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Sample records for inhibit ligand-dependent transactivation

  1. PLZF-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins generated from the variant t(11; 17)(q23; q21) translocation in acute promyelocytic leukemia inhibit ligand-dependent transactivation of wild-type retinoic acid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan; Wang, Zhen-Yi ); Guidez, F.; Rousselot, P.; Agadir, A.; Degos, L.; Chomienne, C. ); Zelent, A. ); Waxman, S. )

    1994-02-01

    Recently, the authors described a recurrent variant translocation, t(11;17)(q23;q21), in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) which juxtaposes PLZF, a gene encoding a zinc finger protein, to RARA, encoding retinoic acid receptor [alpha] (RAR[alpha]). They have now cloned cDNAs encoding PLZF-RAR[alpha] chimeric proteins and studied their transactivating activities. In transient-expression assays, both the PLZF(A)-RAR[alpha] and PLZF(B)-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins like the PML-RAR[alpha] protein resulting from the well-known t(15;17) translocation in APL, antagonized endogenous and transfected wild-type RAR[alpha] in the presence of retinoic acid. Cotransfection assays showed that a significant repression of RAR[alpha] transactivation activity was obtained even with a very low PLZF-RAR[alpha]-expressing plasmid concentration. A [open quotes]dominant negative[close quotes] effect was observed with vectors expressing RAR[alpha] and retinoid X receptor [alpha] (RXR[alpha]). These abnormal transactivation properties observed in retinoic acid-sensitive myeloid cells strongly implicate the PLZF-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins in the molecular pathogenesis of APL.

  2. PLZF-RAR alpha fusion proteins generated from the variant t(11;17)(q23;q21) translocation in acute promyelocytic leukemia inhibit ligand-dependent transactivation of wild-type retinoic acid receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z; Guidez, F; Rousselot, P; Agadir, A; Chen, S J; Wang, Z Y; Degos, L; Zelent, A; Waxman, S; Chomienne, C

    1994-01-01

    Recently, we described a recurrent variant translocation, t(11;17)(q23;q21), in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) which juxtaposes PLZF, a gene encoding a zinc finger protein, to RARA, encoding retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha). We have now cloned cDNAs encoding PLZF-RAR alpha chimeric proteins and studied their transactivating activities. In transient-expression assays, both the PLZF(A)-RAR alpha and PLZF(B)-RAR alpha fusion proteins like the PML-RAR alpha protein resulting from the well-known t(15;17) translocation in APL, antagonized endogenous and transfected wild-type RAR alpha in the presence of retinoic acid. Cotransfection assays showed that a significant repression of RAR alpha transactivation activity was obtained even with a very low PLZF-RAR alpha-expressing plasmid concentration. A "dominant negative" effect was observed when PLZF-RAR alpha fusion proteins were cotransfected with vectors expressing RAR alpha and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha). These abnormal transactivation properties observed in retinoic acid-sensitive myeloid cells strongly implicate the PLZF-RAR alpha fusion proteins in the molecular pathogenesis of APL. Images PMID:8302850

  3. ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transactivation in adipocyte cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Jung, Myeong Ho

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transcriptional activation. • ATF3 interacts with PPARγ. • ATF3 suppresses p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation. • ATF3 decreases the binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE. - Abstract: Previously, we reported that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) downregulates peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPARγ) gene expression and inhibits adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. Here, we investigated another role of ATF3 on the regulation of PPARγ activity. ATF3 inhibited PPARγ-stimulated transactivation of PPARγ responsive element (PPRE)-containing reporter or GAL4/PPARγ chimeric reporter. Thus, ATF3 effectively repressed rosiglitazone-stimulated expression of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2), PPARγ target gene, in 3T3-L1 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that ATF3 interacted with PPARγ. Accordingly, ATF3 prevented PPARγ from binding to PPRE on the aP2 promoter. Furthermore, ATF3 suppressed p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation of PPRE-containing reporter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that overexpression of ATF3 blocked both binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE on aP2 promoter induced by rosiglitazone treatment in 3T3-L1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that ATF3 interacts with PPARγ and represses PPARγ-mediated transactivation through suppression of p300-stimulated coactivation in 3T3-L1 cells, which may play a role in inhibition of adipocyte differentiation.

  4. Baicalein exhibits anti-inflammatory effects via inhibition of NF-κB transactivation.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Sharma, Deepak; Thoh, Maikho; Checker, Rahul; Sandur, Santosh K

    2016-05-15

    NF-κB is a crucial mediator of inflammatory and immune responses and a number of phytochemicals that can suppress this immune-regulatory transcription factor are known to have promising anti-inflammatory potential. However, we report that inducer of pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB functions as an anti-inflammatory agent. Our findings reveal that a plant derived flavonoid baicalein could suppress mitogen induced T cell activation, proliferation and cytokine secretion. Treatment of CD4+ T cells with baicalein prior to transfer in to lymphopenic allogenic host significantly suppressed graft versus host disease. Interestingly, addition of baicalein to murine splenic lymphocytes induced DNA binding of NF-κB but did not suppress Concanavalin A induced NF-κB. Since baicalein did not inhibit NF-κB binding to DNA, we hypothesized that baicalein may be suppressing NF-κB trans-activation. Thioredoxin system is implicated in the regulation of NF-κB trans-activation potential and therefore inhibition of thioredoxin system may be responsible for suppression of NF-κB dependent genes. Baicalein not only inhibited TrxR activity in cell free system but also suppressed mitogen induced thioredoxin activity in the nuclear compartment of lymphocytes. Similar to baicalein, pharmacological inhibitors of thioredoxin system also could suppress mitogen induced T cell proliferation without inhibiting DNA binding of NF-κB. Further, activation of cellular thioredoxin system by the use of pharmacological activator or over-expression of thioredoxin could abrogate the anti-inflammatory action of baicalein. We propose a novel strategy using baicalein to limit NF-κB dependent inflammatory responses via inhibition of thioredoxin system. PMID:27019135

  5. Inhibition of the HIV Rev transactivator : a new target for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Heguy, A

    1997-01-01

    The viral transactivator Rev is essential for HIV replication, since it allows the nuclear export of unspliced and partially spliced viral mRNAs that encode the structural proteins. Rev is an RNA binding protein that interacts with a highly structured RNA element, the RRE, found within the envelope sequences. This viral protein also interacts with cellular proteins, termed nucleoporins, and acts as an adaptor between the viral mRNAs and the cellular nuclear export machinery. Both interactions are specific, and required for Rev function. Because of its crucial role in the HIV replication cycle, and its novel mechanism of action, Rev represents an ideal target for therapeutic intervention. This review describes the efforts towards Rev inhibition. Gene therapy approaches, including the expression of trans-dominant mutants and RNA decoys, as well as antisense therapies and small molecule inhibitors of Rev-RRE binding or Rev interaction with the cellular machinery will be discussed PMID:9206979

  6. A small molecule directly inhibits the p53 transactivation domain from binding to replication protein A

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Carnes, Katie A.; Soto, Patricia; Liu, Shengqin; Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Oakley, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), essential for DNA replication, repair and DNA damage signalling, possesses six ssDNA-binding domains (DBDs), including DBD-F on the N-terminus of the largest subunit, RPA70. This domain functions as a binding site for p53 and other DNA damage and repair proteins that contain amphipathic alpha helical domains. Here, we demonstrate direct binding of both ssDNA and the transactivation domain 2 of p53 (p53TAD2) to DBD-F, as well as DBD-F-directed dsDNA strand separation by RPA, all of which are inhibited by fumaropimaric acid (FPA). FPA binds directly to RPA, resulting in a conformational shift as determined through quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in full length RPA. Structural analogues of FPA provide insight on chemical properties that are required for inhibition. Finally, we confirm the inability of RPA possessing R41E and R43E mutations to bind to p53, destabilize dsDNA and quench tryptophan fluorescence by FPA, suggesting that protein binding, DNA modulation and inhibitor binding all occur within the same site on DBD-F. The disruption of p53–RPA interactions by FPA may disturb the regulatory functions of p53 and RPA, thereby inhibiting cellular pathways that control the cell cycle and maintain the integrity of the human genome. PMID:23267009

  7. Angiotensin-(1-7) inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saghir; Yousif, Mariam HM; Dhaunsi, Gursev S; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Al-Farsi, Omama; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The transactivation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor appears to be an important central transduction mechanism in mediating diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] via its Mas receptor can prevent the development of hyperglycaemia-induced cardiovascular complications. Here, we investigated whether Ang-(1-7) can inhibit hyperglycaemia-induced EGF receptor transactivation and its classical signalling via ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in vivo and in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were chronically treated with Ang-(1-7) or AG1478, a selective EGF receptor inhibitor, for 4 weeks and mechanistic studies performed in the isolated mesenteric vasculature bed as well as in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). KEY RESULTS Diabetes significantly enhanced phosphorylation of EGF receptor at tyrosine residues Y992, Y1068, Y1086, Y1148, as well as ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in the mesenteric vasculature bed whereas these changes were significantly attenuated upon Ang-(1–7) or AG1478 treatment. In VSMCs grown in conditions of high glucose (25 mM), an Src-dependent elevation in EGF receptor phosphorylation was observed. Ang-(1-7) inhibited both Ang II- and glucose-induced transactivation of EGF receptor. The inhibition of high glucose-mediated Src-dependant transactivation of EGF receptor by Ang-(1-7) could be prevented by a selective Mas receptor antagonist, D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results show for the first time that Ang-(1-7) inhibits EGF receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor/Src-dependent pathway and might represent a novel general mechanism by which Ang-(1-7) exerts its beneficial effects in many disease states including diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. PMID:21806601

  8. Angiotensin-induced EGF receptor transactivation inhibits insulin signaling in C9 hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Arellano-Plancarte, Araceli; Hernandez-Aranda, Judith; Catt, Kevin J.; Olivares-Reyes, J. Alberto

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential interactions between the angiotensin II (Ang II) and insulin signaling systems, regulation of IRS-1 phosphorylation and insulin-induced Akt activation by Ang II were examined in clone 9 (C9) hepatocytes. In these cells, Ang II specifically inhibited activation of insulin-induced Akt Thr308 and its immediate downstream substrate GSK-3α/β in a time-dependent fashion, with ∼70% reduction at 15min. These inhibitory actions were associated with increased IRS-1 phosphorylation of Ser636/Ser639 that was prevented by selective blockade of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity with AG1478. Previous studies have shown that insulin-induced phosphorylation of IRS-1 on Ser636/Ser639 is mediated mainly by the PI3K/mTOR/S6K-1 sequence. Studies with specific inhibitors of PI3K (wortmannin) and mTOR (rapamycin) revealed that Ang II stimulates IRS-1 phosphorylation of Ser636/Ser639 via the PI3K/mTOR/S6K-1 pathway. Both inhibitors blocked the effect of Ang II on insulin-induced activation of Akt. Studies using the specific MEK inhibitor, PD98059, revealed that ERK1/2 activation also mediates Ang II-induced S6K-1 and IRS-1 phosphorylation, and the impairment of Akt Thr308 and GSK-3α/β phosphorylation. Further studies with selective inhibitors showed that PI3K activation was upstream of ERK, suggesting a new mechanism for Ang II-induced impairment of insulin signaling. These findings indicate that Ang II has a significant role in the development of insulin resistance by a mechanism that involves EGFR transactivation and the PI3K/ERK1/2/mTOR-S6K-1 pathway. PMID:19879250

  9. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester downregulates phospholipase D1 via direct binding and inhibition of NFκB transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Mi Hee; Kang, Dong Woo; Jung, Yunjin; Choi, Kang-Yell; Min, Do Sik

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •We found CAFÉ, a natural product that suppresses expression and activity of PLD1. •CAPE decreased PLD1 expression by inhibiting NFκB transactivation. •CAPE rapidly inhibited PLD activity via its binding to a Cys837 of PLD1. •PLD1 downregulation by CAPE inhibited invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. -- Abstract: Upregulation of phospholipase D (PLD) is functionally linked with oncogenic signals and tumorigenesis. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active compound of propolis extract that exhibits anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and antineoplastic properties. In this study, we demonstrated that CAPE suppressed the expression of PLD1 at the transcriptional level via inhibition of binding of NFκB to PLD1 promoter. Moreover, CAPE, but not its analogs, bound to a Cys837 residue of PLD1 and inhibited enzymatic activity of PLD. CAPE also decreased activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 induced by phosphatidic acid, a product of PLD activity. Ultimately, CAPE-induced downregulation of PLD1 suppressed invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that CAPE might contribute to anti-neoplastic effect by targeting PLD1.

  10. Orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner inhibits transforming growth factor-beta signaling by repressing SMAD3 transactivation.

    PubMed

    Suh, Ji Ho; Huang, Jiansheng; Park, Yun-Yong; Seong, Hyun-A; Kim, Dongwook; Shong, Minho; Ha, Hyunjung; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Keesook; Wang, Li; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2006-12-22

    Orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor superfamily; SHP regulates the nuclear receptor-mediated transcription of target genes but lacks a conventional DNA binding domain. In this study, we demonstrate that SHP represses transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)-induced gene expression through a direct interaction with Smad, a transducer of TGF-beta signaling. Transient transfection studies demonstrate that SHP represses Smad3-induced transcription. In vivo and in vitro protein interaction assays revealed that SHP directly interacts with Smad2 and Smad3 but not with Smad4. Mapping of domains mediating the interaction between SHP and Smad3 showed that the entire N-terminal domain (1-159 amino acids) of SHP and the linker domain of Smad3 are involved in this interaction. In vitro glutathione S-transferase pulldown competition experiments revealed the SHP-mediated repression of Smad3 transactivation through competition with its co-activator p300. SHP also inhibits the activation of endogenous TGF-beta-responsive gene promoters, the p21, Smad7, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoters. Moreover, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of SHP decreases PAI-1 mRNA levels, and down-regulation of SHP by a small interfering RNA increases both the transactivation of Smad3 and the PAI-1 mRNA levels. Finally, the PAI-1 gene is expressed in SHP(-/-) mouse hepatocytes at a higher level than in normal hepatocytes. Taken together, these data indicate that SHP is a novel co-regulator of Smad3, and this study provides new insights into regulation of TGF-beta signaling. PMID:17074765

  11. Molecular and cellular correlates of the CIITA-mediated inhibition of HTLV-2 Tax-2 transactivator function resulting in loss of viral replication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MHC class II transactivator CIITA inhibits the function of HTLV-2 Tax-2 viral transactivator and, consequently, the replication of the virus in infected cells. Moreover overexpression of the nuclear factor NF-YB, that cooperates with CIITA for the expression of MHC class II genes, results also in inhibition of Tax-2 transactivation. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the cellular and molecular basis of the CIITA-mediated inhibition on Tax-2, and the relative role of NF-YB in this phenomenon. Methods By co-immunoprecipitation of lysates from 293T cells cotransfected with CIITA or fragments of it, and Tax-2 it was assessed whether the two factors interact in vivo. A similar approach was used to assess Tax-2-NF-YB interaction. In parallel, deletion fragments of CIITA were tested for the inhibition of Tax-2-dependent HTLV-2 LTR-luciferase transactivation. Subcellular localization of CIITA and Tax-2 was investigated by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results CIITA and Tax-2 interact in vivo through at least two independent regions, at the 1-252 N-term and at the 410-1130 C-term, respectively. Interestingly only the 1-252 N-term region mediates Tax-2 functional inhibition. CIITA and Tax-2 are localized both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, when separately expressed. Instead, when coexpressed, most of Tax-2 colocalize with CIITA in cytoplasm and around the nuclear membrane. The Tax-2 minor remaining nuclear portion also co-localizes with CIITA. Interestingly, when CIITA nucleus-cytoplasm shuttling is blocked by leptomycin B treatment, most of the Tax-2 molecules are also blocked and co-localize with CIITA in the nucleus, suggesting that CIITA-Tax-2 binding does not preclude Tax-2 entry into the nucleus. Finally, the nuclear factor NF-YB, also strongly binds to Tax-2. Notably, although endogenous NF-YB does not inhibit Tax-2-dependent HTLV-2 LTR transactivation, it still binds to Tax-2, and in presence of CIITA, this binding seems to

  12. APOBEC3G inhibits HIV-1 RNA elongation by inactivating the viral trans-activation response element.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-07-29

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. dC-to-dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defense against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. We further show that free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3'+5' ends is sufficient for A3G deamination. These results identify A3G as an efficient mutator and that deamination of (-)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:24859335

  13. APOBEC3G Inhibits HIV-1 RNA Elongation by Inactivating the Viral Trans-Activation Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA (vDNA) is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient HIV-1 replication. dC to dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defence against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. Finally, we show that free ssDNA termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3′+5′ ends is sufficient for A3G deamination, identifying A3G as an efficient mutator, and that deamination of (−)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:24859335

  14. Synthesis, cellular uptake and HIV-1 Tat-dependent trans-activation inhibition activity of oligonucleotide analogues disulphide-conjugated to cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Turner, John J.; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Gait, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Oligonucleotides composed of 2′-O-methyl and locked nucleic acid residues complementary to HIV-1 trans-activation responsive element TAR block Tat-dependent trans-activation in a HeLa cell assay when delivered by cationic lipids. We describe an improved procedure for synthesis and purification under highly denaturing conditions of 5′-disulphide-linked conjugates of 3′-fluorescein labelled oligonucleotides with a range of cell-penetrating peptides and investigate their abilities to enter HeLa cells and block trans-activation. Free uptake of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide conjugates to Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9F2 was observed in cytosolic compartments of HeLa cells. Uptake of the Tat conjugate was enhanced by N-terminal addition of four Lys or Arg residues or a second Tat peptide. None of the conjugates entered the nucleus or inhibited trans-activation when freely delivered, but inhibition was obtained in the presence of cationic lipids. Nuclear exclusion was seen for free delivery of Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9 conjugates of 16mer phosphorothioate OMe oligonucleotide. Uptake into human fibroblast cytosolic compartments was seen for Tat, Penetratin, R9F2 and Transportan conjugates. Large enhancements of HeLa cell uptake into cytosolic compartments were seen when free Tat peptide was added to Tat conjugate of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide or Penetratin peptide to Penetratin conjugate of the same oligonucleotide. PMID:15640444

  15. Transactivation of ErbB Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Is Inhibited by Angiotensin-(1-7) via Its Mas Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saghir; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Attur, Sreeja; Dhaunsi, Gursev S.; Yousif, Mariam H. M.; Benter, Ibrahim F.

    2015-01-01

    Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB) family members, namely EGFR and ErbB2, appears important in the development of diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. Angiotensin-(1–7) [Ang-(1–7)] can prevent the development of hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications partly through inhibiting EGFR transactivation. Here, we investigated whether Ang-(1–7) can inhibit transactivation of ErbB2 as well as other ErbB receptors in vivo and in vitro. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were chronically treated with Ang-(1–7) or AG825, a selective ErbB2 inhibitor, for 4 weeks and mechanistic studies performed in the isolated mesenteric vasculature bed as well as in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Ang-(1–7) or AG825 treatment inhibited diabetes-induced phosphorylation of ErbB2 receptor at tyrosine residues Y1221/22, Y1248, Y877, as well as downstream signaling via ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, ROCK, eNOS and IkB-α in the mesenteric vascular bed. In VSMCs cultured in high glucose (25 mM), Ang-(1–7) inhibited src-dependent ErbB2 transactivation that was opposed by the selective Mas receptor antagonist, D-Pro7-Ang-(1–7). Ang-(1–7) via Mas receptor also inhibited both Angiotensin II- and noradrenaline/norephinephrine-induced transactivation of ErbB2 and/or EGFR receptors. Further, hyperglycemia-induced transactivation of ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors could be attenuated by Ang-(1–7) that could be prevented by D-Pro7-Ang-(1–7) in VSMC. These data suggest that Ang-(1–7) via its Mas receptor acts as a pan-ErbB inhibitor and might represent a novel general mechanism by which Ang-(1–7) exerts its beneficial effects in many disease states including diabetes-induced vascular complications. PMID:26536590

  16. Transactivation of ErbB Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Is Inhibited by Angiotensin-(1-7) via Its Mas Receptor.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saghir; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Attur, Sreeja; Dhaunsi, Gursev S; Yousif, Mariam H M; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2015-01-01

    Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB) family members, namely EGFR and ErbB2, appears important in the development of diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] can prevent the development of hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications partly through inhibiting EGFR transactivation. Here, we investigated whether Ang-(1-7) can inhibit transactivation of ErbB2 as well as other ErbB receptors in vivo and in vitro. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were chronically treated with Ang-(1-7) or AG825, a selective ErbB2 inhibitor, for 4 weeks and mechanistic studies performed in the isolated mesenteric vasculature bed as well as in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Ang-(1-7) or AG825 treatment inhibited diabetes-induced phosphorylation of ErbB2 receptor at tyrosine residues Y1221/22, Y1248, Y877, as well as downstream signaling via ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, ROCK, eNOS and IkB-α in the mesenteric vascular bed. In VSMCs cultured in high glucose (25 mM), Ang-(1-7) inhibited src-dependent ErbB2 transactivation that was opposed by the selective Mas receptor antagonist, D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7). Ang-(1-7) via Mas receptor also inhibited both Angiotensin II- and noradrenaline/norephinephrine-induced transactivation of ErbB2 and/or EGFR receptors. Further, hyperglycemia-induced transactivation of ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors could be attenuated by Ang-(1-7) that could be prevented by D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7) in VSMC. These data suggest that Ang-(1-7) via its Mas receptor acts as a pan-ErbB inhibitor and might represent a novel general mechanism by which Ang-(1-7) exerts its beneficial effects in many disease states including diabetes-induced vascular complications. PMID:26536590

  17. Naked Polyamidoamine Polymers Intrinsically Inhibit Angiotensin II-Mediated EGFR and ErbB2 Transactivation in a Dendrimer Generation- and Surface Chemistry-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saghir; El-Hashim, Ahmed Z; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Attur, Sreeja; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2016-05-01

    The effects of naked polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers on renin-angiotensin system (RAS) signaling via Angiotensin (Ang) II-mediated transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the closely related family member ErbB2 (HER2) were investigated. In primary aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, a cationic fifth-generation (G5) PAMAM dendrimer dose- and time-dependently inhibited Ang II/AT1 receptor-mediated transactivation of EGFR and ErbB2 as well as their downstream signaling via extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibition even occurred at noncytotoxic concentrations at short (1 h) exposure times and was dependent on dendrimer generation (G7 > G6 > G5 > G4) and surface group chemistry (amino > carboxyl > hydroxyl). Mechanistically, the cationic G5 PAMAM dendrimer inhibited Ang II-mediated transactivation of EGFR and ErbB2 via inhibition of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src. This novel, early onset, intrinsic biological action of PAMAM dendrimers as inhibitors of the Ang II/AT1/Src/EGFR-ErbB2/ERK1/2 signaling pathway could have important toxicological and pharmacological implications. PMID:26985693

  18. Overexpression of ERβ is sufficient to inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1 transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Choa; Lee, YoungJoo

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We examined the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition. • DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels in PC3 cells. • DPN did not show additional effect in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. • Our study shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression. - Abstract: Estrogen receptor (ER) β is predicted to play an important role in the prevention of breast cancer development and progression. We have previously shown that ERβ suppresses hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1-mediated transcription through aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) degradation via ubiquitination processes. In this study, we attempted to examine the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition in ERβ positive PC3 cells and ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. ERβ specific agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) stimulated estrogen response element (ERE)-luciferase activity in a similar fashion to estradiol in PC3 cells. We observed that DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels leading to an attenuation of hypoxia-induced hypoxia response element (HRE)-driven luciferase reporter gene activation in PC3 cells. Treatment of DPN reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and co-treatment with ERβ specific antagonist PHTPP abrogated the effect in PC3 cells. We then examined the effect of DPN in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. HIF-1 transcriptional activity repression by ERβ was not further reduced by DPN, as examined by HRE-driven luciferase assays. Expression of ERβ significantly decreased VEGF secretion and ARNT expression under hypoxic conditions. However, DPN did not additionally affect this suppression in MCF-7 cells transfected with ERβ. This result shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression.

  19. Inhibition of {beta}-catenin-mediated transactivation by flavanone in AGS gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chi Hoon; Hahm, Eun Ryeong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Kyung Chae; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-06-17

    Recently, data which prove that Wnt pathway activation may be an early event in multistep carcinogenesis in the stomach have been accumulating. We examined the effect of flavanone against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in AGS gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that flavanone inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by flavanone in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that there is no change of {beta}-catenin distribution and of nuclear {beta}-catenin levels through flavanone. In addition, the binding of Tcf complexes to DNA is not influenced by flavanone. The {beta}-catenin/Tcf transcriptional target gene cyclinD1 was downregulated by flavanone. These data suggest that flavanone inhibits the transcription of {beta}-catenin/Tcf responsive genes, by modulating Tcf activity without disrupting {beta}-catenin/Tcf complex formation.

  20. Pax6 represses androgen receptor-mediated transactivation by inhibiting recruitment of the coactivator SPBP.

    PubMed

    Elvenes, Julianne; Thomassen, Ernst Ivan Simon; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Kaino, Katrine; Sjøttem, Eva; Johansen, Terje

    2011-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:21935435

  1. Pax6 Represses Androgen Receptor-Mediated Transactivation by Inhibiting Recruitment of the Coactivator SPBP

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Kaino, Katrine; Sjøttem, Eva; Johansen, Terje

    2011-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:21935435

  2. The 6-Aminoquinolone WC5 Inhibits Human Cytomegalovirus Replication at an Early Stage by Interfering with the Transactivating Activity of Viral Immediate-Early 2 Protein ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Loregian, Arianna; Mercorelli, Beatrice; Muratore, Giulia; Sinigalia, Elisa; Pagni, Silvana; Massari, Serena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gatto, Barbara; Palumbo, Manlio; Tabarrini, Oriana; Cecchetti, Violetta; Palù, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    WC5 is a 6-aminoquinolone that potently inhibits the replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) but has no activity, or significantly less activity, against other herpesviruses. Here we investigated the nature of its specific anti-HCMV activity. Structure-activity relationship studies on a small series of analogues showed that WC5 possesses the most suitable pattern of substitutions around the quinolone scaffold to give potent and selective anti-HCMV activity. Studies performed to identify the possible target of WC5 indicated that it prevents viral DNA synthesis but does not significantly affect DNA polymerase activity. In yield reduction experiments with different multiplicities of infection, the anti-HCMV activity of WC5 appeared to be highly dependent on the viral inoculum, suggesting that WC5 may act at an initial stage of virus replication. Consistently, time-of-addition and time-of-removal studies demonstrated that WC5 affects a phase of the HCMV replicative cycle that precedes viral DNA synthesis. Experiments to monitor the effects of the compound on virus attachment and entry showed that it does not inhibit either process. Evaluation of viral mRNA and protein expression revealed that WC5 targets an event of the HCMV replicative cycle that follows the transcription and translation of immediate-early genes and precedes those of early and late genes. In cell-based assays to test the effects of WC5 on the transactivating activity of the HCMV immediate-early 2 (IE2) protein, WC5 markedly interfered with IE2-mediated transactivation of viral early promoters. Finally, WC5 combined with ganciclovir in checkerboard experiments exhibited highly synergistic activity. These findings suggest that WC5 deserves further investigation as a candidate anti-HCMV drug with a novel mechanism of action. PMID:20194695

  3. Nickel(II) Complex of Polyhydroxybenzaldehyde N4-Thiosemicarbazone Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Activity by Inhibiting NF-κB Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Sheng Wei; Looi, Chung Yeng; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Phan, Alicia Yi Ling; Wong, Won Fen; Wang, Hao; Paterson, Ian C.; Ea, Chee Kwee; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2014-01-01

    Background The biological properties of thiosemicarbazone have been widely reported. The incorporation of some transition metals such as Fe, Ni and Cu to thiosemicarbazone complexes is known to enhance its biological effects. In this study, we incorporated nickel(II) ions into thiosemicarbazone with N4-substitution groups H3L (H; H3L1, CH3; H3L2, C6H5; H3L3 and C2H5; H3L4) and examined its potential anti-inflammatory activity. Methodology/Principal Findings Four ligands (1–4) and their respective nickel-containing complexes (5–8) were synthesized and characterized. The compounds synthesized were tested for their effects on NF-κB nuclear translocation, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and NF-κB transactivation activity. The active compound was further evaluated on its ability to suppress carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in vivo. A potential binding target of the active compound was also predicted by molecular docking analysis. Conclusions/Significance Among all synthesized compounds tested, we found that complex [Ni(H2L1)(PPh3)]Cl (5) (complex 5), potently inhibited IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells as well as TNFα-stimulated HeLa S3 cells. In addition, complex 5 significantly down-regulated LPS- or TNFα-induced transcription of NF-κB target genes, including genes that encode the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IFNβ and IL6. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that complex 5 inhibited the transactivation activity of NF-κB. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory effect of complex 5 was also supported by its suppressive effect on carrageenan-induced paw edema formation in wild type C57BL/6 mice. Interestingly, molecular docking study showed that complex 5 potentially interact with the active site of IKKβ. Taken together, we suggest complex 5 as a novel NF-κB inhibitor with potent anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24977407

  4. Steric inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 Tat-dependent trans-activation in vitro and in cells by oligonucleotides containing 2′-O-methyl G-clamp ribonucleoside analogues

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Stephen C.; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Gait, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    We report the synthesis of a novel 2′-O-methyl (OMe) riboside phosphoramidite derivative of the G-clamp tricyclic base and incorporation into a series of small steric blocking OMe oligonucleotides targeting the apical stem–loop region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) trans- activation-responsive (TAR) RNA. Binding to TAR RNA is substantially enhanced for certain single site substitutions in the centre of the oligonucleotide, and doubly substituted anti-TAR OMe 9mers or 12mers exhibit remarkably low binding constants of <0.1 nM. G-clamp-containing oligomers achieved 50% inhibition of Tat-dependent in vitro transcription at ∼25 nM, 4-fold lower than for a TAR 12mer OMe oligonucleotide and better than found for any other oligonucleotide tested to date. Addition of one or two OMe G-clamps did not impart cellular trans-activation inhibition activity to cellularly inactive OMe oligonucleotides. Addition of an OMe G-clamp to a 12mer OMe–locked nucleic acid chimera maintained, but did not enhance, inhibition of Tat-dependent in vitro transcription and cellular trans-activation in HeLa cells. The results demonstrate clearly that an OMe G-clamp has remarkable RNA-binding enhancement ability, but that oligonucleotide effectiveness in steric block inhibition of Tat-dependent trans-activation both in vitro and in cells is governed by factors more complex than RNA-binding strength alone. PMID:12771202

  5. Triptonide Effectively Inhibits Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling via C-terminal Transactivation Domain of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Chinison, Jessica; Aguilar, Jose S; Avalos, Alan; Huang, Ying; Wang, Zhijun; Cameron, D Joshua; Hao, Jijun

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal activation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is implicated in many diseases including cancer. As a result, therapeutic agents that disrupt this signaling pathway have been highly sought after. Triptonide is a key bioactive small molecule identified in a traditional Chinese medicine named Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F., and it has a broad spectrum of biological functions. Here we show that triptonide can effectively inhibit canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling by targeting the downstream C-terminal transcription domain of β-catenin or a nuclear component associated with β-catenin. In addition, triptonide treatment robustly rescued the zebrafish "eyeless" phenotype induced by GSK-3β antagonist 6-bromoindirubin-30-oxime (BIO) for Wnt signaling activation during embryonic gastrulation. Finally, triptonide effectively induced apoptosis of Wnt-dependent cancer cells, supporting the therapeutic potential of triptonide. PMID:27596363

  6. Triptonide Effectively Inhibits Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling via C-terminal Transactivation Domain of β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Chinison, Jessica; Aguilar, Jose S.; Avalos, Alan; Huang, Ying; Wang, Zhijun; Cameron, D. Joshua; Hao, Jijun

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal activation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is implicated in many diseases including cancer. As a result, therapeutic agents that disrupt this signaling pathway have been highly sought after. Triptonide is a key bioactive small molecule identified in a traditional Chinese medicine named Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F., and it has a broad spectrum of biological functions. Here we show that triptonide can effectively inhibit canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling by targeting the downstream C-terminal transcription domain of β-catenin or a nuclear component associated with β-catenin. In addition, triptonide treatment robustly rescued the zebrafish “eyeless” phenotype induced by GSK-3β antagonist 6-bromoindirubin-30-oxime (BIO) for Wnt signaling activation during embryonic gastrulation. Finally, triptonide effectively induced apoptosis of Wnt-dependent cancer cells, supporting the therapeutic potential of triptonide. PMID:27596363

  7. Inhibition of IL-1β Transcription by Peptides Derived from the hCMV IE2 Transactivator

    PubMed Central

    Listman, James; Race, JoAnne E.; Walker-Kopp, Nancy; Unlu, Sebnem; Auron, Philip E.

    2008-01-01

    The immediate early (IE) proteins of human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) have diverse roles in directing viral and host cell transcription. Among these is the ability of IE2 to induce transcription of the IL1B gene that codes for IL-1β in monocytes. This function is partially explained by interaction between IE2 and the host cell transcription factor Spi-1/PU.1 (Spi-1). We now show that maximal IE2 function also depends on productive interactions localizing to two C/EBP sites on the IL1B promoter suggesting either bi- or tri-molecular interactions between IE2, Spi-1 and C/EBPβ at two different locations on the promoter. The IE2 interaction region on Spi-1 was previously mapped to the DNA-binding ETS domain and overlaps the region of Spi-1 that interacts with the transcription factor C/EBPβ, a factor known to be critical for the induction of IL1B in response to Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) family signal transduction. The Spi-1 interacting region of IE2 maps to amino acids 315–328, a sequence that also interacts with the bZIP domain of C/EBPβ. An expression vector coding for amino acids 291–364 of IE2 can suppress LPS induction of a cotransfected IL1B enhancer-promoter fragment in a monocyte cell line. This inhibition is likely the result of competition between Spi-1 and C/EBPβ, thus blunting gene induction. PMID:18308397

  8. In vivo screening of ligand-dependent hammerhead ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Saragliadis, Athanasios; Klauser, Benedikt; Hartig, Jörg S

    2012-01-01

    The development of artificial switches of gene expression is of high importance for future applications in biotechnology and synthetic biology. We have developed a powerful RNA-based system which allows for the ligand-dependent and reprogrammable control of gene expression in Escherichia coli. Our system makes use of the hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) which acts as molecular scaffold for the sequestration of the ribosome binding site (RBS), mimicking expression platforms in naturally occurring riboswitches. Aptamer domains can be attached to the ribozyme as exchangeable ligand-sensing modules. Addition of ligands to the bacterial growth medium changes the activity of the ligand-dependent self-cleaving ribozyme which in turn switches gene expression. In this chapter, we describe the in vivo screening procedure allowing for reprogramming the ligand-specificity of our system. PMID:22315086

  9. Inhibition of aryl hydrocarbon receptor transactivation and DNA adduct formation by CYP1 isoform-selective metabolic deactivation of benzo[a]pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Kaori; Uno, Shigeyuki; Seki, Taiichiro; Ariga, Toyohiko; Kusumi, Yoshiaki; Mitsumata, Masako; Yamada, Sachiko; Makishima, Makoto

    2008-07-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polyaromatic hydrocarbon produced by the combustion of cigarettes and coke ovens, is a known procarcinogen. BaP activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and induces the expression of a battery of genes, including CYP1A1, which metabolize BaP to toxic compounds. The possible role of CYP1 enzymes in mediating BaP detoxification or metabolic activation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we assessed the effects of CYP1 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1) on BaP-induced AhR transactivation and DNA adduct formation in HEK293 cells and HepG2 cells. Transfection of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, but not CYP1A2, suppressed BaP-induced activation of AhR. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, but not CYP1B1, inhibited DNA adduct formation in BaP-treated HepG2 cells. These results indicate that CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 play a role in deactivation of BaP on AhR and that CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 are involved in BaP detoxification by suppressing DNA adduct formation. BaP treatment did not induce DNA adduct formation in HEK293 cells, even after transfection of CYP1 enzymes, suggesting that expression of CYP1 enzymes is not sufficient for DNA adduct formation. Lower expression of epoxide hydrolase and higher expression of glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and GSTM1/M2 were observed in HEK293 cells compared with HepG2 cells. Dynamic expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 along with expression of other enzymes such as epoxide hydrolase and phase II enzymes may determine the detoxification or metabolic activation of BaP.

  10. Expression of microRNA-195 is transactivated by Sp1 but inhibited by histone deacetylase 3 in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Li, Siwen; Wang, Ruizhi; Xiao, Manhuan; Meng, Yu; Zeng, Chunxian; Fang, Jian-Hong; Yang, Jine; Zhuang, Shi-Mei

    2016-07-01

    MiR-195 expression is frequently reduced in various cancers, but its underlying mechanisms remain unknown. To explore whether abnormal transcription contributed to miR-195 downregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we characterized the -2165-bp site upstream of mature miR-195 as transcription start site and the -2.4 to -2.0-kb fragment as the promoter of miR-195 gene. Subsequent investigation showed that deletion of the predicted Sp1 binding site decreased the miR-195 promoter activity; Sp1 silencing significantly reduced the miR-195 promoter activity and the endogenous miR-195 level; Sp1 directly interacted with the miR-195 promoter in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest Sp1 as a transactivator for miR-195 transcription. Interestingly, miR-195 expression was also subjected to epigenetic regulation. Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) could anchor to the miR-195 promoter via interacting with Sp1 and consequently repress the Sp1-mediated miR-195 transactivation by deacetylating histone in HCC cells. Consistently, substantial increase of HDAC3 protein was detected in human HCC tissues and HDAC3 upregulation was significantly correlated with miR-195 downregulation, suggesting that HDAC3 elevation may represent an important cause for miR-195 reduction in HCC. Our findings uncover the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation and expression deregulation of miR-195 in HCC cells and provide new insight into microRNA biogenesis in cancer cells. PMID:27179445

  11. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat-dependent activation of translation in Xenopus oocytes by the benzodiazepine Ro24-7429 requires trans-activation response element loop sequences.

