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Sample records for inherited demyelinating neuropathies

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Inherited Demyelinating Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    SCHERER, STEVEN S.; WRABETZ, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    The past 15 years have witnessed the identification of more than 25 genes responsible for inherited neuropathies in humans, many associated with primary alterations of the myelin sheath. A remarkable body of work in patients, as well as animal and cellular models, has defined the clinical and molecular genetics of these illnesses and shed light on how mutations in associated genes produce the heterogeneity of dysmyelinating and demyelinating phenotypes. Here, we review selected recent developments from work on the molecular mechanisms of these disorders and their implications for treatment strategies. PMID:18803325

  2. Inherited neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Chance, P F; Reilly, M

    1994-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT) type 1 is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B), the X chromosome (CMTX), and to another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-Mb duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (P0) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1C is unknown. CMTX is associated with mutations in the connexin 32 gene. CMT2 is an axonal neuropathy of undetermined cause. One form of CMT2 maps to chromosome 1p36 (CMT2A). Dejerine-Sottas disease is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the P0 gene. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and may result from reduced expression of the PMP22 gene. Most examples of CMT1A and HNPP are reciprocal duplication or deletion syndromes originating from unequal crossover during germ cell meiosis. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that classically presents with a sensory peripheral neuropathy and early autonomic involvement. Transthyretin (TTR) is the most common constituent amyloid fibril protein deposited in FAP, and there are now 28 point mutations in the TTR gene described in TTR-related FAP. Liver transplantation looks promising as a treatment for TTR-related FAP. PMID:7804455

  3. Inherited mitochondrial neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) occasionally manifest as polyneuropathy either as the dominant feature or as one of many other manifestations (inherited mitochondrial neuropathy). MIDs in which polyneuropathy is the dominant feature, include NARP syndrome due to the transition m.8993T>, CMT2A due to MFN2 mutations, CMT2K and CMT4A due to GDAP1 mutations, and axonal/demyelinating neuropathy with external ophthalmoplegia due to POLG1 mutations. MIDs in which polyneuropathy is an inconstant feature among others is the MELAS syndrome, MERRF syndrome, LHON, Mendelian PEO, KSS, Leigh syndrome, MNGIE, SANDO; MIRAS, MEMSA, AHS, MDS (hepato-cerebral form), IOSCA, and ADOA syndrome. In the majority of the cases polyneuropathy presents in a multiplex neuropathy distribution. Nerve conduction studies may reveal either axonal or demyelinated or mixed types of neuropathies. If a hereditary neuropathy is due to mitochondrial dysfunction, the management of these patients is at variance from non-mitochondrial hereditary neuropathies. Patients with mitochondrial hereditary neuropathy need to be carefully investigated for clinical or subclinical involvement of other organs or systems. Supportive treatment with co-factors, antioxidants, alternative energy sources, or lactate lowering agents can be tried. Involvement of other organs may require specific treatment. Mitochondrial neuropathies should be included in the differential diagnosis of hereditary neuropathies. PMID:21402391

  4. Chronic demyelinating peripheral neuropathy in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

    PubMed

    Argov, Z; Soffer, D; Eisenberg, S; Zimmerman, Y

    1986-07-01

    Three siblings with chemically proved cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis presented with typical neurological manifestations of dementia and spinocerebellar disorder. Electrodiagnostic tests revealed demyelinating neuropathy in all three. Sural nerve biopsies showed loss of myelinated large fibers, marked Schwann cell proliferation, and onion bulb formation. Teased-fiber preparations confirmed the occurrence of segmental demyelination and remyelination. We suggest that demyelinating neuropathy is part of the neurological spectrum of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a recessively inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. PMID:3017187

  5. Inherited Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    With a prevalence of 1 in 2500 people, inherited peripheral nerve diseases, collectively called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are among the most common inherited neurologic disorders. Patients with CMT typically present with chronic muscle weakness and atrophy in limbs, sensory loss in the feet and hands, and foot deformities. Clinical similarities between patients often require genetic testing to achieve a precise diagnosis. In this article, the author reviews the clinical and pathologic features of CMT, and demonstrates how electrodiagnostic and genetic tools are used to assist in the diagnosis and symptomatic management of the diseases. Several cases are presented to illustrate the diagnostic processes. PMID:23117945

  6. Inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Muley, Suraj Ashok; Parry, Gareth J

    2009-05-01

    Early and effective treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is important to minimize axonal degeneration that occurs secondary to demyelination. The disease course is invariably chronic, so long-term treatment is often required, and adverse effects and costs are important considerations in devising a treatment plan. CIDP responds to prednisone, but long-term treatment can result in significant adverse effects. Azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporine can be used as steroid-sparing agents and may facilitate more rapid and successful tapering of prednisone. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and plasma exchange are also effective in the treatment of CIDP and can be used in patients who are unresponsive to prednisone or develop steroid-related adverse effects. IVIg may also be used as a first-line treatment, but its cost can be a limiting factor. A few uncontrolled studies have suggested that pulsed weekly methylprednisolone is both effective and well tolerated in the long-term treatment of CIDP. Treatments based on rituximab or cyclophosphamide have also been used in resistant disease. Variants of CIDP have been described on the basis of their association with specific antibodies or immunoglobulins and their response to specific immunomodulatory treatments. Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block responds to IVIg in the majority of patients. However, weakness may slowly worsen over time, and some patients become unresponsive. Anecdotal reports suggest that rituximab may be useful in patients who develop progressive disease. Placebo-controlled trials in anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy suggest that rituximab is effective and, with a combination of prednisone and cyclophosphamide, numbness and strength may improve. Other treatments that may be effective include plasma exchange and IVIg. Treatment is generally started with prednisone, IVIg, or plasma exchange. Rituximab and cyclophosphamide are used only

  7. MNGIE neuropathy: five cases mimicking chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bedlack, Richard S; Vu, Tuan; Hammans, Simon; Sparr, Steven A; Myers, Bennett; Morgenlander, Joel; Hirano, Michio

    2004-03-01

    We report five patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) who had demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The MNGIE neuropathy had clinical and electrodiagnostic features typical of acquired, rather than inherited, etiologies. In fact, three patients were actually treated for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We discuss findings that may help distinguish patients with MNGIE from those with CIDP. PMID:14981734

  8. Ultrasound of Inherited vs. Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Zaidman, Craig M.; Harms, Matthew B.; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We compared features of nerve enlargement in inherited and acquired demyelinating neuropathies using ultrasound. Methods We measured median and ulnar nerve cross-sectional areas in proximal and distal regions in 128 children and adults with inherited (Charcot-Marie Tooth-1 (CMT-1) (n=35)) and acquired (Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) (n=55), Guillaine-Barre Syndrome (GBS) (n=21) and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN) (n=17)) demyelinating neuropathies. We classified nerve enlargement by degree and number of regions affected. We defined patterns of nerve enlargement as: none- no enlargement; mild-nerves enlarged but never more than twice normal; regional- nerves normal at at least one region and enlarged more than twice normal at atleast one region; diffuse- nerves enlarged at all four regions with atleast one region more than twice normal size. Results Nerve enlargement was commonly diffuse (89%) and generally more than twice normal size in CMT-1, but not (p<0.001) in acquired disorders which mostly had either no, mild or regional nerve enlargement (CIDP (64%), GBS (95%), and MMN (100%)). In CIDP, subjects treated within three months of disease onset had less nerve enlargement than those treated later. Discussion Ultrasound identified patterns of diffuse nerve enlargement can be used to screen patients suspected of having CMT-1. Normal, mildly, or regionally enlarged nerves in demyelinating polyneuropathy suggests an acquired etiology. Early treatment in CIDP may impede nerve enlargement. PMID:24101129

  9. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  10. Intrathecal gene therapy rescues a model of demyelinating peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kagiava, Alexia; Sargiannidou, Irene; Theophilidis, George; Karaiskos, Christos; Richter, Jan; Bashiardes, Stavros; Schiza, Natasa; Nearchou, Marianna; Christodoulou, Christina; Scherer, Steven S; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2016-04-26

    Inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies are progressive incurable diseases without effective treatment. To develop a gene therapy approach targeting myelinating Schwann cells that can be translatable, we delivered a lentiviral vector using a single lumbar intrathecal injection and a myelin-specific promoter. The human gene of interest, GJB1, which is mutated in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT1X), was delivered intrathecally into adult Gjb1-null mice, a genetically authentic model of CMT1X that develops a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. We obtained widespread, stable, and cell-specific expression of connexin32 in up to 50% of Schwann cells in multiple lumbar spinal roots and peripheral nerves. Behavioral and electrophysiological analysis revealed significantly improved motor performance, quadriceps muscle contractility, and sciatic nerve conduction velocities. Furthermore, treated mice exhibited reduced numbers of demyelinated and remyelinated fibers and fewer inflammatory cells in lumbar motor roots, as well as in the femoral motor and sciatic nerves. This study demonstrates that a single intrathecal lentiviral gene delivery can lead to Schwann cell-specific expression in spinal roots extending to multiple peripheral nerves. This clinically relevant approach improves the phenotype of an inherited neuropathy mouse model and provides proof of principle for treating inherited demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:27035961

  11. Animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Martini, R

    1997-10-01

    Recent progress in human genetics and neurobiology has led to the identification of various mutations in particular myelin genes as the cause for many of the known inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in 3 distinct myelin genes, PMP22, P0, and connexin 32 cause the 3 major demyelinating subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A, CMT1B and CMTX, respectively. In addition, a reduction in the gene dosage of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), while particular point mutations in PMP22 and P0 cause the severe Dejerine-Sottas (DS) neuropathy. A series of spontaneous and genetically engineered rodent mutants for genes for the above-mentioned myelin constituents are now available and their suitability to serve as models for these still untreatable diseases is an issue of particular interest. The spontaneous mutants Trembler-J and Trembler, with point mutations in PMP22, reflect some of the pathological alterations seen in CMT1A and DS patients, respectively. Furthermore, engineered mutants that either over or underexpress particular myelin genes are suitable models for patients who are similarly compromised in the gene dosage of the corresponding genes. In addition, engineered mutants heterozygously or homozygously deficient in the myelin component P0 show the pathology of distinct CMT1B and DS patients, respectively, while Cx32 deficient mice develop pathological abnormalities similar to those of CMTX patients. Mutants that mimic human peripheral neuropathies might allow the development of strategies to alleviate the symptoms of the diseases, and help to define environmental risk factors for aggravation of the disease. In addition, such mutants might be instrumental in the development of strategies to cure the diseases by gene therapy. PMID:9418989

  12. Animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MARTINI, RUDOLF

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in human genetics and neurobiology has led to the identification of various mutations in particular myelin genes as the cause for many of the known inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in 3 distinct myelin genes, PMP22, P0, and connexin 32 cause the 3 major demyelinating subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A, CMT1B and CMTX, respectively. In addition, a reduction in the gene dosage of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), while particular point mutations in PMP22 and P0 cause the severe Dejerine-Sottas (DS) neuropathy. A series of spontaneous and genetically engineered rodent mutants for genes for the above-mentioned myelin constituents are now available and their suitability to serve as models for these still untreatable diseases is an issue of particular interest. The spontaneous mutants Trembler-J and Trembler, with point mutations in PMP22, reflect some of the pathological alterations seen in CMT1A and DS patients, respectively. Furthermore, engineered mutants that either over or underexpress particular myelin genes are suitable models for patients who are similarly compromised in the gene dosage of the corresponding genes. In addition, engineered mutants heterozygously or homozygously deficient in the myelin component P0 show the pathology of distinct CMT1B and DS patients, respectively, while Cx32 deficient mice develop pathological abnormalities similar to those of CMTX patients. Mutants that mimic human peripheral neuropathies might allow the development of strategies to alleviate the symptoms of the diseases, and help to define environmental risk factors for aggravation of the disease. In addition, such mutants might be instrumental in the development of strategies to cure the diseases by gene therapy. PMID:9418989

  13. Restless Leg Syndrome in Different Types of Demyelinating Neuropathies: A Single-Center Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Bisogni, Giulia; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazza, Salvatore; Sabatelli, Mario; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of patients with demyelinating neuropathies. Methods: Patients were retrospectively recruited from our cohort of different forms of demyelinating neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) referred to our Department of Neurology in a 10-year period. The validated 4-item RLS questionnaire was used for diagnosis of RLS. All patients with RLS who fulfilled criteria underwent a suggested immobilization test to confirm the diagnosis. A group of outpatients referred to the sleep disorders unit and data from published literature were used as controls. Results: Prevalence of RLS in demyelinating neuropathy group was higher than prevalence observed in control population (p = 0.0142) or in the literature data (p = 0.0007). In particular, in comparison with both control population and literature data, prevalence of RLS was higher in CIDP group (p = 0.0266 and p = 0.0063, respectively) and in CMT1A group (p = 0.0312 and p = 0.0105, respectively), but not in HNPP (p = 1.000 and p = 0.9320, respectively). Conclusions: our study confirms a high prevalence of RLS in inflammatory neuropathies as CIDP and, among inherited neuropathies, in CMT1A but not in HNPP. Considering that this is only a small cohort from a single-center retrospective experience, the link between RLS and neuropathy remains uncertain, and larger multicenter studies are probably needed to clarify the real meaning of the association between RLS and neuropathy. Citation: Luigetti M; Del Grande A; Testani E; Bisogni G; Losurdo A; Giannantoni NM; Mazza S; Sabatelli M; Della Marca G. Restless leg syndrome in different types of demyelinating neuropathies: a single-center pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(9):945-949. PMID:23997707

  14. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26878172

  15. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  16. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy, Multifocal Acquired Demyelinating Sensory and Motor Neuropathy and Other Chronic Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Variants

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Katz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies (CADP) are an important group of immune neuromuscular disorders affecting myelin. These are distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Classically, CIDP is characterized by proximal and distal weakness, large fiber sensory loss, elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein content, demyelinating changes nerve conduction studies or nerve biopsy, and response to immunomodulating treatment. In this chapter we discuss CADP with emphasis on multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy and conclude with less common variants. While each of these entities has distinctive laboratory and electrodiagnostic features that aid in their diagnosis, clinical characteristics are of paramount importance in diagnosing specific conditions and determining the most appropriate therapies. Unlike CIDP, MMN is typically asymmetric and affects only the motor nerve fibers. MMN is a rare disease that presents chronically, over several years of progression affecting the arms are more commonly than the legs. Men are more likely than women to develop MMN. MADSAM should be suspected in patients who have weakness and loss of sensation in primarily one arm or leg which progresses slowly over several months to years. It is important in patient with multifocal demyelinating clinical presentation to distinguish MMN from MADSAM since corticosteroids are not effective in MMN where the mainstay of therapy is intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIg). DADS can be subdivided into DADS-M (associated woth M-protein) and DADS-I which is idioapthic. While DADS-I patients respond somewhat to immunotherapy, DADS-M patients present with distal predominant sensorimotor demyelinating neuropathy phenotype and are notoriously refractory to immunotherapies regardless of antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Our knowledge

  17. Desert hedgehog is a mediator of demyelination in compression neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Jung, James; Frump, Derek; Su, Jared; Wang, Weiping; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Gupta, Ranjan

    2015-09-01

    The secreted protein desert hedgehog (dhh) controls the formation of the nerve perineurium during development and is a key component of Schwann cells that ensures peripheral nerve survival. We postulated that dhh may play a critical role in maintaining myelination and investigated its role in demyelination-induced compression neuropathies by using a post-natal model of a chronic nerve injury in wildtype and dhh(-/-) mice. We evaluated demyelination using electrophysiological, morphological, and molecular approaches. dhh transcripts and protein are down-regulated early after injury in wild-type mice, suggesting an intimate relationship between the hedgehog pathway and demyelination. In dhh(-/-) mice, nerve injury induced more prominent and severe demyelination relative to their wild-type counterparts, suggesting a protective role of dhh. Alterations in nerve fiber characteristics included significant decreases in nerve conduction velocity, increased myelin debris, and substantial decreases in internodal length. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that dhh blockade via either adenovirus-mediated (shRNA) or pharmacological inhibition both resulted in severe demyelination, which could be rescued by exogenous Dhh. Exogenous Dhh was protective against this demyelination and maintained myelination at baseline levels in a custom in vitro bioreactor to applied biophysical forces to myelinated DRG/Schwann cell co-cultures. Together, these results demonstrate a pivotal role for dhh in maintaining myelination. Furthermore, dhh signaling reveals a potential target for therapeutic intervention to prevent and treat demyelination of peripheral nerves in compression neuropathies. PMID:25936873

  18. An unusual demyelinating neuropathy in a patient with Waardenburg's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J M; Wilson, J

    1992-01-01

    We present clinical and laboratory data from a patient with Waardenburg's syndrome type II comprising iris heterochromia and deafness, complicated by Hirschsprung's disease--a known association--and an unusual demyelinating peripheral neuropathy--a unique association. The neuropathy is characterised by excessive focal folding of myelin sheaths. It is our view that, although both disorders could represent the consequences of neural crest embryopathy, it is more likely that they are associated by chance. PMID:1636383

  19. Differences in Membrane Properties in Simulated Cases of Demyelinating Neuropathies: Internodal Focal Demyelinations without Conduction Block

    PubMed Central

    Daskalova, M. S.; Alexandrov, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The membrane properties (intracellular, extracellular, electrotonic potentials, strength-duration time constants, rheobasic currents and recovery cycles), which can now be measured in healthy subjects and patients with demyelinating neuropathies, are investigated in simulated cases of focal reduction (70%) of the myelin sheath in one, two and three successive internodal segments along the length of human motor fibres. The internodally focally demyelinated cases (termed as IFD1, IFD2 and IFD3, respectively) are simulated using our previous double cable model of the fibres. The results show that the intracellular potentials are with reduced amplitude and slowed conduction velocity in the vicinity of demyelinated segments, however the segmental conduction block is not achieved. The radial decline of the extracellular potential amplitudes slightly increases with the increase of the radial distance and demyelination. In contrast, the electrotonic potentials, strength-duration time constants and rheobases are normal. In the recovery cycles, the refractoriness, supernormality and less late subnormality are close to the normal, showing that the pathology is relatively minor. The obtained abnormalities in the potentials and excitability properties provide new information about the pathophysiology of the demyelinated human motor axons and can be observed in vivo in patients with acquired demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:19669452

  20. Periaxin mutations cause a broad spectrum of demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroshi; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; De Jonghe, Peter; Ceuterick, Chantal; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Voit, Thomas; Schröder, J-Michael; Williams, Anna; Brophy, Peter J; Timmerman, Vincent; Lupski, James R

    2002-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that apparent loss-of-function mutations in the periaxin gene cause autosomal recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy or severe demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this report, we extend the associated phenotypes with the identification of two additional families with novel periaxin gene mutations (C715X and R82fsX96) and provide detailed neuropathology. Each patient had marked sensory involvement; two siblings with a homozygous C715X mutation had much worse sensory impairment than motor impairment. Despite early disease onset, these siblings with the C715X mutation had relatively slow disease progression and adult motor impairment typical of classic demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. In contrast, a patient with the homozygous R82fsX96 mutation had a disease course consistent with Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy. The neuropathology of patients in both families was remarkable for demyelination, onion bulb and occasional tomacula formation with focal myelin thickening, abnormalities of the paranodal myelin loops, and focal absence of paranodal septate-like junctions between the terminal loops and axon. Our study indicates a prominent sensory neuropathy resulting from periaxin gene mutations and suggests a role for the carboxyl terminal domain of the periaxin protein. PMID:12112076

  1. Are electrophysiological criteria useful in distinguishing childhood demyelinating neuropathies?

    PubMed

    Potulska-Chromik, Anna; Ryniewicz, Barbara; Aragon-Gawinska, Karolina; Kabzinska, Dagmara; Seroka, Andrzej; Lipowska, Marta; Kaminska, Anna M; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) needs to be differentiated from hereditary neuropathy. We aimed to validate existing CIDP nerve conduction study (NCS) criteria in a group of children with demyelinating neuropathies of chronic or subacute onset. Retrospective analysis of clinical and NCS results in 18 children with CIDP, 7 with hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsy (HNPP), and 24 with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1a (CMT1a). AAN and EFNS electrodiagnostic CIDP criteria were fulfilled in 17 of 18 CIDP, 3 of 7 HNPP, and 23 of 24 CMT1a patients. A distal compound muscle action potential (dCMAP) of >9 ms was observed in 14 of 18 CIDP patients but not in any patients with HNPP. Abnormal median/normal sural SNAP (AMNS) and a 10 m/s difference between conduction velocities (CV) of two corresponding nerves were not observed in any CMT1a patients. NCS in CMT1a, HNPP, and CIDP reflect demyelination. dCMAP duration, sensory AMNS, and a 10 m/s CV difference parameter are most useful in the differential diagnosis of pediatric CIDP. PMID:26663344

  2. Differences in Membrane Properties in Simulated Cases of Demyelinating Neuropathies: Internodal Focal Demyelinations with Conduction Block

    PubMed Central

    Daskalova, M. S.; Alexandrov, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the membrane properties (potentials and axonal excitability indices) in the case of myelin wrap reduction (96%) in one, two and three consecutive internodes along the length of human motor nerve fibre. The internodally focally demyelinated cases (termed as IFD1, IFD2 and IFD3, respectively, with one, two and three demyelinated internodes are simulated using our previous double cable model of the fibre. The progressively greater increase of focal loss of myelin lamellae blocks the invasion of the intracellular potentials into the demyelinated zones. For all investigated cases, the radial decline of the extracellular potential amplitudes increases with the increase of the radial distance and demyelination, whereas the electrotonic potentials show a decrease in the slow part of the depolarizing and hyperpolarizing responses. The time constants are shorter and the rheobases higher for the IFD2 and IFD3 cases than for the normal case. In the recovery cycles, the same cases have less refractoriness, greater supernormality and less late subnormality than the normal case. The simulated membrane abnormalities can be observed in vivo in patients with demyelinating forms of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The study provides new information about the pathophysiology of acquired demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:19669456

  3. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculo-neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nogués, Martín A; Varela, Francisco J; Seminario, Gisela; Insúa, María C; Bezrodnik, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired disease that may affect nerve roots and peripheral nerves. Despite its low incidence, diagnosis is particularly important because there are different effective treatments. Human immunoglobulin is one of the mainstays of the treatment. Although there are few studies up to date, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IgSC) has been proposed as an alternative to intravenous administration with similar efficacy. We present three cases with definite CIDP, classified according to the European Federation of Neurological Societies / Peripheral Nerve, Society (EFNS /PNS) criteria in which was used SCIgG as a treatment after success with the intravenous route. The Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale (ONLS) was used to estimate the changes in the muscular strength before and after treatment. PMID:26826992

  4. Supramaximal Stimulus Intensity as a Diagnostic Tool in Chronic Demyelinating Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Vivien; Warman Chardon, Jodi; Mills, Julie; Goldsmith, Claire; Bourque, Pierre R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The ability to correctly identify chronic demyelinating neuropathy can have important therapeutic and prognostic significance. The stimulus intensity value required to obtain a supramaximal compound muscle action potential amplitude is a commonly acquired data point that has not been formally assessed as a diagnostic tool in routine nerve conduction studies to identify chronic neuropathies. We postulated that this value was significantly elevated in chronic demyelinating neuropathy. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed electrophysiology laboratory records to compare the stimulus intensity values recorded during median and ulnar motor nerve conduction studies. The groups studied included normal controls (n = 42) and the following diagnostic categories: chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) (n = 20), acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (AIDP) (n = 13), Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) type 1 or 4C (n = 15), carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (n = 11), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (n = 18). Results. Supramaximal intensities were significantly higher in patients with CMT (median nerve: 43.4 mA) and CIDP (median nerve: 38.9 mA), whereas values similar to normal controls (median nerve: 25.3 mA) were obtained in ALS, CTS, and AIDP. Conclusions. Supramaximal stimulus intensity may be used as an additional criterion to identify the pathophysiology of neuropathy. We postulate that endoneurial hypertrophic changes may increase electrical impedance and thus the threshold of excitation at nodes of Ranvier. PMID:27413732

  5. Supramaximal Stimulus Intensity as a Diagnostic Tool in Chronic Demyelinating Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Parker, Vivien; Warman Chardon, Jodi; Mills, Julie; Goldsmith, Claire; Bourque, Pierre R

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The ability to correctly identify chronic demyelinating neuropathy can have important therapeutic and prognostic significance. The stimulus intensity value required to obtain a supramaximal compound muscle action potential amplitude is a commonly acquired data point that has not been formally assessed as a diagnostic tool in routine nerve conduction studies to identify chronic neuropathies. We postulated that this value was significantly elevated in chronic demyelinating neuropathy. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed electrophysiology laboratory records to compare the stimulus intensity values recorded during median and ulnar motor nerve conduction studies. The groups studied included normal controls (n = 42) and the following diagnostic categories: chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) (n = 20), acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (AIDP) (n = 13), Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) type 1 or 4C (n = 15), carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (n = 11), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (n = 18). Results. Supramaximal intensities were significantly higher in patients with CMT (median nerve: 43.4 mA) and CIDP (median nerve: 38.9 mA), whereas values similar to normal controls (median nerve: 25.3 mA) were obtained in ALS, CTS, and AIDP. Conclusions. Supramaximal stimulus intensity may be used as an additional criterion to identify the pathophysiology of neuropathy. We postulate that endoneurial hypertrophic changes may increase electrical impedance and thus the threshold of excitation at nodes of Ranvier. PMID:27413732

  6. Transcriptomic analyses of genes and tissues in inherited sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sapio, Matthew R; Goswami, Samridhi C; Gross, Jacklyn R; Mannes, Andrew J; Iadarola, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Inherited sensory neuropathies are caused by mutations in genes affecting either primary afferent neurons, or the Schwann cells that myelinate them. Using RNA-Seq, we analyzed the transcriptome of human and rat DRG and peripheral nerve, which contain sensory neurons and Schwann cells, respectively. We subdivide inherited sensory neuropathies based on expression of the mutated gene in these tissues, as well as in mouse TRPV1 lineage DRG nociceptive neurons, and across 32 human tissues from the Human Protein Atlas. We propose that this comprehensive approach to neuropathy gene expression leads to better understanding of the involved cell types in patients with these disorders. We also characterize the genetic "fingerprint" of both tissues, and present the highly tissue-specific genes in DRG and sciatic nerve that may aid in the development of gene panels to improve diagnostics for genetic neuropathies, and may represent specific drug targets for diseases of these tissues. PMID:27343803

  7. Axon membrane remodeling in the lead-induced demyelinating neuropathy of the rat.

    PubMed

    Coria, F; Berciano, M T; Berciano, J; Lafarga, M

    1984-01-23

    Single-teased fibers stained with the ferric ion-ferrocyanide method allowed us to study axonal remodeling in the lead-induced demyelinating neuropathy of the rat. Our findings, in agreement with recent physiological data, pointed to a transitory reorganization of the demyelinated axons to maintain impulse conduction until remyelination and formation of new cytochemically normal nodes had restored a secure saltatory conduction. PMID:6320964

  8. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and related inherited neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Garcia, C A; Reiter, L T; Lupski, J R

    1996-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) was initially described more than 100 years ago by Charcot, Marie, and Tooth. It was only recently, however, that molecular genetic studies of CMT have uncovered the underlying causes of most forms of the diseases. Most cases of CMT1 are associated with a 1.5-Mb tandem duplication in 17p11.2-p12 that encompasses the PMP22 gene. Although many genes may exist in this large duplicated region, PMP22 appears to be the major dosage-sensitive gene. CMT1A is the first autosomal dominant disease associated with a gene dosage effect due to an inherited DNA rearrangement. There is no mutant gene, but instead the disease phenotype results from having 3 copies of a normal gene. Furthermore, these findings suggest that therapeutic intervention in CMT1A duplication patients may be possible by normalizing the amount of PMP22 mRNA levels. Alternatively, CMT1A can be caused by mutations in the PMP22 gene. Other forms of CMT are associated with mutations in the MPZ (CMT1B) and Cx32 (CMTX) genes. Thus, mutations in different genes can cause similar CMT phenotypes. The related but more severe neuropathy, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS), can also be caused by mutations in the PMP22 and MPZ genes. All 3 genes thus far identified by CMT researchers appear to play an important role in the myelin formation or maintenance of peripheral nerves. CMT1A, CMT1B, CMTX, hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), and DSS have been called myelin disorders or "myelino-pathies." Other demyelinating forms, CMT1C and CMT-AR, may be caused by mutations of not yet identified myelin genes expressed in Schwann cells. The clinically distinct disease HNPP is caused by a 1.5-Mb deletion in 17p11.2-p12, which spans the same region duplicated in most CMT1A patients. Underexpression of the PMP22 gene causes HNPP just as overexpression of PMP22 causes CMT1A. Thus, 2 different phenotypes can be caused by dosage variations of the same gene. It is apparent that

