, like Fabry cardiomyopathy. Patients with Fabry cardiomyopathy progressively develop myocardial fibrosis, and sudden cardiac death occurs regularly. Because 24-hour Holter electrocardiograms (ECGs) might not detect clinically important arrhythmias, we tested an implanted loop recorder for continuous heart rhythm surveillance and determined its impact on therapy. This prospective study included 16 patients (12 men) with advanced Fabry cardiomyopathy, relevant hypertrophy, and replacement fibrosis in "loco typico." No patients previously exhibited clinically relevant arrhythmias on Holter ECGs. Patients received an implantable loop recorder and were prospectively followed with telemedicine for a median of 1.2 years (range 0.3 to 2.0 years). The primary end point was a clinically meaningful event, which required a therapy change, captured with the loop recorder. Patients submitted data regularly (14 ± 11 times per month). During follow-up, 21 events were detected (including 4 asystole, i.e., ECG pauses ≥3 seconds) and 7 bradycardia events; 5 episodes of intermittent atrial fibrillation (>3 minutes) and 5 episodes of ventricular tachycardia (3 sustained and 2 nonsustained). Subsequently, as defined in the primary end point, 15 events leaded to a change of therapy. These patients required therapy with a pacemaker or cardioverter-defibrillator implantation and/or anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation. In conclusion, clinically relevant arrhythmias that require further device and/or medical therapy are often missed with Holter ECGs in patients with advanced stage Fabry cardiomyopathy, but they can be detected by telemonitoring with

  20. Arrhythmias Seen in Baseline 24-Hour Holter ECG Recordings in Healthy Normal Volunteers During Phase 1 Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Pooja; Karnad, Dilip R; Rohekar, Prashant; Kerkar, Vaibhav; Lokhandwala, Yash Y; Kothari, Snehal

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory agencies encourage sponsors to submit 24-hour ambulatory ECG data for assessing cardiac safety of new drugs, and some arrhythmias, hitherto considered rare, have been observed in some early-phase studies. Interpretation of these observations is difficult given the dearth of published data on the prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias seen during 24-hour continuous ECG monitoring in healthy volunteers (HV) from clinical trials. We analyzed drug-free ambulatory ECG recordings from 1273 HV (1000 males, 273 females; age 18-65 years) from 22 phase 1 studies that were analyzed in a core ECG laboratory; all subjects had normal screening ECGs. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as supraventricular premature complexes were observed in 60.8% of healthy volunteers, supraventricular tachycardia in 2.2%, and atrial fibrillation in 0.1%. Ventricular arrhythmias included premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) in 43.4%, >200 PVCs per 24 hours in 3.3%, multifocal PVCs in 5.3%, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 0.7%, and accelerated idioventricular rhythm in 0.3%. Bradyarrhythmias included sinus pause >3 seconds in 0.3%, and second-degree AV block in 2.4%. Complete heart block and torsades de pointes were not seen in any subject. Based on the observed incidence, we estimated the maximum number of healthy subjects in whom these arrhythmias may be seen as a matter of chance in studies with smaller sample sizes if the study drug has no arrhythmogenic effect. Our results and these estimates could help interpret whether cardiac arrhythmias observed in early-phase studies are due to chance or possibly are a drug effect. PMID:26626443

  1. The role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to treatment of patients with cardiac arrhythmias: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Chen, Jian; Dobreanu, Dan; Madrid, Antonio Hernandez; Tilz, Roland; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias is increasingly complex because of continuous technological advance and multifaceted clinical conditions associated with ageing of the population, the presence of co-morbidities and the need for polypharmacy. The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association Scientific Initiatives Committee survey was to provide an insight into the role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias. Forty-eight centres from 18 European countries replied to the Web-based questionnaire. The presence of an Arrhythmia Team was reported by 44% of the respondents, whereas 17% were not familiar with this term. Apart from the electrophysiologist, health professionals who should belong to such teams, according to the majority of the respondents, include a clinical cardiologist, a nurse, a cardiac surgeon, a heart failure specialist, a geneticist, and a geriatrician. Its main activity should be dedicated to the management of patients with complex clinical conditions or refractory or inherited forms of arrhythmias. When present, the Arrhythmia Team was considered helpful by 95% of respondents; the majority of centres (79%) agreed that it should be implemented. The Arrhythmia Team seems to be connected to important expectations in the management of cardiac arrhythmias. The efficacy of such an integrated and multidisciplinary approach should be encouraged and tested in clinical practice. PMID:27174994

  2. Next-generation sequencing for the diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Steven A; Ellinor, Patrick T

    2015-05-01

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes are collectively associated with substantial morbidity, yet our understanding of the genetic architecture of these conditions remains limited. Recent technological advances in DNA sequencing have led to the commercialization of genetic testing now widely available in clinical practice. In particular, next-generation sequencing allows the large-scale and rapid assessment of entire genomes. Although next-generation sequencing represents a major technological advance, it has introduced numerous challenges with respect to the interpretation of genetic variation and has opened a veritable floodgate of biological data of unknown clinical significance to practitioners. In this review, we discuss current genetic testing indications for inherited arrhythmia syndromes, broadly outline characteristics of next-generation sequencing techniques, and highlight challenges associated with such testing. We further summarize future directions that will be necessary to address to enable the widespread adoption of next-generation sequencing in the routine management of patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes. PMID:25625719

  3. Experience inheritance from famous specialists based on real-world clinical research paradigm of traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Song, Guanli; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Runshun; Liu, Baoyan; Zhou, Xuezhong; Zhou, Xiaji; Zhang, Hong; Guo, Yufeng; Xue, Yanxing; Xu, Lili

    2014-09-01

    The current modes of experience inheritance from famous specialists in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) include master and disciple, literature review, clinical-epidemiology-based clinical research observation, and analysis and data mining via computer and database technologies. Each mode has its advantages and disadvantages. However, a scientific and instructive experience inheritance mode has not been developed. The advent of the big data era as well as the formation and practice accumulation of the TCM clinical research paradigm in the real world have provided new perspectives, techniques, and methods for inheriting experience from famous TCM specialists. Through continuous exploration and practice, the research group proposes the innovation research mode based on the real-world TCM clinical research paradigm, which involves the inheritance and innovation of the existing modes. This mode is formulated in line with its own development regularity of TCM and is expected to become the main mode of experience inheritance in the clinical field. PMID:25159993

  4. Marine omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids: From mechanisms to clinical implications in heart failure and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Glück, Tobias; Alter, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Therapeutic implications of marine omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) in cardiovascular disease are still discussed controversially. Several clinical trials report divergent findings and thus leave ambiguity on the meaning of oral omega-3 therapy. Potential prognostic indications of HUFA treatment have been predominantly studied in coronary artery disease, sudden cardiac death, ventricular arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation and heart failure of various origin. It is suspected that increased ventricular wall stress is crucially involved in the prognosis of heart failure. Increased wall stress and an unfavorable myocardial remodeling is associated with an increased risk of arrhythmias by stretch-activated membrane ion channels. Integration of HUFA into the microenvironment of cardiomyocyte ion channels lead to allosteric changes and increase the electrical stability. Increased ventricular wall stress appears to be involved in the local myocardial as well as in the hepatic fatty acid metabolism, i.e. a cardio-hepatic syndrome. Influences of an altered endogenous HUFA metabolism and an inverse shift of the fatty acid profile was underrated in the past. A better understanding of these interacting endogenous mechanisms appears to be required for interpreting the findings of recent experimental and clinical studies. The present article critically reviews major studies on basic pathophysiological mechanisms and treatment effects in clinical trials. PMID:27080538

  5. [Arrhythmias in athlets (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, H; Jungmann, H

    1978-10-20

    380 athletes in optimal performance were examinated within 10 years between 2 and 13 times (average: 4 times): ECG were taken at rest, during breathing tests and under maximal physical load by ergometry. 88 (23.2%) of them showed arrhythmias, 32 in the same examination different forms of premature beats. All kinds of arrhythmias were seen except atrial flatter, total av-block and paroxysmal tachycardias. Breathing tests provoked most of arrhythmias followed by the recovery after maximal physical load. Follow-up studies and clinical examinations proved that in 86 sportsmen these arrhythmias were not a symptom of heart disease. Only in 2 athletes heart injury could not be excluded. But in nearly 50% extracardial inflammations, like tonsillitis, bronchitis etc., were found. It is discussed that bradycardia and vagotonia of the highly trained sportsmen cause the arrhythmias. This vagotonia is intensified by breathing tests. But arrhythmias found in athletes should cause an examination for other chronical sicknesses. PMID:703672

  6. Arrhythmias in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rajdev, Archana; Garan, Hasan; Biviano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are important contributors to morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Such patients manifest a substrate resulting from altered autonomics, repolarization abnormalities, and ischemia. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and flutter are associated with worsened outcomes, and maintenance of sinus rhythm is a goal. Sudden death is a relatively common issue, though the contribution of malignant ventricular arrhythmias versus bradyarrhythmias differs from non-PAH patients. Congenital heart disease patients with PAH benefit from catheter ablation of medically refractory arrhythmias. Clinical studies of defibrillator/pacemaker therapy for primary prevention against sudden death in PAH patients are lacking. PMID:23009914

  7. Arrhythmias in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Archana; Garan, Hasan; Biviano, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are important contributors to morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Such patients manifest a substrate resulting from altered autonomics, repolarization abnormalities, and ischemia. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and flutter are associated with worsened outcomes, and maintenance of sinus rhythm is a goal. Sudden death is a relatively common issue, though the contribution of malignant ventricular arrhythmias versus bradyarrhythmias differs from non-PAH patients. Congenital heart disease patients with PAH benefit from catheter ablation of medically refractory arrhythmias. Clinical studies of defibrillator/pacemaker therapy for primary prevention against sudden death in PAH patients are lacking. PMID:23009914

  8. [New diagnostic tools for arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Teres, C; Burri, H

    2015-05-27

    Cardiac arrhythmias are common conditions that often manifest themselves intermittently, thus complicating their diagnosis, particularly in the ambulatory setting. Recently, technological advances have facilitated public access to health applications and devices. This article reviews the available technologies and analyses their usefulness for the diagnosis of arrhythmias in the context of everyday clinical practice. PMID:26182638

  9. Chronic granulomatous disease with unusual clinical manifestation, outcome, and pattern of inheritance in an Iranian family.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Saeed F; Tabarsi, Payam; Mansouri, Nahal; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Motazedi Ghajar, Mohamad A; Karimi, Shirin; Najar, Hossain M; Mansouri, Davood

    2006-05-01

    CGD is a rare phagocytic disorder manifesting as recurrent, severe bacterial and fungal infections. We describe an Iranian family with eight children, of whom six, five males and one female were diagnosed with CGD resulting in diffuse pulmonary sterile granulomatous lesions. Three died despite multiple courses of antibiotic and antituberculosis medications while three are alive, to date they are asymptomatic but with imaging and pathologic findings of pulmonary granulomatosis, treated with steroids. The parents are healthy. Our report describes the clinical manifestations and outcome in this family. The inheritance pattern suggests an autosomal recessive pattern with high penetrance. PMID:16783468

  10. Hemodynamics in fetal arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Sven-Erik; Acharya, Ganesh

    2016-06-01

    Fetal arrhythmias are among the few conditions that can be managed in utero. However, accurate diagnosis is essential for appropriate management. Ultrasound-based imaging methods can be used to study fetal heart structure and function noninvasively and help to understand fetal cardiovascular pathophysiology, and they remain the mainstay of evaluating fetuses with arrhythmias in clinical settings. Hemodynamic evaluation using Doppler echocardiography allows the elucidation of the electrophysiological mechanism and helps to make an accurate diagnosis. It can also be used as a tool to understand fetal cardiac pathophysiology, for assessing fetal condition and monitoring the effect of antiarrhythmic treatment. This narrative review describes Doppler techniques that are useful for evaluating fetal cardiac rhythms to refine diagnosis and provides an overview of hemodynamic changes observed in different types of fetal arrhythmia. PMID:26660845

  11. History of arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Janse, M J; Rosen, M R

    2006-01-01

    the late 1970s, and optical mapping in the 1980s, simultaneous registrations could be made from many sites. The analysis of atrial and ventricular fibrillation then became much more precise. The old question whether an arrhythmia is due to a focal or a re-entrant mechanism could be answered, and for atrial fibrillation, for instance, the answer is that both mechanisms may be operative. The road from understanding the mechanism of an arrhythmia to its successful therapy has been long: the studies of Mines in 1913 and 1914, microelectrode studies in animal preparations in the 1960s and 1970s, experimental and clinical demonstrations of initiation and termination of tachycardias by premature stimuli in the 1960s and 1970s, successful surgery in the 1980s, the development of external and implantable defibrillators in the 1960s and 1980s, and finally catheter ablation at the end of the previous century, with success rates that approach 99% for supraventricular tachycardias. PMID:16610339

  12. Inherited erythromelalgia due to mutations in SCN9A: natural history, clinical phenotype and somatosensory profile.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Aoibhinn; Schulman, Betsy; Ali, Zahid; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Brock, Fiona; Cobain, Sonia; Mainka, Tina; Vollert, Jan; Tarabar, Sanela; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-04-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia, the first human pain syndrome linked to voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely regarded as a genetic model of human pain. Because inherited erythromelalgia was linked to gain-of-function changes of sodium channel Na(v)1.7 only a decade ago, the literature has mainly consisted of reports of genetic and/or clinical characterization of individual patients. This paper describes the pattern of pain, natural history, somatosensory profile, psychosocial status and olfactory testing of 13 subjects with primary inherited erythromelalgia with mutations of SCN9A, the gene encoding Na(v)1.7. Subjects were clinically profiled using questionnaires, quantitative sensory testing and olfaction testing during the in-clinic phase of the study. In addition, a detailed pain phenotype for each subject was obtained over a 3-month period at home using diaries, enabling subjects to self-report pain attacks, potential triggers, duration and severity of pain. All subjects reported pain and heat in the extremities (usually feet and/or hands), with pain attacks triggered by heat or exercise and relieved mainly by non-pharmacological manoeuvres such as cooling. A large proportion of pain attacks (355/1099; 32%) did not involve a specific trigger. There was considerable variability in the number, duration and severity of pain attacks between subjects, even those carrying the same mutation within a family, and within individuals over the 12-13 week observation period. Most subjects (11/13) had pain between attacks. For these subjects, mean pain severity between pain attacks was usually lower than that during an attack. Olfaction testing using the Sniffin'T test did not demonstrate hyperosmia. One subject had evidence of orthostatic hypotension. Overall, there was a statistically significant correlation between total Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores (P= 0.005) and pain between attacks and for Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Depression scores and pain

  13. Inherited Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    With a prevalence of 1 in 2500 people, inherited peripheral nerve diseases, collectively called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are among the most common inherited neurologic disorders. Patients with CMT typically present with chronic muscle weakness and atrophy in limbs, sensory loss in the feet and hands, and foot deformities. Clinical similarities between patients often require genetic testing to achieve a precise diagnosis. In this article, the author reviews the clinical and pathologic features of CMT, and demonstrates how electrodiagnostic and genetic tools are used to assist in the diagnosis and symptomatic management of the diseases. Several cases are presented to illustrate the diagnostic processes. PMID:23117945

  14. Fetal cardiac arrhythmia detection and in utero therapy

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Janette F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    The human fetal heart develops arrhythmias and conduction disturbances in response to ischemia, inflammation, electrolyte disturbances, altered load states, structural defects, inherited genetic conditions, and many other causes. Yet sinus rhythm is present without altered rate or rhythm in some of the most serious electrophysiological diseases, which makes detection of diseases of the fetal conduction system challenging in the absence of magnetocardiographic or electrocardiographic recording techniques. Life-threatening changes in QRS or QT intervals can be completely unrecognized if heart rate is the only feature to be altered. For many fetal arrhythmias, echocardiography alone can assess important clinical parameters for diagnosis. Appropriate treatment of the fetus requires awareness of arrhythmia characteristics, mechanisms, and potential associations. Criteria to define fetal bradycardia specific to gestational age are now available and may allow detection of ion channelopathies, which are associated with fetal and neonatal bradycardia. Ectopic beats, once thought to be entirely benign, are now recognized to have important pathologic associations. Fetal tachyarrhythmias can now be defined precisely for mechanism-specific therapy and for subsequent monitoring of response. This article reviews the current and future diagnostic techniques and pharmacologic treatments for fetal arrhythmia. PMID:20418904

  15. Inherited retinal disorders in South Africa and the clinical impact of evolving technologies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L; Goliath, R; Rebello, G; Bardien, S; September, A V; Bartmann, L; Loubser, F; Greenberg, L J; Ramesar, R S

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degenerative disorders (RDDs) encompass a group of inherited diseases characterised by vision loss. The genetic and clinical complexity poses a challenge in unravelling the molecular genetic aetiology of this group of disorders. Furthermore, the population diversity in South Africa (SA) presents researchers with a particularly complicated task. Rapid advances in the development of cutting-edge technological platforms over the past two decades, however, have assisted in overcoming some of the challenges. The RDD research team has utilised these escalating technologies, which has facilitated a corresponding increase in molecular diagnoses. A biorepository has been established and comprises ~3 200 patient DNA samples archived with many forms of RDD (including retinitis pigmentosa, macular dystrophies, Stargardt disease, Leber congenital amaurosis, Usher syndrome and Bardet Biedl syndrome). A comprehensive review is presented of the SA journey spanning 25 years, into elucidating the molecular genetic basis of various forms of RDD in SA. PMID:27245521

  16. [Retracted] Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhong; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Jian; Wang, Tao; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-07-01

    We wish to retract our article entitled 'Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy' published in Molecular Medicine Reports 13: 4273-4278, 2016. The article was submitted by the first author, Xinhong Liu, without the prior knowledge of the corresponding author, Chuanzhu Yan, or the other authors included on the paper. Furthermore, the details of the paper were not discussed by the authors prior to the submission, and all are in agreement that the paper contains data therein (and interpretations thereof) which are either inaccurate or inappropriate. All the authors agree to this retraction, and we apologize for the inconvenience caused in this regard.[the original article was published in the Molecular Medicine Reports 13: 4273-4278, 2016; DOI: 10.3892/mmr.2016.5047]. PMID:27176730

  17. Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhong; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Jian; Wang, Tao; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to report on a family with pathologically and genetically diagnosed autosomal dominant inherited centronuclear myopathy (CNM). In addition, this study aimed to investigate the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic characteristics of the disease. This pedigree was traced back three generations, four patients underwent neurological examination, two patients underwent muscle biopsy, and eight family members were subjected to dynamin 2 (DNM2) gene mutation analysis. DNM2 mutations were detected in seven family members, of which four patients exhibited DNM2 mutation‑specific clinical and pathological features. Lower extremity weakness was the predominant symptom of these patients, however, proximal and distal lower extremity involvement was inconsistent. All patients exhibited marked systematic muscle atrophy and various degrees of facial muscle involvement. The patients presented the typical pathological changes of CNM, and their muscle tissues were heavily replaced by adipose tissue, with clustered distribution of muscle fibers as another notable feature. DNM2‑CNM patients of this pedigree exhibited heterogeneous clinical and pathological features, providing a basis for further molecular genetic analysis. PMID:27035234

  18. Living with an Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With an Arrhythmia Many arrhythmias are harmless. It's common to have an occasional ... heartbeat or mild palpitations . People who have harmless arrhythmias can live healthy lives. They usually don't ...

  19. Correlating perceived arrhythmia symptoms and QoL in the elderly with Heart Failure in an urban clinic: A prospective, single center study

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Kathleen T.; Reiffel, James; Sciacca, Robert R.; Whang, William; Biviano, Angelo; Baumeister, Maurita; Castillo, Carmen; Talathothi, Jyothi; Garan, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Aim To determine the relationship between quality of life (QoL) and perceived self reported symptoms in an elderly, ambulatory, urban population living with heart failure (HF). Background While arrhythmias in the elderly with HF are well documented, the association between perceived arrhythmia symptoms and QoL is not well defined. Design Prospective, cross sectional single center study. Methods A single-center, prospective study was conducted with HF patients recruited from an urban outpatient cardiology clinic in the United States. Fifty-seven patients completed a baseline QoL survey with 42 of these completing the 6-month follow-up survey. QoL was evaluated with the SF-36v2™ and frequency of symptoms with the Atrial Fibrillation Severity Scale. Subjects wore an auto triggered cardiac loop monitor (LifeStar AF Express®) for 2-weeks to document arrhythmias. Data analysis utilized Spearman’s rank correlation and logistic regression. Results Baseline and 6-month QoL measures did not correlate with recorded arrhythmias. However, perceptions of diminished general health correlated significantly with symptoms of exercise intolerance, lightheadedness/dizziness, palpitations, and chest pain/pressure. By multivariable logistic regression, more severe perceived arrhythmic, symptoms of exercise intolerance, and lightheadedness/dizziness were independently associated with diminished QoL. Conclusion QoL was significantly worse in patients with perceptions of severe arrhythmic episodes and in those whose symptoms of dizziness and exercise intolerance. Relevance to clinical practice The findings of this study indicate that symptomatic HF patients suffer from poor QoL and that interventions are needed to improve QoL and decrease symptom severity. Nurses who care for HF patients play an essential role in symptom evaluation and management and could significantly improve overall QoL in these patients by carefully evaluating symptomatology and testing interventions and

  20. Spectrum of Fascicular Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Sung, Raphael; Scheinman, Melvin

    2016-09-01

    Fascicular arrhythmias encompass a wide spectrum of ventricular arrhythmias that depend on the specialized conduction system of the right and left ventricles. These arrhythmias include premature ventricular complexes, monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and ventricular fibrillation. These arrhythmias may be organized by mechanism, including intrafascicular reentry, interfascicular reentry, and focal. Mapping and ablation of the fascicular system can result in high cure rates of debilitating and potentially life-threatening arrhythmias. When approaching these arrhythmias, careful consideration of the structure of the His Purkinje system as well as their electrophysiologic properties may help guide even the most complex of arrhythmias. PMID:27521090

  1. Regulatory T cells, inherited variation, and clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Keith L; Maurer, Matthew J; Preston, Claudia C; Moysich, Kirsten B; Goergen, Krista; Hawthorne, Kieran M; Cunningham, Julie M; Odunsi, Kunle; Hartmann, Lynn C; Kalli, Kimberly R; Oberg, Ann L; Goode, Ellen L

    2015-12-01

    The immune system constitutes one of the host factors modifying outcomes in ovarian cancer. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are believed to be a major factor in preventing the immune response from destroying ovarian cancers. Understanding mechanisms that regulate Tregs in the tumor microenvironment could lead to the identification of novel targets aimed at reducing their influence. In this study, we used immunofluorescence-based microscopy to enumerate Tregs, total CD4 T cells, and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells in fresh frozen tumors from over 400 patients with ovarian cancer (>80 % high-grade serous). We sought to determine whether Tregs were associated with survival and genetic variation in 79 genes known to influence Treg induction, trafficking, or function. We used Cox regression, accounting for known prognostic factors, to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) associated with T cell counts and ratios. We found that the ratios of CD8 T cells and total CD4 T cells to Tregs were associated with improved overall survival (CD8/Treg HR 0.84, p = 0.0089; CD4/Treg HR 0.88, p = 0.046) and with genetic variation in IL-10 (p = 0.0073 and 0.01, respectively). In multivariate analyses, the associations between the ratios and overall survival remained similar (IL-10 and clinical covariate-adjusted CD8/Treg HR 0.85, p = 0.031; CD4/Treg HR 0.87, p = 0.093), suggesting that this association was not driven by variation in IL-10. Thus, integration of novel tumor phenotyping measures with extensive clinical and genetic information suggests that the ratio of T cells to Tregs may be prognostic of outcome in ovarian cancer, regardless of inherited genotype in genes related to Tregs. PMID:26298430

  2. [Rational management of arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    González-Hermosillo, J A; Colín, L; Iturralde, P; Romero, L

    1990-01-01

    Despite the development of better diagnostic techniques and new modes of therapy, management of cardiac arrhythmias is still difficult. The lack of standardization in the indications of each technique has increased the risk of overtreatment and unnecessary cost. This paper describes the minimal requirements necessary for the different techniques and the appropriate information that should be collected from each. A well taken clinical history and a 12-lead EKG give very important information for the decision on when and how to treat. PMID:2091549

  3. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing--an editorial overview of selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2014-04-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management.This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing. PMID:24783482

  4. Oculodentodigital dysplasia: study of ophthalmological and clinical manifestations in three boys with probably autosomal recessive inheritance.