    PubMed

    Braddock, M; Cannon, P; Muckenthaler, M; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1994-01-01

    Two benzodiazepine compounds, [7-chloro-5-(2-pyrryl)-3H-1,4 benzodiazapin-2-(H)-one] (Ro5-3335) and [7-chloro-5-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-3H-benzo[e] [1,4] diazepin-2-yl]- methylamine (Ro24-7429), inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication via a specific effect on the function of the transactivator protein, Tat. To gain further insight into the mechanism of action of these compounds, we have tested their effects in an alternative assay for Tat activation in Xenopus oocytes. In this system, translation of trans-activation response element (TAR)-containing RNA is activated by Tat. Both compounds specifically blocked activation of translation in a dose-dependent fashion, with Ro24-7429 showing the greater potency. In the Xenopus oocyte system, as in mammalian cells, mutation of the TAR loop sequences abolishes Tat action. However, it is possible to obtain TAR-specific, Tat-dependent activation of a target RNA with a mutation in the loop provided that this target is in large excess. This result has been interpreted as indicating that a negative factor has been titrated (M. Braddock, R. Powell, A.D. Blanchard, A.J. Kingsman, and S.M. Kingsman, FASEB J. 7:214-222, 1993). Interestingly Ro24-7429 was unable to inhibit the TAR-specific but loop sequence-independent mode of translational activation. This finding suggests that a specific loop-binding cellular factor may mediate the effects of this inhibitor of Tat action. Consistent with this notion, we could not detect any effect of Ro24-7429 on the efficiency of specific Tat binding to TAR in vitro. PMID:8254735

  12. Structural requirements for ErbB2 transactivation.

    PubMed

    Penuel, E; Schaefer, G; Akita, R W; Sliwkowski, M X

    2001-12-01

    ErbB2 is a unique member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases that is distinguished by the fact that no ligand has yet been identified. Due to the absence of an ErbB2 ligand, alternative mechanisms are used for ErbB2 activation. As such, when ErbB2 is overexpressed, kinase activation occurs in the absence of ligand because of constitutive homodimerization. However, at normal expression levels ErbB2 acts as the shared coreceptor for the ErbB family, and these heterodimeric complexes are activated in response to the partner ligand. While the extracellular domain and transmembrane domains are necessary for ErbB2 transactivation, the carboxy terminus is also required. Specifically, ligand-dependent ErbB2 transactivation requires a discrete three-amino-acid segment, located at the C-terminus of ErbB family members ErbB3, ErbB4, and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Transactivation of ErbB2 via the three-amino-acid segment likely represents a conserved mechanism for regulated signaling by the ErbB family of receptors. PMID:11774204

  13. The transactivation domain AF-2 but not the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor is required to inhibit differentiation of avian erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed

    von Lindern, M; Boer, L; Wessely, O; Parker, M; Beug, H

    1998-02-01

    Earlier work demonstrated that an activated estrogen receptor (ER) is required for long-term self-renewal of c-ErbB-expressing avian erythroid progenitors. Here, we demonstrate that activation of the ER does not only arrest or retard differentiation of early progenitors but that it affects erythroid differentiation at all stages of erythroid maturation. A search for genes whose expression is affected by the ER showed that the 17beta-estradiol-activated receptor suppressed the differentiation-associated up-regulation of Gata-1, SCL-1, and globin genes in partially mature cells. In the same cells, the expression of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and histone H5 was enhanced. This led to premature expression of CAII, a possible explanation for the toxic effects of overexpressed ER. Repression specifically required the transactivation domain AF-2, but neither an intact DNA-binding domain (DBD) nor the AF-1 domain. The transcriptional activation of CAII, however, required both an intact AF-2 and a functional DBD. The requirement for the AF-2, but not the DBD, suggested that the ER may compete with other nuclear hormone receptors for transcriptional coactivators that bind AF-2, a domain well conserved within this family of transcription factors. We show, however, that this model does not apply for the most likely candidate, the avian thyroid hormone receptor. PMID:9482667

  14. Downregulation of SWI5 and CTC1 genes: hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase transactivated protein 1-mediated inhibition of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Yao, X-K; Pan, Z-P; Li, Y; Lun, Y-Z; Chi, Q; Jiang, S-J; Wang, F; Sui, W

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA polymerase transactivated protein 1 (HBVDNAPTP1) is a novel protein upregulated by HBV DNA polymerase, which has been screened by suppression subtractive hybridization technique (SSH) (GenBank Acc. No. AY450389). A vector pcDNA3.1 (-)/myc-His A-HBVDNAPTP1 was constructed and used to transfect acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. HBVDNAPTP1 expression was detected by Western blot analysis in the cells. A cDNA library of genes downregulated by HBVDNAPTP1 in THP-1 cells was made in pGEM-T Easy using SSH. The cDNAs were sequenced and analyzed with BLAST search against the sequences in GenBank. Some sequences, such as DNA repair protein SWI5 homolog (SWI5) and CTS telomere maintenance complex component 1 (CTC1), might be involved in DNA repair. Protein expression of SWI5 and CTC1 was identified by Western blot in THP-1 cells. HBVDNAPTP1 could downregulate the expression of SWI5 and CTC1 at translation level. PMID:27265469

  15. Oxidative Stress Promotes Ligand-independent and Enhanced Ligand-dependent Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Ozsoy, Hatice Z.; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Wieder, Eric D.; Pedersen, Steen; Mann, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1, p55) and 2 (TNFR2, p75) are characterized by several cysteine-rich modules in the extracellular domain, raising the possibility that redox-induced modifications of these cysteine residues might alter TNFR function. To test this possibility, we examined fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in 293T cells transfected with CFP- and YFP-tagged TNFRs exposed to the thiol oxidant diamide. Treatment with high concentrations of diamide (1 mm) resulted in an increase in the FRET signal that was sensitive to inhibition with the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting that oxidative stress resulted in TNFR self-association. Treatment of cells with low concentrations of diamide (1 μm) that was not sufficient to provoke TNFR self-association resulted in increased TNF-induced FRET signals relative to the untreated cells, suggesting that oxidative stress enhanced ligand-dependent TNFR signaling. Similar findings were obtained when the TNFR1- and TNFR2-transfected cells were pretreated with a cell-impermeable oxidase, DsbA, that catalyzes disulfide bond formation between thiol groups on cysteine residues. The changes in TNFR self-association were functionally significant, because pretreating the HeLa cells and 293T cells resulted in increased TNF-induced NF-κB activation and TNF-induced expression of IκB and syndecan-4 mRNA levels. Although pretreatment with DsbA did not result in an increase in TNF binding to TNFRs, it resulted in increased TNF-induced activation of NF-κB, consistent with an allosteric modification of the TNFRs. Taken together, these results suggest that oxidative stress promotes TNFR receptor self-interaction and ligand-independent and enhanced ligand-dependent TNF signaling. PMID:18544535

  16. Transactivation Function-2 of Estrogen Receptor α Contains Transactivation Function-1-regulating Element*

    PubMed Central

    Arao, Yukitomo; Coons, Laurel A.; Zuercher, William J.; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    ERα has a ligand-dependent transactivation function in the ligand binding domain of ERα C terminus (AF-2) and a ligand-independent activation function in the N terminus (AF-1). It is still not fully understood how AF-1 and AF-2 activities are regulated cooperatively by ligands. To evaluate the AF-1 involvement in the estrogenic activities of various compounds, we analyzed these transactivation functions using AF-1-truncated and AF-2-mutated ERα mutants. AF-2 is composed of two domains with flexible and static regions. We used an AF-2 flexible region mutant and an AF-2 static region mutant. Both mutants have been reported as non-E2 responsive due to disruption of E2-mediated coactivator recruitment to the AF-2. The AF-2 mutants were not activated by agonists, but surprisingly antagonists and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) activated the AF-2 mutants. This antagonist reversal activity was derived from AF-1. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the AF-2 contains an AF-1 suppression function using C-terminal-truncated ERα mutants. From these findings we hypothesized that the mutation of AF-2 disrupted its ability to suppress AF-1, causing the antagonist reversal. To assess the AF-2-mediated AF-1 suppression, we analyzed the transcription activity of physically separated AF-1 and AF-2 using a novel hybrid reporter assay. We observed that the AF-1 activity was not suppressed by the physically separated AF-2. Furthermore, SERMs did not induce the AF-1-mediated activity from the separated mutant AF-2, which differed from the intact protein. These results imply that SERM activity is dependent on a conformational change of the full-length ERα molecule, which allows for AF-1 activation. PMID:26028650

  17. Nepetaefuran and leonotinin isolated from Leonotis nepetaefolia R. Br. potently inhibit the LPS signaling pathway by suppressing the transactivation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Fumihito; Iizuka, Keito; Tago, Kenji; Narukawa, Yuji; Kiuchi, Fumiyuki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Tamura, Hiroomi; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi

    2015-10-01

    Leonotis nepetaefolia R. Br., also known as Klip Dagga or Lion's Ear, has traditionally been used as a folk medicine to treat inflammatory diseases such as rheumatism, bronchitis, and asthma; however, the components that exhibit its anti-inflammatory activity have not yet been identified. In the present study, we investigated the effects of three types of diterpenoids, nepetaefuran, leonotinin, and leonotin, which were isolated from L. nepetaefolia R. Br., on the LPS signaling pathway in order to elucidate the anti-inflammatory mechanism involved. Nepetaefuran more potently inhibited the LPS-induced production of NO and CCL2 than leonotinin by suppressing the expression of iNOS mRNA and CCL2 mRNA. On the other hand, leonotin failed to inhibit the production of NO and CCL2 induced by LPS. Although nepetaefuran and leonotinin had no effect on the LPS-induced degradation of IκBα or nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, they markedly inhibited the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. Nepetaefuran and leonotinin also inhibited the transcriptional activity of the GAL4-NF-κB p65 fusion protein. On the other hand, nepetaefuran, leonotinin and leonotin did not affect the LPS-induced activation of MAP kinase family members such as ERK, p38, and JNK. In addition, inhibitory effect of nepetaefuran and leonotinin on NF-κB activation is well correlated with their ability to induce activation of Nrf2 and ER stress. Taken together, these results demonstrated that nepetaefuran and leonotinin could be the components responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of L. nepetaefolia R. Br. by specifically inhibiting the LPS-induced activation of NF-κB. PMID:26319953

  18. Multiple, Ligand-Dependent Routes from the Active Site of Cytochrome P450 2C9

    SciTech Connect

    Cojocaru, Vlad; Winn, Peter J.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-02-13

    The active site of liver-specific, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases is deeply buried in the protein and is connected to the protein surface through multiple tunnels, many of which were found open in different CYP crystal structures. It has been shown that different tunnels could serve as ligand passage routes in different CYPs. However, it is not understood whether one CYP uses multiple routes for substrate access and product release and whether these routes depend on ligand properties. From 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations of CYP2C9, the second most abundant CYP in the human liver we found four main ligand exit routes, the occurrence of each depending on the ligand type and the conformation of the F-G loop, which is likely to be affected by the CYP-membrane interaction. A non-helical F-G loop favored exit towards the putative membrane-embedded region. Important protein features that direct ligand exit include aromatic residues that divide the active site and whose motions control access to two pathways. The ligands interacted with positively charged residues on the protein surface through hydrogen bonds that appear to select for acidic substrates. The observation of multiple, ligand-dependent routes in a CYP aids understanding of how CYP mutations affect drug metabolism and provides new possibilities for CYP inhibition.

  19. Sigma-1 receptor activation inhibits osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial (Müller) cells by transactivation of glutamatergic and purinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Stefanie; Winters, Helge; Pannicke, Thomas; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Water accumulation in retinal glial (Müller) and neuronal cells resulting in cellular swelling contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. Sigma (σ) receptor activation is known to have neuroprotective effects in the retina. Here, we show that the nonselective σ receptor agonist ditolylguanidine, and the selective σ1 receptor agonist PRE-084, inhibit the osmotic swelling of Müller cell somata induced by superfusion of rat retinal slices with a hypoosmotic solution containing barium ions. In contrast, PRE-084 did not inhibit the osmotic swelling of bipolar cell somata. The effects of σ receptor agonists on the Müller cell swelling were abrogated in the presence of blockers of metabotropic glutamate and purinergic P2Y1 receptors, respectively, suggesting that σ receptor activation triggers activation of a glutamatergic-purinergic signaling cascade which is known to prevent the osmotic Müller cell swelling. The swelling-inhibitory effect of 17β-estradiol was prevented by the σ1 receptor antagonist BD1047, suggesting that the effect is mediated by σ1 receptor activation. The data may suggest that the neuroprotective effect of σ receptor activation in the retina is in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic swelling of retinal glial cells. PMID:26499958

  20. NF2 loss promotes oncogenic RAS-induced thyroid cancers via YAP-dependent transactivation of RAS proteins and sensitizes them to MEK inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E.R.; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C.; Untch, Brian R.; Landa, Iňigo; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Voza, Francesca; Smith, Vicki E.; Ganly, Ian; Taylor, Barry S.; Persaud, Yogindra; Oler, Gisele; Fang, Yuqiang; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Viale, Agnes; Heguy, Adriana; Huberman, Kety H.; Giancotti, Filippo; Ghossein, Ronald; Fagin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Ch22q LOH is preferentially associated with RAS mutations in papillary and in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC). The 22q tumor suppressor NF2, encoding merlin, is implicated in this interaction because of its frequent loss of function in human thyroid cancer cell lines. Nf2 deletion or Hras mutation are insufficient for transformation, whereas their combined disruption leads to murine PDTC with increased MAPK signaling. Merlin loss induces RAS signaling in part through inactivation of Hippo, which activates a YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. We find that the three RAS genes are themselves YAP-TEAD1 transcriptional targets, providing a novel mechanism of promotion of RAS-induced tumorigenesis. Moreover, pharmacological disruption of YAP-TEAD with verteporfin blocks RAS transcription and signaling, and inhibits cell growth. The increased MAPK output generated by NF2 loss in RAS-mutant cancers may inform therapeutic strategies, as it generates greater dependency on the MAPK pathway for viability. PMID:26359368

  1. Upregulating endogenous genes by an RNA-programmable artificial transactivator

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    To promote expression of endogenous genes ad libitum, we developed a novel, programmable transcription factor prototype. Kept together via an MS2 coat protein/RNA interface, it includes a fixed, polypeptidic transactivating domain and a variable RNA domain that recognizes the desired gene. Thanks to this device, we specifically upregulated five genes, in cell lines and primary cultures of murine pallial precursors. Gene upregulation was small, however sufficient to robustly inhibit neuronal differentiation. The transactivator interacted with target gene chromatin via its RNA cofactor. Its activity was restricted to cells in which the target gene is normally transcribed. Our device might be useful for specific applications. However for this purpose, it will require an improvement of its transactivation power as well as a better characterization of its target specificity and mechanism of action. PMID:26152305

  2. Inhibition of Src kinase blocks high glucose-induced EGFR transactivation and collagen synthesis in mesangial cells and prevents diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Kanta; Xia, Ling; Goldberg, Howard J; Lee, Ken W K; Shah, Anu; Stavar, Laura; Masson, Elodie A Y; Momen, Abdul; Shikatani, Eric A; John, Rohan; Husain, Mansoor; Fantus, I George

    2013-11-01

    Chronic exposure to high glucose leads to diabetic nephropathy characterized by increased mesangial matrix protein (e.g., collagen) accumulation. Altered cell signaling and gene expression accompanied by oxidative stress have been documented. The contribution of the tyrosine kinase, c-Src (Src), which is sensitive to oxidative stress, was examined. Cultured rat mesangial cells were exposed to high glucose (25 mmol/L) in the presence and absence of Src inhibitors (PP2, SU6656), Src small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme (TACE) inhibitor, TAPI-2. Src was investigated in vivo by administration of PP2 to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic DBA2/J mice. High glucose stimulated Src, TACE, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2, p38), and collagen IV accumulation in mesangial cells. PP2 and SU6656 blocked high glucose-stimulated phosphorylation of Src Tyr-416, EGFR, and MAPKs. These inhibitors and Src knockdown by siRNA, as well as TAPI-2, also abrogated high glucose-induced phosphorylation of these targets and collagen IV accumulation. In STZ-diabetic mice, albuminuria, increased Src pTyr-416, TACE activation, ERK and EGFR phosphorylation, glomerular collagen accumulation, and podocyte loss were inhibited by PP2. These data indicate a role for Src in a high glucose-Src-TACE-heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-EGFR-MAPK-signaling pathway to collagen accumulation. Thus, Src may provide a novel therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23942551

  3. Inhibition of Src Kinase Blocks High Glucose–Induced EGFR Transactivation and Collagen Synthesis in Mesangial Cells and Prevents Diabetic Nephropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Kanta; Xia, Ling; Goldberg, Howard J.; Lee, Ken W.K.; Shah, Anu; Stavar, Laura; Masson, Elodie A.Y.; Momen, Abdul; Shikatani, Eric A.; John, Rohan; Husain, Mansoor; Fantus, I. George

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to high glucose leads to diabetic nephropathy characterized by increased mesangial matrix protein (e.g., collagen) accumulation. Altered cell signaling and gene expression accompanied by oxidative stress have been documented. The contribution of the tyrosine kinase, c-Src (Src), which is sensitive to oxidative stress, was examined. Cultured rat mesangial cells were exposed to high glucose (25 mmol/L) in the presence and absence of Src inhibitors (PP2, SU6656), Src small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme (TACE) inhibitor, TAPI-2. Src was investigated in vivo by administration of PP2 to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic DBA2/J mice. High glucose stimulated Src, TACE, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK1/2, p38), and collagen IV accumulation in mesangial cells. PP2 and SU6656 blocked high glucose–stimulated phosphorylation of Src Tyr-416, EGFR, and MAPKs. These inhibitors and Src knockdown by siRNA, as well as TAPI-2, also abrogated high glucose–induced phosphorylation of these targets and collagen IV accumulation. In STZ-diabetic mice, albuminuria, increased Src pTyr-416, TACE activation, ERK and EGFR phosphorylation, glomerular collagen accumulation, and podocyte loss were inhibited by PP2. These data indicate a role for Src in a high glucose-Src-TACE-heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-EGFR-MAPK–signaling pathway to collagen accumulation. Thus, Src may provide a novel therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23942551

  4. TopoisomeraseIIβ in HIV-1 transactivation.

    PubMed

    Chekuri, Anil; Bhaskar, C; Bollimpelli, V Satish; Kondapi, Anand K

    2016-03-01

    TopoisomeraseIIβ, an isoform of type II topoisomerase, was found to be functional in various viral infections. Its plausible role in HIV life cycle was also suggested earlier, but not clearly established. In the present study, we have investigated the role of TopoIIβ in HIV-1 infection by its gain and loss of function. Overexpression of TopoIIβ lead to an increase in viral replication, resulting in enhanced virion production. HIV-1 replication was impaired when TopoIIβ was down regulated by siRNA and inhibited by ICRF-193 and merbarone. The role of TopoIIβ in HIV-1 transcription was shown through its interaction with Tat and recruitement to long terminal repeat (LTR) region by co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assays. Involvement of TopoIIβ in transactivation of HIV-1 LTR was confirmed by luciferase assay in reporter cell line, TZM bl and also by transfection of reporter exogenously. It was also observed that LTR transactivation commensurated with the expression of TopoIIβ in the presence of Tat. In addition, a decreased viral gene expression on treatment with merbarone exemplifies the importance of catalytic activity of TopoIIβ in viral replication. These observations indicate that TopoIIβ is involved in the cascade of coactivator complexes that are recruited to LTR for regulation of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:26876283

  5. Fluoxetine-induced transactivation of the platelet-derived growth factor type β receptor reveals a novel heterologous desensitization process.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jeff S; Vasefi, Maryam S; Gondora, Nyasha; Ahmed, Nawaz; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including serotonin (5-HT) receptors promote the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) via intracellular signaling pathways in a process termed transactivation. Although transactivation pathways are commonly initiated by a GPCR, a recent report demonstrated that serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were able to block 5-HT-induced transactivation of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) type β receptor. We show that a 45 min pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with the SSRI fluoxetine indeed blocked 5-HT-induced transactivation of the PDGFβ receptor. However, upon further examination, we discovered that during the pretreatment period, fluoxetine itself was transiently transactivating the PDGFβ receptor via 5-HT2 receptor activation. After 45min, the increase in PDGFβ receptor phosphorylation induced by fluoxetine had returned to baseline, but a subsequent transactivating stimulus (5-HT) failed to "re-transactivate" the PDGFβ receptor. We further demonstrate that 45min, but not 3h, 5-HT pretreatment blocks dopamine-induced PDGFβ receptor transactivation. This did not involve changes in PDGF receptor function, since ligand (PDGF)-induced PDGFβ receptor activation was not inhibited by 5-HT pretreatment. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the heterologous desensitization of an RTK transactivation pathway and reveals a previously unknown short-term "blackout" period where no additional transactivation signaling is possible. PMID:25702926

  6. Ligand-dependent interaction of the glucocorticoid receptor with p53 enhances their degradation by Hdm2

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sagar; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2001-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the tumor supressor p53 mediate different stress responses. We have studied the mechanism of their mutual inhibition in normal endothelial cells (HUVEC) in response to hypoxia, a physiological stress, and mitomycin C, which damages DNA. Dexamethasone (Dex) stimulates the degradation of endogenous GR and p53 by the proteasome pathway in HUVEC under hypoxia and mitomycin C treatments, and also in hepatoma cells (HepG2) under normoxia. Dex inhibits the functions of p53 (apoptosis, Bax, and p21WAF1/CIP1 expression) and GR (PEPCK and G-6-Pase expression). Endogenous p53 and GR form a ligand-dependent trimeric complex with Hdm2 in the cytoplasm. Disruption of the p53–HDM2 interaction prevents Dex-induced ubiquitylation of GR and p53. The ubiquitylation of GR requires p53, the interaction of p53 with Hdm2, and E3 ligase activity of Hdm2. These results provide a mechanistic basis for GR and p53 acting as opposing forces in the decision between cell death and survival. PMID:11562347

  7. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence of riboswitch-regulated single mRNAs shows ligand-dependent accessibility bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Arlie J.; Lund, Paul E.; Blanco, Mario R.; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    In response to intracellular signals in Gram-negative bacteria, translational riboswitches--commonly embedded in messenger RNAs (mRNAs)--regulate gene expression through inhibition of translation initiation. It is generally thought that this regulation originates from occlusion of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence upon ligand binding; however, little direct evidence exists. Here we develop Single Molecule Kinetic Analysis of RNA Transient Structure (SiM-KARTS) to investigate the ligand-dependent accessibility of the SD sequence of an mRNA hosting the 7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine (preQ1)-sensing riboswitch. Spike train analysis reveals that individual mRNA molecules alternate between two conformational states, distinguished by `bursts' of probe binding associated with increased SD sequence accessibility. Addition of preQ1 decreases the lifetime of the SD's high-accessibility (bursting) state and prolongs the time between bursts. In addition, ligand-jump experiments reveal imperfect riboswitching of single mRNA molecules. Such complex ligand sensing by individual mRNA molecules rationalizes the nuanced ligand response observed during bulk mRNA translation.

  8. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence of riboswitch-regulated single mRNAs shows ligand-dependent accessibility bursts

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Arlie J.; Lund, Paul E.; Blanco, Mario R.; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    In response to intracellular signals in Gram-negative bacteria, translational riboswitches—commonly embedded in messenger RNAs (mRNAs)—regulate gene expression through inhibition of translation initiation. It is generally thought that this regulation originates from occlusion of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence upon ligand binding; however, little direct evidence exists. Here we develop Single Molecule Kinetic Analysis of RNA Transient Structure (SiM-KARTS) to investigate the ligand-dependent accessibility of the SD sequence of an mRNA hosting the 7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine (preQ1)-sensing riboswitch. Spike train analysis reveals that individual mRNA molecules alternate between two conformational states, distinguished by ‘bursts' of probe binding associated with increased SD sequence accessibility. Addition of preQ1 decreases the lifetime of the SD's high-accessibility (bursting) state and prolongs the time between bursts. In addition, ligand-jump experiments reveal imperfect riboswitching of single mRNA molecules. Such complex ligand sensing by individual mRNA molecules rationalizes the nuanced ligand response observed during bulk mRNA translation. PMID:26781350

  9. EGFR Transactivation by Peptide G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Nakamura, Taichi; Jensen, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer kills approximately 1.3 million citizens in the world annually. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) erlotinib and gefitinib are effective anti-tumor agents especially in lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. The goal is to increase the potency of TKI in lung cancer patients with wild type EGFR. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) transactivate the wild type EGFR in lung cancer cells. The GPCR can be activated by peptide agonists causing phosphatidylinositol turnover or stimulation of adenylylcyclase. Recently, nonpeptide antagonists were found to inhibit the EGFR transactivation caused by peptides. Nonpeptide antagonists for bombesin (BB), neurotensin (NTS) and cholecystokinin (CCK) inhibit lung cancer growth and increase the cytotoxicity of gefitinib. The results suggest that GPCR transactivation of the EGFR may play an important role in cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25563590

  10. Ligand-dependent recruitment of the Arnt coregulator determines DNA recognition by the dioxin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitelaw, M.; Pongratz, I.; Wilhelmsson, A.; Gustafsson, J.; Poellinger, L. )

    1993-04-01

    Signal transduction by dioxins is mediated by the intracellular dioxin or aryl hydrocarbon receptor. This receptor binds dioxin and its planar aromatic congeners in a saturable manner with high affinity. The extreme toxicity of dioxin has been demonstrated in animals but not in humans. In animals, dioxin causes thymic wasting, immune suppression, severe epithelial disorders and tumor promotion. On a molecular level, dioxins are inducers of transcription of a battery of target genes encoding xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. Dioxin also appears to transcriptionally regulate the expression of the growth modulatory genes for interleukin-1 Beta and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2. The dioxin induction response is mediated by single or multiple copies of dioxin-inducible transcriptional control elements in target promoters. The research data detailed in this paper examines the ligand-dependent recruitment of the Arnt coregulator which determines DNA recognition by the dioxin receptor. This data suggests that dioxin receptor activity is governed by a complex pattern of combinatorial regulation involving repression by hsp90 and then by ligand-dependent recruitment of the positive coregulator Arnt and that the dioxin receptor system provides the first example of signal-controlled dimerization of bHLH factors.

  11. Ligand-dependent Enhancer Activation Regulated by Topoisomerase-I Activity

    PubMed Central

    Puc, Janusz; Kozbial, Piotr; Li, Wenbo; Tan, Yuliang; Liu, Zhijie; Suter, Tom; Ohgi, Kenneth A.; Zhang, Jie; Aggarwal, Aneel K.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The discovery that enhancers are regulated transcription units, encoding eRNAs, has raised new questions about the mechanisms of their activation. Here, we report an unexpected molecular mechanism that underlies ligand-dependent enhancer activation, based on DNA nicking to relieve torsional stress from eRNA synthesis. Using dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced binding of androgen receptor (AR) to prostate cancer cell enhancers as a model, we show rapid recruitment, within minutes, of DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) to a large cohort of AR-regulated enhancers. Furthermore, we show that the DNA nicking activity of TOP1 is a prerequisite for robust eRNA synthesis and enhancer activation, and is kinetically accompanied by the recruitment of ATR and the MRN complex, followed by additional components of DNA damage repair machinery to the AR-regulated enhancers. Together, our studies reveal a linkage between eRNA synthesis and ligand-dependent TOP1-mediated nicking a strategy exerting quantitative effects on eRNA expression in regulating AR-bound enhancer-dependent transcriptional programs. PMID:25619691

  12. A structural view of ligand-dependent activation in thermoTRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ximena; Lespay-Rebolledo, Carolyne; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) proteins are a large family of ion channels, grouped into seven sub-families. Although great advances have been made regarding the activation and modulation of TRP channel activity, detailed molecular mechanisms governing TRP channel gating are still needed. Sensitive to electric, chemical, mechanical, and thermal cues, TRP channels are tightly associated with the detection and integration of sensory input, emerging as a model to study the polymodal activation of ion channel proteins. Among TRP channels, the temperature-activated kind constitute a subgroup by itself, formed by Vanilloid receptors 1–4, Melastatin receptors 2, 4, 5, and 8, TRPC5, and TRPA1. Some of the so-called “thermoTRP” channels participate in the detection of noxious stimuli making them an interesting pharmacological target for the treatment of pain. However, the poor specificity of the compounds available in the market represents an important obstacle to overcome. Understanding the molecular mechanics underlying ligand-dependent modulation of TRP channels may help with the rational design of novel synthetic analgesics. The present review focuses on the structural basis of ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 and TRPM8 channels. Special attention is drawn to the dissection of ligand-binding sites within TRPV1, PIP2-dependent modulation of TRP channels, and the structure of natural and synthetic ligands. PMID:24847275

  13. Conformational dynamics of ligand-dependent alternating access in LeuT.

    PubMed

    Kazmier, Kelli; Sharma, Shruti; Quick, Matthias; Islam, Shahidul M; Roux, Benoît; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; McHaourab, Hassane S

    2014-05-01

    The leucine transporter (LeuT) from Aquifex aeolicus is a bacterial homolog of neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) that catalyze reuptake of neurotransmitters at the synapse. Crystal structures of wild-type and mutants of LeuT have been interpreted as conformational states in the coupled transport cycle. However, the mechanistic identities inferred from these structures have not been validated, and the ligand-dependent conformational equilibrium of LeuT has not been defined. Here, we used distance measurements between spin-label pairs to elucidate Na(+)- and leucine-dependent conformational changes on the intracellular and extracellular sides of the transporter. The results identify structural motifs that underlie the isomerization of LeuT between outward-facing, inward-facing and occluded states. The conformational changes reported here present a dynamic picture of the alternating-access mechanism of LeuT and NSSs that is different from the inferences reached from currently available structural models. PMID:24747939

  14. Ligand-dependent localization and function of ORP-VAP complexes at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Kentala, Henriikka; Peränen, Johan; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2015-05-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein/OSBP-related proteins (ORPs) constitute a conserved family of sterol/phospholipid-binding proteins with lipid transporter or sensor functions. We investigated the spatial occurrence and regulation of the interactions of human OSBP/ORPs or the S. cerevisiae orthologs, the Osh (OSBP homolog) proteins, with their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) anchors, the VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs), by employing bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down set-ups. The ORP-VAP interactions localize frequently at distinct subcellular sites, shown in several cases to represent membrane contact sites (MCSs). Using established ORP ligand-binding domain mutants and pull-down assays with recombinant proteins, we show that ORP liganding regulates the ORP-VAP association, alters the subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes, or modifies organelle morphology. There is distinct protein specificity in the effects of the mutants on subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes. We provide evidence that complexes of human ORP2 and VAPs at ER-lipid droplet interfaces regulate the hydrolysis of triglycerides and lipid droplet turnover. The data suggest evolutionarily conserved, complex ligand-dependent functions of ORP-VAP complexes at MCSs, with implications for cellular lipid homeostasis and signaling. PMID:25420878

  15. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand. PMID:25916672

  16. Sox5 induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition by transactivation of Twist1

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Xin-Hong; Lv, Xin-Quan; Li, Hui-Xiang

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Depletion of Sox5 inhibits breast cancer proliferation, migration, and invasion. • Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression. • Sox5 induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition through transactivation of Twist1 expression. - Abstract: The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), a highly conserved cellular program, plays an important role in normal embryogenesis and cancer metastasis. Twist1, a master regulator of embryonic morphogenesis, is overexpressed in breast cancer and contributes to metastasis by promoting EMT. In exploring the mechanism underlying the increased Twist1 in breast cancer cells, we found that the transcription factor SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 5(Sox5) is up-regulation in breast cancer cells and depletion of Sox5 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, depletion of Sox5 in breast cancer cells caused a dramatic decrease in Twist1 and chromosome immunoprecipitation assay showed that Sox5 can bind directly to the Twist1 promoter, suggesting that Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression. We further demonstrated that knockdown of Sox5 up-regulated epithelial phenotype cell biomarker (E-cadherin) and down-regulated mesenchymal phenotype cell biomarkers (N-cadherin, Vimentin, and Fibronectin 1), resulting in suppression of EMT. Our study suggests that Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression and plays an important role in the regulation of breast cancer progression.

  17. Synthetic glucocorticoids that dissociate transactivation and AP-1 transrepression exhibit antiinflammatory activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vayssière, B M; Dupont, S; Choquart, A; Petit, F; Garcia, T; Marchandeau, C; Gronemeyer, H; Resche-Rigon, M

    1997-08-01

    Some of the most potent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive agents are synthetic glucocorticoids. However, major side effects severely limit their therapeutic use. The development of improved glucocorticoid-based drugs will require the separation of beneficial from deleterious effects. One possibility toward this goal is to try to dissociate two main activities of glucocorticoids, i.e. transactivation and transrepression. Screening of a library of compounds using transactivation and AP-1 transrepression models in transiently transfected cells identified dissociated glucocorticoids, which exert strong AP-1 inhibition but little or no transactivation. Importantly, despite high ligand binding affinity, the prototypic dissociated compound, RU24858, acted as a weak agonist and did not efficiently antagonize dexamethasone-induced transcription in transfected cells. Similar results were obtained in hepatic HTC cells for the transactivation of the endogenous tyrosine amino transferase gene (TAT), which encodes one of the enzymes involved in the glucocorticoid-dependent stimulation of neoglucogenesis. To investigate whether dissociated glucocorticoids retained the antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive potential of classic glucocorticoids, several in vitro and in vivo models were used. Indeed, secretion of the proinflammatory lymphokine interleukin-1beta was severely inhibited by dissociated glucocorticoids in human monocytic THP 1 cells. Moreover, in two in vivo models, these compounds exerted an antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive activity as potent as that of the classic glucocorticoid prednisolone. These results may lead to an improvement of antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive therapies and provide a novel concept for drug discovery. PMID:9259316

  18. A Potent HER3 Monoclonal Antibody That Blocks Both Ligand-Dependent and -Independent Activities: Differential Impacts of PTEN Status on Tumor Response.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhan; Carrasco, Rosa A; Schifferli, Kevin; Kinneer, Krista; Tammali, Ravinder; Chen, Hong; Rothstein, Ray; Wetzel, Leslie; Yang, Chunning; Chowdhury, Partha; Tsui, Ping; Steiner, Philipp; Jallal, Bahija; Herbst, Ronald; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Tice, David A

    2016-04-01

    HER3/ERBB3 is a kinase-deficient member of the EGFR family receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) that is broadly expressed and activated in human cancers. HER3 is a compelling cancer target due to its important role in activation of the oncogenic PI3K/AKT pathway. It has also been demonstrated to confer tumor resistance to a variety of cancer therapies, especially targeted drugs against EGFR and HER2. HER3 can be activated by its ligand (heregulin/HRG), which induces HER3 heterodimerization with EGFR, HER2, or other RTKs. Alternatively, HER3 can be activated in a ligand-independent manner through heterodimerization with HER2 in HER2-amplified cells. We developed a fully human mAb against HER3 (KTN3379) that efficiently suppressed HER3 activity in both ligand-dependent and independent settings. Correspondingly, KTN3379 inhibited tumor growth in divergent tumor models driven by either ligand-dependent or independent mechanisms in vitro and in vivo Most intriguingly, while investigating the mechanistic underpinnings of tumor response to KTN3379, we discovered an interesting dichotomy in that PTEN loss, a frequently occurring oncogenic lesion in a broad range of cancer types, substantially blunted the tumor response in HER2-amplified cancer, but not in the ligand-driven cancer. To our knowledge, this represents the first study ascertaining the impact of PTEN loss on the antitumor efficacy of a HER3 mAb. KTN3379 is currently undergoing a phase Ib clinical trial in patients with advanced solid tumors. Our current study may help us optimize patient selection schemes for KTN3379 to maximize its clinical benefits. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 689-701. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26880266

  19. Therapeutic benefit of a dissociated glucocorticoid and the relevance of in vitro separation of transrepression from transactivation activity.

    PubMed

    Belvisi, M G; Wicks, S L; Battram, C H; Bottoms, S E; Redford, J E; Woodman, P; Brown, T J; Webber, S E; Foster, M L

    2001-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the mainstay of asthma therapy; however, major side effects limit their therapeutic use. GCs influence the expression of genes either by transactivation or transrepression. The antiinflammatory effects of steroids are thought to be due to transrepression and the side effects, transactivation. Recently, a compound, RU 24858, has been identified that demonstrated dissociation between transactivation and transrepression in vitro. RU 24858 exerts strong AP-1 inhibition (transrepression), but little or no transactivation. We investigated whether this improved in vitro profile results in the maintenance of antiinflammatory activity (evaluated in the Sephadex model of lung edema) with reduced systemic toxicity (evaluated by loss in body weight, thymus involution, and bone turnover) compared with standard GCs. RU 24858 exhibits comparable antiinflammatory activity to the standard steroid, budesonide. However, the systemic changes observed indicate that transactivation events do occur with this GC with similar potency to the standard steroids. In addition, the GCs profiled showed no differentiation on quantitative osteopenia of the femur. These results suggest that in vitro separation of transrepression from transactivation activity does not translate to an increased therapeutic ratio for GCs in vivo or that adverse effects are a consequence of transrepression. PMID:11160246

  20. The bZIP transactivator of Epstein-Barr virus, BZLF1, functionally and physically interacts with the p65 subunit of NF-kappa B.

    PubMed Central

    Gutsch, D E; Holley-Guthrie, E A; Zhang, Q; Stein, B; Blanar, M A; Baldwin, A S; Kenney, S C

    1994-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BZLF1 (Z) immediate-early transactivator initiates the switch between latent and productive infection in B cells. The Z protein, which has homology to the basic leucine zipper protein c-Fos, transactivates the promoters of several replicative cycle proteins. Transactivation efficiency of the EBV BMRF1 promoter by Z is cell type dependent. In B cells, in which EBV typically exists in a latent form, Z activates the BMRF1 promoter inefficiently. We have discovered that the p65 component of the cellular factor NF-kappa B inhibits transactivation of several EBV promoters by Z. Furthermore, the inhibitor of NF-kappa B, I kappa B alpha, can augment Z-induced transactivation in the B-cell line Raji. Using glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins and coimmunoprecipitation studies, we demonstrate a direct interaction between Z and p65. This physical interaction, which requires the dimerization domain of Z and the Rel homology domain of p65, can be demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of Z transactivation function by NF-kappa B p65, or possibly by other Rel family proteins, may contribute to the inefficiency of Z transactivator function in B cells and may be a mechanism of maintaining B-cell-specific viral latency. Images PMID:8114725

  1. Pin1 promotes GR transactivation by enhancing recruitment to target genes

    PubMed Central

    Poolman, Toryn M.; Farrow, Stuart N.; Matthews, Laura; Loudon, Andrew S.; Ray, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ligand activated transcription factor, serving to regulate both energy metabolism and immune functions. Factors that influence cellular sensitivity to glucocorticoids (GC) are therefore of great interest. The N-terminal of the GR contains numerous potential proline-directed phosphorylation sites, some of which can regulate GR transactivation. Unrestricted proline isomerisation can be inhibited by adjacent serine phosphorylation and requires a prolyl isomerise, Pin1. Pin1 therefore determines the functional outcome of proline-directed kinases acting on the GR, as cis/trans isomers are distinct pools with different interacting proteins. We show that Pin1 mediates GR transactivation, but not GR trans-repression. Two N-terminal GR serines, S203 and S211, are targets for Pin1 potentiation of GR transactivation, establishing a direct link between Pin1 and the GR. We also demonstrate GC-activated co-recruitment of GR and Pin1 to the GILZ gene promoter. The Pin1 effect required both its WW and catalytic domains, and GR recruitment to its GRE was Pin1-dependent. Therefore, Pin1 is a selective regulator of GR transactivation, acting through N-terminal phospho-serine residues to regulate GR recruitment to its target sites in the genome. As Pin1 is dysregulated in disease states, this interaction may contribute to altered GC action in inflammatory conditions. PMID:23887939

  2. Essential role for ligand-dependent feedback antagonism of vertebrate hedgehog signaling by PTCH1, PTCH2 and HHIP1 during neural patterning

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Alexander M.; Peterson, Kevin A.; Nishi, Yuichi; Morin, Steves; Song, Jane Y.; Charron, Frédéric; McMahon, Andrew P.; Allen, Benjamin L.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is essential for vertebrate and invertebrate embryogenesis. In Drosophila, feedback upregulation of the HH receptor Patched (PTC; PTCH in vertebrates), is required to restrict HH signaling during development. By contrast, PTCH1 upregulation is dispensable for early HH-dependent patterning in mice. Unique to vertebrates are two additional HH-binding antagonists that are induced by HH signaling, HHIP1 and the PTCH1 homologue PTCH2. Although HHIP1 functions semi-redundantly with PTCH1 to restrict HH signaling in the developing nervous system, a role for PTCH2 remains unresolved. Data presented here define a novel role for PTCH2 as a ciliary localized HH pathway antagonist. While PTCH2 is dispensable for normal ventral neural patterning, combined removal of PTCH2- and PTCH1-feedback antagonism produces a significant expansion of HH-dependent ventral neural progenitors. Strikingly, complete loss of PTCH2-, HHIP1- and PTCH1-feedback inhibition results in ectopic specification of ventral cell fates throughout the neural tube, reflecting constitutive HH pathway activation. Overall, these data reveal an essential role for ligand-dependent feedback inhibition of vertebrate HH signaling governed collectively by PTCH1, PTCH2 and HHIP1. PMID:23900540

  3. Crosstalk between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human breast cancer cells: PPAR{gamma} binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} mediated transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Peng, Xinjian; Yuan, Liang; Mehta, Rajeshwari R.; Knethen, Andreas von; Choubey, Divaker; Mehta, Rajendra G.

    2012-11-15

    Heterodimerization and cross-talk between nuclear hormone receptors often occurs. For example, estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) physically binds to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and inhibits its transcriptional activity. The interaction between PPAR{gamma} and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) however, is unknown. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms linking PPAR{gamma} and VDR signaling, and for the first time we show that PPAR{gamma} physically associates with VDR in human breast cancer cells. We found that overexpression of PPAR{gamma} decreased 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) mediated transcriptional activity of the vitamin D target gene, CYP24A1, by 49% and the activity of VDRE-luc, a vitamin D responsive reporter, by 75% in T47D human breast cancer cells. Deletion mutation experiments illustrated that helices 1 and 4 of PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains, respectively, governed this suppressive function. Additionally, abrogation of PPAR{gamma}'s AF2 domain attenuated its repressive action on 1,25D{sub 3} transactivation, indicating that this domain is integral in inhibiting VDR signaling. PPAR{gamma} was also found to compete with VDR for their binding partner retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR{alpha}). Overexpression of RXR{alpha} blocked PPAR{gamma}'s suppressive effect on 1,25D{sub 3} action, enhancing VDR signaling. In conclusion, these observations uncover molecular mechanisms connecting the PPAR{gamma} and VDR pathways. -- Highlights: PPAR{gamma}'s role on 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} transcriptional activity is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} physically binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains are important for this inhibitory effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} competes with VDR for the availability of their binding partner, RXR{alpha}.