  9. Inherited peripheral neuropathies due to mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Cassereau, J; Codron, P; Funalot, B

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are frequently responsible for neuropathies with variable severity. Mitochondrial diseases causing peripheral neuropathies (PNP) may be due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as is the case in MERRF and MELAS syndromes, or to mutations of nuclear genes. Secondary abnormalities of mtDNA (such as multiple deletions of muscle mtDNA) may result from mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA maintenance. This is the case in several syndromes caused by impaired mtDNA maintenance, such as Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) due to recessive mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mtDNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma), or Mitochondrial Neuro-Gastro-Intestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), due to recessive mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase. The last years have seen a growing list of evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics might be dysfunctional in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2), and these mechanisms might present a common link between dissimilar CMT2-causing genes. PMID:24768438

  10. Antibodies to gliomedin cause peripheral demyelinating neuropathy and the dismantling of the nodes of Ranvier.

    PubMed

    Devaux, Jérôme J

    2012-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are conditions that affect peripheral nerves. The mechanisms that underlie demyelination in these neuropathies are unknown. Recently, we demonstrated that the node of Ranvier is the primary site of the immune attack in patients with GBS and CIDP. In particular, GBS patients have antibodies against gliomedin and neurofascin, two adhesion molecules that play a crucial role in the formation of nodes of Ranvier. We demonstrate that immunity toward gliomedin, but not neurofascin, induced a progressive neuropathy in Lewis rats characterized by conduction defects and demyelination in spinal nerves. The clinical symptoms closely followed the titers of anti-gliomedin IgG and were associated with an important deposition of IgG at nodes. Furthermore, passive transfer of antigliomedin IgG induced a severe demyelinating condition and conduction loss. In both active and passive models, the immune attack at nodes occasioned the loss of the nodal clusters for gliomedin, neurofascin-186, and voltage-gated sodium channels. These results indicate that primary immune reaction against gliomedin, a peripheral nervous system adhesion molecule, can be responsible for the initiation or progression of the demyelinating form of GBS. Furthermore, these autoantibodies affect saltatory propagation by dismantling nodal organization and sodium channel clusters. Antibodies reactive against nodal adhesion molecules thus likely participate in the pathologic process of GBS and CIDP. PMID:22885108

  11. [A case of asymmetric demyelinating neuropathy in a patient with chronic graft-versus-host disease].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Seki, Naoko; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Oshima, Kumi; Asai, Takashi; Motokura, Toru; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2005-10-01

    A 47-year-old man, who suffered from acute lymphocytic leukemia at 45 years old and was treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at 46 years old after the induction of complete remission by the standard chemotherapy, developed the symptoms of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) such as dry eyes, dry mouth, skin thickening, skin scaling, skin pigmentation and impaired liver function. He was admitted to our hospital because of the acute development of diplopia and weakness of his left upper extremity accompanying with the exacerbation of other symptoms of cGVHD. Neurological examinations revealed the right abducens nerve palsy and asymmetric muscular weakness of the extremities; the proximal part of the left upper extremity and the distal part of the right upper extremity were markedly involved. Neurophysiological studies including magnetic motor root stimulation revealed demyelinating neuropathy specifically involving the motor nerves. On the basis of these findings, a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy associated with cGVHD was made. Nighteen reports are available on peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD patients, but to date little is known about the pathophysiology of this condition. Most of those patients have been diagnosed as having symmetric demyelinating polyneuropathy, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. In this study, contrary to previous reports, the asymmetric involvement of motor nerves is noteworthy. Accumulation and further analyses of the cases like the present case are necessary to elucidate the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD. PMID:16318371

  12. Inherited focal, episodic neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    PubMed

    Chance, Phillip F

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP; also called tomaculous neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder that produces a painless episodic, recurrent, focal demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP generally develops during adolescence, and may cause attacks of numbness, muscular weakness, and atrophy. Peroneal palsies, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other entrapment neuropathies may be frequent manifestations of HNPP. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities may be reduced in clinically affected patients, as well as in asymptomatic gene carriers. The histopathological changes observed in peripheral nerves of HNPP patients include segmental demyelination and tomaculous or "sausage-like" formations. Mild overlap of clinical features with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1 (CMT1) may lead patients with HNPP to be misdiagnosed as having CMT1. HNPP and CMT1 are both demyelinating neuropathies, however, their clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological features are quite distinct. HNPP is most frequently associated with a 1.4-Mb pair deletion on chromosome 17p12. A duplication of the identical region leads to CMT1A. Both HNPP and CMT1A result from a dosage effect of the PMP22 gene, which is contained within the deleted/duplicated region. This is reflected in reduced mRNA and protein levels in sural nerve biopsy samples from HNPP patients. Treatment for HNPP consists of preventative and symptom-easing measures. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA; also called familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder causing episodes of paralysis and muscle weakness initiated by severe pain. Individuals with HNA may suffer repeated episodes of intense pain, paralysis, and sensory disturbances in an affected limb. The onset of HNA is at birth or later in childhood with prognosis for recovery usually favorable; however, persons with HNA may have permanent residual neurological dysfunction following attack(s). Episodes are often

  13. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sames, Lori; Moore, Allison; Arnold, Renee; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN) is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL) assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN) could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF), Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF), The Neuropathy Association (TNA) and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies, we can

  14. A Mutation in PMP2 Causes Dominant Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Young Se; Kwak, Geon; Choi, Yu-Ri; Yeo, Ha Kyung; Jwa, Dong Hwan; Kim, Eun Ja; Mo, Won Min; Nam, Soo Hyun; Kim, Sung Min; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Park, Hwan Tae; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies with diverse genetic causes. In this study, we identified p.I43N mutation in PMP2 from a family exhibiting autosomal dominant demyelinating CMT neuropathy by whole exome sequencing and characterized the clinical features. The age at onset was the first to second decades and muscle atrophy started in the distal portion of the leg. Predominant fatty replacement in the anterior and lateral compartment was similar to that in CMT1A caused by PMP22 duplication. Sural nerve biopsy showed onion bulbs and degenerating fibers with various myelin abnormalities. The relevance of PMP2 mutation as a genetic cause of dominant CMT1 was assessed using transgenic mouse models. Transgenic mice expressing wild type or mutant (p.I43N) PMP2 exhibited abnormal motor function. Electrophysiological data revealed that both mice had reduced motor nerve conduction velocities (MNCV). Electron microscopy revealed that demyelinating fibers and internodal lengths were shortened in both transgenic mice. These data imply that overexpression of wild type as well as mutant PMP2 also causes the CMT1 phenotype, which has been documented in the PMP22. This report might expand the genetic and clinical features of CMT and a further mechanism study will enhance our understanding of PMP2-associated peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26828946

  15. An uncommon cause of bifacial weakness and non-length-dependent demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Mahadevan, Anita; Pooja, Mailankody; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T.; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Sinha, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tangier disease is a rare metabolic disorder that causes neuropathy in half of the affected individuals. We present the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings in a middle-aged gentleman of Tangier disease who was initially diagnosed as leprosy and treated with antileprosy drugs. The presence of a demyelinating electrophysiology in a patient with predominant upper limb involvement and facial diplegia should raise the suspicion of Tangier disease. Estimation of serum lipids should form a part of routine evaluation in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:26713019

  16. Tangier's disease: An uncommon cause of facial weakness and non-length dependent demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Mahadevan, Anita; Pooja, M.; Bindu, P. S.; Chickabasaviah, Y. T.; Gayathri, N.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Tangier disease is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation of cholesterol esters in various organs secondary to adenotriphosphate binding cassette transporter A-1 (ABCA-1) transporter deficiency and disrupted reverse cholesterol transport. It causes neuropathy in half of the affected individuals. We present the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings in a middle aged gentleman of Tangier disease who was initially misdiagnosed leprosy and treated with antileprosy drugs. The presence of a demyelinating neuropathy on electrophysiology in a patient with predominant upper limb involvement and facial diplegia should raise the suspicion of Tangier disease. The characteristic lipid profile of Tangier disease was noted in this patient viz. extremely low high density lipoprotein (HDL), elevated triglyceride (TG), and reduced apolipoprotein A1. Estimation of serum lipids should form a part of routine evaluation in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:27011649

  17. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations. PMID:24603424

  18. c-Jun activation in Schwann cells protects against loss of sensory axons in inherited neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hantke, Janina; Carty, Lucy; Wagstaff, Laura J.; Turmaine, Mark; Wilton, Daniel K.; Quintes, Susanne; Koltzenburg, Martin; Baas, Frank; Mirsky, Rhona

    2014-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is the most frequent inherited peripheral neuropathy. It is generally due to heterozygous inheritance of a partial chromosomal duplication resulting in over-expression of PMP22. A key feature of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is secondary death of axons. Prevention of axonal loss is therefore an important target of clinical intervention. We have previously identified a signalling mechanism that promotes axon survival and prevents neuron death in mechanically injured peripheral nerves. This work suggested that Schwann cells respond to injury by activating/enhancing trophic support for axons through a mechanism that depends on upregulation of the transcription factor c-Jun in Schwann cells, resulting in the sparing of axons that would otherwise die. As c-Jun orchestrates Schwann cell support for distressed neurons after mechanical injury, we have now asked: do Schwann cells also activate a c-Jun dependent neuron-supportive programme in inherited demyelinating disease? We tested this by using the C3 mouse model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A. In line with our previous findings in humans with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A, we found that Schwann cell c-Jun was elevated in (uninjured) nerves of C3 mice. We determined the impact of this c-Jun activation by comparing C3 mice with double mutant mice, namely C3 mice in which c-Jun had been conditionally inactivated in Schwann cells (C3/Schwann cell-c-Jun−/− mice), using sensory-motor tests and electrophysiological measurements, and by counting axons in proximal and distal nerves. The results indicate that c-Jun elevation in the Schwann cells of C3 nerves serves to prevent loss of myelinated sensory axons, particularly in distal nerves, improve behavioural symptoms, and preserve F-wave persistence. This suggests that Schwann cells have two contrasting functions in Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A: on the one hand they are the genetic source of

  19. Office immunotherapy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Peter J; Taylor, Bruce V; Davies, Jenny L; Mauermann, Michelle L; Litchy, William J; Klein, Christopher J; Dyck, P James B

    2015-10-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIg], plasma exchange [PE], and corticosteroids are efficacious treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy [CIDP]. IVIg is effective in multifocal motor neuropathy [MMN]. NIS, NIS-weakness, sum scores of raw amplitudes of motor fiber (CMAPs) amplitudes, and Dyck/Rankin score provided reliable measures to detect and scale abnormality and reflect change; they are therefore ideal for office management of response-based immunotherapy (R-IRx) of CIDP. Using efficacious R-IRx, a large early and late therapeutic response (≥ one-fourth were in remission or had recovered) was demonstrated in CIDP. In MMN only an early improvement with late non-significant worsening was observed. The difference in immunotherapy response supports a fundamental difference between CIDP (immune attack on Schwann cells and myelin) and MMN (attack on nodes of Ranvier and axons). PMID:25976871

  20. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data.

    PubMed

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP. PMID:27313890

  1. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP. PMID:27313890

  2. DEFINING DISABILITY: DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A DISABILITY SEVERITY INDEX IN INHERITED NEUROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Michael E.; Feldman, Eva L.; Carlos, Ruth C.; Siskind, Carly

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a reliable patient-reported scale that grades the severity of disability in inherited neuropathy, from an in-depth analysis of patient and healthcare provider perspectives on what constitutes mild, moderate and severe disability. Design In this prospective, cross-sectional study, a 19-item Disability questionnaire was developed following literature and expert review. Between 2011–2012, the Disability Questionnaire was provided to Health Care Providers experienced in inherited neuropathy attending national scientific meetings, and to patients self-registered with the Inherited Neuropathy Consortium – Rare Diseases Clinical Research Consortium on-line contact registry. Provider and patient responses were compared utilizing a 2-sided unpaired t-test with Bonferroni correction. The questionnaire was then assessed for validity, reliability, and unidimensionality. Results We analyzed 259 Disability Questionnaires (167 patients, 92 providers); these showed perfect agreement between patient and provider responses on qualitative descriptions of disability, but significant differences in quantitative responses on items corresponding to minimal or severe disability (p < 0.001). Validity and Test-retest reliability of the Questionnaire was excellent (Cronbach’s alpha =0.96; ICC= 0.977 [0.951–0.993]. Exploratory factor analysis and the Mokken Scaling Procedure supported the unidimensionality of the Disability Severity Index. Conclusion The Disability Severity Index is a unique instrument, categorizing disability from the patient’s perspective, and will undergo further cross-validation studies in inherited neuropathy. This Index may have applications to other peripheral neuropathies, and would thus benefit from future validation studies in the appropriate cohorts. PMID:25157034

  3. Hereditary Neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Hereditary Neuropathies Information Page Synonym(s): Neuropathy - Hereditary Table of Contents ( ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Hereditary Neuropathies? Hereditary neuropathies are a group of inherited disorders ...

  4. Giant axonal neuropathy: a rare inherited neuropathy with simple clinical clues

    PubMed Central

    Kamate, Mahesh; Ramakrishna, Shashikala; Kambali, Shweta; Mahadevan, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterised by accumulation of excess neurofilaments in the axons of peripheral and central nervous systems, which hampers signal transmission. It usually manifests in infancy and early childhood and is slowly progressive. Those affected with GAN have characteristic curly kinky hair, everted feet and a crouched gait, which suggest the diagnosis in most cases. We describe twin children who presented with difficulty in walking and an abnormal gait since they began walking; clinical clues such as hair changes led us to the final diagnosis. PMID:25216920

  5. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  6. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-31

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  7. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) associated to hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and revealed after influenza AH1N1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Remiche, Gauthier; Abramowicz, Marc; Mavroudakis, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Neurological complications of AH1N1 vaccination such as Guillain-Barré syndrome were described in the previous years. Several reports suggest that hereditary neuropathies may be a predisposing factor for immune-mediated neuropathies. We report the case of a 54-year-old female who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) 5 weeks after AH1N1 vaccination. She had no previous neurological history, but neurophysiological features led us to suspect an underlying hereditary neuropathy. PMP22 gene analysis showed a typical deletion, confirming the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). We observed a significant clinical and neurophysiological improvement of the neuropathy after intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of CIDP potentially triggered by AH1N1 vaccination. This and previous observations suggest that genetic-determined neuropathies could predispose to the occurrence of immune-mediated neuropathies. One must recall the possibility of a superimposed hereditary neuropathy like HNPP in patients with a clinical presentation of CIDP, especially when positive family history or unexpected neurophysiological features are present. PMID:24146347

  8. Improved inherited peripheral neuropathy genetic diagnosis by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Alexander P; Zhu, Danqing; Kidambi, Aditi; Ly, Carolyn; Tey, Shelisa; Brewer, Megan H; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2015-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs) are a group of related diseases primarily affecting the peripheral motor and sensory neurons. They include the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), hereditary motor neuropathies (HMN), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Using whole-exome sequencing (WES) to achieve a genetic diagnosis is particularly suited to IPNs, where over 80 genes are involved with weak genotype–phenotype correlations beyond the most common genes. We performed WES for 110 index patients with IPN where the genetic cause was undetermined after previous screening for mutations in common genes selected by phenotype and mode of inheritance. We identified 41 missense sequence variants in the known IPN genes in our cohort of 110 index patients. Nine variants (8%), identified in the genes MFN2, GJB1, BSCL2, and SETX, are previously reported mutations and considered to be pathogenic in these families. Twelve novel variants (11%) in the genes NEFL, TRPV4, KIF1B, BICD2, and SETX are implicated in the disease but require further evidence of pathogenicity. The remaining 20 variants were confirmed as polymorphisms (not causing the disease) and are detailed here to help interpret sequence variants identified in other family studies. Validation using segregation, normal controls, and bioinformatics tools was valuable as supporting evidence for sequence variants implicated in disease. In addition, we identified one SETX sequence variant (c.7640T>C), previously reported as a putative mutation, which we have confirmed as a nonpathogenic rare polymorphism. This study highlights the advantage of using WES for genetic diagnosis in highly heterogeneous diseases such as IPNs and has been particularly powerful in this cohort where genetic diagnosis could not be achieved due to phenotype and mode of inheritance not being previously obvious. However, first tier testing for common genes in clinically well-defined cases remains important and will account for most positive

  9. Congenital cataract, facial dysmorphism and demyelinating neuropathy (CCFDN) in 10 Czech gypsy children – frequent and underestimated cause of disability among Czech gypsies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital Cataract Facial Dysmorphism and demyelinating Neuropathy (CCFDN, OMIM 604468) is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder which was first described in Bulgarian Gypsies in 1999. It is caused by the homozygous founder mutation c.863 + 389C > T in the CTDP1 gene. The syndrome has been described exclusively in patients of Gypsy ancestry. The prevalence of this disorder in the Gypsy population in the Czech Republic and Central Europe is not known and is probably underestimated and under-diagnosed. Methods We clinically diagnosed and assessed 10 CCFDN children living in the Czech Republic. All patients are children of different ages, all of Gypsy origin born in the Czech Republic. Molecular genetic testing for the founder CTDP1 gene mutation was performed. Results All patients are homozygous for the c.863 + 389C > T mutation in the CTDP1 gene. All patients presented a bilateral congenital cataract and microphthalmos and had early cataract surgery. Correct diagnosis was not made until the age of two. All patients had variably delayed motor milestones. Gait is characteristically paleocerebellar in all the patients. Mental retardation was variable and usually mild. Conclusions Clinical diagnosis of CCFDN should be easy for an informed pediatrician or neurologist by the obligate signalling trias of congenital bilateral cataract, developmental delay and later demyelinating neuropathy. Our data indicate a probably high prevalence of CCFDN in the Czech Gypsy ethnic subpopulation. PMID:24690360

  10. Distally pronounced infantile spinal muscular atrophy with severe axonal and demyelinating neuropathy associated with the S230L mutation of SMN1.

    PubMed

    Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Barisić, Nina; Eggermann, Katja; Ortiz Brüchle, Nadina; Grđan, Petra; Zerres, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    Two Croatian siblings with atypical clinical findings in the presence of SMN1 gene mutations are reported. The girl presented with delayed motor development and weakness in hands and feet in her first year of life. She never stood or walked and developed scoliosis and joint contractures during childhood. Her hands and feet were non-functional when last seen at age 14 years. Her 4-year-old brother was more severely affected and had a clinical picture resembling infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type 1. He also showed unusual distally pronounced weakness and facial weakness. Both patients had no sensory deficits but gave evidence of a mixed axonal and demyelinating neuropathy with pronounced slowing in the distal nerve segments. Unexpectedly, both siblings showed a compound heterozygous SMN1 mutation (heterozygous deletion and missense mutation c.689C > T; p.S230L), thus confirming infantile SMA. In addition, next generation sequencing of 52 genes for hereditary neuropathies revealed a heterozygous missense mutation c.505T > C; p.Y169H in the SH3TC2 gene that was transmitted by the healthy father. Our observations widen the phenotypic consequences of SMN1 gene mutations and support the notion to look for additional genetic factors which may modify the clinical picture in atypical cases. PMID:26794302

  11. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  12. [Ultrasonographic diagnosis of inflammatory neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonographic nerve enlargement has primarily been reported in patients with inflammatory neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, vasculitic neuropathy and leprosy. Nerve ultrasonography is a promising diagnostic supportive tool for inflammatory neuropathies. The ultrasonographic findings that are currently useful are 1) nerve enlargement primarily suggests the existence of inflammatory or demyelinating neuropathies and 2) for patients with CIDP or demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the pattern of nerve enlargement is noted, and this pattern is useful for discriminating between these diseases. More precise evidence of ultrasonographic findings for inflammatory neuropathies should be established in the future. PMID:24607946

  13. Clinical and pathological features of an autosomal recessive neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, T W; Riley, E; Hall, C D; Swift, M

    1980-06-01

    Two siblings are described, ages 49 and 45 years, having a distinct hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) with severe peroneal nerve involvement. The neuropathic symptoms began in childhood. Both patients have sensorineural deafness. The proband was found to have a cardiac conduction abnormality in the absence of known ischemic heart disease. Electrodiagnostic studies were consistent with a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The presence of parental consanguinity and absence of affected individuals in succeeding or preceding generations suggested that the sensorimotor neuropathy in this family is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The sural nerve of the proband had significant loss of myelinated fibers and demyelination but few regenerating myelinated fibers and no onion-bulbs. The pathological findings, while nonspecific, are not characteristic of the hypertrophic, neuronal or intermediate types of HMSN. PMID:6247456

  14. Molecular regulators of nerve conduction - Lessons from inherited neuropathies and rodent genetic models.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers are highly compartmentalized. Helically wrapped lipoprotein membranes of myelin are integrated with subsets of proteins specifically in each compartment to shape the physiological behavior of these nerve fibers. With the advance of molecular biology and genetics, many functions of these proteins have been revealed over the past decade. In this review, we will first discuss how action potential propagation has been understood by classical electrophysiological studies. In particular, the discussion will be concentrated on how the geometric dimensions of myelinated nerve fibers (such as internodal length and myelin thickness) may affect nerve conduction velocity. This discussion will then extend into how specific myelin proteins may shape these geometric parameters, thereby regulating action potential propagation. For instance, periaxin may specifically affect the internodal length, but not other parameters. In contrast, neuregulin-1 may affect myelin thickness, but not axon diameter or internodal length. Finally, we will discuss how these basic neurobiological observations can be applied to inherited peripheral nerve diseases. PMID:25792482

  15. Molecular Regulators of Nerve Conduction - Lessons from Inherited Neuropathies and Rodent Genetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers are highly compartmentalized. Helically wrapped lipoprotein membranes of myelin are integrated with subsets of proteins specifically in each compartment to shape the physiological behavior of these nerve fibers. With the advance of molecular biology and genetics, many functions of these proteins have been revealed over the past decade. In this review, we will first discuss how action potential propagation has been understood by classical electrophysiological studies. In particular, the discussion will be concentrated on how the geometric dimensions of myelinated nerve fibers (such as internodal length and myelin thickness) may affect nerve conduction velocity. This discussion will then extend into how specific myelin proteins may shape these geometric parameters, thereby regulating action potential propagation. For instance, periaxin may specifically affect the internodal length, but not other parameters. In contrast, neuregulin-1 may affect myelin thickness, but not axon diameter or internodal length. Finally, we will discuss how these basic neurobiological observations can be applied to inherited peripheral nerve diseases. PMID:25792482

  16. Initial analysis of non-typical Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) at onset and late developing demyelinating disease in Italian patients by SSCP and automated DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sartore, M.; Semeraro, A.; Fortina, P.

    1994-09-01

    LHON is a mitochondrial genetic disease characterized by maternal inheritance and late onset of blindness caused by bilateral retinal degeneration. A number of molecular defects are known affecting expression of seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory chain complex I, III and IV. We screened genomic DNA from Italian patients for seven of the known point mutations in the ND-1, ND-4 and ND-6 subunits of complex I by PCR followed by SSCP and restriction enzyme digestion. Most of the patients had nonfamilial bilateral visual loss with partial or no recovery and normal neurological examination. Fundoscopic examination revealed that none of the patients had features typical of LHON. Nine of 21 patients (43%) showed multifocal CNS demyelination on MRI. Our results show aberrant SSCP patterns for a PCR product from the ND-4 subunit in one affected child and his mother. Sfa NI and Mae III digestions suggested the absence of a previously defined LHON mutation, and automated DNA sequence analysis revealed two A to G neutral sequence polymorphisms in the third position of codons 351 and 353. In addition, PCR products from the same two samples and an unrelated one showed abnormal SSCP patterns for the ND-1 subunit region of complex I due to the presence of a T to C change at nt 4,216 which was demonstrated after Nla III digestion of PCR products and further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. Our results indicate that additional defects are present in the Italian population, and identification of abnormal SSCP patterns followed by targeted automated DNA sequence analysis is a reasonable strategy for delineation of new LHON mutations.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Latov, Norman

    2014-08-01

    Chronic neuropathies are operationally classified as primarily demyelinating or axonal, on the basis of electrodiagnostic or pathological criteria. Demyelinating neuropathies are further classified as hereditary or acquired-this distinction is important, because the acquired neuropathies are immune-mediated and, thus, amenable to treatment. The acquired chronic demyelinating neuropathies include chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), neuropathy associated with monoclonal IgM antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG; anti-MAG neuropathy), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and POEMS syndrome. They have characteristic--though overlapping--clinical presentations, are mediated by distinct immune mechanisms, and respond to different therapies. CIDP is the default diagnosis if the neuropathy is demyelinating and no other cause is found. Anti-MAG neuropathy is diagnosed on the basis of the presence of anti-MAG antibodies, MMN is characterized by multifocal weakness and motor conduction blocks, and POEMS syndrome is associated with IgG or IgA λ-type monoclonal gammopathy and osteosclerotic myeloma. The correct diagnosis, however, can be difficult to make in patients with atypical or overlapping presentations, or nondefinitive laboratory studies. First-line treatments include intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), corticosteroids or plasmapheresis for CIDP; IVIg for MMN; rituximab for anti-MAG neuropathy; and irradiation or chemotherapy for POEMS syndrome. A correct diagnosis is required for choosing the appropriate treatment, with the aim of preventing progressive neuropathy. PMID:24980070

  18. Peripheral neuropathies during biologic therapies.

    PubMed

    Yagita, Masato; Hamano, Toshiaki; Hatachi, Saori; Fujita, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies should be recognized as the adverse effects of biological agents, especially anti-TNF agents. However, no solid clinical databases for biological agent-associated peripheral neuropathies (BAPN) have been established in Japan. Here we report two cases of peripheral neuropathy associated with anti-TNF agents. One was peroneal motor neuropathy. The other case was chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. In addition, we summarize the previous reports on BAPN and discuss their prevalence rate, pathogenesis and management. PMID:24313920

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited form of vision loss. ...