    PubMed

    Frasson, Maria; Calixto, Nassim; Cronemberger, Sebastião; de Aguiar, Regina Amélia Lopes Pessoa; Leão, Letícia Lima; de Aguiar, Marcos José Burle

    2004-09-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is a rare inherited disorder affecting the development of the face, eyes, teeth, and limbs. The majority of cases of ODDD are inherited as an autosomal dominant condition. There are few reports of probable autosomal recessive transmission. Affected patients exhibit a distinctive physiognomy with a narrow nose, hypoplastic alae nasi, and anteverted nostrils, bilateral microphthalmos, and microcornea. Sometimes iris anomalies and secondary glaucoma are present. There are malformations of the distal extremities such as syndactyly. In addition, there are defects in the dental enamel with hypoplasia and yellow discoloration of the teeth. Less common features include hypotrichosis, intracranial calcifications, and conductive deafness secondary to recurrent otitis media. We describe three brothers with ODDD. Their parents are first cousins and present no features of ODDD. These data are in favor of autosomal recessive inheritance and suggest genetic heterogeneity for this entity. PMID:15512999

  5. Prevention and Treatment of Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Prevention & Treatment of Arrhythmia Updated:Sep 2,2016 Do ... Risk for Arrhythmia • Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of Arrhythmia • Prevention & Treatment of Arrhythmia Introduction Medications Ablation Devices for ...

  6. Children and Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ...

  7. Treating Arrhythmias in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ...

  8. How Are Arrhythmias Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some arrhythmias are treated with a jolt of electricity to the heart. This type of treatment is ... senses a dangerous ventricular arrhythmia, it sends an electric shock to the heart to restore a normal ...

  9. Cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Robert J; Garan, Hasan

    2014-08-01

    As more women with repaired congenital heart disease survive to their reproductive years and many other women are delaying pregnancy until later in life, a rising concern is the risk of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy. Naturally occurring cardiovascular changes during pregnancy increase the likelihood that a recurrence of a previously experienced cardiac arrhythmia or a de novo arrhythmia will occur. Arrhythmias should be thoroughly investigated to determine if there is a reversible etiology, and risks/benefits of treatment options should be fully explored. We discuss the approach to working up and treating various arrhythmias during pregnancy with attention to fetal and maternal risks as well as treatment of fetal arrhythmias. Acute management in stable patients includes close monitoring and intravenous pharmacologic therapy, while DC cardioversion should be used to terminate arrhythmias in hemodynamically unstable patients. Long-term management may require continued oral antiarrhythmic therapy, with particular attention to fetal safety, to prevent complications associated with arrhythmias. PMID:25037518

  10. Use of Whole Exome Sequencing for the Identification of Ito-Based Arrhythmia Mechanism and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Amy C; Kline, Crystal F; Glynn, Patric; Johnson, Benjamin L; Curran, Jerry; Kilic, Ahmet; Higgins, Robert S D; Binkley, Philip F; Janssen, Paul M L; Weiss, Raul; Raman, Subha V; Fowler, Steven J; Priori, Silvia G; Hund, Thomas J; Carnes, Cynthia A; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Background Identified genetic variants are insufficient to explain all cases of inherited arrhythmia. We tested whether the integration of whole exome sequencing with well-established clinical, translational, and basic science platforms could provide rapid and novel insight into human arrhythmia pathophysiology and disease treatment. Methods and Results We report a proband with recurrent ventricular fibrillation, resistant to standard therapeutic interventions. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a variant in a previously unidentified exon of the dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like protein-6 (DPP6) gene. This variant is the first identified coding mutation in DPP6 and augments cardiac repolarizing current (Ito) causing pathological changes in Ito and action potential morphology. We designed a therapeutic regimen incorporating dalfampridine to target Ito. Dalfampridine, approved for multiple sclerosis, normalized the ECG and reduced arrhythmia burden in the proband by >90-fold. This was combined with cilostazol to accelerate the heart rate to minimize the reverse-rate dependence of augmented Ito. Conclusions We describe a novel arrhythmia mechanism and therapeutic approach to ameliorate the disease. Specifically, we identify the first coding variant of DPP6 in human ventricular fibrillation. These findings illustrate the power of genetic approaches for the elucidation and treatment of disease when carefully integrated with clinical and basic/translational research teams. PMID:26015324

  11. A clinical perspective on ethical arguments around prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for later onset inherited cancer predispositions.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Tara

    2010-03-01

    Prenatal diagnosis (PND) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for later onset and/or reduced penetrance inherited cancer predispositions, e.g. familial adenomatous polyposis, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, raise a number of ethical issues. Some of these are the same as for conditions which present early in childhood, are fully penetrant and for which no/limited treatment options are possible; others relate to whether reduced penetrance and/or the availability of treatment mean that these are not serious (enough) conditions to warrant tests prior to/during pregnancy or to justify termination of pregnancy. However, attempts to reach a consensus on what counts as a serious (enough) condition in the context of PND and PGD have been unsuccessful. Such a definition may anyway be unhelpful if it cannot also take into account, for example, the woman's/couple's awareness and experience of the condition and the impact of the condition on affected individuals and their families. Individuals affected by, or at high risk of, later onset and/or reduced penetrance inherited cancer predispositions are generally supportive of access to PND and PGD for their own conditions, even if they would not consider using it themselves. Professionals working in clinical cancer genetics need to be prepared to discuss PND and PGD with this group of patients. PMID:19644768

  12. Anger and ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Although anecdotal evidence has long suggested links between emotion and ventricular arrhythmia, more recent studies have prospectively demonstrated the arrhythmogenic effects of anger, as well as mechanisms underlying these effects. Recent findings Epidemiological studies reveal that psychological stress increases sudden death, as well as arrhythmias, in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, in populations during emotionally devastating disasters such as earthquake or war. Diary-based studies confirm that anger and other negative emotions can trigger potentially lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Anger alters electrophysiological properties of the myocardium, including T-wave alternans, a measure of heterogeneity of repolarization, suggesting one mechanistic link between emotion and arrhythmia. Pilot studies of behavioral interventions have shown promise in decreasing arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Summary Anger and other strong emotions can trigger polymorphic, potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in vulnerable patients. Through autonomic changes including increased sympathetic activity and vagal withdrawal, anger leads to increases in heterogeneity of repolarization as measured by T-wave alternans, known to be associated with arrhythmogenesis, as well as increasing inducibility of arrhythmia. Further delineation of mechanisms linking anger and arrhythmia, and of approaches to decrease the detrimental effects of anger and other negative emotions on arrhythmogenesis, are important areas of future investigation. PMID:19864944

  13. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for inherited breast cancer: first clinical application and live birth in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Polo, Ana; Martínez, Olga; Giménez, Carles; Arjona, César; Llort, Gemma; Bassas, Lluís; Viscasillas, Pere; Calaf, Joaquin

    2012-06-01

    Carriers of a mutation in BRCA1/2 genes confront a high lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer and fifty percent probability of passing the mutation to their offspring. Current options for risk management influence childbearing decisions. The indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) have now been expanded to include predisposition for single-gene, late-onset cancer but few cases have been reported to date despite the favorable opinion among professionals and carriers. A 28-year-old BRCA1 mutation carrier (5273G>A in exon 19) with a strong maternal history of breast cancer and 2 years of infertility decided to pursue PGD to have a healthy descendent after an accurate assessment of her reproductive options. The procedure was approved by the national regulation authority and a PGD cycle was initiated. Four out of 6 embryos harbored the mutation. The two unaffected embryos were implanted in the uterus. A singleton pregnancy was achieved and a male baby was delivered at term. Consented umbilical cord blood testing confirmed the accuracy of the technique. Individualized PGD for inherited breast predisposition is feasible in the context of a multidisciplinary team. PMID:22179695

  14. OPA1-related disorders: Diversity of clinical expression, modes of inheritance and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Chao de la Barca, Juan Manuel; Prunier-Mirebeau, Delphine; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Ferré, Marc; Sarzi, Emmanuelle; Bris, Céline; Leruez, Stéphanie; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Gueguen, Naïg; Verny, Christophe; Hamel, Christian; Miléa, Dan; Procaccio, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Lenaers, Guy; Reynier, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the Optic Atrophy 1 gene (OPA1) were first identified in 2000 as the main cause of Dominant Optic Atrophy, a disease specifically affecting the retinal ganglion cells and the optic nerve. Since then, an increasing number of symptoms involving the central, peripheral and autonomous nervous systems, with considerable variations of age of onset and severity, have been reported in OPA1 patients. This variety of phenotypes is attributed to differences in the effects of OPA1 mutations, to the mode of inheritance, which may be mono- or bi-allelic, and eventually to somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations. The diversity of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in OPA1-related disorders is linked to the crucial role played by OPA1 in the maintenance of mitochondrial structure, genome and function. The neurological expression of these disorders highlights the importance of mitochondrial dynamics in neuronal processes such as dendritogenesis, axonal transport, and neuronal survival. Thus, OPA1-related disorders may serve as a paradigm in the wider context of neurodegenerative syndromes, particularly for the development of novel therapeutic strategies against these diseases. PMID:26311407

  15. Noninvasive diagnostic mapping of supraventricular arrhythmias (Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome and atrial arrhythmias).

    PubMed

    Cakulev, Ivan; Sahadevan, Jayakumar; Waldo, Albert L

    2015-03-01

    The 12-lead electrocardiogram has limited value in precisely identifying the origin of focal or critical component of reentrant arrhythmias during supraventricular arrhythmias, as well as precisely locating accessory atrioventricular conduction pathways. Because of these limitations, efforts have been made to reconstruct epicardial activation sequences from body surface measurements obtained noninvasively. The last decade has registered significant progress in obtaining clinically useful data from the attempts to noninvasively map the epicardial electrical activity. This article summarizes the recent advances made in this area, specifically addressing the clinical outcomes of such efforts relating to atrial arrhythmias and Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome. PMID:25784024

  16. Relationship Between Foveal Cone Structure and Clinical Measures of Visual Function in Patients With Inherited Retinal Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, Kavitha; Carroll, Joseph; Porco, Travis C.; Duncan, Jacque L.; Roorda, Austin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To study the relationship between cone spacing and density and clinical measures of visual function near the fovea. Methods. High-resolution images of the photoreceptor mosaic were obtained with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy from 26 patients with inherited retinal degenerations. Cone spacing measures were made close to or at the foveal center (mean [SD] eccentricity, 0.02 [0.03] degree; maximum eccentricity, 0.13 degree) and were converted to Z-scores, fraction of cones, and percentage-of-cones-below-average compared with normal values for each location (based on 37 age-similar visually normal eyes). Z-scores and percentage of cones below average were compared with best-corrected visual acuity (VA) and foveal sensitivity. Results. Visual acuity was significantly correlated with cone spacing (Spearman rank correlation ρ = −0.60, P = 0.003) and was preserved (≥80 letters), despite cone density measures that were 52% below normal. Foveal sensitivity showed significant correlation with cone spacing (ρ = −0.47, P = 0.017) and remained normal (≥35 decibels), despite density measures that were approximately 52% to 62% below normal. Conclusions. Cone density was reduced by up to 62% below normal at or near the fovea in eyes with VA and sensitivity that remained within normal limits. Despite a significant correlation with foveal cone spacing, VA and sensitivity are insensitive indicators of the integrity of the foveal cone mosaic. Direct, objective measures of cone structure may be more sensitive indicators of disease severity than VA or foveal sensitivity in eyes with inherited retinal degenerations. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00254605.) PMID:23908179

  17. Arrhythmias presenting in neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Brucato, A; Previtali, E; Ramoni, V; Ghidoni, S

    2010-09-01

    Perfusion of human foetal heart with anti-Ro/SSA antibodies induces transient heart block. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies may cross-react with T- and L-type calcium channels, and anti-p200 antibodies may cause calcium to accumulate in rat heart cells. These actions may explain a direct electrophysiological effect of these antibodies. Congenital complete heart block is the more severe manifestation of so-called "Neonatal Lupus". In clinical practice, it is important to distinguish in utero complete versus incomplete atrioventricular (AV) block, as complete AV block to date is irreversible, while incomplete AV block has been shown to be potentially reversible after fluorinated steroid therapy. Another issue is the definition of congenital AV block, as cardiologists have considered congenital blocks detected months or years after birth. We propose as congenital blocks detected in utero or within the neonatal period (0-27 days after birth). The possible detection of first degree AV block in utero, with different techniques, might be a promising tool to assess the effects of these antibodies. Other arrhythmias have been described in NL or have been linked to anti-Ro/SSA antibodies: first degree AV block, in utero and after birth, second degree (i.e. incomplete block), sinus bradycardia and QT prolongation, both in infants and in adults, ventricular arrhythmias (in adults). Overall, these arrhythmias have not a clinical relevance, but are important for research purposes. PMID:20696016

  18. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: ‘cardiac arrhythmias’ and ‘epilepsy’. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  19. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  20. Inherited Pain

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O.; Kist, Andreas M.; Lampe, Anne K.; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited “paroxysmal extreme pain disorder” (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079–11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T

  1. Understand Your Risk for Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Understand Your Risk for Arrhythmia Updated:Apr 6,2016 Expected changes in heart ... content was last reviewed on 10/23/2014. Arrhythmia • Home • About Arrhythmia • Why Arrhythmia Matters • Understand Your ...

  2. [On the clinical applications of logotherapy: a review of Victor Emil Frankl inheritance].

    PubMed

    Girmenia, E; Andrissi, L; Tambone, V

    2014-01-01

    The Viktor E. Frankl's thought has found wide application in many areas of the Clinic, not limited to the neuropsychiatric area. If the franklian work is known worldwide for being a theory and a practice within neurotic disorders, we must not forget how logotherapy has been put at the disposal of the sufferer in its broadest sense. Especially in the context of care and care of the chronically and evolutionary ill (cancer, heart disease, degenerative diseases, etc.), the thought and practice logotherapy have made and continue to make a valuable contribution. In this review we will cover in more detail the application of logotherapy in clinical-care, pausing to examine the international literature. PMID:25203351

  3. Devices for Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart an electric shock (as with a defibrillator ). For people with recurrent arrhythmias, medical devices such as a pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) can help by continuously monitoring the heart's ...

  4. Systems Pharmacology of Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Seth I.; Ma’ayan, Avi; Iyengar, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Long-QT syndrome (LQTS) is a congenital or drug-induced change in electrical activity of the heart that can lead to fatal arrhythmias. Mutations in 12 genes encoding ion channels and associated proteins are linked with congenital LQTS. With a computational systems biology approach, we found that gene products involved in LQTS formed a distinct functional neighborhood within the human interactome. Other diseases form similarly selective neighborhoods, and comparison of the LQTS neighborhood with other disease-centered neighborhoods suggested a molecular basis for associations between seemingly unrelated diseases that have increased risk of cardiac complications. By combining the LQTS neighborhood with published genome-wide association study data, we identified previously unknown single-nucleotide polymorphisms likely to affect the QT interval. We found that targets of U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drugs that cause LQTS as an adverse event were enriched in the LQTS neighborhood. With the LQTS neighborhood as a classifier, we predicted drugs likely to have risks for QT effects and we validated these predictions with the FDA’s Adverse Events Reporting System, illustrating how network analysis can enhance the detection of adverse drug effects associated with drugs in clinical use. Thus, the identification of disease-selective neighborhoods within the human interactome can be useful for predicting new gene variants involved in disease, explaining the complexity underlying adverse drug side effects, and predicting adverse event susceptibility for new drugs. PMID:20407125

  5. Giant axonal neuropathy: a rare inherited neuropathy with simple clinical clues

    PubMed Central

    Kamate, Mahesh; Ramakrishna, Shashikala; Kambali, Shweta; Mahadevan, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterised by accumulation of excess neurofilaments in the axons of peripheral and central nervous systems, which hampers signal transmission. It usually manifests in infancy and early childhood and is slowly progressive. Those affected with GAN have characteristic curly kinky hair, everted feet and a crouched gait, which suggest the diagnosis in most cases. We describe twin children who presented with difficulty in walking and an abnormal gait since they began walking; clinical clues such as hair changes led us to the final diagnosis. PMID:25216920

  6. Clinical effects of phosphodiesterase 3A mutations in inherited hypertension with brachydactyly.

    PubMed

    Toka, Okan; Tank, Jens; Schächterle, Carolin; Aydin, Atakan; Maass, Philipp G; Elitok, Saban; Bartels-Klein, Eireen; Hollfinger, Irene; Lindschau, Carsten; Mai, Knut; Boschmann, Michael; Rahn, Gabriele; Movsesian, Matthew A; Müller, Thomas; Doescher, Andrea; Gnoth, Simone; Mühl, Astrid; Toka, Hakan R; Wefeld-Neuenfeld, Yvette; Utz, Wolfgang; Töpper, Agnieszka; Jordan, Jens; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Klussmann, Enno; Bähring, Sylvia; Luft, Friedrich C

    2015-10-01

    Autosomal-dominant hypertension with brachydactyly is a salt-independent Mendelian syndrome caused by activating mutations in the gene encoding phosphodiesterase 3A. These mutations increase the protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of phosphodiesterase 3A resulting in enhanced cAMP-hydrolytic affinity and accelerated cell proliferation. The phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein is diminished, and parathyroid hormone-related peptide is dysregulated, potentially accounting for all phenotypic features. Untreated patients die prematurely of stroke; however, hypertension-induced target-organ damage is otherwise hardly apparent. We conducted clinical studies of vascular function, cardiac functional imaging, platelet function in affected and nonaffected persons, and cell-based assays. Large-vessel and cardiac functions indeed seem to be preserved. The platelet studies showed normal platelet function. Cell-based studies demonstrated that available phosphodiesterase 3A inhibitors suppress the mutant isoforms. However, increasing cGMP to indirectly inhibit the enzyme seemed to have particular use. Our results shed more light on phosphodiesterase 3A activation and could be relevant to the treatment of severe hypertension in the general population. PMID:26283042

  7. Short QT Syndrome in Current Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Khera, Sahil; Jacobson, Jason T

    2016-01-01

    Short QT syndrome is a rare inherited autosomal dominant cardiac channelopathy associated with malignant ventricular and atrial arrhythmias. A shortened corrected QT interval is a marker for risk of malignant arrhythmias, which are secondary to increased transmural dispersion of repolarization. The underlying gain of function mutations in the potassium channels are most common but genetic testing remains low yield. This review discusses the cellular mechanisms, genetic involvement, clinical presentation, and current recommended management of patients with short QT syndrome relevant to current clinical practice. PMID:26440650

  8. Congenital keratoconjunctivitis sicca and ichthyosiform dermatosis in 25 Cavalier King Charles spaniel dogs. Part I: clinical signs, histopathology, and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Claudia; Donaldson, David; Smith, Ken C; Henley, William; Lewis, Tom W; Blott, Sarah; Mellersh, Cathryn; Barnett, Keith C

    2012-09-01

    The clinical presentation and progression (over 9 months to 13 years) of congenital keratoconjunctivitis sicca and ichthyosiform dermatosis (CKCSID) in the Cavalier King Charles spaniel dog are described for six new cases and six previously described cases. Cases presented with a congenitally abnormal (rough/curly) coat and signs of KCS from eyelid opening. Persistent scale along the dorsal spine and flanks with a harsh frizzy and alopecic coat was evident in the first few months of life. Ventral abdominal skin was hyperpigmented and hyperkeratinized in adulthood. Footpads were hyperkeratinized from young adulthood with nail growth abnormalities and intermittent sloughing. Long-term follow-up of cases (13/25) is described. Immunomodulatory/lacrimostimulant treatment had no statistically significant effect on Schirmer tear test results, although subjectively, this treatment reduced progression of the keratitis. Histopathological analysis of samples (skin/footpads/lacrimal glands/salivary glands) for three new cases was consistent with an ichthyosiform dermatosis, with no pathology of the salivary or lacrimal glands identified histologically. Pedigree analysis suggests the syndrome is inherited by an autosomal recessive mode. PMID:22212237

  9. Noninvasive mapping of ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok J; Lim, Han S; Yamashita, Seigo; Zellerhoff, Stephan; Berte, Benjamin; Mahida, Saagar; Hooks, Darren; Aljefairi, Nora; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Sacher, Frédéric; Jais, Pierre; Dubois, Rémi; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead electrocardiogram-based three-dimensional imaging modality to refine noninvasive diagnosis and improve the management of heart rhythm disorders. This article reviews the clinical potential of this noninvasive mapping technique in identifying the sources of electrical disorders and guiding the catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats and ventricular tachycardia). The article also briefly refers to the noninvasive electrical imaging of the arrhythmogenic ventricular substrate based on the electrophysiologic characteristics of postinfarction ventricular myocardium. PMID:25784026

  10. Mitochondria and Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential to providing ATP thereby satisfying the energy demand of the incessant electrical activity and contractile action of cardiac muscle. Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction can adversely impact cardiac electrical functioning by impairing the intracellular ion homeostasis and membrane excitability through reduced ATP production and excessive reactive oxidative species (ROS) generation, resulting in increased propensity to cardiac arrhythmias. In this review, the molecular mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to cardiac arrhythmias are discussed with an emphasis on the impact of increased mitochondrial ROS on the cardiac ion channels and transporters that are critical to maintaining normal electromechanical functioning of the cardiomyocytes. The potential of using mitochondria-targeted antioxidants as a novel anti-arrhythmia therapy is highlighted. PMID:24713422

  11. [Alcohol and arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, D; Jurisch, D; Neef, M; Hagendorff, A

    2016-09-01

    The effects of alcohol on induction of arrhythmias is dose-dependent, independent of preexisting cardiovascular diseases or heart failure and can affect otherwise healthy subjects. While the probability of atrial fibrillation increases with the alcohol dosage, events of sudden cardiac death are less frequent with low and moderate consumption but occur more often in heavy drinkers with alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Men are first affected at higher dosages of alcohol but women can suffer from arrhythmias at lower dosages. Thromboembolisms and ischemic stroke can occur less often at lower dosages of alcohol; however, hemorrhagic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage are increased with higher alcohol dosages. Recognizable protective mechanisms of alcohol with respect to cardiovascular diseases only occur with lower amounts of alcohol of less than 10 g per day. Underlying mechanisms explain these controversial effects. Specific therapeutic options for alcohol-related arrhythmias apart from abstinence from alcohol consumption are not known. PMID:27582366

  12. The Utility of Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring for Detecting Silent Arrhythmias and Clarifying Symptom Mechanism in an Urban Elderly Population with Heart Failure and Hypertension: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Kathleen T; Reiffel, James; Sciacca, Robert R; Whang, William; Biviano, Angelo; Baumeister, Maurita; Castillo, Carmen; Talathothi, Jyothi; Garan, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial and ventriclar tachyarrhythmias, as well as bradyarrhythmias, in the elderly with heart failure (HF) and/or hypertension (HTN) have been well documented. However, the frequency of these arrhythmias, whether silent or symptomatic, and their association with subsequent cardiac events has not been well defined in patients 65 years or older with HF and other cardiovascular risk factors. OBJECTIVE: To assess the value of 2 weeks of remote, transtelephonic cardiac monitoring for detecting arrhythmias in an elderly, urban population living with HF. METHODS: Fifty-four patients with a history of systolic HF and/or HTN were consented and enrolled. All wore an auto triggered cardiac loop monitor for 2 weeks that captures EKG data and both silent and symptomatic arrhythmias were recorded. RESULTS: Mean age was 73 ± 6 years with 59% of subjects were females, 74% Hispanic, 22% black, and 4% white/other. All patients had HF and 94% had HTN. From the cardiac monitoring, 72% demonstrated ectopic atrial and ventricular activity, and 1 paroxysmal episode of atrial fibrillation was documented. In addition, 3 subjects had significant non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, and 4 individuals had severe bradycardia recorded on cardiac monitoring. These 7 individuals underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker based on the documented arrhythmias which may have otherwise gone undetected. CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of patients exhibited cardiac arrhythmias. Future morbidity was prevented because of the detection of arrhythmias on monitoring that led to specific therapies such as pacemaker or ICD implantation which otherwise may not have been implemented. PMID:20798788

