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Sample records for inhibit ligand-dependent transactivation

  1. PLZF-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins generated from the variant t(11; 17)(q23; q21) translocation in acute promyelocytic leukemia inhibit ligand-dependent transactivation of wild-type retinoic acid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan; Wang, Zhen-Yi ); Guidez, F.; Rousselot, P.; Agadir, A.; Degos, L.; Chomienne, C. ); Zelent, A. ); Waxman, S. )

    1994-02-01

    Recently, the authors described a recurrent variant translocation, t(11;17)(q23;q21), in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) which juxtaposes PLZF, a gene encoding a zinc finger protein, to RARA, encoding retinoic acid receptor [alpha] (RAR[alpha]). They have now cloned cDNAs encoding PLZF-RAR[alpha] chimeric proteins and studied their transactivating activities. In transient-expression assays, both the PLZF(A)-RAR[alpha] and PLZF(B)-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins like the PML-RAR[alpha] protein resulting from the well-known t(15;17) translocation in APL, antagonized endogenous and transfected wild-type RAR[alpha] in the presence of retinoic acid. Cotransfection assays showed that a significant repression of RAR[alpha] transactivation activity was obtained even with a very low PLZF-RAR[alpha]-expressing plasmid concentration. A [open quotes]dominant negative[close quotes] effect was observed with vectors expressing RAR[alpha] and retinoid X receptor [alpha] (RXR[alpha]). These abnormal transactivation properties observed in retinoic acid-sensitive myeloid cells strongly implicate the PLZF-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins in the molecular pathogenesis of APL.

  2. PLZF-RAR alpha fusion proteins generated from the variant t(11;17)(q23;q21) translocation in acute promyelocytic leukemia inhibit ligand-dependent transactivation of wild-type retinoic acid receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z; Guidez, F; Rousselot, P; Agadir, A; Chen, S J; Wang, Z Y; Degos, L; Zelent, A; Waxman, S; Chomienne, C

    1994-01-01

    Recently, we described a recurrent variant translocation, t(11;17)(q23;q21), in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) which juxtaposes PLZF, a gene encoding a zinc finger protein, to RARA, encoding retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha). We have now cloned cDNAs encoding PLZF-RAR alpha chimeric proteins and studied their transactivating activities. In transient-expression assays, both the PLZF(A)-RAR alpha and PLZF(B)-RAR alpha fusion proteins like the PML-RAR alpha protein resulting from the well-known t(15;17) translocation in APL, antagonized endogenous and transfected wild-type RAR alpha in the presence of retinoic acid. Cotransfection assays showed that a significant repression of RAR alpha transactivation activity was obtained even with a very low PLZF-RAR alpha-expressing plasmid concentration. A "dominant negative" effect was observed when PLZF-RAR alpha fusion proteins were cotransfected with vectors expressing RAR alpha and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha). These abnormal transactivation properties observed in retinoic acid-sensitive myeloid cells strongly implicate the PLZF-RAR alpha fusion proteins in the molecular pathogenesis of APL. Images PMID:8302850

  3. ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transactivation in adipocyte cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Jung, Myeong Ho

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transcriptional activation. • ATF3 interacts with PPARγ. • ATF3 suppresses p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation. • ATF3 decreases the binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE. - Abstract: Previously, we reported that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) downregulates peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPARγ) gene expression and inhibits adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. Here, we investigated another role of ATF3 on the regulation of PPARγ activity. ATF3 inhibited PPARγ-stimulated transactivation of PPARγ responsive element (PPRE)-containing reporter or GAL4/PPARγ chimeric reporter. Thus, ATF3 effectively repressed rosiglitazone-stimulated expression of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2), PPARγ target gene, in 3T3-L1 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that ATF3 interacted with PPARγ. Accordingly, ATF3 prevented PPARγ from binding to PPRE on the aP2 promoter. Furthermore, ATF3 suppressed p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation of PPRE-containing reporter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that overexpression of ATF3 blocked both binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE on aP2 promoter induced by rosiglitazone treatment in 3T3-L1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that ATF3 interacts with PPARγ and represses PPARγ-mediated transactivation through suppression of p300-stimulated coactivation in 3T3-L1 cells, which may play a role in inhibition of adipocyte differentiation.