  4. Inhibition of Receptor Signaling and of Glioblastoma-derived Tumor Growth by a Novel PDGFRβ Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Camorani, Simona; Esposito, Carla L; Rienzo, Anna; Catuogno, Silvia; Iaboni, Margherita; Condorelli, Gerolama; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Cerchia, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) is a cell-surface tyrosine kinase receptor implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. It represents a compelling therapeutic target in many human tumors, including glioma. A number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors under development as antitumor agents have been found to inhibit PDGFRβ. However, they are not selective as they present multiple tyrosine kinase targets. Here, we report a novel PDGFRβ-specific antagonist represented by a nuclease-resistant RNA-aptamer, named Gint4.T. This aptamer is able to specifically bind to the human PDGFRβ ectodomain (Kd: 9.6 nmol/l) causing a strong inhibition of ligand-dependent receptor activation and of downstream signaling in cell lines and primary cultures of human glioblastoma cells. Moreover, Gint4.T aptamer drastically inhibits cell migration and proliferation, induces differentiation, and blocks tumor growth in vivo. In addition, Gint4.T aptamer prevents PDGFRβ heterodimerization with and resultant transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor. As a result, the combination of Gint4.T and an epidermal growth factor receptor–targeted aptamer is better at slowing tumor growth than either single aptamer alone. These findings reveal Gint4.T as a PDGFRβ-drug candidate with translational potential. PMID:24566984

  5. Cell-Surface Receptors Transactivation Mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Guerra, Germano; Parisi, Melania; De Marinis, Marta; Tafuri, Domenico; Cinelli, Mariapia; Ammendola, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to a large family of cell-surface receptors involved in many intracellular signaling cascades. Despite GPCRs lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, tyrosine phosphorylation of a tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK) occurs in response to binding of specific agonists of several such receptors, triggering intracellular mitogenic cascades. This suggests that the notion that GPCRs are associated with the regulation of post-mitotic cell functions is no longer believable. Crosstalk between GPCR and RTK may occur by different molecular mechanism such as the activation of metalloproteases, which can induce the metalloprotease-dependent release of RTK ligands, or in a ligand-independent manner involving membrane associated non-receptor tyrosine kinases, such as c-Src. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also implicated as signaling intermediates in RTKs transactivation. Intracellular concentration of ROS increases transiently in cells stimulated with GPCR agonists and their deliberated and regulated generation is mainly catalyzed by enzymes that belong to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase family. Oxidation and/or reduction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups of phosphatases tightly controls the activity of RTKs and ROS-mediated inhibition of cellular phosphatases results in an equilibrium shift from the non-phosphorylated to the phosphorylated state of RTKs. Many GPCR agonists activate phospholipase C, which catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate to produce inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and diacylglicerol. The consequent mobilization of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum leads to the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms. PKCα mediates feedback inhibition of RTK transactivation during GPCR stimulation. Recent data have expanded the coverage of transactivation to include Serine/Threonine kinase receptors and Toll-like receptors. Herein, we

  6. Isolation and identification of L-dopa decarboxylase as a protein that binds to and enhances transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor using the repressed transactivator yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed Central

    Wafa, Latif A; Cheng, Helen; Rao, Mira A; Nelson, Colleen C; Cox, Michael; Hirst, Martin; Sadowski, Ivan; Rennie, Paul S

    2003-01-01

    The AR (androgen receptor) is a ligand-regulated transcription factor, which belongs to the steroid receptor family and plays an essential role in growth and development of the prostate. Transcriptional activity of steroid receptors is modulated by interaction with co-regulator proteins and yeast two-hybrid analysis is commonly used to identify these steroid receptor-interacting proteins. However, a limitation of conventional two-hybrid systems for detecting AR protein partners has been that they only allow for analysis of the ligand- and DNA-binding domains of the receptor, as its NTD (N-terminal domain) possesses intrinsic transactivation activity. To identify AR N-terminus-interacting proteins, its NTD was used in the RTA (repressed transactivator) system, which is specifically designed for transactivator bait proteins and was shown to be suitable for two-hybrid analysis with the AR NTD. DDC (L-dopa decarboxylase) was detected multiple times as a novel AR-interacting protein, which was subsequently confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, transient transfection of DDC in prostate cancer cells strongly enhanced ligand-dependent AR transcriptional activity, an effect that was antagonized using high concentrations of the anti-androgen bicalutamide. Glucocorticoid receptor activity was also strongly enhanced with DDC co-transfection, while oestrogen receptor activity was only mildly affected. Together, our data demonstrate that DDC interacts with AR to enhance steroid receptor transactivation, which may have important implications in prostate cancer progression. PMID:12864730

  7. Antineoplastic effects of rosiglitazone and PPARγ transactivation in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cellai, I; Benvenuti, S; Luciani, P; Galli, A; Ceni, E; Simi, L; Baglioni, S; Muratori, M; Ottanelli, B; Serio, M; Thiele, C J; Peri, A

    2006-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumour in infants. Unfortunately, most children present with advanced disease and have a poor prognosis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist rosiglitazone (RGZ) in two NB cell lines (SK-N-AS and SH-SY5Y), which express PPARγ. Rosiglitazone decreased cell proliferation and viability to a greater extent in SK-N-AS than in SH-SY5Y. Furthermore, 20 μM RGZ significantly inhibited cell adhesion, invasiveness and apoptosis in SK-N-AS, but not in SH-SY5Y. Because of the different response of SK-N-AS and SH-SY5Y cells to RGZ, the function of PPARγ as a transcriptional activator was assessed. Noticeably, transient transcription experiments with a PPARγ responsive element showed that RGZ induced a three-fold increase of the reporter activity in SK-N-AS, whereas no effect was observed in SH-SY5Y. The different PPARγ activity may be likely due to the markedly lower amount of phopshorylated (i.e. inactive) protein observed in SK-N-AS. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that the differential response of NB cells to RGZ may be related to differences in PPARγ transactivation. This finding indicates that PPARγ activity may be useful to select those patients, for whom PPARγ agonists may have a beneficial therapeutic effect. PMID:16969347

  8. PU.1 induces apoptosis in myeloma cells through direct transactivation of TRAIL

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, S; Tatetsu, H; Hata, H; Iino, T; Niiro, H; Akashi, K; Tenen, DG.; Mitsuya, H; Okuno, Y

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that PU.1 was down-regulated in myeloma cell lines and myeloma cells in a subset of myeloma patients, and that conditional PU.1 expression in PU.1-negative myeloma cell lines, U266 and KMS12PE, induced growth arrest and apoptosis. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the growth arrest and apoptosis, we performed DNA microarray analyses to compare the difference in gene expression before and after PU.1 induction in U266 cells. Among cell cycle-related genes, cyclin A2, cyclin B1, CDK2 and CDK4 were down-regulated and p21 was up-regulated, while among apoptosis-related genes, TRAIL was found highly up-regulated. When TRAIL was knocked down by siRNAs, apoptosis of PU-1-expressing cells was inhibited, suggesting that TRAIL plays a critical role in PU.1-induced apoptosis in both U266 and KMS12PE myeloma cells. In both U266 and KMS12PE cells expressing PU.1, PU.1 directly bound to a region 30 bp downstream of the transcription start site of the TRAIL gene. Up-regulation of PU.1 induced transactivation of the TRAIL promoter in reporter assays, and disruption of the PU.1-binding site in the TRAIL promoter eliminated this transactivation. Therefore, we conclude that PU.1 is capable of inducing apoptosis in certain myeloma cells by direct transactivation of TRAIL. PMID:19749795

  9. Transmembrane signal transduction in bacterial chemotaxis involves ligand-dependent activation of phosphate group transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Borkovich, K A; Kaplan, N; Hess, J F; Simon, M I

    1989-01-01

    Signal transduction in Escherichia coli involves the interaction of transmembrane receptor proteins such as the aspartate receptor, Tar, and the products of four chemotaxis genes, cheA, cheY, cheW, and cheZ. It was previously shown that the cheA gene product is an autophosphorylating protein kinase that transfers phosphate to CheY, whereas the cheZ gene product acts as a specific CheY phosphatase. Here we report that the system can be reconstituted in vitro and receptor function can be coupled to CheY phosphorylation. Coupling requires the presence of the CheW protein, the appropriate form of the receptor, and the CheA and CheY proteins. Under these conditions the accumulation of CheY-phosphate is enhanced approximately 300-fold. This rate enhancement is seen in reactions using wild-type and "tumble" mutant receptors but not "smooth" mutant receptors. The increased accumulation of phosphoprotein was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of aspartate, using wild-type, but not tumble, receptors. These results provide evidence that the signal transduction pathway in bacterial chemotaxis involves receptor-mediated alteration of the levels of phosphorylated proteins. They suggest that CheW acts as the coupling factor between receptor and phosphorylation. The results also support the suggestion that CheY-phosphate is the tumble signal. Images PMID:2645576

  10. Sulf1 has ligand-dependent effects on canonical and non-canonical Wnt signalling

    PubMed Central

    Fellgett, Simon W.; Maguire, Richard J.; Pownall, Mary Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Wnt signalling plays essential roles during embryonic development and is known to be mis-regulated in human disease. There are many molecular mechanisms that ensure tight regulation of Wnt activity. One such regulator is the heparan-sulfate-specific 6-O-endosulfatase Sulf1. Sulf1 acts extracellularly to modify the structure of heparan sulfate chains to affect the bio-availability of Wnt ligands. Sulf1 could, therefore, influence the formation of Wnt signalling complexes to modulate the activation of both canonical and non-canonical pathways. In this study, we use well-established assays in Xenopus to investigate the ability of Sulf1 to modify canonical and non-canonical Wnt signalling. In addition, we model the ability of Sulf1 to influence morphogen gradients using fluorescently tagged Wnt ligands in ectodermal explants. We show that Sulf1 overexpression has ligand-specific effects on Wnt signalling: it affects membrane accumulation and extracellular levels of tagged Wnt8a and Wnt11b ligands differently, and inhibits the activity of canonical Wnt8a but enhances the activity of non-canonical Wnt11b. PMID:25681501

  11. Replication-dependent transactivation of the polyomavirus late promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, K B; Roome, A J; Carmichael, G G

    1990-01-01

    When a plasmid containing the wild-type polyomavirus intergenic regulatory region fused to the bacterial cat gene was introduced into mouse NIH 3T3 cells along with a plasmid coding for the early viral proteins (T antigens), chloramphenicol transacetylase enzyme activity and mRNA levels were increased about 10-fold over levels observed in the absence of early proteins. To investigate this transactivation phenomenon further, 11 specific deletion mutant derivatives of the wild-type parent plasmid were constructed and studied. One mutant (NAL) with a minimal level of chloramphenicol transacetylase expression in the absence of T antigens was capable of being transactivated more than 40-fold. A number of other mutants, however, had little capacity for transactivation. Each of these mutants had in common a defect in large T-antigen-mediated DNA replication. Interestingly, one of the transactivation-defective mutants showed a basal late promoter activity fivefold higher than that of wild type and replicated in mouse cells in the absence of large T antigen. Subsequently, a small deletion abolishing viral DNA replication was introduced into those mutants capable of transactivation. The effect of the second deletion was to eliminate both replication and transactivation. Finally, wild-type and mutant constructs were transfected into Fisher rat F-111 cells in the presence or absence of early proteins. No transactivation or replication was ever observed in these cells. We concluded from these studies that the observed transactivation of the polyomavirus late promoter by one or more of the viral early proteins was due to either higher template concentration resulting from DNA replication or replication-associated changes in template conformation. Images PMID:2154625

  12. ADAM-mediated amphiregulin shedding and EGFR transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kasina, S.; Scherle, P. A.; Hall, C. L.; Macoska, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The ectodomain shedding of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands, such as amphiregulin (AREG), by ADAMs (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteases) can be stimulated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists. Interactions between the CXCR4 GPCR and the CXCL12 chemokine have been shown to mediate gene transcription and cellular proliferation in non-transformed and transformed prostate epithelial cells, as well as motility/invasiveness in transformed cells. Objectives In this report, we investigated the ability of CXCL12 to stimulate amphiregulin ectodomain shedding in non-transformed and transformed prostate epithelial cells that respond proliferatively to sub-nanomolar levels of CXCL12 and amphiregulin. Materials and Methods Non-transformed N15C6 and transformed PC3 prostate epithelial cells were assessed for amphiregulin shedding, ADAM activation, Src phosphorylation and EGFR activation using ELISA, immunoblot, and immunoprecipitation techniques, and for proliferation using cell counting after stimulation with CXCL12 or vehicle. Results The results of these studies identify CXCL12 as a novel inducer of amphiregulin ectodomain shedding and show that both basal and CXCL12-mediated amphiregulin shedding are ADAM10- and Src kinase-dependent in non-transformed N15C6 cells. In contrast, amphiregulin shedding is not amplified subsequent to stimulation with exogenous CXCL12, and is not reduced subsequent to metalloprotease- or Src kinase-inhibition, in highly aggressive PC3 prostate cancer cells. These data also show that CXCL12-mediated cellular proliferation requires EGFR transactivation in a Src-and ADAM-dependent manner in non-transformed prostate epithelial cells. However, these same mechanisms are dysfunctional in highly transformed prostate cancer cells, which secrete amphiregulin in an autocrine manner that cannot be repressed through metalloprotease- or Src kinase inhibition. Conclusion These findings show that non-transformed and transformed

  13. NUCLEOPHOSMIN/B23 NEGATIVELY REGULATES GCN5-DEPENDENT HISTONE ACETYLATION AND TRANSACTIVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yonglong; Wu, Jun; Giannone, Richard J; Boucher, Lorrie; Du, Hansen; Huang, Ying; Johnson, Dabney K; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2007-01-01

    Nucleophosmin/B23 is a multifunctional phosphoprotein that is overexpressed in cancer cells and has been shown to be involved in both positive and negative regulation of transcription. In this study, we first identified GCN5 acetyltransferase as a B23-interacting protein by mass spectrometry, which was then confirmed by in vivo co-immunoprecipitation. In vitro assay demonstrated that B23 bound the PCAF-N domain of GCN5 and inhibited GCN5-mediated acetylation of both free and mononucleosomal histones, probably through interfering with GCN5 and masking histones from being acetylated. Mitotic B23 exhibited higher inhibitory activity on GCN5-mediated histone acetylation than interphase B23. Immunodepletion experiments of mitotic extracts revealed that phosphorylation of B23 at Thr199 enhanced the inhibition of GCN5-mediated histone acetylation. Moreover, luciferase reporter and microarray analyses suggested that B23 attenuated GCN5-mediated transactivation in vivo. Taken together, our studies suggest a molecular mechanism of B23 in the mitotic inhibition of GCN5-mediated histone acetylation and transactivation.

  14. Identification of diverse microbial metabolites as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 Tat transactivation.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Zink, Deborah L; Polishook, Jon D; Bills, Gerald F; Dombrowski, Anne W; Genilloud, Olga; Pelaez, Fernando F; Herranz, Lucia; Quamina, Donette; Lingham, Russell B; Danzeizen, Renee; Graham, Pia L; Tomassini, Joanne E; Singh, Sheo B

    2005-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is one of six regulatory proteins that are required for viral replication and is an attractive target for the development of new anti-HIV agents. Screening of microbial extracts using a whole cell Tat-dependent transactivation assay, which guided the separation of the active broths, led to the identification of five structurally diverse classes (M(R) range 232-1126) of natural products. These include i) three sesquiterpenoids, namely, sporogen-AO1, petasol, and 6-dehydropetasol, ii) two resorcylic 14-membered lactones, namely monorden and monocillin IV, iii) a ten-membered lactone, iv) a quinoline and quinoxiline bicyclic octadepsipeptides, namely echinomycin and UK-63598, and v) a cyclic heptapeptide, ternatin. These compounds displayed varying degrees of potencies with IC50 values ranging from 0.0002 to 100 microM. The most active compound was the quinoxiline bicyclic octadepsipeptides, UK-63598, which inhibited Tat-dependent transactivation with an IC50 value of 0.2 nM and exhibited a 100-fold therapeutic window with respect to toxicity. In a single-cycle antiviral assay, UK-6358 inhibited viral replication with an IC50 value of 0.5 nM; however, it appeared to be equally toxic at that concentration. Monocillin IV was significantly less active (Tat transactivation inhibitory IC50 of 5 microM) but was not toxic at 100 microM in an equivalent cytotoxicity assay. The compound exhibited antiviral activity with an IC50 value of 6.2 microM in the single-cycle antiviral assay and a sixfold therapeutic window. Details of the isolation, fermentation, and biological activities of these structurally diverse natural products are described. PMID:17191924

  15. TGF{beta} induces proHB-EGF shedding and EGFR transactivation through ADAM activation in gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ebi, Masahide; Kataoka, Hiromi; Shimura, Takaya; Kubota, Eiji; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizushima, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Mabuchi, Motoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Joh, Takashi

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} TGF{beta} induces EGFR transactivation through proHB-EGF shedding by activated ADAM members in gastric cancer cells. {yields} TGF{beta} induces nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF cleaved by ADAM members. {yields} TGF{beta} enhances cell growth by EGFR transactivation and HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and ADAM inhibitors block these effects. {yields} Silencing of ADAM17 also blocks EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and cancer cell growth by TGF{beta}. {yields} ADAM17 may play a crucial role in this TGF{beta}-HB-EGF signal transduction. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF{beta}) is known to potently inhibit cell growth. Loss of responsiveness to TGF{beta} inhibition on cell growth is a hallmark of many types of cancer, yet its mechanism is not fully understood. Membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) ectodomain is cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) members and is implicated in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Recently, nuclear translocation of the C-terminal fragment (CTF) of pro-HB-EGF was found to induce cell growth. We investigated the association between TGF{beta} and HB-EGF signal transduction via ADAM activation. Materials and methods: The CCK-8 assay in two gastric cancer cell lines was used to determine the effect for cell growth by TGF{beta}. The effect of two ADAM inhibitors was also evaluated. Induction of EGFR phosphorylation by TGF{beta} was analyzed and the effect of the ADAM inhibitors was also examined. Nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF by shedding through ADAM activated by TGF{beta} was also analyzed. EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation, and cell growth were examined under the condition of ADAM17 knockdown. Result: TGF{beta}-induced EGFR phosphorylation of which ADAM inhibitors were able to inhibit. TGF{beta} induced shedding of proHB-EGF allowing HB-EGF-CTF to

  16. Gli2 protein expression level is a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Sasajima, J; Mizukami, Y; Koizumi, K; Kawamoto, T; Ono, Y; Karasaki, H; Tanabe, H; Fujiya, M; Kohgo, Y

    2016-06-01

    The hedgehog pathway is known to promote proliferation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and has been shown to restrain tumor progression. To understand how hedgehog causes these effects, we sought to carefully examine protein expression of hedgehog signaling components during different tumor stages. Genetically engineered mice, Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+, were utilized to model distinct phases of tumorigenesis, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN) and PDA. Human pancreatic specimens of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and PDA were also employed. PanIN and IPMN lesions highly express Sonic Hedgehog, at a level that is slightly higher than that observed in PDA. GLI2 protein is also expressed in both PanIN/IPMN and PDA. Although there was no difference in the nuclear staining, the cytoplasmic GLI2 level in PDA was modest in comparison to that in PanIN/IPMN. Hedgehog interacting protein was strongly expressed in the precursors, whereas the level in PDA was significantly attenuated. There were no differences in expression of Patched1 at early and late stages. Finally, a strong correlation between Sonic Hedgehog and GLI2 staining was found in both human and murine pancreatic tumors. The results indicate that the GLI2 protein level could serve as a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:27543868

  17. Suppression of estrogen receptor-alpha transactivation by thyroid transcription factor-2 in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eunsook; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Lee, Keesook

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 was expressed in mammary glands and breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 repressed ER{alpha} transactivation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERs), which mediate estrogen actions, regulate cell growth and differentiation of a variety of normal tissues and hormone-responsive tumors through interaction with cellular factors. In this study, we show that thyroid transcription factor-2 (TTF-2) is expressed in mammary gland and acts as ER{alpha} co-repressor. TTF-2 inhibited ER{alpha} transactivation in a dose-dependent manner in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In addition, TTF-2 directly bound to and formed a complex with ER{alpha}, colocalizing with ER{alpha} in the nucleus. In MCF-7/TTF-2 stable cell lines, TTF-2 repressed the expression of endogenous ER{alpha} target genes such as pS2 and cyclin D1 by interrupting ER{alpha} binding to target promoters and also significantly decreased cell proliferation. Taken together, these data suggest that TTF-2 may modulate the function of ER{alpha} as a corepressor and play a role in ER-dependent proliferation of mammary cells.

  18. MCRS2 represses the transactivation activities of Nrf1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Long; Lin, Young-Sun; Yang, Chi-Chiang; Lin, Yu-Jen; Wu, Shan-Fu; Lin, Ying-Ting; Huang, Chien-Fu

    2009-01-01

    Background Nrf1 [p45 nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (p45 NF-E2)-related factor 1], a member of the CNC-bZIP (CNC basic region leucine zipper) family, is known to be a transcriptional activator by dimerization with distinct partners, such as Maf, FosB, c-Jun, JunD, etc. The transcriptional roles of CNC-bZIP family are demonstrated to be involved in globin gene expression as well as the antioxidant response. For example, CNC-bZIP factors can regulate the expression of detoxification proteins through AREs, such as expression of human gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetases (GCS), glutathione S-transferases (GST), UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UDP-GT), NADP (H) quinone oxidoreductase (NQOs), etc. To further explore other factor(s) in cells related to the function of Nrf1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening assay to identify any Nrf1-interacting proteins. In this study, we isolated a cDNA encoding residues 126–475 of MCRS2 from the HeLa cell cDNA library. Some functions of MCRS1 and its splice variant-MSP58 and MCRS2 have been previously identified, such as transforming, nucleolar sequestration, ribosomal gene regulation, telomerase inhibition activities, etc. Here, we demonstrated MCRS2 can function as a repressor on the Nrf1-mediated transactivation using both in vitro and in vivo systems. Results To find other proteins interacting with the CNC bZIP domain of Nrf1, the CNC-bZIP region of Nrf1 was used as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screening assay. MCRS2, a splicing variant of p78/MCRS1, was isolated as the Nrf1-interacting partner from the screenings. The interaction between Nrf1 and MCRS2 was confirmed in vitro by GST pull-down assays and in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation. Further, the Nrf1-MCRS2 interaction domains were mapped to the residues 354–447 of Nrf1 as well as the residues 314–475 of MCRS2 respectively, by yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down assays. By immunofluorescence, MCRS2-FLAG was shown to colocalize with HA-Nrf1 in the nucleus and didn't result

  19. Nuclear AURKA acquires kinase-independent transactivating function to enhance breast cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Feimeng; Yue, Caifeng; Li, Guohui; He, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Xi; Yan, Min; Long, Zijie; Qiu, Wanshou; Yuan, Zhongyu; Xu, Jie; Liu, Bing; Shi, Qian; Lam, Eric W.-F.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Liu, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Centrosome-localized mitotic Aurora kinase A (AURKA) facilitates G2/M events. Here we show that AURKA translocates to the nucleus and causes distinct oncogenic properties in malignant cells by enhancing breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) phenotype. Unexpectedly, this function is independent of its kinase activity. Instead, AURKA preferentially interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) in the nucleus and acts as a transcription factor in a complex that induces a shift in MYC promoter usage and activates the MYC promoter. Blocking AURKA nuclear localization inhibits this newly discovered transactivating function of AURKA, sensitizing resistant BCSC to kinase inhibition. These findings identify a previously unknown oncogenic property of the spatially deregulated AURKA in tumorigenesis and provide a potential therapeutic opportunity to overcome kinase inhibitor resistance. PMID:26782714

  20. Ligand-Dependent Disorder of Loop Observed in Extended-Spectrum SHV-Type beta-Lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    J Sampson; W Ke; C Bethel; S Pagadala; M Nottingham; R Bonomo; J Buynak; F van den Akker

    2011-12-31

    Among Gram-negative bacteria, resistance to {beta}-lactams is mediated primarily by {beta}-lactamases (EC 3.2.6.5), periplasmic enzymes that inactivate {beta}-lactam antibiotics. Substitutions at critical amino acid positions in the class A {beta}-lactamase families result in enzymes that can hydrolyze extended-spectrum cephalosporins, thus demonstrating an 'extended-spectrum' {beta}-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype. Using SHV ESBLs with substitutions in the {Omega} loop (R164H and R164S) as target enzymes to understand this enhanced biochemical capability and to serve as a basis for novel {beta}-lactamase inhibitor development, we determined the spectra of activity and crystal structures of these variants. We also studied the inactivation of the R164H and R164S mutants with tazobactam and SA2-13, a unique {beta}-lactamase inhibitor that undergoes a distinctive reaction chemistry in the active site. We noted that the reduced K{sub i} values for the R164H and R164S mutants with SA2-13 are comparable to those with tazobactam (submicromolar). The apo enzyme crystal structures of the R164H and R164S SHV variants revealed an ordered {Omega} loop architecture that became disordered when SA2-13 was bound. Important structural alterations that result from the binding of SA2-13 explain the enhanced susceptibility of these ESBL enzymes to this inhibitor and highlight ligand-dependent {Omega} loop flexibility as a mechanism for accommodating and hydrolyzing {beta}-lactam substrates.

  1. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P < 0.05) compared with unliganded conditions. The alterations in cell cycle duration were observed in the S and G2/M phases, whereas the G1 phase was indistinguishable under liganded and unliganded conditions. In addition, ERα knockdown in MCF-7 cells accelerated mitotic exit, whereas transfection of ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with exogenous ERα significantly shortened the S and G2/M phases (by 9.1 hours, P < 0.05) compared with parental cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with antiestrogens revealed that tamoxifen yields a slower cell cycle progression through the S and G2/M phases than fulvestrant does, presumably because of the destabilizing effect of fulvestrant on ERα protein. Together, these results show that ERα modulates breast cancer cell proliferation by regulating events during the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen. PMID:27049344

  2. A Functional Selectivity Mechanism at the Serotonin-2A GPCR Involves Ligand-Dependent Conformations of Intracellular Loop 2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With recent progress in determination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure with crystallography, a variety of other experimental approaches (e.g., NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent-based assays, mass spectrometry techniques) are also being used to characterize state-specific and ligand-specific conformational states. MD simulations offer a powerful complementary approach to elucidate the dynamic features associated with ligand-specific GPCR conformations. To shed light on the conformational elements and dynamics of the important aspect of GPCR functional selectivity, we carried out unbiased microsecond-length MD simulations of the human serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) in the absence of ligand and bound to four distinct serotonergic agonists. The 5-HT2AR is a suitable system to study the structural features involved in the ligand-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GPCRs because it is well-characterized experimentally and exhibits a strong agonist-specific phenotype in that some 5-HT2AR agonists induce LSD-like hallucinations, while others lack this psychoactive property entirely. Here we report evidence for structural and dynamic differences in 5-HT2AR interacting with such pharmacologically distinct ligands, hallucinogens, and nonhallucinogens obtained from all-atom MD simulations. Differential ligand binding contacts were identified for structurally similar hallucinogens and nonhallucinogens and found to correspond to different conformations in the intracellular loop 2 (ICL2). From the different ICL2 conformations, functional selective phenotypes are suggested through effects on dimerization and/or distinct direct interaction with effector proteins. The findings are presented in the context of currently proposed hallucinogenesis mechanisms, and ICL2 is proposed as a fine-tuning selective switch that can differentiates modes of 5-HT2AR activation. PMID:25314362

  3. Dimerization of melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) and MC5R creates a ligand-dependent signal modulation: Potential participation in physiological color change in the flounder.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Hamamoto, Akie; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Saito, Yumiko

    2016-05-01

    Vertebrates produce α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), which contains an N-terminal acetyl group, and desacetyl-α-MSH, which does not contain an N-terminal acetyl group. In teleosts and amphibians, α-MSH-related peptides stimulate pigment dispersion via melanocortin receptors 1-5 (MC1R-MC5R), which are members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. We previously reported an interesting phenomenon associated with physiological color changes in the skin of a flatfish, barfin flounder (bf). Specifically, pigments in xanthophores expressing only the bfMC5R gene were dispersed by both α-MSH and desacetyl-α-MSH, whereas those in melanophores expressing both the bfMC1R and bfMC5R genes were dispersed by desacetyl-α-MSH, but not by α-MSH. In this study, we examined whether heterodimers of bfMC1R and bfMC5R can act as significant inhibitory receptors for the N-terminal acetylation of α-MSH in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells. Immunofluorescence analyses showed that bfMC1R and bfMC5R were localized together at the plasma membrane when expressed in the same cells. Indeed, after coexpression of Flag-bfMC1R and HA-bfMC5R, immunoprecipitation with anti-Flag antibodies resulted in the presence of anti-HA immunoreactivity in the precipitate, and vice versa. Importantly, cyclic AMP assays showed that cotransfection of bfMC1R with bfMC5R inhibited the cyclic AMP accumulation induced by α-MSH to a greater extent than that observed after transfection of bfMC1R alone. Of note, this inhibitory response was not caused by desacetyl-α-MSH. Thus, we show a ligand-dependent signaling through functional heterodimerization of MC1R and MC5R in mammalian cells. The ligand-selective receptor complex also provide the first mechanistic implication that may play a role in the control of color change in teleosts. PMID:27080548

  4. Gastrointestinal hormones stimulate growth of Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors by transactivating the EGF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Di Florio, Alessia; Sancho, Veronica; Moreno, Paola; Fave, Gianfranco Delle; Jensen, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors[NETs] usually pursuit a benign course, but some show aggressive behavior. The treatment of patients with advanced NETs is marginally effective and new approaches are needed. In other tumors, transactivation of the EGF receptor(EGFR) by growth factors, gastrointestinal(GI) hormones and lipids can stimulate growth, which has led to new treatments. Recent studies show a direct correlation between NET malignancy and EGFR expression, EGFR inhibition decreases basal NET growth and an autocrine growth effect exerted by GI hormones, for some NETs. To determine if GI hormones can stimulate NET growth by inducing transactivation of EGFR, we examined the ability of EGF, TGFα and various GI hormones to stimulate growth of the human foregut carcinoid, BON, the somatostatinoma QGP-1 and the rat islet tumor, Rin-14B-cell lines. The EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, AG1478 strongly inhibited EGF and the GI hormones stimulated cell growth, both in BON and QGP-1 cells. In all the three neuroendocrine cell lines studied, we found EGF, TGFα and the other growth-stimulating GI hormones increased Tyr1068 EGFR phosphorylation. In BON cells, both the GI hormones neurotensin and a bombesin analogue caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in EGFR phosphorylation, which was strongly inhibited by AG1478. Moreover, we found this stimulated phosphorylation was dependent on Src kinases, PKCs, matrix metalloproteinase activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. These results raise the possibility that disruption of this signaling cascade by either EGFR inhibition alone or combined with receptor antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of foregut NETs/PETs. PMID:23220008

  5. Identification of nuclear localization, DNA binding, and transactivating mechanisms of Kruppel-like zinc finger protein Gli-similar 2 (Glis2).

    PubMed

    Vasanth, Shivakumar; ZeRuth, Gary; Kang, Hong Soon; Jetten, Anton M

    2011-02-11

    Gli-similar 1-3 (Glis1-3) constitute a subfamily of Krüppel-like zinc finger (ZF) transcription factors that are closely related to the Gli protein family. Mutations in GLIS2 are linked to nephronophthisis, a chronic kidney disease characterized by renal fibrosis and atrophy in children and young adults. Currently, very little information exists about the mechanism of action of Glis2, its target genes, or the signaling pathways that regulate its activity. In this study, we show that a region within ZF3 is required for the nuclear localization of Glis2. Analysis of Glis2 DNA binding demonstrated that Glis2 binds effectively to the consensus Glis binding sequence (GlisBS) (G/C)TGGGGGGT(A/C). Although Glis2 was unable to induce transactivation of a GlisBS-dependent reporter, it effectively inhibited the GlisBS-mediated transactivation by Gli1. Mutations that disrupt the tetrahedral configuration of each ZF within Glis2 abolished Glis2 binding to GlisBS and also abrogated its inhibition of Gli1-mediated transactivation. In contrast, Glis2 was able to activate the murine insulin-2 (Ins2) promoter by binding directly to two GlisBS elements located at -263 and -99 within the Ins2 promoter. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser(245) inhibited the binding of Glis2 to GlisBS and dramatically affected its transactivation of the Ins2 promoter and its ability to inhibit GlisBS-dependent transactivation by Gli1. In this study, we demonstrate that Glis2 can function as a transcriptional activator and that post-translational modification within its DNA-binding domain can regulate its transcriptional activity. This control may play a critical role in the Glis2-dependent regulation of target genes and renal function. PMID:21127075

  6. H3K27 demethylation by JMJD3 at a poised enhancer of anti-apoptotic gene BCL2 determines ERα ligand dependency

    PubMed Central

    Svotelis, Amy; Bianco, Stéphanie; Madore, Jason; Huppé, Gabrielle; Nordell-Markovits, Alexei; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Gévry, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin represents a repressive barrier to the process of ligand-dependent transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors. Here, we show that H3K27 methylation imposes ligand-dependent regulation of the oestrogen receptor α (ERα)-dependent apoptotic response via Bcl-2 in breast cancer cells. The activation of BCL2 transcription is dependent on the simultaneous inactivation of the H3K27 methyltransferase, EZH2, and the demethylation of H3K27 at a poised enhancer by the ERα-dependent recruitment of JMJD3 in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells. We also provide evidence that this pathway is modified in cells resistant to anti-oestrogen (AE), which constitutively express BCL2. We show that the lack of H3K27 methylation at BCL2 regulatory elements due to the inactivation of EZH2 by the HER2 pathway leads to this constitutive activation of BCL2 in these AE-resistant cells. Our results describe a mechanism in which the epigenetic state of chromatin affects ligand dependency during ERα-regulated gene expression. PMID:21841772

  7. Functional role of p35srj, a novel p300/CBP binding protein, during transactivation by HIF-1

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Michels, Catherine L.; Leung, Man-Kit; Arany, Zoltàn P.; Kung, Andrew L.; Livingston, David M.

    1999-01-01

    Recruitment of p300/CBP by the hypoxia-inducible factor, HIF-1, is essential for the transcriptional response to hypoxia and requires an interaction between the p300/CBP CH1 region and HIF-1α. A new p300-CH1 interacting protein, p35srj, has been identified and cloned. p35srj is an alternatively spliced isoform of MRG1, a human protein of unknown function. Virtually all endogenous p35srj is bound to p300/CBP in vivo, and it inhibits HIF-1 transactivation by blocking the HIF-1α/p300 CH1 interaction. p35srj did not affect transactivation by transcription factors that bind p300/CBP outside the CH1 region. Endogenous p35srj is up-regulated markedly by the HIF-1 activators hypoxia or deferoxamine, suggesting that it could operate in a negative-feedback loop. In keeping with this notion, a p300 CH1 mutant domain, defective in HIF-1 but not p35srj binding, enhanced endogenous HIF-1 function. In hypoxic cells, p35srj may regulate HIF-1 transactivation by controlling access of HIF-1α to p300/CBP, and may keep a significant portion of p300/CBP available for interaction with other transcription factors by partially sequestering and functionally compartmentalizing cellular p300/CBP. PMID:9887100

  8. PA1 protein, a new competitive decelerator acting at more than one step to impede glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transactivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Sun, Yunguang; Cho, Young-Wook; Chow, Carson C; Simons, S Stoney

    2013-01-01

    Numerous cofactors modulate the gene regulatory activity of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) by affecting one or more of the following three major transcriptional properties: the maximal activity of agonists (A(max)), the potency of agonists (EC(50)), and the partial agonist activity of antisteroids (PAA). Here, we report that the recently described nuclear protein, Pax2 transactivation domain interaction protein (PTIP)-associated protein 1 (PA1), is a new inhibitor of GR transactivation. PA1 suppresses A(max), increases the EC(50), and reduces the PAA of an exogenous reporter gene in a manner that is independent of associated PTIP. PA1 is fully active with, and strongly binds to, the C-terminal half of GR. PA1 reverses the effects of the coactivator TIF2 on GR-mediated gene induction but is unable to augment the actions of the corepressor SMRT. Analysis of competition assays between PA1 and TIF2 with an exogenous reporter indicates that the kinetic definition of PA1 action is a competitive decelerator at two sites upstream from where TIF2 acts. With the endogenous genes IGFBP1 and IP6K3, PA1 also represses GR induction, increases the EC(50), and decreases the PAA. ChIP and re-ChIP experiments indicate that PA1 accomplishes this inhibition of the two genes via different mechanisms as follows: PA1 appears to increase GR dissociation from and reduce GR transactivation at the IGFBP1 promoter regions but blocks GR binding to the IP6K3 promoter. We conclude that PA1 is a new competitive decelerator of GR transactivation and can act at more than one molecularly defined step in a manner that depends upon the specific gene. PMID:23161582

  9. Transactivation of programmed ribosomal frameshifting by a viral protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhua; Treffers, Emmely E; Napthine, Sawsan; Tas, Ali; Zhu, Longchao; Sun, Zhi; Bell, Susanne; Mark, Brian L; van Veelen, Peter A; van Hemert, Martijn J; Firth, Andrew E; Brierley, Ian; Snijder, Eric J; Fang, Ying

    2014-05-27

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is a widely used translational mechanism facilitating the expression of two polypeptides from a single mRNA. Commonly, the ribosome interacts with an mRNA secondary structure that promotes -1 frameshifting on a homopolymeric slippery sequence. Recently, we described an unusual -2 frameshifting (-2 PRF) signal directing efficient expression of a transframe protein [nonstructural protein 2TF (nsp2TF)] of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) from an alternative reading frame overlapping the viral replicase gene. Unusually, this arterivirus PRF signal lacks an obvious stimulatory RNA secondary structure, but as confirmed here, can also direct the occurrence of -1 PRF, yielding a third, truncated nsp2 variant named "nsp2N." Remarkably, we now show that both -2 and -1 PRF are transactivated by a protein factor, specifically a PRRSV replicase subunit (nsp1β). Embedded in nsp1β's papain-like autoproteinase domain, we identified a highly conserved, putative RNA-binding motif that is critical for PRF transactivation. The minimal RNA sequence required for PRF was mapped within a 34-nt region that includes the slippery sequence and a downstream conserved CCCANCUCC motif. Interaction of nsp1β with the PRF signal was demonstrated in pull-down assays. These studies demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that a protein can function as a transactivator of ribosomal frameshifting. The newly identified frameshifting determinants provide potential antiviral targets for arterivirus disease control and prevention. Moreover, protein-induced transactivation of frameshifting may be a widely used mechanism, potentially including previously undiscovered viral strategies to regulate viral gene expression and/or modulate host cell translation upon infection. PMID:24825891

  10. Tristetraprolin Represses Estrogen Receptor α Transactivation in Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Tecalco-Cruz, Angeles; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Meneses-Morales, Iván; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) mediates the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) in normal mammary gland, and it is a key participant in breast cancer tumor development. ERα transactivation activity is mediated by the synergistic interaction of two domains designated AF1 and AF2. The function of AF2 is to recruit coactivator and corepressor proteins that allow ERα to oscillate between the roles of transcriptional activator and repressor. In contrast, the mechanism responsible for AF-1 transcriptional activity is not completely understood. In this study, we identified tristetraproline (TTP) as a novel ERα-associated protein. TTP expression in MCF7 cells repressed ERα transactivation and reduced MCF7 cell proliferation and the ability of the cells to form tumors in a mouse model. We show that TTP transcriptional activity is mediated through its recruitment to the promoter region of ERα target genes and its interaction with histone deacetylases, in particular with HDAC1. TTP expression attenuates the coactivating activity of SRC-1, suggesting that exchange between TTP and other coactivators may play an important role in fine-tuning ERα transactivation. These results indicate that TTP acts as a bona fide ERα corepressor and suggest that this protein may be a contributing factor in the development of E2-dependent tumors in breast cancer. PMID:24737323

  11. Interleukin-1 beta transactivates epidermal growth factor receptor via the CXCL1-CXCR2 axis in oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Huei; Syu, Shih-Han; Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Chu, Pei-Yi; Yang, Wen-Chan; Lin, Pinpin; Shieh, Wan-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways and chronic inflammation are common characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Previously, we reported that OSCC cells secrete interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), which promotes the proliferation of the oral premalignant cell line, DOK, and stimulates DOK and OSCC cells to produce the chemokine CXCL1. CXCL1 functions through CXCR2, a G protein-coupled receptor that transactivates EGFR in ovarian and lung cancers. We hypothesized that IL-1β transactivates EGFR through the CXCL1–CXCR2 axis in OSCC. In this study, we demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR is crucial for the IL-1β-mediated proliferation and subsequent bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation of DOK cells because the EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and erlotinib inhibit these abilities in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of IL-1β instantly enhanced CXCL1 expression and secretion (within 15 min) in the DOK and OSCC cell lines. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR was significantly enhanced in DOK (1 h) and OSCC (20 min) cell lines after IL-1β treatment, and both cell lines were inhibited on the addition of an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra). CXCL1 treatment resulted in EGFR phosphorylation, whereas the knockdown of CXCL1 expression by lentivirus-mediated shRNA or the addition of the CXCR2 antagonist SB225002 dramatically reduced IL-1β-mediated EGFR phosphorylation and proliferation of DOK cells. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-1β or CXCL1 markedly inhibited the constitutive or IL-1β-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR in OSCC cells. IL-1β transactivates EGFR through the CXCL1-CXCR2 axis, revealing a novel molecular network in OSCC that is associated with autocrine IL-1β and EGFR signaling. PMID:26462152

  12. Degradation, Promoter Recruitment and Transactivation Mediated by the Extreme N-Terminus of MHC Class II Transactivator CIITA Isoform III

    PubMed Central

    Ethier, Sylvain; Gaudreau, Luc; Steimle, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Multiple relationships between ubiquitin-proteasome mediated protein turnover and transcriptional activation have been well documented, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. One way to induce degradation is via ubiquitination of the N-terminal α-amino group of proteins. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator CIITA is the master regulator of MHC class II gene expression and we found earlier that CIITA is a short-lived protein. Using stable and transient transfections of different CIITA constructs into HEK-293 and HeLa cell lines, we show here that the extreme N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III induces both rapid degradation and transactivation. It is essential that this sequence resides at the N-terminal end of the protein since blocking of the N-terminal end with an epitope-tag stabilizes the protein and reduces transactivation potential. The first ten amino acids of CIITA isoform III act as a portable degron and transactivation sequence when transferred as N-terminal extension to truncated CIITA constructs and are also able to destabilize a heterologous protein. The same is observed with the N-terminal ends of several known N-terminal ubiquitination substrates, such as Id2, Cdt1 and MyoD. Arginine and proline residues within the N-terminal ends contribute to rapid turnover. The N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III is responsible for efficient in vivo recruitment to the HLA-DRA promoter and increased interaction with components of the transcription machinery, such as TBP, p300, p400/Domino, the 19S ATPase S8, and the MHC-II promoter binding complex RFX. These experiments reveal a novel function of free N-terminal ends of proteins in degradation-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:26871568