  13. The Utility of Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring for Detecting Silent Arrhythmias and Clarifying Symptom Mechanism in an Urban Elderly Population with Heart Failure and Hypertension: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Kathleen T.; Reiffel, James; Sciacca, Robert R.; Whang, William; Biviano, Angelo; Baumeister, Maurita; Castillo, Carmen; Talathothi, Jyothi; Garan, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Background Atrial and ventriclar tachyarrhythmias, as well as bradyarrhythmias, in the elderly with heart failure (HF) and/or hypertension (HTN) have been well documented. However, the frequency of these arrhythmias, whether silent or symptomatic, and their association with subsequent cardiac events has not been well defined in patients 65 years or older with HF and other cardiovascular risk factors. Objective To assess the value of 2 weeks of remote, transtelephonic cardiac monitoring for detecting arrhythmias in an elderly, urban population living with HF. Methods Fifty-four patients with a history of systolic HF and/or HTN were consented and enrolled. All wore an auto triggered cardiac loop monitor for 2 weeks that captures EKG data and both silent and symptomatic arrhythmias were recorded. Results Mean age was 73 ± 6 years with 59% of subjects were females, 74% Hispanic, 22% black, and 4% white/other. All patients had HF and 94% had HTN. From the cardiac monitoring, 72% demonstrated ectopic atrial and ventricular activity, and 1 paroxysmal episode of atrial fibrillation was documented. In addition, 3 subjects had significant non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, and 4 individuals had severe bradycardia recorded on cardiac monitoring. These 7 individuals underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker based on the documented arrhythmias which may have otherwise gone undetected. Conclusion A substantial proportion of patients exhibited cardiac arrhythmias. Future morbidity was prevented because of the detection of arrhythmias on monitoring that led to specific therapies such as pacemaker or ICD implantation which otherwise may not have been implemented. PMID:20798788

  14. Fetal and Neonatal Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Jaeggi, Edgar; Öhman, Annika

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an important aspect of fetal and neonatal medicine. Premature complexes of atrial or ventricular origin are the main cause of an irregular heart rhythm. The finding is typically unrelated to an identifiable cause and no treatment is required. Tachyarrhythmia most commonly relates to supraventricular reentrant tachycardia, atrial flutter, and sinus tachycardia. Several antiarrhythmic agents are available for the perinatal treatment of tachyarrhythmias. Enduring bradycardia may result from sinus node dysfunction, complete heart block and nonconducted atrial bigeminy as the main arrhythmia mechanisms. The management and outcome of bradycardia depend on the underlying mechanism. PMID:26876124

  15. Inherited interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Christine Kim; Raghu, Ganesh

    2004-09-01

    This article focuses on recent advances in the identification of genes and genetic polymorphisms that have been implicated in the development of human interstitial lung diseases. It focuses on the inherited mendelian diseases in which pulmonary fibrosis is part of the clinical phenotype and the genetics of familial idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other rare inherited interstitial lung diseases. The article also reviews the association studies that have been published to date regarding the genetics of sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The reader is directed to recent reviews on human genetic predisposition of sarcoidosis, environmental-related, drug-related, connective tissue related pulmonary fibrosis, and genetic predisposition of fibrosis in animal models. PMID:15331184

  16. Electromechanical wave imaging for arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Thanh-Hieu Nguyen, Vu; Legrand, Diégo; Okrasinski, Stan; Costet, Alexandre; Gambhir, Alok; Garan, Hasan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2011-11-01

    Electromechanical wave imaging (EWI) is a novel ultrasound-based imaging modality for mapping of the electromechanical wave (EW), i.e. the transient deformations occurring in immediate response to the electrical activation. The correlation between the EW and the electrical activation has been established in prior studies. However, the methods used previously to map the EW required the reconstruction of images over multiple cardiac cycles, precluding the application of EWI for non-periodic arrhythmias such as fibrillation. In this study, new imaging sequences are developed and applied based on flash- and wide-beam emissions to image the entire heart at very high frame rates (2000 fps) during free breathing in a single heartbeat. The methods are first validated by imaging the heart of an open-chest canine while simultaneously mapping the electrical activation using a 64-electrode basket catheter. Feasibility is then assessed by imaging the atria and ventricles of closed-chest, conscious canines during sinus rhythm and during right-ventricular pacing following atrio-ventricular dissociation, i.e., during a non-periodic rhythm. The EW was validated against electrode measurements in the open-chest case, and followed the expected electrical propagation pattern in the closed-chest setting. These results indicate that EWI can be used for the characterization of non-periodic arrhythmias in conditions similar to the clinical setting, in a single heartbeat, and during free breathing.

  17. Electromechanical Wave Imaging for Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Nguyen, Vu Thanh-Hieu; Legrand, Diégo; Okrasinski, Stan; Costet, Alexandre; Gambhir, Alok; Garan, Hasan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Electromechanical Wave Imaging (EWI) is a novel ultrasound-based imaging modality for the mapping of the electromechanical wave (EW), i.e., the transient deformations occurring in immediate response to the electrical activation. The correlation between the EW and the electrical activation has been established in previous studies. However, the methods used previously to map the EW required the reconstruction of images over multiple cardiac cycle, precluding the application of EWI for non-periodic arrhythmia such as fibrillation. In this study, we develop new imaging sequences based on flash and wide-beam emissions to image the entire heart at very high frame rate (2000 fps) during free breathing in a single heartbeat. The methods are first validated by imaging the heart of an open-chest canine while simultaneously mapping the electrical activation using a 64-electrode basket catheter. Feasibility is then assessed by imaging the atria and ventricles of closed-chest, conscious canines during sinus rhythm and during right-ventricular pacing following atrioventricular dissociation, i.e., a non-periodic rhythm. The EW was validated against electrode measurements in the open-chest case, and followed the expected electrical propagation pattern in the closed-chest setting. These results indicate that EWI can be used for the characterization of non-periodic arrhythmia in conditions close to the clinical setting, in a single heartbeat, and during free-breathing. PMID:22024555

  18. Electromechanical wave imaging for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Nguyen, Vu Thanh-Hieu; Legrand, Diégo; Okrasinski, Stan; Costet, Alexandre; Gambhir, Alok; Garan, Hasan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2011-11-21

    Electromechanical wave imaging (EWI) is a novel ultrasound-based imaging modality for mapping of the electromechanical wave (EW), i.e. the transient deformations occurring in immediate response to the electrical activation. The correlation between the EW and the electrical activation has been established in prior studies. However, the methods used previously to map the EW required the reconstruction of images over multiple cardiac cycles, precluding the application of EWI for non-periodic arrhythmias such as fibrillation. In this study, new imaging sequences are developed and applied based on flash- and wide-beam emissions to image the entire heart at very high frame rates (2000 fps) during free breathing in a single heartbeat. The methods are first validated by imaging the heart of an open-chest canine while simultaneously mapping the electrical activation using a 64-electrode basket catheter. Feasibility is then assessed by imaging the atria and ventricles of closed-chest, conscious canines during sinus rhythm and during right-ventricular pacing following atrio-ventricular dissociation, i.e., during a non-periodic rhythm. The EW was validated against electrode measurements in the open-chest case, and followed the expected electrical propagation pattern in the closed-chest setting. These results indicate that EWI can be used for the characterization of non-periodic arrhythmias in conditions similar to the clinical setting, in a single heartbeat, and during free breathing. PMID:22024555

  19. Inherited 1q21.1q21.2 duplication and 16p11.2 deletion: a two-hit case with more severe clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Brisset, Sophie; Capri, Yline; Briand-Suleau, Audrey; Tosca, Lucie; Gras, Domitille; Fauret-Amsellem, Anne-Laure; Pineau, Dominique; Saada, Julien; Ortonne, Valérie; Verloes, Alain; Goossens, Michel; Tachdjian, Gérard; Métay, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    We report paternally inherited duplication of 1q12q21.2 of 5.8 Mb associated with maternally inherited deletion of 16p11.2 of 545 Kb, this latter first identified in a fetus exhibiting an absent nasal bone detected during pregnancy. During the neonatal period, the young boy presented developmental delay, epilepsy, congenital anomalies and overweight. The clinical features of the proband with two rearrangements were more severe than in either of the parents carrying only one or the other mutation. Thus our data support a two-hit model in which the concomitant presence of these two copy-number variations exacerbates the neurodevelopmental phenotype. PMID:26162704

  20. Clinical spectrum in homozygotes and compound heterozygotes inheriting cystic fibrosis mutation 3849+10kbC>T: Significance for geneticists

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, F.; Li, Zhen; Arzimanoglou, I.

    1995-09-25

    We describe patients inheriting cystic fibrosis (CF) mutation 3849+10kbC>T as homozygotes or compound heterozygotes. Three unrelated homozygotes for this mutation were all pancreatic-sufficient and sweat test-negative or inconclusive. Among the compound heterozygotes, both pancreatic sufficiency and insufficiency, as well as positive and negative/inconclusive sweat test results are reported, expanding the range of clinical expression associated with inheritance of this mutation. 3849+10kbC>T is one of several CF mutations that can result in atypical or variant forms of CF. For geneticists, the diagnosis of variant CF has implications for recurrence risk and prognosis counseling of the families of affected individuals, and possibly for CF carrier screening in the general population. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Perspective: A Dynamics-Based Classification of Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, James N.; Garfinkel, Alan; Karagueuzian, Hrayr S.; Nguyen, Thao P.; Olcese, Riccardo; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-01-01

    Despite key advances in the clinical management of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, culminating with the development of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and catheter ablation techniques, pharmacologic/biologic therapeutics have lagged behind. The fundamental issue is that biological targets are molecular factors. Diseases, however, represent emergent properties at the scale of the organism that result from dynamic interactions between multiple constantly changing molecular factors. For a pharmacologic/biologic therapy to be effective, it must target the dynamic processes that underlie the disease. Here we propose a classification of ventricular arrhythmias that is based on our current understanding of the dynamics occurring at the subcellular, cellular, tissue and organism scales, which cause arrhythmias by simultaneously generating arrhythmia triggers and exacerbating tissue vulnerability. The goal is to create a framework that systematically links these key dynamic factors together with fixed factors (structural and electrophysiological heterogeneity) synergistically promoting electrical dispersion and increased arrhythmia risk to molecular factors that can serve as biological targets. We classify ventricular arrhythmias into three primary dynamic categories related generally to unstable Ca cycling, reduced repolarization, and excess repolarization, respectively. The clinical syndromes, arrhythmia mechanisms, dynamic factors and what is known about their molecular counterparts are discussed. Based on this framework, we propose a computational-experimental strategy for exploring the links between molecular factors, fixed factors and dynamic factors that underlie life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The ultimate objective is to facilitate drug development by creating an in silico platform to evaluate and predict comprehensively how molecular interventions affect not only a single targeted arrhythmia, but all primary arrhythmia dynamics

  2. [Arrhythmias during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Trappe, H-J

    2008-09-01

    Cardiovascular emergencies are rare during pregnancy with an incidence of 0,2-4,0%. Emergencies include arrhythmias, acute coronary syndrome, peripartum cardiomyopathy and hypertensive disorders. Electrical DC-cardioversion with 50-100 Joules is indicated in the acute treatment of arrhythmias in all patients in an unstable hemodynamic state. If 100 J fails higher energies (up to 360 J) will be necessary. In stable supraventricular tachycardia intravenous adenosine is the first choice drug and may safely terminate the arrhythmia. Ventricular premature beats are frequently present during pregnancy and benign in most patients. However, life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias (sustained ventricular tachycardia [VT], ventricular flutter [VFlt], ventricular fibrillation [VF]) were observed less frequently. Electrical DC-cardioversion is necessary in all pregnant women who are in a hemodynamically unstable state and have a life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In hemodynamically stable pregnant women the initial therapy with ajmaline, procainamide or lidocaine is indicated. Implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator is indicated in patients with syncope caused by VT, VF, VFlt or aborted sudden death. PMID:18767007

  3. Clinical and genetic study of a family with a paternally inherited 15q11-q13 duplication.

    PubMed

    Marini, Carla; Cecconi, Antonella; Contini, Elisa; Pantaleo, Marilena; Metitieri, Tiziana; Guarducci, Silvia; Giglio, Sabrina; Guerrini, Renzo; Genuardi, Maurizio

    2013-06-01

    Interstitial chromosome 15q11-q13 duplications are associated with developmental delay, behavioral problems and additional manifestations, including epilepsy. In most affected individuals the duplicated chromosome is maternally derived, whereas paternal inheritance is more often associated with a normal phenotype. Seizures have not been described in patients with paternal dup 15q11-q13. We describe a family with five individuals in three generations with a paternally-inherited 15q11-q13 duplication, four of whom exhibited abnormal phenotypic characteristics, including seizures. The 18-year-old female proband presented with moderate intellectual disability, obesity, and epilepsy. Her brother manifested learning disability and behavioral problems. They both inherited the 15q11-q13 dup from their father who had a normal phenotype. Their paternal uncle and grandfather also had the duplication and were reported to have had seizures. Array-CGH and MLPA analyses showed that the duplication included the TUBGCP5, CYFIP1, MKRN3, MAGEL2, NDN, SNRPN, UBE3A, ATP10A, GABRB3, GABRA5, GABRG3, and OCA2 genes. This report provides evidence for intrafamilial phenotypic variability of paternal dup 15q11-q13, ranging from normal to intellectual disability and seizures, and potentially expanding the phenotype of paternal 15q11-q13 interstitial duplications. PMID:23633446

  4. Cardiac arrhythmias during exercise testing in healthy men.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, E. F.; Owen, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Clinically healthy male executives who participate in a long-term physical conditioning program have demonstrated cardiac arrhythmia during and after periodic ergometric testing at submaximal and maximal levels. In 1,385 tests on 248 subjects, it was found that 34% of subjects demonstrated an arrhythmia at some time and 13% of subjects developed arrhythmia on more than one test. Premature systoles of ventricular origin were most common, but premature systoles of atrial origin, premature systoles of junctional origin, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrioventricular block, wandering pacemaker, and pre-excitation were also seen. Careful post-test monitoring and pulse rate regulated training sessions are suggested for such programs.

  5. Mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias: from molecular fluctuations to electrical turbulence.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias have complex causes and mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation involving many clinical, experimental, and computational studies, effective biological therapeutics are still very limited. In this article, we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias by summarizing the state of knowledge spanning from the molecular scale to electrical wave behavior at the tissue and organ scales and how the complex nonlinear interactions integrate into the dynamics of arrhythmias in the heart. We discuss the challenges that we face in synthesizing these dynamics to develop safe and effective novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25340965

  6. Mechanisms of Ventricular Arrhythmias: From Molecular Fluctuations to Electrical Turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias have complex causes and mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation involving many clinical, experimental, and computational studies, effective biological therapeutics are still very limited. In this article, we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias by summarizing the state of knowledge spanning from the molecular scale to electrical wave behavior at the tissue and organ scales and how the complex nonlinear interactions integrate into the dynamics of arrhythmias in the heart. We discuss the challenges that we face in synthesizing these dynamics to develop safe and effective novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25340965

  7. The Spectrum of Clinical Utilities in Molecular Pathology Testing Procedures for Inherited Conditions and Cancer: A Report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Loren; Cankovic, Milena; Caughron, Samuel; Chandra, Pranil; Emmadi, Rajyasree; Hagenkord, Jill; Hallam, Stephanie; Jewell, Kay E; Klein, Roger D; Pratt, Victoria M; Rothberg, Paul G; Temple-Smolkin, Robyn L; Lyon, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    Clinical utility describes the benefits of each laboratory test for that patient. Many stakeholders have adopted narrow definitions for the clinical utility of molecular testing as applied to targeted pharmacotherapy in oncology, regardless of the population tested or the purpose of the testing. This definition does not address all of the important applications of molecular diagnostic testing. Definitions consistent with a patient-centered approach emphasize and recognize that a clinical test result's utility depends on the context in which it is used and are particularly relevant to molecular diagnostic testing because of the nature of the information they provide. Debates surrounding levels and types of evidence needed to properly evaluate the clinical value of molecular diagnostics are increasingly important because the growing body of knowledge, stemming from the increase of genomic medicine, provides many new opportunities for molecular testing to improve health care. We address the challenges in defining the clinical utility of molecular diagnostics for inherited diseases or cancer and provide assessment recommendations. Starting with a modified analytic validity, clinical validity, clinical utility, and ethical, legal, and social implications model for addressing clinical utility of molecular diagnostics with a variety of testing purposes, we recommend promotion of patient-centered definitions of clinical utility that appropriately recognize the valuable contribution of molecular diagnostic testing to improve patient care. PMID:27542512

  8. Arrhythmias in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Bisbal, F; Mont, L

    2012-06-01

    Regular exercise provides substantial health benefits, mostly by reducing cardiovascular risk factors. However, it may also trigger acute cardiac events and cause sudden cardiac death in individuals with a pre-existing condition. In an otherwise healthy population, intense regular exercise may lead to morphological and electrical cardiac adaptations commonly referred as "athlete's heart." Recent data suggest that this may itself produce structural changes of atrial and ventricular myocardium with enlargement and fibrosis, creating the substrate for development of arrhythmias in apparently healthy athletes. The state of the art in this controversial issue is reviewed. PMID:22782729

  9. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  10. An update on risk factors for drug-induced arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Konstantinos; Georgopoulos, Stamatis; Efremidis, Michael; Sideris, Antonios; Letsas, Konstantinos P

    2016-01-01

    A variety of drugs, either anti-arrhythmics or non-antiarrhythmics, have been associated with drug-induced arrhythmias. Drug-induced arrhythmias are usually observed in the presence of long QT interval or Brugada electrocardiographic pattern. Clinical risk factors, such as female gender, structural heart disease, metabolic and electrolyte abnormalities, bradycardia and conduction disease, increased drug bioavailability, and silent channelopathies act as ''effect amplifiers'' which can make an otherwise relatively safe drug dangerous with regard to risk for polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in the setting of QT interval prolongation. A drug-induced type 1 electrocardiographic pattern of Brugada syndrome is considered highly proarrhythmic. Specific electrocardiographic markers including the corrected QT interval, QRS duration, Tpeak-Tend/QT ratio, and others may predict the risk of arrhythmias in both situations. The present review highlights on the current clinical and electrocardiographic risk factors for prediction of drug-induced arrhythmias. PMID:26460585

  11. Who Is at Risk for Arrhythmia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for an Arrhythmia? Arrhythmias are very common in older adults. Atrial fibrillation (a common type of arrhythmia that can cause problems) affects millions of people, ...

  12. Impact of Inherited Prothrombotic Disorders on the Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dubský, Michal; Jirkovská, Alexandra; Pagáčová, Libuše; Bém, Robert; Němcová, Andrea; Fejfarová, Vladimíra; Wosková, Veronika; Jude, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to analyse inherited thrombotic disorders that influence the long-term outcome of PTA. Methods. Diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) treated by PTA in our centre between 2008 and 2011 were included in the study. Patients were divided into unsuccessful PTA group (75 patients), successful PTA group (58 patients), and control group (65 patients, with diabetes but no PAD). Diagnosis of inherited thrombotic disorders included mutation in factor V (Leiden), factor II (prothrombin), and mutation in genes for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase—MTHFR (C677T and A1298C). Results. The genotypic frequency of Leiden allele G1691A was significantly associated with a risk of unsuccessful PTA in comparison with successful PTA group and control group (OR 8.8 (1.1–70.6), p = 0.041, and OR 9.8 (1.2–79.2), p = 0.032, resp.). However, we only observed a trend for the association of the prothrombin allele G20210A and risk of PTA failure. The frequencies of alleles of MTHFR 677 or 1298 did not differ significantly among the groups. Conclusion. Our study showed higher frequency of heterozygous form of Leiden mutation in diabetic patients with unsuccessful outcome of PTA in comparison with patients with successful PTA and diabetic patients without PAD. PMID:26247037

  13. HERG1 Channel Agonists and Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Sanguinetti, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG1) potassium channels are a key determinant of normal repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Loss of function mutations in hERG1 channels cause inherited long QT syndrome and increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. Many common medications that block hERG1 channels as an unintended side effect also increase arrhythmic risk. Routine preclinical screening for hERG1 block led to the discovery of agonists that shorten action potential duration and QT interval. Agonists have the potential to be used as pharmacotherapy for long QT syndrome, but can also be proarrhythmic. Recent studies have elucidated multiple mechanisms of action for these compounds and the structural basis for their binding to the pore domain of the hERG1 channel. PMID:24721650

  14. HERG1 channel agonists and cardiac arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG1) potassium channels are a key determinant of normal repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Loss of function mutations in hERG1 channels cause inherited long QT syndrome and increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. Many common medications that block hERG1 channels as an unintended side effect also increase arrhythmic risk. Routine preclinical screening for hERG1 block led to the discovery of agonists that shorten action potential duration and QT interval. Agonists have the potential to be used as pharmacotherapy for long QT syndrome, but can also be proarrhythmic. Recent studies have elucidated multiple mechanisms of action for these compounds and the structural basis for their binding to the pore domain of the hERG1 channel. PMID:24721650

  15. Arrhythmia in Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Shone O.; Skelton, Rhys J.; Adigopula, Sasikanth; Ardehali, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Stem cell regenerative therapies hold promise for treating diseases across the spectrum of medicine. Recent clinical trials have confirmed the safety of stem cell delivery to the heart with promising but variable results. While significant progress has been made in the preclinical stages, the clinical application of cardiac cell therapy is limited by technical challenges, including inability to isolate a pure population of cardiac-specific progenitors capable of robust engraftment and regeneration, lack of appropriate pre-clinical animal models, uncertainty about the best mode of delivery, paucity of adequate imaging modalities, and lack of knowledge about the fate of transplanted cells. The inability of transplanted cells to structurally and functionally integrate into the host myocardium may pose arrhythmogenic risk to patients. This is in part dependent on the type of cell transplanted, where the expression of gap junctions such as connexin-43 is essential not only for electromechanical integration, but has also been found to be protective against electrical instability post-transplant. Additionally, certain methods of cell delivery, such as intramyocardial injection, carry a higher rate of arrhythmias. Other potential contributors to the arrhythmogenicity of cell transplantation include re-entrant pathways due to heterogeneity in conduction velocities between graft and host as well as graft automaticity. In this paper, we discuss the arrhythmogenic potential of cell delivery to the heart. PMID:26002399

  16. A clinical variant in SCN1A inherited from a mosaic father cosegregates with a novel variant to cause Dravet syndrome in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Feyza N; Gormez, Zeliha; Calik, Mustafa; Altiokka Uzun, Gunes; Sagiroglu, Mahmut S; Yuceturk, Betul; Yuksel, Bayram; Baykan, Betul; Bebek, Nerses; Iscan, Akin; Ugur Iseri, Sibel A; Ozbek, Ugur

    2015-07-01

    A consanguineous family from Turkey having two children with intellectual disability exhibiting myoclonic, febrile and other generalized seizures was recruited to identify the genetic origin of these phenotypes. A combined approach of SNP genotyping and exome sequencing was employed both to screen genes associated with Dravet syndrome and to detect homozygous variants. Analysis of exome data was extended further to identify compound heterozygosity. Herein, we report identification of two paternally inherited genetic variants in SCN1A (rs121917918; p.R101Q and p.I1576T), one of which was previously implicated in Dravet syndrome. Interestingly, the previously reported clinical variant (rs121917918; p.R101Q) displayed mosaicism in the blood and saliva of the father. The study supported the genetic diagnosis of affected children as Dravet syndrome possibly due to the combined effect of one clinically associated (rs121917918; p.R101Q) and one novel (p.I1576T) variants in SCN1A gene. This finding is important given that heterozygous variants may be overlooked in standard exome scans of consanguineous families. Thus, we are presenting an interesting example, where the inheritance of the condition may be misinterpreted as recessive and identical by descent due to consanguinity and mosaicism in one of the parents. PMID:25986186

  17. Caveolae, Ion Channels and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Balijepalli, Ravi C.; Kamp, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Caveolae are specialized membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids which are present in multiple cell types including cardiomyocytes. Along with the essential scaffolding protein caveolin-3, a number of different ion channels and transporters have been localized to caveolae in the heart including L-type Ca2+ channels (Cav1.2), Na+ channels (Nav1.5), pacemaker channels (HCN4), Na+/Ca2+ exchnager (NCX1) and others. Closely associated with these channels are specific macromolecular signaling complexes that provide highly localized regulation of the channels. Mutations in the caveolin-3 gene (CAV3) have been linked with the congenital long QT syndrome (LQT9), and mutations in caveolar-localized ion channels may contribute to other inherited arrhythmias. Changes in the caveolar microdomain in acquired heart disease may also lead to dysregulation and dysfunction of ion channels, altering the risk of arrhythmias in conditions such as heart failure. This review highlights the existing evidence identifying and characterizing ion channels localized to caveolae in cardiomyocytes and their role in arrhythmogenesis. PMID:19351512

  18. Inherit Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.; Jenks, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin development of a unique educational tool targeted at educating and inspiring young people 12-16 years old about NASA and the Space Program. Since these young people are the future engineers, scientists and space pioneers, the nurturing of their enthusiasm and interest is of critical importance to the Nation. This summer the basic infrastructure of the tool was developed in the context of an educational game paradigm. The game paradigm has achieved remarkable success in maintaining the interest of young people in a self-paced, student-directed learning environment. This type of environment encourages student exploration and curiosity which are exactly the traits that future space pioneers need to develop to prepare for the unexpected. The Inherit Space Educational Tool is an open-ended learning environment consisting of a finite-state machine classic adventure game paradigm. As the young person explores this world, different obstacles must be overcome. Rewards will be offered such as using the flight simulator to fly around and explore Titan. This simulator was modeled on conventional Earth flight simulators but has been considerably enhanced to add texture mapping of Titan's atmosphere utilizing the latest information from the NASA Galileo Space Probe. Additional scenery was added to provide color VGA graphics of a futuristic research station on Titan as well as an interesting story to keep the youngster's attention. This summer the game infrastructure has been developed as well as the Titan Flight Simulator. A number of other enhancements are planned.