  20. CMT subtypes and disease burden in patients enrolled in the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium natural history study: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, V; Bundy, B; Reilly, M M; Pareyson, D; Bacon, C; Burns, J; Day, J; Feely, S; Finkel, R S; Grider, T; Kirk, C A; Herrmann, D N; Laurá, M; Li, J; Lloyd, T; Sumner, C J; Muntoni, F; Piscosquito, G; Ramchandren, S; Shy, R; Siskind, C E; Yum, S W; Moroni, I; Pagliano, E; Zuchner, S; Scherer, S S; Shy, M E

    2015-01-01

    Background The international Inherited Neuropathy Consortium (INC) was created with the goal of obtaining much needed natural history data for patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. We analysed clinical and genetic data from patients in the INC to determine the distribution of CMT subtypes and the clinical impairment associated with them. Methods We analysed data from 1652 patients evaluated at 13 INC centres. The distribution of CMT subtypes and pathogenic genetic mutations were determined. The disease burden of all the mutations was assessed by the CMT Neuropathy Score (CMTNS) and CMT Examination Score (CMTES). Results 997 of the 1652 patients (60.4%) received a genetic diagnosis. The most common CMT subtypes were CMT1A/PMP22 duplication, CMT1X/GJB1 mutation, CMT2A/MFN2 mutation, CMT1B/MPZ mutation, and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy/PMP22 deletion. These five subtypes of CMT accounted for 89.2% of all genetically confirmed mutations. Mean CMTNS for some but not all subtypes were similar to those previously reported. Conclusions Our findings confirm that large numbers of patients with a representative variety of CMT subtypes have been enrolled and that the frequency of achieving a molecular diagnosis and distribution of the CMT subtypes reflects those previously reported. Measures of severity are similar, though not identical, to results from smaller series. This study confirms that it is possible to assess patients in a uniform way between international centres, which is critical for the planned natural history study and future clinical trials. These data will provide a representative baseline for longitudinal studies of CMT. Clinical trial registration ID number NCT01193075. PMID:25430934

  1. INF2 mutations associated with dominant inherited intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in two Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Jin, Suqin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Renbin; Lv, He; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jiao, Jinsong; Yuan, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, mutations in the inverted formin 2 (INF2) gene have been indentified in patients with dominant inherited intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (DI-CMT) with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). We report clinical and nerve pathological changes in two Chinese patients. Case 1 is 27 years old and presented with distal muscle weakness and atrophy of legs at the age of 13 and renal failure at the age of 26. Three of his family members died due to pure renal failure. Case 2 is 22 years old and presented with distal muscle weakness and atrophy of the legs with transient attacks of difficulty in speaking at age 17. Proteinuria was found by routine urine test at the same time. Sural nerve biopsy revealed moderate-to-severe loss of myelinated fibers with union bulbs and regeneration clusters in both patients. Ultrastructurally, numerous elongated extensions of Schwann cells of unmyelinated fibers could be seen in both patients. INF2 gene mutation screening revealed c.451 T>C in case 1 and c.341 G>A in case 2. This is the first report of Chinese patients with INF2-related DI-CMT. The c.451 T>C mutant was responsible for both isolated FSGS and a dual phenotype of FSGS and neuropathy within one family. Intrafamilial variability can be found with the same INF2 mutation. The CNS manifestations further broadened the clinical spectrum of INF2- associated disorders. PMID:25943269

  2. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy: two cases of difficult diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Beydoun, Said R; Cho, Justin

    2013-09-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder that causes a polyneuropathy with predisposition for involvement at sites of compression and is often underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed due to its heterogeneity in clinical and electrophysiological presentation. We report 2 cases of HNPP, which were initially diagnosed and treated as either an acquired demyelinating disorder or alternative inherited demyelinating disorder. Thorough evaluation of repeat electrodiagnostic studies and genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis of HNPP in both cases. One case showed the classic peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) deletion and the other case showed a previously reported single base pair deletion at Leu145 causing a frameshift mutation at the PMP22 gene. These cases underscore the difficulty of diagnosing HNPP, because of the variations in clinical and electrophysiological findings and reinforce the importance of a combination high index of clinical suspicion, electrodiagnostic testing, and genetic testing to make the diagnosis. PMID:23965407

  3. Diagnostic approach to peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Nair, Pradeep P.

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy refers to disorders of the peripheral nervous system. They have numerous causes and diverse presentations; hence, a systematic and logical approach is needed for cost-effective diagnosis, especially of treatable neuropathies. A detailed history of symptoms, family and occupational history should be obtained. General and systemic examinations provide valuable clues. Neurological examinations investigating sensory, motor and autonomic signs help to define the topography and nature of neuropathy. Large fiber neuropathy manifests with the loss of joint position and vibration sense and sensory ataxia, whereas small fiber neuropathy manifests with the impairment of pain, temperature and autonomic functions. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) tests include sensory, motor nerve conduction, F response, H reflex and needle electromyography (EMG). EDx helps in documenting the extent of sensory motor deficits, categorizing demyelinating (prolonged terminal latency, slowing of nerve conduction velocity, dispersion and conduction block) and axonal (marginal slowing of nerve conduction and small compound muscle or sensory action potential and dennervation on EMG). Uniform demyelinating features are suggestive of hereditary demyelination, whereas difference between nerves and segments of the same nerve favor acquired demyelination. Finally, neuropathy is classified into mononeuropathy commonly due to entrapment or trauma; mononeuropathy multiplex commonly due to leprosy and vasculitis; and polyneuropathy due to systemic, metabolic or toxic etiology. Laboratory investigations are carried out as indicated and specialized tests such as biochemical, immunological, genetic studies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy are carried out in selected patients. Approximately 20% patients with neuropathy remain undiagnosed but the prognosis is not bad in them. PMID:19893645

  4. Motor neuropathy in porphobilinogen deaminase–deficient mice imitates the peripheral neuropathy of human acute porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Raija L.P.; Martini, Rudolf; Baumgartner, Matthias; Erne, Beat; Borg, Jacques; Zielasek, Jürgen; Ricker, Kenneth; Steck, Andreas; Toyka, Klaus V.; Meyer, Urs A.

    1999-01-01

    Acute porphyrias are inherited disorders caused by partial deficiency of specific heme biosynthesis enzymes. Clinically, porphyrias are manifested by a neuropsychiatric syndrome that includes peripheral neuropathy. Although much is known about the porphyrias’ enzyme defects and their biochemical consequences, the cause of the neurological manifestations remains unresolved. We have studied porphyric neuropathy in mice with a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). PBGD-deficient mice (PBGD–/–) imitate acute porphyria through massive induction of hepatic δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase by drugs such as phenobarbital. Here we show that PBGD–/– mice develop impairment of motor coordination and muscle weakness. Histologically femoral nerves of PBGD–/– mice exhibit a marked decrease in large-caliber (>8 μm) axons and ultrastructural changes consistent with primary motor axon degeneration, secondary Schwann cell reactions, and axonal regeneration. These findings resemble those found in studies of affected nerves of patients with acute porphyria and thus provide strong evidence that PBGD deficiency causes degeneration of motor axons without signs of primary demyelination, thereby resolving a long-standing controversy. Interestingly, the neuropathy in PBGD–/– mice developed chronically and progressively and in the presence of normal or only slightly (twofold) increased plasma and urinary levels of the putative neurotoxic heme precursor δ-aminolevulinic acid. These data suggest that heme deficiency and consequent dysfunction of hemeproteins can cause porphyric neuropathy. PMID:10207164

  5. Immunotherapy in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Léger, Jean-Marc; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Muntean, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been investigated in a small subset of peripheral neuropathies, including an acute one, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 3 chronic forms: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and neuropathy associated with IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein. Several experimental studies and clinical data are strongly suggestive of an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Either cell-mediated mechanisms or antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin, or nodal antigens are considered to act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves. Immunomodulatory treatments used in these neuropathies aim to act at various steps of this pathogenic process. However, there are many phenotypic variants and, consequently, there is a significant difference in the response to immunotherapy between these neuropathies, as well as a need to improve our knowledge and long-term management of chronic forms. PMID:26602549

  6. [Immune-mediated neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Stoll, G; Reiners, K

    2016-08-01

    The Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are the most common immune-mediated polyneuropathies, which can show variable clinical and electrophysiological manifestations. Rarer immune-mediated neuropathies encompass paraproteinemic neuropathies (PPN), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and vasculitic neuropathies. The diagnosis usually relies on the history of symptom evolution, distribution of nerve dysfunction and particularly on characteristic features in nerve conduction studies, aided by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy findings. The therapeutic toolbox encompasses corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis often accompanied by long-term immunosuppression. It is important to note that immune-mediated neuropathies selectively respond to treatment and contraindications need to be considered. Despite treatment a considerable number of patients suffer from permanent neurological deficits. PMID:27474733

  7. A report of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy: the value of complete electrodiagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Bulusu, Srinivas; McMillan, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    Patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) typically present with a mononeuropathy (particularly peroneal or ulnar palsy) or a brachial plexopathy. Careful electrodiagnostic testing has an important role in establishing the diagnosis of HNPP differentiating this condition from other inherited or acquired neuropathies as well as obviating the need for unnecessary surgeries. We present a case of a patient who presented with a painless brachial plexopathy who was found to have multiple sites of segmental demyelination on nerve conduction studies, consistent with HNPP. We review the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of HNPP including the key electrodiagnostic findings to screen for this disorder. PMID:21988036

  8. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

  9. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies.

    PubMed

    van Paassen, Barbara W; van der Kooi, Anneke J; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Verhamme, Camiel; Baas, Frank; de Visser, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

  10. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  11. HIV peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gabbai, Alberto Alain; Castelo, Adauto; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are the most common neurological manifestations occurring in HIV-infected individuals. Distal symmetrical sensory neuropathy is the most common form encountered today and is one of the few that are specific to HIV infection or its treatment. The wide variety of other neuropathies is akin to the neuropathies seen in the general population and should be managed accordingly. In the pre-ART era, neuropathies were categorized according to the CD4 count and HIV viral load. In the early stages of HIV infection when CD4 count is high, the inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies predominate and in the late stages with the decline of CD4 count opportunistic infection-related neuropathies prevail. That scenario has changed with the present almost universal use of ART (antiretroviral therapy). Hence, HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies are better classified according to their clinical presentations: distal symmetrical polyneuropathy, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), mononeuropathies, mononeuropathies multiplex and cranial neuropathies, autonomic neuropathy, lumbosacral polyradiculomyelopathy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-like motor neuropathy. Treated with ART, HIV-infected individuals are living longer and are at a higher risk of metabolic and age-related complications; moreover they are also prone to the potentially neurotoxic effects of ART. There are no epidemiological data regarding the incidence and prevalence of the peripheral neuropathies. In the pre-ART era, most data were from case reports, series of patients, and pooled autopsy data. At that time the histopathological evidence of neuropathies in autopsy series was almost 100%. In large prospective cohorts presently being evaluated, it has been found that 57% of HIV-infected individuals have distal symmetrical sensory neuropathy and 38% have neuropathic pain. It is now clear that

  12. [Phenotypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Syndrome and Differential Diagnosis Focused in Inflammatory Neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most frequent form of inherited neuropathy, is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome of the peripheral nervous system with a rather homologous clinical phenotype (slowly progressive distal weakness and muscle atrophy, skeletal deformities, and areflexia in each limb). CMT1 is the autosomal-dominant demyelinating form, and CMT1A (mostly PMP22 duplication) is the most frequent subtype, followed by CMTX1, HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies), CMT1B, or CMT2. As CMT is characterized by slowly progressive motor and sensory disturbances in each limb, it could be misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) occasionally. Some points can distinguish demyelinating CMT from CIDP. CMT1 patients do not show the conduction block that is frequent in CIDP. In addition, ultrasonographic findings are useful because CMT1 suggests diffuse enlargement of peripheral nerves, whereas CIDP is characterized by asymmetrical or focal enlargement of peripheral nerves. Some CMT1 cases show favorable responses to immunomodulating therapeutics such as corticosteroids, IVIg, and plasma exchange. Such CIDP-like CMT1 (especially CMT1B or CMT2A) shows moderate to high levels of cerebrospinal fluid protein and infiltrated inflammatory macrophages. PMID:26764297

  13. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Amanda C.; Donofrio, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common treatable chronic autoimmune neuropathy. Multiple diagnostic criteria have been established, with the primary goal of identifying neurophysiologic hallmarks of acquired demyelination. Treatment modalities have expanded to include numerous immuno-modulatory therapies, although the best evidence continues to be for corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg). This review describes the pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CIDP. PMID:23117943

  14. A patient with PMP22-related hereditary neuropathy and DBH-gene-related dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Chiaro, Giacomo; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Contin, Manuela; Scaglione, Cesa; Barletta, Giorgio; Cecere, Annagrazia; Garagnani, Paolo; Tieri, Paolo; Ferrarini, Alberto; Piras, Silvia; Franceschi, Claudio; Delledonne, Massimo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent focal neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a relatively frequent autosomal-dominant demyelinating neuropathy linked to peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene deletions. The combination of PMP22 gene mutations with other genetic variants is known to cause a more severe phenotype than expected. We present the case of a patient with severe orthostatic hypotension since 12 years of age, who inherited a PMP22 gene deletion from his father. Genetic double trouble was suspected because of selective sympathetic autonomic disturbances. Through exome-sequencing analysis, we identified two novel mutations in the dopamine beta hydroxylase gene. Moreover, with interactome analysis, we excluded a further influence on the origin of the disease by variants in other genes. This case increases the number of unique patients presenting with dopamine-β-hydroxylase deficiency and of cases with genetically proven double trouble. Finding the right, complete diagnosis is crucial to obtain adequate medical care and appropriate genetic counseling. PMID:26410747

  15. Multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Muley, Suraj Ashok; Parry, Gareth J

    2012-09-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) was first described in 1988 as a purely motor neuropathy affecting multiple motor nerves. The diagnosis was based entirely on demonstrating electrophysiological evidence of a conduction block (CB) that selectively affected motor axons, with sparing of sensory axons even through the site of motor CB. Subsequently, a similar disorder was reported but with absence of demonstrable CB on routine nerve conduction studies and there is still some debate as to whether MMN without CB is related to MMN. MMN is thought to be an inflammatory neuropathy related to an immune attack on motor nerves. The conventional hypothesis is that the primary pathology is segmental demyelination, but recent research raises the possibility of a primary axonopathy. Anti-GM1 antibodies can be found in some patients but it is unclear whether these antibodies are pathogenic. Intravenous immunoglobulin is the mainstay of treatment but other immunosuppressive treatments can also be effective. PMID:22743043

  16. Autoantibodies to tetraspanins (CD9, CD81 and CD82) in demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Kazuki; Paul, Friedemann; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Umapathi, Thirugnanam; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-02-15

    Tetraspanin family proteins, CD9, CD81 and CD82 are expressed in the oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells. We investigated autoantibodies to tetraspanin proteins in patients with demyelinating diseases. Sera were collected from 119 multiple sclerosis patients, 19 neuromyelitis optica, 42 acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, 23 chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and 13 acute motor axonal neuropathy as well as 55 healthy controls. Few multiple sclerosis and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients had autoantibodies that were weakly reactive to CD9 or CD81 but the significance is unclear. It is unlikely that these autoantibodies are pathogenic or serve as potential biomarkers in demyelinating diseases. PMID:26857499

  17. Evidence for an Environmental and Inherited Predisposition Contributing to the Risk for Global Tendinopathies or Compression Neuropathies in Patients With Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Tashjian, Robert Z.; Farnham, James M.; Granger, Erin K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tearing has been found to be clinically associated with other tendinopathies and compression neuropathies; a significant excess of these phenotypes has been seen in patients with rotator cuff tears. It is unclear if the association is secondary to environmental or genetic influences. Purpose: To examine population-based data for comorbid association of rotator cuff tearing and tendinopathies and compression neuropathies and to determine whether the association extends to relatives of patients with rotator cuff tears, which could suggest a genetic contribution. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The Utah Population Database (UPDB) contains health and genealogical data on over 2 million Utah residents. Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Revision, codes (CPT 4) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes (ICD-9) entered in patient records were used to identify patients with rotator cuff tearing and with comorbid tendinopathies and compression neuropathies. We tested the hypothesis of excess familial clustering of these other phenotypes with rotator cuff tearing using a well-established method (estimation of relative risks) in the overall study group of rotator cuff patients (N = 1889). Results: Significantly elevated risk for elbow, hand/wrist, foot/ankle, knee, and hip tendinopathies, as well as for all tendinopathies and compression neuropathies, was observed in rotator cuff tear cases themselves (P < 2.8e–13), in their spouses (P < .02), and in their first-degree relatives (P < 5.5e–4). A significant excess of elbow (P = .01), foot/ankle (P = .04), and all tendinopathies (P = 3.1e–3) was also observed in second-degree relatives, and a significant excess of compression neuropathies (P = .03) was observed in third-degree relatives. Conclusion: The current study shows strong evidence of familial clustering of rotator cuff tearing with other tendinopathies and with compression

  18. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

  19. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk for ...

  20. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  1. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathey, Emily K; Pollard, John D

    2013-10-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is the commonest treatable neuropathy in the western world. Untreated it may result in severe disability but if diagnosed and treated early there is effective treatment for the majority of patients. Typical CIDP is readily recognised but the diagnosis of other subgroups can be more challenging. The pathology of polyradiculoneuropathies such as CIDP characteristically affects the most proximal regions of the peripheral nervous system, nerve roots and major plexuses. It is important to test these regions with electrodiagnostic studies since routine neurophysiology may not encounter regions of pathology. Although accepted as an autoimmune disorder with an underlying immunopathology involving T cell and B cell responses, there is no agreement on major target antigens; however recent studies have highlighted a role for molecules in non compact myelin which play an essential role in the formation and maintenance of the nodal structures and hence in the function of ion channels central to saltatory conduction. Controlled trials have proven the efficacy of corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange in the short term and intravenous immunoglobulin also in the long term. Immunosuppressive agents are widely used but their efficacy has not been proven in controlled trials. Recent trials have shown the importance of attempting treatment withdrawal in patients apparently in remission to conserve treatments that are very expensive and in short supply, since a significant proportion of patients may enter long lasting remission following short term therapy. For the relatively small group of patients who do not respond to these first line therapies new agents including monoclonal antibodies may have a role. PMID:23146613

  2. Coexistent Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and type 2 diabetes mellitus neuropathies in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Sun, A-ping; Tang, Lu; Liao, Qin; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Ying-shuang; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is caused by duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene on chromosome 17. It is the most common inherited demyelinating neuropathy. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder that frequently causes predominantly sensory neuropathy. In this study, we report the occurrence of CMT1A in a Chinese family affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this family, seven individuals had duplication of the PMP22 gene, although only four had clinical features of polyneuropathy. All CMT1A patients with a clinical phenotype also presented with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The other three individuals had no signs of CMT1A or type 2 diabetes mellitus. We believe that there may be a genetic link between these two diseases. PMID:26692872

  3. Coexistent Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and type 2 diabetes mellitus neuropathies in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Sun, A-Ping; Tang, Lu; Liao, Qin; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Ying-Shuang; Zhang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is caused by duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene on chromosome 17. It is the most common inherited demyelinating neuropathy. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder that frequently causes predominantly sensory neuropathy. In this study, we report the occurrence of CMT1A in a Chinese family affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this family, seven individuals had duplication of the PMP22 gene, although only four had clinical features of polyneuropathy. All CMT1A patients with a clinical phenotype also presented with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The other three individuals had no signs of CMT1A or type 2 diabetes mellitus. We believe that there may be a genetic link between these two diseases. PMID:26692872

  4. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  5. Methanol optic neuropathy: a histopathological study.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, J A; Hostovsky, M; Bilbao, J M; Rewcastle, N B

    1982-10-01

    The histopathologic effects of methanol on the optic nerve were studied in four patients. Circumscribed myelin damage occurred behind the lamina cribrosa in each nerve. Axons were preserved. Demyelination also occurred in cerebral hemispheric white matter in one patient. This selective myelinoclastic effect of methanol metabolism is probably caused by histotoxic anoxia in watershed areas of the cerebral and distal optic nerve circulations. Juxtabulbar demyelination may cause optic disk edema in methanol poisoning by compressive obstruction of orthograde axoplasmic flow. Visual loss may be due to disruption of saltatory conduction. Retrolaminar demyelinating optic neuropathy is an early morphologic correlate of visual loss in methanol intoxication. PMID:6889696

  6. Electrophysiological investigation of toxic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Le Quesne, P M

    1982-01-01

    Electrophysiological changes are correlated with pathological processes. Marked slowing of conduction is found in segmental demyelination due to delayed nodal excitation or short lengths of continuous conduction. Secondary demyelination causes slow conduction in hexacarbon neuropathy. Slight reduction in maximal conduction velocity is attributable to selective damage to large fibres in acrylamide neuropathy. Sensory nerve action potential amplitude is a sensitive measure of peripheral nerve function and comparison of abnormalities in different nerve segments may indicate the nature of the underlying pathological change. Other abnormalities may be elucidated by double stimuli; eg repetitive activity due to cholinesterase inhibition only occurs after the first of two closely spaced stimuli. Activity-related excitability changes may be detected by measuring the amplitude of the response to a submaximal stimulus at varying times after a maximal shock and is increased and prolonged by the pyrethroid deltamethrin. PMID:6962658

  7. Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Pierre R; Chardon, Jodi Warman; Massie, Rami

    2015-09-20

    Peripheral nervous system axons and myelin have unique potential protein, proteolipid, and ganglioside antigenic determinants. Despite the existence of a blood-nerve barrier, both humoral and cellular immunity can be directed against peripheral axons and myelin. Molecular mimicry may be triggered at the systemic level, as was best demonstrated in the case of bacterial oligosaccharides. The classification of immune neuropathy has been expanded to take into account specific syndromes that share unique clinical, electrophysiological, prognostic and serological features. Guillain-Barré syndrome encompasses a classical syndrome of acute demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and many variants: axonal motor and sensory, axonal motor, Miller-Fisher, autonomic, and sensory. Similarly, chronic immune neuropathy is composed of classic chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and variants characterized as multifocal (motor or sensorimotor), sensory, distal symmetric, and syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathy. Among putative biomarkers, myelin associated glycoprotein and several anti-ganglioside autoantibodies have shown statistically significant associations with specific neuropathic syndromes. Currently, the strongest biomarker associations are those linking Miller-Fisher syndrome with anti-GQ1b, multifocal motor neuropathy with anti-GM1, and distal acquired symmetric neuropathy with anti-MAG antibodies. Many other autoantibody associations have been proposed, but presently lack sufficient specificity and sensitivity to qualify as biomarkers. This field of research has contributed to the antigenic characterization of motor and sensory functional systems, as well as helping to define immune neuropathic syndromes with widely different clinical presentation, prognosis and response to therapy. Serologic biomarkers are likely to become even more relevant with the advent of new targeted forms of immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:25748038

  8. Precise correlation between structural and electrophysiological disturbances in MADSAM neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2015-11-01

    Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy is characterised by multifocal clinical deficits. Imaging studies have identified multifocal enlargements of nerve trunks, but a precise correlation between structural abnormalities and electrophysiological dysfunction has not been elucidated. Two patients diagnosed with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy were evaluated with nerve conduction studies, including short segment nerve conduction studies to precisely localise motor conduction block, and ultrasound studies of corresponding nerve trunks. Motor conduction block was identified in each patient (upper limb nerves in two patients), superimposed on additional demyelinating neurophysiological features. Upper limb ultrasound studies demonstrated focal nerve enlargement that precisely correlated with neurophysiological conduction block. The results of this study suggest that factors contributing to focal structural abnormalities in multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy are also those that produce conduction block. PMID:26314279

  9. Characteristics of demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with concurrent diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiliang; Wu, Xiaohua; Xie, Huijun; Han, Ying; Guan, Yangtai; Qin, Yong; Zheng, Huimin; Jiang, Jianming; Niu, Zhenmin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common type of inherited peripheral neuropathy and has a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. CMT with concurrent diabetes mellitus (DM) is rare. The purpose of this study is to explore the genetic, clinical and pathological characteristics of the patients with CMT and concurrent DM. Methods: We investigated gene mutations (the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene, myelin protein zero gene, lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-α factor gene, early growth response gene and the neurofilament light chain gene loci) of a relatively large and typical Chinese family with CMT1 and concurrent DM2. From the literature, we also retrieved all reported families and single cases with CMT and concurrent DM. We comprehensively analyzed the characteristics of total 33 patients with CMT and concurrent DM, and further compared these characteristics with those of patients of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Results: Patients with CMT and concurrent DM had some relatively independent characteristics and pathogenic mechanisms. So we designated that kind of characteristic demyelinating CMT which accompanies DM as Yu-Xie syndrome (YXS), a new specific clinical subtype of CMT. Conclusion: CMT is an etiologic factor of DM, even though the intrinsic association between CMT and DM still remains further exploration. PMID:25120817

  10. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  11. Neuropathy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Neuropathy Share this page: Was this page helpful? Overview | ... of testing are: To diagnose the presence of neuropathy and distinguish it from other conditions that may ...

  12. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be associated with peripheral neuropathy. Metabolic and endocrine disorders impair the body’s ability to transform nutrients into ... to neuropathies as a result of chemical imbalances. Endocrine disorders that lead to hormonal imbalances can disturb normal ...

  13. Sensory neuropathy in two Border collie puppies.

    PubMed

    Vermeersch, K; Van Ham, L; Braund, K G; Bhatti, S; Tshamala, M; Chiers, K; Schrauwen, E

    2005-06-01

    A peripheral sensory neuropathy was diagnosed in two Border collie puppies. Neurological, electrophysiological and histopathological examinations suggested a purely sensory neuropathy with mainly distal involvement. Urinary incontinence was observed in one of the puppies and histological examination of the vagus nerve revealed degenerative changes. An inherited disorder was suspected. PMID:15971901

  14. N-hexane neuropathy in offset printers.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C M; Yu, C W; Fong, K Y; Leung, S Y; Tsin, T W; Yu, Y L; Cheung, T F; Chan, S Y

    1993-01-01

    In an offset printing factory with 56 workers, 20 (36%) developed symptomatic peripheral neuropathy due to exposure to n-hexane. Another 26 workers (46%) were found to have subclinical neuropathy. The initial change in the nerve conduction study was reduced amplitude of the sensory action potentials, followed by reduced amplitude of the motor action potentials, reduction in motor conduction velocities and increase in distal latencies. These changes indicate primary axonal degeneration with secondary demyelination. Sural nerve biopsy in a severe case showed giant axonal swellings due to accumulation of 10nm neurofilaments, myelin sheath attenuation and widening of nodal gaps. The development of neuropathy bore no direct relationship to the duration of exposure, hence factors such as individual susceptibility may be important. Optic neuropathy and CNS involvement were uncommon and autonomic neuropathy was not encountered. Images PMID:8505647

  15. Rheumatoid neuropathy: a histological and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Weller, R. O.; Bruckner, F. E.; Chamberlain, M. Anne

    1970-01-01

    Peripheral nerves in five patients with rheumatoid neuropathy were examined electrophysiologically and by sural nerve biopsy. There was close correlation between the clinical severity of the disease and the degree of nerve damage found histologically and by EMG. Group 1 patients with a mild distal sensory neuropathy showed varying degrees of axonal degeneration in the large myelinated fibres and some segmental demyelination. Group 2 patients with a severe, rapidly progressive sensori-motor neuropathy had extensive loss of myelinated fibres. In one case all the large fibres had degenerated. The second case had lost both large and small myelinated fibres together with many of the non-myelinated axons. The major nerve damage in both groups appeared to be axonal degeneration but some segmental demyelination was detected. Occlusive vascular disease in the vasa nervorum was considered to be the major cause of the nerve damage. Images PMID:4320255

  16. Vesicular demyelination induced by raised intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Hall, S M; Schauf, C L

    1985-11-01

    myelin vesiculation. We conclude that vesicular demyelination can be initiated in vital Schwann cells by a raised intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Such demyelination does not necessarily lead to Schwann cell death. The possible relevance of the findings to vesicular demyelinating neuropathies is discussed, and a hypothesis regarding the mechanism of demyelination is advanced. PMID:3003255

  17. Genetic disruption of Pten in a novel mouse model of tomaculous neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Goebbels, Sandra; Oltrogge, Jan H; Wolfer, Susanne; Wieser, Georg L; Nientiedt, Tobias; Pieper, Alexander; Ruhwedel, Torben; Groszer, Matthias; Sereda, Michael W; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2012-06-01

    'Tomacula' and myelin outfoldings are striking neuropathological features of a diverse group of inherited demyelinating neuropathies. Whereas the underlying genetic defects are well known, the molecular mechanisms of tomacula formation have remained obscure. We hypothesized that they are caused by uncontrolled, excessive myelin membrane growth, a process, which is regulated in normal development by neuregulin-1/ErbB2, PI3 Kinase signalling and ERK/MAPK signalling. Here, we demonstrate by targeted disruption of Pten in Schwann cells that hyperactivation of the endogenous PI3 Kinase pathway causes focal hypermyelination, myelin outfoldings and tomacula, even when induced in adult animals by tamoxifen, and is associated with progressive peripheral neuropathy. Activated AKT kinase is associated with PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) at paranodal loops and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures. This striking myelin pathology, with features of human CMT type 4B1 and HNPP, is dependent on AKT/mTOR signalling, as evidenced by a significant amelioration of the pathology in mice treated with rapamycin. We suggest that regions of non-compact myelin are under lifelong protection by PTEN against abnormal membrane outgrowth, and that dysregulated phosphoinositide levels play a critical role in the pathology of tomaculous neuropathies. PMID:22488882

  18. Genetic disruption of Pten in a novel mouse model of tomaculous neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Goebbels, Sandra; Oltrogge, Jan H; Wolfer, Susanne; Wieser, Georg L; Nientiedt, Tobias; Pieper, Alexander; Ruhwedel, Torben; Groszer, Matthias; Sereda, Michael W; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2012-01-01