  13. Degradation, Promoter Recruitment and Transactivation Mediated by the Extreme N-Terminus of MHC Class II Transactivator CIITA Isoform III.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Yves B; Leon Machado, Jorge A; Ethier, Sylvain; Gaudreau, Luc; Steimle, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Multiple relationships between ubiquitin-proteasome mediated protein turnover and transcriptional activation have been well documented, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. One way to induce degradation is via ubiquitination of the N-terminal α-amino group of proteins. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator CIITA is the master regulator of MHC class II gene expression and we found earlier that CIITA is a short-lived protein. Using stable and transient transfections of different CIITA constructs into HEK-293 and HeLa cell lines, we show here that the extreme N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III induces both rapid degradation and transactivation. It is essential that this sequence resides at the N-terminal end of the protein since blocking of the N-terminal end with an epitope-tag stabilizes the protein and reduces transactivation potential. The first ten amino acids of CIITA isoform III act as a portable degron and transactivation sequence when transferred as N-terminal extension to truncated CIITA constructs and are also able to destabilize a heterologous protein. The same is observed with the N-terminal ends of several known N-terminal ubiquitination substrates, such as Id2, Cdt1 and MyoD. Arginine and proline residues within the N-terminal ends contribute to rapid turnover. The N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III is responsible for efficient in vivo recruitment to the HLA-DRA promoter and increased interaction with components of the transcription machinery, such as TBP, p300, p400/Domino, the 19S ATPase S8, and the MHC-II promoter binding complex RFX. These experiments reveal a novel function of free N-terminal ends of proteins in degradation-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:26871568

  14. Structural and Functional Analysis of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3: Localization of the Transactivation and Autoinhibitory Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rongtuan; Mamane, Yael; Hiscott, John

    1999-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) gene encodes a 55-kDa protein which is expressed constitutively in all tissues. In unstimulated cells, IRF-3 is present in an inactive cytoplasmic form; following Sendai virus infection, IRF-3 is posttranslationally modified by protein phosphorylation at multiple serine and threonine residues located in the carboxy terminus. Virus-induced phosphorylation of IRF-3 leads to cytoplasmic to nuclear translocation of phosphorylated IRF-3, association with the transcriptional coactivator CBP/p300, and stimulation of DNA binding and transcriptional activities of virus-inducible genes. Using yeast and mammalian one-hybrid analysis, we now demonstrate that an extended, atypical transactivation domain is located in the C terminus of IRF-3 between amino acids (aa) 134 and 394. We also show that the C-terminal domain of IRF-3 located between aa 380 and 427 participates in the autoinhibition of IRF-3 activity via an intramolecular association with the N-terminal region between aa 98 and 240. After Sendai virus infection, an intermolecular association between IRF-3 proteins is detected, demonstrating a virus-dependent formation of IRF-3 homodimers; this interaction is also observed in the absence of virus infection with a constitutively activated form of IRF-3. Substitution of the C-terminal Ser-Thr phosphorylation sites with the phosphomimetic Asp in the region ISNSHPLSLTSDQ between amino acids 395 and 407 [IRF-3(5D)], but not the adjacent S385 and S386 residues, generates a constitutively activated DNA binding form of IRF-3. In contrast, substitution of S385 and S386 with either Ala or Asp inhibits both DNA binding and transactivation activities of the IRF-3(5D) protein. These studies thus define the transactivation domain of IRF-3, two domains that participate in the autoinhibition of IRF-3 activity, and the regulatory phosphorylation sites controlling IRF-3 dimer formation, DNA binding activity, and association with the CBP/p300

  15. A new Epstein-Barr virus transactivator, R, induces expression of a cytoplasmic early antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, J M; Lieberman, P M; Hayward, S D

    1988-01-01

    Several Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) early promoters respond to a new EBV transactivator encoded by BRLF1, designated R. Transactivation was measured in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays on Raji, BHK, and Vero cells that were cotransfected with the transactivator and target promoters linked to the cat gene. The divergent promoter of BamHI-H was particularly responsive to R transactivation. This large promoter region consists of a leftward TATA box for the NotI repeat gene (BHLF1) and a probable rightward TATA box for the EA-R gene (BHRF1) separated by 940 base pairs of unusual sequence complexity. Sequences within this divergent promoter region appear to confer inducibility by EBV transactivators R and Z (BZLF1). The Z transactivator stimulated expression in both the leftward and rightward directions, and R stimulated expression primarily in the rightward direction, but the MS transactivator (BMLF1) had no activity in either direction. The adenovirus E3 promoter also responded to the R transactivator, but several other herpesvirus and human promoters were nonresponsive. When the divergent promoter was linked to the EA-R gene as it is in the EBV genome, the R and Z transactivators also induced the expression of EA-R in cotransfected cells. This cytoplasmic early antigen is encoded by BHRF1 and may be anchored in intracellular membranes by a carboxy-terminal transmembrane region. Images PMID:2836611

  16. Role of EGFR transactivation in angiotensin II signaling to extracellular regulated kinase in preglomerular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Bradley T; Linnoila, Jenny J; Jackson, Edwin K; Romero, Guillermo G

    2003-03-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II promotes the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK); however, the mechanisms leading to Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation are debated. The currently accepted theory involves transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We have shown that generation of phosphatidic acid (PA) is required for the recruitment of Raf to membranes and the activation of ERK by multiple agonists, including Ang II. In the present report, we confirm that phospholipase D-dependent generation of PA is required for Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat preglomerular smooth muscle cells (PGSMCs). However, EGF stimulation does not activate phospholipase D or generate PA. These observations indicate that EGF recruits Raf to membranes via a mechanism that does not involve PA, and thus, Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK is partially independent of EGFR-mediated signaling cascades. We hypothesized that phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) can also act to recruit Raf to membranes; therefore, inhibition of PI3K should inhibit EGF signaling to ERK. Wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, inhibited EGF-mediated phosphorylation of ERK (IC50, approximately 14 nmol/L). To examine the role of the EGFR in Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK we utilized 100 nmol/L wortmannin to inhibit EGFR signaling to ERK and T19N RhoA to block Ang II-mediated ERK phosphorylation. Wortmannin treatment inhibited EGF-mediated but not Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK. Furthermore, T19N RhoA inhibited Ang II-mediated ERK phosphorylation, whereas T19N RhoA had significantly less effect on EGF-mediated ERK phosphorylation. We conclude that transactivation of the EGFR is not primarily responsible for Ang II-mediated activation of ERK in PGSMCs. PMID:12623996

  17. Stromelysin-3 induction and interstitial collagenase repression by retinoic acid. Therapeutical implication of receptor-selective retinoids dissociating transactivation and AP-1-mediated transrepression.

    PubMed

    Guérin, E; Ludwig, M G; Basset, P; Anglard, P

    1997-04-25

    Human stromelysin-3 and interstitial collagenase are matrix metalloproteinases whose expression by stromal cells in several types of carcinomas has been associated with cancer progression. We compared here the regulation of the expression of both proteinases by retinoids in human fibroblasts. Physiological concentrations of retinoic acid were found to simultaneously induce stromelysin-3 and repress interstitial collagenase. In both cases, the involvement of a transcriptional mechanism was supported by run-on assays. Furthermore, in transient transfection experiments, the activity of the stromelysin-3 promoter was induced by retinoic acid through endogenous receptors acting on a DR1 retinoic acid-responsive element. The ligand-dependent activation of the receptors was also investigated by using selective synthetic retinoids, and we demonstrated that retinoic acid-retinoid X receptor heterodimers were the most potent functional units controlling both stromelysin-3 induction and interstitial collagenase repression. However, specific retinoids dissociating the transactivation and the AP-1-mediated transrepression functions of the receptors were found to repress interstitial collagenase without inducing stromelysin-3. These findings indicate that such retinoids may represent efficient inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase expression in the treatment of human carcinomas. PMID:9111003

  18. Dual effects of daidzein on chicken hepatic vitellogenin II expression and estrogen receptor-mediated transactivation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ying-Dong; Hong, Wen-Jie; Zhou, Yu-Chuan; Grossmann, Roland; Zhao, Ru-Qian

    2010-03-01

    Two in vitro systems were employed to delineate the estrogenic activity of daidzein (Da), alone or in combination with high or low concentrations of estrogen in two cell types possessing different estrogen-receptor (ER) isoforms, ERalpha and/or ERbeta: (1) vitellogenin II (VTG), the egg yolk precursor protein and the endpoint biomarker for estrogenicity, in chicken primary hepatocytes, and (2) CHO-K1 cells transiently co-transfected with ERalpha or ERbeta and estrogen-response elements (ERE) linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Da (100 microM) alone induced VTG mRNA expression in chicken hepatocytes, albeit with much less potency compared to estradiol (E(2)). Da exhibited different effects in the presence of 1 microM and 10 microM E(2). At a concentration of 100 microM, Da enhanced 1 microM E(2)-induced VTG transcription by 2.4-fold, but significantly inhibited 10 microM E(2)-induced VTG mRNA expression in a dose-dependent fashion from 1 to 100 microM. Tamoxifen completely blocked the estrogenic effect of daidzein, alone or in combination with 1 microM of E(2), but did not influence its anti-estrogenic effect on 10 microM E(2)-induced VTG mRNA expression. Furthermore, neither E(2) nor daidzein, alone or in combination, affected ERalpha mRNA expression, yet all the treatments significantly up-regulated ERbeta mRNA expression in chicken hepatocytes. E(2) effectively triggered estrogen-response elements (ERE)-driven reporter gene transactivation in CHO-K1 cells expressing ERalpha or ERbeta and showed much greater potency with ERalpha than with ERbeta. In contrast, daidzein was 1000 times more powerful in stimulating ERbeta- over ERalpha-mediated transactivation. Daidzein, in concentrations ranging from 5 nM to 50 microM, did not affect ERbeta-mediated transactivation induced by 1 nM E(2), but it significantly inhibited ERbeta-mediated transactivation induced by 10 nM E(2) at 500 nM. Despite the tremendous difference in sensitivity between the two in vitro systems

  19. Notch Ankyrin Repeat Domain Variation Influences Leukemogenesis and Myc Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Aster, Jon C.; Bodnar, Nick; Xu, Lanwei; Karnell, Fredrick; Milholland, John M.; Maillard, Ivan; Histen, Gavin; Nam, Yunsun; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Pear, Warren S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The functional interchangeability of mammalian Notch receptors (Notch1-4) in normal and pathophysiologic contexts such as cancer is unsettled. We used complementary in vivo, cell-based and structural analyses to compare the abilities of activated Notch1-4 to support T cell development, induce T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL), and maintain T-ALL cell growth and survival. Principal Findings We find that the activated intracellular domains of Notch1-4 (ICN1-4) all support T cell development in mice and thymic organ culture. However, unlike ICN1-3, ICN4 fails to induce T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) and is unable to rescue the growth of Notch1-dependent T-ALL cell lines. The ICN4 phenotype is mimicked by weak gain-of-function forms of Notch1, suggesting that it stems from a failure to transactivate one or more critical target genes above a necessary threshold. Experiments with chimeric receptors demonstrate that the Notch ankyrin repeat domains differ in their leukemogenic potential, and that this difference correlates with activation of Myc, a direct Notch target that has an important role in Notch-associated T-ALL. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the leukemogenic potentials of Notch receptors vary, and that this functional difference stems in part from divergence among the highly conserved ankyrin repeats, which influence the transactivation of specific target genes involved in leukemogenesis. PMID:22022427

  20. β-Adrenergic Receptor-Mediated Transactivation Of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Decreases Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis Through Differential Subcellular Activation of ERK1/2 and Akt

    PubMed Central

    Grisanti, Laurel A.; Talarico, Jennifer A.; Carter, Rhonda L.; Yu, Justine E.; Repas, Ashley A.; Radcliffe, Scott W.; Tang, Hoang-ai; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Houser, Steven R.; Tilley, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale β-adrenergic receptor (βAR)-mediated transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to relay pro-survival effects via unknown mechanisms. Objective We hypothesized that acute βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation in the heart promotes differential subcellular activation of ERK1/2 and Akt, promoting cell survival through modulation of apoptosis. Methods and Results C57BL/6 mice underwent acute i.p. injection with isoproterenol (ISO) ± AG 1478 (EGFR antagonist) to assess the impact of βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation on phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (P-ERK1/2) and Akt (P-Akt) in distinct cardiac subcellular fractions. Increased P-ERK1/2 and P-Akt were observed in cytosolic, plasma membrane and nuclear fractions following ISO stimulation. Whereas the P-ERK1/2 response was EGFR-sensitive in all fractions, the P-Akt response was EGFR-sensitive only in the plasma membrane and nucleus, results confirmed in primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (RNCM). βAR-mediated EGFR-transactivation also decreased apoptosis in serum-depleted RNCM, as measured via TUNEL as well as caspase 3 activity/cleavage, which were sensitive to inhibition of either ERK1/2 (PD184352) or Akt (LY-294002) signaling. Caspase 3 activity/cleavage was also sensitive to inhibition of transcription, which, with an increase in nuclear P-ERK1/2 and P-Akt in response to ISO, suggested that βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation may regulate apoptotic gene transcription. An Apoptosis PCR Array identified tnfsf10 (TRAIL) to be altered by ISO in an EGFR-sensitive manner, results confirmed via RT-PCR and ELISA measurement of both membrane-bound and soluble cardiomyocyte TRAIL levels. Conclusions βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation induces differential subcellular activation of ERK1/2 and Akt leading to increased cell survival through the modulation of caspase 3 activity and apoptotic gene expression in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24566221

  1. Positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 silences class II transactivator expression in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, N; Gyory, I; Wright, G; Wood, J; Wright, K L

    2001-05-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA) acts as a master switch to activate expression of the genes required for MHC-II antigen presentation. During B-cell to plasma cell differentiation, MHC-II expression is actively silenced, but the mechanism has been unknown. In plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma the repression of MHC-II is associated with the loss of CIITA. We have identified that positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), a transcriptional repressor, inhibits CIITA expression in multiple myeloma cell lines. Repression of CIITA depends on the DNA binding activity of PRDI-BF1 and its specific binding site in the CIITA promoter. Deletion of a histone deacetylase recruitment domain in PRDI-BF1 does not inhibit repression of CIITA nor does blocking histone deacetylase activity. This is in contrast to PRDI-BF1 repression of the c-myc promoter. Repression of CIITA requires either the N-terminal acidic and conserved PR motif or the proline-rich domain. PRDI-BF1 has been shown to be a key regulator of B-cell and macrophage differentiation. These findings now indicate that PRDI-BF1 has at least two mechanisms of repression whose function is dependent on the nature of the target promoter. Importantly, PRDI-BF1 is defined as the key molecule in silencing CIITA and thus MHC-II in multiple myeloma cells. PMID:11279146

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2 regulates the class II transactivator.

    PubMed

    Voong, Lilien N; Slater, Allison R; Kratovac, Sebila; Cressman, Drew E

    2008-04-01

    The expression of major histocompatibility class II genes is necessary for proper antigen presentation and induction of an immune response. This expression is initiated by the class II transactivator, CIITA. The establishment of the active form of CIITA is controlled by a series of post-translational events, including GTP binding, ubiquitination, and dimerization. However, the role of phosphorylation is less clearly defined as are the consequences of phosphorylation on CIITA activity and the identity of the kinases involved. In this study we show that the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) interact directly with CIITA, targeting serine residues in the amino terminus of the protein, including serine 288. Inhibition of this phosphorylation by dominant-negative forms of ERK or by treatment of cells with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 resulted in the increase in CIITA-mediated gene expression from a class II promoter, enhanced the nuclear concentration of CIITA, and impaired its ability to bind to the nuclear export factor, CRM1. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2 activity had little effect on serine-to-alanine mutant forms of CIITA. These data suggest a model whereby ERK1/2-mediated phosphorylation of CIITA down-regulates CIITA activity by priming it for nuclear export, thus providing a means for cells to tightly regulate the extent of antigen presentation. PMID:18245089

  3. Are all regions of folded proteins that undergo ligand-dependent order-disorder transitions targets for allosteric peptide mimetics?†

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Aron W.

    2013-01-01

    Although the classical view of how proteins function relied on well folded structures, it is now recognized that the function of many proteins is dependent on being intrinsically disordered. The primary consideration in this work is the intermediate group of proteins that are overall well folded, but which contain small regions that undergo order/disorder transitions. In particular, the current focus is on those order/disorder transitions that are energetically coupled to ligand binding. As exemplified by the case of human liver pyruvate kinase (hL-PYK), peptides that mimic the sequence of the order/disorder region can be used as allosteric regulators of the enzyme. Based on this example and others reported in the literature, we propose that a similar use of peptides that mimic protein regions that experience ligand-dependent order-disorder transitions can be a generalized initiation point for the development of allosteric drugs. PMID:23520021

  4. In situ autoradiography and ligand-dependent tyrosine kinase activity reveal insulin receptors and insulin-like growth factor I receptors in prepancreatic chicken embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Girbau, M; Bassas, L; Alemany, J; de Pablo, F

    1989-01-01

    We previously reported specific cross-linking of 125I-labeled insulin and 125I-labeled insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the alpha subunit of their respective receptors in chicken embryos of 20 somites and older. To achieve adequate sensitivity and localize spatially the receptors in younger embryos, we adapted an autoradiographic technique using whole-mounted chicken blastoderms. Insulin receptors and IGF-I receptors were expressed and could be localized as early as gastrulation, before the first somite is formed. Relative density was analyzed by a computer-assisted image system, revealing overall slightly higher binding of IGF-I than of insulin. Structures rich in both types of receptors were predominantly of ectodermal origin: Hensen's node in gastrulating embryos and neural folds, neural tube and optic vesicles during neurulation. The signal transduction capability of the receptors in early organogenesis was assessed by their ability to phosphorylate the exogenous substrate poly(Glu80Tyr20). Ligand-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation was demonstrable with both insulin and IGF-I in glycoprotein-enriched preparations from embryos at days 2 through 6 of embryogenesis. There was a developmentally regulated change in ligand-dependent tyrosine kinase activity, with a sharp increase from day 2 to day 4, in contrast with a small increase in the ligand binding. Binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I was, with the solubilized receptors, severalfold higher than binding of 125I-labeled insulin. However, the insulin-dependent phosphorylation was as high as the IGF-I-dependent phosphorylation at each developmental stage. Images PMID:2548191

  5. The N-terminal part of TIF1, a putative mediator of the ligand-dependent activation function (AF-2) of nuclear receptors, is fused to B-raf in the oncogenic protein T18.

    PubMed Central

    Le Douarin, B; Zechel, C; Garnier, J M; Lutz, Y; Tora, L; Pierrat, P; Heery, D; Gronemeyer, H; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) bound to response elements mediate the effects of cognate ligands on gene expression. Their ligand-dependent activation function, AF-2, presumably acts on the basal transcription machinery through intermediary proteins/mediators. We have isolated a mouse nuclear protein, TIF1, which enhances RXR and RAR AF-2 in yeast and interacts in a ligand-dependent manner with several NRs in yeast and mammalian cells, as well as in vitro. Remarkably, these interactions require the amino acids constituting the AF-2 activating domain conserved in all active NRs. Moreover, the oestrogen receptor (ER) AF-2 antagonist hydroxytamoxifen cannot promote ER-TIF1 interaction. We propose that TIF1, which contains several conserved domains found in transcriptional regulatory proteins, is a mediator of ligand-dependent AF-2. Interestingly, the TIF1 N-terminal moiety is fused to B-raf in the mouse oncoprotein T18. Images PMID:7744009

  6. Acetylation reduces SOX9 nuclear entry and ACAN gene transactivation in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bar Oz, Michal; Kumar, Ashok; Elayyan, Jinan; Reich, Eli; Binyamin, Milana; Kandel, Leonid; Liebergall, Meir; Steinmeyer, Juergen; Lefebvre, Veronique; Dvir-Ginzberg, Mona

    2016-06-01

    Changes in the content of aggrecan, an essential proteoglycan of articular cartilage, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA), a prevalent age-related, degenerative joint disease. Here, we examined the effect of SOX9 acetylation on ACAN transactivation in the context of osteoarthritis. Primary chondrocytes freshly isolated from degenerated OA cartilage displayed lower levels of ACAN mRNA and higher levels of acetylated SOX9 compared with cells from intact regions of OA cartilage. Degenerated OA cartilage presented chondrocyte clusters bearing diffused immunostaining for SOX9 compared with intact cartilage regions. Primary human chondrocytes freshly isolated from OA knee joints were cultured in monolayer or in three-dimensional alginate microbeads (3D). SOX9 was hypo-acetylated in 3D cultures and displayed enhanced binding to a -10 kb ACAN enhancer, a result consistent with higher ACAN mRNA levels than in monolayer cultures. It also co-immunoprecipitated with SIRT1, a major deacetylase responsible for SOX9 deacetylation. Finally, immunofluorescence assays revealed increased nuclear localization of SOX9 in primary chondrocytes treated with the NAD SIRT1 cofactor, than in cells treated with a SIRT1 inhibitor. Inhibition of importin β by importazole maintained SOX9 in the cytoplasm, even in the presence of NAD. Based on these data, we conclude that deacetylation promotes SOX9 nuclear translocation and hence its ability to activate ACAN. PMID:26910618

  7. The Mediator complex subunit MED25 is targeted by the N-terminal transactivation domain of the PEA3 group members

    PubMed Central

    Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Verreman, Kathye; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; de Launoit, Yvan; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2013-01-01

    PEA3, ERM and ER81 belong to the PEA3 subfamily of Ets transcription factors and play important roles in a number of tissue-specific processes. Transcriptional activation by PEA3 subfamily factors requires their characteristic amino-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD). However, the cellular targets of this domain remain largely unknown. Using ERM as a prototype, we show that the minimal N-terminal TAD activates transcription by contacting the activator interacting domain (ACID)/Prostate tumor overexpressed protein 1 (PTOV) domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. We further show that depletion of MED25 disrupts the association of ERM with the Mediator in vitro. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of MED25 as well as the overexpression of MED25-ACID and MED25-VWA domains efficiently inhibit the transcriptional activity of ERM. Moreover, mutations of amino acid residues that prevent binding of MED25 to ERM strongly reduce transactivation by ERM. Finally we show that siRNA depletion of MED25 diminishes PEA3-driven expression of MMP-1 and Mediator recruitment. In conclusion, this study identifies the PEA3 group members as the first human transcriptional factors that interact with the MED25 ACID/PTOV domain and establishes MED25 as a crucial transducer of their transactivation potential. PMID:23531547

  8. Global and local perturbation of the tomato microRNA pathway by a trans-activated DICER-LIKE 1 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Arazi, Tzahi

    2014-01-01

    DICER-like 1 (DCL1) is a major player in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and accordingly, its few known loss-of-function mutants are either lethal or display arrested development. Consequently, generation of dcl1 mutants by reverse genetics and functional analysis of DCL1 in late-developing organs are challenging. Here, these challenges were resolved through the unique use of trans-activated RNA interference. Global, as well as organ-specific tomato DCL1 (SlDCL1) silencing was induced by crossing the generated responder line (OP:SlDCL1IR) with the appropriate driver line. Constitutive trans-activation knocked down SlDCL1 levels by ~95%, resulting in severe abnormalities including post-germination growth arrest accompanied by decreased miRNA and 21-nucleotide small RNA levels, but prominently elevated levels of 22-nucleotide small RNAs. The increase in the 22-nucleotide small RNAs was correlated with specific up-regulation of SlDCL2b and SlDCL2d, which are probably involved in their biogenesis. Leaf- and flower-specific OP:SlDCL1IR trans-activation inhibited blade outgrowth, induced premature bud senescence and produced pale petals, respectively, emphasizing the importance of SlDCL1-dependent small RNAs in these processes. Together, these results establish OP:SlDCL1IR as an efficient tool for analysing processes regulated by SlDCL1-mediated gene regulation in tomato. PMID:24376253

  9. Interactions between the Class II Transactivator and CREB Binding Protein Increase Transcription of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Kanazawa, Satoshi; Jean, Dickson; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (class II) genes are regulated in a B-cell-specific and gamma interferon-inducible fashion. The master switch for the expression of these genes is the class II transactivator (CIITA). In this report, we demonstrate that one of the functions of CIITA is to recruit the CREB binding protein (CBP) to class II promoters. Not only functional but also specific binding interactions between CIITA and CBP were demonstrated. Moreover, a dominant negative form of CBP decreased the activity of class II promoters and levels of class II determinants on the surface of cells. Finally, the inhibition of class II gene expression by the glucocorticoid hormone could be attributed to the squelching of CBP by the glucocorticoid receptor. We conclude that CBP, a histone acetyltransferase, plays an important role in the transcription of class II genes. PMID:9858618

  10. Ligand-dependent responses of the silkworm prothoracicotropic hormone receptor, Torso, are maintained by unusual intermolecular disulfide bridges in the transmembrane region

    PubMed Central

    Konogami, Tadafumi; Yang, Yiwen; Ogihara, Mari H.; Hikiba, Juri; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Saito, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    The insect membrane-protein, Torso, is a member of the receptor-tyrosine-kinase family, and is activated by its ligand, prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH). Although PTTH is one of the most important regulators of insect development, the mechanism of Torso activation by the hormone has remained elusive. In this study, using heterologous expression in cultured Drosophila S2 cells, we detected ligand-independent dimerization of silkworm Torso, and found that the receptor molecules in the dimer were linked by intermolecular disulfide bridges. By examining the oligomerization states of several truncation and substitution mutants of Torso, atypical cysteine residues in the transmembrane region were identified as being responsible for the intermolecular linkage in the dimer. The replacement of all of the cysteines in the region with phenylalanines abolished the disulfide-bond-mediated dimerization; however, non-covalent dimerization of the mutant was detected using a cross-linking reagent, both with and without ligand stimulation. This non-covalent dimerization caused apparent receptor autophosphorylation independently of the ligand stimulation, but did not promote the ERK phosphorylation in the downstream signaling pathway. The unique Torso structure with the intermolecular disulfide bridges in the transmembrane region is necessary to maintain the ligand-dependent receptor functions of autophosphorylation and downstream activation. PMID:26928300

  11. Ligand-dependent corepressor contributes to transcriptional repression by C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor ZBRK1 through association with KRAB-associated protein-1

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Mario R.; Verway, Mark; Benslama, Radia Ouelaa; Birlea, Mirela; Bouttier, Manuella; Dimitrov, Vassil; Mader, Sylvie; White, John H.

    2014-01-01

    We identified a novel interaction between ligand-dependent corepressor (LCoR) and the corepressor KRAB-associated protein-1 (KAP-1). The two form a complex with C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor ZBRK1 on an intronic binding site in the growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible α (GADD45A) gene and a novel site in the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) gene. Chromatin at both sites is enriched for histone methyltransferase SETDB1 and histone 3 lysine 9 trimethylation, a repressive epigenetic mark. Depletion of ZBRK1, KAP-1 or LCoR led to elevated GADD45A and FGF2 expression in malignant and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, and caused apoptotic death. Loss of viability could be rescued by simultaneous knockdowns of FGF2 and transcriptional coregulators or by blocking FGF2 function. FGF2 was not concurrently expressed with any of the transcriptional coregulators in breast malignancies, suggesting an inverse correlation between their expression patterns. We propose that ZBRK1, KAP-1 and LCoR form a transcriptional complex that silences gene expression, in particular FGF2, which maintains breast cell viability. Given the broad expression patterns of both LCoR and KAP-1 during development and in the adult, this complex may have several regulatory functions that extend beyond cell survival, mediated by interactions with ZBRK1 or other C2H2 zinc-finger proteins. PMID:24829459

  12. STAT3-dependent transactivation of miRNA genes following Toxoplasma gondii infection in macrophage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii can infect and replicate in virtually any nucleated cell in many species of warm-blooded animals; T. gondii has elaborate mechanisms to counteract host-cell apoptosis in order to maintain survival and breed in the host cells. Methods Using microarray profiling and a combination of conventional molecular approaches, we investigated the levels of microRNAs (miRNAs ) in human macrophage during T. gondii infection. We used molecular tools to examine Toxoplasma-upregualted miRNAs to revealed potential signal transducers and activators of transcription 3(STAT3) binding sites in the promoter elements of a subset of miRNA genes. We analysed the apoptosis of human macrophage with the functional inhibition of the STAT3-binding miRNAs by flow cytometry. Results Our results demonstrated differential alterations in the mature miRNA expression profile in human macrophage following T. gondii infection. Database analysis of Toxoplasma-upregulated miRNAs revealed potential STAT3 binding sites in the promoter elements of a subset of miRNA genes. We demonstrated that miR-30c-1, miR-125b-2, miR-23b-27b-24-1 and miR-17 ~ 92 cluster genes were transactivated through promoter binding of the STAT3 following T. gondii infection. Importantly, functional inhibition of selected STAT3-binding miRNAs in human macropahges increased apoptosis of host cells. Conclusions A panel of miRNAs is regulated through promoter binding of the STAT3 in human macrophage and these miRNAs are involved in anti-apoptosis in response to T. gondii infection. PMID:24341525

  13. Overexpression of RPS27a contributes to enhanced chemoresistance of CML cells to imatinib by the transactivated STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yi; Yang, Guang; Gao, Minjie; Xu, Hongwei; Zhan, Fenghuang; Shi, Jumei; Zhang, Yiwen; Wu, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    STAT3 plays a pivotal role in the hematopoietic system, which constitutively activated by BCR–ABL via JAK and Erk/MAP-kinase pathways. Phospho-STAT3 was overexpressed in imatinib-resistant CML patients as relative to imatinib responsive ones. By activation of the STAT3 pathway, BCR–ABL can promote cell cycling, and inhibit differentiation and apoptosis. Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) performs extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. RPS27a can promote proliferation, regulate cell cycle progression and inhibit apoptosis of leukemia cells. However, the relationship between STAT3 and RPS27a has not been reported. In this study, we detected a significantly increased expression of STAT3 and RPS27a in bone marrow samples from CML-AP/BP patients compared with those from CML-CP. In addition, we also demonstrated that it was a positive correlation between the level of STAT3 and that of RPS27a. Imatinib-resistant K562/G01 cells expressed significantly higher levels of STAT3 and RPS27a compared with those of K562 cells. RPS27a could be transactivated by p-STAT3 through the specific p-STAT3-binding site located nt −633 to −625 and −486 to −478 of the RPS27a gene promoter in a dose-dependent manner. The transactivated RPS27a could decrease the percentage of apoptotic CML cells induced by imatinib. And the effect of STAT3 overexpression could be counteracted by the p-STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 or RPS27a knockdown. These results suggest that drugs targeting STAT3/p-STAT3/RPS27a combining with TKI might represent a novel therapy strategy in patients with TKI-resistant CML. PMID:26942564

  14. A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation

    PubMed Central

    George, Amee J.; Purdue, Brooke W.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Thomas, Daniel W.; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A.; Morgan, Kylie A.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Thomas, Walter G.; Hannan, Ross D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R–EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R–EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R–EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR–EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

  15. A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation.

    PubMed

    George, Amee J; Purdue, Brooke W; Gould, Cathryn M; Thomas, Daniel W; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A; Morgan, Kylie A; Simpson, Kaylene J; Thomas, Walter G; Hannan, Ross D

    2013-12-01

    The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R-EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R-EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R-EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR-EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

  16. EGFRvIII-mediated transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases in glioma: mechanism and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Greenall, S A; Donoghue, J F; Van Sinderen, M; Dubljevic, V; Budiman, S; Devlin, M; Street, I; Adams, T E; Johns, T G

    2015-10-01

    A truncation mutant of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, is commonly expressed in glioma, an incurable brain cancer. EGFRvIII is tumorigenic, in part, through its transactivation of other receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Preventing the effects of this transactivation could form part of an effective therapy for glioma; however, the mechanism by which the transactivation occurs is unknown. Focusing on the RTK MET, we show that MET transactivation in U87MG human glioma cells in vitro is proportional to EGFRvIII activity and involves MET heterodimerization associated with a focal adhesion kinase (FAK) scaffold. The transactivation of certain other RTKs was, however, independent of FAK. Simultaneously targeting EGFRvIII (with panitumumab) and the transactivated RTKs themselves (with motesanib) in an intracranial mouse model of glioma resulted in significantly greater survival than with either agent alone, indicating that cotargeting these RTKs has potent antitumor efficacy and providing a strategy for treating EGFRvIII-expressing gliomas, which are usually refractory to treatment. PMID:25659577

  17. Pigment-cell-specific genes from fibroblasts are transactivated after chromosomal transfer into melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.P.; Davidson, R.L.; Shows, T.B.

    1994-02-01

    Human and mouse fibroblast chromosomes carrying tyrosinase or b-locus genes were introduced, by microcell hybridization, into pigmented Syrian hamster melanoma cells, and the microcell hybrids were tested for transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. By using species-specific PCR amplification to distinguish fibroblast and melanoma cDNAs, it was demonstrated that the previously silent fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes were transactivated following chromosomal transfer into pigmented melanoma cells. However, transactivation of the mouse fibroblast tyrosinase gene was unstable in microcell hybrid subclones and possibly dependent on a second fibroblast locus that could have segregated in the subclones. This second locus was not necessary for transactivation of the fibroblast b-locus gene, thus demonstrating noncoordinate transactivation of fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. Transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase gene in microcell hybrids apparently is dependent on the absence of a putative fibroblast extinguisher locus for tyrosinase gene expression, which presumably is responsible for the extinction of pigmentation in hybrids between karyotypically complete fibroblasts and melanoma cells. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Cell type-dependent divergence of transactivation by glucocorticoid receptor ligand.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Katsunao; Nagase, Hideki; Miyake, Hidekazu; Kiniwa, Mamoru; Ikizawa, Koichi

    2002-12-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor regulates gene expression mainly by two mechanisms; transactivation and trans-repression. A ligand with strong transrepression and weak transactivation activity is predicted to be a beneficial agent with potent anti-inflammatory activity and minor adverse effects. Recently, the profile of a synthetic steroid, RU24858, has been reported to fulfill this condition in vitro, but others have reported no dissociation between the anti-inflammatory activity and side effects in vivo. To gain further information on the profile of this compound, we evaluated its transactivation ability using a reporter gene analysis both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro analysis, RU24858 demonstrated only a weak transactivation activity in HeLa cells, when compared with prednisolone. In CV-1 cells, however, these two glucocorticoids exhibited equivalent transactivation activities. This behavior is independent of whether the reporter gene is regulated by mouse mammary tumor virus promoter or multiple copies of glucocorticoid response element. When the reporter plasmid was inoculated into mouse abdominal skin using a gene gun, followed by orally administration of glucocorticoids, RU24858 induced significantly higher reporter enzyme activity than prednisolone. These results suggest that the profile of RU24858 is divergent and its transactivation ability is comparable to prednisolone depending on the cell-type both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:12499651

  19. Analysis of Cytochrome P450 CYP119 Ligand-dependent Conformational Dynamics by Two-dimensional NMR and X-ray Crystallography*

    PubMed Central

    Basudhar, Debashree; Madrona, Yarrow; Kandel, Sylvie; Lampe, Jed N.; Nishida, Clinton R.; de Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz

    2015-01-01

    Defining the conformational states of cytochrome P450 active sites is critical for the design of agents that minimize drug-drug interactions, the development of isoform-specific P450 inhibitors, and the engineering of novel oxidative catalysts. We used two-dimensional 1H,15N HSQC chemical shift perturbation mapping of 15N-labeled Phe residues and x-ray crystallography to examine the ligand-dependent conformational dynamics of CYP119. Active site Phe residues were most affected by the binding of azole inhibitors and fatty acid substrates, in agreement with active site localization of the conformational changes. This was supported by crystallography, which revealed movement of the F-G loop with various azoles. Nevertheless, the NMR chemical shift perturbations caused by azoles and substrates were distinguishable. The absence of significant chemical shift perturbations with several azoles revealed binding of ligands to an open conformation similar to that of the ligand-free state. In contrast, 4-phenylimidazole caused pronounced NMR changes involving Phe-87, Phe-144, and Phe-153 that support the closed conformation found in the crystal structure. The same closed conformation is observed by NMR and crystallography with a para-fluoro substituent on the 4-phenylimidazole, but a para-chloro or bromo substituent engendered a second closed conformation. An open conformation is thus favored in solution with many azole ligands, but para-substituted phenylimidazoles give rise to two closed conformations that depend on the size of the para-substituent. The results suggest that ligands selectively stabilize discrete cytochrome P450 conformational states. PMID:25670859

  20. Human rhomboid family-1 gene RHBDF1 participates in GPCR-mediated transactivation of EGFR growth signals in head and neck squamous cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Huafei; Thomas, Sufi M.; Yan, Zhen-Wen; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Vogt, Andreas; Li, Lu-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an activated oncogene in many cancers. It can be transactivated by ligands of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We show here that a novel gene, human rhomboid family-1 (RHBDF1), which was recently reported to have a pivotal role in epithelial cancer cell growth in culture and in xenograft tumors, participates in the modulation of GPCR-mediated EGFR transactivation. The RHBDF1 protein localizes mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum. Silencing the RHBDF1 gene in head and neck squamous cancer cell line 1483 cells with siRNA causes an inhibition of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) -induced phosphorylation of EGFR and EGFR-dependent signaling proteins p44/42 MAPK and AKT, accompanied by an inhibition of GRP-induced survival, proliferation, and invasion of the cells. The EGFR signaling pathway itself remains intact, however, as the cells remain responsive to exogenous EGF. In addition, RHBDF1 gene silencing disrupts GRP-stimulated secretion of EGFR ligand TGF-α, but not the production of latent TGF-α, whereas engineered overexpression of RHBDF1 markedly accelerates the secretion of TGF-α. These findings are consistent with the view that RHBDF1 is critically involved in a GPCR ligand-stimulated process leading to the activation of latent EGFR ligands.—Zou, H., Thomas, S. M., Yan, Z.-W., Grandis, J. R., Vogt, A., Li, L.-Y. Human rhomboid family-1 gene RHBDF1 participates in GPCR-mediated transactivation of EGFR growth signals in head and neck squamous cancer cells. PMID:18832597

  1. Sp1 trans-activates the murine H(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(2)-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Li, Mei; Zhang, Dongyu; Xu, William; Kone, Bruce C

    2009-07-01

    The H(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(2) (HKalpha2) gene of the renal collecting duct and distal colon plays a central role in potassium and acid-base homeostasis, yet its transcriptional control remains poorly characterized. We previously demonstrated that the proximal 177 bp of its 5'-flanking region confers basal transcriptional activity in murine inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD3) cells and that NF-kappaB and CREB-1 bind this region to alter transcription. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the -144/-135 Sp element influences basal HKalpha2 gene transcription in these cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays using probes for -154/-127 revealed Sp1-containing DNA-protein complexes in nuclear extracts of mIMCD3 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated that Sp1, but not Sp3, binds to this promoter region of the HKalpha2 gene in mIMCD3 cells in vivo. HKalpha2 minimal promoter-luciferase constructs with point mutations in the -144/-135 Sp element exhibited much lower activity than the wild-type promoter in transient transfection assays. Overexpression of Sp1, but not Sp3, trans-activated an HKalpha2 proximal promoter-luciferase construct in mIMCD3 cells as well as in SL2 insect cells, which lack Sp factors. Conversely, small interfering RNA knockdown of Sp1 inhibited endogenous HKalpha2 mRNA expression, and binding of Sp1 to chromatin associated with the proximal HKalpha2 promoter without altering the binding or regulatory influence of NF-kappaB p65 or CREB-1 on the proximal HKalpha2 promoter. We conclude that Sp1 plays an important and positive role in controlling basal HKalpha2 gene expression in mIMCD3 cells in vivo and in vitro. PMID:19420113

  2. Stimulation of Inducible Nitric Oxide by Hepatitis B Virus Transactivator Protein HBx Requires MTA1 Coregulator*

    PubMed Central

    Bui-Nguyen, Tri M.; Pakala, Suresh B.; Sirigiri, Divijendranatha Reddy; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid; Kumar, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders, including hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. Transactivator protein HBx, a major regulator of cellular responses of hepatitis B virus, is known to induce the expression of MTA1 (metastasis-associated protein 1) coregulator via NF-κB signaling in hepatic cells. However, the underlying mechanism of HBx regulation of the inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) pathway remains unknown. Here we provide evidence that MTA1 is a positive regulator of iNOS transcription and plays a mechanistic role in HBx stimulation of iNOS expression and activity. We found that the HBx-MTA1 complex is recruited onto the human iNOS promoter in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Pharmacological inhibition of the NF-κB signaling prevented the ability of HBx to stimulate the transcription, the expression, and the activity of iNOS; nevertheless, these effects could be substantially rescued by MTA1 dysregulation. We further discovered that HBx-mediated stimulation of MTA1 is paralleled by the suppression of miR-661, a member of the small noncoding RNAs, recently shown to target MTA1. We observed that miR-661 controls of MTA1 expression contributed to the expression and activity of iNOS in HBx-expressing HepG2 cells. Accordingly, depletion of MTA1 by either miR-661 or siRNA in HBx-expressing cells severely impaired the ability of HBx to modulate the endogenous levels of iNOS and nitrite production. Together, these findings reveal an inherent role of MTA1 in HBx regulation of iNOS expression and consequently its function in the liver cancer cells. PMID:20022949

  3. HDAC1 bound to the Cyp1a1 promoter blocks histone acetylation associated with Ah receptor-mediated transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Schnekenburger, Michael; Peng, Li; Puga, Alvaro