  19. Mechanisms of Arrhythmias and Conduction Disorders in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Mahek; Strunets, Anton; Shen, Win-Kuang; Jahangir, Arshad

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Aging is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias, which contribute to higher morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The frequency of cardiac arrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachyarrhythmia, is projected to increase as the population ages, greatly impacting health care resource utilization. Several clinical factors associated with the risk of arrhythmias have been identified in the population, yet the molecular bases for the increased predisposition to arrhythmogenesis in the elderly are not fully understood. Therefore, only limited therapeutic strategies directed at pathophysiological processes that enhance cardiac vulnerability to arrhythmias are available. This is further compounded by the paucity of outcome studies providing evidence on which optimal management guidelines can be formulated for the very elderly. This review highlights the epidemiology of cardiac dysrhythmias, changes incardiac structure and function associated with aging, and the basis for arrhythmogenesis in the elderly, the understanding of which is critical to formulate preventive strategies. PMID:23101571

  20. Non-invasive Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Since more than 100 years, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the standard-of-care tool, which involves measuring electrical potentials from limited sites on the body surface to diagnose cardiac disorder, its possible mechanism, and the likely site of origin. Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead ECG and computed tomography (CT) scan-based three-dimensional electro-imaging modality to non-invasively map abnormal cardiac rhythms including fibrillation. These maps provide guidance towards ablative therapy and thereby help advance the management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Here, we describe the clinical experience obtained using non-invasive technique in mapping the electrical disorder and guide the catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats), and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome). PMID:26072438

  1. Cardiac arrhythmias in space. Role of vagotonia.

    PubMed

    Leguay, G; Seigneuric, A

    1981-07-01

    Rhythm disorders observed in space have always been minor but they are not unfrequent. They include: ventricular or supra-ventricular extrasystoles, nodal arrhythmias, auriculo-ventricular conduction disorders. There are several etiopathogenetic hypotheses: a strict selection must permit its elimination of an underlying heart disease; the potassium deficiency is often advanced but its role is not certain; the role of catecholamines is also discussed; the role of hypervagotony is extensively analysed as great clinical and electro-cardiographic evidence speaks for it. It can induce disorders which are more serious than those observed so far, particularly fibrillation or intermittent atrial flutter; weightlessness itself could partly condition the vagotonic state; and the effects of fluid shifts are also discussed from this point of view. The possible therapies for various atrial, nodal, ventricular disorders are reviewed, with greater detail for vagal atrial arrhythmias. PMID:11542963

  2. Cardiovascular profiles of scleroderma patients with arrhythmias and conduction disorders.

    PubMed

    Muresan, L; Petcu, A; Pamfil, C; Muresan, C; Rinzis, M; Mada, R O; Gusetu, G N; Pop, D; Zdrenghea, D; Rednic, S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arrhythmias and conduction disorders are common among patients with scleroderma. Their early identification is important, since scleroderma patients with arrhythmias have a higher mortality risk compared with scleroderma patients without arrhythmias. The aim of this study was to characterize the cardiovascular profiles of scleroderma patients with different types of arrhythmias and conduction disorders. Methods One hundred and ten consecutive patients with a diagnosis of systemic sclerosis according to the ACR criteria were included in the study. Patients underwent a 12-lead ECG and a 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring for arrhythmias and conduction disorders identification. Blood sample testing, echocardiography, spirometry, chest X-ray and, when considered appropriate, high resolution chest CT were also performed. A subgroup of 21 patients underwent NT-pro BNP level measurements. Patients' clinical and para-clinical characteristics were compared according to the presence or absence of arrhythmias and conduction disorders. Results The prevalence of arrhythmia and conduction disturbances was 60.9%. Patients with such disorders were older (54.4 ± 13.3 vs. 49.7 ± 10.1 years, p=0.05), had a higher prevalence of pulmonary hypertension (p=0.008), valve disease (p < 0.001), especially mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, chamber enlargement on echocardiography (left atrial and right ventricular, p = 0.012 and 0.005, respectively) as well as higher NT-pro BNP levels: 265.5 ± 399.7 vs. 163 ± 264.3 pg/ml, p=0.04. Conclusion Arrhythmias and conduction disorders are common in patients with scleroderma. Patients with such disorders are older, have a higher prevalence of pulmonary hypertension, more severe mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, left atrial and right ventricular dilation on echocardiography. PMID:27115105

  3. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Sandrock-Lang, Kirstin; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Santoso, Sentot; Zieger, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Inherited platelet disorders may be the cause of bleeding symptoms of varying severity as platelets fail to fulfil their haemostatic role after vessel injury. Platelet disorders may be difficult to diagnose (and are likely to be misdiagnosed) and raise problems in therapy and management. This review explores the clinical and molecular genetic phenotype of several inherited disorders. Inherited platelet disorders can be classified according to their platelet defects: receptor defects (adhesion or aggregation), secretion disorder, and cytoskeleton defects. The best characterized platelet receptor defects are Glanzmann thrombasthenia (integrin αIIbβ3 defect) and Bernard-Soulier syndrome (defect of GPIb/IX/V). Detailed case reports of patients suffering from Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) or Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) showing the bleeding diathesis as well as investigation of platelet aggregation/agglutination and platelet receptor expression will complement this review. In addition, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) as an important defect of δ-granule secretion is extensively described together with a case report of a patient suffering from HPS type 1. PMID:25707719

  4. The genetic basis of inherited anomalies of the teeth. Part 1: clinical and molecular aspects of non-syndromic dental disorders.

    PubMed

    Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Molla, Muriel; Verloes, Alain; Berdal, Ariane

    2008-01-01

    The genetic control of dental development represents a complex series of events, which can very schematically be divided in two pathways: specification of type, size and position of each dental organ, and specific processes for the formation of enamel and dentin. Several genes linked with early tooth positioning and development, belong to signalling pathways and have morphogenesis regulatory functions in morphogenesis of other organs where they are associated with the signalling pathways. Their mutations often show pleïotropic effects beyond dental morphogenesis resulting in syndromic developmental disorders. Some genes affecting early tooth development (MSX1, AXIN2) are associated with tooth agenesis and systemic features (cleft palate, colorectal cancer). By contrast, genes involved in enamel (AMELX, ENAM, MMP20, and KLK4) and dentin (DSPP) structures are highly specific for tooth. Mutations in these genes have been identified as causes of amelogenesis imperfecta, dentinogenesis imperfecta, dentin dysplasias and anomalies of teeth number (hypo-, oligo and anodontia), which only partially overlap with the classical phenotypic classifications of dental disorders. This review of genetic basis of inherited anomalies describes, in this first paper, the molecular bases and clinical features of inherited non-syndromic teeth disorders. And in a second part, the review focus on genetic syndromes with dental involvement. PMID:18499550

  5. Clinical Management of a Child with Prader-Willi Syndrome from Maternal Uniparental Disomy (UPD) Genetic Inheritance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellon-Harn, Monica L.

    2005-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is reported in 1 in 10,000-15,000 individuals. Unfortunately, many cases are missed due to clinicians' lack of familiarity with the syndrome as well as clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria. Although common clinical characteristics are reported, variety exists in the nature and severity of dysfunction associated…

  6. Arrhythmia discrimination using a smart phone.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jo Woon; Esa, Nada; McManus, David D; Chon, Ki H

    2015-05-01

    We hypothesize that our smartphone-based arrhythmia discrimination algorithm with data acquisition approach reliably differentiates between normal sinus rhythm (NSR), atrial fibrillation (AF), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) and premature atrial contraction (PACs) in a diverse group of patients having these common arrhythmias. We combine root mean square of successive RR differences and Shannon entropy with Poincare plot (or turning point ratio method) and pulse rise and fall times to increase the sensitivity of AF discrimination and add new capabilities of PVC and PAC identification. To investigate the capability of the smartphone-based algorithm for arrhythmia discrimination, 99 subjects, including 88 study participants with AF at baseline and in NSR after electrical cardioversion, as well as seven participants with PACs and four with PVCs were recruited. Using a smartphone, we collected 2-min pulsatile time series from each recruited subject. This clinical application results show that the proposed method detects NSR with specificity of 0.9886, and discriminates PVCs and PACs from AF with sensitivities of 0.9684 and 0.9783, respectively. PMID:25838530

  7. A preliminary study of inherited thrombophilic risk factors in different clinical manifestations of venous thromboembolism in central Iran

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Ali; Abolhasani, Marziyeh; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Pourgheysari, Batoul

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Inherited thrombophilia is known to be an important risk factor for developing venous thromboembolism. Whether such abnormalities may impact the development of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) differently is not well defined. This preliminary study was undertaken to compare thrombophilic polymorphism in patients with DVT and PE. Methods: A total of 35 DVT, 23 DVT/PE, and 37 PE patients admitted to the Hajar Hospital, Shahrekord, Iran, between October 2009 and February 2011 were included in the study and 306 healthy volunteers matched by age and sex from the same geographical area with no history of venous or arterial diseases were included as control group. Factor V Leiden (FV 1691G/A, rs6025), prothrombin (FII 20210G/A), methylene tetrahydrofulate reductase (MTHFR 677C/T, rs1801133), and PLA2 polymorphisms of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GpIIIa 1565T/C, rs5918) were investigated by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: The number of patients with the investigated polymorphisms and homozygous carriers was significantly different among the groups (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed in the presence of FV 1691G/A and FII 20210G/A between any of the patients groups and the control group. GpIIIa 1565T/C and homozygous MTHFR 677C/T polymorphisms were higher in DVT patients compared with the control group (OR=6.65, 95% CI=3.09-14.30 and OR=4.08, 95% CI=1.35-12.38, respectively). Interpretation & conclusions: As none of the investigated polymorphisms were associated with PE, other thrombophilia polymorphisms may have a role in the pathogenesis of PE in these patients and should be investigated. Because of different prognostic risk factors among different types of patients, the treatment approach could be different. PMID:26261166

  8. Inherited Xq13.2-q21.31 duplication in a boy with recurrent seizures and pubertal gynecomastia: Clinical, chromosomal and aCGH characterization.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália D; Valadares, Eugênia R; da Costa, Silvia S; Arantes, Rodrigo R; de Oliveira, Luiz Roberto; Rosenberg, Carla; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M; Svartman, Marta

    2016-09-01

    We report on a 16-year-old boy with a maternally inherited ~ 18.3 Mb Xq13.2-q21.31 duplication delimited by aCGH. As previously described in patients with similar duplications, his clinical features included intellectual disability, developmental delay, speech delay, generalized hypotonia, infantile feeding difficulties, self-injurious behavior, short stature and endocrine problems. As additional findings, he presented recurrent seizures and pubertal gynecomastia. His mother was phenotypically normal and had completely skewed inactivation of the duplicated X chromosome, as most female carriers of such duplications. Five previously reported patients with partial Xq duplications presented duplication breakpoints similar to those of our patient. One of them, a fetus with multiple congenital abnormalities, had the same cytogenetic duplication breakpoint. Three of the reported patients shared many features with our proband but the other had some clinical features of the Prader-Willi syndrome. It was suggested that ATRX overexpression could be involved in the major clinical features of patients with partial Xq duplications. We propose that this gene could also be involved with the obesity of the patient with the Prader-Willi-like phenotype. Additionally, we suggest that the PCDH11X gene could be a candidate for our patient's recurrent seizures. In males, the Xq13-q21 duplication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome, as previously suggested, and neuromuscular diseases, particularly mitochondriopathies. PMID:27617217

  9. Brain-heart interactions. The neurocardiology of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A M; Natelson, B H

    1993-01-01

    Neuroanatomic connections between the brain and the heart provide links that allow cardiac arrhythmias to occur in response to brain activation. Recognition and analysis of such links in the pathogenesis of malignant cardiac arrhythmia are emphasized in this review. Neurocardiac links have been shown to produce arrhythmia both experimentally and clinically; specific examples, including stroke, epilepsy, and environmental stress are presented. We hypothesize that the individual with a diseased heart has a greater likelihood of experiencing cardiac arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death when the neurocardiac axis is activated. Reviewing possible mechanisms of brain-related arrhythmias, we suggest that the nervous system directs the events leading to cardiac damage by raising catecholamine levels and potentially inducing arrhythmia. PMID:8219819

  10. Exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in horses: Review of the literature and comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Navas de Solis, C

    2016-07-01

    Arrhythmias are common in equine athletes during and immediately after exercise. Many of these rhythm variations are not clinically relevant. In horses, a link between different exercising arrhythmias and poor performance or between exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is strongly suspected but not fully understood or proven. SCD during races or competitions is rare, but has catastrophic consequences for the safety of the human partner and public perceptions of welfare during equestrian sports. This review summarises current knowledge of equine exercise arrhythmias and their implications in SCD and compares existing principles and recommendations for equine subjects with those for human athletes. PMID:27156002

  11. Defining a new paradigm for human arrhythmia syndromes: Phenotypic manifestations of gene mutations in ion channel- and transporter-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Michael J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, gene mutations in cardiac ion channels have been linked with a host of potentially fatal human arrhythmias including long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. More recently, a new paradigm for human arrhythmia has emerged based on gene mutations that affect the activity of cardiac ion channel- and transporter- associated proteins. As part of the Circulation Research thematic series on Inherited Arrhythmias, this review will focus on the emerging field of human arrhythmias due to dysfunction in cytosolic gene products (including ankyrins, yotiao, syntrophin, and caveolin-3) that regulate the activities of key membrane ion channels and transporters. PMID:20724725

  12. Arrhythmogenic right-ventricular cardiomyopathy: molecular genetics into clinical practice in the era of next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Giulia; De Bortoli, Marzia; Calore, Martina; Rampazzo, Alessandra; Lorenzon, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    Sudden death, ventricular arrhythmia and heart failure are common features in arrhythmogenic right-ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), an inheritable heart muscle disease, characterized by clinical and genetic heterogeneity. So far, 13 disease genes have been identified, responsible for around 60% of all ARVC cases. In this review, we summarize the main clinical and pathological aspects of ARVC, focusing on the importance of the genetic testing and the application of the new sequencing techniques referred to next generation sequencing technology. PMID:26990921

  13. Arrhythmia risk in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Mozos, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between the functioning of the heart and the liver have been described, with heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions that simultaneously affect both. The heart is one of the most adversely affected organs in patients with liver cirrhosis. For example, arrhythmias and electrocardiographic changes are observed in patients with liver cirrhosis. The risk for arrhythmia is influenced by factors such as cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, cardiac ion channel remodeling, electrolyte imbalances, impaired autonomic function, hepatorenal syndrome, metabolic abnormalities, advanced age, inflammatory syndrome, stressful events, impaired drug metabolism and comorbidities. Close monitoring of cirrhotic patients is needed for arrhythmias, particularly when QT interval-prolonging drugs are given, or if electrolyte imbalances or hepatorenal syndrome appear. Arrhythmia risk may persist after liver transplantation due to possible QT interval prolongation, persistence of the parasympathetic impairment, post-transplant reperfusion and chronic immunosuppression, as well as consideration of the fact that the transplant itself is a stressful event for the cardiovascular system. The aims of the present article were to provide a review of the most important data regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and biomarkers of arrhythmia risk in patients with liver cirrhosis, to elucidate the association with long-term outcome, and to propose future research directions. PMID:25866603

  14. EFFECTS OF 4% AND 5% CARBOXYHEMOGLOBIN ON ARRHYTHMIA PRODUCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sudden death frequently occurs from coronary artery disease. t almost always results from cardiac arrhythmias and is often the first and only clinically recognizable manifestation of the disease process (1). ecause of the relations among cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death, and cor...

  15. Maximizing the Effectiveness of Ablation for Arrhythmias in the Congenital Heart Patients.

    PubMed

    Arujuna, Aruna; de Bono, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Arrhythmias are common in adults with congenital heart disease and account for a large proportion of hospitalizations. The complex anatomical heterogeneity, often in the presence of a delicate hemodynamic system, presents a significant electrophysiological challenge. This review outlines current clinical practice and advances in maximizing the effectiveness of ablation for arrhythmias in congenital heart patients. PMID:27289368

  16. Arrhythmias in the muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Rajdev, Archana; Groh, William J

    2015-06-01

    In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occurs with variable prevalence, mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate management of these patients, thereby improving survival. The noncardiac manifestations can lead to delayed recognition of symptoms, affect the decision to implant a prophylactic device, and once a decision is made to proceed with device implant, increase peri-procedural respiratory and anesthesia-related complications. PMID:26002394

  17. [Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes].

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yusuke

    2016-02-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes comprise a series of disorders caused by various gene mutations. Genetic tests were formerly difficult to perform because of the large size and number of causative genes. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing has enabled simultaneous testing of all causative genes to be performed at an acceptable cost. We collaboratively conducted a series of whole-exome sequencing studies of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes and discovered RPS27/RPL27 and FANCT as causative genes of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Fanconi anemia, respectively. Furthermore, we established a target gene sequencing system to cover 189 genes associated with pediatric blood diseases to assist genetic diagnoses in clinical practice. In this review, discovery of new causative genes and possible roles of next-generation sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are discussed. PMID:26935625

  18. Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndromes (SADS) Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... all proceeds benefiting the SADS Foundation (Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndrome). Each year 4,000 young Americans die ... Investigator Awardees 5/19/2016 The Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndromes (SADS) Foundation announces the winners for the ...

  19. Arrhythmia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arrhythmia URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arrhythmia.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  20. Arrhythmia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arrhythmia URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/arrhythmia.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  1. Inherited renal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Akira; Young, Scott W; Takahashi, Naoki; King, Bernard F; Atwell, Thomas D

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary forms of kidney carcinoma account for 5-8% of all malignant kidney neoplasms. The renal tumors are often multiple and bilateral and occur at an earlier age. Each of the hereditary kidney carcinoma syndromes is associated with specific gene mutations as well as a specific histologic type of kidney carcinoma. The presence of associated extrarenal manifestations may suggest a hereditary kidney cancer syndrome. Radiology is most commonly used to screen and manage patients with hereditary kidney cancer syndromes. This manuscript reviews the clinical and imaging findings of well-defined inherited kidney cancer syndromes including von Hippel-Lindau disease, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, hereditary papillary renal carcinoma syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and RCC syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex, and Lynch syndrome. PMID:27108134

  2. Cardiac arrhythmias in hypokalemic periodic paralysis: Hypokalemia as only cause?

    PubMed

    Stunnenberg, Bas C; Deinum, Jaap; Links, Thera P; Wilde, Arthur A; Franssen, Hessel; Drost, Gea

    2014-09-01

    It is unknown how often cardiac arrhythmias occur in hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) and if they are caused by hypokalemia alone or other factors. This systematic review shows that cardiac arrhythmias were reported in 27 HypoPP patients. Cases were confirmed genetically (13 with an R528H mutation in CACNA1S, 1 an R669H mutation in SCN4A) or had a convincing clinical diagnosis of HypoPP (13 genetically undetermined) if reported prior to the availability of genetic testing. Arrhythmias occurred during severe hypokalemia (11 patients), between attacks at normokalemia (4 patients), were treatment-dependent (2 patients), or unspecified (10 patients). Nine patients died from arrhythmia. Convincing evidence for a pro-arrhythmogenic factor other than hypokalemia is still lacking. The role of cardiac expression of defective skeletal muscle channels in the heart of HypoPP patients remains unclear. Clinicians should be aware of and prevent treatment-induced cardiac arrhythmia in HypoPP. PMID:25088161

  3. Arrhythmias in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Robert M.; Tseng, Zian H.

    2014-01-01

    Late after surgical repair of complex congenital heart disease, atrial arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity, and ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death are a major cause of mortality. The six cases in this article highlight common challenges in the management of arrhythmias in the adult congenital heart disease population. PMID:25197326

  4. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed. PMID:26218181

  5. Laboratory Markers of Ventricular Arrhythmia Risk in Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death continues to be a major public health problem. Ventricular arrhythmia is a main cause of sudden cardiac death. The present review addresses the links between renal function tests, several laboratory markers, and ventricular arrhythmia risk in patients with renal disease, undergoing or not hemodialysis or renal transplant, focusing on recent clinical studies. Therapy of hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia should be an emergency and performed simultaneously under electrocardiographic monitoring in patients with renal failure. Serum phosphates and iron, PTH level, renal function, hemoglobin and hematocrit, pH, inflammatory markers, proteinuria and microalbuminuria, and osmolarity should be monitored, besides standard 12-lead ECG, in order to prevent ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. PMID:24982887

  6. Method for classifying cardiac arrhythmias using photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Polania, Luisa F; Mestha, Lalit K; Huang, David T; Couderc, Jean-Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Advances in mobile computing and miniature devices have contributed to the accelerated development of wearable technologies for clinical applications. The new trend of wearable technologies has fostered a growth of interest for sensors that can be easily integrated into wearable devices. In particular, photoplethysmography (PPG) is especially suitable for wearable sensing, as it is low-cost, noninvasive, and does not require wet electrodes like the electrocardiogram. Photoplethysmograph signals contain rich information about the blood pulsating variation which is strongly related to the electrical activities of the heart. Therefore, in this paper we hypothesize that the ambulatory PPG monitoring could be employed for arrhythmia detection and classification. This paper presents a method for classifying ventricular premature contraction (VPC) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) from normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and supraventricular premature contraction (SVPC) recorded in patients going through ablation therapy for arrhythmia. Although occasional VPCs are benign, the increase in the frequency of VPC events may lead to VT, which in turn,could evolve into ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Therefore the accurate measurement of VPC frequency and early detection of VT events becomes essential for patients with cardiac disease. PMID:26737799

  7. HeartSearcher: finds patients with similar arrhythmias based on heartbeat classification.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyoung; Kang, Kyungtae

    2015-12-01

    Long-term electrocardiogram data can be acquired by linking a Holter monitor to a mobile phone. However, most systems of this variety are simply designed to detect arrhythmia through heartbeat classification, and do not provide any additional support for clinical decisions. HeartSearcher identifies patients with similar arrhythmias from heartbeat classifications, by summarising each patient's typical heartbeat pattern in the form of a regular expression, and then ranking patients according to the similarities of their patterns. Results obtained using electrocardiogram data from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database show that this abstraction reduces the volume of heartbeat classifications by 98% on average, offering great potential to support clinical decisions. PMID:26577165

  8. Clinical aspects of an autosomal dominantly inherited hearing impairment linked to the DFNA60 locus on chromosome 2q23.1-2q23.3.