    ‘Tomacula’ and myelin outfoldings are striking neuropathological features of a diverse group of inherited demyelinating neuropathies. Whereas the underlying genetic defects are well known, the molecular mechanisms of tomacula formation have remained obscure. We hypothesized that they are caused by uncontrolled, excessive myelin membrane growth, a process, which is regulated in normal development by neuregulin-1/ErbB2, PI3 Kinase signalling and ERK/MAPK signalling. Here, we demonstrate by targeted disruption of Pten in Schwann cells that hyperactivation of the endogenous PI3 Kinase pathway causes focal hypermyelination, myelin outfoldings and tomacula, even when induced in adult animals by tamoxifen, and is associated with progressive peripheral neuropathy. Activated AKT kinase is associated with PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 at paranodal loops and Schmidt–Lanterman incisures. This striking myelin pathology, with features of human CMT type 4B1 and HNPP, is dependent on AKT/mTOR signalling, as evidenced by a significant amelioration of the pathology in mice treated with rapamycin. We suggest that regions of non-compact myelin are under lifelong protection by PTEN against abnormal membrane outgrowth, and that dysregulated phosphoinositide levels play a critical role in the pathology of tomaculous neuropathies. PMID:22488882

  19. Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James W.; Zilliox, Lindsay A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article provides an overview for understanding the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management of diabetic neuropathy. Recent Findings: New information about the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy continues to emerge, which will lead to identifying new drug targets. It is clear that the natural history of diabetic neuropathy is changing and the rate of progression is slowing. This is likely because of a combination of earlier diagnosis, improved glycemic management, and improved control of related complications such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Early diagnosis is critical, and small fiber neuropathy or subclinical diabetic neuropathy may be reversed or significantly improved with appropriate intervention. The American Academy of Neurology recently published guidelines for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Summary: Diabetic neuropathy is common and can present with varied clinical presentations discussed in this article. Although treatment currently focuses on pain management, attention should be paid to potential risk factors for neuropathy. For example, glycemic control, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension should be managed with diet, exercise, and medications. Class I or II clinical studies indicate that pregabalin, duloxetine, amitriptyline, gabapentin, and opioids are effective in the management of diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:25299279

  20. The modified ultrasound pattern sum score mUPSS as additional diagnostic tool for genetically distinct hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Rasenack, Maria; Athanasopoulou, Ioanna M; Dammeier, Nele Maria; Lipski, Christina; Wolking, Stefan; Vittore, Debora; Décard, Bernhard F; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the nerve ultrasound characteristics in genetically distinct inherited neuropathies, the value of the modified ultrasound pattern sum score (mUPSS) to differentiate between the subtypes and the correlation of ultrasound with nerve conduction studies (NCS), disease duration and severity. All patients underwent a standardized neurological examination, ultrasound, and NCS. In addition, genetic testing was performed. Consequently, mUPSS was applied, which is a sum-score of cross-sectional areas (CSA) at predefined anatomical points in different nerves. 31 patients were included (10xCharcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT)1a, 3xCMT1b, 3xCMTX, 9xCMT2, 6xHNPP [Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies]). Generalized, homogeneous nerve enlargement and significantly increased UPS scores emphasized the diagnosis of demyelinating neuropathy, particularly CMT1a and CMT1b. The amount of enlargement did not depend on disease duration, symptom severity, height and weight. In CMTX the nerves were enlarged, as well, however, only in the roots and lower limbs, most prominent in men. In CMT2 no significant enlargement was detectable. In HNPP the CSA values were increased at entrapped sites, and not elsewhere. However, a distinction from CMT1, which also showed enlarged CSA values at entrapment sites, was only possible by calculating the entrapment ratios and entrapment score. The mUPSS allowed distinction between CMT1a (increased UPS scores, entrapment ratios <1.0) and HNPP (low UPS scores, entrapment ratios >1.4), while CMT1b and CMTX showed intermediate UPS types and entrapment ratios <1.0. Although based on few cases, ultrasound revealed consistent and homogeneous nerve alteration in certain inherited neuropathies. The modified UPSS is a quantitative tool, which may provide useful information for diagnosis, differentiation and follow-up evaluation in addition to NCS and molecular testing. PMID:26559821

  1. Giant axonal neuropathy: MRS findings.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Alpay; Kutlu, Ramazan; Sigirci, Ahmet; Baysal, Tamer; Altinok, Tayfun; Yakinci, Cengiz

    2003-10-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare genetic disease of childhood involving the central and peripheral nervous systems. Axonal loss with several giant axons filled with neurofilaments is the main histopathological feature of peripheral nerve biopsies in this disease. Routine neuroimaging studies reveal diffuse hyperintensities in cerebral and cerebellar white matter. In this case report, the authors present the brain magnetic resonance spectroscopic features (normal N-acetylaspartate/creatine and increased choline/creatine and myoinositol/creatine ratios), which might indicate the absence of neuroaxonal loss and the presence of significant demyelination and glial proliferation in white matter, of an 11-year-old boy diagnosed with GAN. PMID:14569833

  2. Guillain Barré syndrome and other immune mediated neuropathies: diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Eldar, Adi Hersalis; Chapman, Joab

    2014-01-01

    Immune mediated neuropathies are uncommon but important to diagnose because they are potentially treatable. This chapter summarizes the clinical approach to diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), and related neuropathies which are thought to be caused by direct autoimmune attack on peripheral nerves. PMID:24434363

  3. Autonomic neuropathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  4. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: case report and discussion.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Marc J; Feinberg, Joseph; DiCarlo, Edward F; Birchansky, Sherri B; Wolfe, Scott W

    2007-09-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an uncommon diagnosis that should be considered in patients with multiple compressive neuropathies. We present the case of a woman who presented with bilateral hand numbness and weakness. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, bilateral ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, left peroneal neuropathy at the fibular head, and a primarily demyelinating generalized sensorimotor neuropathy. Subsequent genetic testing identified a deletion at chromosome 17p11.2 to confirm the diagnosis of HNPP. Treatment of this largely self-limiting disease is controversial, and this patient suffered minimal disability with treatment including splinting and surgical releases. PMID:18751796

  5. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... objects in the shoes Guarding the extremities to prevent injury from pressure Alcohol must be stopped to prevent the damage from ... The only way to prevent alcoholic neuropathy is not to drink excessive amounts of alcohol.

  6. Handcuff neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Stone, D A; Laureno, R

    1991-01-01

    Compressive neuropathy due to tight application of handcuffs occurred in 5 patients. The superficial radial nerve was affected in 8 hands and the median nerve in two. Neurologic deficits persisted as long as 3 years after handcuffing. Nerve conduction studies helped to exclude malingering and other diagnoses. All patients had been intoxicated when handcuffed or had been arrested with force. The handcuff mechanism, which allows accidental overtightening after application, is an unrecognized factor in these neuropathies. PMID:1985280

  7. Fulminant Demyelinating Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rahmlow, Megan R.; Kantarci, Orhun

    2013-01-01

    Fulminant demyelinating disease is a heading that covers acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and its variant acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (Hurst disease), severe relapses of multiple sclerosis (MS), variants of MS (tumefactive MS, Marburg variant, Balo concentric sclerosis, myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis), and neuromyelitis optica-spectrum disorders associated with aquaporin autoimmunity. These categories of inflammatory demyelinating disease often prompt hospital admission and many necessitate intensive care monitoring due to the aggressive nature of the illness and associated neurologic morbidity. In this review, we highlight the discriminating clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of these disorders. Acute management is often accomplished with use of high-dose intravenous steroids and plasma exchange. Aggressive disease may respond to immunosuppression. Prognosis for recovery varies among the disorders but most patients improve. Factors influencing outcome are also discussed. PMID:23983890

  8. Familial multiple symmetric lipomatosis with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chalk, C H; Mills, K R; Jacobs, J M; Donaghy, M

    1990-08-01

    We describe coexisting peripheral neuropathy and multiple symmetric lipomatosis in 4 of 7 siblings. The absence of either condition in 3 other generations of this family suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. None of the affected siblings were alcoholic, a factor some have proposed to explain the frequent occurrence of peripheral neuropathy in sporadic multiple symmetric lipomatosis. Serum lipid studies, including apoprotein A levels, were normal. Sural nerve biopsy from 1 patient showed nerve fiber loss, predominantly affecting large myelinated fibers. The relationship between myelin sheath thickness and axon diameter was normal, arguing that this neuropathy is not due to primary axonal atrophy. PMID:2166247

  9. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Stéphane; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Magy, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic immune-mediated neuropathy: it is clinically heterogeneous (relapsing-remitting form, chronic progressive form, monophasic form or CIDP having a Guillain-Barré syndrome-like onset), but potentially treatable. Although its pathophysiology remains largely unknown, CIDP is considered an immune-mediated neuropathy. Therefore, many immunotherapies have been proposed in this peripheral nervous system disorder, the most known efficient treatments being intravenous immunoglobulin, corticosteroids and plasma exchange. However, these therapies remain unsatisfactory for many patients, so numerous other immunotherapeutic strategies have been evaluated, based on their immunosuppressant or immunomodulatory potency. We have performed a large review of the literature about treatment in CIDP, with a special emphasis on novel and alternative immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26809024

  10. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi, Farzad; Nafissi, Shahriar; Basiri, Keivan; Amiri, Mostafa; Soltanzadeh, Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Various forms of neuropathy are seen diabetic patients; chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) seems not to be infrequent neuropathy in patients suffering from diabetes and it seems to be more common than in the general population; on the contrary, some authorities do not support pathogenetic association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and CIDP. Also, there are some controversies on the subject of CIDP treatment in diabetic patients. Some studies showed that patients with CIDP-DM considerably had recovered following treatment with immunotherapeutic modalities like (Intravenous immunoglobulin) IVIG and conversely, some else have argued against the prescription of IVIG in this group and recommend treatment with corticosteroids and provided that resistant, rituximab may be beneficial. The main limitation in most studies is the inadequate number of cases and as a result, problematic decision making in treatment. This article represents an inclusive review of diabetic CIDP presentation and treatment. PMID:24174953

  11. Demyelinative chiamal lesions.

    PubMed

    Spector, R H; Glaser, J S; Schatz, N J

    1980-12-01

    To clarify the clinical syndrome of demyelinative chiasmal involvement, six case histories were analyzed and the literature was reviewed. This entitity is characterized by especial predilection for women in the third to fifth decades; visual deficites of a chiasmal pattern that may be modest to marked, with a generallly good prognosis for functional recovery; and other signs and symptoms, not necessarily severe, of scattered lesions of the neuraxis. Neuroradiological studies, especially laminography of the sellar area and computerized tomography, must be employed to rule out a suprasellar mass lesion. The efficacy of systemic corticosteroid therapy is moot, but it seems reasonable to use such agents during acute stages, especially where vision is severely reduced on both sides. PMID:7447764

  12. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Chronic Inflammatory polyneuropathies are an important group of neuromuscular disorders that present chronically and progress over more than 8 weeks, being referred to as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Despite tremendous progress in elucidating disease pathogenesis, the exact triggering event remains unknown. Our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of CIDP and its variants continues to expand, resulting in improved opportunities for identification and treatment. Most clinical neurologists will be involved in the management of patients with these disorders, and should be familiar with available therapies for CIDP. We review the distinctive clinical, laboratory, and electro-diagnostic features that aid in diagnosis. We emphasize the importance of clinical patterns that define treatment responsiveness and the most appropriate therapies in order to improve prognosis. PMID:23564314

  13. Neuroradiological evaluation of demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disease can affect patients across the life span. Consensus definitions and criteria of all of the different acquired demyelinating diseases that fall on this spectrum have magnetic resonance imaging criteria. The advances of both neuroimaging techniques and important discoveries in immunology have produced an improved understanding of these conditions and classification. Neuroimaging plays a central role in the accurate diagnosis, prognosis, disease monitoring and research efforts that are being undertaken in this disease. This review focuses on the imaging spectrum of acquired demyelinating disease. PMID:23858328

  14. Serum cytokine and chemokine profiles in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Minako; Sawai, Setsu; Misawa, Sonoko; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Mori, Masahiro; Ishige, Takayuki; Satoh, Mamoru; Nomura, Fumio; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-02-15

    To identify serum cytokine networks specific to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), serum samples of two subgroups (18 patients with typical CIDP and 12 patients with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy [MADSAM]) were analyzed with multiplex magnetic bead-based cytokine assay. TNF-α, HGF, MIP-1β and IL-1β levels were significantly higher in total CIDP patients than in normal controls. Of these, HGF levels were elevated in typical CIDP patients, but not in MADSAM patients. Patients with high HGF levels showed good responses to steroid treatment. Different cytokine profiles among the CIDP subtypes presumably reflect differences in pathophysiology. PMID:25669993

  15. Hereditary neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Wayne F

    2010-01-01

    A 58-year-old male presented with a history of slowly progressive bilateral hand weakness manifested by decreased grip strength and pinch strength associated with some pain in the first metacarpal-carpal joints with atrophy of the muscles of the web space. An evaluation based on history, physical exam, and judicious diagnostic testing yielded a finding of motor and sensory peripheral polyneuropathy and a working diagnosis of hereditary nerve pressure palsy syndrome (HNPP) or hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The clinical findings and diagnostic tests for sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy are discussed. The case details over time, hereditary features, and the natural history of this disorder lead to a favorable clinical and insurance medicine prognosis. PMID:21290997

  16. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multifocal Motor Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Multifocal Motor Neuropathy? Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder ...

  17. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  18. Pathogenesis of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune neuropathies occur when immunologic tolerance to myelin or axonal antigens is lost. Even though the triggering factors and the underling immunopathology have not been fully elucidated in all neuropathy subsets, immunological studies on the patients' nerves, transfer experiments with the patients' serum or intraneural injections, and molecular fingerprinting on circulating autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells, indicate that cellular and humoral factors, either independently or in concert with each other, play a fundamental role in their cause. The review is focused on the main subtypes of autoimmune neuropathies, mainly the Guillain-Barré syndrome(s), the Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), the Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN), and the IgM anti-MAG-antibody mediated neuropathy. It addresses the factors associated with breaking tolerance, examines the T cell activation process including co-stimulatory molecules and key cytokines, and discusses the role of antibodies against peripheral nerve glycolipids or glycoproteins. Special attention is given to the newly identified proteins in the nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions as potential antigenic targets that could best explain conduction failure and rapid recovery. New biological agents against T cells, cytokines, B cells, transmigration and transduction molecules involved in their immunopathologic network, are discussed as future therapeutic options in difficult cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:24949885

  19. Demyelination increases axonal stationary mitochondrial size and the speed of axonal mitochondrial transport

    PubMed Central

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Kidd, Grahame J.; Komuro, Hitoshi; Trapp, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Axonal degeneration contributes to permanent neurological disability in inherited and acquired diseases of myelin. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as a major contributor to this axonal degeneration. It remains to be determined, however, if myelination, demyelination or remyelination alter the size and distribution of axonal mitochondrial stationary sites or the rates of axonal mitochondrial transport. Using live myelinated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, we investigated whether myelination and lysolecithin-induced demyelination affect axonal mitochondria. Myelination increased the size of axonal stationary mitochondrial sites by 2.3 fold. Following demyelination, the size of axonal stationary mitochondrial sites was increased by an additional 2.2 fold and the transport velocity of motile mitochondria was increased by 47%. These measures returned to the levels of myelinated axons following remyelination. Demyelination induced activating transcription factor (ATF) 3 in DRG neurons. Knockdown of neuronal ATF3 by shRNA abolished the demyelination-induced increase in axonal mitochondrial transport and increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in axonal mitochondria, suggesting that neuronal ATF3 expression and increased mitochondrial transport protect demyelinated axons from oxidative damage. In response to insufficient ATP production, demyelinated axons increase the size of stationary mitochondrial sites and thereby balance ATP production with the increased energy needs of nerve conduction. PMID:20463228

  20. Management of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Raymond Azman

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of neuropathy worldwide. Diabetic neuropathy (DN) develops in about 4–10% of diabetic patients after 5 years and in 15% after 20 years. Four main mechanisms have been postulated to underlie the pathogenesis of DN. Diabetic neuropathy can be divided into symmetrical and asymmetrical neuropathies. Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy (DAN) parallels the severity of DSN, and affects primarily the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and integumentary systems. The cornerstone of treatment of diabetic neuropathy is optimization of glycaemic control. Future treatments for diabetic neuropathy should address the underlying pathogenesis. PMID:23386794

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Stübgen, Joerg-Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha plays an important role in many aspects of immune system development, immune-response regulation, and T-cell-mediated tissue injury. The evidence that TNF-alpha, released by autoreactive T cells and macrophages, may contribute to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathies is reviewed. TNF-alpha antagonists (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab) are indicated for the treatment of advanced inflammatory rheumatic and bowel disease, but these drugs can induce a range of autoimmune diseases that also attack the central and peripheral nervous systems. Case histories and series report on the association between anti-TNF-alpha treatment and various disorders of peripheral nerve such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block, mononeuropathy multiplex, and axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathies. The proposed pathogeneses of TNF-alpha-associated neuropathies include both a T-cell and humoral immune attack against peripheral nerve myelin, vasculitis-induced nerve ischemia, and inhibition of signaling support for axons. Most neuropathies improve over a period of months by withdrawal of the TNF-alpha antagonist, with or without additional immune-modulating treatment. Preliminary observations suggest that TNF-alpha antagonists may be useful as an antigen-nonspecific treatment approach to immune-mediated neuropathies in patients with a poor response to, or intolerance of, standard therapies, but further studies are required. PMID:18041052

  2. [2013: what's new in inflammatory neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Kuntzer, T

    2014-12-01

    Several high-quality publications were published in 2013 and some major trials studies were started. In Guillain-Barré syndrome, events included the launch of IGOS and a better understanding of diagnostic limits, the effect of influenza vaccination, and better care, but uncertainty remains about analgesics. A new mouse model was also described. In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), diagnostic pitfalls can be recalled. Our knowledge of underlying pathophysiological processes has improved, and the value of monitoring with function and deficit scores has been demonstrated. IVIG can sometimes be effective longer than expected, but CIDP remains sensitive to corticosteroids, particularly with the long-term beneficial effects of megadose dexamethasone. The impact of fingolimod remains to be demonstrated in an ongoing trial. Advances concerning multifocal motor neuropathy, inflammatory plexopathy, and neuropathy with anti -MAG activity are discussed but treatments already recognized as effective should not be changed. Imaging of peripheral nerve progresses. PMID:25459118

  3. Inherited mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Though inherited mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are most well known for their syndromic forms, for which widely known acronyms (MELAS, MERRF, NARP, LHON etc.) have been coined, the vast majority of inherited MIDs presents in a non-syndromic form. Since MIDs are most frequently multisystem disorders already at onset or during the disease course, a MID should be suspected if there is a combination of neurological and non-neurological abnormalities. Neurological abnormalities occurring as a part of a MID include stroke-like episodes, epilepsy, migraine-like headache, movement disorders, cerebellar ataxia, visual impairment, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment, dementia, psychosis, hypopituitarism, aneurysms, or peripheral nervous system disease, such as myopathy, neuropathy, or neuronopathy. Non-neurological manifestations concern the ears, the endocrine organs, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, the kidneys, the bone marrow, and the skin. Whenever there is an unexplained combination of neurological and non-neurological disease in a patient or kindred, a MID should be suspected and appropriate diagnostic measures initiated. Genetic testing should be guided by the phenotype, the biopsy findings, and the biochemical results. PMID:22399423

  4. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from pathology to phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mathey, Emily K; Park, Susanna B; Hughes, Richard A C; Pollard, John D; Armati, Patricia J; Barnett, Michael H; Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P James B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory neuropathy, classically characterised by a slowly progressive onset and symmetrical, sensorimotor involvement. However, there are many phenotypic variants, suggesting that CIDP may not be a discrete disease entity but rather a spectrum of related conditions. While the abiding theory of CIDP pathogenesis is that cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves, the relative contributions of T cell and autoantibody responses remain largely undefined. In animal models of spontaneous inflammatory neuropathy, T cell responses to defined myelin antigens are responsible. In other human inflammatory neuropathies, there is evidence of antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin or nodal antigens. In this review, the roles of the cellular and humoral immune systems in the pathogenesis of CIDP will be discussed. In time, it is anticipated that delineation of clinical phenotypes and the underlying disease mechanisms might help guide diagnostic and individualised treatment strategies for CIDP. PMID:25677463

  5. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. PMID:27288727

  6. Placebo-controlled trial of rituximab in IgM anti-myelin–associated glycoprotein neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Viala, Karine; Nicolas, Guillaume; Créange, Alain; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Pouget, Jean; Clavelou, Pierre; Vial, Christophe; Steck, Andreas; Musset, Lucile; Marin, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether rituximab 375 mg/m2 was efficacious in patients with immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-myelin–associated glycoprotein antibody demyelinating neuropathy (IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy). Methods: Fifty-four patients with IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The inclusion criteria were inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment (INCAT) sensory score (ISS) ≥4 and visual analog pain scale >4 or ataxia score ≥2. The primary outcome was mean change in ISS at 12 months. Results: Twenty-six patients were randomized to a group receiving 4 weekly infusions of 375 mg/m2 rituximab, and 28 patients to placebo. Intention-to-treat analysis, with imputation of missing ISS values by the last observation carried forward method, showed a lack of mean change in ISS at 12 months, 1.0 ± 2.7 in the rituximab group, and 1.0 ± 2.8 in the placebo group. However, changes were observed, in per protocol analysis at 12 months, for the number of patients with an improvement of at least 2 points in the INCAT disability scale (p = 0.027), the self-evaluation scale (p = 0.016), and 2 subscores of the Short Form–36 questionnaire. Conclusions: Although primary outcome measures provide no evidence to support the use of rituximab in IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, there were improvements in several secondary outcomes in per protocol analysis. Level of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that rituximab is ineffective in improving ISS in patients with IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy. PMID:23667063

  7. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    PubMed Central

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  8. Erythromelalgia-like presentation of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy in a setting of past alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Chuquilin, Miguel; Dhand, Upinder K

    2016-02-01

    Erythromelalgia may be primary or secondary to an underlying medical condition. Association with small fiber neuropathy and axonal large fiber peripheral neuropathy has been described. Erythromelalgia in the setting of acquired demyelinating neuropathy has not been reported. We report a 52-year-old woman with severe erythromelalgia, pain and burning, progressive weakness, hyporeflexia and distal pan-sensory deficits. Cerebrospinal fluid protein was 219 mg/dL. Nerve conduction study revealed extreme (ten-fold) prolongation of distal motor latencies, markedly slow motor nerve conduction, reduced terminal latency index, reduced distal compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude, possible conduction blocks, and distal denervation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, prednisone and azathioprine resulted in marked clinical and electrophysiological improvement. Our patient fulfills the diagnostic criteria for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP); however, the unique electrodiagnostic features and presentation with erythromelalgia may represent a CIDP variant or a novel dysimmune neuropathy, or may partly be related to neurotoxic effects of prior alcohol abuse. PMID:26804376

  9. Autoimmune demyelination in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tabira, T

    1988-01-01

    Autoimmune demyelination was studied in EAE induced by active challenge or by transfer of effector T-cell lines or clones specific for myelin basic protein or proteolipid apoprotein. The following points became clear: (1) Proteolipid apoprotein is responsible for widespread demyelination; (2) demyelination is more significant in EAE with a more chronic disease process; (3) a single T-cell clone can mediate significant demyelination without the aid of recipient-derived T-cell populations; (4) the difference in vulnerability between axons and myelin may account for the T-cell-mediated demyelination; and (5) effector T-cell clones can be activated by allogeneic antigens. PMID:2462801

  10. Purple pigments: the pathophysiology of acute porphyric neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cindy S-Y; Lee, Ming-Jen; Park, Susanna B; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2011-12-01

    The porphyrias are inherited metabolic disorders arising from disturbance in the haem biosynthesis pathway. The neuropathy associated with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) occurs due to mutation involving the enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) and is characterised by motor-predominant features. Definitive diagnosis often encompasses a combination of biochemical, enzyme analysis and genetic testing, with clinical neurophysiological findings of a predominantly motor axonal neuropathy. Symptomatic and supportive treatment are the mainstays during an acute attack. If administered early, intravenous haemin may prevent progression of neuropathy. While the pathophysiology of AIP neuropathy remains unclear, axonal dysfunction appears intrinsically linked to the effects of neural energy deficits acquired through haem deficiency coupled to the neurotoxic effects of porphyrin precursors. The present review will provide an overview of AIP neuropathy, including discussion of recent advances in understanding developed through neurophysiological approaches that have further delineated the pathophysiology of axonal degeneration. PMID:21855406

  11. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000700.htm Neuropathy secondary to drugs To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neuropathy secondary to drugs is a loss of sensation ...

  12. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy secondary to drugs is a loss of sensation or movement in a part of the body ... weakness. Many medicines may affect the development of neuropathy, including: Heart or blood pressure drugs: Amiodarone Hydralazine ...

  13. Peripheral neuropathies 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Assal, J.P.; Liniger, C.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present results and experience in sixteen specific disciplines related to the study of nerve physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment. Twenty-two different peripheral neuropathies are presented, and different models related to health care strategies are discussed. The authors report on Inflammatory and autoimmune neuropathies and Genetic neuropathies.

  14. [Methylprednisolone pulse in treatment of childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Rafai, M A; Boulaajaj, F Z; Sekkat, Z; El Moutawakkil, B; Slassi, I

    2010-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in children is rare and treatment is based primarily on intravenous immunoglobulins or oral corticosteroids. Boluses of methylprednisolone (MP) are a possible alternative. We report 3 cases of CIDP in children with good outcome after MP pulse therapy. One male (7 years of age) and 2 females (4 and 5 years of age) presented with recurring episodes of functional impotence of both lower limbs and walking impairment, partially reversible without treatment. Clinical and electrophysiological data and the analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid were compatible with CIDP. MP pulses were administered: the total number of pulses varied from 5 to 8, very satisfactory progression on the clinical and electrophysiological pattern was noted, without recurrence in the 3 cases. Childhood CIDP presents clinical, electrophysiological outcome, and prognostic particularities, recurring readily, and the outcome is good. Boluses of MP are an alternative for treatment of these neuropathies in childhood. PMID:20709511

  15. Entrapment in anti myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Faber, Catharina G; Notermans, Nicolette C; Wokke, John H J; Franssen, Hessel

    2009-04-01

    Anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) neuropathy is a chronic disorder in which IgM antibodies react with Schwann cell glycoproteins, including MAG and peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). Nerve conduction studies show features of axon loss and predominantly distal slowing consistent with demyelination. Because a genetic loss of PMP22 function yields hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), loss of PMP22 function due to anti- MAG antibodies may result in increased sensitivity to entrapment. We investigated this by performing standardized electrophysiological studies in 16 patients with anti-MAG neuropathy and 16 disease controls with genetically confirmed HNPP. Disproportionate slowing relative to adjacent segments occurred in similar proportions of patients with anti-MAG neuropathy and HNPP, and was of the same magnitude in each group. Affected were the elbow, carpal tunnel and the wrist-hand segments of the median and ulnar nerves. However, in anti-MAG neuropathy as compared to HNPP, absolute values of distal motor latencies and conduction velocities outside entrapment sites were slower and amplitudes were lower. In conclusion, increased sensitivity for entrapment may occur in anti-MAG neuropathy and contribute to part of the nerve damage. PMID:19306083

  16. SURF1 deficiency causes demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Daniele; Chassagne, Maïté; Mayençon, Martine; Padet, Sylvie; Melchionda, Laura; Rouvet, Isabelle; Lannes, Béatrice; Bozon, Dominique; Latour, Philippe; Zeviani, Massimo; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédicte

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether mutations in the SURF1 gene are a cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Methods: We describe 2 patients from a consanguineous family with demyelinating autosomal recessive CMT disease (CMT4) associated with the homozygous splice site mutation c.107-2A>G in the SURF1 gene, encoding an assembly factor of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV. This observation led us to hypothesize that mutations in SURF1 might be an unrecognized cause of CMT4, and we investigated SURF1 in a total of 40 unrelated patients with CMT4 after exclusion of mutations in known CMT4 genes. The functional impact of c.107-2A>G on splicing, amount of SURF1 protein, and on complex IV activity and assembly was analyzed. Results: Another patient with CMT4 was found to harbor 2 additional SURF1 mutations. All 3 patients with SURF1-associated CMT4 presented with severe childhood-onset neuropathy, motor nerve conduction velocities <25 m/s, and lactic acidosis. Two patients had brain MRI abnormalities, including putaminal and periaqueductal lesions, and developed cerebellar ataxia years after polyneuropathy. The c.107-2A>G mutation produced no normally spliced transcript, leading to SURF1 absence. However, complex IV remained partially functional in muscle and fibroblasts. Conclusions: We found SURF1 mutations in 5% of families (2/41) presenting with CMT4. SURF1 should be systematically screened in patients with childhood-onset severe demyelinating neuropathy and additional features such as lactic acidosis, brain MRI abnormalities, and cerebellar ataxia developing years after polyneuropathy. PMID:24027061

  17. Phosphatidic acid mediates demyelination in Lpin1 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Nadra, Karim; de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Hendriks, William T.; Han, Gil-Soo; Grès, Sandra; Carman, George M.; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Verheijen, Mark H.G.; Chrast, Roman

    2008-01-01

    Lipids play crucial roles in many aspects of glial cell biology, affecting processes ranging from myelin membrane biosynthesis to axo-glial interactions. In order to study the role of lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells, we specifically deleted in Schwann cells the Lpin1 gene, which encodes the Mg2+-dependent phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP1) enzyme necessary for normal triacylglycerol biosynthesis. The affected animals developed pronounced peripheral neuropathy characterized by myelin degradation, Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation, and a reduction in nerve conduction velocity. The observed demyelination is mediated by endoneurial accumulation of the substrate of the PAP1 enzyme, phosphatidic acid (PA). In addition, we show that PA is a potent activator of the MEK–Erk pathway in Schwann cells, and that this activation is required for PA-induced demyelination. Our results therefore reveal a surprising role for PA in Schwann cell fate determination and provide evidence of a direct link between diseases affecting lipid metabolism and abnormal Schwann cell function. PMID:18559480

  18. Upper Extremity Multifocal Neuropathy in a 10-Year-Old Boy Associated With NS6S Disaccharide Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Frederick; Naddaf, Elie; Waclawik, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    We present a 10-year-old boy with a predominantly motor multifocal neuropathy with demyelinating and axonal changes with sensory involvement, affecting only one upper extremity. Laboratory studies revealed an elevated titer of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies against the NS6S antigen. He responded to treatment with high dose intravenous immunoglobulins. Focal or multifocal immune-mediated neuropathies are not common in children and may be underdiagnosed. PMID:25038124

  19. [Physiological approach to peripheral neuropathy. Conventional nerve conduction studies and magnetic motor root stimulation].