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic bioactivation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as the environmental procarcinogen benzo[a]pyrene, is catalyzed by a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase encoded by the substrate-inducible Cyp1a1 gene. Cyp1a1 induction requires trans-activation by the heterodimeric transcriptional complex formed by the liganded Ah receptor (AHR) and its partner, ARNT. Previously, we showed that constitutively bound HDAC1 dissociates from Cyp1a1 promoter chromatin after ligand-mediated induction, concomitantly with the recruitment of AHR/ARNT complexes and p300. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that HDAC1 binding maintains the Cyp1a1 gene in a silenced state in uninduced cells. We find that Cyp1a1 induction by the AHR/ARNT is associated with modification of specific chromatin marks, including hyperacetylation of histone H3K14 and H4K16, trimethylation of histone H3K4, and phosphorylation of H3S10. HDAC1 and DNMT1 form complexes on the Cyp1a1 promoter of uninduced cells but HDAC1 inhibition alone is not sufficient to induce Cyp1a1 expression, although it allows for the hyperacetylation of H3K14 and H4K16 to levels similar to those found in B[a]P-induced cells. These results show that by blocking modification of histone marks, HDAC1 plays a central role in Cyp1a1 expression and that its removal is a necessary but not sufficient condition for Cyp1a1 induction, underscoring the requirement for a concerted series of chromatin remodeling events to complete the initial steps of gene trans-activation by the Ah receptor. PMID:17707923

  4. Probing the structure and function of the estrogen receptor ligand binding domain by analysis of mutants with altered transactivation characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, F C; Lee, H S; Ferrara, J; Willson, T M; White, J H

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a genetic screen for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to isolate estrogen receptor (ER) mutants with altered transactivation characteristics. Use of a "reverse" ER, in which the mutagenized ligand binding domain was placed at the N terminus of the receptor, eliminated the isolation of truncated constitutively active mutants. A library was screened with a low-affinity estrogen, 2-methoxyestrone (2ME), at concentrations 50-fold lower than those required for activation of the unmutagenized ER. Several mutants displaying enhanced sensitivity to 2ME were isolated. We further characterized a mutant carrying the substitution L536P, which was located immediately N terminal to the AF-2-activating domain of the receptor. Amino acid 536 corresponds to a ligand contact residue in retinoic acid receptor gamma, suggesting that key contact points are conserved among receptors. Introduction of L536P into the original ER cDNA isolate HE0, which contains the substitution G400V, rendered the receptor more sensitive to a variety of agonists. When introduced into the wild-type ER HEG0, L536P also rendered the receptor more sensitive to agonists, and, in addition, induced high levels of constitutive activity that could be inhibited by antiestrogens. Estrogens containing a keto substitution in the steroid D ring, but not those containing a hydroxyl group, were full agonists of L536P-HEG0. Limited proteolytic analysis suggested that the L536P substitution, which is located immediately N terminal to the AF-2 domain, induces a conformational change in the ER that partially mimics binding by hormone. Both HEG0 and L536P-HEG0 formed complexes with hsp90 in vitro, indicating a lack of correlation between interaction with hsp90 in vitro and hormonal regulation of ER transactivation in vivo. This supports the idea that a factor(s) acting downstream of hsp90 is important for controlling activity of the hormone-free receptor. PMID:9234721

  5. p53 Transactivation and the Impact of Mutations, Cofactors and Small Molecules Using a Simplified Yeast-Based Screening System

    PubMed Central

    Bisio, Alessandra; Lion, Mattia; Jordan, Jennifer; Fronza, Gilberto; Menichini, Paola; Resnick, Michael A.; Inga, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Background The p53 tumor suppressor, which is altered in most cancers, is a sequence-specific transcription factor that is able to modulate the expression of many target genes and influence a variety of cellular pathways. Inactivation of the p53 pathway in cancer frequently occurs through the expression of mutant p53 protein. In tumors that retain wild type p53, the pathway can be altered by upstream modulators, particularly the p53 negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4. Methodology/Principal Findings Given the many factors that might influence p53 function, including expression levels, mutations, cofactor proteins and small molecules, we expanded our previously described yeast-based system to provide the opportunity for efficient investigation of their individual and combined impacts in a miniaturized format. The system integrates i) variable expression of p53 proteins under the finely tunable GAL1,10 promoter, ii) single copy, chromosomally located p53-responsive and control luminescence reporters, iii) enhanced chemical uptake using modified ABC-transporters, iv) small-volume formats for treatment and dual-luciferase assays, and v) opportunities to co-express p53 with other cofactor proteins. This robust system can distinguish different levels of expression of WT and mutant p53 as well as interactions with MDM2 or 53BP1. Conclusions/Significance We found that the small molecules Nutlin and RITA could both relieve the MDM2-dependent inhibition of WT p53 transactivation function, while only RITA could impact p53/53BP1 functional interactions. PRIMA-1 was ineffective in modifying the transactivation capacity of WT p53 and missense p53 mutations. This dual-luciferase assay can, therefore, provide a high-throughput assessment tool for investigating a matrix of factors that can influence the p53 network, including the effectiveness of newly developed small molecules, on WT and tumor-associated p53 mutants as well as interacting proteins. PMID:21674059

  6. Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor mediates muscarinic stimulation of focal adhesion kinase in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Calandrella, Sean O; Barrett, Kim E; Keely, Stephen J

    2005-04-01

    We have previously shown that the Gq protein coupled receptor (GqPCR) agonist, carbachol (CCh), transactivates and recruits epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr)-dependent signaling mechanisms in intestinal epithelial cells. Increasing evidence suggests that GqPCR agonists can also recruit focal adhesion-dependent signaling pathways in some cell types. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate if CCh stimulates activation of the focal adhesion-associated protein, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), in intestinal epithelia and, if so, to examine the signaling mechanisms involved. Experiments were carried out on monolayers of T84 cells grown on permeable supports. CCh rapidly induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK in T84 cells. This effect was accompanied by phosphorylation of another focal adhesion-associated protein, paxillin, and association of FAK with paxillin. CCh-stimulated FAK phosphorylation was inhibited by a chelator of intracellular Ca2+, BAPTA/AM (20 microM), and was mimicked by thapsigargin (2 microM), which mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ in a receptor-independent fashion. CCh also induced association of FAK with the EGFr and FAK phosphorylation was attenuated by an EGFr inhibitor, tyrphostin AG1478, and an inhibitor of Src family kinases, PP2. The actin cytoskeleton disruptor, cytochalasin D (20 microM), abolished FAK phosphorylation in response to CCh but did not alter CCh-induced EGFr or ERK MAPK activation. In summary, these data demonstrate that agonists of GqPCRs have the ability to induce FAK activation in intestinal epithelial cells. GqPCR-induced FAK activation is mediated by via a pathway involving transactivation of the EGFr and alterations in the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:15389641

  7. MafA has strong cell transforming ability but is a weak transactivator.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Makoto; Kataoka, Kohsuke; Vogt, Peter K

    2003-09-11

    The maf oncogene of the avian oncogenic retrovirus AS42 encodes a nuclear bZip protein, v-Maf, that recognizes sequences related to the AP-1 target site. The corresponding cellular protein, c-Maf belongs to a family of related bZip proteins together with MafA and MafB. In this paper, we compare the transactivation and cell transforming abilities of MafA and MafB along with two forms of the c-Maf protein. These proteins induce cellular transformation when expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts. In reporter assays, MafA is a much less effective transactivator than the other Maf proteins, but unexpectedly shows the strongest activity in cell transformation. Chimeras of MafA and MafB correlate the strong cell transforming ability of MafA with its DNA-binding domain. The DNA-binding domain of MafA is also correlated with weak transactivation. Additional mutagenesis experiments show that transactivation and transformation by MafA are also controlled by phosphorylation of two conserved serine residues in the transactivation domain. Finally, we constructed MafA-estrogen receptor fusion molecules that show tightly hormone-dependent cell transforming ability. These regulatable constructs permit a kinetic characterization of target gene responses and facilitate discrimination between direct and indirect targets. PMID:12970735

  8. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  9. Molecular Basis of Ligand-Dependent Regulation of NadR, the Transcriptional Repressor of Meningococcal Virulence Factor NadA

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Alessia; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Fagnocchi, Luca; Cantini, Francesca; Haag, Andreas F.; Brier, Sébastien; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Delany, Isabel; Bottomley, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is present on the meningococcal surface and contributes to adhesion to and invasion of human cells. NadA is also one of three recombinant antigens in the recently-approved Bexsero vaccine, which protects against serogroup B meningococcus. The amount of NadA on the bacterial surface is of direct relevance in the constant battle of host-pathogen interactions: it influences the ability of the pathogen to engage human cell surface-exposed receptors and, conversely, the bacterial susceptibility to the antibody-mediated immune response. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms which regulate nadA expression levels, which are predominantly controlled by the transcriptional regulator NadR (Neisseria adhesin A Regulator) both in vitro and in vivo. NadR binds the nadA promoter and represses gene transcription. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA), a catabolite present in human saliva both under physiological conditions and during bacterial infection, the binding of NadR to the nadA promoter is attenuated and nadA expression is induced. NadR also mediates ligand-dependent regulation of many other meningococcal genes, for example the highly-conserved multiple adhesin family (maf) genes, which encode proteins emerging with important roles in host-pathogen interactions, immune evasion and niche adaptation. To gain insights into the regulation of NadR mediated by 4-HPA, we combined structural, biochemical, and mutagenesis studies. In particular, two new crystal structures of ligand-free and ligand-bound NadR revealed (i) the molecular basis of ‘conformational selection’ by which a single molecule of 4-HPA binds and stabilizes dimeric NadR in a conformation unsuitable for DNA-binding, (ii) molecular explanations for the binding specificities of different hydroxyphenylacetate ligands, including 3Cl,4-HPA which is produced during inflammation, (iii) the presence of a leucine residue essential for dimerization and conserved in

  10. Molecular Basis of Ligand-Dependent Regulation of NadR, the Transcriptional Repressor of Meningococcal Virulence Factor NadA.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Alessia; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Fagnocchi, Luca; Cantini, Francesca; Haag, Andreas F; Brier, Sébastien; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Delany, Isabel; Bottomley, Matthew J

    2016-04-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is present on the meningococcal surface and contributes to adhesion to and invasion of human cells. NadA is also one of three recombinant antigens in the recently-approved Bexsero vaccine, which protects against serogroup B meningococcus. The amount of NadA on the bacterial surface is of direct relevance in the constant battle of host-pathogen interactions: it influences the ability of the pathogen to engage human cell surface-exposed receptors and, conversely, the bacterial susceptibility to the antibody-mediated immune response. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms which regulate nadA expression levels, which are predominantly controlled by the transcriptional regulator NadR (Neisseria adhesin A Regulator) both in vitro and in vivo. NadR binds the nadA promoter and represses gene transcription. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA), a catabolite present in human saliva both under physiological conditions and during bacterial infection, the binding of NadR to the nadA promoter is attenuated and nadA expression is induced. NadR also mediates ligand-dependent regulation of many other meningococcal genes, for example the highly-conserved multiple adhesin family (maf) genes, which encode proteins emerging with important roles in host-pathogen interactions, immune evasion and niche adaptation. To gain insights into the regulation of NadR mediated by 4-HPA, we combined structural, biochemical, and mutagenesis studies. In particular, two new crystal structures of ligand-free and ligand-bound NadR revealed (i) the molecular basis of 'conformational selection' by which a single molecule of 4-HPA binds and stabilizes dimeric NadR in a conformation unsuitable for DNA-binding, (ii) molecular explanations for the binding specificities of different hydroxyphenylacetate ligands, including 3Cl,4-HPA which is produced during inflammation, (iii) the presence of a leucine residue essential for dimerization and conserved in

  11. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tat protein enhances Cryptosporidium parvum-induced apoptosis in cholangiocytes via a Fas ligand-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Steven P; Small, Aaron J; Nelson, Jeremy B; Badley, Andrew D; Chen, Xian-Ming; Gores, Gregory J; Larusso, Nicholas F

    2007-02-01

    While Cryptosporidium parvum infection of the intestine has been reported in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, biliary infection is seen primarily in adult AIDS patients and is associated with development of AIDS cholangiopathy. However, the mechanisms of pathogen-induced AIDS cholangiopathy remain unclear. Since we previously demonstrated that the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system is involved in paracrine-mediated C. parvum cytopathicity in cholangiocytes, we also tested the potential synergistic effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transactivator of transcription (Tat)-mediated FasL regulation on C. parvum-induced apoptosis in cholangiocytes by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence analysis, and immunogold electron microscopy. H69 cells do not express CXCR4 and CCR5, which are receptors required for direct HIV-1 viral infection. However, recombinant biologically active HIV-1-associated Tat protein increased FasL expression in the cytoplasm of cholangiocytes without a significant increase in apoptosis. We found that C. parvum-induced apoptosis was associated with translocation of intracellular FasL to the cell membrane surface and release of full-length FasL from infected H69 cells. Tat significantly (P < 0.05) increased C. parvum-induced apoptosis in bystander cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, Tat enhanced both C. parvum-induced FasL membrane translocation and release of full-length FasL. In addition, the FasL neutralizing antibody NOK-1 and the caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-fmk both blocked C. parvum-induced apoptosis in cholangiocytes. The data demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat enhances C. parvum-induced cholangiocyte apoptosis via a paracrine-mediated, FasL-dependent mechanism. Our results suggest that concurrent active HIV replication, with associated production of Tat protein, and C. parvum infection synergistically increase cholangiocyte apoptosis and thus jointly contribute to

  12. Phage Lambda P Protein: Trans-Activation, Inhibition Phenotypes and their Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sidney; Erker, Craig; Horbay, Monique A.; Marciniuk, Kristen; Wang, Wen; Hayes, Connie

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of bacteriophage λ replication depends upon interactions between the oriλ DNA site, phage proteins O and P, and E. coli host replication proteins. P exhibits a high affinity for DnaB, the major replicative helicase for unwinding double stranded DNA. The concept of P-lethality relates to the hypothesis that P can sequester DnaB and in turn prevent cellular replication initiation from oriC. Alternatively, it was suggested that P-lethality does not involve an interaction between P and DnaB, but is targeted to DnaA. P-lethality is assessed by examining host cells for transformation by ColE1-type plasmids that can express P, and the absence of transformants is attributed to a lethal effect of P expression. The plasmid we employed enabled conditional expression of P, where under permissive conditions, cells were efficiently transformed. We observed that ColE1 replication and plasmid establishment upon transformation is extremely sensitive to P, and distinguish this effect from P-lethality directed to cells. We show that alleles of dnaB protect the variant cells from P expression. P-dependent cellular filamentation arose in ΔrecA or lexA[Ind-] cells, defective for SOS induction. Replication propagation and restart could represent additional targets for P interference of E. coli replication, beyond the oriC-dependent initiation step. PMID:23389467

  13. Evolution of p53 transactivation specificity through the lens of a yeast-based functional assay.

    PubMed

    Lion, Mattia; Raimondi, Ivan; Donati, Stefano; Jousson, Olivier; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Co-evolution of transcription factors (TFs) with their respective cis-regulatory network enhances functional diversity in the course of evolution. We present a new approach to investigate transactivation capacity of sequence-specific TFs in evolutionary studies. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as an in vivo test tube and p53 proteins derived from human and five commonly used animal models were chosen as proof of concept. p53 is a highly conserved master regulator of environmental stress responses. Previous reports indicated conserved p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro, even for evolutionary distant species. We used isogenic yeast strains where p53-dependent transactivation was measured towards chromosomally integrated p53 response elements (REs). Ten REs were chosen to sample a wide range of DNA binding affinity and transactivation capacity for human p53 and proteins were expressed at two levels using an inducible expression system. We showed that the assay is amenable to study thermo-sensitivity of frog p53, and that chimeric constructs containing an ectopic transactivation domain could be rapidly developed to enhance the activity of proteins, such as fruit fly p53, that are poorly effective in engaging the yeast transcriptional machinery. Changes in the profile of relative transactivation towards the ten REs were measured for each p53 protein and compared to the profile obtained with human p53. These results, which are largely independent from relative p53 protein levels, revealed widespread evolutionary divergence of p53 transactivation specificity, even between human and mouse p53. Fruit fly and human p53 exhibited the largest discrimination among REs while zebrafish p53 was the least selective. PMID:25668429

  14. Transactivation and transformation by Myb are negatively regulated by a leucine-zipper structure.

    PubMed Central

    Kanei-Ishii, C; MacMillan, E M; Nomura, T; Sarai, A; Ramsay, R G; Aimoto, S; Ishii, S; Gonda, T J

    1992-01-01

    The negative regulatory domain of the c-myb protooncogene product (c-Myb) normally represses transcriptional activation by c-Myb. We show here that a leucine-zipper structure is a component of the negative regulatory domain, because its disruption markedly increases both the transactivating and transforming capacities of c-Myb. We also demonstrate that this leucine-zipper structure can interact with cellular proteins. Our results suggest that an inhibitor that suppresses transactivation binds to c-Myb through the leucine zipper and that c-Myb can be oncogenically activated by missense mutation. Images PMID:1557416

  15. Cooperation between bovine leukaemia virus transactivator protein and Ha-ras oncogene product in cellular transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Willems, L; Heremans, H; Chen, G; Portetelle, D; Billiau, A; Burny, A; Kettmann, R

    1990-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLV-I and -II) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) express transactivator proteins able to increase long terminal repeat (LTR) directed viral expression. These transacting factors are though to be involved in the induction of leukaemia by these viruses. Transfection of BLV transactivator p34tax together with Ha-ras immortalizes and transforms rat embryo fibroblasts, in vitro. The transformed cell induce tumours in nude mice. These data emphasize the causal role exerted by p34tax in in vivo tumorigenesis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2158445

  16. Normal Myeloid Development Requires Both the Glutamine-Rich Transactivation Domain and the PEST Region of Transcription Factor PU.1 but Not the Potent Acidic Transactivation Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Robert C.; Olson, Marilyn C.; Pongubala, Jagan M. R.; Perkel, Jeffrey M.; Atchison, Michael L.; Scott, Edward W.; Simon, M. Celeste

    1998-01-01

    Gene targeting of transcription factor PU.1 results in an early block to fetal hematopoiesis, with no detectable lymphoid or myeloid cells produced in mouse embryos. Furthermore, PU.1−/− embryonic stem (ES) cells fail to differentiate into Mac-1+ and F4/80+ macrophages in vitro. We have previously shown that a PU.1 transgene under the control of its own promoter restores the ability of PU.1−/− ES cells to differentiate into macrophages. In this study, we take advantage of our PU.1−/− ES cell rescue system to genetically test which previously identified PU.1 functional domains are necessary for the development of mature macrophages. PU.1 functional domains include multiple N-terminal acidic and glutamine-rich transactivation domains, a PEST domain, several serine phosphorylation sites, and a C-terminal Ets DNA binding domain, all delineated and characterized by using standard biochemical and transactivational assays. By using the production of mature macrophages as a functional readout in our assay system, we have established that the glutamine-rich transactivation domain, a portion of the PEST domain, and the DNA binding domain are required for myelopoiesis. Deletion of three acidic domains, which exhibit potent transactivation potential in vitro, had no effect on the ability of PU.1 to promote macrophage development. Furthermore, mutagenesis of four independent sites of serine phosphorylation also had no effect on myelopoiesis. Collectively, our results indicate that PU.1 interacts with important regulatory proteins during macrophage development via the glutamine-rich and PEST domains. The PU.1−/− ES cell rescue system represents a powerful, in vitro strategy to functionally map domains of PU.1 essential for normal hematopoiesis and the generation of mature macrophages. PMID:9632818

  17. The C-terminal region of Drosophila heat shock factor (HSF) contains a constitutively functional transactivation domain.

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, J; Orosz, A; Allada, R; Wu, C

    1996-01-01

    The heat shock transcription factor (HSF) is constitutively expressed in Drosophila cells as an inactive monomer. Upon heat shock HSF undergoes trimerization and acquires high affinity DNA binding ability leading to specific interaction with its cognate elements in heat shock promoters. Here we show that the transactivation function of HSF is conferred by the extreme C-terminal region of the protein. Deletion analysis of HSF fragments fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain demonstrates that transactivation is dependent on HSF residues 610-691. This domain is located beyond the C-terminal heptad repeat (leucine zipper 4) whose presence or integrity is dispensable for transactivation. The transactivation domain is functional in the absence of heat shock and can be replaced by the extreme C-terminal region of human HSF1. The Drosophila and human HSF transactivation domains are both rich in hydrophobic and acidic residues and may be structurally conserved, despite limited sequence identity. PMID:8628664

  18. The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transactivator and repressor proteins use different nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed

    Skiadopoulos, M H; McBride, A A

    1996-02-01

    The E2 gene of bovine papillomavirus type 1 encodes at least three nuclear phosphoproteins that regulate viral transcription and DNA replication. All three proteins have a common C-terminal domain that has DNA-binding and dimerization activities. A basic region in this domain forms an alpha helix which makes direct contact with the DNA target. In this study, it is shown that in addition to its role in DNA binding, this basic region functions as a nuclear localization signal both in the E2 DNA-binding domain and in a heterologous protein. Deletion of this signal sequence resulted in increased accumulation of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins in the cytoplasm, but nuclear localization was not eliminated. In the full-length transactivator protein, another signal, present in the N-terminal transactivation domain, is used for transport to the nucleus, and the C-terminal nuclear localization signal(s) are masked. The use of different nuclear localization signals could potentially allow differential regulation of the subcellular localization of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins at some stage in the viral life cycle. PMID:8551571

  19. Structure of the EGF receptor transactivation circuit integrates multiple signals with cell context

    SciTech Connect

    Joslin, Elizabeth J.; Shankaran, Harish; Opresko, Lee K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H. S.

    2010-05-10

    Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been proposed to be a mechanism by which a variety of cellular inputs can be integrated into a single signaling pathway, but the regulatory topology of this important system is unclear. To understand the transactivation circuit, we first created a “non-binding” reporter for ligand shedding. We then quantitatively defined how signals from multiple agonists were integrated both upstream and downstream of the EGFR into the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) cascade in human mammary epithelial cells. We found that transactivation is mediated by a recursive autocrine circuit where ligand shedding drives EGFR-stimulated ERK that in turn drives further ligand shedding. The time from shedding to ERK activation is fast (<5 min) whereas the recursive feedback is slow (>15 min). Simulations showed that this delay in positive feedback greatly enhanced system stability and robustness. Our results indicate that the transactivation circuit is constructed so that the magnitude of ERK signaling is governed by the sum of multiple direct inputs, while recursive, autocrine ligand shedding controls signal duration.

  20. The growth-inhibitory function of p53 is separable from transactivation, apoptosis and suppression of transformation by E1a and Ras.

    PubMed

    Hansen, R S; Braithwaite, A W

    1996-09-01

    p53 is known to suppress oncogenic cell transformation, inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and activate and repress gene transcription. To investigate the relationships between these functions, we have examined various mutant forms of p53 for their abilities to perform each activity. This study has shown that growth inhibition is not a prerequisite for apoptotic cell death as these two functions are separate and alternative activities of p53. Additionally, we have demonstrated that the ability of p53 to suppress transformation (by adenovirus E1a and activated Ras) correlates with its ability to induce apoptosis and not with its ability to inhibit cell growth. Although p53 is thought to inhibit growth through the transactivation of p21WAFI, our study has demonstrated that transcriptional activation and repression are neither sufficient nor necessary for growth inhibition. This indicates that p53 has more than one mechanism for inhibiting cell growth and that another type of biochemical function must be involved. Furthermore, we have shown that transcriptional activation and repression may each be necessary, and the combination of these activities may even be sufficient, for p53-dependent apoptosis. In summary, our results have provided new information about the cellular and biochemical mechanisms through which p53 acts as a tumor suppressor. PMID:8806689

  1. N- and C-terminal Transactivation Domains of GATA1 Protein Coordinate Hematopoietic Program*

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eri; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Shimizu, Ritsuko

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factor GATA1 regulates the expression of a cluster of genes important for hematopoietic cell differentiation toward erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages. Three functional domains have been identified in GATA1, a transactivation domain located in the N terminus (N-TAD) and two zinc finger domains located in the middle of the molecule. Although N-TAD is known as a solitary transactivation domain for GATA1, clinical observations in Down syndrome leukemia suggest that there may be additional transactivation domains. In this study, we found in reporter co-transfection assays that transactivation activity of GATA1 was markedly reduced by deletion of the C-terminal 95 amino acids without significant attenuation of the DNA binding activity or self-association potential. We therefore generated transgenic mouse lines that expressed GATA1 lacking the C-terminal region (GATA1-ΔCT). When we crossed these transgenic mouse lines to the Gata1-deficient mouse, we found that the GATA1-ΔCT transgene rescued Gata1-deficient mice from embryonic lethality. The embryos rescued with an almost similar level of GATA1-ΔCT to endogenous GATA1 developed beyond embryonic 13.5 days, showing severe anemia with accumulation of immature erythroid cells, as was the case for the embryos rescued by endogenous levels of GATA1 lacking N-TAD (GATA1-ΔNT). Distinct sets of target genes were affected in the embryos rescued by GATA1-ΔCT and GATA1-ΔNT. We also found attenuated GATA1 function in cell cycle control of immature megakaryocytes in both lines of rescued embryos. These results thus demonstrate that GATA1 has two independent transactivation domains, N-TAD and C-TAD. Both N-TAD and C-TAD retain redundant as well as specific activities for proper hematopoiesis in vivo. PMID:22556427

  2. Cyclin E/Cdk2, P/CAF, and E1A regulate the transactivation of the c-myc promoter by FOXM1

    SciTech Connect

    Wierstra, Inken Alves, Juergen

    2008-03-28

    FOXM1c transactivates the c-myc promoter by binding directly to its TATA-boxes. The present study demonstrates that the transactivation of the c-myc promoter by FOXM1c is enhanced by the key proliferation signal cyclin E/Cdk2, but repressed by P/CAF and the adenoviral oncoprotein E1A. Furthermore, FOXM1c interacts with the coactivator and histone acetyltransferase P/CAF. This study shows that, on the c-myc-P1 TATA-box, FOXM1c does not function simply as normal transcription factor just binding to an unusual site. Moreover, the inhibitory N-terminus of FOXM1c does not inhibit its transrepression domain or its EDA. Others reported that a cyclin/Cdk-binding LXL-motif of the splice variant FoxM1b is required for its interaction with Cdk2, Cdk1, and p27, its phosphorylation by Cdk1 and its activation by Cdc25B. In contrast, we now demonstrate that this LXL-motif is not required for the activation of FOXM1c by cyclin D1/Cdk4, cyclin E/Cdk and cyclin A/Cdk2 or for the repression of FOXM1c by p27.

  3. Transactivation specificity is conserved among p53 family proteins and depends on a response element sequence code

    PubMed Central

    Ciribilli, Yari; Monti, Paola; Bisio, Alessandra; Nguyen, H. Thien; Ethayathulla, Abdul S.; Ramos, Ana; Foggetti, Giorgia; Menichini, Paola; Menendez, Daniel; Resnick, Michael A.; Viadiu, Hector; Fronza, Gilberto; Inga, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Structural and biochemical studies have demonstrated that p73, p63 and p53 recognize DNA with identical amino acids and similar binding affinity. Here, measuring transactivation activity for a large number of response elements (REs) in yeast and human cell lines, we show that p53 family proteins also have overlapping transactivation profiles. We identified mutations at conserved amino acids of loops L1 and L3 in the DNA-binding domain that tune the transactivation potential nearly equally in p73, p63 and p53. For example, the mutant S139F in p73 has higher transactivation potential towards selected REs, enhanced DNA-binding cooperativity in vitro and a flexible loop L1 as seen in the crystal structure of the protein–DNA complex. By studying, how variations in the RE sequence affect transactivation specificity, we discovered a RE-transactivation code that predicts enhanced transactivation; this correlation is stronger for promoters of genes associated with apoptosis. PMID:23892287

  4. Crystal structure of the E2 transactivation domain of human papillomavirus type 11 bound to a protein interaction inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Coulombe, René; Cameron, Dale R; Thauvette, Louise; Massariol, Marie-Josée; Amon, Lynn M; Fink, Dominique; Titolo, Steve; Welchner, Ewald; Yoakim, Christiane; Archambault, Jacques; White, Peter W

    2004-02-20

    Interaction between the E2 protein and E1 helicase of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is essential for the initiation of viral DNA replication. We recently described a series of small molecules that bind to the N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of HPV type 11 E2 and inhibits its interaction with E1 in vitro and in cellular assays. Here we report the crystal structures of both the HPV11 TAD and of a complex between this domain and an inhibitor, at 2.5- and 2.4-A resolution, respectively. The HPV11 TAD structure is very similar to that of the analogous domain of HPV16. Inhibitor binding caused no significant alteration of the protein backbone, but movements of several amino acid side chains at the binding site, in particular those of Tyr-19, His-32, Leu-94, and Glu-100, resulted in the formation of a deep hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the indandione moiety of the inhibitor. Mutational analysis provides functional evidence for specific interactions between Tyr-19 and E1 and between His-32 and the inhibitor. A second inhibitor molecule is also present at the binding pocket. Although evidence is presented that this second molecule makes only weak interactions with the protein and is likely an artifact of crystallization, its presence defines additional regions of the binding pocket that could be exploited to design more potent inhibitors. PMID:14634007

  5. Glucocorticoid Repression of Inflammatory Gene Expression Shows Differential Responsiveness by Transactivation- and Transrepression-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    King, Elizabeth M.; Chivers, Joanna E.; Rider, Christopher F.; Minnich, Anne; Giembycz, Mark A.; Newton, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Binding of glucocorticoid to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR/NR3C1) may repress inflammatory gene transcription via direct, protein synthesis-independent processes (transrepression), or by activating transcription (transactivation) of multiple anti-inflammatory/repressive factors. Using human pulmonary A549 cells, we showed that 34 out of 39 IL-1β-inducible mRNAs were repressed to varying degrees by the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone. Whilst these repressive effects were GR-dependent, they did not correlate with either the magnitude of IL-1β-inducibility or the NF-κB-dependence of the inflammatory genes. This suggests that induction by IL-1β and repression by dexamethasone are independent events. Roles for transactivation were investigated using the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. However, cycloheximide reduced the IL-1β-dependent expression of 13 mRNAs, which, along with the 5 not showing repression by dexamethasone, were not analysed further. Of the remaining 21 inflammatory mRNAs, cycloheximide significantly attenuated the dexamethasone-dependent repression of 11 mRNAs that also showed a marked time-dependence to their repression. Such effects are consistent with repression occurring via the de novo synthesis of a new product, or products, which subsequently cause repression (i.e., repression via a transactivation mechanism). Conversely, 10 mRNAs showed completely cycloheximide-independent, and time-independent, repression by dexamethasone. This is consistent with direct GR transrepression. Importantly, the inflammatory mRNAs showing attenuated repression by dexamethasone in the presence of cycloheximide also showed a significantly greater extent of repression and a higher potency to dexamethasone compared to those mRNAs showing cycloheximide-independent repression. This suggests that the repression of inflammatory mRNAs by GR transactivation-dependent mechanisms accounts for the greatest levels of repression and the most potent

  6. Characterization of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene promoter: an AP1 complex and an Sp1-related complex transactivate the promoter activity that is suppressed by a YY1 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, J; Zhang, X; Dong, Z

    1996-01-01

    It is well documented that a repeated CATT element in the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene promoter is required for promoter activity. However, the transcription factors that are able to transactivate this enhancer element remain unidentified. Recently, we have found that nuclear factor YY1 can interact with the enhancer element. Here, we report that in addition to YY1, two other nuclear factors have been identified in the DNA-protein complexes formed by the CATT oligonucleotide and the Jurkat T-cell nuclear protein. One of these factors is AP1, and the other one is an Sp1-related protein. Results from transient transfection of Jurkat T cells have revealed that formation of both AP1 and the Sp1-related complex is required for the full enhancer activity of the CATT element. This result is supported by cotransfection of a c-jun expression vector and mutational analysis of the AP1 site or the Sp1-related protein binding site. In contrast, formation of the YY1 complex suppresses enhancer activity, since deletion of the YY1 complex induces an augmentation of the enhancer activity and overexpression of YY1 results in an attenuation of the enhancer activity. Results from the mechanism study have revealed that YY1 is able to inhibit transactivation mediated by either AP1 or the Sp1-related protein, and YY1 suppressive activity is DNA binding dependent. Taken together, these data support the ideas that AP1 and the Sp1-related nuclear protein are required for transactivation of the human GM-CSF gene promoter and that YY1 can suppress transactivation of the promoter even under inducible conditions. PMID:8524292

  7. A novel antagonist anti-cMet antibody with antitumor activities targeting both ligand-dependent and ligand-independent c-Met receptors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alexandra; Broussas, Matthieu; Beau-Larvor, Charlotte; Haeuw, Jean-François; Boute, Nicolas; Robert, Alain; Champion, Thierry; Beck, Alain; Bailly, Christian; Corvaïa, Nathalie; Goetsch, Liliane

    2016-10-15

    c-Met is a prototypic member of a sub-family of RTKs. Inappropriate c-Met activation plays a crucial role in tumor formation, proliferation and metastasis. Using a key c-Met dimerization assay, a set of 12 murine whole IgG1 monoclonal antibodies was selected and a lead candidate, m224G11, was humanized by CDR-grafting and engineered to generate a divalent full antagonist humanized IgG1 antibody, hz224G11. Neither m224G11 nor hz224G11 bind to the murine c-Met receptor. Their antitumor activity was investigated in vitro in a set of experiments consistent with the reported pleiotropic effects mediated by c-Met and, in vivo, using several human tumor xenograft models. Both m224G11 and hz224G11 exhibited nanomolar affinities for the receptor and inhibited HGF binding, c-Met phosphorylation, and receptor dimerization in a similar fashion, resulting in a profound inhibition of all c-Met functions in vitro. These effects were presumably responsible for the inhibition of c-Met's major functions including cell proliferation, migration, invasion scattering, morphogenesis and angiogenesis. In addition to these in vitro properties, hz224G11 dramatically inhibits the growth of autocrine, partially autophosphorylated and c-Met amplified cell lines in vivo. Pharmacological studies performed on Hs746T gastric cancer xenografts demonstrate that hz224G11 strongly downregulates c-Met expression and phosphorylation. It also decreases the tumor mitotic index (Ki67) and induces apoptosis. Taken together, the in vitro and in vivo data suggest that hz224G11 is a promising candidate for the treatment of tumors. This antibody, now known as ABT-700 and currently in Phase I clinical trials, may provide a novel therapeutic approach to c-Met-expressing cancers. PMID:27144973

  8. A novel SREBP-1 splice variant: tissue abundance and transactivation potency.

    PubMed

    Felder, Thomas Klaus; Klein, Kerstin; Patsch, Wolfgang; Oberkofler, Hannes

    2005-10-15

    Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) belong to the family of basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factors. The SREBP-1 gene encodes two different isoforms, SREBP-1a and -1c, that are expressed at varying levels in different tissues and cultured cells and exhibit common and distinct functions. We identified an additional SREBP-1 isoform, termed SREBP-1ac, and determined its mRNA abundance in different human tissues and cell lines. SREBP-1ac mRNA was detectable in all tissues studied, although at lower levels than the major SREBP-1a and -1c isoforms. Transcription of the novel SREBP isoform was not induced by insulin or cholesterol depletion. SREBP-1ac did not transactivate the human LDLR and UCP2 promoters but robustly attenuated the transactivation capacity of SREBP-1a, -1c and -2 in cotransfection experiments. PMID:16153721

  9. The 9aaTAD Transactivation Domains: From Gal4 to p53.

    PubMed

    Piskacek, Martin; Havelka, Marek; Rezacova, Martina; Knight, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The family of the Nine amino acid Transactivation Domain, 9aaTAD family, comprises currently over 40 members. The 9aaTAD domains are universally recognized by the transcriptional machinery from yeast to man. We had identified the 9aaTAD domains in the p53, Msn2, Pdr1 and B42 activators by our prediction algorithm. In this study, their competence to activate transcription as small peptides was proven. Not surprisingly, we elicited immense 9aaTAD divergence in hundreds of identified orthologs and numerous examples of the 9aaTAD species' convergence. We found unforeseen similarity of the mammalian p53 with yeast Gal4 9aaTAD domains. Furthermore, we identified artificial 9aaTAD domains generated accidentally by others. From an evolutionary perspective, the observed easiness to generate 9aaTAD transactivation domains indicates the natural advantage for spontaneous generation of transcription factors from DNA binding precursors. PMID:27618436

  10. Transactivation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor by G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Recent Progress, Challenges and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Both G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor-tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate large signaling networks, control multiple cell functions and are implicated in many diseases including various cancers. Both of them are also the top therapeutic targets for disease treatment. The discovery of the cross-talk between GPCRs and RTKs connects these two vast signaling networks and complicates the already complicated signaling networks that regulate cell signaling and function. In this review, we focus on the transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a subfamily of RTKs, by GPCRs. Since the first report of EGFR transactivation by GPCR, significant progress has been made including the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the transactivation. Here, we first provide a basic picture for GPCR, EGFR and EGFR transactivation by GPCR. We then discuss the progress made in the last five years and finally provided our view of the future challenge and future researches needed to overcome these challenges. PMID:26771606

  11. EPAS1 trans-activation during hypoxia requires p42/p44 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Freeman, T L; Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1999-11-19

    Hypoxia is a common environmental stress that regulates gene expression and cell function. A number of hypoxia-regulated transcription factors have been identified and have been shown to play critical roles in mediating cellular responses to hypoxia. One of these is the endothelial PAS-domain protein 1 (EPAS1/HIF2-alpha/HLF/HRF). This protein is 48% homologous to hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1-alpha). To date, virtually nothing is known about the signaling pathways that lead to either EPAS1 or HIF1-alpha activation. Here we show that EPAS1 is phosphorylated when PC12 cells are exposed to hypoxia and that p42/p44 MAPK is a critical mediator of EPAS1 activation. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with the MEK inhibitor, PD98059, completely blocked hypoxia-induced trans-activation of a hypoxia response element (HRE) reporter gene by transfected EPAS1. Likewise, expression of a constitutively active MEK1 mimicked the effects of hypoxia on HRE reporter gene expression. However, pretreatment with PD98059 had no effect on EPAS1 phosphorylation during hypoxia, suggesting that MAPK targets other proteins that are critical for the trans-activation of EPAS1. We further show that hypoxia-induced trans-activation of EPAS1 is independent of Ras. Finally, pretreatment with calmodulin antagonists nearly completely blocked both the hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and the EPAS1 trans-activation of HRE-Luc. These results demonstrate that the MAPK pathway is a critical mediator of EPAS1 activation and that activation of MAPK and EPAS1 occurs through a calmodulin-sensitive pathway and not through the GTPase, Ras. These results are the first to identify a specific signaling pathway involved in EPAS1 activation. PMID:10559262

  12. Identification of Essential Genetic Baculoviral Elements for Recombinant Protein Expression by Transactivation in Sf21 Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang-Fang; Yen, Zen-Zen; Lindemann, Nils; Meyer, Steffen; Spehr, Johannes; van den Heuvel, Joop

    2016-01-01

    The Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) is widely used to produce high amounts of recombinant proteins. Nevertheless, generating recombinant baculovirus in high quality is rather time-consuming and labor-intensive. Alternatively, virus-free expression in insect cells did not achieve similar expression levels for most proteins so far. The transactivation method is a promising approach for protein expression in Sf21 cells. It combines advantages of BEVS and plasmid-based expression by activating strong virus-dependent promoters on a transfected plasmid by baculoviral coinfection. Here, we identified expression elements required for transactivation. Therefore, we designed several vectors comprising different viral promoters or promoter combinations and tested them for eGFP expression using the automated BioLector microcultivation system. Remarkably, only the combination of the very late promoter p10 together with the homologous region 5 (hr5) could boost expression during transactivation. Other elements, like p10 alone or the late viral promoter polH, did not respond to transactivation. A new combination of hr5 and p10 with the strongest immediate early OpMNPV viral promoter OpIE2 improved the yield of eGFP by ~25% in comparison to the previous applied hr5-IE1-p10 expression cassette. Furthermore, we observed a strong influence of the transcription termination sequence and vector backbone on the level of expression. Finally, the expression levels for transactivation, BEVS and solely plasmid-based expression were compared for the marker protein eGFP, underlining the potential of transactivation for fast recombinant protein expression in Sf21 cells. In conclusion, essential elements for transactivation could be identified. The optimal elements were applied to generate an improved vector applicable in virus-free plasmid-based expression, transactivation and BEVS. PMID:26934632

  13. Phosphorylation of Src by phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulates beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated EGFR transactivation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Lewis J; Alexander, Kevin M; Mohan, Maradumane L; Bowman, Amber L; Mangmool, Supachoke; Xiao, Kunhong; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Rockman, Howard A

    2016-10-01

    β2-Adrenergic receptors (β2AR) transactivate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) through formation of a β2AR-EGFR complex that requires activation of Src to mediate signaling. Here, we show that both lipid and protein kinase activities of the bifunctional phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) enzyme are required for β2AR-stimulated EGFR transactivation. Mechanistically, the generation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-tris-phosphate (PIP3) by the lipid kinase function stabilizes β2AR-EGFR complexes while the protein kinase activity of PI3K regulates Src activation by direct phosphorylation. The protein kinase activity of PI3K phosphorylates serine residue 70 on Src to enhance its activity and induce EGFR transactivation following βAR stimulation. This newly identified function for PI3K, whereby Src is a substrate for the protein kinase activity of PI3K, is of importance since Src plays a key role in pathological and physiological signaling. PMID:27169346