    PubMed

    van Beelen, E; Schraders, M; Huygen, P L M; Oostrik, J; Plantinga, R F; van Drunen, W; Collin, R W J; Kooper, D P; Pennings, R J E; Cremers, C W R J; Kremer, H; Kunst, H P M

    2013-06-01

    A total of 64 loci for autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing impairment have been described, and the causative genes have been identified for 24 of these. The present study reports on the clinical characteristics of an autosomal dominantly inherited hearing impairment that is linked to a region within the DFNA60 locus located on chromosome 2 in q22.1-24.1. A pedigree spanning four generations was established with 13 affected individuals. Linkage analysis demonstrated that the locus extended over a 2.96 Mb region flanked by markers D2S2335 and D2S2275. The audiograms mainly showed a distinctive U-shaped configuration. Deterioration of hearing started at a wide age range, from 12 to 40 years. Cross-sectional analysis showed rapid progression of hearing impairment from mild to severe, between the ages of 40 and 60 years, a phenomenon that is also observed in DFNA9 patients. The results of the individual longitudinal analyses were generally in line with those obtained by the cross-sectional analysis. Speech recognition scores related to the level of hearing impairment (PTA1,2,4 kHz) appeared to be fairly similar to those of presbyacusis patients. It is speculated that hearing impairment starting in mid-life, as shown by DFNA60 patients, could play a role in the development of presbyacusis. Furthermore, speech recognition did not deteriorate appreciably before the sixth decade of life. We conclude that DFNA60 should be considered in hearing impaired patients who undergo a rapid progression in middle age and are negative for DFNA9. Furthermore, cochlear implantation resulted in good rehabilitation in two DFNA60 patients. PMID:23538131

  9. Arrhythmias in the Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Archana; Groh, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occur with variable prevalence mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. These patients are at risk for development for bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate management of these patients, thereby improving survival. The non-cardiac manifestations can lead to delayed recognition of symptoms (limited mobility and respiratory weakness masking cardiac manifestations), affect decision to implant prophylactic device (quantity vs. quality of life) and once a decision is made to proceed with device implant, increase peri-procedural respiratory and anesthesia-related complications. PMID:26002394

  10. Transgenerational Inheritance of Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from C. elegans to M. musculus to S. scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment. PMID:25937492

  11. Remote Arrhythmia Monitoring System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, David W.; Mackin, Michael A.; Liszka, Kathy J.; Lichter, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Telemedicine is taking a step forward with the efforts of team members from the NASA Glenn Research Center, the MetroHealth campus of Case Western University, and the University of Akron. The Arrhythmia Monitoring System is a completed, working test bed developed at Glenn that collects real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) signals from a mobile or homebound patient, combines these signals with global positioning system (GPS) location data, and transmits them to a remote station for display and monitoring. Approximately 300,000 Americans die every year from sudden heart attacks, which are arrhythmia cases. However, not all patients identified at risk for arrhythmias can be monitored continuously because of technological and economical limitations. Such patients, who are at moderate risk of arrhythmias, would benefit from technology that would permit long-term continuous monitoring of electrical cardiac rhythms outside the hospital environment. Embedded Web Technology developed at Glenn to remotely command and collect data from embedded systems using Web technology is the catalyst for this new telemetry system (ref. 1). In the end-to-end system architecture, ECG signals are collected from a patient using an event recorder and are transmitted to a handheld personal digital assistant (PDA) using Bluetooth, a short-range wireless technology. The PDA concurrently tracks the patient's location via a connection to a GPS receiver. A long distance link is established via a standard Internet connection over a 2.5-generation Global System for Mobile Communications/General Packet Radio Service (GSM/GPRS)1 cellular, wireless infrastructure. Then, the digital signal is transmitted to a call center for monitoring by medical professionals.

  12. Calcium and voltage imaging in arrhythmia models by high-speed microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mauro, C.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Alfieri, D.; Borile, G.; Urbani, A.; Mongillo, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-03-01

    Alterations in intracellular cardiomyocyte calcium handling have a key role in initiating and sustaining arrhythmias. Arrhythmogenic calcium leak from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) can be attributed to all means by which calcium exits the SR store in an abnormal fashion. Abnormal SR calcium exit maymanifest as intracellular Ca2+ sparks and/or Ca2+ waves. Ca2+ signaling in arrhythmogenesis has been mainly studied in isolated cardiomyocytes and given that the extracellular matrix influences both Ca2+ and membrane potential dynamics in the intact heart and underlies environmentally mediated changes, understanding how Ca2+ and voltage are regulated in the intact heart will represent a tremendous advancement in the understanding of arrhythmogenic mechanisms. Using novel high-speed multiphoton microscopy techinques, such as multispot and random access, we investigated animal models with inherited and acquired arrhythmias to assess the role of Ca2+ and voltage signals as arrhythmia triggers in cell and subcellular components of the intact heart and correlate these with electrophysiology.

  13. Electrical injury causing ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, P J; Thomsen, P E; Bagger, J P; Nørgaard, A; Baandrup, U

    1987-01-01

    Dangerous or long lasting ventricular arrhythmias developed in three patients who had sustained an electrical injury in which current passed through the thorax. In all three cases there was a delay of 8-12 hours between the injury and the onset of symptoms. The ventricular arrhythmias were severe and long lasting. In two of the three patients, ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation or both occurred and in one patient ventricular parasystole developed. No enzymatic evidence of myocardial necrosis was found but the results of an endomyocardial biopsy carried out in two of the three patients showed focal myocardial fibrosis and increased numbers of Na, K-pumps. The two patients with ventricular tachycardia became symptom free after appropriate antiarrhythmic treatment and in the third patient ventricular parasystole disappeared spontaneously within two years. Patients sustaining electrical injury in which current passes through the thorax should be monitored electrocardiographically for at least 24 hours, and patients with unexpected arrhythmias should be questioned about previous electrical injury. Images Fig 2 PMID:3566986

  14. Inherited mitochondrial neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) occasionally manifest as polyneuropathy either as the dominant feature or as one of many other manifestations (inherited mitochondrial neuropathy). MIDs in which polyneuropathy is the dominant feature, include NARP syndrome due to the transition m.8993T>, CMT2A due to MFN2 mutations, CMT2K and CMT4A due to GDAP1 mutations, and axonal/demyelinating neuropathy with external ophthalmoplegia due to POLG1 mutations. MIDs in which polyneuropathy is an inconstant feature among others is the MELAS syndrome, MERRF syndrome, LHON, Mendelian PEO, KSS, Leigh syndrome, MNGIE, SANDO; MIRAS, MEMSA, AHS, MDS (hepato-cerebral form), IOSCA, and ADOA syndrome. In the majority of the cases polyneuropathy presents in a multiplex neuropathy distribution. Nerve conduction studies may reveal either axonal or demyelinated or mixed types of neuropathies. If a hereditary neuropathy is due to mitochondrial dysfunction, the management of these patients is at variance from non-mitochondrial hereditary neuropathies. Patients with mitochondrial hereditary neuropathy need to be carefully investigated for clinical or subclinical involvement of other organs or systems. Supportive treatment with co-factors, antioxidants, alternative energy sources, or lactate lowering agents can be tried. Involvement of other organs may require specific treatment. Mitochondrial neuropathies should be included in the differential diagnosis of hereditary neuropathies. PMID:21402391

  15. Circadian rhythms in cardiac arrhythmias and opportunities for their chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Portaluppi, Francesco; Hermida, Ramón C

    2007-08-31

    It is now well established that nearly all functions of the body, including those that influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications, exhibit significant 24-hour variation. The electrical properties of the heart as well as cardiac arrhythmias also vary as circadian rhythms, even though the suboptimal methods initially used for their investigation slowed their identification and thorough characterization. The application of continuous Holter monitoring of the electrical properties of the heart has revealed 24-hour variation in the occurrence of ventricular premature beats with the peak in events, in diurnally active persons, between 6 a.m. and noon. After the introduction of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation were also found to peak in the same period of the day. Even defibrillator energy requirements show circadian variation, thus supporting the need for a temporal awareness in the therapeutic approach to arrhythmias. Imbalanced autonomic tone, circulating levels of catecholamines, increased heart rate and blood pressure, all established determinants of cardiac arrhythmias, show circadian variations and underlie the genesis of the circadian pattern of cardiac arrhythmias. Arrhythmogenesis appears to be suppressed during nighttime sleep, and this can influence the evaluation of the efficacy of antiarrhythmic medications in relation to their administration time. Unfortunately, very few studies have been undertaken to assess the proper timing (chronotherapy) of antiarrhythmic medications as means to maximize efficacy and possibly reduce side effects. Further research in this field is warranted and could bring new insight and clinical advantage. PMID:17659808

  16. [Inherited amino acid transport disorders].

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Y; Tada, K

    1992-07-01

    Disorders due to inherited amino acids transport defect are reviewed. The disorders were categorized into three types of transport defects, namely, brush-border membrane of epithelial cells of small intestine and kidney tubules (Hartnup disease, blue diaper syndrome, cystinuria, iminoglycinuria and lysine malabsorption syndrome), basolateral membrane (lysinuric protein intolerance) and membrane of intracellular organelles (cystinosis and hyperornitinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome). Pathogenesis, clinical feature, laboratory findings, diagnosis, genetics and treatment of these disorders are described, briefly. There is not much data for the transport systems themselves, so that further investigation in molecular and gene levels for transport systems is necessary to clarify the characteristics of the transport and heterogeneity of phenotypes in inherited amino acids transport disorders. PMID:1404888

  17. Maternal cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy and lactation

    PubMed Central

    Cordina, Rachael; McGuire, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    Arrhythmias occurring during pregnancy can cause significant symptoms and even death in mother and fetus. The management of these arrhythmias is complicated by the need to avoid harm to the fetus and neonate. It is useful to classify patients with arrhythmias into those with and without structural heart disease. Those with a primary electrical problem, but an otherwise normal heart, often tolerate rapid heart rates without compromise whereas patients with problems such as rheumatic heart disease, congenital heart disease or cardiomyopathy may quickly decompensate during an arrhythmia.

  18. The electrocardiogram in the assessment of the effect of drugs on cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, D S

    1978-01-01

    The search for the ideal antiarrhythmic drug continues since none of the available agents offers optimum antiarrhythmic therapy. The continuing search coupled with the interest in the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias has led to the development of new techniques for the study of arrhythmias and antiarrhythmic drugs. In this article it is proposed to discuss the electrocardiographic methods used in the assessment of antiarrhythmic drugs. Firstly, to discuss the electrocardiogram in the assessment of the clinical electrophysiological properties of a drug and secondly, the electrocardiogram in the assessment of the value of the drug in the management of cardiac arrhythmias in man. PMID:365208

  19. Carbon monoxide and lethal arrhythmias

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, J.P.; Schwartz, P.J.; Vanoli, E.; Stramba-Badiale, M.; De Ferrari, G.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of acute exposure to carbon monoxide on ventricular arrhythmias was studied in a previously described chronically maintained animal model of sudden cardiac death. In 60 percent of dogs with a healed anterior myocardial infarction, the combination of mild exercise and acute myocardial ischemia induces ventricular fibrillation. The events in this model are highly reproducible, thus allowing study by internal control analysis. Dogs that develop ventricular fibrillation during the test of exercise and acute myocardial ischemia are considered at high risk for sudden death and are defined as 'susceptible'; dogs that survive the test without a fatal arrhythmia are considered at low risk for sudden death and are defined as 'resistant.' In the current study, the effects of carboxyhemoglobin levels ranging from 5 to 15 percent were tested in resistant and susceptible dogs. A trend toward higher heart rates was observed at all levels of carboxyhemoglobin, although significant differences were observed only with 15 percent carboxyhemoglobin. This trend was observed at rest and during exercise in both resistant and susceptible dogs. In resistant animals, in which acute myocardial ischemia is typically associated with bradycardia even under the control condition, this reflex response occurred earlier and was augmented after exposure to carbon monoxide. This effect may depend on the increased hypoxic challenge caused by carbon monoxide, and thus on an augmentation of the neural reflex activation or a sensitization of the sinus node to acetylcholine induced by hypoxia. In both resistant and susceptible dogs, carbon monoxide exposure induced a worsening of ventricular arrhythmias in a minority of cases. This worsening was not reproducible in subsequent trials. These data indicate that acute exposure to carbon monoxide is seldom arrhythmogenic in dogs that have survived myocardial infarction. (Abstract Truncated)

  20. Novel Therapeutic Strategies for the Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias Associated with the Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Patocskai, Bence; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia syndrome characterized by prominent J waves appearing as distinct coved type ST segment elevation in the right precordial leads of the ECG. It is associated with a high risk for sudden cardiac death. Areas Covered We discuss 1) ECG manifestations of BrS which can be unmasked or aggravated by sodium channel blockers, febrile states, vagotonic agents, as well as tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants; 2) Genetic basis of BrS; 3) Ionic and cellular mechanisms underlying BrS; 4) Therapy involving devices including an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD); 5) Therapy involving radiofrequency ablation; and 6) Therapy involving pharmacological therapy which is aimed at producing an inward shift in the balance of the currents active during phase 1 of the right ventricular action potential either by boosting calcium channel current (isoproterenol, cilostazol and milrinone) or by inhibition of transient outward current Ito (quinidine, bepridil and the Chinese herb extract Wenxin Keli). Expert Opinion This review provides an overview of the clinical and molecular aspects of BrS with a focus on approaches to therapy. Available data suggest that agents capable of inhibiting the transient outward current Ito can exert an ameliorative effect regardless of the underlying cause.

  1. Arrhythmias

    MedlinePlus

    ... done to look at heart function: Coronary angiography ECG (electrocardiogram) Echocardiogram A special test, called an electrophysiology ... through the middle Heart, front view Atrioventricular block, ECG tracing Normal heart rhythm Bradycardia Ventricular tachycardia Conduction ...

  2. Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... chambers. The walls of the heart squeeze together (contract) to push blood through the chambers. The contractions ... heart beats too slowly. Cardiac defibrillation (very brief electric shock) can be used to stop an abnormal ...

  3. Arrhythmias

    MedlinePlus

    ... a heart function test, like an electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) . continue What's a Normal Heart Rate? Heart rate ... suspected, the doctor will probably recommend an ECG/EKG to measure the heart's electrical activity. There's nothing ...

  4. Arrhythmias

    MedlinePlus

    ... travels through the heart along a set electrical pathway. Different nerve messages signal your heart to beat ... slowed. Electrical signals travel in new or different pathways through the heart. Some common causes of abnormal ...

  5. Sinus Node and Atrial Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    John, Roy M; Kumar, Saurabh

    2016-05-10

    Although sinus node dysfunction (SND) and atrial arrhythmias frequently coexist and interact, the putative mechanism linking the 2 remain unclear. Although SND is accompanied by atrial myocardial structural changes in the right atrium, atrial fibrillation (AF) is a disease of variable interactions between left atrial triggers and substrate most commonly of left atrial origin. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the genetic and pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the development and progression of SND and AF. Although some patients manifest SND as a result of electric remodeling induced by periods of AF, others develop progressive atrial structural remodeling that gives rise to both conditions together. The treatment strategy will thus vary according to the predominant disease phenotype. Although catheter ablation will benefit patients with predominantly AF and secondary SND, cardiac pacing may be the mainstay of therapy for patients with predominant fibrotic atrial cardiomyopathy. This contemporary review summarizes current knowledge on sinus node pathophysiology with the broader goal of yielding insights into the complex relationship between sinus node disease and atrial arrhythmias. PMID:27166347

  6. [Electrophysiologic study in arrhythmia surgery].

    PubMed

    Nitta, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    The traditional paradigm in surgery for cardiac arrhythmias has been the electrophysiological assessment of the arrhythmia followed by the determination of a specific lesion set for the ablation or a definitive procedure based on the results of the analysis in each patient. The maze procedure was developed as a definitive procedure for atrial fibrillation (AF) and was not guided by electrophysiologic findings in individual patients. The rationale behind the maze procedure is to create a line of conduction block to prevent the propagation of repetitive activations from the pulmonary veins toward the left atrium and to block the reentrant activations occurring on the atrial wall. The cut-and-sew technique is the most reliable method to accomplish conduction block. However, it extends the cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary times and increases the risk of bleeding. During the past decade, a number of ablation devices have been developed and tested in animals and humans for their ability to create complete conduction block. The use of ablation devices enables less invasive AF surgery. However, the non-transmural or non-contiguous necrosis caused by an incomplete ablation can permit conduction across the ablation line and impair the efficacy of the surgery. Intraoperative verification of conduction block is mandatory to assure the transmurality and contiguity of the lesions created by the ablation devices. PMID:17763669

  7. Exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias in congestive heart failure and role of ACE inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hasija, P K; Karloopia, S D; Shahi, B N; Chauhan, S S

    1998-02-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias are considered to be related to left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. ACE inhibitors though improve LV function their beneficial role on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias is not established. To study the effects of ACE inhibitors on exercise capacity vis-a-vis their role on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias, 25 patients of congestive heart failure (CHF) of various etiologies in NYHA Class II and III were subjected to a prospective randomised controlled trial. The control group comprising of 12 patients received conventional treatment (digitalis and diuretics) and the test group was given enalapril/captopril in addition as tolerated. They were followed up for 3 months. Exercise testing on treadmill and monitoring of clinical and biochemical parameters were done at the beginning and end of study in all cases. Ventricular arrhythmias observed during exercise and post-exercise for 10 minutes was analysed using Lown's grading for frequency and severity of ventricular arrhythmia. The mean exercise duration showed significant improvement on ACE inhibitor as compared to the control group (p < 0.05) however there was no significant change in the grades of arrhythmia. Serum electrolytes and other bio-chemical parameter were within normal range. It is concluded that effect of ACE inhibitor on improving functional capacity in CHF is independent of it's any effect on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:11273109

  8. Inherited disorders of GABA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L; Hartka, Thomas R; Cabalza, Jessica L; Taylor, Jacob; Gibson, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    The inherited disorders of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism require an increased index of clinical suspicion. The known genetic disorders are GABA-transaminase deficiency, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency and homocarnosinosis. A recent link has also been made between impaired GABA synthesis and nonsyndromic cleft lip, with or without cleft palate. SSADH deficiency is the most commonly occurring of the inherited disorders of neurotransmitters. The disorder has a nonspecific phenotype with myriad neurological and psychiatric manifestations, and usually has a nonprogressive temporal course. Diagnosis is made by the detection of γ-hydroxybutyrate excretion on urine organic acid testing. The most consistent magnetic resonance imaging abnormality is an increased signal in the globus pallidus. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has demonstrated the first example of increased endogenous GABA in human brain parenchyma in this disorder. GABA-transaminase deficiency and homocarnosinosis appear to be very rare, but require cerebrospinal fluid for detection, thus allowing for the possibility that these entities, as in the other inherited neurotransmitter disorders, are under-recognized. PMID:23842532

  9. Atrial Arrhythmia Summit: Post Summit Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together nationally and internationally recognized experts in cardiology, electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space medicine in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms, risk factors, and management of atrial arrhythmias in the unique occupational cohort of the U.S. astronaut corps.

  10. Inherited Disorders of Bilirubin Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Naureen; Weinberger, Barry I; Hegyi, Thomas; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-01-01

    Inherited disorders of hyperbilirubinemia may be caused by increased bilirubin production or decreased bilirubin clearance. Reduced hepatic bilirubin clearance can be due to defective 1) unconjugated bilirubin uptake and intrahepatic storage, 2) conjugation of glucuronic acid to bilirubin (e.g. Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, breast milk jaundice), 3) bilirubin excretion into bile (Dubin-Johnson syndrome), or 4) conjugated bilirubin re-uptake (Rotor syndrome). In this review, the molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of these conditions are described, as well as current approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26595536

  11. Electrical storm: A clinical and electrophysiological overview

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Sergio; Pala, Salvatore; Biagioli, Viviana; Del Giorno, Giuseppe; Zucchetti, Martina; Russo, Eleonora; Marino, Vittoria; Dello Russo, Antonio; Casella, Michela; Pizzamiglio, Francesca; Catto, Valentina; Tondo, Claudio; Carbucicchio, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Electrical storm (ES) is a clinical condition characterized by three or more ventricular arrhythmia episodes leading to appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapies in a 24 h period. Mostly, arrhythmias responsible of ES are multiple morphologies of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT), but polymorphic VT and ventricular fibrillation can also result in ES. Clinical presentation is very dramatic in most cases, strictly related to the cardiac disease that may worsen electrical and hemodynamic decompensation. Therefore ES management is challenging in the majority of cases and a high mortality is the rule both in the acute and in the long-term phases. Different underlying cardiomyopathies provide significant clues into the mechanism of ES, which can arise in the setting of structural arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies or rarely in patients with inherited arrhythmic syndrome, impacting on pharmacological treatment, on ICD programming, and on the opportunity to apply strategies of catheter ablation. This latter has become a pivotal form of treatment due to its high efficacy in modifying the arrhythmogenic substrate and in achieving rhythm stability, aiming at reducing recurrences of ventricular arrhythmia and at improving overall survival. In this review, the most relevant epidemiological and clinical aspects of ES, with regard to the acute and long-term follow-up implications, were evaluated, focusing on these novel therapeutic strategies of treatment. PMID:26413232

  12. Dipyridamole-thallium tests are predictive of severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Saragoca, M.A.; Canziani, M.E.; Gil, M.A.; Castiglioni, M.L.; Cassiolato, J.L.; Barbieri, A.; Lima, V.C.; Draibe, S.A.; Martinez, E.E. )

    1991-01-01

    In a population of patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) and a high prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) undergoing chronic hemodialysis, the authors investigated the association between the results of dipyridamole-thallium tests (DTTs) and the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias. They observed a positive significant association between positive DTTs and the occurrence of severe forms of ventricular arrhythmias. A significant association was also observed between the presence of severe LVH and the occurrence of severe ventricular arrhythmias. However, no association was found between the presence of LVH and the positivity of the DTT. As most of their patients with positive DTTs had unimpaired coronary circulations, they conclude that positive DTTs, although falsely indicative of impaired myocardial blood supply, does have an important clinical relevance, indicating increased risk of morbidity (and, possibly, mortality) due to ventricular arrhythmias in a population of CRF patients submitted to chronic renal function replacement program.

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes: boutique science or valuable arrhythmia model?

    PubMed

    Knollmann, Björn C

    2013-03-15

    This article reviews the strengths and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) as models of cardiac arrhythmias. Specifically, the article attempts to answer the following questions: Which clinical arrhythmias can be modeled by iPSC-CM? How well can iPSC-CM model adult ventricular myocytes? What are the strengths and limitations of published iPSC-CM arrhythmia models? What new mechanistic insight has been gained? What is the evidence that would support using iPSC-CM to personalize antiarrhythmic drug therapy? The review also discusses the pros and cons of using the iPSC-CM technology for modeling specific genetic arrhythmia disorders, such as long QT syndrome, Brugada Syndrome, or Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia. PMID:23569106

  14. [Treatment of arrhythmia in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Daubert, Jean-Claude; Pavin, Dominique

    2013-02-01

    The initial therapy after onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) should always include adequate antithrombotic treatment and control of the ventricular rate. Depending on the patient's course, this strategy may prove insufficient and may then be supplemented by rhythm control using drugs or interventions. Clinical frustration came by clinical trials that have demonstrated that the strategy of maintaining sinus rhythm has no demonstrable value when compared with the "laissez-faire" approach of leaving AF to a permanent form and controlling ventricular rate. These disappointing findings can be considered as paradoxical when considering the severe complications associated with AF in epidemiological studies. New anti-arrhythmic approaches might offer added value but this is still a matter of debate. Non-pharmacological interventions to prevent AF recurrences or to limit its expression have been substantially developed in the past decade. Ablation techniques, usually done percutaneously using a catheter, have proved successful n the treatment of AF, particularly by reducing the symptomatic burden associated with the arrhythmia, to such an extent that a 'cure' may be achieved in some patients with paroxysmal AF. PMID:23513784

  15. Biomarkers in electrophysiology: role in arrhythmias and resynchronization therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Abhishek; Truong, Quynh A.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating biomarkers related to inflammation, neurohormones, myocardial stress, and necrosis have been associated with commonly encountered arrhythmic disorders such as atrial fibrillation (AF) and more malignant processes including ventricular arrhythmias (VA) and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Both direct and indirect biomarkers implicated in the heart failure cascade have potential prognostic value in patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). This review will focus on the role of biomarkers in AF, history of SCD, and CRT with an emphasis to improve clinical risk assessment for arrhythmias and patient selection for device therapy. Notably, information obtained from biomarkers may supplement traditional diagnostic and imaging techniques, thus providing an additional benefit in the management of patients. PMID:25715916

  16. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) metabolism and cardiac arrhythmias

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, D.M.; Man, R.Y.K.; Arthur, G.; Choy, P.C.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of LPC in the production of cardiac arrhythmias in isolated mammalian hearts has been well-documented. Cardiac arrhythmias are initiated by the accumulation of the lysolipid in the cardiac membrane. When isolated rat hearts were perfused in 10 ..mu..M LPC for 10 min, severe arrhythmias were observed in all experiments. In isolated guinea pig hearts that were perfused under identical conditions, the development of severe arrhythmias was never observed, and mild arrhythmias were produced in less than 50% of the hearts used. When the hearts of both species were perfused with (/sup 14/C-palmitate)-LPC, the labellings found in the microsomal fractions (expressed in mg protein) were similar. However, a higher amount of labelled LPC (2-fold) was found in rat heart microsomes, whereas a higher amount of labelled fatty acid was located in the guinea pig heart microsomes. Determination of lysophospholipase activities in these microsomal fractions revealed that the specific activity of the enzyme was much higher in the guinea pig heart than the rat heart. The authors conclude that the differential effect of LPC-induced arrhythmias between the rat and guinea pig heart may be a direct result of the lysophospholipase activities in these hearts. The ability to catabolize LPC more rapidly in the guinea pig heart may decrease the accumulation of LPC in the membrane, and hence, reduce the production of arrhythmias.