    PubMed

    Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2004-11-01

    In this communication, I first show some points we should mind in the conventional peripheral nerve conduction studies and later present clinical usefulness of motor root stimulation for peripheral neuropathy. CONVENTIONAL NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES (NCS): The most important point revealed by the conventional NCSs is whether neuropathy is due to axonal degeneration or demyelinating process. Precise clinical examination with this neurophysiological information leads us to a diagnosis and treatment. Poor clinical examination makes these findings useless. Long standing axonal degeneration sometimes induces secondary demyelination at the most distal part of involved nerves. On the other hand, severe segmental demyelination often provokes secondary axonal degeneration at distal parts to the site of demyelination. These secondary changes show the same abnormal neurophysiological findings as those of the primary involvement. We should be careful of this possibility when interpreting the results of NCS. NCS of sensory nerves is not good at revealing demyelinating process. Mild temporal dispersion of potentials often reduces an amplitude of SNAP or loss of responses, which usually suggests axonal degeneration, because of short duration of sensory nerve potentials. MOTOR ROOT STIMULATION IN PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: Magnetic stimulation with a coil placed over the spine activates motor roots and evokes EMG responses from upper and lower limb muscles. The site of activation with this method was determined to be where the motor roots exit from the spinal canal (intervertebral foramina) (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 52 (9): 1025-1032, 1989) because induced currents are very dense at such a foramen made by electric resistant bones. In several kinds of peripheral neuropathy, this method has been used to detect a lesion at a proximal part of the peripheral nerves which can not be detected by the conventional NCSs. I present a few cases in whom motor root stimulation had a clinical

  20. Entrapment neuropathies III: lower limb.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Luis S; Bencardino, Jenny; Ghazikhanian, Varand; Beltran, Javier

    2010-11-01

    Clinicians frequently encounter compressive neuropathies of the lower extremity. The clinical history and physical examination, along with electrodiagnostic testing and imaging studies, lead to the correct diagnosis. The imaging characteristics of the compression neuropathies can include acute and chronic changes in the nerves and the muscles they innervate. We provide a detailed review of compression neuropathies of the lower extremity with an emphasis on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics. We discuss the clinical presentation, etiology, anatomical location, and MR imaging appearance of these neuropathies, including the piriformis syndrome, iliacus syndrome, saphenous neuropathy, obturator neuropathy, lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy (meralgia paresthetica), proximal tibial neuropathy, common peroneal neuropathy, deep peroneal neuropathy, superficial peroneal neuropathy, tarsal tunnel syndrome, Baxter's neuropathy, jogger's foot, sural neuropathy, and Morton's neuroma. PMID:21072728

  1. [Peripheral neuropathy occurring soon after cord blood transplantation].

    PubMed

    Harada, Sakiko; Hayashi, Hiromi; Tadera, Noriyuki; Iwama, Kannichi; Kajiwara, Kouichi; Kouzai, Yasuji; Koudo, Hideki

    2016-04-01

    We experienced two cases of peripheral neuropathy in the early phase following cord blood transplantation. Case 1 was a 66-year-old man with recurrent T-ALL. On day 8, he experienced a sharp pain originating in both the palms and the soles, which worsened spreading to the knees, and was accompanied by muscle weakness. The neurological symptom progressed to the point of being unable to walk. A nerve conduction velocity test showed demyelination and axonopathy. In the CSF analysis, albuminocytologic dissociation and a rise in myelin basic protein were detected. These findings met the diagnostic criteria for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The symptoms improved with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). He is now able to walk and continues to visit our department. Case 2 was a 42-year-old man with primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. As the disease was refractory, he underwent reduced intensity cord blood transplantation (RICBT). Flare and numbness started in the palms and soles on day 26, with the symptoms progressing thereafter. A nerve conduction velocity test showed demyelination and axonopathy. The symptoms improved after IVIG administration. The diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy after transplantation is often difficult, but when an immunologic disorder is suspected to be the cause, early administration of IVIG may be effective. PMID:27169453

  2. Inherited Pain

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O.; Kist, Andreas M.; Lampe, Anne K.; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited “paroxysmal extreme pain disorder” (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079–11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T

  3. Treatment Responsiveness in CIDP Patients with Diabetes Is Associated with Higher Degrees of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alon; Alabdali, Majed; Qrimli, Mohammad; Albulaihe, Hana; Breiner, Ari; Barnett, Carolina; Katzberg, Hans D.; Lovblom, Leif E.; Perkins, Bruce A.; Bril, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is one of several chronic treatable acquired demyelinating neuropathies. Objectives To explore the association between the degree of demyelination in CIDP, and treatment responsiveness. Methods A retrospective chart review of CIDP subjects assessed between 1997 and 2013 was performed to compare treatment responsiveness using different sets of criteria. Results 99 CIDP patients were included, 34 with diabetes mellitus (DM). Treatment responsiveness was higher in CIDP-DM fulfilling 1 or more EFNS/PNS criteria, (63% vs. 31%, p = 0.03), and in CIDP+DM fulfilling 2 or more criteria (89% vs. 36%, p = 0.01). Nonetheless, treatment responsiveness in CIDP+DM had the highest odds ratio (3.73, p = 0.01). Similar results were also shown in simplified uniform study criteria, with 10% cut off values for CIDP-DM, compared to 30% for CIDP+DM. Conclusion In CIDP+DM, higher degrees of demyelination are associated with treatment responsiveness, implying the need to adjust current criteria in these patients. PMID:26461125

  4. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  5. Molecular study of patients with auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Guilherme Machado De; Ramos, Priscila Zonzini; Castilho, Arthur Menino; Guimarães, Alexandre Caixeta; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia

    2016-07-01

    Auditory neuropathy is a type of hearing loss that constitutes a change in the conduct of the auditory stimulus by the involvement of inner hair cells or auditory nerve synapses. It is characterized by the absence or alteration of waves in the examination of brainstem auditory evoked potentials, with otoacoustic and/or cochlear microphonic issues. At present, four loci associated with non‑syndromic auditory neuropathy have been mapped: Autosomal recessive deafness‑9 [DFNB9; the otoferlin (OTOF) gene] and autosomal recessive deafness‑59 [DFNB59; the pejvakin (PJVK) gene], associated with autosomal recessive inheritance; the autosomal dominant auditory neuropathy gene [AUNA1; the diaphanous‑3 (DIAPH3) gene]; and AUNX1, linked to chromosome X. Furthermore, mutations of connexin 26 [the gap junction β2 (GJB2) gene] have also been associated with the disease. OTOF gene mutations exert a significant role in auditory neuropathy. In excess of 80 pathogenic mutations have been identified in individuals with non‑syndromic deafness in populations of different origins, with an emphasis on the p.Q829X mutation, which was found in ~3% of cases of deafness in the Spanish population. The identification of genetic alterations responsible for auditory neuropathy is one of the challenges contributing to understand the molecular bases of the different phenotypes of hearing loss. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate molecular changes in the OTOF gene in patients with auditory neuropathy, and to develop a DNA chip for the molecular diagnosis of auditory neuropathy using mass spectrometry for genotyping. Genetic alterations were investigated in 47 patients with hearing loss and clinical diagnosis of auditory neuropathy, and the c.35delG mutation in the GJB2 gene was identified in three homozygous patients, and the heterozygous parents of one of these cases. Additionally, OTOF gene mutations were tracked by complete sequencing of 48 exons, although these results

  6. Genotype-phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene.

    PubMed

    Sanmaneechai, Oranee; Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S; Herrmann, David N; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E; Day, John W; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S; Yum, Sabrina W; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Shy, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3-84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required ambulation aids or wheelchairs for

  7. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China. PMID:27161475

  8. Combined central and peripheral demyelination: Clinical features, diagnostic findings, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cortese, A; Franciotta, D; Alfonsi, E; Visigalli, N; Zardini, E; Diamanti, L; Prunetti, P; Osera, C; Gastaldi, M; Berzero, G; Pichiecchio, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Piscosquito, G; Salsano, E; Ceroni, M; Moglia, A; Bono, G; Pareyson, D; Marchioni, E

    2016-04-15

    Combined central and peripheral demyelination (CCPD) is rare, and current knowledge is based on case reports and small case series. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical features, diagnostic results, treatment and outcomes in a large cohort of patients with CCPD. Thirty-one patients entered this retrospective, observational, two-center study. In 20 patients (65%) CCPD presented, after an infection, as myeloradiculoneuropathy, encephalopathy, cranial neuropathy, length-dependent peripheral neuropathy, or pseudo-Guillain-Barré syndrome. Demyelinating features of peripheral nerve damage fulfilling European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) electrodiagnostic criteria for CIDP were found in 23 patients (74%), and spatial dissemination of demyelinating lesions on brain MRI fulfilling the 2010 McDonald criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) in 11 (46%). Two thirds of the patients had a relapsing or progressive disease course, usually related to the appearance of new spinal cord lesions or worsening of the peripheral neuropathy, and showed unsatisfactory responses to high-dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. The clinical presentation of CCPD was severe in 22 patients (71%), who were left significantly disabled. Our data suggest that CCPD has heterogeneous features and shows frequent post-infectious onset, primary peripheral nervous system or central nervous system involvement, a monophasic or chronic disease course, inadequate response to treatments, and a generally poor outcome. We therefore conclude that the current diagnostic criteria for MS and CIDP may not fully encompass the spectrum of possible manifestations of CCPD, whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown. PMID:27000248

  9. Delayed nerve stimulation promotes axon-protective neurofilament phosphorylation, accelerates immune cell clearance and enhances remyelination in vivo in focally demyelinated nerves.

    PubMed

    McLean, Nikki A; Popescu, Bogdan F; Gordon, Tessa; Zochodne, Douglas W; Verge, Valerie M K

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and efficient axon remyelination aids in restoring strong electrochemical communication with end organs and in preventing axonal degeneration often observed in demyelinating neuropathies. The signals from axons that can trigger more effective remyelination in vivo are still being elucidated. Here we report the remarkable effect of delayed brief electrical nerve stimulation (ES; 1 hour @ 20 Hz 5 days post-demyelination) on ensuing reparative events in a focally demyelinated adult rat peripheral nerve. ES impacted many parameters underlying successful remyelination. It effected increased neurofilament expression and phosphorylation, both implicated in axon protection. ES increased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and promoted node of Ranvier re-organization, both of which coincided with the early reappearance of remyelinated axons, effects not observed at the same time points in non-stimulated demyelinated nerves. The improved ES-associated remyelination was accompanied by enhanced clearance of ED-1 positive macrophages and attenuation of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in accompanying Schwann cells, suggesting a more rapid clearance of myelin debris and return of Schwann cells to a nonreactive myelinating state. These benefits of ES correlated with increased levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the acute demyelination zone, a key molecule in the initiation of the myelination program. In conclusion, the tremendous impact of delayed brief nerve stimulation on enhancement of the innate capacity of a focally demyelinated nerve to successfully remyelinate identifies manipulation of this axis as a novel therapeutic target for demyelinating pathologies. PMID:25310564

  10. Inherit Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.; Jenks, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin development of a unique educational tool targeted at educating and inspiring young people 12-16 years old about NASA and the Space Program. Since these young people are the future engineers, scientists and space pioneers, the nurturing of their enthusiasm and interest is of critical importance to the Nation. This summer the basic infrastructure of the tool was developed in the context of an educational game paradigm. The game paradigm has achieved remarkable success in maintaining the interest of young people in a self-paced, student-directed learning environment. This type of environment encourages student exploration and curiosity which are exactly the traits that future space pioneers need to develop to prepare for the unexpected. The Inherit Space Educational Tool is an open-ended learning environment consisting of a finite-state machine classic adventure game paradigm. As the young person explores this world, different obstacles must be overcome. Rewards will be offered such as using the flight simulator to fly around and explore Titan. This simulator was modeled on conventional Earth flight simulators but has been considerably enhanced to add texture mapping of Titan's atmosphere utilizing the latest information from the NASA Galileo Space Probe. Additional scenery was added to provide color VGA graphics of a futuristic research station on Titan as well as an interesting story to keep the youngster's attention. This summer the game infrastructure has been developed as well as the Titan Flight Simulator. A number of other enhancements are planned.

  11. Neurology of inherited glycosylation disorders

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, HH; Eklund, E A; Ng, BG; Patterson, M C

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation comprise most of the nearly 70 genetic disorders known to be caused by impaired synthesis of glycoconjugates. The effects are expressed in most organ systems, and most involve the nervous system. Typical manifestations include structural abnormalities, (eg, rapidly progressive cerebellar atrophy), myopathies (including congenital muscular dystrophies and limb-girdle dystrophies), strokes and stroke-like episodes, epileptic seizures, developmental delay, and demyelinating neuropathy. Patients can have neurological symptoms associated with coagulopathies, immune dysfunction with or without infections, and cardiac, renal, or hepatic failure, which are common features of glycosylation disorders. The diagnosis of congenital disorders of glycosylation should be considered for any patient with multisystem disease and in those with more specific phenotypic features. Measurement of concentrations of selected glycoconjugates can be used to screen for many of these disorders, and molecular diagnosis is becoming more widely available in clinical practice. Disease-modifying treatments are available for only a few disorders, but all affected individuals benefit from early diagnosis and aggressive management. PMID:22516080

  12. Propylthiouracil and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Boekel, V; Godoy, J M; Lamy, L A; Assuf, S; Meyer Neto, J G; Balassiano, S L; Prata, L E

    1992-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a rare manifestation in hyperthyroidism. We describe the neurological manifestations of a 38 year old female with Graves' disease who developed peripheral neuropathy in the course of her treatment with propylthiouracil. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs disappeared. Therefore, we call attention for a possible toxic effect on peripheral nervous system caused by this drug. PMID:1339201

  13. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  14. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions. PMID:27475512

  15. Subcutaneous immunoglobulins in the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Leussink, Verena I.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Stettner, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins represent an established therapy for the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies, specifically chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDPs) as well as multifocal motor neuropathies (MMNs). For the treatment of antibody deficiency syndromes, subcutaneous immunoglobulins (SCIgs) have represented a mainstay for decades. An emerging body of evidence suggests that SCIg might also exhibit clinical efficacy in CIDP and MMN. This article reviews the current evidence for clinical effectiveness, as well as safety of SCIg for the treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies, and addresses remaining open questions in this context. We conclude that despite the need for controlled long-term studies to demonstrate long-term efficacy of SCIg in immune-mediated neuropathies, SCIg may already represent a potential therapeutic alternative for selected patients. PMID:27366241

  16. Subcutaneous immunoglobulins in the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Leussink, Verena I; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C; Stettner, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins represent an established therapy for the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies, specifically chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDPs) as well as multifocal motor neuropathies (MMNs). For the treatment of antibody deficiency syndromes, subcutaneous immunoglobulins (SCIgs) have represented a mainstay for decades. An emerging body of evidence suggests that SCIg might also exhibit clinical efficacy in CIDP and MMN. This article reviews the current evidence for clinical effectiveness, as well as safety of SCIg for the treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies, and addresses remaining open questions in this context. We conclude that despite the need for controlled long-term studies to demonstrate long-term efficacy of SCIg in immune-mediated neuropathies, SCIg may already represent a potential therapeutic alternative for selected patients. PMID:27366241

  17. A case of inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy associated with T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wada, M; Kurita, K; Tajima, K; Kawanami, T; Kato, T

    2003-01-01

    Malignant lymphoma may present prominent peripheral nervous system disorders with variable etiologies. We describe a patient who presented with chronic relapsing polyradiculoneuropathy accompanied by right facial nerve palsy. Gadolinium enhancement of the right facial nerve and cervical spinal roots was noted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sural nerve biopsy specimens showed mononuclear cell infiltration around the vessels in the epineurium. Histopathological and immunohistochemical investigations of sural nerve specimens revealed perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes with T-cell dominancy. No apparent direct invasion of lymphoma cells was seen. The results of nerve conduction studies, sural nerve biopsy and cerebrospinal fluid examination were suggestive of immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy. The chronic and relapsing fashion and unique radiological findings in our patient expand on the previously reported features of peripheral neuropathy associated with peripheral T-cell lymphoma. PMID:12542515

  18. Development profile in a patient with monosomy 10q and Dup(17p) associated with a peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrino, J.E.; Spinner, N.B.; Zackai, E.H.

    1996-02-02

    We report on a patient with dup(17p) and monosomy (10q) resulting from a familial translocation. Manifestations typical of both syndromes were present. The overall development of this patient was better by comparison with similar reported cases of either anomaly. Our evaluation detected severe gross motor delay and signs of a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. This patient is trisomic for the region of 17p which includes the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP-22) gene, known to be duplicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1A (CMT1A). Our analysis in this patient suggests that trisomy for the PMP-22 gene led to the demyelinating neuropathy and contributed to his severe motor development delay. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Cervical root sonography to differentiate multifocal motor neuropathy from ALS.

    PubMed

    Nodera, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Yuishin; Takamatsu, Naoko; Kaji, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    To explore suggestive evidence of focal proximal demyelination in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) without overt evidence of conduction block, we conducted sonographical assessment of cervical nerve roots in 9 MMN patients, 22 ALS patients, and 17 control subjects. The mean diameters of the C5 and C6 roots in MMN patients were significantly larger than those in ALS and controls, especially on the clinically dominant side. Although non-specific, sonography can be a potentially useful diagnostic procedure to support the diagnosis of MMN, even when overt conduction block is lacking. J. Med. Invest. 63: 104-107, February, 2016. PMID:27040062

  20. Clinical and Molecular Characterization of BSCL2 Mutations in a Taiwanese Cohort with Hereditary Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Lin, Chou-Ching; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Huang, Yen-Hua; Liao, Yi-Chu; Huang, Han-Wei; Lin, Kon-Ping; Soong, Bing-Wen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Background A small group of patients with inherited neuropathy that has been shown to be caused by mutations in the BSCL2 gene. However, little information is available about the role of BSCL2 mutations in inherited neuropathies in Taiwan. Methodology and Principal Findings Utilizing targeted sequencing, 76 patients with molecularly unassigned Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2) and 8 with distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), who were selected from 348 unrelated patients with inherited neuropathies, were screened for mutations in the coding regions of BSCL2. Two heterozygous BSCL2 mutations, p.S90L and p.R96H, were identified, of which the p.R96H mutation is novel. The p.S90L was identified in a pedigree with CMT2 while the p.R96H was identified in a patient with apparently sporadic dHMN. In vitro studies demonstrated that the p.R96H mutation results in a remarkably low seipin expression and reduced cell viability. Conclusion BSCL2 mutations account for a small number of patients with inherited neuropathies in Taiwan. The p.R96H mutation is associated with dHMN. This study expands the molecular spectrum of BSCL2 mutations and also emphasizes the pathogenic role of BSCL2 mutations in molecularly unassigned hereditary neuropathies. PMID:26815532

  1. Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony in Biotinidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a disorder inherited autosomal recessively showing evidence of hearing loss and optic atrophy in addition to seizures, hypotonia, and ataxia. In the present study, a 2-year-old boy with Biotinidase deficiency is presented in which clinical symptoms have been reported with auditory neuropathy/auditory dyssynchrony (AN/AD). In this case, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions showed bilaterally normal responses representing normal function of outer hair cells. In contrast, acoustic reflex test showed absent reflexes bilaterally, and visual reinforcement audiometry and auditory brainstem responses indicated severe to profound hearing loss in both ears. These results suggest AN/AD in patients with Biotinidase deficiency. PMID:27144235

  2. [Chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kubiatowski, Tomasz; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Mocarska, Agnieszka; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-11-01

    Modern cancer therapy prolongs patients life but commonly increases incidence of treatment-related complications. One of such adverse effect is a neurotoxicity, which usually manifestates as peripheral neuropathies (CIPN), characterised by various sensory (tingling, numbness, pain), motor (foot and hands drop, fastening buttons difficulties) and autonomic (constipation, arythmia) abnormalities as well as pain. Despite of intensive epidemiological and clinical studies, standardized diagnostic criteria and methods of the neuropathy prevention and treatment have not been fully established. The most commonly used form of treatment is symptomatic therapy, including anticonvulsant and antidepressant drugs. Proper education of patients and their families of symptoms and neuropathy consequences is desirable to reduce anxiety and stress. PMID:24575651

  3. Atypical inflammatory demyelinating syndromes of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Todd A; Reddel, Stephen W; Barnett, Michael H; Palace, Jacqueline; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Weinshenker, Brian G

    2016-08-01

    Atypical inflammatory demyelinating syndromes are rare disorders that differ from multiple sclerosis owing to unusual clinical or MRI findings or poor response to treatments used for multiple sclerosis. These syndromes include neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, tumefactive demyelination, Baló's concentric sclerosis, Schilder's disease, and Marburg's multiple sclerosis. The overlapping features of these syndromes with multiple sclerosis and with each other complicate diagnosis and their categorisation as distinct or related conditions. Recognition of these syndromes is crucial because they differ from multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating and non-demyelinating conditions in their prognosis and treatment. Advances in MRI, pathology, and immunobiology are needed to increase understanding of these syndromes, including the extent to which some of them represent distinct entities, and to assist with improvements in their diagnosis and management. PMID:27478954

  4. Recurrence Quantification Analysis of F-Waves and the Evaluation of Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Morris A.; Patil, Vijaya K.; Webber, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Electrodiagnostic (EDX) patterns of neuropathic dysfunction have been based on axonal/demyelinating criteria requiring prior assumptions. This has not produced classifications of desired sensitivity or specificity. Furthermore, standard nerve conduction studies have limited reproducibility. New methodologies in EDX seem important. Recurrent Quantification Analysis (RQA) is a nonlinear method for examining patterns of recurrence. RQA might provide a unique method for the EDX evaluation of neuropathies. RQA was used to analyze F-wave recordings from the abductor hallucis muscle in 61 patients with neuropathies. Twenty-nine of these patients had diabetes as the sole cause of their neuropathies. In the other 32 patients, the etiologies of the neuropathies were diverse. Commonly used EDX variables were also recorded. RQA data could separate the 29 patients with diabetic neuropathies from the other 32 patients (P < 0.009). Statistically significant differences in two EDX variables were also present: compound muscle action potential amplitudes (P < 0.007) and F-wave persistence (P < 0.001). RQA analysis of F-waves seemed able to distinguish diabetic neuropathies from the other neuropathies studied, and this separation was associated with specific physiological abnormalities. This study would therefore support the idea that RQA of F-waves can distinguish between types of neuropathic dysfunction based on EDX data alone without prior assumptions. PMID:26688754

  5. Experimental diabetes in neonatal mice induces early peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ariza, L; Pagès, G; García-Lareu, B; Cobianchi, S; Otaegui, P J; Ruberte, J; Chillón, M; Navarro, X; Bosch, A

    2014-08-22

    Animal models of diabetes do not reach the severity of human diabetic neuropathy but relatively mild neurophysiological deficits and minor morphometric changes. The lack of degenerative neuropathy in diabetic rodent models seems to be a consequence of the shorter length of the axons or the shorter animal life span. Diabetes-induced demyelination needs many weeks or even months before it can be evident by morphometrical analysis. In mice myelination of the peripheral nervous system starts at the prenatal period and it is complete several days after birth. Here we induced experimental diabetes to neonatal mice and we evaluated its effect on the peripheral nerve 4 and 8 weeks after diabetes induction. Neurophysiological values showed a decline in sensory nerve conduction velocity at both time-points. Morphometrical analysis of the tibial nerve demonstrated a decrease in the number of myelinated fibers, fiber size and myelin thickness at both time-points studied. Moreover, aldose reductase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activities were increased even if the amount of the enzyme was not affected. Thus, type 1 diabetes in newborn mice induces early peripheral neuropathy and may be a good model to assay pharmacological or gene therapy strategies to treat diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24846610

  6. Temperature sensitive auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiujing; Lan, Lan; Shi, Wei; Yu, Lan; Xie, Lin-Yi; Xiong, Fen; Zhao, Cui; Li, Na; Yin, Zifang; Zong, Liang; Guan, Jing; Wang, Dayong; Sun, Wei; Wang, Qiuju

    2016-05-01

    Temperature sensitive auditory neuropathy is a very rare and puzzling disorder. In the present study, we reported three unrelated 2 to 6 year-old children who were diagnosed as auditory neuropathy patients who complained of severe hearing loss when they had fever. Their hearing thresholds varied from the morning to the afternoon. Two of these patients' hearing improved with age, and one patient received positive results from cochlear implant. Genetic analysis revealed that these three patients had otoferlin (OTOF) homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations with the genotypes c.2975_2978delAG/c.4819C>T, c.4819C>T/c.4819C>T, or c.2382_2383delC/c.1621G>A, respectively. Our study suggests that these gene mutations may be the cause of temperature sensitive auditory neuropathy. The long term follow up results suggest that the hearing loss in this type of auditory neuropathy may recover with age. PMID:26778470

  7. Permanent Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The health risks and side effects of fluoroquinolone use include the risk of tendon rupture and myasthenia gravis exacerbation, and on August 15, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration updated its warning to include the risk of permanent peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of fluoroquinolone-induced peripheral neuropathy in a patient treated for clinically diagnosed urinary tract infection with ciprofloxacin antibiotic. PMID:26425618

  8. Gliopathy of Demyelinating and Non-Demyelinating Strains of Mouse Hepatitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Lawrence C.; Biswas, Kaushiki; Shindler, Kenneth S.; Nabar, Manasi; Stout, Marjorie; Hingley, Susan T.; Grinspan, Judith B.; Das Sarma, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Demyelination in the central nervous system induced by neurovirulent strains of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) is mediated by the viral spike glycoprotein, but it is not clear whether the mechanism of this disease pathology involves direct viral infection of oligodendrocytes. Detailed studies of glial cell tropism of MHV are presented, demonstrating that direct MHV infection of oligodendrocytes differs between demyelinating (RSA59) and non-demyelinating (RSMHV2) viral strains both in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that direct injury of mature oligodendrocytes is an important mechanism of virus-induced demyelination. In vivo, RSA59 infection was identified in spinal cord gray and white matter, but infected oligodendrocytes were restricted to white matter. In contrast, RSMHV2 infection was restricted to gray matter neurons and was not localized to oligodendrocytes. In vitro, RSA59 can infect both oligodendrocyte precursors and differentiated oligodendrocytes, whereas RSMHV2 can infect oligodendrocyte precursors but not differentiated oligodendrocytes. Viral spreading through axonal means to white matter and release of the demyelinating strain MHV at the nerve end is critical for oligodendrocytes infection and subsequent demyelination. Understanding the mechanisms by which known viruses effect demyelination in this animal model has important therapeutic implications in the treatment of human demyelinating disease. PMID:26733813