  14. EGF transactivation of Trk receptors regulates the migration of newborn cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Puehringer, Dirk; Orel, Nadiya; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Subramanian, Narayan; Herrmann, Thomas; Chao, Moses V; Sendtner, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The development of neuronal networks in the neocortex depends on control mechanisms for mitosis and migration that allow newborn neurons to find their accurate position. Multiple mitogens, neurotrophic factors, guidance molecules and their corresponding receptors are involved in this process, but the mechanisms by which these signals are integrated are only poorly understood. We found that TrkB and TrkC, the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), are activated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling rather than by BDNF or NT-3 in embryonic mouse cortical precursor cells. This transactivation event regulated migration of early neuronal cells to their final position in the developing cortex. Transactivation by EGF led to membrane translocation of TrkB, promoting its signaling responsiveness. Our results provide genetic evidence that TrkB and TrkC activation in early cortical neurons do not depend on BDNF and NT-3, but instead on transactivation by EGFR signaling. PMID:23416450

  15. EGF transactivation of Trk receptors regulates the migration of newborn cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Puehringer, Dirk; Orel, Nadiya; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Subramanian, Narayan; Herrmann, Thomas; Chao, Moses V; Sendtner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The development of neuronal networks in the neocortex depends on control mechanisms for mitosis and migration that allow newborn neurons to find their accurate position. Multiple mitogens, neurotrophic factors, guidance molecules and their corresponding receptors are involved in this process, but the mechanisms by which these signals are integrated are only poorly understood. We found that TrkB and TrkC, the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), are activated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling rather than by BDNF or NT-3 in embryonic mouse cortical precursor cells. This transactivation event regulated migration of early neuronal cells to their final position in the developing cortex. Transactivation by EGF led to membrane translocation of TrkB, promoting its signaling responsiveness. Our results provide genetic evidence that TrkB and TrkC activation in early cortical neurons do not depend on BDNF and NT-3, but instead on transactivation by EGFR signaling. PMID:23416450

  16. RELIEF OF PROFOUND FEEDBACK INHIBITION OF MITOGENIC SIGNALING BY RAF INHIBITORS ATTENUATES THEIR ACTIVITY IN BRAFV600E MELANOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Lito, Piro; Pratilas, Christine A.; Joseph, Eric W.; Tadi, Madhavi; Halilovic, Ensar; Zubrowski, Matthew; Huang, Alan; Wong, Wai Lin; Callahan, Margaret K.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Poulikakos, Poulikos I.; Fagin, James A.; Rosen, Neal

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY BRAFV600E drives tumors by dysregulating ERK signaling. In these tumors, we show that high levels of ERK-dependent negative feedback potently suppress ligand-dependent mitogenic signaling and Ras function. BRAFV600E activation is Ras-independent and it signals as a RAF-inhibitor sensitive monomer. RAF inhibitors potently inhibit RAF monomers and ERK signaling, causing relief of ERK-dependent feedback, reactivation of ligand-dependent signal transduction, increased Ras-GTP and generation of RAF inhibitor-resistant RAF dimers. This results in a rebound in ERK activity and culminates in a new steady state, wherein ERK signaling is elevated compared to its initial nadir after RAF inhibition. In this state, ERK signaling is RAF inhibitor resistant, and MEK inhibitor sensitive, and combined inhibition results in enhancement of ERK-pathway inhibition and antitumor activity. PMID:23153539

  17. Mycobacterium-Specific γ9δ2 T Cells Mediate Both Pathogen-Inhibitory and CD40 Ligand-Dependent Antigen Presentation Effects Important for Tuberculosis Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Charles T.; Hamzabegovic, Fahreta; Blazevic, Azra; Xia, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, can activate human γ9δ2 T cells to proliferate and express effector mechanisms. γ9δ2 T cells can directly inhibit the growth of intracellular mycobacteria and may also act as antigen-presenting cells (APC). Despite evidence for γδ T cells having the capacity to function as APC, the mechanisms involved and importance of these effects on overall tuberculosis (TB) immunity are unknown. We prepared M. tuberculosis-specific γ9δ2 T cell lines to study their direct protective effects and APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells. The direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria were measured, and the enhancing effects on proliferative and effector responses of αβ T cells assessed. Furthermore, the importance of cell-to-cell contact and soluble products for γ9δ2 T cell effector responses and APC functions were investigated. We demonstrate, in addition to direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria, the following: (i) γ9δ2 T cells enhance the expansion of M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells and increase the ability of αβ T cells to inhibit intracellular mycobacteria; (ii) although soluble mediators are critical for the direct inhibitory effects of γ9δ2 T cells, their APC functions do not require soluble mediators; (iii) the APC functions of γ9δ2 T cells involve cell-to-cell contact that is dependent on CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) interactions; and (iv) fully activated CD4+ αβ T cells and γ9δ2 T cells provide similar immune enhancing/APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific T cells. These effector and helper effects of γ9δ2 T cells further indicate that these T cells should be considered important new targets for new TB vaccines. PMID:26644385

  18. Autoregulation of the NF-kappa B transactivator RelA (p65) by multiple cytoplasmic inhibitors containing ankyrin motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, S C; Ganchi, P A; Béraud, C; Ballard, D W; Greene, W C

    1994-01-01

    RelA (p65) functions as the critical transactivating component of the heterodimeric p50-p65 NF-kappa B complex and contains a high-affinity binding site for its cytoplasmic inhibitor, I kappa B alpha. After cellular activation, I kappa B alpha is rapidly degraded in concert with the induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B. The present study demonstrates that tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced degradation of I kappa B alpha in human T cells is preceded by its rapid phosphorylation in vivo. However, these effects on I kappa B alpha result in nuclear mobilization of only a fraction of the entire cytoplasmic pool of RelA. Subsequent studies have revealed that (i) cytoplasmic RelA is stably associated not only with I kappa B alpha but also with other ankyrin motif-rich proteins including the products of the NF-kappa B2 (p100) and NF-kappa B1 (p105) genes; (ii) in contrast to RelA-I kappa B alpha, RelA-p100 cytoplasmic complexes are not dissociated following tumor necrosis factor alpha activation; (iii) p100 functions as a potent inhibitor of RelA-mediated transcription in vivo; (iv) the interaction of RelA and p100 involves the conserved Rel homology domain of both proteins but not the nuclear localization signal of RelA, which is required for I kappa B alpha binding; (v) p100 inhibition of RelA function requires the C-terminal ankyrin motif domain, which mediates cytoplasmic retention of RelA; and (vi) as observed with I kappa B alpha, nuclear RelA stimulates p100 mRNA and protein expression. These findings thus reveal the presence of a second inducible autoregulated inhibitory pathway that helps ensure the rapid but transient action of nuclear NF-kappa B. Images PMID:8108414

  19. NF-kappaB p65-Dependent Transactivation of miRNA Genes following Cryptosporidium parvum Infection Stimulates Epithelial Cell Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Gong, Ai-Yu; Drescher, Kristen M.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite that infects the gastrointestinal epithelium and causes diarrheal disease worldwide. Innate epithelial immune responses are key mediators of the host's defense to C. parvum. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Using an in vitro model of human cryptosporidiosis, we analyzed C. parvum-induced miRNA expression in biliary epithelial cells (i.e., cholangiocytes). Our results demonstrated differential alterations in the mature miRNA expression profile in cholangiocytes following C. parvum infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Database analysis of C. parvum-upregulated miRNAs revealed potential NF-κB binding sites in the promoter elements of a subset of miRNA genes. We demonstrated that mir-125b-1, mir-21, mir-30b, and mir-23b-27b-24-1 cluster genes were transactivated through promoter binding of the NF-κB p65 subunit following C. parvum infection. In contrast, C. parvum transactivated mir-30c and mir-16 genes in cholangiocytes in a p65-independent manner. Importantly, functional inhibition of selected p65-dependent miRNAs in cholangiocytes increased C. parvum burden. Thus, we have identified a panel of miRNAs regulated through promoter binding of the NF-κB p65 subunit in human cholangiocytes in response to C. parvum infection, a process that may be relevant to the regulation of epithelial anti-microbial defense in general. PMID:19997496

  20. Identification of TRIML2, a Novel p53 Target, that Enhances p53-SUMOylation and Regulates the Transactivation of Pro-apoptotic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Che-Pei; Khaku, Sakina; Jennis, Matthew; Zhou, Yan; Murphy, Maureen E.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53, encoded by TP53, inhibits tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. Several genetic polymorphisms exist in TP53, including a proline to arginine variant at amino acid 72 (P72 and R72, respectively); this polymorphism alters p53 function. In general, the P72 variant shows increased ability to induce cell cycle arrest, while the R72 variant possesses increased ability to induce apoptosis, relative to P72. At present, the underlying mechanisms for these functional differences are not fully understood. Toward elucidating the molecular basis for these differences a gene expression microarray analysis was conducted on normal human fibroblast cells that are homozygous for P72 and R72 variants, along with subclones of these lines that express a p53 short hairpin (shp53). Approximately three dozen genes were identified whose transactivation is affected by the codon 72 polymorphism. One of these is the tripartite motif family-like 2 (TRIML2) gene, which is preferentially induced by the R72 variant. Importantly, the accumulated data indicate that TRIML2 interacts with p53, and facilitates the modification of p53 with SUMO2. TRIML2 also enhances the ability of p53 to transactivate a subset of pro-apoptotic target genes associated with prolonged oxidative stress, including PIDD, PIG3 (TP53I3) and PIG6 (PRODH). These data indicate that TRIML2 is part of a feed-forward loop that activates p53 in cells expressing the R72 variant, particularly after prolonged stress. PMID:25256710

  1. 5-HT(1A) receptors transactivate the platelet-derived growth factor receptor type beta in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jeff S; Vasefi, Maryam S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of ligand, certain growth factor receptors can be activated via G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation in a process termed transactivation. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors can transactivate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors in smooth muscle cells, but it is not known if similar pathways occur in neuronal cells. Here we show that 5-HT can transiently increase the phosphorylation of PDGFβ receptors through 5-HT(1A) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. 5-HT also transactivates PDGFβ receptors in primary cortical neurons. This transactivation pathway is pertussis-toxin sensitive and Src tyrosine kinase-dependent. This pathway is also dependent on phospholipase C activity and intracellular calcium signaling. Several studies involving PDGFβ receptor transactivation by GPCRs have also demonstrated a PDGFβ receptor-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Yet in SH-SY5Y cells, 5-HT treatment causes a PDGFβ receptor-independent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This crosstalk between 5-HT and PDGFβ receptors identifies a potentially important signaling link between the serotonergic system and growth factor signaling in neurons. PMID:23006663

  2. Piroxicam and c-phycocyanin prevent colon carcinogenesis by inhibition of membrane fluidity and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling while up-regulating ligand dependent transcription factor PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-06-01

    The colon cancer tissues from DMH treated rats exhibited higher membrane potential, fluidity and changed lipid order as examined by Merocyanine 540 and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, respectively. A transition from gel to liquid crystalline state was observed by Laurdan fluorescence and also reduced fluorescence quenching of NBD-PE as contributed in the decreased membrane lipid phase separation. With piroxicam, a traditional NSAID and c-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis, these effects were normalized. An augmented intracellular Ca(+2) had contributed to the drug mediated apoptosis which is supported by an elevated calpain-9 expression. Histopathologically, a large pool of secreted acid/neutral mucopolysaccrides as well as the presence of blood vessels and dysplastic crypts signifies invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma while both the drugs reduced these neoplastic alterations. Wnt/β-catenin pathway was also found to be up-regulated which served as a crucial indicator for cancer cell growth. A concomitant down regulation of PPARγ was noted in DMH treatment which is associated with tumor progression. The expression of PPARα and δ, the other two isoforms of PPAR family was also modulated. We conclude that piroxicam and c-phycocyanin exert their anti-neoplastic effects via regulating membrane properties, raising calpain-9 and PPARγ expression while suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in experimental colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24721324

  3. Super-Transactivation TP53 Variant in the Germline of a Family with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Id Said, Badr; Kim, Han; Tran, James; Novokmet, Ana; Malkin, David

    2016-09-01

    Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant familial cancer syndrome, characterized by multiple malignancies and frequent germline alterations in TP53. In this study, we highlight four unclassified exonic TP53 variants detected in patients with a suspected diagnosis of LFS. Most intriguing was the discovery of a "super-transactivation" variant within Exon 10 of TP53 (c.1079G>T/p.G360V). Functional analysis of this novel variant revealed a paradoxical "super-transactivation" effect on tp53 response elements and a corresponding tumor suppressive effect on colony formation and apoptosis. While unlikely to be disease-causing, we propose that this variant may represent a novel tp53 polymorphism and potential phenotypic modifier in LFS. In the future, the enhanced transactivation effects of p.G360V-tp53 may also prove useful in designing more efficacious tp53-based gene therapies. PMID:27297285

  4. Enhancement of alkaloid production in opium and California poppy by transactivation using heterologous regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Apuya, Nestor R; Park, Joon-Hyun; Zhang, Liping; Ahyow, Maurice; Davidow, Patricia; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Rarang, Joel C; Hippley, Matthew; Johnson, Thomas W; Yoo, Hye-Dong; Trieu, Anthony; Krueger, Shannon; Wu, Chuan-yin; Lu, Yu-ping; Flavell, Richard B; Bobzin, Steven C

    2008-02-01

    Genes encoding regulatory factors isolated from Arabidopsis, soybean and corn have been screened to identify those that modulate the expression of genes encoding for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of morphinan alkaloids in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and benzophenanthridine alkaloids in California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). In opium poppy, the over-expression of selected regulatory factors increased the levels of PsCOR (codeinone reductase), Ps4'OMT (S-adenosyl-l-methionine:3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase) and Ps6OMT [(R,S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase] transcripts by 10- to more than 100-fold. These transcriptional activations translated into an enhancement of alkaloid production in opium poppy of up to at least 10-fold. In California poppy, the transactivation effect of regulatory factor WRKY1 resulted in an increase of up to 60-fold in the level of EcCYP80B1 [(S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase] and EcBBE (berberine bridge enzyme) transcripts. As a result, the accumulations of selected alkaloid intermediates were enhanced up to 30-fold. The transactivation effects of other regulatory factors led to the accumulation of the same intermediates. These regulatory factors also led to the production of new alkaloids in California poppy callus culture. PMID:17961129

  5. Enhancement of transactivation activity of Rta of Epstein-Barr virus by RanBPM.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung; Kuo, Chung-Wen; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2008-05-30

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses the immediate-early protein Rta to activate the transcription of EBV lytic genes and the lytic cycle. We show that RanBPM acts as a binding partner of Rta in yeast two-hybrid analysis. The binding was confirmed by glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assay. A coimmunoprecipitation experiment and confocal microscopy revealed that RanBPM and Rta interact in vivo and colocalize in the nucleus. The interaction appears to involve the SPRY domain in RanBPM and the region between amino acid residues 416 to 476 in Rta. The interaction promotes the transactivation activity of Rta in activating the transcription of BMLF1 and p21 in transient transfection assays. Additionally, RanBPM interacts with SUMO-E2 (Ubc9) to promote sumoylation of Rta by SUMO-1. This fact explains why the expression of RanBPM enhances the transactivation activity of Rta. Taken together, the present results indicate a new role of RanBPM in regulating a viral protein that is critical to EBV lytic activation. PMID:18455188

  6. Equilibrium dissociation and unfolding of human papillomavirus E2 transactivation domain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nitu; Kanthaje, Shruthi; Bose, Kakoli

    2015-08-01

    Papillomavirus E2 protein that performs essential functions such as viral oncogene expression and replication represents specific target for therapeutic intervention. DNA-binding activity is associated with its C-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD), while the N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) is responsible for replication and transactivation functions. Although both demonstrate large dependence on dimerization for mediating their functions, KD for N-terminal dimerization is significantly high suggesting more dynamic role of this domain. However, unlike DBD, very little information is available on TAD dimerization, its folding and stability. Therefore, with an aim at delineating the regulatory switch of its dimerization, we have characterized high-risk HPV18 E2 TAD. Our studies demonstrate that E2 TAD is a weak but thermodynamically stable dimer (KD ∼ 1.8 μM, [Formula: see text]  = 18.8 kcal mol(-1)) with α2-α3 helices forming the interface. It follows a three-state folding pathway, in which unfolding involves dissociation of a dimeric intermediate. Interestingly, 90% of the conformational free energy is associated with dimer dissociation (16.9 of 18.8 kcal mol(-1)) suggesting dimerization significantly contributes to its overall thermodynamic stability. These revelations might be important toward designing inhibitors for targeting dimerization or folding intermediates and hence multiple functions that E2 performs. PMID:26091566

  7. A versatile cis-blocking and trans-activation strategy for ribozyme characterization

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Andrew B.; Liang, Joe C.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic RNA control devices that use ribozymes as gene-regulatory components have been applied to controlling cellular behaviors in response to environmental signals. Quantitative measurement of the in vitro cleavage rate constants associated with ribozyme-based devices is essential for advancing the molecular design and optimization of this class of gene-regulatory devices. One of the key challenges encountered in ribozyme characterization is the efficient generation of full-length RNA from in vitro transcription reactions, where conditions generally lead to significant ribozyme cleavage. Current methods for generating full-length ribozyme-encoding RNA rely on a trans-blocking strategy, which requires a laborious gel separation and extraction step. Here, we develop a simple two-step gel-free process including cis-blocking and trans-activation steps to support scalable generation of functional full-length ribozyme-encoding RNA. We demonstrate our strategy on various types of natural ribozymes and synthetic ribozyme devices, and the cleavage rate constants obtained for the RNA generated from our strategy are comparable with those generated through traditional methods. We further develop a rapid, label-free ribozyme cleavage assay based on surface plasmon resonance, which allows continuous, real-time monitoring of ribozyme cleavage. The surface plasmon resonance-based characterization assay will complement the versatile cis-blocking and trans-activation strategy to broadly advance our ability to characterize and engineer ribozyme-based devices. PMID:23155065

  8. Limited species differences in estrogen receptor alpha-medicated reporter gene transactivation by xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Kayo; Ooe, Norihisa; Saito, Koichi; Kaneko, Hideo

    2003-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) play an important role in estrogen function. However, it is well known that there are species differences in amino acid sequences of the ligand binding domains. Here, we report on the analysis of species differences in ER-dependent transactivation with some chemicals using reporter gene assays. Full-length ER cDNAs from human, rat, chicken, alligator (Caiman), whiptail lizard, African clawed frog and rainbow trout were prepared from hepatic mRNA by the RT-PCR method and inserted into expression plasmids. Both expression and reporter plasmids were transiently transfected into HeLa cells, and then the estrogenic effects of chemicals were analyzed in terms of induction of luciferase activity. No species differences in transactivation were found among human, rat, chicken, alligator, whiptail lizard and African clawed frog ERs. However, thermo-dependent alteration in susceptibility to 17-beta-estradiol was observed with the rainbow trout ER because of thermo-dependence of estrogen binding. PMID:12648522

  9. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A; Lizee, Gregory A; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-05-24

    Cancer cells develop under immune surveillance, thus necessitating immune escape for successful growth. Loss of MHC class I expression provides a key immune evasion strategy in many cancers, although the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. MHC class I transactivator (CITA), known as "NLRC5" [NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5], has recently been identified as a critical transcriptional coactivator of MHC class I gene expression. Here we show that the MHC class I transactivation pathway mediated by CITA/NLRC5 constitutes a target for cancer immune evasion. In all the 21 tumor types we examined, NLRC5 expression was highly correlated with the expression of MHC class I, with cytotoxic T-cell markers, and with genes in the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway, including LMP2/LMP7, TAP1, and β2-microglobulin. Epigenetic and genetic alterations in cancers, including promoter methylation, copy number loss, and somatic mutations, were most prevalent in NLRC5 among all MHC class I-related genes and were associated with the impaired expression of components of the MHC class I pathway. Strikingly, NLRC5 expression was significantly associated with the activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells and patient survival in multiple cancer types. Thus, NLRC5 constitutes a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cancers. PMID:27162338

  10. Inhibition of HIV-1 reactivation by a telomerase-derived peptide in a HSP90-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide vaccine designed to induce T-cell immunity to telomerase, GV1001, has been shown to modulate cellular signaling pathways and confer a direct anti-cancer effect through the interaction with heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and 70. Here, we have found that GV1001 can modulate transactivation protein-mediated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. GV1001 treatment resulted in significant suppression of HIV-1 replication and rescue of infected cells from death by HIV-1. Transactivation of HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR) was inhibited by GV1001, indicating that GV1001 suppressed the transcription from proviral HIV DNA. The anti-HIV-1 activity of GV1001 was completely abrogated by an HSP90-neutralizing antibody, indicating that the antiviral activity depends on HSP90. Further mechanistic studies revealed that GV1001 suppresses basal NF-κB activation, which is required for HIV-1 LTR transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. Inhibition of LTR transactivation by GV1001 suggests its potential to suppress HIV-1 reactivation from latency. Indeed, PMA-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latent infected cells was suppressed by GV1001. The results suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001, a peptide proven to be safe for human use, as an anti-HIV-1 agent to suppress the reactivation from latently infected cells. PMID:27363520

  11. Inhibition of HIV-1 reactivation by a telomerase-derived peptide in a HSP90-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide vaccine designed to induce T-cell immunity to telomerase, GV1001, has been shown to modulate cellular signaling pathways and confer a direct anti-cancer effect through the interaction with heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and 70. Here, we have found that GV1001 can modulate transactivation protein-mediated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. GV1001 treatment resulted in significant suppression of HIV-1 replication and rescue of infected cells from death by HIV-1. Transactivation of HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR) was inhibited by GV1001, indicating that GV1001 suppressed the transcription from proviral HIV DNA. The anti-HIV-1 activity of GV1001 was completely abrogated by an HSP90-neutralizing antibody, indicating that the antiviral activity depends on HSP90. Further mechanistic studies revealed that GV1001 suppresses basal NF-κB activation, which is required for HIV-1 LTR transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. Inhibition of LTR transactivation by GV1001 suggests its potential to suppress HIV-1 reactivation from latency. Indeed, PMA-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latent infected cells was suppressed by GV1001. The results suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001, a peptide proven to be safe for human use, as an anti-HIV-1 agent to suppress the reactivation from latently infected cells. PMID:27363520

  12. Bovine papillomavirus type 1 genomes and the E2 transactivator protein are closely associated with mitotic chromatin.

    PubMed

    Skiadopoulos, M H; McBride, A A

    1998-03-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transactivator protein is required for viral transcriptional regulation and DNA replication and may be important for long-term episomal maintenance of viral genomes within replicating cells (M. Piirsoo, E. Ustav, T. Mandel, A. Stenlund, and M. Ustav, EMBO J. 15:1-11, 1996). We have evidence that, in contrast to most other transcriptional transactivators, the E2 transactivator protein is associated with mitotic chromosomes in dividing cells. The shorter E2-TR and E8/E2 repressor proteins do not bind to mitotic chromatin, and the N-terminal transactivation domain of the E2 protein is necessary for the association. However, the DNA binding function of E2 is not required. We have found that bovine papillomavirus type 1 genomes are also associated with mitotic chromosomes, and we propose a model in which E2-bound viral genomes are transiently associated with cellular chromosomes during mitosis to ensure that viral genomes are segregated to daughter cells in approximately equal numbers. PMID:9499063

  13. Mutational analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev transactivator: essential residues near the amino terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Hope, T J; McDonald, D; Huang, X J; Low, J; Parslow, T G

    1990-01-01

    The expression of certain mRNAs from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is controlled by the viral transactivator Rev, a nucleolar protein that binds a cis-acting element in these mRNAs. Rev is encoded by two viral exons that specify amino acids 1 to 26 and 27 to 116, respectively. Earlier studies have mapped essential regions of the protein that are encoded in the second exon. By further mutational analysis of Rev, we have now identified a novel locus encoded by the first exon that also is essential for transactivation in vivo. Defined by mutations at residues 14 to 20, this locus coincides with a cluster of positively charged and nonpolar amino acids that is conserved in Rev proteins of all known primate immunodeficiency viruses. Rev proteins that contained mutations at this site were defective in both nuclear localization and transactivation and did not function as trans-dominant inhibitors of wild-type Rev. Fusion of these mutants to a heterologous nuclear protein complemented the defect in localization but did not restore biological activity. Our findings suggest that this N-terminal locus may play a direct role in transactivation, perhaps contributing to essential protein-protein interactions or forming part of the RNA-binding domain of Rev. Images PMID:2120472

  14. Phosphorylation of RAF Kinase Dimers Drives Conformational Changes that Facilitate Transactivation.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, Pablo G; Rauch, Nora; Pilkington, Ruth; Rybakova, Katja; Nguyen, Lan K; Kholodenko, Boris N; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Kolch, Walter; Rosta, Edina

    2016-01-18

    RAF kinases are key players in the MAPK signaling pathway and are important targets for personalized cancer therapy. RAF dimerization is part of the physiological activation mechanism, together with phosphorylation, and is known to convey resistance to RAF inhibitors. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations are used to show that phosphorylation of a key N-terminal acidic (NtA) motif facilitates RAF dimerization by introducing several interprotomer salt bridges between the αC-helix and charged residues upstream of the NtA motif. Additionally, we show that the R-spine of RAF interacts with a conserved Trp residue in the vicinity of the NtA motif, connecting the active sites of two protomers and thereby modulating the cooperative interactions in the RAF dimer. Our findings provide a first structure-based mechanism for the auto-transactivation of RAF and could be generally applicable to other kinases, opening new pathways for overcoming dimerization-related drug resistance. PMID:26644280

  15. Enhancement of gene transactivation activity of androgen receptor by hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Yanyan; Chen Wenling; Ma, W.-L. Maverick; Chang Chawnshang; Ou, J.-H. James . E-mail: jamesou@hsc.usc.edu

    2007-07-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) is a regulatory protein that is required for efficient replication of HBV in its natural host. In this report, we demonstrate by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that HBx can physically bind to the androgen receptor (AR), which is a nuclear hormone receptor that is expressed in many different tissues including the liver. This observation is further supported by confocal microscopy, which reveals that HBx can alter the subcellular localization of the AR both in the presence and in the absence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Further studies indicate that HBx can enhance the gene transactivation activity of AR by enhancing its DNA binding activity in a DHT-dependent manner. However, HBx does not remain associated with AR on the DNA. As AR can regulate the expression of a number of cellular genes, our results raise the possibility that HBV pathogenesis may be mediated in part via the interaction between HBx and AR.

  16. Sterol fatty acid esters from the mushroom Hericium erinaceum and their PPAR transactivational effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhou, Wei; Song, Seok Bean; Shim, Sang Hee; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-12-26

    Six new (erinarols A-F, 1-6) and five known (7-11) ergostane-type sterol fatty acid esters were isolated from the methanol extract of the dried fruiting bodies of Hericium erinaceum. Their chemical structures were elucidated using chemical and physical methods as well as through comparison of NMR and mass spectral data with those reported previously. This is the first comprehensive investigation on ergostane-type sterol fatty acid esters from H. erinaceum. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their PPAR transactivational effects using a luciferase reporter system. Compounds 1 and 2 significantly activated the transcriptional activity of PPARs in a dose-dependent manner, with EC50 values of 8.2 and 6.4 μM, respectively. Moreover, compounds 1 and 2 also activated PPARα and PPARγ transcriptional activity, with stimulation from 1.3- to 3.9-fold at 20 μM concentrations. PMID:25437304

  17. Identification of transcriptional regulatory nodes in soybean defense networks using transient co-transactivation assays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongli; Wang, Hui; Ma, Yujie; Du, Haiping; Yang, Qing; Yu, Deyue

    2015-01-01

    Plant responses to major environmental stressors, such as insect feeding, not only occur via the functions of defense genes but also involve a series of regulatory factors. Our previous transcriptome studies proposed that, in addition to two defense-related genes, GmVSPβ and GmN:IFR, a high proportion of transcription factors (TFs) participate in the incompatible soybean-common cutworm interaction networks. However, the regulatory mechanisms and effects of these TFs on those induced defense-related genes remain unknown. In the present work, we isolated and identified 12 genes encoding MYB, WRKY, NAC, bZIP, and DREB TFs from a common cutworm-induced cDNA library of a resistant soybean line. Sequence analysis of the promoters of three co-expressed genes, including GmVSPα, GmVSPβ, and GmN:IFR, revealed the enrichment of various TF-binding sites for defense and stress responses. To further identify the regulatory nodes composed of these TFs and defense gene promoters, we performed extensive transient co-transactivation assays to directly test the transcriptional activity of the 12 TFs binding at different levels to the three co-expressed gene promoters. The results showed that all 12 TFs were able to transactivate the GmVSPβ and GmN:IFR promoters. GmbZIP110 and GmMYB75 functioned as distinct regulators of GmVSPα/β and GmN:IFR expression, respectively, while GmWRKY39 acted as a common central regulator of GmVSPα/β and GmN:IFR expression. These corresponding TFs play crucial roles in coordinated plant defense regulation, which provides valuable information for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in insect-induced transcriptional regulation in soybean. More importantly, the identified TFs and suitable promoters can be used to engineer insect-resistant plants in molecular breeding studies. PMID:26579162

  18. Sox transcription factors require selective interactions with Oct4 and specific transactivation functions to mediate reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Irene; Jauch, Ralf; Eras, Volker; Chng, Wen-Bin Alfred; Chen, Jiaxuan; Divakar, Ushashree; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Stanton, Lawrence W

    2013-12-01

    The unique ability of Sox2 to cooperate with Oct4 at selective binding sites in the genome is critical for reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We have recently demonstrated that Sox17 can be converted into a reprogramming factor by alteration of a single amino acid (Sox17EK) within its DNA binding HMG domain. Here we expanded this study by introducing analogous mutations to 10 other Sox proteins and interrogated the role of N-and C-termini on the reprogramming efficiency. We found that point-mutated Sox7 and Sox17 can convert human and mouse fibroblasts into iPSCs, but Sox4, Sox5, Sox6, Sox8, Sox9, Sox11, Sox12, Sox13, and Sox18 cannot. Next we studied regions outside the HMG domain and found that the C-terminal transactivation domain of Sox17 and Sox7 enhances the potency of Sox2 in iPSC assays and confers weak reprogramming potential to the otherwise inactive Sox4EK and Sox18EK proteins. These results suggest that the glutamate (E) to lysine (K) mutation in the HMG domain is necessary but insufficient to swap the function of Sox factors. Moreover, the HMG domain alone fused to the VP16 transactivation domain is able to induce reprogramming, albeit at low efficiency. By molecular dissection of the C-terminus of Sox17, we found that the β-catenin interaction region contributes to the enhanced reprogramming efficiency of Sox17EK. To mechanistically understand the enhanced reprogramming potential of Sox17EK, we analyzed ChIP-sequencing and expression data and identified a subset of candidate genes specifically regulated by Sox17EK and not by Sox2. PMID:23963638

  19. Functional characterization of the transactivation properties of the PDX-1 homeodomain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Peshavaria, M; Henderson, E; Sharma, A; Wright, C V; Stein, R

    1997-01-01

    Pancreas formation is prevented in mice carrying a null mutation in the PDX-1 homeoprotein, demonstrating a key role for this factor in development. PDX-1 can also bind to and activate transcription from cis-acting regulatory sequences in the insulin and somatostatin genes, which are expressed in pancreatic islet beta and delta cells, respectively. In this study, we compared the functional properties of PDX-1 with those of the closely related Xenopus homeoprotein XIHbox8. Analysis of chimeras between PDX-1, XIHbox8, and the DNA-binding domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor GAL4 revealed that their transactivation domain was contained within the N-terminal region (amino acids 1 to 79). Detailed mutagenesis of this region indicated that transactivation is mediated by three highly conserved sequences, spanning amino acids 13 to 22 (subdomain A), 32 to 38 (subdomain B), and 60 to 73 (subdomain C). These sequences were also required by PDX-1 to synergistically activate insulin enhancer-mediated transcription with another key insulin gene activator, the E2A-encoded basic helix-loop-helix E2-5 and E47 proteins. These results indicated that N-terminal sequences conserved between the mammalian PDX-1 and Xenopus XIHbox8 proteins are important in transcriptional activation. Stable expression of the PDX-1 deltaABC mutant in the insulin- and PDX-1-expressing betaTC3 cell line resulted in a threefold reduction in the rate of endogenous insulin gene transcription. Strikingly, the level of the endogenous PDX-1 protein was reduced to very low levels in these cells. These results suggest that PDX-1 is not absolutely essential for insulin gene expression in betaTC3 cells. We discuss the possible significance of these findings for insulin gene transcription in islet beta cells. PMID:9199333

  20. A novel simian virus 40 early-region domain mediates transactivation of the cyclin A promoter by small-t antigen and is required for transformation in small-t antigen-dependent assays.

    PubMed Central

    Porrás, A; Bennett, J; Howe, A; Tokos, K; Bouck, N; Henglein, B; Sathyamangalam, S; Thimmapaya, B; Rundell, K

    1996-01-01

    At least three regions of the simian virus 40 small-t antigen (small-t) contribute to the protein's ability to enhance cellular transformation. As we showed previously for rat F111 cells, one region includes sequences from residues 97 to 103 that are involved in the binding and inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A. In the present study, the role of the protein phosphatase 2A binding region was confirmed in two additional small-t-dependent transformation systems. Second, small-t was found to provide a function previously identified as a large-T transformation domain. Mutations in residues 19 to 28 of large-T affected its transforming ability, but these mutations were complemented by a wild-type small-t. A third region of small-t was also required for efficient transformation. This region, the 42-47 region, is shared by large-T and small-t and contains a conserved HPDKGG hexapeptide. The 42-47 region function could be provided by either small-t or large-T in small-t-dependent systems. Mutations in the 42-47 region reduced the ability of small-t to transactivate the cyclin A promoter, of interest because small-t increased endogenous cyclin A mRNA levels in both human and monkey cells, as well as transactivating the promoter in transient assays. PMID:8794333

  1. Ligand-dependent serum response factor activation by the human CC chemokine receptors CCR2a and CCR2b is mediated by G proteins of the Gq family.

    PubMed

    Vatter, Petra; Schuhholz, Julia; Koenig, Carolin; Pfreimer, Mariana; Moepps, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Expression of the human CCR2 receptors, CCR2a and CCR2b, in mammalian cells results in ligand-dependent changes in the activity of multiple cellular signal transduction pathways, mediated in most cases by pertussis toxin-sensitive heterotrimeric G proteins of the Gi/o subfamily. In addition, CCR2a and CCR2b receptors have been shown to couple to Gq family members, triggering the canonical activation of phospholipase Cβ isoenzymes. Activation of pertussis toxin-insensitive Gq proteins by cell-surface receptors is not only coupled to activation of phospholipase isoenzymes but also to Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors, which in turn mediate activation of the Rho GTPases. Activated Rho GTPases regulate numerous cellular functions, including the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and gene transcription, such as the transcription factor serum response factor. These findings prompted us to investigate whether CCR2a and/or CCR2b stimulate serum response factor activity. The results presented herein demonstrate that stimulation of human CCR2a- or CCR2b-expressing COS-7 cells caused a vigorous induction of serum response factor activity. This effect was specifically mediated by Gq and/or G14, as well as Rho A and/or a closely related Rho GTPase. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect of CCR2a and CCR2b and Gαq was sensitive to coexpression of the Gαq-interacting leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The findings of the work indicate a role for Gαq and/or Gα14 and in CCR2a/CCR2b-stimulated Rho A GTPase-mediated serum response factor activation and introduce a noncanonical pathway activated by CCR2 receptors by coupling to Gq proteins. PMID:26823487

  2. MDM2 binds and inhibits vitamin D receptor

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Kristina; Heil, Tessa-Carina; Bette, Birgit; Reichrath, Jörg; Roemer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase and transcriptional repressor MDM2 is a potent inhibitor of the p53 family of transcription factors and tumor suppressors. Herein, we report that vitamin D receptor (VDR), another transcriptional regulator and probably, tumor suppressor, is also bound and inhibited by MDM2. This interaction was not affected by vitamin D ligand. VDR was ubiquitylated in the cell and its steady-state level was controlled by the proteasome. Strikingly, overproduced MDM2 reduced the level of VDR whereas knockdown of endogenous MDM2 increased the level of VDR. In addition to ubiquitin-marking proteins for degradation, MDM2, once recruited to promoters by DNA-binding interaction partners, can inhibit the transactivation of genes. Transient transfections with a VDR-responsive luciferase reporter revealed that low levels of MDM2 potently suppress VDR-mediated transactivation. Conversely, knockdown of MDM2 resulted in a significant increase of transcript from the CYP24A1 and p21 genes, noted cellular targets of transactivation by liganded VDR. Our findings suggest that MDM2 negatively regulates VDR in some analogy to p53. PMID:25969952

  3. The cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 transactivates epithelial membrane protein 2, a potential tumor suppressor in the urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Ren; Liao, Yu-Jing; Chen, Lih-Ren; Huang, Chun-Nung; Li, Ching-Chia; Li, Wei-Ming; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ling; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chow, Nan-Haw; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report that EMP2 plays a tumor suppressor role by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest, suppressing cell viability, proliferation, colony formation/anchorage-independent cell growth via regulation of G2/M checkpoints in distinct urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC)-derived cell lines. Genistein treatment or exogenous expression of the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) gene in different UBUC-derived cell lines induced EMP2 transcription and subsequent translation. Mutagenesis on either or both cAMP-responsive element(s) dramatically decreased the EMP2 promoter activity with, without genistein treatment or exogenous CREB1 expression, respectively. Significantly correlation between the EMP2 immunointensity and primary tumor, nodal status, histological grade, vascular invasion and mitotic activity was identified. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that low EMP2 immunoexpression is an independent prognostic factor for poor disease-specific survival. Genistein treatments, knockdown of EMP2 gene and double knockdown of CREB1 and EMP2 genes significantly inhibited tumor growth and notably downregulated CREB1 and EMP2 protein levels in the mice xenograft models. Therefore, genistein induced CREB1 transcription, translation and upregulated pCREB1(S133) protein level. Afterward, pCREB1(S133) transactivated the tumor suppressor gene, EMP2, in vitro and in vivo. Our study identified a novel transcriptional target, which plays a tumor suppressor role, of CREB1. PMID:25940704

  4. Activating transcription factor 4 mediates a multidrug resistance phenotype of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells through transactivation of STAT3 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongwu; Chen, Xiong; Chen, Bin; Chen, Bei; Fan, Jianyong; Song, Weibing; Xie, Ziying; Jiang, Dan; Li, Qiuqiong; Zhou, Meihua; Sun, Dayong; Zhao, Yagang

    2014-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major challenge to the clinical treatment of esophageal cancer. The stress response gene activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is involved in homeostasis and cellular protection. However, relatively little is known about the expression and function of ATF4 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) MDR. In this study, we investigate the potential role and mechanisms of ATF4 in ESCC MDR. We demonstrated that overexpression of ATF4 promotes the MDR phenotype in ESCC cells, while depletion of ATF4 in the MDR ESCC cell line induces drug re-sensitization. We also demonstrated that ATF4 transactivates STAT3 expression by directly binding to the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) promoter, resulting in MDR in ESCC cells. Significantly, inhibition of STAT3 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or a selective inhibitor (JSI-124) reintroduces therapeutic sensitivity. In addition, increased Bcl-2, survivin, and MRP1 expression levels were observed in ATF4-overexpressing cells. In conclusion, ATF4 may promote MDR in ESCC cells through the up-regulation of STAT3 expression, and thus is an attractive therapeutic target to combat therapeutic resistance in ESCC. PMID:25130172

  5. The cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 transactivates epithelial membrane protein 2, a potential tumor suppressor in the urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Feng; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Wu, Wen-Ren; Liao, Yu-Jing; Chen, Lih-Ren; Huang, Chun-Nung; Li, Ching-Chia; Li, Wei-Ming; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ling; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chow, Nan-Haw; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2015-04-20

    In this study, we report that EMP2 plays a tumor suppressor role by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest, suppressing cell viability, proliferation, colony formation/anchorage-independent cell growth via regulation of G2/M checkpoints in distinct urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC)-derived cell lines. Genistein treatment or exogenous expression of the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) gene in different UBUC-derived cell lines induced EMP2 transcription and subsequent translation. Mutagenesis on either or both cAMP-responsive element(s) dramatically decreased the EMP2 promoter activity with, without genistein treatment or exogenous CREB1 expression, respectively. Significantly correlation between the EMP2 immunointensity and primary tumor, nodal status, histological grade, vascular invasion and mitotic activity was identified. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that low EMP2 immunoexpression is an independent prognostic factor for poor disease-specific survival. Genistein treatments, knockdown of EMP2 gene and double knockdown of CREB1 and EMP2 genes significantly inhibited tumor growth and notably downregulated CREB1 and EMP2 protein levels in the mice xenograft models. Therefore, genistein induced CREB1 transcription, translation and upregulated pCREB1(S133) protein level. Afterward, pCREB1(S133) transactivated the tumor suppressor gene, EMP2, in vitro and in vivo. Our study identified a novel transcriptional target, which plays a tumor suppressor role, of CREB1. PMID:25940704

  6. Neuroprotective effects of a chromatin modifier on ischemia/reperfusion neurons: implication of its regulation of BCL2 transactivation by ERα signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun; Zhang, Tao; Yu, Jia; Li, Hong-Zeng; Zhao, Cong; Qiu, Jing; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Jie; Li, Wei; Zhao, Tian-Zhi

    2016-06-01

    An understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-mediated neuroprotective effects is valuable for the development of therapeutic strategy against neuronal ischemic injury. Here, we report the upregulated expression of metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1), a master chromatin modifier and transcriptional regulator, in the murine middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model. Inhibition of MTA1 expression by in vivo short interfering RNA treatment potentiated neuronal apoptosis in a caspase-3-dependent manner and thereafter aggravated MCAO-induced neuronal damage. Mechanistically, the pro-survival effects of MTA1 required the participation of ERα signaling. We also provide in vitro evidence that MTA1 enhances the binding of ERα with the BCL2 promoter upon ischemic insults via recruitment of HDAC2 together with other unidentified coregulators, thus promoting the ERα-mediated transactivation of the BCL2 gene. Collectively, our results suggest that the augmentation of endogenous MTA1 expression during neuronal ischemic injury acts additionally to an endocrinous cascade orchestrating intimate interactions between ERα and BCL2 pathways and operates as an indispensable defensive mechanism in response to neuronal ischemia/reperfusion stress. Future studies in this field will shed light on the modulation of the complicated neuroprotective effects by estrogen signaling. PMID:26728277

  7. miR-16 Targets Transcriptional Corepressor SMRT and Modulates NF-kappaB-Regulated Transactivation of Interleukin-8 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoku; Gong, Ai-Yu; Drescher, Kristen M.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The signaling pathways associated with the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) are essential to pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression, as well as initiating innate epithelial immune responses. The TLR/NF-κB signaling pathways must be stringently controlled through an intricate network of positive and negative regulatory elements. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding small RNAs that regulate the stability and/or translation of protein-coding mRNAs. Herein we report that miR-16 promotes NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene by suppression of the silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT). LPS stimulation activated miR-16 gene transcription in human monocytes (U937) and biliary epithelial cells (H69) through MAPK-dependent mechanisms. Transfection of cells with the miR-16 precursor promoted LPS-induced production of IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1α, without a significant effect on their RNA stability. Instead, an increase in NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene was confirmed in cells following transfection of miR-16 precursor. Importantly, miR-16 targeted the 3′-untranslated region of SMRT and caused translational suppression of SMRT. LPS decreased SMRT expression via upregulation of miR-16. Moreover, functional manipulation of SMRT altered NF-κB-regulated transactivation of LPS-induced IL-8 expression. These data suggest that miR-16 targets SMRT and modulates NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene. PMID:22292036

  8. Non-transactivational, dual pathways for LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation in primary cultures of brown pre-adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Holmstroem, Therese E.; Mattsson, Charlotte L.; Wang, Yanling; Iakovleva, Irina; Petrovic, Natasa; Nedergaard, Jan

    2010-10-01

    In many cell types, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-induced Erk1/2 MAP kinase activation is mediated via receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) transactivation, in particular via the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting via GPCRs, is a mitogen and MAP kinase activator in many systems, and LPA can regulate adipocyte proliferation. The mechanism by which LPA activates the Erk1/2 MAP kinase is generally accepted to be via EGF receptor transactivation. In primary cultures of brown pre-adipocytes, EGF can induce Erk1/2 activation, which is obligatory and determinant for EGF-induced proliferation of these cells. Therefore, we have here examined whether LPA, via EGF transactivation, can activate Erk1/2 in brown pre-adipocytes. We found that LPA could induce Erk1/2 activation. However, the LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation was independent of transactivation of EGF receptors (or PDGF receptors) in these cells (whereas in transformed HIB-1B brown adipocytes, the LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation indeed proceeded via EGF receptor transactivation). In the brown pre-adipocytes, LPA instead induced Erk1/2 activation via two distinct non-transactivational pathways, one G{sub i}-protein dependent, involving PKC and Src activation, the other, a PTX-insensitive pathway, involving PI3K (but not Akt) activation. Earlier studies showing LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation being fully dependent on RTK transactivation have all been performed in cell lines and transfected cells. The present study implies that in non-transformed systems, RTK transactivation may not be involved in the mediation of GPCR-induced Erk1/2 MAP kinase activation.