  17. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  18. The year in review of clinical cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Gregory M; Keung, Edmund; Scheinman, Melvin M

    2013-02-19

    This past year saw multiple important advances in the field clinical cardiac electrophysiology. Seminal articles describing new anticoagulant drugs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation were published. New results that raise questions regarding the safety of dronedarone and several new promising techniques in AF ablation were described. Important articles that refine our understanding of the risk of sudden death among Wolff-Parkinson-White patients were published. In the basic and translational sciences, the application of gene therapy to the study and potential treatment of arrhythmias was described, whereas genetic determinants important to the optimal treatment of inherited arrhythmia syndromes were further elucidated. Issues relevant to cardiac rhythm device therapy included investigations into the St. Jude Riata lead, new applications of device monitoring, predicting response to cardiac resynchronization therapy, and the use of pacemakers for vasovagal syncope. PMID:23312706

  19. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Paul; Balaji, Seshadri

    2009-01-01

    Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy. PMID:19898654

  20. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue to treat ventricular tachycardia and other arrhythmias while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In operation, microwave energy between about 1 Gigahertz and 12 Gigahertz is applied to monopole microwave radiator having a surface wave limiter. A test setup provides physical testing of microwave radiators to determine the temperature profile created in actual heart tissue or ersatz heart tissue. Saline solution pumped over the heart tissue with a peristaltic pump simulates blood flow. Optical temperature sensors disposed at various tissue depths within the heart tissue detect the temperature profile without creating any electromagnetic interference. The method may be used to produce a desired temperature profile in other body tissues reachable by catheter such as tumors and the like.

  1. Cibenzoline versus flecainide in the prevention of paroxysmal atrial arrhythmias: a double-blind randomized study.

    PubMed

    Babuty, D; D'Hautefeuille, B; Scheck, F; Mycinsky, C; Pruvost, P; Peraudeau, P

    1995-05-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, parallel clinical trial, the authors tested and compared flecainide and cibenzoline, a new antiarrhythmic drug, on atrial arrhythmias. Sixty-eight patients (36 men, 32 women, mean age 62.5 +/- 1.6 years) with documented symptomatic paroxysmal atrial arrhythmias (fibrillation in 56, flutter in 12) were recruited and received either cibenzoline 260 mg/day (n = 33) or flecainide 200 mg/day (n = 35). Patients were assessed with physical examination, resting ECG, 24-hour ambulatory ECG recording, two-dimensional echocardiography, and standard biologic titrations before the inclusion day, and 3 months and 6 months after the randomization day. Sixteen patients were withdrawn (7 were lost to follow-up, 7 had side effects, 2 had another medical event). Seventeen patients had documented recurrence of atrial arrhythmia (9 in the cibenzoline group, 8 in the flecainide group) during the study. The efficacy of cibenzoline and flecainide for preventing recurrence of atrial arrhythmias was not significantly different (62.5% versus 71.4%). Eleven patients complained of one or more side effects (cibenzoline, n = 6; flecainide, n = 5), justifying leaving the trial in 6 cases (cibenzoline, n = 3; flecainide, n = 3). Two ventricular proarrhythmic effects were observed. No atrial proarrhythmic effects were reported. The efficacy of cibenzoline and flecainide for preventing atrial arrhythmia is good and similar during a follow-up period of 6 months. In view of these results, cibenzoline may be administered first to prevent atrial arrhythmia. PMID:7657846

  2. Shensong Yangxin capsules prevent ischemic arrhythmias by prolonging action potentials and alleviating Ca2+ overload.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixiu; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Hongtao; Zhu, Jiuxin; Chang, Liping; Du, Zhimin; Zhang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Shensong Yangxin capsules (SSYX) are an effective traditional Chinese medicine that has been used to treat coronary heart disease clinically. The present study aimed to establish whether SSYX prevent ischemic arrhythmias in rats, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Male rats were pretreated with distilled water, SSYX and amiodarone for one week. Acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) was performed to induce ischemic arrhythmias. The incidence and severity of ischemic arrhythmias were evaluated. The action potential, transient outward K+ current (Ito) and inward rectifier K+ current (IK1) of rat cardiomyocytes were measured using the patch‑clamp technique. The intracellular Ca2+ concentration of the cardiomyocytes was measured using a laser scanning confocal microscope. The results revealed that SSYX lowered the incidence of arrhythmia markedly during AMI. Furthermore, SSYX delayed the appearance, and reduced the severity, of ischemic arrhythmias compared with the control. In addition, SSYX markedly decreased the ratio of the myocardial infarction region to the whole heart. In an in vitro study, SSYX prolonged the action potential duration of rat cardiomyocytes, and inhibited Ito and IK1 markedly. Additionally, SSYX inhibited Ca2+ elevation induced by KCl in cardiomyocytes. These results suggested that SSYX prevents ischemic arrhythmia, and the underlying mechanism responsible for this process may include prolonging the action potential and alleviating Ca2+ overload. PMID:27122298

  3. Sympathetic restraint of respiratory sinus arrhythmia: implications for vagal-cardiac tone assessment in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Myers, C. W.; Halliwill, J. R.; Seidel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Clinicians and experimentalists routinely estimate vagal-cardiac nerve traffic from respiratory sinus arrhythmia. However, evidence suggests that sympathetic mechanisms may also modulate respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Our study examined modulation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia by sympathetic outflow. We measured R-R interval spectral power in 10 volunteers that breathed sequentially at 13 frequencies, from 15 to 3 breaths/min, before and after beta-adrenergic blockade. We fitted changes of respiratory frequency R-R interval spectral power with a damped oscillator model: frequency-dependent oscillations with a resonant frequency, generated by driving forces and modified by damping influences. beta-Adrenergic blockade enhanced respiratory sinus arrhythmia at all frequencies (at some, fourfold). The damped oscillator model fit experimental data well (39 of 40 ramps; r = 0.86 +/- 0.02). beta-Adrenergic blockade increased respiratory sinus arrhythmia by amplifying respiration-related driving forces (P < 0.05), without altering resonant frequency or damping influences. Both spectral power data and the damped oscillator model indicate that cardiac sympathetic outflow markedly reduces heart period oscillations at all frequencies. This challenges the notion that respiratory sinus arrhythmia is mediated simply by vagal-cardiac nerve activity. These results have important implications for clinical and experimental estimation of human vagal cardiac tone.

  4. [Cardiac arrhythmias in targeted connexin deficient mice: significance for the arrhythmia field].

    PubMed

    Hagendorff, A; Plum, A

    2000-12-01

    Intercellular communication can be mediated by gap junction channels. One channel is composed of two hexameric hemichannels which consist of six polypeptide subunits called connexines (Cx). Three different connexines were documented in the cardiac myocytes: Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45. The labeling by number represents the rounded, molecular mass of the amino acid sequences given in kD. Identical connexons form homotypic channels different connexons can form heterotypic channels. Each channel type has specific properties regarding permeability and electrical conductance. Beside a typical age-dependent alignment of gap junction channels on the surface of the cardiac myocytes, regional distribution of the different connexins is different at distinct parts of the mouse heart. The ventricular working myocardium is characterized by Cx43, whereas Cx40 and Cx45 were not found in this region. In the atria as well as in the conduction system, Cx40 is the most frequently expressed. Cx45 appears to form a border zone between conductive and the surrounding working myocardium. In line with the localization and the conduction properties of distinct homotypic gap junction channels, the Cx43 deficient mouse is suitable for analysis of ventricular arrhythmias and the Cx40 deficient mouse primarily for studies of atrial arrhythmias. Increased ventricular conduction velocity and increased ventricular vulnerability were observed in the presence of a decreased number and density of Cx43 gap junction channels. This observation, however, is controversially discussed. Cx40 deficiency induces an impairment of the sinuatrial, intraatrial and atrioventricular conduction properties and is associated with an increased atrial vulnerability. Transgenic mouse models and new mapping techniques for detection of the electrical wavefront propagation provide new insights into the mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis. Geneticists, clinicians and basic researchers need to collaborate in order to explore the clinical

  5. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life. PMID:19820803

  6. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J.; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C.; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computational modelling. We construct personalized three-dimensional computer models of post-infarction hearts from patients' clinical magnetic resonance imaging data and assess the propensity of each model to develop arrhythmia. In a proof-of-concept retrospective study, the virtual heart test significantly outperformed several existing clinical metrics in predicting future arrhythmic events. The robust and non-invasive personalized virtual heart risk assessment may have the potential to prevent SCD and avoid unnecessary ICD implantations. PMID:27164184

  7. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computational modelling. We construct personalized three-dimensional computer models of post-infarction hearts from patients' clinical magnetic resonance imaging data and assess the propensity of each model to develop arrhythmia. In a proof-of-concept retrospective study, the virtual heart test significantly outperformed several existing clinical metrics in predicting future arrhythmic events. The robust and non-invasive personalized virtual heart risk assessment may have the potential to prevent SCD and avoid unnecessary ICD implantations. PMID:27164184

  8. Arrhythmia Management in the Elderly-Implanted Cardioverter Defibrillators and Prevention of Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Manian, Usha; Gula, Lorne J

    2016-09-01

    We present an overview of arrhythmia management in elderly patients as it pertains to implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy and prevention of sudden death. Treatment of arrhythmia in elderly patients is fraught with challenges pertaining to goals of care and patient frailty. With an ever increasing amount of technology available, realistic expectations of therapy need to balance quality and quantity of life. The ICD is an important treatment option for selected patients at risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. However, the incidence of sudden death as a percentage of all-cause mortality decreases with age. Studies have reported that 20% of elderly patients might die within 1 year of an episode of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, but most because of nonarrhythmic causes. This illustrates the 'sudden cardiac death paradox,' with a great proportion of death in elderly patients, even those at risk for ventricular arrhythmias, attributable to medical conditions that cannot be addressed by an ICD. We discuss current practices in ICD therapy in elderly patients, existing evidence from registries and clinical trials, approaches to risk stratification, and important ethical considerations. Although the decision on whether ICD insertion is appropriate in the elderly population remains an area of uncertainty from an evidence-based and ethical perspective, we offer insight on potential clinical and research strategies for this growing population. PMID:27568872

  9. Use of an Implantable Loop Recorder in the Investigation of Arrhythmias in Adult Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Lammey, Michael L; Jackson, Raven; Ely, John J; Lee, D Rick; Sleeper, Meg M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in general, and cardiac arrhythmias specifically, is common in great apes. However, the clinical significance of arrhythmias detected on short-duration electrocardiograms is often unclear. Here we describe the use of an implantable loop recorder to evaluate cardiac rhythms in 4 unanesthetized adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), 1 with a history of possible syncope and 3 with the diagnosis of multiform ventricular ectopy (ventricular premature complexes) and cardiomyopathy. The clinical significance of ventricular ectopy was defined further by using the implantable loop recorder. Arrhythmia was ruled out as a cause of collapse in the chimpanzee that presented with possible syncope because the implantable loop recorder demonstrated normal sinus rhythm during a so-called syncopal event. This description is the first report of the use of an implantable loop recorder to diagnose cardiac arrhythmias in an unanesthetized great ape species. PMID:21819684

  10. The involvement of TRPC3 channels in sinoatrial arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yue-Kun; Lee, Bon Hyang; Trajanovska, Sofie; Hao, Gouliang; Allen, David G.; Lei, Ming; Cannell, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a significant contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The currently available treatments are limited and AF continues to be a major clinical challenge. Clinical studies have shown that AF is frequently associated with dysfunction in the sino-atrial node (SAN). The association between AF and SAN dysfunction is probably related to the communication between the SAN and the surrounding atrial cells that form the SAN-atrial pacemaker complex and/or pathological processes that affect both the SAN and atrial simultaneously. Recent evidence suggests that Ca2+ entry through TRPC3 (Transient Receptor Potential Canonical-3) channels may underlie several pathophysiological conditions -including cardiac arrhythmias. However, it is still not known if atrial and sinoatrial node cells are also involved. In this article we will first briefly review TRPC3 and IP3R signaling that relate to store/receptor-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE/ROCE) mechanisms and cardiac arrhythmias. We will then present some of our recent research progress in this field. Our experiments results suggest that pacing-induced AF in angiotensin II (Ang II) treated mice are significantly reduced in mice lacking the TRPC3 gene (TRPC3−/− mice) compared to wild type controls. We also show that pacemaker cells express TRPC3 and several other molecular components related to SOCE/ROCE signaling, including STIM1 and IP3R. Activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling that is able to modulate SOCE/ROCE and Ang II induced Ca2+ homeostasis changes in sinoatrial complex being linked to TRPC3. The results provide new evidence that TRPC3 may play a role in sinoatrial and atrial arrhythmias that are caused by GPCRs activation. PMID:25859221

  11. Inheritance of Cytosine Methylation.

    PubMed

    Tillo, Desiree; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Vinson, Charles

    2016-11-01

    There are numerous examples of parental transgenerational inheritance that is epigenetic. The informational molecules include RNA, chromatin modifications, and cytosine methylation. With advances in DNA sequencing technologies, the molecular and epigenetic mechanisms mediating these effects are now starting to be uncovered. This mini-review will highlight some of the examples of epigenetic inheritance, the establishment of cytosine methylation in sperm, and recent genomic studies linking sperm cytosine methylation to epigenetic effects on offspring. A recent paper examining changes in diet and sperm cytosine methylation from pools of eight animals each, found differences between a normal diet, a high fat diet, and a low protein diet. However, epivariation between individuals within a group was greater than the differences between groups obscuring any potential methylation changes linked to diet. Learning more about epivariation may help unravel the mechanisms that regulate cytosine methylation. In addition, other experimental and genetic systems may also produce more dramatic changes in the sperm methylome, making it easier to unravel potential transgenerational phenomena. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2346-2352, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26910768

  12. Inherited mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Though inherited mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are most well known for their syndromic forms, for which widely known acronyms (MELAS, MERRF, NARP, LHON etc.) have been coined, the vast majority of inherited MIDs presents in a non-syndromic form. Since MIDs are most frequently multisystem disorders already at onset or during the disease course, a MID should be suspected if there is a combination of neurological and non-neurological abnormalities. Neurological abnormalities occurring as a part of a MID include stroke-like episodes, epilepsy, migraine-like headache, movement disorders, cerebellar ataxia, visual impairment, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment, dementia, psychosis, hypopituitarism, aneurysms, or peripheral nervous system disease, such as myopathy, neuropathy, or neuronopathy. Non-neurological manifestations concern the ears, the endocrine organs, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, the kidneys, the bone marrow, and the skin. Whenever there is an unexplained combination of neurological and non-neurological disease in a patient or kindred, a MID should be suspected and appropriate diagnostic measures initiated. Genetic testing should be guided by the phenotype, the biopsy findings, and the biochemical results. PMID:22399423

  13. Gene therapies for inherited skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Qasim, Waseem; McGrath, John A

    2014-06-01

    Skin is an amenable organ for gene replacement and gene editing therapeutics. Its accessibility makes it well-suited for direct topical gene delivery, grafting of genetically corrected cells, and monitoring of possible adverse events. Monogenic recessive disorders with a clinically severe or life-threatening phenotype provide the best candidate diseases for the introduction of a single normal copy of the gene into the target cell, usually keratinocytes. Preclinical studies have shown impressive results in terms of gene correction using both in vivo and ex vivo approaches. The clinical application of gene replacement or genomic editing as potential therapies for inherited skin disorders, however, has been held back by the inadequacy of delivery vectors and concerns from regulatory agencies regarding safety; thus translation to clinical trials has been slow. Over the past 15 years, cell culture and animal models have shown efficient gene correction techniques as preludes to treat inherited skin disorders such as junctional epidermolysis bullosa, dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, xeroderma pigmentosum, lamellar ichthyosis and Netherton syndrome, but so far only one patient has been treated in a clinical trial. This article reviews the current status of gene therapies for patients with inherited skin diseases and explores future perspectives. PMID:25085667

  14. A Case for Pharmacogenomics in Management of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Kandoi, Gaurav; Nanda, Anjali; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    Disorders of the cardiac rhythm are quite prevalent in clinical practice. Though the variability in drug response between individuals has been extensively studied, this information has not been widely used in clinical practice. Rapid advances in the field of pharmacogenomics have provided us with crucial insights on inter-individual genetic variability and its impact on drug metabolism and action. Technologies for faster and cheaper genetic testing and even personal genome sequencing would enable clinicians to optimize prescription based on the genetic makeup of the individual, which would open up new avenues in the area of personalized medicine. We have systematically looked at literature evidence on pharmacogenomics markers for anti-arrhythmic agents from the OpenPGx consortium collection and reason the applicability of genetics in the management of arrhythmia. We also discuss potential issues that need to be resolved before personalized pharmacogenomics becomes a reality in regular clinical practice. PMID:22557843

  15. Brief history of arrhythmia in the WPW syndrome - the contribution of George Ralph Mines.

    PubMed

    Boukens, Bas J; Janse, Michiel J

    2013-09-01

    George Ralph Mines studied the basic principles of reentry and published his data in The Journal of Physiology in 1913. Exactly 100 years later we discuss his first electrophysiological experiments and how his results lead to the insight that was the basis for the treatment of the clinical arrhythmias seen in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. PMID:23858007

  16. Electrical alternans during rest and exercise as predictors of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Estes, N A; Michaud, G; Zipes, D P; El-Sherif, N; Venditti, F J; Rosenbaum, D S; Albrecht, P; Wang, P J; Cohen, R J

    1997-11-15

    This investigation was performed to evaluate the feasibility of detecting repolarization alternans with the heart rate elevated with a bicycle exercise protocol. Sensitive spectral signal-processing techniques are able to detect beat-to-beat alternation of the amplitude of the T wave, which is not visible on standard electrocardiogram. Previous animal and human investigations using atrial or ventricular pacing have demonstrated that T-wave alternans is a marker of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. Using a spectral analysis technique incorporating noise reduction signal-processing software, we evaluated electrical alternans at rest and with the heart rate elevated during a bicycle exercise protocol. In this study we defined optimal criteria for electrical alternans to separate patients from those without inducible arrhythmias. Alternans and signal-averaged electrocardiographic results were compared with the results of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias as defined by induction of sustained ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation at electrophysiologic evaluation. In 27 patients alternans recorded at rest and with exercise had a sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 75%, and overall clinical accuracy of 80% (p <0.003). In this patient population the signal-averaged electrocardiogram was not a significant predictor of arrhythmia vulnerability. This is the first study to report that repolarization alternans can be detected with heart rate elevated with a bicycle exercise protocol. Alternans measured using this technique is an accurate predictor of arrhythmia inducibility. PMID:9388105

  17. Electrical alternans during rest and exercise as predictors of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, N. A. 3rd; Michaud, G.; Zipes, D. P.; El-Sherif, N.; Venditti, F. J.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Albrecht, P.; Wang, P. J.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    This investigation was performed to evaluate the feasibility of detecting repolarization alternans with the heart rate elevated with a bicycle exercise protocol. Sensitive spectral signal-processing techniques are able to detect beat-to-beat alternation of the amplitude of the T wave, which is not visible on standard electrocardiogram. Previous animal and human investigations using atrial or ventricular pacing have demonstrated that T-wave alternans is a marker of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. Using a spectral analysis technique incorporating noise reduction signal-processing software, we evaluated electrical alternans at rest and with the heart rate elevated during a bicycle exercise protocol. In this study we defined optimal criteria for electrical alternans to separate patients from those without inducible arrhythmias. Alternans and signal-averaged electrocardiographic results were compared with the results of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias as defined by induction of sustained ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation at electrophysiologic evaluation. In 27 patients alternans recorded at rest and with exercise had a sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 75%, and overall clinical accuracy of 80% (p <0.003). In this patient population the signal-averaged electrocardiogram was not a significant predictor of arrhythmia vulnerability. This is the first study to report that repolarization alternans can be detected with heart rate elevated with a bicycle exercise protocol. Alternans measured using this technique is an accurate predictor of arrhythmia inducibility.

  18. Ubiquitous health monitoring and real-time cardiac arrhythmias detection: a case study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhou, Haiying; Zuo, Decheng; Hou, Kun-Mean; De Vaulx, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    As the symptoms and signs of heart diseases that cause sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmia has attracted great attention. Due to limitations in time and space, traditional approaches to cardiac arrhythmias detection fail to provide a real-time continuous monitoring and testing service applicable in different environmental conditions. Integrated with the latest technologies in ECG (electrocardiograph) analysis and medical care, the pervasive computing technology makes possible the ubiquitous cardiac care services, and thus brings about new technical challenges, especially in the formation of cardiac care architecture and realization of the real-time automatic ECG detection algorithm dedicated to care devices. In this paper, a ubiquitous cardiac care prototype system is presented with its architecture framework well elaborated. This prototype system has been tested and evaluated in all the clinical-/home-/outdoor-care modes with a satisfactory performance in providing real-time continuous cardiac arrhythmias monitoring service unlimitedly adaptable in time and space. PMID:24211993

  19. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hector, Sven Magnus; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krassioukov, Andrei; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2013-01-01

    Context/Objectives To review the current literature to reveal the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and its relation to spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods Data source: MEDLINE database, 304 hits, and 32 articles were found to be relevant. The relevant articles all met the inclusion criteria: (1) contained original data (2) on cardiac arrhythmias (3) in humans with (4) traumatic SCI. Results In the acute phase of SCI (1–14 days after injury) more cranial as well as more severe injuries seemed to increase the incidence of bradycardia. Articles not covering the first 14 days after injury, thus describing the chronic phase of SCI, showed that individuals with SCI did not have a higher incidence of cardiac arrhythmias compared with able-bodied controls. Furthermore, their heart rate did not differ significantly. Penile vibro-stimulation was the procedure investigated most likely to cause bradycardia, which in turn was associated with episodes of autonomic dysreflexia. The incidence of bradycardia was found to be 17–77% for individuals with cervical SCI. For individuals with thoracolumbar SCI, the incidence was 0–13%. Conclusion Bradycardia was commonly seen in the acute stage after SCI as well as during procedures such as penile vibro-stimulation and tracheal suction. These episodes of bradycardia were seen more often in individuals with cervical injuries. Longitudinal studies with continuous electrocardiogram recordings are needed to uncover the true relation between cardiac arrhythmias and SCI. PMID:24090076

  20. Arrhythmias: Opening Pandora's Box -- incidental genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Behr, Elijah R; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    A major goal of precision medicine is to improve disease prevention and therapy by using big data provided by genomic technology and electronic health records. In a new study, assessment of a patient population without a history of cardiac disease revealed that genetic variants putatively associated with a risk of sudden death were not linked with arrhythmia phenotypes. PMID:26935036

  1. [Inherited thrombopathia in Simmental cattle].