  4. Baicalein exhibits anti-inflammatory effects via inhibition of NF-κB transactivation.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Sharma, Deepak; Thoh, Maikho; Checker, Rahul; Sandur, Santosh K

    2016-05-15

    NF-κB is a crucial mediator of inflammatory and immune responses and a number of phytochemicals that can suppress this immune-regulatory transcription factor are known to have promising anti-inflammatory potential. However, we report that inducer of pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB functions as an anti-inflammatory agent. Our findings reveal that a plant derived flavonoid baicalein could suppress mitogen induced T cell activation, proliferation and cytokine secretion. Treatment of CD4+ T cells with baicalein prior to transfer in to lymphopenic allogenic host significantly suppressed graft versus host disease. Interestingly, addition of baicalein to murine splenic lymphocytes induced DNA binding of NF-κB but did not suppress Concanavalin A induced NF-κB. Since baicalein did not inhibit NF-κB binding to DNA, we hypothesized that baicalein may be suppressing NF-κB trans-activation. Thioredoxin system is implicated in the regulation of NF-κB trans-activation potential and therefore inhibition of thioredoxin system may be responsible for suppression of NF-κB dependent genes. Baicalein not only inhibited TrxR activity in cell free system but also suppressed mitogen induced thioredoxin activity in the nuclear compartment of lymphocytes. Similar to baicalein, pharmacological inhibitors of thioredoxin system also could suppress mitogen induced T cell proliferation without inhibiting DNA binding of NF-κB. Further, activation of cellular thioredoxin system by the use of pharmacological activator or over-expression of thioredoxin could abrogate the anti-inflammatory action of baicalein. We propose a novel strategy using baicalein to limit NF-κB dependent inflammatory responses via inhibition of thioredoxin system. PMID:27019135

  5. Inhibition of the HIV Rev transactivator : a new target for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Heguy, A

    1997-01-01

    The viral transactivator Rev is essential for HIV replication, since it allows the nuclear export of unspliced and partially spliced viral mRNAs that encode the structural proteins. Rev is an RNA binding protein that interacts with a highly structured RNA element, the RRE, found within the envelope sequences. This viral protein also interacts with cellular proteins, termed nucleoporins, and acts as an adaptor between the viral mRNAs and the cellular nuclear export machinery. Both interactions are specific, and required for Rev function. Because of its crucial role in the HIV replication cycle, and its novel mechanism of action, Rev represents an ideal target for therapeutic intervention. This review describes the efforts towards Rev inhibition. Gene therapy approaches, including the expression of trans-dominant mutants and RNA decoys, as well as antisense therapies and small molecule inhibitors of Rev-RRE binding or Rev interaction with the cellular machinery will be discussed PMID:9206979

  6. A small molecule directly inhibits the p53 transactivation domain from binding to replication protein A

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Carnes, Katie A.; Soto, Patricia; Liu, Shengqin; Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Oakley, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), essential for DNA replication, repair and DNA damage signalling, possesses six ssDNA-binding domains (DBDs), including DBD-F on the N-terminus of the largest subunit, RPA70. This domain functions as a binding site for p53 and other DNA damage and repair proteins that contain amphipathic alpha helical domains. Here, we demonstrate direct binding of both ssDNA and the transactivation domain 2 of p53 (p53TAD2) to DBD-F, as well as DBD-F-directed dsDNA strand separation by RPA, all of which are inhibited by fumaropimaric acid (FPA). FPA binds directly to RPA, resulting in a conformational shift as determined through quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in full length RPA. Structural analogues of FPA provide insight on chemical properties that are required for inhibition. Finally, we confirm the inability of RPA possessing R41E and R43E mutations to bind to p53, destabilize dsDNA and quench tryptophan fluorescence by FPA, suggesting that protein binding, DNA modulation and inhibitor binding all occur within the same site on DBD-F. The disruption of p53–RPA interactions by FPA may disturb the regulatory functions of p53 and RPA, thereby inhibiting cellular pathways that control the cell cycle and maintain the integrity of the human genome. PMID:23267009