  9. Lysophosphatidic Acid-induced ERK Activation and Chemotaxis in MC3T3-E1 Preosteoblasts are Independent of EGF Receptor Transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Chrisler, William B.; Bollinger, Nikki; Karin, Norman J.

    2009-06-01

    Growing evidence indicates that bone-forming osteoblasts and their progenitors are target cells for the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) which is produced by degranulating platelets at sites of injury. LPA is a potent inducer of bone cell migration, proliferation and survival in vitro and an attractive candidate to facilitate preosteoblast chemotaxis during skeletal regeneration in vivo, but the intracellular signaling pathways mediating the effects of this lipid on bone cells are not defined. In this study we measured the ability of LPA to stimulate extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2) in MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells and determined the contribution of this pathway to LPA-stimulated chemotaxis. LPA-treated cells exhibited a bimodal activation of ERK1/2 with maximal phosphorylation at 5 and 60 minutes. The kinetics of ERK1/2 phosphorylation were not coupled to Ras activation or LPA-induced elevations in cytosolic Ca2+. While LPA is coupled to the transactivation of the EGF receptor in many cell types, LPA-stimulated ERK1/2 activation in MC3T3-E1 cells was unaffected by inhibition of EGF receptor function. ERK isoforms rapidly accumulated at nuclear sites in LPA-treated cells, a process that was blocked if ERK1/2 phosphorylation was prevented with the MEK1 inhibitor U0126. Blocking ERK1/2 phosphorylation with U0126 also diminished MC3T3-E1 cell migration and altered the normal disassembly of LPA-induced stress fibers, while the inhibition of EGF receptor function had no effect on LPA-coupled preosteoblast motility. Our results identify ERK1/2 activation as a mediatora mediator of LPA-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cell migration that may be relevant to preosteoblast motility during bone repair in vivo.

  10. Neutrophil elastase enhances IL-12p40 production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages via transactivation of the PAR-2/EGFR/TLR4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are involved in innate immune responses and signaling cross-talk between these receptor molecules has the potential to augment an ongoing inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible cooperative influence of PAR-2 and TLR4 on IL-12p40 production by macrophages after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). During culture, GM-CSF upregulated PAR-2 expression by macrophages in a time-dependent manner. Stimulation with LPS enhanced IL-12p40 production by macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. While human neutrophil elastase (HNE) did not induce IL-12p40 production, pretreatment of macrophages with HNE synergistically increased the IL-12p40 protein level after LPS exposure. Silencing of TLR4 with small interfering RNA blunted the synergistic enhancement of IL-12p40 by HNE combined with LPS. Silencing of β-arrestin 2, p22phox, or ERK1/2 also inhibited an increase of IL-12p40. Interestingly, transfection of macrophages with small interfering RNA duplexes for DUOX-2, EGFR, TLR4, or TRAF6 significantly blunted the increase of IL-12p40 in response to treatment with HNE plus LPS. U73122 and Rottlerin also inhibited the increased production of IL-12p40. In conclusion, HNE is involved in transactivation of TLR4 through activation of DUOX-2/EGFR and synergistically enhances IL-12p40 production by macrophages stimulated with LPS. PMID:27282560

  11. Alpha1a-Adrenoceptor Genetic Variant Triggers Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Hyperproliferation and Agonist Induced Hypertrophy via EGFR Transactivation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schwinn, Debra A.; Oganesian, Anush

    2015-01-01

    α1a Adrenergic receptors (α1aARs) are the predominant AR subtype in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). α1aARs in resistance vessels are crucial in the control of blood pressure, yet the impact of naturally occurring human α1aAR genetic variants in cardiovascular disorders remains poorly understood. To this end, we present novel findings demonstrating that 3D cultures of vascular SMCs expressing human α1aAR-247R (247R) genetic variant demonstrate significantly increased SMC contractility compared with cells expressing the α1aAR-WT (WT) receptor. Stable expression of 247R genetic variant also triggers MMP/EGFR-transactivation dependent serum- and agonist-independent (constitutive) hyperproliferation and agonist-dependent hypertrophy of SMCs. Agonist stimulation reduces contractility Using pathway-specific inhibitors we determined that the observed hyperproliferation of 247R-expressing cells is triggered via β-arrestin1/Src/MMP-2/EGFR/ERK-dependent mechanism. MMP-2-specific siRNA inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation indicating MMP-2 involvement in 247R-triggered hyperproliferation in SMCs. β-arrestin1-specific shRNA also inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation but did not affect hypertrophy in 247R-expressing SMCs, indicating that agonist-dependent hypertrophy is independent of β-arrestin1. Our data reveal that in different cardiovascular cells the same human receptor genetic variant can activate alternative modulators of the same signaling pathway. Thus, our findings in SMCs demonstrate that depending on the type of cells expressing the same receptor (or receptor variant), different target-specific inhibitors could be used to modulate aberrant hyperproliferative or hypertrophic pathways in order to restore normal phenotype. PMID:26571308

  12. Transactivation of the proximal promoter of human oxytocin gene by TR4 orphan receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-P.; Lee, Y.-F.; Chang, C.; Lee, H.-J. . E-mail: hjlee@mail.ndhu.edu.tw

    2006-12-08

    The human testicular receptor 4 (TR4) shares structural homology with members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Some other members of this superfamily were able to regulate the transcriptional activity of the human oxytocin (OXT) promoter by binding to the first DR0 regulatory site. However, little investigation was conducted systematically in the study of the second dDR4 site of OXT proximal promoter, and the relationship between the first and the second sites of OXT promoter. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that TR4 could increase the proximal promoter activity of the human OXT gene via DR0, dDR4, and OXT (both DR0 and dDR4) elements, respectively. TR4 might induce OXT gene expression through the OXT element in a dose-dependent manner. However, there is no synergistic effect between DR0 and dDR4 elements during TR4 transactivation. Taken together, these results suggested that TR4 should be one of important regulators of OXT gene expression.

  13. Brain-Targeted Delivery of Trans-Activating Transcriptor-Conjugated Magnetic PLGA/Lipid Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifang; Sun, Tingting; Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jian; Fu, Yanyan; Du, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Ying; Liu, YongHai; Ma, Kai; Liu, Hongzhi; Song, Yuanjian

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs) were fabricated from PLGA, L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol) (DSPE-PEG-NH2), and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES), naringin (NAR), and glutathione (GSH) were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10%) and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%). The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain. PMID:25187980

  14. SIP1/NHERF2 enhances estrogen receptor alpha transactivation in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Meneses-Morales, Ivan; Tecalco-Cruz, Angeles C.; Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Trujillo-González, Isis; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Méndez-Enríquez, Erika; Cervantes-Roldán, Rafael; Pérez-Sánchez, Víctor; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that possesses two activating domains designated AF-1 and AF-2 that mediate its transcriptional activity. The role of AF-2 is to recruit coregulator protein complexes capable of modifying chromatin condensation status. In contrast, the mechanism responsible for the ligand-independent AF-1 activity and for its synergistic functional interaction with AF-2 is unclear. In this study, we have identified the protein Na+/H+ Exchanger RegulatoryFactor 2 (NHERF2) as an ERα-associated coactivator that interacts predominantly with the AF-1 domain of the nuclear receptor. Overexpression of NHERF2 in breast cancer MCF7 cells produced an increase in ERα transactivation. Interestingly, the presence of SRC-1 in NHERF2 stably overexpressing MCF7 cells produced a synergistic increase in ERα activity. We show further that NHERF2 interacts with ERα and SRC-1 in the promoter region of ERα target genes. The binding of NHERF2 to ERα in MCF7 cells increased cell proliferation and the ability of MCF7 cells to form tumors in a mouse model. We analyzed the expression of NHERF2 in breast cancer tumors finding a 2- to 17-fold increase in its mRNA levels in 50% of the tumor samples compared to normal breast tissue. These results indicate that NHERF2 is a coactivator of ERα that may participate in the development of estrogen-dependent breast cancer tumors. PMID:24771346

  15. Abnormal XPD-induced nuclear receptor transactivation in DNA repair disorders: trichothiodystrophy and xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Khan, Sikandar G; Tamura, Deborah; Ueda, Takahiro; Boyle, Jennifer; Compe, Emmanuel; Egly, Jean-Marc; DiGiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2013-08-01

    XPD (ERCC2) is a DNA helicase involved in nucleotide excision repair and in transcription as a structural bridge tying the transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) core with the cdk-activating kinase complex, which phosphorylates nuclear receptors. Mutations in XPD are associated with several different phenotypes, including trichothiodystrophy (TTD), with sulfur-deficient brittle hair, bone defects, and developmental abnormalities without skin cancer, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), with pigmentary abnormalities and increased skin cancer, or XP/TTD with combined features, including skin cancer. We describe the varied clinical features and mutations in nine patients examined at the National Institutes of Health who were compound heterozygotes for XPD mutations but had different clinical phenotypes: four TTD, three XP, and two combined XP/TTD. We studied TFIIH-dependent transactivation by nuclear receptor for vitamin D (VDR) and thyroid in cells from these patients. The vitamin D stimulation ratio of CYP24 and osteopontin was associated with specific pairs of mutations (reduced in 5, elevated in 1) but not correlated with distinct clinical phenotypes. Thyroid receptor stimulation ratio for KLF9 was not significantly different from normal. XPD mutations frequently were associated with abnormal VDR stimulation in compound heterozygote patients with TTD, XP, or XP/TTD. PMID:23232694

  16. BFV activates the NF-kappaB pathway through its transactivator (BTas) to enhance viral transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jian; Tan Juan; Zhang Xihui; Guo Hongyan; Zhang Qicheng; Guo Tingting; Geng Yunqi; Qiao Wentao

    2010-05-10

    Multiple families of viruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to regulate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling, which plays a pivotal role in diverse cellular events, including virus-host interactions. In this study, we report that bovine foamy virus (BFV) is able to activate the NF-kappaB pathway through the action of its transactivator, BTas. Both cellular IKKbeta and IkappaBalpha also participate in this activation. In addition, we demonstrate that BTas induces the processing of p100, which implies that BTas can activate NF-kappaB through a noncanonical pathway as well. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis shows that BTas interacts with IKK catalytic subunits (IKKalpha and IKKbeta), which may be responsible for regulation of IKK kinase activity and persistent NF-kappaB activation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the level of BTas-mediated LTR transcription correlates with the activity of cellular NF-kappaB. Together, this study suggests that BFV activates the NF-kappaB pathway through BTas to enhance viral transcription.

  17. Platelet transactivation by monocytes promotes thrombosis in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Tutwiler, Valerie; Madeeva, Daria; Ahn, Hyun Sook; Andrianova, Izabella; Hayes, Vincent; Zheng, X Long; Cines, Douglas B; McKenzie, Steven E; Poncz, Mortimer; Rauova, Lubica

    2016-01-28

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is characterized by a high incidence of thrombosis, unlike other antibody-mediated causes of thrombocytopenia. We have shown that monocytes complexed with surface-bound platelet factor 4 (PF4) activated by HIT antibodies contribute to the prothrombotic state in vivo, but the mechanism by which this occurs and the relationship to the requirement for platelet activation via fragment crystallizable (Fc)γRIIA is uncertain. Using a microfluidic model and human or murine blood, we confirmed that activation of monocytes contributes to the prothrombotic state in HIT and showed that HIT antibodies bind to monocyte FcγRIIA, which activates spleen tyrosine kinase and leads to the generation of tissue factor (TF) and thrombin. The combination of direct platelet activation by HIT immune complexes through FcγRIIA and transactivation by monocyte-derived thrombin markedly increases Annexin V and factor Xa binding to platelets, consistent with the formation of procoagulant coated platelets. These data provide a model of HIT wherein a combination of direct FcγRIIA-mediated platelet activation and monocyte-derived thrombin contributes to thrombosis in HIT and identifies potential new targets for lessening this risk. PMID:26518435

  18. Amino acids critical for the functions of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transactivator.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, J L; Blanco, M; McBride, A A

    1996-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 protein is important for viral DNA replication, for transcriptional transactivation, and for interaction with the E1 protein. To determine which residues of this 200-amino-acid domain are important for these activities, single conservative amino acid substitutions have been generated in 17 residues that are invariant among all papillomavirus E2 proteins. The resulting mutated E2 proteins were tested for the ability to support viral DNA replication, activate transcription, and cooperatively bind to the origin of replication with the E1 protein. We identified five mutated proteins that were completely defective for transcriptional activation and either were defective or could support viral DNA replication at only low levels. However, several of these proteins could still interact efficiently with the E1 protein. In addition, we identified several mutated proteins that were unable to efficiently cooperatively bind to the origin with the E1 protein. Although a number of the mutated proteins demonstrated wild-type activity in all of the functions tested, only 3 out of 17 mutated viral genomes were able to induce foci in a C127 focus formation assay when the mutations were generated in the background of the entire bovine papillomavirus type 1 genome. This finding suggests that the E2 protein may have additional activities that are important for the viral life cycle. PMID:8523530

  19. Transactivation of dianthin transgene expression by African cassava mosaic virus AC2.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y; Saunders, K; Stanley, J

    1997-02-17

    We have recently described a novel strategy for engineering resistance to African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a virus-inducible promoter to control the expression of a plant ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) transgene (Y. Hong et al., Virology 220, 119-127, 1996). Here, we have used a potato virus X (PVX) vector to express the ACMV transactivator protein, AC2, in planta. We confirm that amplification of RIP activity in transgenic plants is mediated by AC2; disruption of AC2 expression by either the introduction of an in-frame stop codon or the deletion of 5'-terminal or 3'-terminal coding sequences reduced RIP expression to the basal level associated with PVX-infected plants. AC2 expression from the PVX vector induced necrosis in nontransformed plants as well as in plants containing the RIP transgene, suggesting that the protein can functionally interact with PVX and/or host factors. The potential of this system to provide a direct and sensitive assay to investigate AC2 function in planta is discussed. PMID:9123846

  20. An alternative model of H ferritin promoter transactivation by c-Jun.

    PubMed Central

    Faniello, Maria C; Chirico, Giuseppa; Quaresima, Barbara; Cuda, Giovanni; Allevato, Giovanna; Bevilacqua, Maria A; Baudi, Francesco; Colantuoni, Vittorio; Cimino, Filiberto; Venuta, Salvatore; Avvedimento, Vittorio E; Costanzo, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    c-Jun is a member of the activator protein 1 family, and its interaction with different nuclear factors generates a wide spectrum of complexes that regulate transcription of different promoters. H ferritin promoter transcription is tightly dependent on nuclear factor Y (NFY). Ferritin transcription is activated by c-Jun, although the promoter does not contain a canonical binding site. NFY, on the other hand, does not bind c-Jun in vitro, whereas in vivo c-Jun is found in the complex containing NFY. Moreover, a c-Jun-GCN4 chimaeric construct containing only the transactivation domain of Jun and the basic-region leucine-zipper domain of GCN4 stimulates the H ferritin promoter. A synthetic GAL4 promoter and the cognate activator, the fusion protein NFY-GAL4, are potently activated by c-Jun. Titration of p300 by co-expressing E1A abolishes the stimulatory effect. Moreover, another p300-dependent promoter, the cAMP-response element, can be superactivated by c-Jun using the same mechanism. These data indicate that c-Jun, when activated or overexpressed, is recruited to the H ferritin promoter by p300, which links NFY, bound to DNA, to the complex. These results add a new level of complexity to transcriptional regulation by c-Jun, which can activate p300-dependent promoters without binding directly to the target DNA. PMID:11903046

  1. The Baculovirus PE38 Protein Augments Apoptosis Induced by Transactivator IE1

    PubMed Central

    Prikhod’ko, Elena A.; Miller, Lois K.

    1999-01-01

    While studying apoptosis induced by baculovirus transactivator IE1 in SF-21 cells, we found that the levels of IE1-induced apoptosis were increased approximately twofold upon cotransfection with the baculovirus early pe38 gene. However, no apoptotic activity was observed in cells transfected with pe38 alone, even when placed under the control of a constitutive promoter. Thus, pe38 was able to augment IE1-induced apoptosis but was unable to induce apoptosis when expressed in SF-21 cells alone. PE38, the full-length product of pe38, is a nuclear protein with RING finger and leucine zipper motifs. Deletion of the amino-terminal region, which contains a putative nuclear localization motif, resulted in cytoplasmic localization of the PE38 mutants. These N-terminal deletion mutants were unable to enhance IE1-induced apoptosis. Mutation of a single conserved leucine (L242) of the leucine zipper motif also eliminated the ability of PE38 to augment apoptosis induced by IE1. In contrast, PE38 mutants with alanine substitutions for conserved cysteine residues (C109 or C138) of the RING finger motif were able to increase IE1-induced apoptosis to levels equivalent to those of wild-type PE38. We propose that PE38 is one of at least two viral factors which collectively evoke a cellular apoptotic response during baculovirus infection. PMID:10400766

  2. Trans-activation of TRPV1 by D1R in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woo; Cho, Pyung Sun; Lee, Han Kyu; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Oh, Seog Bae

    2015-10-01

    TRPV1, a ligand-gated ion channel expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons is modulated by a variety of intracellular signaling pathways. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that plays important roles in motor control, cognition, and pain modulation in the CNS, and acts via a variety of dopamine receptors (D1R-D5R), a class of GPCRs. Although nociceptive sensory neurons express D1-like receptors, very little is known about the effect of dopamine on TRPV1 in the peripheral nervous system. Therefore, in this study, we examined the effects of D1R activation on TRPV1 in mouse DRG neurons using Ca(2+) imaging and immunohistochemical analysis. The D1R agonist SKF-38393 induced reproducible Ca(2+) responses via Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 rather than Ca(2+) mobilization from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed co-expression of D1R and TRPV1 in mouse DRG neurons. The PLC-specific inhibitor blocked the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response, whereas the PKC, DAG lipase, AC, and PKA inhibitors had no effect on the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response. Taken together, our results suggest that the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response results from the direct activation of TRPV1 by a PLC/DAG-mediated membrane-delimited pathway. These results provide evidence that the trans-activation of TRPV1 following D1R activation may contribute to the modulation of pain signaling in nociceptive sensory neurons. PMID:26319554

  3. Radical acceleration of nuclear reprogramming by chromatin remodeling with the transactivation domain of MyoD.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Tani, Tetsuya; Katoku-Kikyo, Nobuko; Kellner, Steven; Karian, Peter; Firpo, Meri; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2011-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be created by reprogramming differentiated cells through introduction of defined genes, most commonly Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM). However, this process is slow and extremely inefficient. Here, we demonstrate radical acceleration of iPSC creation with a fusion gene between Oct4 and the powerful transactivation domain (TAD) of MyoD (M(3)O). Transduction of M(3) O as well as Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc into fibroblasts effectively remodeled patterns of DNA methylation, chromatin accessibility, histone modifications, and protein binding at pluripotency genes, raising the efficiency of making mouse and human iPSCs more than 50-fold in comparison to OSKM. These results identified that one of the most critical barriers to iPSC creation is poor chromatin accessibility and protein recruitment to pluripotency genes. The MyoD TAD has a capability of overcoming this problem. Our approach of fusing TADs to unrelated transcription factors has far-reaching implications as a powerful tool for transcriptional reprogramming beyond application to iPSC technology. PMID:21732495

  4. Different Modes of Transactivation of Bacteriophage Mu Late Promoters by Transcription Factor C.

    PubMed

    Swapna, Ganduri; Kumari, Vandana; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-01-01

    Transactivator protein C is required for the expression of bacteriophage Mu late genes from lys, I, P and mom promoters during lytic life cycle of the phage. The mechanism of transcription activation of mom gene by C protein is well understood. C activates transcription at Pmom by initial unwinding of the promoter DNA, thereby facilitating RNA polymerase (RNAP) recruitment. Subsequently, C interacts with the ß' subunit of RNAP to enhance promoter clearance. The mechanism by which C activates other late genes of the phage is not known. We carried out promoter-polymerase interaction studies with all the late gene promoters to determine the individual step of C mediated activation. Unlike at Pmom, at the other three promoters, RNAP recruitment and closed complex formation are not C dependent. Instead, the action of C at Plys, PI, and PP is during the isomerization from closed complex to open complex with no apparent effect at other steps of initiation pathway. The mechanism of transcription activation of mom and other late promoters by their common activator is different. This distinction in the mode of activation (promoter recruitment and escape versus isomerization) by the same activator at different promoters appears to be important for optimized expression of each of the late genes. PMID:26058069

  5. Structure-based design of a potent artificial transactivation domain based on p53.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Chantal; Del Gatto, Annarita; Arseneault, Geneviève; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; De Simone, Mariarosaria; Morse, Thomas; de Paola, Ivan; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Legault, Pascale; Pedone, Carlo; Zaccaro, Laura; Omichinski, James G

    2012-01-25

    Malfunctions in transcriptional regulation are associated with a number of critical human diseases. As a result, there is considerable interest in designing artificial transcription activators (ATAs) that specifically control genes linked to human diseases. Like native transcriptional activator proteins, an ATA must minimally contain a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a transactivation domain (TAD) and, although there are several reliable methods for designing artificial DBDs, designing artificial TADs has proven difficult. In this manuscript, we present a structure-based strategy for designing short peptides containing natural amino acids that function as artificial TADs. Using a segment of the TAD of p53 as the scaffolding, modifications are introduced to increase the helical propensity of the peptides. The most active artificial TAD, termed E-Cap-(LL), is a 13-mer peptide that contains four key residues from p53, an N-capping motif and a dileucine hydrophobic bridge. In vitro analysis demonstrates that E-Cap-(LL) interacts with several known p53 target proteins, while in vivo studies in a yeast model system show that it is a 20-fold more potent transcriptional activator than the native p53-13 peptide. These results demonstrate that structure-based design represents a promising approach for developing artificial TADs that can be combined with artificial DBDs to create potent and specific ATAs. PMID:22191432

  6. Localization of sequences responsible for trans-activation of the equine infectious anemia virus long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, L; Gazit, A; Yaniv, A; Kawakami, T; Dahlberg, J E; Tronick, S R

    1988-01-01

    We used the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) to study sequences that influence expression of the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) genome. The EIAV long terminal repeat (LTR) directed CAT activity in a canine cell line, but at levels much lower than those achieved with other eucaryotic viral promoters. In the same cells infected with EIAV or cotransfected with molecularly cloned EIAV genomic DNA, LTR-directed activity was markedly enhanced. Comparison of cat mRNA and protein levels in these cells indicated that this trans-activating effect could be accounted for by a bimodal mechanism in which both transcriptional and posttranscriptional events are enhanced. trans-Activation but not promoter activity was abolished by deletion of the R-U5 region of the EIAV LTR. EIAV sequences responsible for the trans-activating function could be localized to a region encompassing the 3' and 5' termini of the pol and env genes, respectively (nucleotides 4474 to 5775). Interestingly, this stretch harbors a short open reading frame with some amino acid sequence similarity to the human immunodeficiency virus type I tat gene product. Images PMID:2824840

  7. C-terminal activating and inhibitory domains determine the transactivation potential of BSAP (Pax-5), Pax-2 and Pax-8.

    PubMed Central

    Dörfler, P; Busslinger, M

    1996-01-01

    Pax-5 encodes the transcription factor BSAP which plays an essential role in early B cell development and midbrain patterning. In this study we have analysed the structural requirements for transcriptional activation by BSAP. In vitro mutagenesis and transient transfection experiments indicate that the C-terminal serine/threonine/proline-rich region of BSAP contains a potent transactivation domain of 55 amino acids which is active from promoter and enhancer positions. This transactivation domain was found to be inactivated by a naturally occurring frameshift mutation in one PAX-5 allele of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line REH. The function of the transactivation domain is negatively regulated by adjacent sequences from the extreme C-terminus. The activating and inhibitory domains function together as an independent regulatory module in different cell types as shown by fusion to the GAL4 DNA binding domain. The same arrangement of positively and negatively acting sequences has been conserved in the mammalian Pax-2 and Pax-8, the zebrafish Pax-b as well as the sea urchin Pax-258 proteins. These data demonstrate that the transcriptional competence of a subfamily of Pax proteins is determined by a C-terminal regulatory module composed of activating and inhibitory sequences. Images PMID:8617244

  8. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection.

  9. Omega 3 but not omega 6 fatty acids inhibit AP-1 activity and cell transformation in JB6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangming; Bibus, Douglas M.; Bode, Ann M.; Ma, Wei-Ya; Holman, Ralph T.; Dong, Zigang

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal-based investigations have indicated that the development of skin cancer is in part associated with poor dietary practices. Lipid content and subsequently the derived fatty acid composition of the diet are believed to play a major role in the development of tumorigenesis. Omega 3 (ω3) fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), can effectively reduce the risk of skin cancer whereas omega 6 (ω6) fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA) reportedly promote risk. To investigate the effects of fatty acids on tumorigenesis, we performed experiments to examine the effects of the ω3 fatty acids EPA and DHA and of the ω6 fatty acid AA on phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA)-induced or epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription activator protein 1 (AP-1) transactivation and on the subsequent cellular transformation in a mouse epidermal JB6 cell model. DHA treatment resulted in marked inhibition of TPA- and EGF-induced cell transformation by inhibiting AP-1 transactivation. EPA treatment also inhibited TPA-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation but had no effect on EGF-induced transformation. AA treatment had no effect on either TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation or transformation, but did abrogate the inhibitory effects of DHA on TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation in a dose-dependent manner. The results of this study demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of ω3 fatty acids on tumorigenesis are more significant for DHA than for EPA and are related to an inhibition of AP-1. Similarly, because AA abrogates the beneficial effects of DHA, the dietary ratio of ω6 to ω3 fatty acids may be a significant factor in mediating tumor development. PMID:11416221

  10. Protein kinase C modulates aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator protein-mediated transactivation potential in a dimer context.

    PubMed

    Long, W P; Chen, X; Perdew, G H

    1999-04-30

    Protein kinase C (PKC)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated modulation of the transactivation potential of human aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (hARNT), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS transcription factor, and the bHLH-ZIP transcription factors USF-1 (for upstream regulatory factor 1) and c-Myc were examined. An 81 nM dose of the PKC activator phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), shown here to specifically activate PKC in COS-1 cells, or a 1 nM dose of the PKA activator 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP) results in 2. 6- and 1.9-fold enhancements, respectively, in hARNT-mediated transactivation of the class B, E-box-driven reporter pMyc3E1bLuc relative to identically transfected, carrier solvent-treated COS-1 cells. In contrast, 81 nM PMA and 1 nM 8-Br-cAMP did not enhance transactivation of pMyc3E1bLuc-driven by USF-1 and c-Myc expression relative to identically transfected, carrier-treated COS-1 cells. Co-transfection of pcDNA3/ARNT-474-Flag, expressing a hARNT carboxyl-terminal transactivation domain deletion, and pMyc3E1bLuc does not result in induction of reporter activity, suggesting PMA's effects do not involve formation of unknown hARNT-protein heterodimers. Additionally, PMA had no effect on hARNT expression relative to Me2SO-treated cells. Metabolic 32P labeling of hARNT in cells treated with carrier solvent or 81 nM PMA demonstrates that PMA does not increase the overall phosphorylation level of hARNT. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that the transactivation potential of ARNT in a dimer context can be specifically modulated by PKC or PKA stimulation and that the bHLH-PAS and bHLH-ZIP transcription factors are differentially regulated by these pathways in COS-1 cells. PMID:10212212

  11. Exosomes derived from HIV-1-infected cells contain trans-activation response element RNA.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-07-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 10(4)-10(6) copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 10(3) copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS. PMID:23661700

  12. Dimerization and Transactivation Domains as Candidates for Functional Modulation and Diversity of Sox9

    PubMed Central

    Geraldo, Marcos Tadeu; Valente, Guilherme Targino; Nakajima, Rafael Takahiro; Martins, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Sox9 plays an important role in a large variety of developmental pathways in vertebrates. It is composed of three domains: high-mobility group box (HMG box), dimerization (DIM) and transactivation (TAD). One of the main processes for regulation and variability of the pathways involving Sox9 is the self-gene expression regulation of Sox9. However, the subsequent roles of the Sox9 domains can also generate regulatory modulations. Studies have shown that TADs can bind to different types of proteins and its function seems to be influenced by DIM. Therefore, we hypothesized that both domains are directly associated and can be responsible for the functional variability of Sox9. We applied a method based on a broad phylogenetic context, using sequences of the HMG box domain, to ensure the homology of all the Sox9 copies used herein. The data obtained included 4,921 sequences relative to 657 metazoan species. Based on coevolutionary and selective pressure analyses of the Sox9 sequences, we observed coevolutions involving DIM and TADs. These data, along with the experimental data from literature, indicate a functional relationship between these domains. Moreover, DIM and TADs may be responsible for the functional plasticity of Sox9 because they are more tolerant for molecular changes (higher Ka/Ks ratio than the HMG box domain). This tolerance could allow a differential regulation of target genes or promote novel targets during transcriptional activation. In conclusion, we suggest that DIM and TADs functional association may regulate differentially the target genes or even promote novel targets during transcription activation mediated by Sox9 paralogs, contributing to the subfunctionalization of Sox9a and Sox9b in teleosts. PMID:27196604

  13. Arsenic trioxide phosphorylates c-Fos to transactivate p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zimiao; Huang, H.-S.

    2008-12-01

    An infamous poison, arsenic also has been used as a drug for nearly 2400 years; in recently years, arsenic has been effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Increasing evidence suggests that opposite effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO) on tumors depend on its concentrations. For this reason, the mechanisms of action of the drug should be elucidated, and it should be used therapeutically only with extreme caution. Previously, we demonstrated the opposing effects of ERK1/2 and JNK on p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} (p21) expression in response to ATO in A431 cells. In addition, JNK phosphorylates c-Jun (Ser{sup 63/73}) to recruit TGIF/HDAC1 to suppress p21 gene expression. Presently, we demonstrated that a high concentration of ATO sustains ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increases c-Fos biosynthesis and stability, which enhances p21 gene expression. Using site-directed mutagenesis, a DNA affinity precipitation assay, and functional assays, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of the C-terminus of c-Fos (Thr{sup 232}, Thr{sup 325}, Thr{sup 331}, and Ser{sup 374}) plays an important role in its binding to the p21 promoter, and in conjunction with N-terminus phosphorylation of c-Fos (Ser{sup 70}) to transactivate p21 promoter expression. In conclusion, a high concentration of ATO can sustain ERK1/2 activation to enhance c-Fos expression, then dimerize with dephosphorylated c-Jun (Ser{sup 63/73}) and recruit p300/CBP to the Sp1 sites (- 84/- 64) to activate p21 gene expression in A431 cells.

  14. TAR-independent transactivation by Tat in cells derived from the CNS: a novel mechanism of HIV-1 gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J P; Pomerantz, R; Bagasra, O; Chowdhury, M; Rappaport, J; Khalili, K; Amini, S

    1992-01-01

    The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is essential for productive infection and is a potential target for antiviral therapy. Tat, a potent activator of HIV-1 gene expression, serves to greatly increase the rate of transcription directed by the viral promoter. This induction, which seems to be an important component in the progression of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), may be due to increased transcriptional initiation, increased transcriptional elongation, or a combination of these processes. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of Tat with a specific RNA target termed TAR (transactivation responsive) which is present in the leader sequence of all HIV-1 mRNAs. This interaction is believed to be an important component of the mechanism of transactivation. In this report we demonstrate that in certain CNS-derived cells Tat is capable of activating HIV-1 through a TAR-independent pathway. A Tat-responsive element is found upstream within the viral promoter that in glial-derived cell lines allows transactivation in the absence of TAR. Deletion mapping and hybrid promoter constructs demonstrate that the newly identified Tat-responsive element corresponds to a sequence within the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) previously identified as the HIV-1 enhancer, or NF-kappa B domain. DNA band-shift analysis reveals NF-kappa B binding activity in glial cells that differs from that present in T lymphoid cells. Further, we observe that TAR-deleted mutants of HIV-1 demonstrate normal late gene expression in glial cells as evidenced by syncytia formation and production of viral p24 antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1505523

  15. FOXM1c transactivates the human c-myc promoter directly via the two TATA boxes P1 and P2.

    PubMed

    Wierstra, Inken; Alves, Jürgen

    2006-10-01

    FOXM1c transactivates the c-myc promoter via the P1 and P2 TATA boxes using a new mechanism. Whereas the P1 TATA box TATAATGC requires its sequence context to be FOXM1c responsive, the P2 TATA box TATAAAAG alone is sufficient to confer FOXM1c responsiveness to any minimal promoter. FOXM1c transactivates by binding to the TATA box as well as directly to TATA-binding protein, transcription factor IIB and transcription factor IIA. This new transactivation mechanism is clearly distinguished from the function of FOXM1c as a conventional transcription factor. The central domain of FOXM1c functions as an essential domain for activation via the TATA box, but as an inhibitory domain (retinoblastoma protein-independent transrepression domain and retinoblastoma protein-recruiting negative regulatory domain) for transactivation via conventional FOXM1c-binding sites. Each promoter with the P2 TATA box TATAAAAG is postulated to be transactivated by FOXM1c. This was demonstrated for the promoters of c-fos, hsp70 and histone H2B/a. A database search revealed almost 300 probable FOXM1c target genes, many of which function in proliferation and tumorigenesis. Accordingly, dominant-negative FOXM1c proteins reduced cell growth approximately threefold, demonstrating a proliferation-stimulating function for wild-type FOXM1c. PMID:16965535

  16. Rat beta 1-adrenergic receptor regulatory region containing consensus AP-2 elements recognizes novel transactivator proteins.

    PubMed

    Kirigiti, P; Yang, Y F; Li, X; Li, B; Midson, C N; Machida, C A

    2000-03-01

    will bind to both the beta 1-AR GS-1 promoter fragment and commercially available AP-2 consensus element control probes. Interestingly, using antibody supershift and immunoblotting experiments, no supershifts were observed and the major 117-kDa protein was not immunoreactive to antibodies recognizing either AP-2 alpha or AP-2 beta. These results support our contention that this beta 1-AR regulatory region contains AP-2 consensus elements that recognize novel transactivator proteins. PMID:10860867

  17. Ets transcription factors bind and transactivate the core promoter of the von Willebrand factor gene.

    PubMed

    Schwachtgen, J L; Janel, N; Barek, L; Duterque-Coquillaud, M; Ghysdael, J; Meyer, D; Kerbiriou-Nabias, D

    1997-12-18

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene expression is restricted to endothelial cells and megakaryocytes. Previous results demonstrated that basal transcription of the human vWF gene is mediated through a promoter located between base pairs -89 and +19 (cap site: +1) which is functional in endothelial and non endothelial cells. Two DNA repeats TTTCCTTT correlating with inverted consensus binding sites for the Ets family of transcription factors are present in the -56/-36 sequence. In order to analyse whether these DNA elements are involved in transcription, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), bovine calf pulmonary endothelial cell line (CPAE), HeLa and COS cells were transfected with constructs containing deletions of the -89/+19 fragment, linked to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene. The -60/+19 region exhibits significant promoter activity in HUVEC and CPAE cells only. The -42/+19 fragment is not active. Mutations of the -60/+19 promoter fragment in the 5' (-56/-49) Ets binding site abolish transcription in endothelial cells whereas mutations in the 3' (-43/-36) site does not. The -60/-33 fragment forms three complexes with proteins from HUVEC nuclear extracts in electrophoretic mobility shift assay which are dependent on the presence of the 5' Ets binding site. Binding of recombinant Ets-1 protein to the -60/-33 fragment gives a complex which also depends on the 5' site. The -60/+19 vWF gene core promoter is transactivated in HeLa cells by cotransfecting with Ets-1 or Erg (Ets-related gene) expression plasmids. In contrast to the wild type construct, transcription of the 5' site mutants is not increased by these expressed proteins. The results indicate that the promoter activity of the -60/+19 region of the vWF gene depends on transcription factors of the Ets family of which several members like Ets-1, Ets-2 and Erg are expressed in endothelium. Cotransfection of Ets-1 and Erg expression plasmids is sufficient to induce the -60/+19 v

  18. Inhibition of the FACT Complex Reduces Transcription from the Human Cytomegalovirus Major Immediate Early Promoter in Models of Lytic and Latent Replication.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Christine M; Nukui, Masatoshi; Gurova, Katerina V; Murphy, Eain A

    2016-04-01

    The successful colonization of the majority of the population by human cytomegalovirus is a direct result of the virus's ability to establish and, more specifically, reactivate from latency. The underlying cellular factors involved in viral reactivation remain unknown. Here, we show that the host complexfacilitateschromatintranscription (FACT) binds to the major immediate early promoter (MIEP) and that inhibition of this complex reduces MIEP transactivation, thus inhibiting viral reactivation. PMID:26865717

  19. Interactions between human cyclin T, Tat, and the transactivation response element (TAR) are disrupted by a cysteine to tyrosine substitution found in mouse cyclin T

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Koh; Taube, Ran; Wimmer, Jörg; Cujec, Thomas P.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    The transcriptional transactivator Tat from HIV binds to the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA to increase rates of elongation of viral transcription. Human cyclin T supports these interactions between Tat and TAR. In this study, we report the sequence of mouse cyclin T and identify the residues from positions 1 to 281 in human cyclin T that bind to Tat and TAR. Mouse cyclin T binds to Tat weakly and is unable to facilitate interactions between Tat and TAR. Reciprocal exchanges of the cysteine and tyrosine at position 261 in human and mouse cyclin T proteins also render human cyclin T inactive and mouse cyclin T active. These findings reveal the molecular basis for the restriction of Tat transactivation in rodent cells. PMID:9990016

  20. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-3 alpha (HNF-3{alpha}) negatively regulates androgen receptor transactivation in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Hwang, Miok; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Lee, Keesook

    2008-03-07

    The androgen receptor (AR) is involved in the development and progression of prostate cancers. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs remain incompletely understood. In previous reports, hepatocyte nuclear factor-3{alpha} (HNF-3{alpha}) has been shown to be expressed in the epithelia of the prostate gland, and has been determined to regulate the transcription of prostate-specific genes. In this study, we report that HNF-3{alpha} functions as a novel corepressor of AR in prostatic cells. HNF-3{alpha} represses AR transactivation on target promoters containing the androgen response element (ARE) in a dose-dependent manner. HNF-3{alpha} interacts physically with AR, and negatively regulates AR transactivation via competition with AR coactivators, including GRIP1. Furthermore, HNF-3{alpha} overexpression reduces the androgen-induced expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in LNCaP cells. Taken together, our findings indicate that HNF-3{alpha} is a novel corepressor of AR, and predict its effects on the proliferation of prostate cancer cells.