    PubMed

    Aebi, M; Wiedemar, N; Drögemüller, C; Zanolari, R

    2016-02-01

    During the years 2012 to 2014, a total of 5 affected Simmental cattle showing persistent bleeding after minor or unknown trauma, were presented at the Clinic for Ruminants or at the Institute for Genetics of the Vetsuisse-Faculty, University of Berne. The homozygous mutation RASGRP2, initially reported in 2007, was present in all these cases and all available parents were heterozygous carriers thus confirming the recessive mode of inheritance. Three affected animals died as a result of persistent bleeding. One animal was stabilized at the Clinic for Ruminants and was slaughtered one month later. Another case showing persistent bleeding and several hematomas was euthanized after genotyping. A frequency of 10% carriers for the associated mutation was detected in a sample of 145 Simmental sires which were used 2013 for artificial insemination in Switzerland. These bulls are designated as TP carriers and should not be used uncontrolled. Breeding organizations in Switzerland make use of the gene test to select bulls which do not carry the mutation. PMID:27145685

  2. Inherited cardiomyopathies--Novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Leviner, Dror B; Hochhauser, Edith; Arad, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies arising due to a single gene defect represent various pathways that evoke adverse remodeling and cardiac dysfunction. While the gene therapy approach is slowly evolving and has not yet reached clinical "prime time" and gene correction approaches are applicable at the bench but not at the bedside, major advances are being made with molecular and drug therapies. This review summarizes the contemporary drugs introduced or being tested to help manage these unique disorders bearing a major impact on the quality of life and survival of the affected individuals. The restoration of the RNA reading frame facilitates the expression of partly functional protein to salvage or alleviate the disease phenotype. Chaperones are used to prevent the degradation of abnormal but still functional proteins, while other molecules are given for pathogen silencing, to prevent aggregation or to enhance clearance of protein deposits. The absence of protein may be managed by viral gene delivery or protein therapy. Enzyme replacement therapy is already a clinical reality for a series of metabolic diseases. The progress in molecular biology, based on the knowledge of the gene defect, helps generate small molecules and pharmaceuticals targeting the key events occurring in the malfunctioning element of the sick organ. Cumulatively, these tools augment the existing armamentarium of phenotype oriented symptomatic and evidence-based therapies for patients with inherited cardiomyopathies. PMID:26297672

  3. Dog Models for Blinding Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Komáromy, András M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  4. Dog models for blinding inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Komáromy, András M

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  5. The developmental basis of adult arrhythmia: atrial fibrillation as a paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Sunil; MacRae, Calum A.

    2013-01-01

    Normal cardiac rhythm is one of the most fundamental physiologic phenomena, emerging early in the establishment of the vertebrate body plan. The developmental pathways underlying the patterning and maintenance of stable cardiac electrophysiology must be extremely robust, but are only now beginning to be unraveled. The step-wise emergence of automaticity, AV delay and sequential conduction are each tightly regulated and perturbations of these patterning events is now known to play an integral role in pediatric and adult cardiac arrhythmias. Electrophysiologic patterning within individual cardiac chambers is subject to exquisite control and is influenced by early physiology superimposed on the underlying gene networks that regulate cardiogenesis. As additional cell populations migrate to the developing heart these too bring further complexity to the organ, as it adapts to the dynamic requirements of a growing organism. A comprehensive understanding of the developmental basis of normal rhythm will inform not only the mechanisms of inherited arrhythmias, but also the differential regional propensities of the adult heart to acquired arrhythmias. In this review we use atrial fibrillation as a generalizable example where the various factors are perhaps best understood. PMID:24062689

  6. Controversies in Cardiovascular Research: Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes – boutique science or valuable arrhythmia model?

    PubMed Central

    Knollmann, Björn C

    2013-01-01

    As part of the series on Controversies in Cardiovascular Research, the article reviews the strengths and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) as models of cardiac arrhythmias. Specifically, the article attempts to answer the following questions: Which clinical arrhythmias can be modeled by iPSC-CM? How well can iPSC-CM model adult ventricular myocytes? What are the strengths and limitations of published iPSC-CM arrhythmia models? What new mechanistic insight has been gained? What is the evidence that would support using iPSC-CM to personalize anti-arrhythmic drug therapy? The review also discusses the pros and cons of using the iPSC-CM technology for modeling specific genetic arrhythmia disorders such as long QT syndrome, Brugada Syndrome or Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia. PMID:23569106

  7. Intermittent short ECG recording is more effective than 24-hour Holter ECG in detection of arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients report symptoms of palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. These patients are often referred for 24-hour Holter ECG, although the sensitivity for detecting relevant arrhythmias is comparatively low. Intermittent short ECG recording over a longer time period might be a convenient and more sensitive alternative. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of 24-hour Holter ECG with intermittent short ECG recording over four weeks to detect relevant arrhythmias in patients with palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. Methods Design: prospective, observational, cross-sectional study. Setting: Clinical Physiology, University Hospital. Patients: 108 consecutive patients referred for ambiguous palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. Interventions: All individuals underwent a 24-hour Holter ECG and additionally registered 30-second handheld ECG (Zenicor EKG® thumb) recordings at home, twice daily and when having cardiac symptoms, during 28 days. Main outcome measures: Significant arrhythmias: atrial fibrillation (AF), paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), atrioventricular (AV) block II–III, sinus arrest (SA), wide complex tachycardia (WCT). Results 95 patients, 42 men and 53 women with a mean age of 54.1 years, completed registrations. Analysis of Holter registrations showed atrial fibrillation (AF) in two patients and atrioventricular (AV) block II in one patient (= 3.2% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 1.1–8.9]). Intermittent handheld ECG detected nine patients with AF, three with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and one with AV-block-II (= 13.7% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 8.2–22.0]). There was a significant difference between the two methods in favour of intermittent ECG with regard to the ability to detect relevant arrhythmias (P = 0.0094). With Holter ECG, no symptoms were registered during any of the detected arrhythmias. With intermittent ECG, symptoms were registered during half of the arrhythmia

  8. Family-based associations in measures of psychological distress and quality of life in a cardiac screening clinic for inheritable cardiac diseases: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Family-based cardiac screening programmes for persons at risk for genetic cardiac diseases are now recommended. However, the psychological wellbeing and health related quality of life (QoL) of such screened patients is poorly understood, especially in younger patients. We sought to examine wellbeing and QoL in a representative group of adults aged 16 and over in a dedicated family cardiac screening clinic. Methods Prospective survey of consecutive consenting patients attending a cardiac screening clinic, over a 12 month period. Data were collected using two health measurement tools: the Short Form 12 (version 2) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), along with baseline demographic and screening visit-related data. The HADS and SF-12v.2 outcomes were compared by age group. Associations with a higher HADS score were examined using logistic regression, with multi-level modelling used to account for the family-based structure of the data. Results There was a study response rate of 86.6%, with n=334 patients providing valid HADS data (valid response rate 79.5%), and data on n=316 retained for analysis. One-fifth of patients were aged under 25 (n=61). Younger patients were less likely than older to describe significant depression on their HADS scale (p<0.0001), although there were overall no difference between the prevalence of a significant HADS score between the younger and older age groups (18.0% vs 20.0%, p=0.73). Significant positive associates of a higher HADS score were having lower educational attainment, being single or separated, and being closely related to the family proband. Between-family variance in anxiety and depression scores was greater than within-family variance. Conclusions High levels of anxiety were seen amongst patients attending a family-based cardiac screening clinic.Younger patients also had high rates of clinically significant anxiety. Higher levels of anxiety and depression tends to run in families, and this has

  9. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke. PMID:26802767

  10. Recommendations and cardiological evaluation of athletes with arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hoogsteen, J.; Bennekers, J.H.; van der Wall, E.E.; van Hemel, N.M.; Wilde, A.A.M.; Crijns, H.J.G.M.; Gorgels, A.P.M.; Smeets, J.L.R.M.; Hauer, R.N.W.; Jordaens, J.L.M.; Schalij, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Confronted with a competitive or recreational athlete, the physician has to discriminate between benign, paraphysiological and pathological arrhythmias. Benign arrhythmias do not represent a risk for SCD, nor do they induce haemodynamic consequences during athletic activities. These arrhythmias are not markers for heart disease. Paraphysiological arrhythmias are related to athletic performance. Long periods of endurance training induce changes in rhythm, conduction and repolarisation. These changes are fully reversible and disappear when the sport is terminated. Pathological arrhythmias have haemodynamic consequences and express disease, such as sick sinus syndrome, cardiomyopathy or inverse consequences of physical training. Arrhythmias can be classified as bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias. Conduction disorders can be seen in fast as well as in slow arrhythmias. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:25696329

  11. Introduction: Mapping and control of complex cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Christini, David J.; Glass, Leon

    2002-09-01

    This paper serves as an introduction to the Focus Issue on mapping and control of complex cardiac arrhythmias. We first introduce basic concepts of cardiac electrophysiology and describe the main clinical methods being used to treat arrhythmia. We then provide a brief summary of the main themes contained in the articles in this Focus Issue. In recent years there have been important advances in the ability to map the spread of excitation in intact hearts and in laboratory settings. This work has been combined with simulations that use increasingly realistic geometry and physiology. Waves of excitation and contraction in the heart do not always propagate with constant velocity but are often subject to instabilities that may lead to fluctuations in velocity and cycle time. Such instabilities are often treated best in the context of simple one- or two-dimensional geometries. An understanding of the mechanisms of propagation and wave stability is leading to the implementation of different stimulation protocols in an effort to modify or eliminate abnormal rhythms. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779601

  12. Hematopoietic transcription factor mutations and inherited platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Songdej, Natthapol

    2015-01-01

    The molecular and genetic mechanisms in most patients with inherited platelet dysfunction are unknown. There is increasing evidence that mutations in hematopoietic transcription factors are major players in the pathogenesis of defective megakaryopoiesis and platelet dysfunction in patients with inherited platelet disorders. These hematopoietic transcription factors include RUNX1, FLI1, GATA-1, and GFI1B. Mutations involving these transcription factors affect diverse aspects of platelet production and function at the genetic and molecular levels, culminating in clinical manifestations of thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction. This review focuses on these hematopoietic transcription factors in the pathobiology of inherited platelet dysfunction. PMID:26097739

  13. Inherited resistance to HIV-1 conferred by an inactivating mutation in CC chemokine receptor 5: studies in populations with contrasting clinical phenotypes, defined racial background, and quantified risk.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, P. A.; Buckler-White, A.; Alkhatib, G.; Spalding, T.; Kubofcik, J.; Combadiere, C.; Weissman, D.; Cohen, O.; Rubbert, A.; Lam, G.; Vaccarezza, M.; Kennedy, P. E.; Kumaraswami, V.; Giorgi, J. V.; Detels, R.; Hunter, J.; Chopek, M.; Berger, E. A.; Fauci, A. S.; Nutman, T. B.; Murphy, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a cell entry cofactor for macrophage-tropic isolates of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Recently, an inactive CCR5 allele (designated here as CCR5-2) was identified that confers resistance to HIV-1 infection in homozygotes and slows the rate of progression to AIDS in heterozygotes. The reports conflict on the effect of heterozygous CCR5-2 on HIV-1 susceptibility, and race and risk levels have not yet been fully analyzed. Here we report our independent identification of CCR5-2 and test its effects on HIV-1 pathogenesis in individuals with contrasting clinical outcomes, defined race, and quantified risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mutant CCR5 alleles were sought by directed heteroduplex analysis of genomic DNA from random blood donors. Genotypic frequencies were then determined in (1) random blood donors from North America, Asia, and Africa; (2) HIV-1+ individuals; and (3) highly exposed-seronegative homosexuals with quantified risk. RESULTS: CCR5-2 was the only mutant allele found. It was common in Caucasians, less common in other North American racial groups, and not detected in West Africans or Tamil Indians. Homozygous CCR5-2 frequencies differed reciprocally in highly exposed-seronegative (4.5%, n = 111) and HIV-1-seropositive (0%, n = 614) Caucasians relative to Caucasian random blood donors (0.8%, n = 387). This difference was highly significant (p < 0.0001). By contrast, heterozygous CCR5-2 frequencies did not differ significantly in the same three groups (21.6, 22.6, and 21.7%, respectively). A 55% increase in the frequency of heterozygous CCR5-2 was observed in both of two cohorts of Caucasian homosexual male, long-term nonprogressors compared with other HIV-1+ Caucasian homosexuals (p = 0.006) and compared with Caucasian random blood donors. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier estimates indicated that CCR5-2 heterozygous seroconvertors had a 52.6% lower risk of developing AIDS than homozygous wild-type seroconvertors

  14. Factor XI replacement for inherited factor XI deficiency in routine clinical practice: results of the HEMOLEVEN prospective 3-year postmarketing study

    PubMed Central

    Bauduer, F; de Raucourt, E; Boyer-Neumann, C; Trossaert, M; Beurrier, P; Faradji, A; Peynet, J; Borg, J-Y; Chamouni, P; Chatelanaz, C; Henriet, C; Bridey, F; Goudemand, J

    2015-01-01

    Factor XI (FXI)-deficient patients may develop excessive bleeding after trauma or surgery. Replacement therapy should be considered in high-risk situations, especially when FXI levels are below 20 IU dL−1. HEMOLEVEN is a human plasma-derived factor XI concentrate available in France since 1992, but there are few data regarding its use by physicians. This prospective study assessed the use, efficacy and safety of HEMOLEVEN in common clinical practice. HEMOLEVEN was evaluated in FXI-deficient patients in 13 French centres in a 3-year postmarketing study. Forty-four patients (30 females, 14 males) received 67 treatments. The median age was 37 years (8 months–91 years). Basal FXI levels were <1 to 51 IU dL−1 (median: 5.5); 29 patients were severely FXI-deficient (<20 IU dL−1). FXI was administered prophylactically before 43 surgical procedures, 10 invasive procedures, 8 vaginal deliveries, or as curative treatment for six bleeds. The efficacy was assessed as excellent/good in 63, moderate in two and undetermined in two treatments. Seven patients experienced seven adverse effects, including two rated as serious: one sudden massive pulmonary embolism with fatal outcome and one case of inhibitor to FXI. HEMOLEVEN is effective for bleeding prevention in FXI deficiency. However, considering the benefit/risk ratio observed in relation to dosage in this study; firstly, it should be used sparingly due to its potential prothrombotic effect; secondly, new prescription procedures should be defined to adapt the dosage, especially in patients with intrinsic and/or acquired risk factors for thrombosis. PMID:25817556

  15. Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and careful stratification of fetal heart rate (FHR) is extremely important in all pregnancies. The most lethal cardiac rhythm disturbances occur during apparently normal pregnancies where FHR and rhythmare regular and within normal or low-normal ranges. These hidden depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, associated with genetic ion channelopathies cannot be detected by echocardiography, and may be responsible for up to 10% of unexplained fetal demise, prompting a need for newer and better fetal diagnostic techniques. Other manifest fetal arrhythmias such as premature beats, tachycardia, and bradycardia are commonly recognized. Heart rhythm diagnosis in obstetrical practice is usually made by M-mode and pulsed Doppler fetal echocardiography, but not all fetal cardiac time intervals are captured by echocardiographic methods. This article reviews different types of fetal arrhythmias, their presentation and treatment strategies, and gives an overview of the present and future diagnostic techniques. PMID:24858320

  16. Progressive interatrial block and supraventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Andres; Conde, Diego; Redfearn, Damian P; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Interatrial conduction disorders are frequent in patients with structural heart diseases, including hypertension, coronary disease, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and they are strongly associated with atrial tachyarrhythmias, especially atrial fibrillation and flutter. Conduction delays lead to dispersion of refractory periods and participate in initiating and maintaining reentry circuits, facilitating atrial arrhythmias. In this case, the changing pattern over time is a manifestation of progressive atrial remodeling and conduction delay. The terminal negative component of the P wave in the inferior leads suggests block of the electrical impulse in the Bachman bundle zone, with retrograde activation of the left atria via muscular connections at the coronary sinus. This has been reproduced in experimental models and confirmed by endocardial mapping. Physicians should be aware of the association between advanced interatrial block and development of atrial arrhythmias as its recognition could prompt early and aggressive antiarrhythmic treatment. PMID:25201217

  17. Central Sympathetic Inhibition: a Neglected Approach for Treatment of Cardiac Arrhythmias?

    PubMed

    Cagnoni, Francesca; Destro, Maurizio; Bontempelli, Erika; Locatelli, Giovanni; Hering, Dagmara; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. Overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of comorbidities related to AF such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, obesity, insulin resistance, and obstructive sleep apnea. Methods that reduce sympathetic drive, such as centrally acting sympatho-inhibitory agents, have been shown to reduce the incidence of spontaneous or induced atrial arrhythmias, suggesting that neuromodulation may be helpful in controlling AF. Moxonidine acts centrally to reduce activity of the SNS, and clinical trials indicate that this is associated with a decreased AF burden in hypertensive patients with paroxysmal AF and reduced post-ablation recurrence of AF in patients with hypertension who underwent pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Furthermore, device-based approaches to reduce sympathetic drive, such as renal denervation, have yielded promising results in the prevention and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. In light of these recent findings, targeting elevated sympathetic drive with either pharmacological or device-based approaches has become a focus of clinical research. Here, we review the data currently available to explore the potential utility of sympatho-inhibitory therapies in the prevention and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26781253

  18. Catheter Ablation of Arrhythmia During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Driver, Kevin; Chisholm, Christian A; Darby, Andrew E; Malhotra, Rohit; Dimarco, John P; Ferguson, John D

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia as a complication of pregnancy can be problematic to maternal health and fetal life and development. Catheter ablation of tachyarrhythmias during pregnancy has been successfully performed in selected patients with limited experience. Techniques to limit maternal and fetal radiation exposure, including intracardiac echo and electroanatomic mapping systems, are particularly important in this setting. Specific accommodations are necessary in the care of the gravid patient during catheter ablation. PMID:25828853

  19. [Managing acute supraventricular arrhythmia in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Manzo-Silberman, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Palpitations: frequent reason for referral to a cardiologist. Arrythmia: rare, mostly benign. Premature extra-beats and sustained tachy-arrhythmias: more frequent or revealed during pregnancy. Hemodynamic changes in expectant women favor an environment conducive to arrhythmogenesis. AF and flutter: very rare unless structural heart disease or hyperthyroidism. Drugs: careful monitoring of the patient and dose adjustments. Cardioversion: only in case of severe symptoms or hemodynamically unstable. PMID:26277779

  20. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Haugaa, Kristina H; Haland, Trine F; Leren, Ida S; Saberniak, Jørg; Edvardsen, Thor

    2016-07-01

    This review aims to give an update on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is mainly an autosomal dominant inherited disease linked to mutations in genes encoding desmosomes or desmosome-related proteins. Classic symptoms include palpitations, cardiac syncope, and aborted cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias. Heart failure may develop in later stages. Diagnosis is based on the presence of major and minor criteria from the Task Force Criteria revised in 2010 (TFC 2010), which includes evaluation of findings from six different diagnostic categories. Based on this, patients are classified as having possible, borderline, or definite ARVC. Imaging is important in ARVC diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting structural and functional abnormalities, but importantly these findings may occur after electrical alterations and ventricular arrhythmias. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) and signal-averaged ECGs are analysed for depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG alteration. Ventricular arrhythmias are common in ARVC and are considered a major diagnostic criterion if originating from the RV inferior wall or apex. Family history of ARVC and detection of an ARVC-related mutation are included in the TFC 2010 and emphasize the importance of family screening. Electrophysiological studies are not included in the diagnostic criteria, but may be important for differential diagnosis including RV outflow tract tachycardia. Further differential diagnoses include sarcoidosis, congenital abnormalities, myocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, dilated cardiomyopathy, and athletic cardiac adaptation, which may mimic ARVC. PMID:26498164

  1. Clinical Severity of PGK1 Deficiency Due To a Novel p.E120K Substitution Is Exacerbated by Co-inheritance of a Subclinical Translocation t(3;14)(q26.33;q12), Disrupting NUBPL Gene.

    PubMed

    David, Dezső; Almeida, Lígia S; Maggi, Maristella; Araújo, Carlos; Imreh, Stefan; Valentini, Giovanna; Fekete, György; Haltrich, Irén

    2015-01-01

    Carriers of cytogenetically similar, apparently balanced familial chromosome translocations not always exhibit the putative translocation-associated disease phenotype. Additional genetic defects, such as genomic imbalance at breakpoint regions or elsewhere in the genome, have been reported as the most plausible explanation.By means of comprehensive molecular and functional analyses, additional to careful dissection of the t(3;14)(q26.33;q12) breakpoints, we unveil a novel X-linked PGK1 mutation and examine the contribution of these to the extremely severe clinical phenotype characterized by hemolytic anemia and neuromyopathy.The 3q26.33 breakpoint is 40 kb from the 5' region of tetratricopeptide repeat domain 14 gene (TTC14), whereas the 14q12 breakpoint is within IVS6 of nucleotide-binding protein-like gene (NUBPL) that encodes a mitochondrial complex I assembly factor. Disruption of NUBPL in translocation carriers leads to a decrease in the corresponding mRNA accompanied by a decrease in protein level. Exclusion of pathogenic genomic imbalance and reassessment of familial clinical history indicate the existence of an additional causal genetic defect. Consequently, by WES a novel mutation, c.358G>A, p.E120K, in the X-linked phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) was identified that segregates with the phenotype. Specific activity, kinetic properties, and thermal stability of this enzyme variant were severely affected. The novel PGK1 mutation is the primary genetic alteration underlying the reported phenotype as the translocation per se only results in a subclinical phenotype. Nevertheless, its co-inheritance presumably exacerbates PGK1-deficient phenotype, most likely due to a synergistic interaction of the affected genes both involved in cell energy supply. PMID:25814383

  2. Non-Invasive Assessment of Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias During Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    cardiac susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias in subjects exposed to simulated space flight in the Human Studies Core protocol being conducted by the Cardiovascular Alterations Team, which involves sixteen days .of bed rest. In particular, we are applying a powerful new non-invasive technology, developed in Professor Cohen's laboratory at MIT for the quantitative assessment of the risk of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This technology involves the measurement of microvolt levels of T wave alternans (TWA) during exercise stress, and was recently granted approval by the Food and Drug Administration to be used for the clinical evaluation of patients suspected to be at risk of ventricular arrhythmias. In addition, we are obtaining 24 hour Holter monitoring (to detect non-sustained ventricular tachycardia and to assess heart rate variability). We are also conducting protocols to obtain these same measures on a monthly basis for up to four months in subjects in the Bone Demineralization/calcium Metaboloism Team's long term bed rest study.