  7. Angiotensin-(1-7) inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saghir; Yousif, Mariam HM; Dhaunsi, Gursev S; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Al-Farsi, Omama; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The transactivation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor appears to be an important central transduction mechanism in mediating diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] via its Mas receptor can prevent the development of hyperglycaemia-induced cardiovascular complications. Here, we investigated whether Ang-(1-7) can inhibit hyperglycaemia-induced EGF receptor transactivation and its classical signalling via ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in vivo and in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were chronically treated with Ang-(1-7) or AG1478, a selective EGF receptor inhibitor, for 4 weeks and mechanistic studies performed in the isolated mesenteric vasculature bed as well as in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). KEY RESULTS Diabetes significantly enhanced phosphorylation of EGF receptor at tyrosine residues Y992, Y1068, Y1086, Y1148, as well as ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in the mesenteric vasculature bed whereas these changes were significantly attenuated upon Ang-(1–7) or AG1478 treatment. In VSMCs grown in conditions of high glucose (25 mM), an Src-dependent elevation in EGF receptor phosphorylation was observed. Ang-(1-7) inhibited both Ang II- and glucose-induced transactivation of EGF receptor. The inhibition of high glucose-mediated Src-dependant transactivation of EGF receptor by Ang-(1-7) could be prevented by a selective Mas receptor antagonist, D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results show for the first time that Ang-(1-7) inhibits EGF receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor/Src-dependent pathway and might represent a novel general mechanism by which Ang-(1-7) exerts its beneficial effects in many disease states including diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. PMID:21806601

  8. Angiotensin-induced EGF receptor transactivation inhibits insulin signaling in C9 hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Arellano-Plancarte, Araceli; Hernandez-Aranda, Judith; Catt, Kevin J.; Olivares-Reyes, J. Alberto

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential interactions between the angiotensin II (Ang II) and insulin signaling systems, regulation of IRS-1 phosphorylation and insulin-induced Akt activation by Ang II were examined in clone 9 (C9) hepatocytes. In these cells, Ang II specifically inhibited activation of insulin-induced Akt Thr308 and its immediate downstream substrate GSK-3α/β in a time-dependent fashion, with ∼70% reduction at 15min. These inhibitory actions were associated with increased IRS-1 phosphorylation of Ser636/Ser639 that was prevented by selective blockade of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity with AG1478. Previous studies have shown that insulin-induced phosphorylation of IRS-1 on Ser636/Ser639 is mediated mainly by the PI3K/mTOR/S6K-1 sequence. Studies with specific inhibitors of PI3K (wortmannin) and mTOR (rapamycin) revealed that Ang II stimulates IRS-1 phosphorylation of Ser636/Ser639 via the PI3K/mTOR/S6K-1 pathway. Both inhibitors blocked the effect of Ang II on insulin-induced activation of Akt. Studies using the specific MEK inhibitor, PD98059, revealed that ERK1/2 activation also mediates Ang II-induced S6K-1 and IRS-1 phosphorylation, and the impairment of Akt Thr308 and GSK-3α/β phosphorylation. Further studies with selective inhibitors showed that PI3K activation was upstream of ERK, suggesting a new mechanism for Ang II-induced impairment of insulin signaling. These findings indicate that Ang II has a significant role in the development of insulin resistance by a mechanism that involves EGFR transactivation and the PI3K/ERK1/2/mTOR-S6K-1 pathway. PMID:19879250

  9. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester downregulates phospholipase D1 via direct binding and inhibition of NFκB transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Mi Hee; Kang, Dong Woo; Jung, Yunjin; Choi, Kang-Yell; Min, Do Sik

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •We found CAFÉ, a natural product that suppresses expression and activity of PLD1. •CAPE decreased PLD1 expression by inhibiting NFκB transactivation. •CAPE rapidly inhibited PLD activity via its binding to a Cys837 of PLD1. •PLD1 downregulation by CAPE inhibited invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. -- Abstract: Upregulation of phospholipase D (PLD) is functionally linked with oncogenic signals and tumorigenesis. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active compound of propolis extract that exhibits anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and antineoplastic properties. In this study, we demonstrated that CAPE suppressed the expression of PLD1 at the transcriptional level via inhibition of binding of NFκB to PLD1 promoter. Moreover, CAPE, but not its analogs, bound to a Cys837 residue of PLD1 and inhibited enzymatic activity of PLD. CAPE also decreased activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 induced by phosphatidic acid, a product of PLD activity. Ultimately, CAPE-induced downregulation of PLD1 suppressed invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that CAPE might contribute to anti-neoplastic effect by targeting PLD1.

  10. Orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner inhibits transforming growth factor-beta signaling by repressing SMAD3 transactivation.