  9. Electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiuming; Qin, Xinyue; Zhang, Yuping; Huang, Cheng; Yu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    Polyneuropathy is often an initial manifestation of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome and therefore this disorder is frequently misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We reviewed electrophysiological data in 20 patients with POEMS syndrome and 36 matched patients with CIDP to compare the electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and CIDP. Compared with CIDP controls, POEMS patients demonstrated (1) less prolonged distal motor latency and less reduced motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction velocities, (2) greater reduction of amplitudes of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) in distal stimulation, and similar reduction of amplitudes of CMAP in proximal stimulation, (3) similar reduction of amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) in median and ulnar nerves, and a greater reduction of amplitudes of SNAP in tibial and peroneal nerves, (4) less temporal dispersion, (5) less frequent conduction block, (6) more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the upper and lower limbs, and more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the lower than upper limbs, (7) similar F wave and H reflex abnormalities, and (8) less frequent skin sympathetic response abnormalities. We concluded that before development of typical clinical manifestations, POEMS neuropathy can be distinguished from CIDP by neural electrophysiological examination. These electrophysiological features can be used for early diagnosis and initiating correct treatment of POEMS syndrome. PMID:24268501

  10. Challenges in the treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Costa, R; Iancu Ferfoglia, R; Viala, K; Léger, J-M

    2014-10-01

    Chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a rare disease, the most frequent one within the spectrum of the so-called "chronic immune-mediated neuropathies". Challenges in the treatment of CIDP firstly concern its diagnosis, which may be difficult, mainly for the atypical forms. Secondly, challenges encompass the choice of the first-line treatment, such as corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg), and plasma exchanges (PE) that have been proven as efficacious by several randomized controlled trials (RCT). Recent reports have focused on both different regimens of corticosteroids, and the occurrence of relapses following treatment with either corticosteroids or IVIg. These data may be helpful for the choice of the first-line treatment and may result in changing the guidelines for treatment of CIDP in clinical practice. The third and more difficult challenge is to manage long-term treatment for CIDP, since no immunomodulatory treatment has to date been proven as efficacious in this situation. Lastly, challenges in the treatment concern the choice of the best outcome measure for CIDP in RCT and clinical practice. The aim of this article is to overview the results of the more recently reported published trials for CIDP, and to give some insights for the current and future management of CIDP. PMID:25200479

  11. Stance Postural Strategies in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Missori, Paolo; Trompetto, Carlo; Fattapposta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyneuropathy leads to postural instability and an increased risk of falling. We investigated how impaired motor impairment and proprioceptive input due to neuropathy influences postural strategies. Methods Platformless bisegmental posturography data were recorded in healthy subjects and patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Each subject stood on the floor, wore a head and a hip electromagnetic tracker. Sway amplitude and velocity were recorded and the mean direction difference (MDD) in the velocity vector between trackers was calculated as a flexibility index. Results Head and hip postural sway increased more in patients with CIDP than in healthy controls. MDD values reflecting hip strategies also increased more in patients than in controls. In the eyes closed condition MDD values in healthy subjects decreased but in patients remained unchanged. Discussion Sensori-motor impairment changes the balance between postural strategies that patients adopt to maintain upright quiet stance. Motor impairment leads to hip postural strategy overweight (eyes open), and prevents strategy re-balancing when the sensory context predominantly relies on proprioceptive input (eyes closed). PMID:26977594

  12. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  13. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  14. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: decreased claudin-5 and relocated ZO-1

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, T; Numata, Y; Mizusawa, H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To clarify the dynamics of molecules composing the blood–nerve barrier (BNB) in inflammatory neuropathies. Methods: The expression of four tight junction (TJ) proteins—claudin-1, claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1—was analysed immunohistochemically in sural nerve biopsy specimens obtained from patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Results: Claudin-1 was detected only in perineurial cells, whereas claudin-5 was present in endothelial cells, irrespective of vessel location or size. Occludin and ZO-1 were found in perineurial cells, in addition to some epineurial and endoneurial endothelial cells. In CIDP, percentages of endoneurial small vessels immunoreactive for claudin-5 were significantly decreased, as were ZO-1 immunoreactive endoneurial small vessels, with staining localised to interfaces between cells. Claudin-1 and occludin immunoreactivity did not differ appreciably between the neuropathies examined. Conclusions: The downregulation of claudin-5 and altered localisation of ZO-1 seen in CIDP specimens may indicate that BNB derangement occurs in inflammatory neuropathies. Further investigation of TJ molecules may suggest new treatments based on properties of the BNB. PMID:15090575

  15. Peripheral neuropathy in chronic liver disease: clinical, electrodiagnostic, and nerve biopsy findings

    PubMed Central

    Knill-Jones, R. P.; Goodwill, C. J.; Dayan, A. D.; Williams, Roger

    1972-01-01

    In a prospective study of 70 unselected patients with chronic liver disease, clinical signs of a peripheral neuropathy were observed in 13 patients. Abnormal nerve conduction was demonstrated in nine of these and in one further patient who had no abnormal neurological signs. The occurrence of a neuropathy (in patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis, haemochromatosis, active chronic hepatitis as well as in alcoholic cirrhosis) could not be related to liver function, although it was associated with higher IgA and IgM values. Clinical diabetes was present in six of the 14 patients with neuropathy but there was no relation in the non-diabetic patients between neuropathy and minor impairment of carbohydrate tolerance. Those with neuropathy had a significantly higher incidence of oesophageal varices and there was also a relationship to a history of previous encephalopathy. Sural nerve biopsy was carried out on 14 patients, eight of whom had clinical or electrodiagnostic evidence of neuropathy. Single nerve fibres were examined by teasing and in all nerves histological evidence was found of an indolent process which had damaged whole Schwann cells and which resulted in demyelination and remyelination. Diabetic angiopathy was not seen and axonal degeneration, which was never severe, was found in all disease groups equally. Images PMID:4337271

  16. [Demyelinating diseases in children with acute neurological symptoms].

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Isa Amalie; Skov, Liselotte; Miranda, Maria Jose

    2015-12-01

    Demyelinating diseases in children is a broad group of illnesses, which affect the central nervous system. Demyelinating diseases can be monophasic or chronic and comprise acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Demyelinating diseases are rare, but it is important for the physician to recognize these diseases, as well as to understand the differential diagnoses. This review summarizes the current knowledge of demyelinating disorders in children, focusing on an approach to diagnosis and management. PMID:26651911

  17. Aggregation of MBP in chronic demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Frid, Kati; Einstein, Ofira; Friedman-Levi, Yael; Binyamin, Orli; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Gabizon, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Misfolding of key disease proteins to an insoluble state is associated with most neurodegenerative conditions, such as prion, Parkinson, and Alzheimer’s diseases. In this work, and by studying animal models of multiple sclerosis, we asked whether this is also the case for myelin basic protein (MBP) in the late and neurodegenerative phases of demyelinating diseases. Methods To this effect, we tested whether MBP, an essential myelin component, present prion-like properties in animal models of MS, as is the case for Cuprizone-induced chronic demyelination or chronic phases of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). Results We show here that while total levels of MBP were not reduced following extensive demyelination, part of these molecules accumulated thereafter as aggregates inside oligodendrocytes or around neuronal cells. In chronic EAE, MBP precipitated concomitantly with Tau, a marker of diverse neurodegenerative conditions, including MS. Most important, analysis of fractions from Triton X-100 floatation gradients suggest that the lipid composition of brain membranes in chronic EAE differs significantly from that of naïve mice, an effect which may relate to oxidative insults and subsequently prevent the appropriate insertion and compaction of new MBP in the myelin sheath, thereby causing its misfolding and aggregation. Interpretation Prion-like aggregation of MBP following chronic demyelination may result from an aberrant lipid composition accompanying this pathological status. Such aggregation of MBP may contribute to neuronal damage that occurs in the progressive phase of MS. PMID:26273684

  18. The armadillo as a model for peripheral neuropathy in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Truman, Richard W; Ebenezer, Gigi J; Pena, Maria T; Sharma, Rahul; Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Scollard, David M; McArthur, Justin C; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's Disease) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that primarily targets the peripheral nervous system; skin, muscle, and other tissues are also affected. Other than humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only natural hosts of M. leprae, and they are the only laboratory animals that develop extensive neurological involvement with this bacterium. Infection in the armadillo closely recapitulates many of the structural, physiological, and functional aspects of leprosy seen in humans. Armadillos can be useful models of leprosy for basic scientific investigations into the pathogenesis of leprosy neuropathy and its associated myopathies, as well as for translational research studies in piloting new diagnostic methods or therapeutic interventions. Practical and ethical constraints often limit investigation into human neuropathies, but armadillos are an abundant source of leprotic neurologic fibers. Studies with these animals may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in leprosy that also might benefit the understanding of other demyelinating neuropathies. Although there is only a limited supply of armadillo-specific reagents, the armadillo whole genomic sequence has been completed, and gene expression studies can be employed. Clinical procedures, such as electrophysiological nerve conduction testing, provide a functional assessment of armadillo nerves. A variety of standard histopathological and immunopathological procedures including Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) analysis, Schwann Cell Density, and analysis for other conserved cellular markers can be used effectively with armadillos and will be briefly reviewed in this text. PMID:24615444

  19. Insulin influenced expression of myelin proteins in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rachana, Kuruvanthe S; Manu, Mallahalli S; Advirao, Gopal M

    2016-08-26

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the downstream complications of diabetes. This complication is caused by the deficiency of insulin action and subsequent hyperglycemia, but the details of their pathogenesis remain unclear. Hence, it is of critical importance to understand how such hormonal variation affects the expression of myelin proteins such as myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in the peripheral nerve. An earlier report from our lab has demonstrated the expression of insulin receptors (IR) in Schwann cells (SCs) of sciatic nerve. To assess the neurotrophic role of insulin in diabetic neuropathy, we studied the expression of these myelin proteins under control, DPN and insulin treated DPN subjects at developmental stages. Further, the expression of these myelin proteins was correlated with the expression of insulin receptor. Expression of myelin proteins was significantly reduced in the diabetic model compared to normal, and upregulated in insulin treated diabetic rats. Similarly, an in vitro study was also carried out in SCs grown at high glucose and insulin treated conditions. The expression pattern of myelin proteins in SCs was comparable to that of in vivo samples. In addition, quantitative study of myelin genes by real time PCR has also showed the significant expression pattern change in the insulin treated and non-treated DPN subjects. Taken together, these results corroborate the critical importance of insulin as a neurotrophic factor in demyelinized neurons in diabetic neuropathy. PMID:27373589

  20. The Armadillo as a Model for Peripheral Neuropathy in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Richard W.; Ebenezer, Gigi J.; Pena, Maria T.; Sharma, Rahul; Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Scollard, David M.; McArthur, Justin C.; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's Disease) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that primarily targets the peripheral nervous system; skin, muscle, and other tissues are also affected. Other than humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only natural hosts of M. leprae, and they are the only laboratory animals that develop extensive neurological involvement with this bacterium. Infection in the armadillo closely recapitulates many of the structural, physiological, and functional aspects of leprosy seen in humans. Armadillos can be useful models of leprosy for basic scientific investigations into the pathogenesis of leprosy neuropathy and its associated myopathies, as well as for translational research studies in piloting new diagnostic methods or therapeutic interventions. Practical and ethical constraints often limit investigation into human neuropathies, but armadillos are an abundant source of leprotic neurologic fibers. Studies with these animals may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in leprosy that also might benefit the understanding of other demyelinating neuropathies. Although there is only a limited supply of armadillo-specific reagents, the armadillo whole genomic sequence has been completed, and gene expression studies can be employed. Clinical procedures, such as electrophysiological nerve conduction testing, provide a functional assessment of armadillo nerves. A variety of standard histopathological and immunopathological procedures including Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) analysis, Schwann Cell Density, and analysis for other conserved cellular markers can be used effectively with armadillos and will be briefly reviewed in this text. PMID:24615444

  1. Paediatric UK demyelinating disease longitudinal study (PUDDLS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that at least 5% of Multiple sclerosis (MS) cases manifest in childhood. Children with MS present with a demyelinating episode involving single or multiple symptoms prior to developing a second event (usually within two years) to then meet criteria for diagnosis. There is evidence from adult cohorts that the incidence and sex ratios of MS are changing and that children of immigrants have a higher risk for developing MS. A paediatric population should reflect the vanguard of such changes and may reflect trends yet to be observed in adult cohorts. Studying a paediatric population from the first demyelinating event will allow us to test these hypotheses, and may offer further valuable insights into the genetic and environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of MS. Methods/Design The Paediatric UK Demyelinating Disease Longitudinal Study (PUDDLS) is a prospective longitudinal observational study which aims to determine the natural history, predictors and outcomes of childhood CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases. PUDDLS will involve centres in the UK, and will establish a cohort of children affected with a first CNS inflammatory demyelinating event for long-term follow up by recruiting for approximately 5 years. PUDDLS will also establish a biological sample archive (CSF, serum, and DNA), allowing future hypothesis driven research. For example, the future discovery of a biomarker will allow validation within this dataset for the evaluation of novel biomarkers. Patients will also be requested to consent to be contacted in the future. A secondary aim is to collaborate internationally with the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group when future collaborative studies are proposed, whilst sharing a minimal anonymised dataset. PUDDLS is the second of two jointly funded studies. The first (UCID-SS) is an epidemiological surveillance study that already received ethical approvals, and started on the 1st September 2009. There is

  2. Mitochondria as crucial players in demyelinated axons: lessons from neuropathology and experimental demyelination.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Graham R; Mahad, Don J

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are the most efficient producers of energy in the form of ATP. Energy demands of axons, placed at relatively great distances from the neuronal cell body, are met by mitochondria, which when functionally compromised, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess. Axons are made metabolically efficient by myelination, which enables saltatory conduction. The importance of mitochondria for maintaining the structural integrity of myelinated axons is illustrated by neuroaxonal degeneration in primary mitochondrial disorders. When demyelinated, the compartmentalisation of ion channels along axons is disrupted. The redistribution of electrogenic machinery is thought to increase the energy demand of demyelinated axons. We review related studies that focus on mitochondria within unmyelinated, demyelinated and dysmyelinated axons in the central nervous system. Based on neuropathological observations we propose the increase in mitochondrial presence within demyelinated axons as an adaptive process to the increased energy need. An increased presence of mitochondria would also increase the capacity to produce deleterious agents such as ROS when functionally compromised. Given the lack of direct evidence of a beneficial or harmful effect of mitochondrial changes, the precise role of increased mitochondrial presence within axons due to demyelination needs to be further explored in experimental demyelination in-vivo and in-vitro. PMID:21331147

  3. Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Meredith C; Cameron, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are rare consequences of central nervous system (CNS) idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Tumefactive demyelinating lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because they can mimic tumors and abscesses and because they can be caused by a heterogeneous range of disorders. This article reviews the recent literature on the clinical presentation; radiographic features; prognosis; and management of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and the rare variants of multiple sclerosis including Schilder's disease, Marburg acute multiple sclerosis, and Balo's concentric sclerosis. PMID:26847090

  4. Rapidly progressive amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in a young patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Canali, Elena; Chiari, Annalisa; Sola, Patrizia; Fioravanti, Valentina; Valzania, Franco; Pentore, Roberta; Nichelli, Paolo; Mandrioli, Jessica

    2010-05-01

    We describe the rare case of a young woman with hereditary neuropathy with liability to compression palsy (HNPP), who developed a rapidly progressive ALS. We suggest that underexpression of PMP22 protein in the nervous system might interfere with motor neuron function by impairing myelin formation and exposure of the axon to injury. Patients with ALS and evidence of demyelination should be screened for HNPP. PMID:19437170

  5. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Understanding molecular pathogenesis could lead to future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Nivedita U; Shy, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies, like many other degenerative disorders, have been challenging to treat. At this point, there is little specific therapy for the inherited neuropathies other than genetic counseling as well as symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation. In the past, ascorbic acid, progesterone antagonists, and subcutaneous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) injections have demonstrated improvement in animal models of CMT 1A, the most common inherited neuropathy, but have failed to translate any effect in humans. Given the difficulty in treatment, it is important to understand the molecular pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies in order to strategize potential future therapies. The hereditary neuropathies are in an era of molecular insight and over the past 20 years, more than 78 subtypes of Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) have been identified and extensively studied to understand the biological pathways in greater detail. Next generation molecular sequencing has also improved the diagnosis as well as the understanding of CMT. A greater understanding of the molecular pathways will help pave the way to future therapeutics of CMT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25108281

  6. Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:18616962

  7. Dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON).

    PubMed

    Ebner, Roberto

    2002-03-01

    Dysthyroid Optic Neuropathy (DON) affects a small percentage of patients with Graves disease, but, when it occurs, it can cause significant and permanent loss of vision. DON is treatable if recognized early. Systemic steroids can be effective, but may cause side affects. Orbital injection of steroids may play a role in selected patients. Orbital radiation has a more permanent effect and has gained wide acceptance as a relatively non-invasive method of reversing DON. Surgery to decompress crowded orbits has been used for years and continues to be a viable approach for those patients with optic neuropathy, especially when there is significant proptosis. Optic nerve decompression can also be achieved through a transethmoidal approach. PMID:15513451

  8. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia neuropathy spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ataxia neuropathy spectrum ataxia neuropathy spectrum Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia neuropathy spectrum is part of a group of conditions ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: small fiber neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions small fiber neuropathy small fiber neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Small fiber neuropathy is a condition characterized by severe pain attacks ...

  10. Infectious optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Golnik, Karl C

    2002-03-01

    A wide variety of infectious agents are known to cause optic neuropathy. This article will consider the bacteria, spirochetes, fungi, and viruses that most commonly affect the optic nerve. Clinical presentation is variable, but some pathogens often produce a characteristic funduscopic pattern. Diagnosis is usually made on the basis of clinical suspicion and serologic testing. Polymerase chain reaction is also increasingly utilized. Most infectious agents can be effectively treated but visual recovery is highly variable. PMID:15513450

  11. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Clarke, B F; Ewing, D J; Campbell, I W

    1979-10-01

    This review attempts to outline the present understanding of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The clinical features have been increasinly recognised but knowledge of the localization and morphology of the lesions and their pathogenesis remains fragmentary. A metabolic causation as postulated in somatic nerves accords best with clinical observations. Most bodily systems, particularly the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and urogenital, are involved with added disturbances of thermoregulatory function and pupillary reflexes. Possible effects on neuroendocrine and peptidergic secretion and respiratory control await definition. Current interest centres around the development of a new generation of tests of autonomic nerve function that are simple, non-invasive, reproducible and allow precision in diagnosis and accurate quantitation. Most are based on cardiovascular reflexes and abnormality in them is assumed to reflect autonomic damage elsewhere. Probably no single test suffices and a battery of tests reflecting both parasympathetic and sympathetic function is preferable. Little is known of the natural history. The prevalence may be greater than previously suspected and although symptoms are mild in the majority, a few develop florid features. The relation of control and duration of diabetes to the onset and progression of autonomic neuropathy is not clearly established. Once tests of autonomic function become abnormal they usually remain abnormal. Symptomatic autonomic neuropathy carries a greatly increased mortality rate possibly due to indirect mechanisms such as renal failure and direct mechanisms such as cardio-resiratory arrest. Improved treatment of some of the more disabling symptoms has been possible in recent years. PMID:387501

  12. [Radiation-induced neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Dobrzyńska-Rutkowska, Aneta; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-12-01

    Radiation-induced neuropathy is commonly observed among oncological patients. Radiation can affect the nervous tissue directly or indirectly by inducing vasculopathy or dysfunction of internal organs. Symptoms may be mild and reversible (e.g., pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, drowsiness, fatigue, paresthesia) or life-threatening (cerebral oedema, increased intracranial pressure, seizures). Such complications are clinically divided into peripheral (plexopathies, neuropathies of spinal and cranial nerves) and central neuropathy (myelopathy, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment). The degree of neuronal damages primarily depends on the total and fractional radiation dose and applied therapeutic methods. The conformal and megavoltage radiotherapy seems to be the safeties ones. Diagnostic protocol includes physical examination, imaging (in particular magnetic resonance), electromyography, nerve conduction study and sometimes histological examination. Prevention and early detection of neurological complications are necessary in order to prevent a permanent dysfunction of the nervous system. Presently their treatment is mostly symptomatic, but in same cases a surgical intervention is required. An experimental and clinical data indicates some effectiveness of different neuroprotective agents (e.g. anticoagulants, vitamin E, hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline, bevacizumab, methylphenidate, donepezil), which should be administered before and/or during radiotherapy. PMID:24490474

  13. Treatment of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy by intravenous mangafodipir

    PubMed Central

    Coriat, Romain; Alexandre, Jérôme; Nicco, Carole; Quinquis, Laurent; Benoit, Evelyne; Chéreau, Christiane; Lemaréchal, Hervé; Mir, Olivier; Borderie, Didier; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Weill, Bernard; Coste, Joel; Goldwasser, François; Batteux, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Background. The majority of patients receiving the platinum-based chemotherapy drug oxaliplatin develop peripheral neurotoxicity. Because this neurotoxicity involves ROS production, we investigated the efficacy of mangafodipir, a molecule that has antioxidant properties and is approved for use as an MRI contrast enhancer. Methods. The effects of mangafodipir were examined in mice following treatment with oxaliplatin. Neurotoxicity, axon myelination, and advanced oxidized protein products (AOPPs) were monitored. In addition, we enrolled 23 cancer patients with grade ≥2 oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in a phase II study, with 22 patients receiving i.v. mangafodipir following oxaliplatin. Neuropathic effects were monitored for up to 8 cycles of oxaliplatin and mangafodipir. Results. Mangafodipir prevented motor and sensory dysfunction and demyelinating lesion formation. In mice, serum AOPPs decreased after 4 weeks of mangafodipir treatment. In 77% of patients treated with oxaliplatin and mangafodipir, neuropathy improved or stabilized after 4 cycles. After 8 cycles, neurotoxicity was downgraded to grade ≥2 in 6 of 7 patients. Prior to enrollment, patients received an average of 880 ± 239 mg/m2 oxaliplatin. Patients treated with mangafodipir tolerated an additional dose of 458 ± 207 mg/m2 oxaliplatin despite preexisting neuropathy. Mangafodipir responders managed a cumulative dose of 1,426 ± 204 mg/m2 oxaliplatin. Serum AOPPs were lower in responders compared with those in nonresponders. Conclusion. Our study suggests that mangafodipir can prevent and/or relieve oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in cancer patients. Trial registration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00727922. Funding. Université Paris Descartes, Ministère de la Recherche et de l’Enseignement Supérieur, and Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris. PMID:24355920

  14. Painful neuropathies: the emerging role of sodium channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Brigitte A; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Gerrits, Monique M; Waxman, Stephen G; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a frequent debilitating feature reported in peripheral neuropathies with involvement of small nerve (Aδ and C) fibers. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the generation and conduction of action potentials in the peripheral nociceptive neuronal pathway where NaV 1.7, NaV 1.8, and NaV 1.9 sodium channels (encoded by SCN9A, SCN10A, and SCN11A) are preferentially expressed. The human genetic pain conditions inherited erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder were the first to be linked to gain-of-function SCN9A mutations. Recent studies have expanded this spectrum with gain-of-function SCN9A mutations in patients with small fiber neuropathy and in a new syndrome of pain, dysautonomia, and small hands and small feet (acromesomelia). In addition, painful neuropathies have been recently linked to SCN10A mutations. Patch-clamp studies have shown that the effect of SCN9A mutations is dependent upon the cell-type background. The functional effects of a mutation in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and sympathetic neuron cells may differ per mutation, reflecting the pattern of expression of autonomic symptoms in patients with painful neuropathies who carry the mutation in question. Peripheral neuropathies may not always be length-dependent, as demonstrated in patients with initial facial and scalp pain symptoms with SCN9A mutations showing hyperexcitability in both trigeminal ganglion and DRG neurons. There is some evidence suggesting that gain-of-function SCN9A mutations can lead to degeneration of peripheral axons. This review will focus on the emerging role of sodium channelopathies in painful peripheral neuropathies, which could serve as a basis for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25250524

  15. Perk Ablation Ameliorates Myelination in S63del-Charcot–Marie–Tooth 1B Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Musner, Nicolò; Sidoli, Mariapaola; Zambroni, Desireè; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Ungaro, Daniela; D’Antonio, Maurizio; Feltri, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, P0 glycoprotein accounts for more than 20% of myelin protein content. P0 is synthesized by Schwann cells, processed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and enters the secretory pathway. However, the mutant P0 with S63 deleted (P0S63del) accumulates in the ER lumen and induces a demyelinating neuropathy in Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1B (CMT1B)–S63del mice. Accumulation of P0S63del in the ER triggers a persistent unfolded protein response. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an ER stress sensor that phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2alpha) in order to attenuate protein synthesis. We have shown that increasing phosphophorylated-eIF2alpha (P-eIF2alpha) is a potent therapeutic strategy, improving myelination and motor function in S63del mice. Here, we explore the converse experiment: Perk haploinsufficiency reduces P-eIF2alpha in S63del nerves as expected, but surprisingly, ameliorates, rather than worsens S63del neuropathy. Motor performance and myelin abnormalities improved in S63del//Perk+/− compared with S63del mice. These data suggest that mechanisms other than protein translation might be involved in CMT1B/S63del neuropathy. In addition, Perk deficiency in other cells may contribute to demyelination in a non–Schwann-cell autonomous manner. PMID:27095827

  16. Perk Ablation Ameliorates Myelination in S63del-Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Musner, Nicolò; Sidoli, Mariapaola; Zambroni, Desireè; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Ungaro, Daniela; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Feltri, Maria L; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    In peripheral nerves, P0 glycoprotein accounts for more than 20% of myelin protein content. P0 is synthesized by Schwann cells, processed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and enters the secretory pathway. However, the mutant P0 with S63 deleted (P0S63del) accumulates in the ER lumen and induces a demyelinating neuropathy in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B (CMT1B)-S63del mice. Accumulation of P0S63del in the ER triggers a persistent unfolded protein response. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an ER stress sensor that phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2alpha) in order to attenuate protein synthesis. We have shown that increasing phosphophorylated-eIF2alpha (P-eIF2alpha) is a potent therapeutic strategy, improving myelination and motor function in S63del mice. Here, we explore the converse experiment:Perkhaploinsufficiency reduces P-eIF2alpha in S63del nerves as expected, but surprisingly, ameliorates, rather than worsens S63del neuropathy. Motor performance and myelin abnormalities improved in S63del//Perk+/- compared with S63del mice. These data suggest that mechanisms other than protein translation might be involved in CMT1B/S63del neuropathy. In addition,Perkdeficiency in other cells may contribute to demyelination in a non-Schwann-cell autonomous manner. PMID:27095827

  17. Selective vulnerability of peripheral nerves in avian riboflavin deficiency demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Z; Blumbergs, P C; Finnie, J W; Manavis, J; Thompson, P D

    2009-01-01

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) deficiency in young chickens produces a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. In this study, day-old broiler meat chickens were fed a riboflavin-deficient diet (1.8 mg/kg) and killed on posthatch days 6, 11, 16, 21, and 31, while control chickens were given a conventional diet containing 5.0 mg/kg riboflavin. Pathologic changes were found in sciatic, cervical, and lumbar spinal nerves of riboflavin-deficient chickens from day 11 onwards, characterized by endoneurial oedema, hypertrophic Schwann cells, tomacula (redundant myelin swellings), demyelination/remyelination, lipid deposition, and fibroblastic onion bulb formation. Similar changes were also found in large and medium intramuscular nerves, although they were less severe in the latter. However, by contrast, ventral and dorsal spinal nerve roots, distal intramuscular nerves, and subcutaneous nerves were normal at all time points examined. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that riboflavin deficiency in young, rapidly growing chickens produces selective injury to peripheral nerve trunks, with relative sparing of spinal nerve roots and distal nerve branches to muscle and skin. These novel findings suggest that the response of Schwann cells in peripheral nerves with riboflavin deficiency differs because either there are subsets of these cells in, or there is variability in access of nutrients to, different sites within the nerves. PMID:19112122