  3. Update: Arrhythmias (V). Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias and preexcitation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Jesús; Castellanos, Eduardo; Ortiz, Mercedes

    2012-05-01

    Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias are fast and usually regular rhythms that require some structure above the bifurcation of the His bundle to be continued. The 3 most common types are atrial tachycardias, atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardias, and tachycardias mediated by an accessory pathway. The last two varieties are discussed in the present manuscript. Their prognosis is benign regarding life expectancy but typically they are symptomatic and chronically recurrent, producing a certain disability. They usually occur in people without structural heart disease. Pharmacologic therapy is possible, but given the high efficacy of catheter ablation, these procedures are frequently chosen. Ventricular preexcitation is due to the presence of an accessory pathway, usually atrioventricular. The clinical course can be asymptomatic, generating a characteristic electrocardiographic pattern, produce paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias, or facilitate other types of arrhythmias. Very rarely, they can cause sudden cardiac death. The treatment of choice for symptomatic patients is catheter ablation of the accessory pathway. The therapeutic attitude towards asymptomatic preexcitation remains controversial. PMID:22459483

  4. Defects in Cytoskeletal Signaling Pathways, Arrhythmia, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sakima; Curran, Jerry; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Ankyrin polypeptides are cellular adapter proteins that tether integral membrane proteins to the cytoskeleton in a host of human organs. Initially identified as integral components of the cytoskeleton in erythrocytes, a recent explosion in ankyrin research has demonstrated that these proteins play prominent roles in cytoskeletal signaling pathways and membrane protein trafficking/regulation in a variety of excitable and non-excitable cells including heart and brain. Importantly, ankyrin research has translated from bench to bedside with the discovery of human gene variants associated with ventricular arrhythmias that alter ankyrin–based pathways. Ankyrin polypeptides have also been found to play an instrumental role in various forms of sinus node disease and atrial fibrillation (AF). Mouse models of ankyrin-deficiency have played fundamental roles in the translation of ankyrin-based research to new clinical understanding of human sinus node disease, AF, and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:22586405

  5. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic. PMID:26427454

  6. Novel Calmodulin (CALM2) Mutations Associated with Congenital Arrhythmia Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Naomasa; Yagihara, Nobue; Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Roh, Michelle S.; Shigemizu, Daichi; Lichtner, Peter; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aiba, Takeshi; Homfray, Tessa; Behr, Elijah R.; Klug, Didier; Denjoy, Isabelle; Mastantuono, Elisa; Theisen, Daniel; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Naoto; Kimura, Akinori; Ozaki, Kouichi; Motomura, Hideki; Suda, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Schwartz, Peter J.; Meitinger, Thomas; Kääb, Stefan; Guicheney, Pascale; Shimizu, Wataru; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Chazin, Walter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as in congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) represent treatable causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and children. Recently, mutations in calmodulin (CALM1, CALM2) have been associated with severe forms of LQTS and CPVT, with life-threatening arrhythmias occurring very early in life. Additional mutation-positive cases are needed to discern genotype-phenotype correlations associated with calmodulin mutations. Methods and Results We employed conventional and next-generation sequencing approaches including exome analysis in genotype-negative LQTS probands. We identified five novel de novo missense mutations in CALM2 in three subjects with LQTS (p.N98S, p.N98I, p.D134H) and two subjects with clinical features of both LQTS and CPVT (p.D132E, p.Q136P). Age of onset of major symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest) ranged from 1–9 years. Three of five probands had cardiac arrest and one of these subjects did not survive. Although all probands had LQTS, two subjects also exhibited electrocardiographic features consistent with CPVT. The clinical severity among subjects in this series was generally less than that originally reported for CALM1 and CALM2 associated with recurrent cardiac arrest during infancy. Four of five probands responded to β-blocker therapy whereas one subject with mutation p.Q136P died suddenly during exertion despite this treatment. Mutations affect conserved residues located within calcium binding loops III (p.N98S, p.N98I) or IV (p.D132E, p.D134H, p.Q136P) and caused reduced calcium binding affinity. Conclusions CALM2 mutations can be associated with LQTS and with overlapping features of LQTS and CPVT. PMID:24917665

  7. Arrhythmias following spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery - Is Wenckebach common?

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Seema; Hayaran, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Arrhythmias in pregnancy are common and may cause concern for the well-being of both mother and fetus. Generally, no previous history of heart disease is elicited and majority of the arrhythmias are benign. Bradycardia is commonly seen following subarachnoid block for cesarean section. However, the incidence of subsequent heart block is low. This case report highlights the occurrence of perioperative arrhythmias following sympathetic blockade in pregnant patients and their early detection by vigilant monitoring. PMID:22096293

  8. Anger-induced T-wave alternans predicts future ventricular arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Rachel; Shusterman, Vladimir; Burg, Matthew; McPherson, Craig; Batsford, William; Goldberg, Anna; Soufer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether T-wave alternans (TWA) induced by anger in a laboratory setting predicts future ventricular arrhythmias (VT/VF) in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Background Anger can precipitate spontaneous VT/VF, and induce TWA. Whether anger-induced TWA predicts future arrhythmias is unknown. Methods Sixty-two patients with ICDs underwent ambulatory ECG during a mental stress protocol, three months post-implant. TWA was analyzed using time-domain methods. After ≥ 1 year follow-up, ICD stored data was reviewed to determine incidence of ICD-terminated VT/VF. Results Patients with ICD-terminated arrhythmias during follow-up (N=10) had higher TWA induced by anger, 13.2uV (iqr 9.3-16), compared to 9.3uV (7.5-11.5) (p<0.01). Patients in the highest quartile of anger-induced TWA (>11.9uV, N=15) were more likely to experience arrhythmias by one year than those in the lower quartiles, (33% versus 4%), and during extended follow-up (40% versus 9%, p<0.01 for both.) In multivariable regression controlling for ejection fraction, prior clinical arrhythmia, and wide QRS, anger-induced TWA remained a significant predictor of arrhythmia, with likelihood in the top quartile 10.8 times that of other patients (CI 1.6-113, p<0.05.) Conclusion Anger-induced TWA predicts future ventricular arrhythmias in patients with ICDs, suggesting that emotion-induced repolarization instability may be one mechanism linking stress and sudden death. Whether there is a clinical role for anger-induced TWA testing requires further study. PMID:19245968

  9. KCNE genetics and pharmacogenomics in cardiac arrhythmias: much ado about nothing?

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels respond to changes in membrane potential with conformational shifts that either facilitate or stem the movement of charged ions across the cell membrane. This controlled movement of ions is particularly important for the action potentials of excitable cells such as cardiac myocytes, and therefore essential for timely beating of the heart. Inherited mutations in ion channel genes and in the genes encoding proteins that regulate them can cause lethal cardiac arrhythmias either by direct channel disruption or by altering interactions with therapeutic drugs, the best-understood example of both these scenarios being Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Unsurprisingly, mutations in the genes encoding ion channel pore-forming α subunits underlie the large majority (~90%) of identified cases of inherited LQTS. Given that inherited LQTS is comparatively rare in itself (~0.04% of the US population), is pursuing study of the remaining known and unknown LQTS-associated genes subject to the law of diminishing returns? Here, with a particular focus on the KCNE family of single transmembrane domain K+ channel ancillary subunits, the significance to cardiac pharmacogenetics of ion channel regulatory subunits is discussed. PMID:23272793

  10. Weather and triggering of ventricular arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Laden, Francine; Link, Mark S.; Schwartz, Joel; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Dockery, Douglas W.

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor ambient weather has been hypothesized to be responsible for the seasonal distribution of cardiac arrhythmias. Because people spend most of their time indoors, we hypothesized that weather-related arrhythmia risk would be better estimated using an indoor measure or an outdoor measure that correlates well with indoor conditions, such as absolute humidity. The clinical records of 203 patients in eastern Massachusetts, USA, with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator were abstracted for arrhythmias between 1995 and 2002. We used case-crossover methods to examine the association between weather and ventricular arrhythmia (VA). Among 84 patients who experienced 787 VAs, lower estimated indoor temperature (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–1.27 for a 1 °C decrease in the 24-h average) and lower absolute humidity (OR = 1.06, 95% CI 1.03–1.08 for a 0.5 g/m3 decrease in the 96-h average) were associated with increased risk. Lower outdoor temperature increased risk only in warmer months, likely attributable to the poor correlation between outdoor and indoor temperature during cooler months. These results suggest that lower temperature and drier air are associated with increased risk of VA onset among implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients. PMID:24169878

  11. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26733873

  12. Arrhythmia-induced cardiomyopathies: the riddle of the chicken and the egg still unanswered?

    PubMed

    Simantirakis, Emmanuel N; Koutalas, Emmanuel P; Vardas, Panos E

    2012-04-01

    The hypothesis testing of inappropriate fast, irregular, or asynchronous myocardial contraction provoking cardiomyopathy has been the primary focus of numerous research efforts, especially during the last few decades. Rapid ventricular rates resulting from supraventricular arrhythmias and atrial fibrillation (AF), irregularity of heart rhythm-basic element of AF-and asynchrony, as a consequence of right ventricular pacing, bundle branch block, or frequent premature ventricular complexes, have been established as primary causes of arrhythmia-induced cardiomyopathy. The main pathophysiological pathways involved have been clarified, including neurohumoral activation, energy stores depletion, and abnormalities in stress and strain. Unfortunately, from a clinical point of view, patients usually seek medical advice only when symptoms develop, while the causative arrhythmia may be present for months or years, resulting in myocardial remodelling, diastolic, and systolic dysfunction. In some cases, making a definite diagnosis may become a strenuous exercise for the treating physician, as the arrhythmia may not be present and, additionally, therapy must be applied for the diagnosis to be confirmed retrospectively. The diagnostic process is also hardened due to the fact that strict diagnosing criteria are still a matter of discrepancy. Therapy options include pharmaceutical agents trials, catheter-based therapies and, in the context of chronic ventricular pacing, resynchronization. For the majority of patients, partial or complete recovery is expected, although they have to be followed up thoroughly due to the risk of recurrence. Large, randomized controlled trials are more than necessary to optimize patients' stratification and therapeutic strategy choices. PMID:22084300

  13. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26733873

  14. Weather and triggering of ventricular arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jennifer L; Laden, Francine; Link, Mark S; Schwartz, Joel; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Dockery, Douglas W

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor ambient weather has been hypothesized to be responsible for the seasonal distribution of cardiac arrhythmias. Because people spend most of their time indoors, we hypothesized that weather-related arrhythmia risk would be better estimated using an indoor measure or an outdoor measure that correlates well with indoor conditions, such as absolute humidity. The clinical records of 203 patients in eastern Massachusetts, USA, with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator were abstracted for arrhythmias between 1995 and 2002. We used case-crossover methods to examine the association between weather and ventricular arrhythmia (VA). Among 84 patients who experienced 787 VAs, lower estimated indoor temperature (odds ratio (OR)=1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.27 for a 1 °C decrease in the 24-h average) and lower absolute humidity (OR=1.06, 95% CI 1.03-1.08 for a 0.5 g/m(3) decrease in the 96-h average) were associated with increased risk. Lower outdoor temperature increased risk only in warmer months, likely attributable to the poor correlation between outdoor and indoor temperature during cooler months. These results suggest that lower temperature and drier air are associated with increased risk of VA onset among implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients. PMID:24169878

  15. [Correlation between QT interval, ventricular arrhythmias and left ventricular function in chronic alcoholics].

    PubMed

    Pomini, G; Gribaldo, R; Bellavere, F; Lupia, M; Sale, F; Rugna, A; Costa, L; Molfese, G

    1986-04-01

    Prolonged QT interval and arrhythmias have been reported to occur in chronic alcoholics. To investigate the role of chronic alcohol consumption in the onset of arrhythmias and the development of the preclinical left ventricular dysfunction, in a group of 12 asymptomatic chronic alcoholics with no clinical evidence of heart disease, with histologically proven hepatic damage, after a week of abstinence from alcohol, the following investigations were performed: measurements of the corrected QT interval (QTc), 24-hours Holter monitoring, systolic time intervals, M-mode echocardiograms. The results were compared to those of 10 normal subjects. Our data suggested no difference in QTc interval between chronic alcoholics and normal persons. The distribution of arrhythmias was not statistically different in the two groups, particularly frequent and complicated arrhythmias occurred in only one subject in each group. Preejection period corrected for heart rate (PEPI) was significantly longer in alcoholics (132 +/- 16 vs 119 +/- 11, p less than 0.05). All echocardiographic parameters examined were not significantly different in the two groups. On the basis of our results, our impression is that the arrhythmogenic role of alcohol, not under acute ingestion, is relatively unimportant and further studies are needed to become a definitive conclusion about subclinical alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:3743931

  16. Basic Cardiac Electrophysiology and Common Drug-induced Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aimee; Pickham, David

    2016-09-01

    Drugs can be a double-edged sword, providing the benefit of symptom alleviation and disease modification but potentially causing harm from adverse cardiac arrhythmic events. Proarrhythmia is the ability of a drug to cause an arrhythmia, the number one reason for drugs to be withdrawn from the patient. Drug-induced arrhythmias are defined as the production of de novo arrhythmias or aggravation of existing arrhythmias, as a result of previous or concomitant pharmacologic treatment. This review summarizes normal cardiac cell and tissue functioning and provides an overview of drugs that effect cardiac repolarization and the adverse effects of commonly administered antiarrhythmics. PMID:27484663

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Inherited Demyelinating Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    SCHERER, STEVEN S.; WRABETZ, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    The past 15 years have witnessed the identification of more than 25 genes responsible for inherited neuropathies in humans, many associated with primary alterations of the myelin sheath. A remarkable body of work in patients, as well as animal and cellular models, has defined the clinical and molecular genetics of these illnesses and shed light on how mutations in associated genes produce the heterogeneity of dysmyelinating and demyelinating phenotypes. Here, we review selected recent developments from work on the molecular mechanisms of these disorders and their implications for treatment strategies. PMID:18803325

  18. Drug Resistant Fetal Arrhythmia in Obstetric Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Altug, Nahide; Kirbas, Ayse; Daglar, Korkut; Biberoglu, Ebru; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Obstetric cholestasis (OC) is a pregnancy specific liver disease characterized by increased levels of bile acid (BA) and pruritus. Raised maternal BA levels could be associated with intrauterine death, fetal distress, and preterm labor and also alter the rate and rhythm of cardiomyocyte contraction and may cause fetal arrhythmic events. We report a case of drug resistant fetal supraventricular tachycardia and concomitant OC. Conclusion. If there are maternal OC and concomitant fetal arrhythmia, possibility of the resistance to antiarrhythmic treatment should be kept in mind. PMID:25821617

  19. Arrhythmia analysis with an expert system.

    PubMed

    Redman, T C; Hahn, A W

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a rule based expert system which was designed to diagnose electrocardiographic arrhythmias in several species. The program, called ECG-X, is written in OPS5 and runs under MS-DOS 2.1 and higher on an IBM-PC or AT type machine. The program uses the paper speed, the species, the temporal relationships between the P waves and the QRS complexes as well as basic information about the P and QRS morphology, and provides the user with a rhythm diagnosis consistent with rules provided by contemporary cardiac electrophysiologic knowledge. PMID:2742969

  20. Classification of cardiac arrhythmias using competitive networks.

    PubMed

    Leite, Cicilia R M; Martin, Daniel L; Sizilio, Glaucia R A; Dos Santos, Keylly E A; de Araujo, Bruno G; Valentim, Ricardo A M; Neto, Adriao D D; de Melo, Jorge D; Guerreiro, Ana M G

    2010-01-01

    Information generated by sensors that collect a patient's vital signals are continuous and unlimited data sequences. Traditionally, this information requires special equipment and programs to monitor them. These programs process and react to the continuous entry of data from different origins. Thus, the purpose of this study is to analyze the data produced by these biomedical devices, in this case the electrocardiogram (ECG). Processing uses a neural classifier, Kohonen competitive neural networks, detecting if the ECG shows any cardiac arrhythmia. In fact, it is possible to classify an ECG signal and thereby detect if it is exhibiting or not any alteration, according to normality. PMID:21096338

  1. Difficulties with Ablation for Arrhythmias in Children

    PubMed Central

    Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation procedures in children present unique challenges for the electrophysiologist. At times, obtaining vascular access to reach the heart is a problem. If this first step is accomplished, the small size of the child's heart, arrhythmias relatively unique to the pediatric population, and the presence of congenital heart disease add to the complexity. In this manuscript, a review of commonly encountered problems and suggested solutions based on practice are presented. Precise mapping of the arrhythmogenic substrate, techniques to access excluded portions of the atrium from prior surgery, and the basis for electrophysiology maneuvers important in pediatric ablation are highlighted. PMID:18478062

  2. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Neves, Victor Ribeiro; Peltola, Mirja; Huikuri, Heikki; Rocha, Manoel Otávio da Costa; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz

    2014-10-01

    We applied the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) quantification algorithm to 24-hour ECG recordings of Chagas disease (ChD) patients with (G1, n=148) and without left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) (G2, n=33), and in control subjects (G0, n=28). Both ChD groups displayed a reduced RSA index; G1=299 (144-812); G2=335 (162-667), p=0.011, which was correlated with vagal indexes of heart rate variability analysis. RSA index is a marker of vagal modulation in ChD patients. PMID:25130950

  3. Inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liatsikos, Spyros A.; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Manav, Bachar; Csorba, Roland; von Tempelhoff, Georg Friedrich; Galazios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Apart from its established role in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE), inherited thrombophilia has been proposed as a possible cause of pregnancy loss and vascular gestational complications. There is a lot of controversy in the literature on the relationship between inherited prothrombotic defects and these obstetric complications. This is a review of the literature on inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders. Factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutation, and protein S deficiency seem to be associated with late and recurrent early pregnancy loss, while their impact on other pregnancy complications is conflicting. No definite association has been established between protein C and antithrombin deficiency and adverse pregnancy outcome, primarily due to their low prevalence. Screening is suggested only for women with early recurrent loss or late pregnancy loss. Anticoagulant treatment during pregnancy should be considered for women with complications who were tested positive for thrombophilia. PMID:27026779

  4. Inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Liatsikos, Spyros A; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Manav, Bachar; Csorba, Roland; von Tempelhoff, Georg Friedrich; Galazios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Apart from its established role in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE), inherited thrombophilia has been proposed as a possible cause of pregnancy loss and vascular gestational complications. There is a lot of controversy in the literature on the relationship between inherited prothrombotic defects and these obstetric complications. This is a review of the literature on inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders. Factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutation, and protein S deficiency seem to be associated with late and recurrent early pregnancy loss, while their impact on other pregnancy complications is conflicting. No definite association has been established between protein C and antithrombin deficiency and adverse pregnancy outcome, primarily due to their low prevalence. Screening is suggested only for women with early recurrent loss or late pregnancy loss. Anticoagulant treatment during pregnancy should be considered for women with complications who were tested positive for thrombophilia. PMID:27026779

  5. Nongenetic inheritance and transgenerational epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Szyf, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The idea that inherited genotypes define phenotypes has been paramount in modern biology. The question remains, however, whether stable phenotypes could be also inherited from parents independently of the genetic sequence per se. Recent data suggest that parental experiences can be transmitted behaviorally, through in utero exposure of the developing fetus to the maternal environment, or through either the male or female germline. The challenge is to delineate a plausible mechanism. In the past decade it has been proposed that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in multigenerational transmission of phenotypes and transgenerational inheritance. The prospect that ancestral experiences are written in our epigenome has immense implications for our understanding of human behavior, health, and disease. PMID:25601643

  6. Outcomes after nonemergent electrical cardioversion for atrial arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Benjamin Adam; Schulte, Phillip Joel; Hofmann, Paul; Ersbøll, Mads; Alexander, John Hunter; Broderick-Forsgren, Kathleen; Anstrom, Kevin Joseph; Granger, Christopher Bull; Piccini, Jonathan Paul; Velazquez, Eric Jose; Shah, Bimal Ramesh

    2015-05-15

    Electrical cardioversion (ECV) is recommended for rhythm control in patients with atrial arrhythmia; yet, ECV use and outcomes in contemporary practice are unknown. We reviewed all nonemergent ECVs for atrial arrhythmias at a tertiary care center (2010 to 2013), stratifying patients by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) use before ECV and comparing demographics, history, vitals, and laboratory studies. Outcomes included postprocedural success and complications and repeat cardioversion, rehospitalization, and death within 30 days. Overall, 1,017 patients underwent ECV, 760 (75%) for atrial fibrillation and 240 (24%) for atrial flutter; 633 underwent TEE before ECV and 384 did not. TEE recipients were more likely to be inpatients (74% vs 44%, p <0.001), have higher mean CHADS2 scores (2.6 vs 2.4, p = 0.03), and lower mean international normalized ratios (1.2 vs 2.1, p <0.001). Overall, 89 patients (8.8%) did not achieve sinus rhythm and 14 experienced procedural complications (1.4%). Within 30 days, 80 patients (7.9%) underwent repeat ECV, 113 (11%) were rehospitalized, and 14 (1.4%) died. Although ECV success was more common in patients who underwent TEE before ECV (77% vs 68%, p = 0.01), there were no differences in 30-day death or rehospitalization rates (11.1% vs 13.0%, p = 0.37). In multivariate analyses, higher pre-ECV heart rate was associated with increased rehospitalization or death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.15/10 beats/min, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.24, p <0.001), whereas TEE use was associated with lower rates (adjusted hazard ratio 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.39 to 0.86, p = 0.007). In conclusion, failures, complications, and rehospitalization after nonemergent ECV are common and associated more with patient condition than procedural characteristics. TEE use was associated with better clinical outcomes. PMID:25784514

  7. Outcomes Following Non-Emergent Electrical Cardioversion for Atrial Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Benjamin Adam; Schulte, Phillip; Hofmann, Paul; Ersbøll, Mads; Alexander, John Hunter; Broderick-Forsgren, Kathleen; Anstrom, Kevin Joseph; Granger, Christopher Bull; Piccini, Jonathan Paul; Velazquez, Eric Jose; Shah, Bimal Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Electrical cardioversion (ECV) is recommended for rhythm control in atrial arrhythmia patients, yet ECV use and outcomes in contemporary practice are unknown. We reviewed all non-emergent ECVs for atrial arrhythmias at a tertiary care center (2010–2013), stratifying patients by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) use pre-ECV and comparing demographics, history, vitals, and laboratory studies. Outcomes included post-procedure success and complications, and repeat cardioversion, rehospitalization, and death within 30 days. Overall, 1017 patients underwent ECV; 760 (75%) for atrial fibrillation and 240 (24%) for atrial flutter; 633 underwent TEE pre-ECV and 384 did not. TEE recipients were more likely to be inpatients (74% vs. 44%, p<0.001), have higher mean CHADS2 scores (2.6 vs. 2.4, p=0.03), and lower mean international normalized ratios (1.2 vs. 2.1, p<0.001). Overall, 89 (8.8%) did not achieve sinus rhythm and 14 experienced procedural complications (1.4%). Within 30 days, 80 (7.9%) underwent repeat ECV, 113 (11%) were rehospitalized, and 14 (1.4%) died. Although ECV success was more common in patients who underwent TEE pre-ECV (77% vs. 68%, p=0.01), there were no differences in 30-day death or rehospitalization rates (11.1% vs. 13.0%, p=0.37). In multivariable analyses, higher pre-ECV heart rate was associated with increased rehospitalization or death (adjusted HR 1.15/10 bpm, 95% CI 1.07–1.24, p<0.001), while TEE use was associated with lower rates (adjusted HR 0.58, 95% CI 0.39–0.86, p=0.007). In conclusion, failures, complications, and rehospitalization following non-emergent ECV are common, and associated more with patient condition than procedural characteristics. TEE use was associated with better clinical outcomes. PMID:25784514

  8. Inherited desmosomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Samuelov, Liat; Sprecher, Eli

    2015-06-01

    Desmosomes serve as intercellular junctions in various tissues including the skin and the heart where they play a crucial role in cell-cell adhesion, signalling and differentiation. The desmosomes connect the cell surface to the keratin cytoskeleton and are composed of a transmembranal part consisting mainly of desmosomal cadherins, armadillo proteins and desmoplakin, which form the intracytoplasmic desmosomal plaque. Desmosomal genodermatoses are caused by mutations in genes encoding the various desmosomal components. They are characterized by skin, hair and cardiac manifestations occurring in diverse combinations. Their classification into a separate and distinct clinical group not only recognizes their common pathogenesis and facilitates their diagnosis but might also in the future form the basis for the design of novel and targeted therapies for these occasionally life-threatening diseases. PMID:25487406

  9. Fetal Arrhythmias Associated with Cardiac Rhabdomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F; Cuneo, Bettina; Wiggins, Delonia; Gotteiner, Nina; Wakai, Ronald T

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary heart tumors in fetuses are rare and mainly represent rhabdomyomas. The tumors have a variable expression and can be associated with arrhythmias, including both wide and narrow QRS tachycardia. Although multiple Doppler techniques exist to assess fetal heart rhythm, it can be difficult to record precise electrophysiological pathologies in fetal life. Objective Investigations defining precise electrophysiological diagnosis were performed using fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Methods In addition to routine fetal echocardiography, fMCG was used to investigate electrophysiologic rhythm patterns in a series of 10 fetuses with cardiac rhabdomyomas. Results The mean gestational age of the fetuses was 28.6 weeks (SD ± 4.7 weeks). The multiple rhabdomyomas were mainly located in the right and left ventricles as well as around the AV groove. Arrhythmias or conduction abnormalities were diagnosed in all 10 patients, although only six of them were referred due to that indication. Remarkably, 80% (8/10) had associated Wolff-Parkinson-White pre-excitation. In addition, we found prominent p waves in four fetuses. Conclusion In fetuses with rhabdomyomas, a disease where rhythm pathology is common, precise electrophysiological diagnosis can now be made by fMCG. fMCG is complimentary to echocardiography for rhythm assessment, and can detect conduction abnormalities that are not possible to diagnose prenatally with M-mode or pulsed Doppler ultrasound. Risk factor assessment using fMCG can support pregnancy management and post-natal treatment and follow-up. PMID:24333285

  10. Loperamide Induced Life Threatening Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Bodar, Vijaykumar; Singh, Sharanjit; Frumkin, William; Mangla, Aditya; Doshi, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Loperamide is over-the-counter antidiarrheal agent acting on peripherally located μ opioid receptors. It is gaining popularity among drug abusers as opioid substitute. We report a case of a 46-year-old male that was presented after cardiac arrest. After ruling out ischemia, cardiomyopathy, pulmonary embolism, central nervous system pathology, sepsis, and other drug toxicity, we found out that patient was using around 100 mg of Loperamide to control his chronic diarrhea presumably because of irritable bowel syndrome for last five years and consumed up to 200 mg of Loperamide daily for last two days before the cardiac arrest. We hypothesize that the patient's QTc prolongation and subsequent cardiac arrest are due to Loperamide toxicity. Patient experienced gradual resolution of tachyarrhythmia and gradual decrease in QTc interval during hospitalization which supports the evidence of causal relationship between Loperamide overdose and potentially fatal arrhythmias. It also provided the clue that patient may have congenital long QT syndrome which was unmasked by Loperamide causing ventricular arrhythmias. This case adds one more pearl in the literature to support that Loperamide overdose related cardiac toxicity does exist and it raises concerns over Loperamide abuse in the community. PMID:27547470