    PubMed

    Suh, Ji Ho; Huang, Jiansheng; Park, Yun-Yong; Seong, Hyun-A; Kim, Dongwook; Shong, Minho; Ha, Hyunjung; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Keesook; Wang, Li; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2006-12-22

    Orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor superfamily; SHP regulates the nuclear receptor-mediated transcription of target genes but lacks a conventional DNA binding domain. In this study, we demonstrate that SHP represses transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)-induced gene expression through a direct interaction with Smad, a transducer of TGF-beta signaling. Transient transfection studies demonstrate that SHP represses Smad3-induced transcription. In vivo and in vitro protein interaction assays revealed that SHP directly interacts with Smad2 and Smad3 but not with Smad4. Mapping of domains mediating the interaction between SHP and Smad3 showed that the entire N-terminal domain (1-159 amino acids) of SHP and the linker domain of Smad3 are involved in this interaction. In vitro glutathione S-transferase pulldown competition experiments revealed the SHP-mediated repression of Smad3 transactivation through competition with its co-activator p300. SHP also inhibits the activation of endogenous TGF-beta-responsive gene promoters, the p21, Smad7, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoters. Moreover, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of SHP decreases PAI-1 mRNA levels, and down-regulation of SHP by a small interfering RNA increases both the transactivation of Smad3 and the PAI-1 mRNA levels. Finally, the PAI-1 gene is expressed in SHP(-/-) mouse hepatocytes at a higher level than in normal hepatocytes. Taken together, these data indicate that SHP is a novel co-regulator of Smad3, and this study provides new insights into regulation of TGF-beta signaling. PMID:17074765

  11. Molecular and cellular correlates of the CIITA-mediated inhibition of HTLV-2 Tax-2 transactivator function resulting in loss of viral replication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MHC class II transactivator CIITA inhibits the function of HTLV-2 Tax-2 viral transactivator and, consequently, the replication of the virus in infected cells. Moreover overexpression of the nuclear factor NF-YB, that cooperates with CIITA for the expression of MHC class II genes, results also in inhibition of Tax-2 transactivation. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the cellular and molecular basis of the CIITA-mediated inhibition on Tax-2, and the relative role of NF-YB in this phenomenon. Methods By co-immunoprecipitation of lysates from 293T cells cotransfected with CIITA or fragments of it, and Tax-2 it was assessed whether the two factors interact in vivo. A similar approach was used to assess Tax-2-NF-YB interaction. In parallel, deletion fragments of CIITA were tested for the inhibition of Tax-2-dependent HTLV-2 LTR-luciferase transactivation. Subcellular localization of CIITA and Tax-2 was investigated by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results CIITA and Tax-2 interact in vivo through at least two independent regions, at the 1-252 N-term and at the 410-1130 C-term, respectively. Interestingly only the 1-252 N-term region mediates Tax-2 functional inhibition. CIITA and Tax-2 are localized both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, when separately expressed. Instead, when coexpressed, most of Tax-2 colocalize with CIITA in cytoplasm and around the nuclear membrane. The Tax-2 minor remaining nuclear portion also co-localizes with CIITA. Interestingly, when CIITA nucleus-cytoplasm shuttling is blocked by leptomycin B treatment, most of the Tax-2 molecules are also blocked and co-localize with CIITA in the nucleus, suggesting that CIITA-Tax-2 binding does not preclude Tax-2 entry into the nucleus. Finally, the nuclear factor NF-YB, also strongly binds to Tax-2. Notably, although endogenous NF-YB does not inhibit Tax-2-dependent HTLV-2 LTR transactivation, it still binds to Tax-2, and in presence of CIITA, this binding seems to

  12. APOBEC3G inhibits HIV-1 RNA elongation by inactivating the viral trans-activation response element.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-07-29

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. dC-to-dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defense against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. We further show that free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3'+5' ends is sufficient for A3G deamination. These results identify A3G as an efficient mutator and that deamination of (-)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:24859335

  13. APOBEC3G Inhibits HIV-1 RNA Elongation by Inactivating the Viral Trans-Activation Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA (vDNA) is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient HIV-1 replication. dC to dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defence against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. Finally, we show that free ssDNA termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3′+5′ ends is sufficient for A3G deamination, identifying A3G as an efficient mutator, and that deamination of (−)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:24859335