  18. Autophagic myelin destruction by schwann cells during wallerian degeneration and segmental demyelination.

    PubMed

    Jang, So Young; Shin, Yoon Kyung; Park, So Young; Park, Joo Youn; Lee, Hye Jeong; Yoo, Young Hyun; Kim, Jong Kuk; Park, Hwan Tae

    2016-05-01

    As lysosomal hydrolysis has long been suggested to be responsible for myelin clearance after peripheral nerve injury, in this study, we investigated the possible role of autophagolysosome formation in myelin phagocytosis by Schwann cells and its final contribution to nerve regeneration. We found that the canonical formation of autophagolysosomes was induced in demyelinating Schwann cells after injury, and the inhibition of autophagy via Schwann cell-specific knockout of the atg7 gene or pharmacological intervention of lysosomal function caused a significant delay in myelin clearance. However, Schwann cell dedifferentiation, as demonstrated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and c-Jun induction, and redifferentiation were not significantly affected, and thus the entire repair program progressed normally in atg7 knockout mice. Finally, autophagic Schwann cells were also found during segmental demyelination in a mouse model of inflammatory peripheral neuropathy. Together, our findings suggest that autophagy is the self-myelin destruction mechanism of Schwann cells, but mechanistically, it is a process distinct from Schwann cell plasticity for nerve repair. GLIA 2016;64:730-742. PMID:26712109

  19. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  20. Autoantibodies to neurofascin-186 and gliomedin in multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Notturno, Francesca; Di Febo, Tiziana; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Fernandez Rodriguez, Blanca M; Corti, Davide; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Carpo, Marinella; De Lauretis, Angelo; Uncini, Antonino

    2014-11-15

    We tested autoantibodies to neurofascin-186 (NF186) and gliomedin in sera from patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN, n=53) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP, n=95) by ELISA. IgG antibodies to NF186 or gliomedin were found in 62% of MMN and 1% of CIDP sera, and IgM antibodies to the same antigens in 12% of MMN and 1% of CIDP sera. These autoantibodies activated complement. Ten percent of the MMN sera without IgM anti-GM1 reactivity had anti-NF186 antibodies. Because NF186 and gliomedin play a crucial role for salutatory conduction, the autoantibodies may contribute to produce motor nerve conduction block and muscle weakness in MMN. PMID:25283719

  1. CIDP-like neuropathies in graft versus host disease.

    PubMed

    Cocito, Dario; Romagnolo, Alberto; Rosso, Michela; Peci, Erdita; Lopiano, Leonardo; Merola, Aristide

    2015-03-01

    Cases of chronic inflammatory demyelinating poliradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) have been reported in hematopoietic stem cells transplantation complicated by graft versus host disease (GVHD). A systematic review of the CIDP-like neuropathies associated with GVHD was conducted until January 2015, analyzing the clinical presentation and the response to different therapeutic regimens. Nineteen patients have been reported in literature including the present one. Fourteen subjects fulfilled the criteria for CIDP, whereas two cases presented with an asymmetric motor onset and one showed motor involvement only associated with anti-ganglioside antibodies. In addition, two subjects already affected by CIDP developed a significant relapse after GVHD. This study reviews the literature data and reports one additional case of CIDP and GVHD, suggesting that the two clinical entities might share a similar immunological background. PMID:25864585

  2. Health-related quality of life in chronic inflammatory neuropathies: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2015-01-15

    Chronic inflammatory neuropathies represent a heterogeneous group of disorders which affect patients' functional status and quality of life. We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature on the effects of both disease and treatment interventions on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in this patient population. The available data are limited, as few studies have systematically considered HRQoL in patients with inflammatory neuropathies. Moreover, in treatment trials, HRQoL measures have exclusively been used as secondary outcome measures. There is some evidence suggesting that baseline pre-treatment HRQoL reports are lower in patients with chronic inflammatory neuropathy than in age and gender-matched controls. Following treatment interventions, improvements in self-reported measures were consistently documented in the physical domain of HRQoL, which in turn correlated with improvements in traditional strength and functional scales. The impact of available treatments on the quality of life of patients with inflammatory neuropathies remains largely under-investigated. Interestingly, recent, although limited evidence from generic HRQoL measures may partly or completely contradict the results found with the primary, traditional outcome measures used (rituximab for anti-MAG neuropathy; immunoglobulins versus corticosteroids for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy). Similarly, HRQoL measures may suggest superiority, rather than equivalence, of certain drug administration methods (subcutaneous over intravenous immunoglobulins). Further research is needed to assess HRQOL in patients with untreated chronic inflammatory neuropathies in comparison to normative values, as well as precisely quantify treatment benefit. The role of both generic and disease-specific HRQoL measures in the evaluation of patients with chronic inflammatory neuropathies is also worthy of further consideration. PMID:25467139

  3. Changed distribution of sodium channels along demyelinated axons.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Gamboni, F; Levinson, S R; Finger, T E

    1990-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are largely localized to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons, providing a physiological basis for saltatory conduction. What happens to these channels in demyelinated axons is not known with certainty. Experimentally demyelinated axons were examined by using a well-characterized, polyclonal antibody directed against sodium channels. Immunocytochemical and radioimmunoassay data were consistent with the distribution of an increased number of sodium channels along segments of previously internodal axon. These findings affirm the plasticity of sodium channels in demyelinated axolemma and may be relevant to understanding how axons recover conduction after demyelination. PMID:2168559

  4. Painful Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Marchettini, P; Lacerenza, M; Mauri, E; Marangoni, C

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases affecting peripheral nerves. The causes are multiple: hereditary, metabolic, infectious, inflammatory, toxic, traumatic. The temporal profile includes acute, subacute and chronic conditions. The majority of peripheral neuropathies cause mainly muscle weakness and sensory loss, positive sensory symptoms and sometimes pain. When pain is present, however, it is usually extremely intense and among the most disabling symptoms for the patients. In addition, the neurological origin of the pain is often missed and patients receive inadequate or delayed specific treatment. Independently of the disease causing the peripheral nerve injury, pain originating from axonal pathology or ganglionopathy privileges neuropathies affecting smaller fibres, a clinical observation that points towards abnormal activity within nociceptive afferents as a main generator of pain. Natural activation of blood vessels or perineurial nociceptive network by pathology also causes intense pain. Pain of this kind, i.e. nerve trunk pain, is among the heralding symptoms of inflammatory or ischemic mononeuropathy and for its intensity represents itself a medical emergency. Neuropathic pain quality rekindles the psychophysical experience of peripheral nerves intraneural microstimulation i.e. a combination of large and small fibres sensation temporally distorted compared to physiological perception evoked by natural stimuli. Pins and needles, burning, cramping mixed with numbness, and tingling are the wording most used by patients. Nociceptive pain instead is most often described as aching, deep and dull. Good command of peripheral nerve anatomy and pathophysiology allows timely recognition of the different pain components and targeted treatment, selected according to intensity, type and temporal profile of the pain. PMID:18615140

  5. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Niamh

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy often goes unrecognized. We present a case of a 22-year-old man with multiple manifestations of this disease, including weakness, dizziness, fatigue, tachycardia, abnormal QTc, and orthostasis, which occurred 2 years after his type 1 diabetes diagnosis. He exhibited parasympathetic denervation with resting tachycardia and exercise intolerance but also had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, which suggests sympathetic denervation. He did not have complete cardiovascular autonomic reflex testing, which would have been helpful, but improved with aggressive diabetes treatment and the increase of beta-blockade. It is important to identify these patients to understand their signs and symptoms and consider appropriate therapies. PMID:27034552

  6. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Niamh; Silverman, Barry

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy often goes unrecognized. We present a case of a 22-year-old man with multiple manifestations of this disease, including weakness, dizziness, fatigue, tachycardia, abnormal QTc, and orthostasis, which occurred 2 years after his type 1 diabetes diagnosis. He exhibited parasympathetic denervation with resting tachycardia and exercise intolerance but also had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, which suggests sympathetic denervation. He did not have complete cardiovascular autonomic reflex testing, which would have been helpful, but improved with aggressive diabetes treatment and the increase of beta-blockade. It is important to identify these patients to understand their signs and symptoms and consider appropriate therapies. PMID:27034552

  7. Contactin-1 and Neurofascin-155/-186 Are Not Targets of Auto-Antibodies in Multifocal Motor Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Doppler, Kathrin; Appeltshauser, Luise; Krämer, Heidrun H; Ng, Judy King Man; Meinl, Edgar; Villmann, Carmen; Brophy, Peter; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G; Weishaupt, Andreas; Sommer, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy is an immune mediated disease presenting with multifocal muscle weakness and conduction block. IgM auto-antibodies against the ganglioside GM1 are detectable in about 50% of the patients. Auto-antibodies against the paranodal proteins contactin-1 and neurofascin-155 and the nodal protein neurofascin-186 have been detected in subgroups of patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Recently, auto-antibodies against neurofascin-186 and gliomedin were described in more than 60% of patients with multifocal motor neuropathy. In the current study, we aimed to validate this finding, using a combination of different assays for auto-antibody detection. In addition we intended to detect further auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins, specifically contactin-1 and neurofascin-155 in multifocal motor neuropathy patients' sera. We analyzed sera of 33 patients with well-characterized multifocal motor neuropathy for IgM or IgG anti-contactin-1, anti-neurofascin-155 or -186 antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, binding assays with transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells and murine teased fibers. We did not detect any IgM or IgG auto-antibodies against contactin-1, neurofascin-155 or -186 in any of our multifocal motor neuropathy patients. We conclude that auto-antibodies against contactin-1, neurofascin-155 and -186 do not play a relevant role in the pathogenesis in this cohort with multifocal motor neuropathy. PMID:26218529

  8. Contactin-1 and Neurofascin-155/-186 Are Not Targets of Auto-Antibodies in Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Doppler, Kathrin; Appeltshauser, Luise; Krämer, Heidrun H.; Ng, Judy King Man; Meinl, Edgar; Villmann, Carmen; Brophy, Peter; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Weishaupt, Andreas; Sommer, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy is an immune mediated disease presenting with multifocal muscle weakness and conduction block. IgM auto-antibodies against the ganglioside GM1 are detectable in about 50% of the patients. Auto-antibodies against the paranodal proteins contactin-1 and neurofascin-155 and the nodal protein neurofascin-186 have been detected in subgroups of patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Recently, auto-antibodies against neurofascin-186 and gliomedin were described in more than 60% of patients with multifocal motor neuropathy. In the current study, we aimed to validate this finding, using a combination of different assays for auto-antibody detection. In addition we intended to detect further auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins, specifically contactin-1 and neurofascin-155 in multifocal motor neuropathy patients’ sera. We analyzed sera of 33 patients with well-characterized multifocal motor neuropathy for IgM or IgG anti-contactin-1, anti-neurofascin-155 or -186 antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, binding assays with transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells and murine teased fibers. We did not detect any IgM or IgG auto-antibodies against contactin-1, neurofascin-155 or -186 in any of our multifocal motor neuropathy patients. We conclude that auto-antibodies against contactin-1, neurofascin-155 and -186 do not play a relevant role in the pathogenesis in this cohort with multifocal motor neuropathy. PMID:26218529

  9. Peripheral neuropathies in Sjögren's syndrome: a critical update on clinical features and pathogenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pavlakis, P P; Alexopoulos, H; Kosmidis, M L; Mamali, I; Moutsopoulos, H M; Tzioufas, A G; Dalakas, M C

    2012-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease that, apart from exocrine glands, may affect every organ or system. Involvement of different sections of the peripheral nervous system results in a wide spectrum of neuropathic manifestations. Based on distinct clinical, electrophysiological and histological criteria, the types of neuropathies seen in Sjögren's syndrome include: a) pure sensory which presents with distal symmetric sensory loss due to axonal degeneration of sensory fibers; sensory ataxia due to loss of proprioceptive large fibers (ganglionopathy); or with painful dysethesias (small fiber sensory neuropathy) due to degeneration of cutaneous axons. The latter appears to be the most common neuropathy in Sjögren's syndrome and requires skin biopsy for diagnosis to document loss or reduction of nerve fiber density; b) sensorimotor polyneuropathy affecting sensory and motor axons, often associated with severe systemic or pro-lymhomatous manifestations, such as palpable purpura and cryoglobulinemia, and c) rare types that include autoimmune demyelinating neuropathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex and autonomic neuropathy. In this review, the frequency, prevalence and diagnostic criteria for each neuropathy subset are discussed and possible pathogenetic mechanisms are outlined. PMID:22318209

  10. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and related peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    De Jonghe, P; Timmerman, V; Nelis, E; Martin, J J; Van Broeckhoven, C

    1997-01-01

    Soon after the description of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) in 1886, it became apparent that this syndrome is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Neuropathological and electrophysiological studies have further dissected this syndrome into distinct categories that are now classified in a complex nosology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies. The recent advent of molecular genetics has dramatically increased our understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms. Genetic linkage studies have identified at least 17 genetic loci for different types of inherited neuropathies although most genes involved still remain to be found. The application of molecular genetics has already had an important impact on clinical practice and genetic counselling. Three genes responsible for hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I (HMSNI) or CMT1 have been identified: peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) and myelin protein zero (MPZ) for the autosomal dominant form and connexin 32 (Cx32) for the X-linked dominant variant. The PMP22 gene is also involved in the majority of families with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). The observation of a 1.5 Mb tandem duplication in chromosome 17p11.2, containing the PMP22 gene, in CMT1 and the reciprocal deletion in the same region in HNPP has provided a novel disease paradigm for autosomal dominant disorders, i.e. the gene dosage mechanism. The study of phenotype-genotype correlations in transgenic animal models for PMP22, MPZ and Cx32 mutations will help elucidate the underlying disease mechanisms and will provide a basis for gene therapy and/or other therapeutic approaches such as treatment with neurotrophic growth factors. PMID:10975746

  11. Metabolic neuropathies and myopathies.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism may impact on muscle and peripheral nerve. Abnormalities involve mitochondria and other subcellular organelles such as peroxisomes and lysosomes related to the turnover and recycling of cellular compartments. Treatable causes are β-oxidation defects producing progressive neuropathy; pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, porphyria, or vitamin B12 deficiency causing recurrent episodes of neuropathy or acute motor deficit mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. On the other hand, lysosomal (mucopolysaccharidosis, Gaucher and Fabry diseases), mitochondriopathic (mitochondrial or nuclear mutations or mDNA depletion), peroxisomal (adrenomyeloneuropathy, Refsum disease, sterol carrier protein-2 deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, α-methylacyl racemase deficiency) diseases are multisystemic disorders involving also the heart, liver, brain, retina, and kidney. Pathophysiology of most metabolic myopathies is related to the impairment of energy production or to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Main symptoms are exercise intolerance with myalgias, cramps and recurrent myoglobinuria or limb weakness associated with elevation of serum creatine kinase. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency, followed by acid maltase deficiency, and lipin deficiency, are the most common cause of isolated rhabdomyolysis. Metabolic myopathies are frequently associated to extra-neuromuscular disorders particularly involving the heart, liver, brain, retina, skin, and kidney. PMID:23622366

  12. Diabetic corneal neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, R O; Peters, M A; Sobocinski, K; Nassif, K; Schultz, K J

    1983-01-01

    Corneal epithelial lesions can be found in approximately one-half of asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. These lesions are transient and clinically resemble the keratopathy seen in staphylococcal keratoconjunctivitis. Staphylococcal organisms, however, can be isolated in equal percentages from diabetic patients without keratopathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be related to the presence of diabetic keratopathy after adjusting for age with analysis of covariance. The strongest predictor of both keratopathy and corneal fluorescein staining was vibration perception threshold in the toes (P less than 0.01); and the severity of keratopathy was directly related to the degree of diminution of peripheral sensation. Other predictors of keratopathy were: reduced tear breakup time (P less than 0.03), type of diabetes (P less than 0.01), and metabolic status as indicated by c-peptide fasting (P less than 0.01). No significant relationships were found between the presence of keratopathy and tear glucose levels, endothelial cell densities, corneal thickness measurements, the presence of S epidermidis, or with duration of disease. It is our conclusion that asymptomatic epithelial lesions in the nontraumatized diabetic cornea can occur as a manifestation of generalized polyneuropathy and probably represent a specific form of corneal neuropathy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6676964

  13. Pediatric sciatic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, M.M.; Escolar, D.M.; Darras, B.; Jones, H.R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The incidence, cause, and prognosis of sciatic neuropathy in children is not well understood. We report our 30-year experience of 53 patients with pediatric sciatic neuropathies (SN). Methods: Prospective review of the history, physical examination, electrophysiologic findings, and clinical course of children with SN. Results: The etiology of SN injury was varied and included trauma (13), iatrogenic causes (13) (8 orthopedic surgeries and 5 miscellaneous surgeries), prolonged extrinsic compression and immobilization (6), tumors (7), vascular (5), idiopathic and progressive (4), infantile and nonprogressive (2), and unknown, presumed postviral (3). Electrophysiologic studies demonstrated abnormalities in motor conduction studies of the peroneal nerve in 44/53 (83%) or tibial nerve in 35/51 (67%). Sensory conduction studies were abnormal in sural nerve in 34 of 43 cases (79%), and superficial peroneal nerves in 15/25 (60%). Needle EMG was abnormal in peroneal innervated muscles in all subjects, in tibial nerve innervated muscles in 43/51 (84%), and in the hamstrings in 18/29 (62%). Prognosis for recovery was variable and depended on the etiology and the severity of the nerve injury. Conclusions: SN is an uncommon mononeuropathy in children. The causes of SN are varied in children compared to adults. Electrophysiologic studies in children may be limited by poor tolerance but play an important role in establishing the diagnosis. PMID:21403109

  14. Atypical hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP): the value of direct DNA diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sessa, M; Nemni, R; Quattrini, A; Del Carro, U; Wrabetz, L; Canal, N

    1997-01-01

    We report two patients with suspected hereditary liability to pressure palsies. Neurophysiological studies showed a mixed axonal-demyelinating sensory-motor polyneuropathy with focal slowing of conduction velocities at the common sites of entrapment. Morphological studies on sural nerve biopsy from the proband showed active axonal regeneration without typical tomacula. Molecular analysis confirmed the presence of a deletion of chromosome 17p11.2 in both patients. Our observation confirms the heterogeneity of hereditary liability to pressure palsies and the relevance of DNA testing for the diagnosis of this hereditary neuropathy. Images PMID:9391880

  15. Does ability to walk reflect general functionality in inflammatory neuropathies?

    PubMed

    Draak, Thomas H P; Gorson, Kenneth C; Vanhoutte, Els K; van Nes, Sonja I; van Doorn, Pieter A; Cornblath, David R; van den Berg, Leonard H; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J

    2016-06-01

    The "ability to walk" is considered a benchmark for good clinical recovery and prognosis, particularly in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). However, it has never been determined whether being "able to walk" represents general functionality. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the ability to walk outside independently reflects general functional improvement in patients with GBS, CIDP, and gammopathy-related neuropathy (MGUSP). A total of 137 patients with newly diagnosed (or relapsing) GBS (55), CIDP (59), and MGUSP (23) were serially examined (1-year). Predefined arbitrary cut-offs (so-called patients' Functional-Acceptable-Clinical-Thresholds [FACTs]) were taken at the 50th, 75th, and 90th percentile of the Inflammatory-Rasch-built-Overall-Disability-Scale (I-RODS(©) ). We determined the proportion of patients able to walk outside independently that reached the postulated cut-offs. A mean total of 85%, 39%, and 12% of all patients able to walk reached 50th, 75th, and 90th percentile thresholds, respectively. These findings were not neuropathy type related. Our findings show that assessing only one construct of functionality (e.g., walking ability) does not reflect the full scope of daily/social functional deficits perceived by patients. The ability to walk shows a patient is doing better, but not necessarily doing well. The I-RODS(©) bypasses these limitations. PMID:26968437

  16. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review on psychological and behavioral comorbidities in patients with inflammatory neuropathies. In Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), psychotic symptoms are reported during early stages in 30% of patients. Typical associations include mechanical ventilation, autonomic dysfunction, inability to communicate, and severe weakness. Anxiety and depression are frequent comorbidities. Anxiety may increase post-hospital admissions and be a predictor of mechanical ventilation. Posttraumatic stress disorder may affect up to 20% of ventilated patients. Sleep disturbances are common in early-stage GBS, affecting up to 50% of patients. In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, memory and quality of sleep may be impaired. An independent link between depression and pretreatment upper limb disability and ascites was reported in POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, skin) syndrome, with an association with early death. Hematological treatment of POEMS appears effective on depression. Published literature on psychological/behavioral manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies remains scarce, and further research is needed. Muscle Nerve 54: 1-8, 2016. PMID:26999767

  17. [Diabetic neuropathy. Current concepts on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zorrilla Hernández, E; Frati Munari, A; Lozano Castañeda, O; Villalpando Hernández, S; Boulton, A J

    1994-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is chronic complication which occurs in 50% of long standing diabetes mellitus. DN is a consequence of hyperglycemia probably through the following mechanisms: a) activation of aldose-reductase, intracellular sorbitol accumulation and myoinositol depletion, reduced activity of Na+/K+ATPase, loss of Na+ channels and demyelination; b) proteins glycation; c) microangiopathy; the first mechanism being the best known and the most reliable. DN may be subclinical or clinical. The main clinical picture is a peripheral, bilateral, symmetric polyneuropathy with a "socks and gloves" sensory impairment, muscular weakness, hyporeflexia, plantar ulcers and arthropathy. Less frequent syndromes are proximal motor neuropathy and mononeuropathy of cranial nerves or thoraco-abdominal roots. Diagnosis is based on clinical data, and may be sustained on impaired nerve conduction velocity, abnormal evoked somatosensory potentials, or sural nerve biopsy. These methods are highly sensitive but unspecific. Etiopathogenic treatment is based on glycemic control and aldose reductase inhibitors. Improvement in clinical, electrophysiologic and histopathologic data have been obtained with the latter. Symptomatic treatment includes carbamazepin, phenytoin, tricyclic antidepressives and a phenotiazin. Mononeuropathies tend to complete recovery in less than 6 months. Polyneuropathy is thought to be irreversible and progressive; however, with excellent glycemic control or with aldose reductase inhibitors nerve damage may be stabilized or even reversed. PMID:7557046

  18. A prospective study of acute idiopathic neuropathy. III. Immunological studies.

    PubMed Central

    Winer, J B; Gray, I A; Gregson, N A; Hughes, R A; Leibowitz, S; Shepherd, P; Taylor, W A; Yewdall, V

    1988-01-01

    The immune responses of 100 patients who presented with an acute idiopathic neuropathy were compared with those of age and sex matched controls. Blood lymphocytes and their subsets were counted with a fluorescent activated cell sorter. CD8+ (putative suppressor) lymphocytes were significantly reduced in the first week of the disease but total lymphocytes, total T and CD4+ (putative helper) cells were not altered. This reduction depended on the nature of the preceding infection. Serum complement C3 and C4 concentrations remained normal and immune complexes were rarely detected with a C1q binding assay. Complement-fixing antibodies to human peripheral nerve antigens were discovered in the serum of 7% of patients but only 1% of controls. Complement-fixing antibodies to galactocerebroside were not discovered in any sera. Enzyme-linked immunoassays detected increased antibody responses to galactocerebroside but none at all to human P2 myelin protein in the patient sera. Forty microliter of serum from five patients injected into the sciatic nerves of rats did not induce significantly more demyelination than the serum from control patients. It is concluded that auto-immune responses can only be detected by these techniques in a small minority of patients with acute idiopathic neuropathy. PMID:2969956

  19. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  20. A New Model of Cuprizone-Mediated Demyelination/Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Hilary H.; Bercury, Kathryn K.; Popescu, Daniela C.; Narayanan, S. Priya

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, result in devastating long-term neurologic damage, in part because of the lack of effective remyelination in the adult human brain. One model used to understand the mechanisms regulating remyelination is cuprizone-induced demyelination, which allows investigation of remyelination mechanisms in adult animals following toxin-induced demyelination. Unfortunately, the degree of demyelination in the cuprizone model can vary, which complicates understanding the process of remyelination. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that the Akt/mTOR pathway regulates active myelination. When given to young postnatal mice, the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits active myelination. In the current study, the cuprizone model was modified by the addition of rapamycin during cuprizone exposure. When administered together, cuprizone and rapamycin produced more complete demyelination and provided a longer time frame over which to investigate remyelination than treatment with cuprizone alone. The consistency in demyelination will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms initiating remyelination. Furthermore, the slower rate of remyelination provides a longer window of time in which to investigate the diverse contributing factors that regulate remyelination. This new model of cuprizone-induced demyelination could potentially aid in identification of new therapeutic targets to enhance remyelination in demyelinating diseases. PMID:25290063

  1. A new model of cuprizone-mediated demyelination/remyelination.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Hilary H; Bercury, Kathryn K; Popescu, Daniela C; Narayanan, S Priya; Macklin, Wendy B

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, result in devastating long-term neurologic damage, in part because of the lack of effective remyelination in the adult human brain. One model used to understand the mechanisms regulating remyelination is cuprizone-induced demyelination, which allows investigation of remyelination mechanisms in adult animals following toxin-induced demyelination. Unfortunately, the degree of demyelination in the cuprizone model can vary, which complicates understanding the process of remyelination. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that the Akt/mTOR pathway regulates active myelination. When given to young postnatal mice, the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits active myelination. In the current study, the cuprizone model was modified by the addition of rapamycin during cuprizone exposure. When administered together, cuprizone and rapamycin produced more complete demyelination and provided a longer time frame over which to investigate remyelination than treatment with cuprizone alone. The consistency in demyelination will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms initiating remyelination. Furthermore, the slower rate of remyelination provides a longer window of time in which to investigate the diverse contributing factors that regulate remyelination. This new model of cuprizone-induced demyelination could potentially aid in identification of new therapeutic targets to enhance remyelination in demyelinating diseases. PMID:25290063

  2. Inherited interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Christine Kim; Raghu, Ganesh

    2004-09-01

    This article focuses on recent advances in the identification of genes and genetic polymorphisms that have been implicated in the development of human interstitial lung diseases. It focuses on the inherited mendelian diseases in which pulmonary fibrosis is part of the clinical phenotype and the genetics of familial idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other rare inherited interstitial lung diseases. The article also reviews the association studies that have been published to date regarding the genetics of sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The reader is directed to recent reviews on human genetic predisposition of sarcoidosis, environmental-related, drug-related, connective tissue related pulmonary fibrosis, and genetic predisposition of fibrosis in animal models. PMID:15331184

  3. Radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, L.B.; Kim, J.Y.; Ceballos, R.

    1985-08-01

    Following surgery for pituitary adenoma, radiation therapy is an accepted treatment in reducing tumor recurrence. However, a potential therapeutic complication is delayed radionecrosis of perisellar neural structures, including the optic nerves and chiasm. This particular cause of visual loss, radiation optic neuropathy (RON), has not been emphasized in the ophthalmologic literature. Four cases of RON seen in the past five years are reported. Diagnostic criteria include: (1) acute visual loss (monocular or binocular), (2) visual field defects indicating optic nerve or chiasmal dysfunction, (3) absence of optic disc edema, (4) onset usually within three years of therapy (peak: 1-1 1/2 years), and (5) no computed tomographic evidence of visual pathway compression. Pathologic findings, differential diagnosis and therapy will be discussed in outlining the clinical profile of RON.