  1. Transactivation of human osteopontin promoter by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-encoded Tax protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Chagan-Yasutan, Haorile; Hattori, Toshio

    2010-06-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a cytokine that contributes substantially to the growth and metastasis in a wide spectrum of malignancies. We report here that OPN gene is transactivated by Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Northern blot showed enhanced OPN gene expression in cells stably expressing Tax. Co-expression of Tax increased the reporter gene expression directed by OPN promoter. Tax-induced OPN activation was abrogated by treatment with LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor) or co-transfection with AKT siRNA, suggesting PI3K/AKT pathway is involved in Tax-mediated transactivation. Reporter assay with deletion mutants showed that the 5'-partial sequence between -765 and -660 of the OPN promoter is the region responsive to Tax, and further, disrupting the AP-1 site within this region abolished the OPN induction by Tax, indicating that Tax activation of OPN promoter is likely mediated by AP-1 site. This study suggests that OPN is one of the downstream mediators of aberrantly activated PI3K/AKT signaling by Tax, which may partially contribute to HTLV-1-associated leukemogenesis. PMID:19767100

  2. Transactivation of ErbB receptors by leptin in the cardiovascular system: mechanisms, consequences and target for therapy.

    PubMed

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Jazmroz-Wiśniewska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Many experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that elevated leptin concentration in patients with obesity/metabolic syndrome contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders including arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis after coronary angioplasty and myocardial hypertrophy. Receptor tyrosine kinases belonging to the ErbB family, especially ErbB1 (epidermal growth factor receptor) and ErbB2 are abundantly expressed in the blood vessels and the heart. EGFR is activated not only by its multiple peptide ligands but also by many other factors including angiotensin II, endothelin-1, norepinephrine, thrombin and prorenin; the phenomenon referred to as "transactivation". Augmented EGFR signaling contributes to abnormalities of vascular tone and renal sodium handling as well as vascular remodeling and myocardial hypertrophy through various intracellular mechanisms, in particular extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Recent experimental studies indicate that chronically elevated leptin transactivates the EGFR through the mechanisms requiring reactive oxygen species and cytosolic tyrosine kinase, c-Src. In addition, hyperleptinemia increases ErbB2 activity in the arterial wall. Stimulation of EGFR and ErbB2 downstream signaling pathways such as ERK and PI3K in the vascular wall and the kidney may contribute to the increase in vascular tone, enhanced tubular sodium reabsorption as well as vascular and renal lesions in hyperleptinemic obese subjects. PMID:23688012

  3. Characterization of ERM transactivation domain binding to the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator subunit MED25

    PubMed Central

    Landrieu, Isabelle; Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Rucktooa, Prakash; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD) of ERM/ETV5 (ERM38–68), a PEA3 group member of Ets-related transcription factors, directly interacts with the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. Molecular details of this interaction were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The TAD is disordered in solution but has a propensity to adopt local transient secondary structure. We show that it folds upon binding to MED25 and that the resulting ERM–MED25 complex displays characteristics of a fuzzy complex. Mutational analysis further reveals that two aromatic residues in the ERM TAD (F47 and W57) are involved in the binding to MED25 and participate in the ability of ERM TAD to activate transcription. Mutation of a key residue Q451 in the VP16 H1 binding pocket of MED25 affects the binding of ERM. Furthermore, competition experiments show that ERM and VP16 H1 share a common binding interface on MED25. NMR data confirms the occupancy of this binding pocket by ERM TAD. Based on these experimental data, a structural model of a functional interaction is proposed. This study provides mechanistic insights into the Mediator–transactivator interactions. PMID:26130716

  4. Activation of human papillomavirus type 18 gene expression by herpes simplex virus type 1 viral transactivators and a phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Gius, D.; Laimins, L.A.

    1989-02-01

    Several viral trans-activators and a tumor promoter were examined for the ability to activate human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) gene expression. A plasmid containing the HPV-18 noncoding region placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene was cotransfected with different herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genes into several cell lines. Both HSV-1 TIF and ICPO activated HPV-18 expression; however, activation by TIF was observed only in epithelial cells, while ICPO stimulated expression in a wide variety of cells. The element activated by both TIF and ICOP was mapped to a 229-base-pair fragment which also contains an HPV-18 epithelial cell-preferred enhancer. The inclusion of a papillomavirus E2 trans-activator with TIF and ICOP further increased HPV-18 expression. In contrast, the HSV-1 ICP4 and ICP27 genes, as well as the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tat genes, were found to have no effect on HPV-18 expression. In transient assays, the addition of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also activated HPV-18 expression. The region of HPV-18 activated by TPA was localized to a sequence which is homologous to other TPA-responsive elements.

  5. Low Levels of the Reverse Transactivator Fail to Induce Target Transgene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Viceconte, Nikenza; McKenna, Tomás; Eriksson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a genetic disease with multiple features that are suggestive of premature aging. Most patients with HGPS carry a mutation on one of their copies of the LMNA gene. The LMNA gene encodes the lamin A and lamin C proteins, which are the major proteins of the nuclear lamina. The organs of the cardiovascular system are amongst those that are most severely affected in HGPS, undergoing a progressive depletion of vascular smooth muscle cells, and most children with HGPS die in their early teens from cardio-vascular disease and other complications from atherosclerosis. In this study, we developed a transgenic mouse model based on the tet-ON system to increase the understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the most lethal aspect of HGPS. To induce the expression of the most common HGPS mutation, LMNA c.1824C>T; p.G608G, in the vascular smooth muscle cells of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, we used the previously described reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator, sm22α-rtTA. However, the expression of the reverse sm22α-transactivator was barely detectable in the arteries, and this low level of expression was not sufficient to induce the expression of the target human lamin A minigene. The results from this study are important because they suggest caution during the use of previously functional transgenic animal models and emphasize the importance of assessing transgene expression over time. PMID:25090270

  6. Specific binding of a HeLa cell nuclear protein to RNA sequences in the human immunodeficiency virus transactivating region.

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, R; Soultanakis, E; Kuwabara, M; Garcia, J; Sigman, D S

    1989-01-01

    The transactivator protein, tat, encoded by the human immunodeficiency virus is a key regulator of viral transcription. Activation by the tat protein requires sequences downstream of the transcription initiation site called the transactivating region (TAR). RNA derived from the TAR is capable of forming a stable stem-loop structure and the maintenance of both the stem structure and the loop sequences located between +19 and +44 is required for complete in vivo activation by tat. Gel retardation assays with RNA from both wild-type and mutant TAR constructs generated in vitro with SP6 polymerase indicated specific binding of HeLa nuclear proteins to the TAR. To characterize this RNA-protein interaction, a method of chemical "imprinting" has been developed using photoactivated uranyl acetate as the nucleolytic agent. This reagent nicks RNA under physiological conditions at all four nucleotides in a reaction that is independent of sequence and secondary structure. Specific interaction of cellular proteins with TAR RNA could be detected by enhanced cleavages or imprints surrounding the loop region. Mutations that either disrupted stem base-pairing or extensively changed the primary sequence resulted in alterations in the cleavage pattern of the TAR RNA. Structural features of the TAR RNA stem-loop essential for tat activation are also required for specific binding of the HeLa cell nuclear protein. Images PMID:2544877

  7. Phosphorylation-Induced Dimerization of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Unmasks DNA Binding and a Bipartite Transactivation Domain

    PubMed Central

    Marié, Isabelle; Smith, Eric; Prakash, Arun; Levy, David E.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is an interferon (IFN)-inducible transcription factor required for activation of a subset of IFN-α genes that are expressed with delayed kinetics following viral infection. IRF7 is synthesized as a latent protein and is posttranslationally modified by protein phosphorylation in infected cells. Phosphorylation required a carboxyl-terminal regulatory domain that controlled the retention of the active protein exclusively in the nucleus, as well as its binding to specific DNA target sequences, multimerization, and ability to induce target gene expression. Transcriptional activation by IRF7 mapped to two distinct regions, both of which were required for full activity, while all functions were masked in latent IRF7 by an autoinhibitory domain mapping to an internal region. A conditionally active form of IRF7 was constructed by fusing IRF7 with the ligand-binding and dimerization domain of estrogen receptor (ER). Hormone-dependent dimerization of chimeric IRF7-ER stimulated DNA binding and transcriptional transactivation of endogenous target genes. These studies demonstrate the regulation of IRF7 activity by phosphorylation-dependent allosteric changes that result in dimerization and that facilitate nuclear retention, derepress transactivation, and allow specific DNA binding. PMID:11073981

  8. The length and location of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the androgen receptor N-terminal domain affect transactivation function.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, N L; Driver, E D; Miesfeld, R L

    1994-01-01

    Some transcription factors contain stretches of polyglutamine encoded by repeats of the trinucleotide CAG. Expansion of the CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR) has been correlated with the incidence and severity of X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease). In order to understand the relationship of this mutation to AR function, we constructed ARs that varied in the position and size of the polyglutamine tract, and assayed for the abilities of these mutant receptors to bind androgen and to activate transcription of several different AR-responsive reporter genes. Elimination of the tract in both human and rat AR resulted in elevated transcriptional activation activity, strongly suggesting that the presence of the polyglutamine tract is inhibitory to transactivation. Progressive expansion of the CAG repeat in human AR caused a linear decrease of transactivation function. Importantly, expansion of the tract did not completely eliminate AR activity. We postulate that this residual AR activity may be sufficient for development of male primary and secondary sex characteristics, but may fall below a threshold level of activity necessary for normal maintenance of motor neuron function. This functional abnormality may be representative of other genetic diseases that are associated with CAG expansion mutations in open reading frames, such as spinocerebellar ataxia type I and Huntington's disease. Images PMID:8065934

  9. Fusion of adenovirus E1A to the glucocorticoid receptor by high-resolution deletion cloning creates a hormonally inducible viral transactivator.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, D M; Hollenberg, S M; Ricciardi, R P

    1989-01-01

    The 289-amino-acid E1A protein of adenovirus type 2 stimulates transcription from early viral and certain cellular promoters. Its mechanism is not known, and there exist no temperature-sensitive mutants of E1A that could help to elucidate the details of E1A transcriptional activation. To create for E1A such a conditional phenotype, we fused portions of E1A to the human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to make transactivation by E1A dependent on the presence of dexamethasone. Nested subsets of the E1A coding region, centered around the 46-amino-acid transactivating domain, were substituted for the DNA-binding domain of the GR. One of the resulting chimeric proteins (GR/E1A-99), which included the entire E1A transactivating domain, stimulated expression from a viral early promoter (E3) exclusively in the presence of hormone. GR/E1A-99 did not transactivate a GR-responsive promoter. It therefore exhibited the promoter specificity of E1A while possessing the hormone inducibility of the GR. Two smaller chimeras that contained only portions of the E1A transactivating domain failed to transactivate E3. These three chimeras were constructed by a novel strategy, high-resolution deletion cloning. In this procedure, series of unidirectional deletions were made with exonuclease III on each side of the E1A coding region at a resolution of 1 to 2 nucleotides. The large number of in-frame fragments present in the collection of deleted clones facilitated the construction of the GR/E1A chimeras and can be used to create many additional fusions. Images PMID:2550806

  10. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived Soluble Protein, p40, Stimulates Ligand Release from Intestinal Epithelial Cells to Transactivate Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Liu, Liping; Dempsey, Peter J.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Raines, Elaine W.; Wilson, Carole L.; Cao, Hailong; Cao, Zheng; Liu, LinShu; Polk, D. Brent

    2013-01-01

    p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis, and preserves barrier function by transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study is to determine the mechanisms by which p40 transactivates the EGFR in intestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that p40-conditioned medium activates EGFR in young adult mouse colon epithelial cells and human colonic epithelial cell line, T84 cells. p40 up-regulates a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17) catalytic activity, and broad spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitors block EGFR transactivation by p40 in these two cell lines. In ADAM17-deficient mouse colonic epithelial (ADAM17−/− MCE) cells, p40 transactivation of EGFR is blocked, but can be rescued by re-expression with WT ADAM17. Furthermore, p40 stimulates release of heparin binding (HB)-EGF, but not transforming growth factor (TGF)α or amphiregulin, in young adult mouse colon cells and ADAM17−/− MCE cells overexpressing WT ADAM17. Knockdown of HB-EGF expression by siRNA suppresses p40 effects on transactivating EGFR and Akt, preventing apoptosis, and preserving tight junction function. The effects of p40 on HB-EGF release and ADAM17 activation in vivo are examined after administration of p40-containing pectin/zein hydrogel beads to mice. p40 stimulates ADAM17 activity and EGFR activation in colonic epithelial cells and increases HB-EGF levels in blood from WT mice, but not from mice with intestinal epithelial cell-specific ADAM17 deletion. Thus, these data define a mechanism of a probiotic-derived soluble protein in modulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis through ADAM17-mediated HB-EGF release, leading to transactivation of EGFR. PMID:24043629

  11. Critical role of tyrosine 277 in the ligand-binding and transactivating properties of retinoic acid receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Mailfait, S; Belaiche, D; Kouach, M; Dallery, N; Chavatte, P; Formstecher, P; Sablonnière, B

    2000-03-01

    Retinoic acid receptors specifically bind all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) and function as RA-inducible transcriptional regulatory factors. Binding of RA to RARalpha, beta, and gamma is sensitive to nitration with tetranitromethane, a tyrosine-specific modifying reagent. To identify tyrosine residue(s) that are important for RA binding, we carried out chemical modification experiments with purified RARalpha ligand-binding domain (RARalpha-LBD) subjected to partial acid hydrolysis and selective proteolysis. The chemically modified peptides containing each of the three Tyr residues present in the RARalpha-LBD sequence were then analyzed and identified by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS). We found that RA binding to RARalpha-LBD protected Tyr(277)-containing peptides from nitration. Protection of Tyr(277) could result either from direct masking by the bound ligand or from ligand-induced changes in receptor conformation and tyrosine accessibility. The role of Tyr residues was further documented by site directed mutagenesis using three site-specific RARalpha mutants: Y208A, Y277A, and Y362A. The affinity for RA of these mutant receptors was in the range of that of the wild-type protein, except for the Y277A receptor mutant, which displays a 15-20-fold reduction in affinity and transactivation activity for RA. Whereas mutation of Tyr(277) into alanine had a variable effect on different agonists and antagonists binding, it caused a dramatic decrease of retinoid-dependent transactivation activity. This later effect was also observed with mutation of Tyr(277) into phenylalanine. It is unlikely that major conformational changes are responsible for the lower affinity of RA binding and RA-dependent transactivation since these mutants displayed wild-type dimerization and DNA-binding activities. Limited proteolysis revealed that upon ligand binding, the Y277A mutant induced a conformational change slightly

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation Is Required for Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in HaCaT Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ockenga, Wymke; Kühne, Sina; Bocksberger, Simone; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2014-01-01

    Non-neuronal acetylcholine plays a substantial role in the human skin by influencing adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. These processes are regulated by the Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) kinase cascade. Here we show that in HaCaT keratinocytes all five muscarinic receptor subtypes are expressed, but M1 and M3 are the subtypes involved in mitogenic signaling. Stimulation with the cholinergic agonist carbachol leads to activation of the MAP kinase extracellular signal regulated kinase, together with the protein kinase Akt. The activation is fully dependent on the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which even appears to be the sole pathway for the muscarinic receptors to facilitate MAP kinase activation in HaCaT cells. The transactivation pathway involves a triple-membrane-passing process, based on activation of matrix metalloproteases, and extracellular ligand release; whereas phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Src family kinases or protein kinase C do not appear to be involved in MAP kinase activation. Furthermore, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and endocytosis of the EGF receptor after cholinergic transactivation are different from that induced by a direct stimulation with EGF, suggesting that ligands other than EGF itself mediate the cholinergic transactivation. PMID:25421240

  13. The hepatitis B virus X protein increases the cellular level of TATA-binding protein, which mediates transactivation of RNA polymerase III genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Horng-Dar; Johnson, D.L.; Yuh, Chio-Hwa

    1995-12-01

    This report decribes the mechanism by which the hepatitis B virus X gene product induces RNA polymerase III genes. The RNA pol III transcription system serves as model for understanding the mechanism of X in the transactivation of cellular genes in both Drosophila and rat cell lines. 53 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. E2 polypeptides encoded by bovine papillomavirus type 1 form dimers through the common carboxyl-terminal domain: transactivation is mediated by the conserved amino-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    McBride, A A; Byrne, J C; Howley, P M

    1989-01-01

    The E2 open reading frame (ORF) of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) encodes positive- and negative-acting factors that regulate viral gene expression. The full-length ORF encodes a transactivator, and two transcriptional repressors are expressed from the 3' half of the ORF. Previous analysis has shown that a conserved C-terminal region of 101 amino acids, which is shared by E2 transactivator and repressor proteins, contains the specific DNA binding activity. Further analysis of the E2 transactivator shows that a conserved N-terminal domain of approximately 220 amino acids is crucial for the transcriptional activation function, whereas the variable internal region is not required. The E2 proteins bind to a sequence, ACCGN4CGGT, several copies of which are sufficient to constitute an E2-dependent enhancer. By using a gel retardation assay and proteins derived by in vitro transcription and translation, we were able to show that the E2 polypeptides bind as dimers to a single DNA binding site. The dimeric E2 proteins are stable in the absence of DNA and dimerization is mediated through the DNA binding domain. This may reveal an additional mechanism of repression that could potentially result from the formation of inactive heterodimers between transactivator and repressor species. PMID:2536165

  15. Overlap of Viviparous1 (VP1) and abscisic acid response elements in the Em promoter: G-box elements are sufficient but not necessary for VP1 transactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Vasil, V; Marcotte, W R; Rosenkrans, L; Cocciolone, S M; Vasil, I K; Quatrano, R S; McCarty, D R

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between promoter sequences that mediate Viviparous1 (VP1) transactivation and regulation by abscisic acid (ABA) in the wheat Em promoter was investigated using deletion analysis and directed mutagenesis. The Em1a G-box is strongly coupled to VP1 transactivation as well as to ABA regulation; however, the Em promoter includes additional components that can support VP1 transactivation without ABA responsiveness or synergism. Oligonucleotide tetramers of several G-box sequences, including Em1a, Em1b, and the dyad G-box element from the UV light-regulated parsley chalcone synthase gene, were sufficient to confer VP1 transactivation and the synergistic interaction with ABA to the -45 cauliflower mosaic virus 35S core promoter. These data suggest that VP1 can activate transcription through at least two classes of cis-acting sequences, including the G-box elements and the Sph regulatory motif found in the C1 promoter. The contrasting roles of these motifs in the Em and C1 promoters suggest a basis for the differential regulation of the corresponding genes by VP1. PMID:8589631

  16. Phenotypic Complementation Establishes Requirements for Specific POU Domain and Generic Transactivation Function of Oct-3/4 in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Hitoshi; Masui, Shinji; Chambers, Ian; Smith, Austin G.; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi

    2002-01-01

    Transcription factors of the POU family govern cell fate through combinatorial interactions with coactivators and corepressors. The POU factor Oct-3/4 can define differentiation, dedifferentation, or self-renewal of pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells in a sensitive, dose-dependent manner (H. Niwa, J.-I. Miyazali, and A. G. Smith, Nat. Genet. 24:372-376, 2000). Here we have developed a complementation assay based on the ability of Oct-3/4 transgenes to rescue self-renewal in conditionally null ES cells and used this to define which domains of Oct-3/4 are required to sustain the undifferentiated stem cell phenotype. Surprisingly, we found that molecules lacking either the N-terminal or C-terminal transactivation domain, though not both, can effectively replace full-length Oct-3/4. Furthermore, a fusion of the heterologous transactivation domain of Oct-2 to the Oct-3/4 POU domain can also sustain self-renewal. Thus, the unique function of Oct-3/4 in ES cell propagation resides in combination of the specific POU domain with a generic proline-rich transactivation domain. Interestingly, however, Oct-3/4 target gene expression elicited by the N- and C-terminal transactivation domains is not identical, indicating that at least one class of genes activated by Oct-3/4 is not required for ES cell propagation. PMID:11839818

  17. Recent advances in the identification of Tat-mediated transactivation inhibitors: progressing toward a functional cure of HIV.

    PubMed

    Tabarrini, Oriana; Desantis, Jenny; Massari, Serena

    2016-03-01

    The current anti-HIV combination therapy does not eradicate the virus that persists mainly in quiescent infected CD4(+) T cells as a latent integrated provirus that resumes after therapy interruption. The Tat-mediated transactivation (TMT) is a critical step in the HIV replication cycle that could give the opportunity to reduce the size of latent reservoirs. More than two decades of research led to the identification of various TMT inhibitors. While none of them met the criteria to reach the market, the search for a suitable TMT inhibitor is still actively pursued. Really promising compounds, including one in a Phase III clinical trial, have been recently identified, thus warranting an update. PMID:26933891

  18. Quercetin-induced downregulation of phospholipase D1 inhibits proliferation and invasion in U87 glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Mi Hee; Min, Do Sik

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Quercetin, a bioactive flavonoid, suppresses expression and enzymatic activity of phospholipase D1. {yields} Quercetin abolishes NFkB-induced phospholipase D1 expression via inhibition of NFkB transactivation. {yields} Quercetin-induced suppression of phospholipase D1 inhibits invasion and proliferation of human glioma cells. -- Abstract: Phospholipase D (PLD) has been recognized as a regulator of cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, but little is known about the molecules regulating PLD expression. Thus, the identification of small molecules inhibiting PLD expression would be an important advance in PLD-mediated physiology. Quercetin, a ubiquitous bioactive flavonoid, is known to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the effect of quercetin on the expression of PLD in U87 glioma cells. Quercetin significantly suppressed the expression of PLD1 at the transcriptional level. Moreover, quercetin abolished the protein expression of PLD1 in a time and dose-dependent manner, as well as inhibited PLD activity. Quercetin suppressed NF{kappa}B-induced PLD1 expression via inhibition of NFkB transactivation. Furthermore, quercetin inhibited activation and invasion of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), a key modulator of glioma cell invasion, induced by phosphatidic acid (PA), a product of PLD activity. Taken together these data demonstrate that quercetin abolishes PLD1 expression and subsequently inhibits invasion and proliferation of glioma cells.

  19. Modified GFAP promoter auto-regulates tet-activator expression for increased transactivation and reduced tTA-associated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael D; Dunlop, J W; Psaltis, G; Kulik, J; DeGennaro, L; Kwak, Seung P

    2002-05-30

    Transactivator tTA is a necessary component of the tetracycline-regulated inducible gene system. While several transgenic animals have been described that express tTA in the central nervous system (CNS), their tTA levels are often limited, presumably due to toxic effects. We evaluated methods for auto-regulating tTA levels in astrocytes by modifying the transgenic promoter human GFAP (hGFAP). The hGFAP promoter carrying a single copy of the tet-operon in place of a native enhancer element (GFAPtetO1) drove expression of tTA at low levels during un-stimulated, basal condition. However the same promoter auto-induced expression of tTA to significant levels after tetracycline withdrawal. Glial cell-specificity of the promoter remained uncompromised during both basal and induced conditions. Transgenic rats were developed using the auto-inducible GFAPtetO1 promoter that expressed tTA mRNA to high levels in the brain. Expression was widespread within the CNS but enriched in astrocyte-rich regions including the cerebellum. Primary cerebellar astrocytes from GFAPtetO1 rats transfected with 07LacZ produced substantially greater inducibility of reporter gene compared to GFAP-tTA transgenic rats. Finally, GFAPtetO1 rats exhibited severe motor/gait deficit when bred to homozygosity. This phenotype was attributable to developmental abnormalities of the cerebellum and was completely abrogated by doxycycline administration. These results suggest that developmental toxicity resulting from tTA expression can be circumvented and tTA transgenics with high transactivation potential can be developed using the auto-activation strategy. Promoter modification presented here may be useful in developing highly inducible transgenic strategies without loss in tissue-specificity. PMID:12007834

  20. Splicing is required for transactivation by the immediate early gene 1 of the Lymantria dispar multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M N; Rohrmann, G F

    1997-08-18

    A region of the Lymantria disper multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdMNPV) genome containing the homolog of the baculovirus ie-1 gene was identified using a series of overlapping cosmids and individual plasmids in a transient transcriptional expression assay. Sequence analysis of the active region identified two ORFs, one of which is 32% identical to AcMNPV ORF141 (ie-0) and contains a putative splice donor site and the other of which is 29% identical to AcMNPV ie-1 and contains a highly conserved splice acceptor consensus sequences. Plasmids containing the LdMNPV ORF141 and ie-1 regions were able to stimulate expression of a GUS reporter gene, while plasmids containing the ie-1 region alone were inactive, suggesting that only the spliced, IE-0 form of the gene product is an active transactivator. Primer extension analysis confirmed the presence of spliced ie-0 mRNA transcripts starting at 6 hr and continuing throughout the time course of viral infection of the L dispar cell line Ld652Y. Using a plasmid containing the ie-0 spliced form of the gene as a transactivator, hr4, one of the eight homologous regions of LdMNPV, was shown to act as a transcriptional enhancer. In contrast, a reporter plasmid containing the AcMNPV hr5 enhancer did not show increased activity when cotransfected with LdMNPV ie-0, suggesting that these enhancer sequences are viral specific. In a transient replication assay system. LdMNPV ie-0 acted as an essential replication gene, but LdMNPV ie-1 was inactive. These results indicate that splicing is required to obtain an active gene product in LdMNPV in the Ld652Y cell line. PMID:9300047

  1. The viral transactivator HBx protein exhibits a high potential for regulation via phosphorylation through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) encodes an oncogenic factor, HBx, which is a multifunctional protein that can induce dysfunctional regulation of signaling pathways, transcription, and cell cycle progression, among other processes, through interactions with target host factors. The subcellular localization of HBx is both cytoplasmic and nuclear. This dynamic distribution of HBx could be essential to the multiple roles of the protein at different stages during HBV infection. Transactivational functions of HBx may be exerted both in the nucleus, via interaction with host DNA-binding proteins, and in the cytoplasm, via signaling pathways. Although there have been many studies describing different pathways altered by HBx, and its innumerable binding partners, the molecular mechanism that regulates its different roles has been difficult to elucidate. Methods In the current study, we took a bioinformatics approach to investigate whether the viral protein HBx might be regulated via phosphorylation by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Results We found that the phylogenetically conserved residues Ser25 and Ser41 (both within the negative regulatory domain), and Thr81 (in the transactivation domain) are predicted to be phosphorylated. By molecular 3D modeling of HBx, we further show these residues are all predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein, making them easily accesible to these types of modifications. Furthermore, we have also identified Yin Yang sites that might have the potential to be phosphorylated and O-β-GlcNAc interplay at the same residues. Conclusions Thus, we propose that the different roles of HBx displayed in different subcellular locations might be regulated by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of posttranslational modification, via phosphorylation. PMID:23079056

  2. PEBP2 alpha B/mouse AML1 consists of multiple isoforms that possess differential transactivation potentials.

    PubMed

    Bae, S C; Ogawa, E; Maruyama, M; Oka, H; Satake, M; Shigesada, K; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; Ito, Y

    1994-05-01

    A murine transcription factor, PEBP2, is composed of two subunits, alpha and beta. There are two genes in the mouse genome, PEBP2 alpha A and PEBP2 alpha B, which encode the alpha subunit. Two types of the alpha B cDNA clones, alpha B1 and alpha B2, were isolated from mouse fibroblasts and characterized. They were found to represent 3.8- and 7.9-kb transcripts, respectively. The 3.8-kb RNA encodes the previously described alpha B protein referred to as alpha B1, while the 7.9-kb RNA encodes a 387-amino-acid protein, termed alpha B2, which is identical to alpha B1 except that it has an internal deletion of 64 amino acid residues. Both alpha B1 and alpha B2 associate with PEBP2 beta and form a heterodimer. The alpha B2/beta complex binds to the PEBP2 binding site two- to threefold more strongly than the alpha B1/beta complex does. alpha B1 stimulates transcription through the PEBP2 site about 40-fold, while alpha B2 is only about 25 to 45% as active as alpha B1. Transactivation domain is located downstream of the 128-amino-acid runt homology region, referred to as the Runt domain. Mouse chromosome mapping studies revealed that alpha A, alpha B, and beta genes are mapped to chromosomes 17, 16, and 8, respectively. The last two genes are syntenic with the human AML1 on chromosome 21q22 and PEBP2 beta/CBF beta on 16q22 detected at the breakpoints of characteristic chromosome translocations of the two different subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia. These results suggest that previously described chimeric gene products, AML1/MTG8(ETO) and AML1-EAP generated by t(8;21) and t(3;21), respectively, lack the transactivation domain of AML1. PMID:8164679

  3. ETS1 transactivates the human GM-CSF promoter in Jurkat T cells stimulated with PMA and ionomycin.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R S; Tymms, M J; Seth, A; Shannon, M F; Kola, I

    1995-11-16

    Activation of T helper cells results in coordinate expression of a number of cytokines involved in differentiation, proliferation and activation of the haematopoietic system. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is one such cytokine whose increased expression results partly from increases in transcription. Cis-acting elements with NF kappa B, AP-1 and ETS-like motifs have been identified in the promoter region of the GM-CSF gene, which are important for transcriptional activity following PMA and ionomycin stimulation. A number of the ETS family of transcription factors are expressed in T cells, including ETS1 and ELF1. Here we describe the ability of these factors to interact with a site (GM5), located within the CLE0 element, -47 to -40 upstream of the GM-CSF transcription initiation site. Exogenous ETS1, but not ELF1, can transactivate GM-CSF, through the GM5 site, in a PMA/ionomycin dependent manner. Other unidentified ETS-like factors present in Jurkat cells are also capable of binding GM5. Mutation of the core ETS binding site from -GGAA- to -GGAT- prevents the binding of ETS-like factors with the exception of ETS1. The GM-CSF promoter, modified in this way to be ETS1 specific, is fully responsive to PMA/ionomycin induction, in addition to ETS1 transactivation in the presence of PMA and ionomycin. Together these data suggest that ETS1 may be involved in mediating the increased GM-CSF production associated with T cell activation. PMID:7478534

  4. Effect of p40tax trans-activator of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I on expression of autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Banki, K; Ablonczy, E; Nakamura, M; Perl, A

    1994-03-01

    The possibility of a retroviral etiology has long been raised in a number of autoimmune disorders. More recently, Sjögren's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis were noted in transgenic mice carrying the tax gene of human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I). To evaluate the involvement of HTLV-I Tax in autoimmunity, its effect on expression of autoantigens was investigated. A metallothionein promoter-driven p40tax expression plasmid, pMAXRHneo-1, was stably transfected into Molt4 and Jurkat cells and the p40tax protein was induced with CdCl2. trans-Activation or trans-repression of autoantigens by HTLV-I Tax was studied by Western blot analysis utilizing autoantigen-specific murine monoclonal and rabbit polyvalent antibodies as well as sera from 161 autoimmune patients. Induction of p40tax of HTLV-I had no significant effect on levels of expression of common autoantigens U1 snRNP, Sm, Ro, La, HSP-70, topoisomerase I/Scl70, PCNA, and HRES-1. Expression of two potentially novel autoantigens, 44 and 46 kDa, was induced by p40tax as detected by sera of progressive systemic sclerosis patients, BAK and VAR. By contrast, expression of 24- and 34-kDa proteins was suppressed in response to induction of p40tax as detected by sera of systemic lupus erythematosus patients PUS and HOR. Because none of these patients were infected by HTLV-I, a protein functionally similar to p40tax may be involved in eliciting autoantigen expression and a subsequent autoantibody response in a minority of patients with PSS and SLE. Sera of autoimmune patients may also be utilized to detect novel proteins trans-activated or trans-repressed by p40tax of HTLV-I. PMID:8018391

  5. The EBNA-2 N-Terminal Transactivation Domain Folds into a Dimeric Structure Required for Target Gene Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Janosch; Zou, Peijian; Nössner, Elfriede; Ling, Paul D.; Sattler, Michael; Kempkes, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a γ-herpesvirus that may cause infectious mononucleosis in young adults. In addition, epidemiological and molecular evidence links EBV to the pathogenesis of lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. EBV has the unique ability to transform resting B cells into permanently proliferating, latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2) is a key regulator of viral and cellular gene expression for this transformation process. The N-terminal region of EBNA-2 comprising residues 1-58 appears to mediate multiple molecular functions including self-association and transactivation. However, it remains to be determined if the N-terminus of EBNA-2 directly provides these functions or if these activities merely depend on the dimerization involving the N-terminal domain. To address this issue, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the EBNA-2 N-terminal dimerization (END) domain by heteronuclear NMR-spectroscopy. The END domain monomer comprises a small fold of four β-strands and an α-helix which form a parallel dimer by interaction of two β-strands from each protomer. A structure-guided mutational analysis showed that hydrophobic residues in the dimer interface are required for self-association in vitro. Importantly, these interface mutants also displayed severely impaired self-association and transactivation in vivo. Moreover, mutations of solvent-exposed residues or deletion of the α-helix do not impair dimerization but strongly affect the functional activity, suggesting that the EBNA-2 dimer presents a surface that mediates functionally important intra- and/or intermolecular interactions. Our study shows that the END domain is a novel dimerization fold that is essential for functional activity. Since this specific fold is a unique feature of EBNA-2 it might provide a novel target for anti-viral therapeutics. PMID:26024477

  6. Integrin-mediated transactivation of P2X7R via hemichannel-dependent ATP release stimulates astrocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Alvaro; Lagos-Cabré, Raúl; Kong, Milene; Cárdenas, Areli; Burgos-Bravo, Francesca; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F G; Leyton, Lisette

    2016-09-01

    Our previous reports indicate that ligand-induced αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 engagement increases focal adhesion formation and migration of astrocytes. Additionally, ligated integrins trigger ATP release through unknown mechanisms, activating P2X7 receptors (P2X7R), and the uptake of Ca(2+) to promote cell adhesion. However, whether the activation of P2X7R and ATP release are required for astrocyte migration and whether αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 receptors communicate with P2X7R via ATP remains unknown. Here, cells were stimulated with Thy-1, a reported αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 ligand. Results obtained indicate that ATP was released by Thy-1 upon integrin engagement and required the participation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospholipase-C gamma (PLCγ) and inositol trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3R). IP3R activation leads to increased intracellular Ca(2+), hemichannel (Connexin-43 and Pannexin-1) opening, and ATP release. Moreover, silencing of the P2X7R or addition of hemichannel blockers precluded Thy-1-induced astrocyte migration. Finally, Thy-1 lacking the integrin-binding site did not stimulate ATP release, whereas Thy-1 mutated in the Syndecan-4-binding domain increased ATP release, albeit to a lesser extent and with delayed kinetics compared to wild-type Thy-1. Thus, hemichannels activated downstream of an αVβ3 integrin-PI3K-PLCγ-IP3R pathway are responsible for Thy-1-induced, hemichannel-mediated and Syndecan-4-modulated ATP release that transactivates P2X7Rs to induce Ca(2+) entry. These findings uncover a hitherto unrecognized role for hemichannels in the regulation of astrocyte migration via P2X7R transactivation induced by integrin-mediated ATP release. PMID:27235833

  7. Low-affinity E2-binding site mediates downmodulation of E2 transactivation of the human papillomavirus type 8 late promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Stubenrauch, F; Pfister, H

    1994-01-01

    The constitutively active promoter P7535 of the epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus type 8 (HPV8) is transactivated by the viral E2 protein. The distribution of potential E2-binding sites (ACCN6GGT) in the viral transcription control region is highly conserved among epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated human papillomaviruses and differs completely from that of other papillomaviruses. To investigate the role of E2-binding sites P0 to P4 in P7535 regulation, we analyzed their binding affinities in gel retardation experiments using a full-length HPV8 E2 protein expressed from a recombinant baculovirus. Binding site P1 within a transcriptional silencer showed the highest affinity, followed by P0 within the L1 gene and P3 downstream of P7535. P2, 33 nucleotides upstream of the mRNA cap site, and P4 were very weak binders. There is some indication that the number of A/T pairs in the nonconserved core of the recognition sequence is critical for the binding of HPV8 E2. Transient transfection experiments were carried out with an HPV8 E2 expression vector and reporter plasmids containing mutated E2-binding sites in the context of the HPV8 regulatory region. The knockout of the strongest binding site P1 sufficed to clearly diminish transactivation. P0, P3, and P4 mutations had little effect on their own, whereas double mutations P01 and P34 strongly reduced E2 inducibility. Both mutations in P2 severely affected constitutive promoter activity but had opposite effects on transactivation. They revealed an inverse correlation between E2-binding strength and the extent of E2 transactivation. This finding suggests that P2 mediates a negative control of P7535 by E2, counteracting E2 transactivation exerted via the four distal E2 target sequences. Images PMID:7933077

  8. Trans-activation function of a 3 prime truncated X gene-cell fusion product from integrated hepatitis B virus DNA in chronic hepatitis tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Shinako; Koike, Katsuro )

    1990-08-01

    To investigate the expression and transactivation function of the X gene in integrated hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA from chronic hepatitis tissues, a series of transfectants containing cloned integrated HBV DNAs was made and analyzed for X mRNA expression and trans-activation activity by using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay. Most of the integrated HBV DNAs expressed X mRNA and encoded a product with trans-activation activity in spite of the loss of the 3{prime} end region of the X gene due to integration. From cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of X mRNA transcribed from native or integrated HBV DNA, the X protein was found to be translated from the X open reading frame without splicing. For integrated HBV DNA, transcription was extended to a cellular flanking DNA and an X gene-cell fusion transcript was terminated by using a cellular poly(A) signal. The amino acid sequence deduced from an X-cell fusion transcript indicated truncation of the carboxyl-terminal five amino acids, but the upstream region of seven amino acids conserved among hepadnaviruses was retained in the integrated HBV DNA, suggesting that this conserved region is essential for the transactivation function of the X protein. These findings support the following explanation for hepatocarcinogenesis by HBV DNA integration: the expression of a cellular oncogene(s) is transactivated at the time of chronic infection by the increasing amounts of the integrated HBV gene product(s), such as the X-cell fusion product.

  9. Estrogen receptor transcription and transactivation: Estrogen receptor knockout mice: what their phenotypes reveal about mechanisms of estrogen action.

    PubMed

    Curtis Hewitt, S; Couse, J F; Korach, K S

    2000-01-01

    Natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens have numerous effects on the development and physiology of mammals. Estrogen is primarily known for its role in the development and functioning of the female reproductive system. However, roles for estrogen in male fertility, bone, the circulatory system and immune system have been established by clinical observations regarding sex differences in pathologies, as well as observations following menopause or castration. The primary mechanism of estrogen action is via binding and modulation of activity of the estrogen receptors (ERs), which are ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factors. ERs are found in highest levels in female tissues critical to reproduction, including the ovaries, uterus, cervix, mammary glands and pituitary gland. Since other affected tissues have extremely low levels of ER, indirect effects of estrogen, for example induction of pituitary hormones that affect the bone, have been proposed. The development of transgenic mouse models that lack either estrogen or ER have proven to be valuable tools in defining the mechanisms by which estrogen exerts its effects in various systems. The aim of this article is to review the mouse models with disrupted estrogen signaling and describe the associated phenotypes. PMID:11250727

  10. Adeno-associated virus type 2 rep protein inhibits human papillomavirus type 16 E2 recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator p300.

    PubMed

    Marcello, A; Massimi, P; Banks, L; Giacca, M

    2000-10-01

    Infection by human adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) is a possible protective factor in the development of cervical carcinomas associated with human papillomaviruses (HPV). The replicative proteins of AAV2 (Rep) have been implicated in the inhibition of papillomavirus replication and transforming activities, although the molecular events underlying these effects are poorly understood. We observed that each of the four forms of AAV2 Rep inhibited the E1- and E2-driven replication of oncogenic HPV type 16 (HPV16). Rep40, corresponding to the C-terminal domain of all Rep proteins, inhibited both HPV DNA replication and HPV16 E2-mediated transactivation. Rep40 specifically bound the N-terminal transactivation domain of HPV16 E2 both in vitro and in vivo. This interaction was found to specifically disrupt the binding of E2 to the cellular transcriptional coactivator p300. Accordingly, the inhibitory effect of Rep on HPV16 E2 transactivation was rescued by the overexpression of p300. These data indicate a novel role of Rep in the down-regulation of papillomaviruses through inhibition of complex formation between the HPV16 E2 transcriptional activator and its cellular coactivator, p300. PMID:10982355