  4. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy for inflammatory neuropathy: current evidence base and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is of proven effect in chronic inflammatory neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). In more recent years, there have been a number of anecdotal case reports and small series, followed by a few trials of variable design, of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in these neuropathies. To date, limited evidence suggests that the subcutaneous route may be a more clinically effective, better-tolerated, at least cost-equivalent and a more patient-friendly option than the still more used intravenous alternative. Long-term efficacy is not as yet established in neuropathic indications by randomised controlled clinical trial evidence, and it is likely that the subcutaneous route may not be suitable in all cases with some hints to this effect appearing from the limited data available to date. Further studies are ongoing, including those of dose comparison, and more are likely to be planned in future. The literature on the use of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in chronic inflammatory neuropathy is reviewed here. The current use in clinical practice, day-to-day benefits, including quality of life measures and health economics as published thus far, are evaluated. The limitations of this form of treatment in CIDP and MMN are also analysed in the light of current literature and taking into account the remaining unknowns. Future prospects and research with this mode of immunoglobulin therapy administration are discussed. PMID:24124042

  5. Grip strength comparison in immune-mediated neuropathies: Vigorimeter vs. Jamar.

    PubMed

    Draak, Thomas H P; Pruppers, Mariëlle H J; van Nes, Sonja I; Vanhoutte, Els K; Bakkers, Mayienne; Gorson, Kenneth C; Van der Pol, W-Ludo; Lewis, Richard A; Notermans, Nicolette C; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Léger, Jean-Marc; Van den Bergh, Peter Y K; Lauria, Giuseppe; Bril, Vera; Katzberg, Hans; Lunn, Michael P T; Pouget, Jean; van der Kooi, Anneke J; van den Berg, Leonard H; van Doorn, Pieter A; Cornblath, David R; Hahn, Angelika F; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J

    2015-09-01

    The Jamar dynamometer and Vigorimeter have been used to assess grip strength in immune-mediated neuropathies, but have never been compared to each other. Therefore, we performed a comparison study between these two devices in patients with immune-mediated neuropathies. Grip strength data were collected in 102 cross-sectional stable and 163 longitudinal (new diagnoses or changing condition) patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), gammopathy-related polyneuropathy (MGUSP), and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Stable patients were assessed twice (validity/reliability studies). Longitudinal patients were assessed 3-5 times during 1 year. Responsiveness comparison between the two tools was examined using combined anchor-/distribution-based minimum clinically important difference (MCID) techniques. Patients were asked to indicate their preference for the Jamar or Vigorimeter. Both tools correlated highly with each other (ρ = 0.86, p < 0.0001) and showed good intra-class correlation coefficients (Jamar [Right/Left hands]: ICC 0.997/0.96; Vigori: ICC 0.95/0.98). Meaningful changes were comparable between the two instruments, being higher in GBS compared to CIDP patients. In MGUSP/MMN poor responsiveness was seen. Significant more patients preferred the Vigorimeter. In conclusion, validity, reliability, and responsiveness aspects were comparable between the Jamar dynamometer and Vigorimeter. However, based on patients' preference, the Vigorimeter is recommended in future studies in immune-mediated neuropathies. PMID:26115516

  6. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... registry health exam . Research on peripheral neuropathy and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... acute or subacute onset may be associated with herbicide exposure. Based on this evidence, VA presumed an ...

  7. Extracellular potentials of myelinated and demyelinated human motor nerve fibres.

    PubMed

    Stephanova, D I; Daskalova, M

    2003-12-01

    The extracellular potentials of myelinated and demyelinated human motor nerve fibres in an unbounded volume conductor are studied. Using our previous double-cable models of normal and demyelinated human fibres, the spatial and temporal intracellular potentials are calculated in the cases of point polarization and adaptation of the fibres. The intracellular potentials are then used as input to a line source model that allows to calculate the corresponding spatial and temporal extracellular potentials at various radial distances in the surrounding volume conductor. Four fibre demyelinations (termed as internodal focal\\systematic and paranodal focal\\systematic demyelinations, respectively) are studied. In all investigated cases, the radial decline of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the extracellular potential depends on the radial distance of the field point and increases with the increase of the distance. The results are consistent with the interpretation that the considerably different spatial and temporal distributions of the extracellular potentials depend not only on the cable properties of the fibres, but on the methods of fibre stimulation. In the case of fibre adaptation, the temporal extracellular potentials in the normal and demyelinated cases correspond well with electromyograms (EMGs) from healthy subjects and patients with demyelinated disorders as reported in the literature. Simulation results indicate that the models used are rather promising tools in studying the main properties of compound action potentials in patients with demyelinated disorders which up till now have not been sufficiently well understood. PMID:14717030

  8. Mitochondrial immobilization mediated by syntaphilin facilitates survival of demyelinated axons

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Nobuhiko; Chiang, Hao; Mahad, Don J.; Kidd, Grahame J.; Liu, LiPing; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Sheng, Zu-Hang; Komuro, Hitoshi; Trapp, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a primary cause of permanent neurological disability in individuals with the CNS demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. Dysfunction of axonal mitochondria and imbalanced energy demand and supply are implicated in degeneration of chronically demyelinated axons. The purpose of this study was to define the roles of mitochondrial volume and distribution in axonal degeneration following acute CNS demyelination. We show that the axonal mitochondrial volume increase following acute demyelination of WT CNS axons does not occur in demyelinated axons deficient in syntaphilin, an axonal molecule that immobilizes stationary mitochondria to microtubules. These findings were supported by time-lapse imaging of WT and syntaphilin-deficient axons in vitro. When demyelinated, axons deficient in syntaphilin degenerate at a significantly greater rate than WT axons, and this degeneration can be rescued by reducing axonal electrical activity with the Na+ channel blocker flecainide. These results support the concept that syntaphilin-mediated immobilization of mitochondria to microtubules is required for the volume increase of axonal mitochondria following acute demyelination and protects against axonal degeneration in the CNS. PMID:24958879

  9. Immunopathophysiology of pediatric CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Rostasy, Kevin; Brück, Wolfgang; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-08-30

    Elucidating pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric-onset CNS demyelinating diseases, particularly those that may distinguish multiple sclerosis (MS) from other entities, promises to both improve diagnostics and guide more-informed therapeutic decisions. Observations that pediatric- and adult-onset MS share the same genetic and environmental risk factors support the view that these conditions represent essentially the same illness manifesting at different ages. Nonetheless, special consideration must be given when CNS inflammation manifests in early life, at a time when multiple organs (including immune and nervous systems) are actively maturing. CSF analysis in pediatric-onset MS points to chronic CNS inflammation, supported by observations from limited pathologic material available for study. Emerging results implicate abnormalities in both effector and regulatory T cell subsets, and potentially immune senescence, in children with MS. Although CNS-directed antibodies (including antibodies recognizing myelin antigens; Kir4.1) can be documented in pediatric-onset MS, their pathophysiologic significance (as in adults) remains unclear. This is in contrast to the presence of serum and/or CSF antibodies recognizing aquaporin-4, which, when measured using validated cell-based assays, supports the diagnosis of a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, distinct from MS. Presence of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies documented with similar cell-based assays may also be associated with pathophysiologically distinct disease phenotypes in children. The substantial impact of pediatric-onset MS on normal brain development and function underscores the importance of elucidating both the immunobiology and neurobiology of disease. Ongoing efforts are aimed at developing and validating biological measures that define pathophysiologically distinct monophasic and chronic forms of pediatric CNS demyelination. PMID:27572856

  10. Abnormal Nerve Conduction Study Findings Indicating the Existence of Peripheral Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica

    PubMed Central

    Warabi, Yoko; Yamazaki, Mikihiro; Shimizu, Toshio; Nagao, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) has been reported in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, there have been limited reports of peripheral neuropathy as a complication of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). In this paper, we showed the characteristics and differences between peripheral neuropathy as a complication of MS and NMO. Method. We analyzed a series of 58 MS and 28 NMO patients and evaluated nerve conduction studies (NCS) in 21 MS and 5 NMO patients. Results. Six of the 58 MS and 3 of the 28 NMO patients revealed abnormal NCS findings. Three (5.2%) of the 58 MS patients fulfilled the criteria for CIDP. One (3.6%) of the 28 NMO patients showed peripheral neuropathy at the same time of NMO relapse, although CIDP was not seen in NMO. The other 5 (3 MS and 2 NMO) patients were complicated with neuropathy caused by concomitant diabetes mellitus and Sjögren's syndrome. Conclusion. Frequency of abnormal NCS findings might exhibit no significant difference between MS and NMO, although the cause and pathophysiology of peripheral neuropathy were different in MS and in NMO. There might be a group of NMO who were affected simultaneously in the central and peripheral nervous tissues. PMID:24308009

  11. Oligodendrocyte ablation as a tool to study demyelinating diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pajoohesh-Ganji, Ahdeah; Miller, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune mediated neurodegenerative disease characterized by demyelination and oligodendrocyte (OL) loss in the central nervous system and accompanied by local inflammation and infiltration of peripheral immune cells. Although many risk factors and symptoms have been identified in MS, the pathology is complicated and the cause remains unknown. It is also unclear whether OL apoptosis precedes the inflammation or whether the local inflammation is the cause of OL death and demyelination. This review briefly discusses several models that have been developed to specifically ablate oligodendrocytes in an effort to separate the effects of demyelination from inflammation. PMID:27482202

  12. Oligodendrocyte ablation as a tool to study demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Pajoohesh-Ganji, Ahdeah; Miller, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune mediated neurodegenerative disease characterized by demyelination and oligodendrocyte (OL) loss in the central nervous system and accompanied by local inflammation and infiltration of peripheral immune cells. Although many risk factors and symptoms have been identified in MS, the pathology is complicated and the cause remains unknown. It is also unclear whether OL apoptosis precedes the inflammation or whether the local inflammation is the cause of OL death and demyelination. This review briefly discusses several models that have been developed to specifically ablate oligodendrocytes in an effort to separate the effects of demyelination from inflammation. PMID:27482202

  13. Optimizing IgG therapy in chronic autoimmune neuropathies: a hypothesis driven approach.

    PubMed

    Berger, Melvin; Allen, Jeffrey A

    2015-03-01

    Prolonged intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy is used for the chronic autoimmune neuropathies chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy, but the doses and treatment intervals are usually chosen empirically due to a paucity of data from dose-response studies. Recent studies of the electrophysiology and immunology of these diseases suggest that antibody-induced reversible dysfunction of nodes of Ranvier may play a role in conduction block and disability which responds to immunotherapy more rapidly than would be expected for demyelination or axonal damage per se. Clinical reports suggest that in some cases, the effects of each dose of IVIG may be transient, wearing-off before the next dose is due. These observations lead us to hypothesize that that therapeutic IgG acts by competing with pathologic autoantibodies and that individual patients may require different IgG levels for optimal therapeutic effects. Frequent IVIG dosing and weekly subcutaneous IgG have been tried as ways of continuously maintaining high serum IgG levels, resulting in stabilization of neuromuscular function in small case series. Frequent grip strength and disability measurements, performed by the patient at home and reported electronically, can be used to assess the extent and duration of responses to IgG doses. Individualization of IgG treatment regimens may optimize efficacy, minimize disability, and identify nonresponders. PMID:25418426

  14. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Sandrock-Lang, Kirstin; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Santoso, Sentot; Zieger, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Inherited platelet disorders may be the cause of bleeding symptoms of varying severity as platelets fail to fulfil their haemostatic role after vessel injury. Platelet disorders may be difficult to diagnose (and are likely to be misdiagnosed) and raise problems in therapy and management. This review explores the clinical and molecular genetic phenotype of several inherited disorders. Inherited platelet disorders can be classified according to their platelet defects: receptor defects (adhesion or aggregation), secretion disorder, and cytoskeleton defects. The best characterized platelet receptor defects are Glanzmann thrombasthenia (integrin αIIbβ3 defect) and Bernard-Soulier syndrome (defect of GPIb/IX/V). Detailed case reports of patients suffering from Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) or Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) showing the bleeding diathesis as well as investigation of platelet aggregation/agglutination and platelet receptor expression will complement this review. In addition, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) as an important defect of δ-granule secretion is extensively described together with a case report of a patient suffering from HPS type 1. PMID:25707719

  15. Loss of Fig4 in both Schwann cells and motor neurons contributes to CMT4J neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, Ilaria; Carbone, Antonietta; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Mironova, Yevgeniya A.; Alberizzi, Valeria; Noseda, Roberta; Rivellini, Cristina; Bianchi, Francesca; Del Carro, Ubaldo; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Lenk, Guy M.; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Giger, Roman J.; Meisler, Miriam H.; Bolino, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of FIG4 are responsible for Yunis-Varón syndrome, familial epilepsy with polymicrogyria, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4J neuropathy (CMT4J). Although loss of the FIG4 phospholipid phosphatase consistently causes decreased PtdIns(3,5)P2 levels, cell-specific sensitivity to partial loss of FIG4 function may differentiate FIG4-associated disorders. CMT4J is an autosomal recessive neuropathy characterized by severe demyelination and axonal loss in human, with both motor and sensory involvement. However, it is unclear whether FIG4 has cell autonomous roles in both motor neurons and Schwann cells, and how loss of FIG4/PtdIns(3,5)P2-mediated functions contribute to the pathogenesis of CMT4J. Here, we report that mice with conditional inactivation of Fig4 in motor neurons display neuronal and axonal degeneration. In contrast, conditional inactivation of Fig4 in Schwann cells causes demyelination and defects in autophagy-mediated degradation. Moreover, Fig4-regulated endolysosomal trafficking in Schwann cells is essential for myelin biogenesis during development and for proper regeneration/remyelination after injury. Our data suggest that impaired endolysosomal trafficking in both motor neurons and Schwann cells contributes to CMT4J neuropathy. PMID:25187576

  16. Loss of Fig4 in both Schwann cells and motor neurons contributes to CMT4J neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vaccari, Ilaria; Carbone, Antonietta; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Mironova, Yevgeniya A; Alberizzi, Valeria; Noseda, Roberta; Rivellini, Cristina; Bianchi, Francesca; Del Carro, Ubaldo; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Lenk, Guy M; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Giger, Roman J; Meisler, Miriam H; Bolino, Alessandra

    2015-01-15

    Mutations of FIG4 are responsible for Yunis-Varón syndrome, familial epilepsy with polymicrogyria, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4J neuropathy (CMT4J). Although loss of the FIG4 phospholipid phosphatase consistently causes decreased PtdIns(3,5)P₂ levels, cell-specific sensitivity to partial loss of FIG4 function may differentiate FIG4-associated disorders. CMT4J is an autosomal recessive neuropathy characterized by severe demyelination and axonal loss in human, with both motor and sensory involvement. However, it is unclear whether FIG4 has cell autonomous roles in both motor neurons and Schwann cells, and how loss of FIG4/PtdIns(3,5)P₂-mediated functions contribute to the pathogenesis of CMT4J. Here, we report that mice with conditional inactivation of Fig4 in motor neurons display neuronal and axonal degeneration. In contrast, conditional inactivation of Fig4 in Schwann cells causes demyelination and defects in autophagy-mediated degradation. Moreover, Fig4-regulated endolysosomal trafficking in Schwann cells is essential for myelin biogenesis during development and for proper regeneration/remyelination after injury. Our data suggest that impaired endolysosomal trafficking in both motor neurons and Schwann cells contributes to CMT4J neuropathy. PMID:25187576

  17. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  18. Cuprizone-induced demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation result in different proton magnetic resonance metabolite spectra

    PubMed Central

    Praet, Jelle; Orije, Jasmien; Kara, Firat; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Santermans, Eva; Daans, Jasmijn; Hens, Niel; Verhoye, Marleen; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    Conventional MRI is frequently used during the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis but provides only little additional pathological information. Proton MRS (1H-MRS), however, provides biochemical information on the lesion pathology by visualization of a spectrum of metabolites. In this study we aimed to better understand the changes in metabolite concentrations following demyelination of the white matter. Therefore, we used the cuprizone model, a well-established mouse model to mimic type III human multiple sclerosis demyelinating lesions. First, we identified CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling as a major regulator of microglial activity in the cuprizone mouse model. Compared with control groups (heterozygous CX3CR1+/− C57BL/6 mice and wild type CX3CR1+/+ C57BL/6 mice), microgliosis, astrogliosis, oligodendrocyte cell death and demyelination were shown to be highly reduced or absent in CX3CR1−/− C57BL/6 mice. Second, we show that 1H-MRS metabolite spectra are different when comparing cuprizone-treated CX3CR1−/− mice showing mild demyelination with cuprizone-treated CX3CR1+/+ mice showing severe demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation. Following cuprizone treatment, CX3CR1+/+ mice show a decrease in the Glu, tCho and tNAA concentrations as well as an increased Tau concentration. In contrast, following cuprizone treatment CX3CR1−/− mice only showed a decrease in tCho and tNAA concentrations. Therefore, 1H-MRS might possibly allow us to discriminate demyelination from demyelination-associated inflammation via changes in Tau and Glu concentration. In addition, the observed decrease in tCho concentration in cuprizone-induced demyelinating lesions should be further explored as a possible diagnostic tool for the early identification of human MS type III lesions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25802215

  19. Evaluation and prevention of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Aring, Ann M; Jones, David E; Falko, James M

    2005-06-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a debilitating disorder that occurs in nearly 50 percent of patients with diabetes. It is a late finding in type 1 diabetes but can be an early finding in type 2 diabetes. The primary types of diabetic neuropathy are sensorimotor and autonomic. Patients may present with only one type of diabetic neuropathy or may develop combinations of neuropathies (e.g., distal symmetric polyneuropathy and autonomic neuropathy). Distal symmetric polyneuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy also can cause motor deficits, silent cardiac ischemia, orthostatic hypotension, vasomotor instability, hyperhidrosis, gastroparesis, bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction. Strict glycemic control and good daily foot care are key to preventing complications of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:15952441

  20. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kostianovsky, Alex; Maskin, Patricio; Noriega, María M.; Soler, Cristina; Bonelli, Ignacio; Riley, Claire S.; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Saubidet, Cristi´n López; Alvarez, Paulino A.

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts. PMID:21738505

  1. Overlapping demyelinating syndromes and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Titulaer, Maarten J.; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Leypoldt, Frank; McCracken, Lindsey; Cellucci, Tania; Benson, Leslie A.; Shu, Huidy; Irioka, Takashi; Hirano, Makito; Singh, Gagandeep; Calvo, Alvaro Cobo; Kaida, Kenichi; Morales, Pamela S.; Wirtz, Paul W.; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical, radiological, and immunological association of demyelinating disorders with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Methods Clinical and radiological analysis of a cohort of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Determination of antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was performed using brain immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. Results Twenty-three of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis had prominent MRI and/or clinical features of demyelination. Group 1 included 12 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis was preceded or followed by independent episodes of NMO-spectrum disorder (5 cases, 4 anti-AQP4-positive), or brainstem or multifocal demyelinating syndromes (7 cases, all anti-MOG-positive). Group 2 included 11 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis occurred simultaneously with MRI and symptoms compatible with demyelination (5 AQ4-positive, 2 MOG-positive). Group 3 (136 controls) included 50 randomly selected patients with typical anti-NMDAR encephalitis, 56 with NMO, and 30 with multiple sclerosis: NMDAR-antibodies were detected only in the 50 anti-NMDAR patients, MOG-antibodies in 3/50 anti-NMDAR and 1/56 NMO patients, and AQP4-antibodies in 48/56 NMO and 1/50 anti-NMDAR patients (p<0.0001 for all comparisons with Groups 1 and 2). Most patients improved with immunotherapy, but compared with anti-NMDAR encephalitis the demyelinating episodes required more intensive therapy and resulted in more residual deficits. Only 1/23 NMDAR patients with signs of demyelination had ovarian teratoma compared with 18/50 anti-NMDAR controls (p=0.011) Interpretation Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis may develop concurrent or separate episodes of demyelinating disorders, and conversely patients with NMO or demyelinating disorders with atypical symptoms (e.g., dyskinesias, psychosis) may have anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:24700511

  2. Generalized pruritus preceding paraneoplastic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hébant, Benjamin; Miret, Nicolas; Berthelot, Lucile; Jaafar, Mohamad; Maltête, David; Lefaucheur, Romain

    2016-04-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are a group of rare disorders involving non-metastatic systemic effects accompanying malignancies, and occur remotely from the tumor itself. Chronic pruritus lasting more than 6 weeks can be from paraneoplastic origin. A 65-year-old woman was admitted for generalized pruritus lasting for 1 month, despite treatment with prednisolone, levocetirizine and hydroxyzine. General examination was normal. Biological data and gastroscopy were normal. One month later, the patient was readmitted for worsening of her pruritus and walking impairment, revealing a severe sensory neuropathy. Blood anti-Hu antibodies returned positive at a level of 400 (normal <100). Bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsies revealed small-cell lung carcinoma. To our knowledge, the association of generalized pruritus and paraneoplastic neuropathy has been rarely reported. Our observation raises the question of a pathophysiological continuum between pruritus and neuropathy in a paraneoplastic context. PMID:26633089

  3. Paraproteinemic neuropathy: a practical review.

    PubMed

    Rison, Richard A; Beydoun, Said R

    2016-01-01

    The term paraproteinemic neuropathy describes a heterogeneous set of neuropathies characterized by the presence of homogeneous immunoglobulin in the serum. An abnormal clonal proliferation of B-lymphocytes or plasma cells, which may or may not occur in the context of a hematologic malignancy, produces the immunoglobulins in excess. If malignancy is identified, treatment should be targeted to the neoplasm. Most cases, however, occur as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Few prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are available to inform the management of paraproteinemic neuropathies. Clinical experience combined with data from smaller, uncontrolled studies provide a basis for recommendations, which depend on the specific clinical setting in which the paraprotein occurs. In this review, we provide a clinically practical approach to diagnosis and management of such patients. PMID:26821540

  4. Ulnar neuropathy: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Dy, Christopher J; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2016-06-01

    Ulnar neuropathy is commonly encountered, both acutely after elbow trauma and in the setting of chronic compression neuropathy. Careful clinical evaluation and discerning evaluation of electrodiagnostic studies are helpful in determining the prognosis of recovery with nonoperative and operative management. Appreciation of the subtleties in clinical presentation and thoughtful consideration of the timing and type of surgical intervention are critical to optimizing outcomes after treatment of ulnar neuropathy. The potential need for decompression at both the cubital tunnel and Guyon's canal must be appreciated. Supplementation of decompression with supercharged end-to-side nerve transfer can expedite motor recovery of the ulnar intrinsic muscles in the appropriately selected patient. The emergence of nerve transfer techniques has also changed the management of acute ulnar nerve injuries. PMID:27080868

  5. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise. PMID:26927864

  6. Complexity of the Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathies: Clinical and Cellular Characterization of the MPZ p.D90E Mutation.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Vincenzo; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Sancho, Paula; Calpena, Eduardo; Gutiérrez-Molina, Manuel; Mateo-Martínez, Gonzalo; Espinós, Carmen; Arriola-Pereda, Gema

    2015-10-01

    Early-onset hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies are rare diseases representing a broad clinical and genetic spectrum. Without a notable familial history, the clinical diagnosis is complicated because acquired causes of peripheral neuropathy, such as inflammatory neuropathies, neuropathies with toxic causes, and nutritional deficiencies, must be considered. We examined the clinical, electrophysiological, and pathologic manifestations of a boy with an initial diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. The progression of the disease despite treatment led to a suspicion of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. Genetic testing revealed the presence of the MPZ p.D90E mutation in heterozygosis. To clarify the pathogenicity of this mutation and achieve a conclusive diagnosis, we investigated the MPZ p.D90E mutation through in silico and cellular approaches. This study broadens the clinical phenotype of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy due to MPZ mutation and emphasises the difficulty of achieving an accurate genetic diagnosis in a sporadic patient to provide an appropriate pharmacologic treatment. PMID:25694466

  7. Sulfatide levels correlate with severity of neuropathy in metachromatic leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Dali, Christine í; Barton, Norman W; Farah, Mohamed H; Moldovan, Mihai; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Nair, Nitin; Dunø, Morten; Risom, Lotte; Cao, Hongmei; Pan, Luying; Sellos-Moura, Marcia; Corse, Andrea M; Krarup, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder due to deficient activity of arylsulfatase A (ASA) that causes accumulation of sulfatide and lysosulfatide. The disorder is associated with demyelination and axonal loss in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The late infantile form has an early-onset, rapidly progressive course with severe sensorimotor dysfunction. The relationship between the degree of nerve damage and (lyso)sulfatide accumulation is, however, not established. Methods In 13 children aged 2–5 years with severe motor impairment, markedly elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and sural nerve sulfatide and lysosulfatide levels, genotype, ASA mRNA levels, residual ASA, and protein cross-reactive immunological material (CRIM) confirmed the diagnosis. We studied the relationship between (lyso)sulfatide levels and (1) the clinical deficit in gross motor function (GMFM-88), (2) median and peroneal nerve motor and median and sural nerve sensory conduction studies (NCS), (3) median and tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs), (4) sural nerve histopathology, and (5) brain MR spectroscopy. Results Eleven patients had a sensory-motor demyelinating neuropathy on electrophysiological testing, whereas two patients had normal studies. Sural nerve and CSF (lyso)sulfatide levels strongly correlated with abnormalities in electrophysiological parameters and large myelinated fiber loss in the sural nerve, but there were no associations between (lyso)sulfatide levels and measures of central nervous system (CNS) involvement (GMFM-88 score, SSEP, and MR spectroscopy). Interpretation Nerve and CSF sulfatide and lysosulfatide accumulation provides a marker of disease severity in the PNS only; it does not reflect the extent of CNS involvement by the disease process. The magnitude of the biochemical disturbance produces a continuously graded spectrum of impairments in neurophysiological function and sural

  8. Inheritance of Cytosine Methylation.

    PubMed

    Tillo, Desiree; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Vinson, Charles

    2016-11-01

    There are numerous examples of parental transgenerational inheritance that is epigenetic. The informational molecules include RNA, chromatin modifications, and cytosine methylation. With advances in DNA sequencing technologies, the molecular and epigenetic mechanisms mediating these effects are now starting to be uncovered. This mini-review will highlight some of the examples of epigenetic inheritance, the establishment of cytosine methylation in sperm, and recent genomic studies linking sperm cytosine methylation to epigenetic effects on offspring. A recent paper examining changes in diet and sperm cytosine methylation from pools of eight animals each, found differences between a normal diet, a high fat diet, and a low protein diet. However, epivariation between individuals within a group was greater than the differences between groups obscuring any potential methylation changes linked to diet. Learning more about epivariation may help unravel the mechanisms that regulate cytosine methylation. In addition, other experimental and genetic systems may also produce more dramatic changes in the sperm methylome, making it easier to unravel potential transgenerational phenomena. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2346-2352, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26910768

  9. Oxidative Stress and Neurobiology of Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    Despite a large amount of research which aims at defining the pathophysiology of human demyelination (i.e., multiple sclerosis), etiological bases of disease have been unknown so far. The point of intersection of all assumed etiological factors, which are mainly based upon immunological cascades, is neuroinflammation. The precise definition of the place and role of all pathogenetic factors in the occurrence and development of the disease is of crucial importance for understanding the clinical nature and for finding more effective therapeutic options. There are few studies whose results give more precise data about the role and the importance of other factors in neuroinflammation, besides immunological ones, with regard to clinical and paraclinical correlates of the disease. The review integrates results found in previously performed studies which have evaluated oxidative stress participation in early and late neuroinflammation. The largest number of studies indicates that the use of antioxidants affects the change of neuroinflammation course under experimental conditions, which is reflected in the reduction of the severity and the total reversibility in clinical presentation of the disease, the faster achieving of remission, and the delayed and slow course of neuroinflammation. Therapies based on the knowledge of redox biology targeting free radical generation hold great promise in modulation of the neuroinflammation and its clinical presentations. PMID:25502298

  10. Coexistence of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and anti-MAG neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Salsano, Ettore; Ciano, Claudia; Palamara, Luisa; Morbin, Michela; Pareyson, Davide

    2013-06-01

    At age 35, a man with a genetic diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) but no family history of neuropathy and no clinical symptoms developed rapidly progressive loss of balance, distal limb numbness, loss of manual dexterity, and hand tremor. Five years later, he walked with support and had mild pes cavus, marked sensory ataxia, severe leg and hand weakness, absent deep tendon reflexes (DTRs), severe sensory loss, and hand tremor. He had dramatically reduced motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), strikingly prolonged motor distal latencies, absent sensory action potentials and lower limb compound muscle action potentials. CMT1A duplication was reconfirmed but the dramatic change in his clinical course suggested a superimposed acquired neuropathy. An IgM-kappa monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS) with high titer anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) activity was found. Nerve biopsy showed severe loss of myelinated fibers with onion bulbs, no evidence of uncompacted myelin, and few IgM deposits. Rituximab was given and he improved. It is very likely that this is a chance association of two rare and slowly progressive neuropathies; rapidly worsening course may have been due to a "double hit". Interestingly, there are reports of possible superimposition of dysimmune neuropathies on hereditary ones, and the influence of the immune system on inherited neuropathies is matter for debate. PMID:23781967