  14. Synthesis, cellular uptake and HIV-1 Tat-dependent trans-activation inhibition activity of oligonucleotide analogues disulphide-conjugated to cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Turner, John J.; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Gait, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Oligonucleotides composed of 2′-O-methyl and locked nucleic acid residues complementary to HIV-1 trans-activation responsive element TAR block Tat-dependent trans-activation in a HeLa cell assay when delivered by cationic lipids. We describe an improved procedure for synthesis and purification under highly denaturing conditions of 5′-disulphide-linked conjugates of 3′-fluorescein labelled oligonucleotides with a range of cell-penetrating peptides and investigate their abilities to enter HeLa cells and block trans-activation. Free uptake of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide conjugates to Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9F2 was observed in cytosolic compartments of HeLa cells. Uptake of the Tat conjugate was enhanced by N-terminal addition of four Lys or Arg residues or a second Tat peptide. None of the conjugates entered the nucleus or inhibited trans-activation when freely delivered, but inhibition was obtained in the presence of cationic lipids. Nuclear exclusion was seen for free delivery of Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9 conjugates of 16mer phosphorothioate OMe oligonucleotide. Uptake into human fibroblast cytosolic compartments was seen for Tat, Penetratin, R9F2 and Transportan conjugates. Large enhancements of HeLa cell uptake into cytosolic compartments were seen when free Tat peptide was added to Tat conjugate of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide or Penetratin peptide to Penetratin conjugate of the same oligonucleotide. PMID:15640444

  15. Transactivation of ErbB Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Is Inhibited by Angiotensin-(1-7) via Its Mas Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saghir; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Attur, Sreeja; Dhaunsi, Gursev S.; Yousif, Mariam H. M.; Benter, Ibrahim F.

    2015-01-01

    Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB) family members, namely EGFR and ErbB2, appears important in the development of diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. Angiotensin-(1–7) [Ang-(1–7)] can prevent the development of hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications partly through inhibiting EGFR transactivation. Here, we investigated whether Ang-(1–7) can inhibit transactivation of ErbB2 as well as other ErbB receptors in vivo and in vitro. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were chronically treated with Ang-(1–7) or AG825, a selective ErbB2 inhibitor, for 4 weeks and mechanistic studies performed in the isolated mesenteric vasculature bed as well as in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Ang-(1–7) or AG825 treatment inhibited diabetes-induced phosphorylation of ErbB2 receptor at tyrosine residues Y1221/22, Y1248, Y877, as well as downstream signaling via ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, ROCK, eNOS and IkB-α in the mesenteric vascular bed. In VSMCs cultured in high glucose (25 mM), Ang-(1–7) inhibited src-dependent ErbB2 transactivation that was opposed by the selective Mas receptor antagonist, D-Pro7-Ang-(1–7). Ang-(1–7) via Mas receptor also inhibited both Angiotensin II- and noradrenaline/norephinephrine-induced transactivation of ErbB2 and/or EGFR receptors. Further, hyperglycemia-induced transactivation of ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors could be attenuated by Ang-(1–7) that could be prevented by D-Pro7-Ang-(1–7) in VSMC. These data suggest that Ang-(1–7) via its Mas receptor acts as a pan-ErbB inhibitor and might represent a novel general mechanism by which Ang-(1–7) exerts its beneficial effects in many disease states including diabetes-induced vascular complications. PMID:26536590

  16. Transactivation of ErbB Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Is Inhibited by Angiotensin-(1-7) via Its Mas Receptor.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saghir; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Attur, Sreeja; Dhaunsi, Gursev S; Yousif, Mariam H M; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2015-01-01

    Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB) family members, namely EGFR and ErbB2, appears important in the development of diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] can prevent the development of hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications partly through inhibiting EGFR transactivation. Here, we investigated whether Ang-(1-7) can inhibit transactivation of ErbB2 as well as other ErbB receptors in vivo and in vitro. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were chronically treated with Ang-(1-7) or AG825, a selective ErbB2 inhibitor, for 4 weeks and mechanistic studies performed in the isolated mesenteric vasculature bed as well as in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Ang-(1-7) or AG825 treatment inhibited diabetes-induced phosphorylation of ErbB2 receptor at tyrosine residues Y1221/22, Y1248, Y877, as well as downstream signaling via ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, ROCK, eNOS and IkB-α in the mesenteric vascular bed. In VSMCs cultured in high glucose (25 mM), Ang-(1-7) inhibited src-dependent ErbB2 transactivation that was opposed by the selective Mas receptor antagonist, D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7). Ang-(1-7) via Mas receptor also inhibited both Angiotensin II- and noradrenaline/norephinephrine-induced transactivation of ErbB2 and/or EGFR receptors. Further, hyperglycemia-induced transactivation of ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors could be attenuated by Ang-(1-7) that could be prevented by D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7) in VSMC. These data suggest that Ang-(1-7) via its Mas receptor acts as a pan-ErbB inhibitor and might represent a novel general mechanism by which Ang-(1-7) exerts its beneficial effects in many disease states including diabetes-induced vascular complications. PMID:26536590

  17. Naked Polyamidoamine Polymers Intrinsically Inhibit Angiotensin II-Mediated EGFR and ErbB2 Transactivation in a Dendrimer Generation- and Surface Chemistry-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saghir; El-Hashim, Ahmed Z; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Attur, Sreeja; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2016-05-01

    The effects of naked polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers on renin-angiotensin system (RAS) signaling via Angiotensin (Ang) II-mediated transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the closely related family member ErbB2 (HER2) were investigated. In primary aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, a cationic fifth-generation (G5) PAMAM dendrimer dose- and time-dependently inhibited Ang II/AT1 receptor-mediated transactivation of EGFR and ErbB2 as well as their downstream signaling via extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibition even occurred at noncytotoxic concentrations at short (1 h) exposure times and was dependent on dendrimer generation (G7 > G6 > G5 > G4) and surface group chemistry (amino > carboxyl > hydroxyl). Mechanistically, the cationic G5 PAMAM dendrimer inhibited Ang II-mediated transactivation of EGFR and ErbB2 via inhibition of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src. This novel, early onset, intrinsic biological action of PAMAM dendrimers as inhibitors of the Ang II/AT1/Src/EGFR-ErbB2/ERK1/2 signaling pathway could have important toxicological and pharmacological implications. PMID:26985693

  18. Overexpression of ERβ is sufficient to inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1 transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Choa; Lee, YoungJoo

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We examined the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition. • DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels in PC3 cells. • DPN did not show additional effect in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. • Our study shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression. - Abstract: Estrogen receptor (ER) β is predicted to play an important role in the prevention of breast cancer development and progression. We have previously shown that ERβ suppresses hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1-mediated transcription through aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) degradation via ubiquitination processes. In this study, we attempted to examine the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition in ERβ positive PC3 cells and ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. ERβ specific agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) stimulated estrogen response element (ERE)-luciferase activity in a similar fashion to estradiol in PC3 cells. We observed that DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels leading to an attenuation of hypoxia-induced hypoxia response element (HRE)-driven luciferase reporter gene activation in PC3 cells. Treatment of DPN reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and co-treatment with ERβ specific antagonist PHTPP abrogated the effect in PC3 cells. We then examined the effect of DPN in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. HIF-1 transcriptional activity repression by ERβ was not further reduced by DPN, as examined by HRE-driven luciferase assays. Expression of ERβ significantly decreased VEGF secretion and ARNT expression under hypoxic conditions. However, DPN did not additionally affect this suppression in MCF-7 cells transfected with ERβ. This result shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression.

  19. Inhibition of {beta}-catenin-mediated transactivation by flavanone in AGS gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chi Hoon; Hahm, Eun Ryeong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Kyung Chae; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-06-17

    Recently, data which prove that Wnt pathway activation may be an early event in multistep carcinogenesis in the stomach have been accumulating. We examined the effect of flavanone against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in AGS gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that flavanone inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by flavanone in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that there is no change of {beta}-catenin distribution and of nuclear {beta}-catenin levels through flavanone. In addition, the binding of Tcf complexes to DNA is not influenced by flavanone. The {beta}-catenin/Tcf transcriptional target gene cyclinD1 was downregulated by flavanone. These data suggest that flavanone inhibits the transcription of {beta}-catenin/Tcf responsive genes, by modulating Tcf activity without disrupting {beta}-catenin/Tcf complex formation.

  20. Pax6 represses androgen receptor-mediated transactivation by inhibiting recruitment of the coactivator SPBP.

    PubMed

    Elvenes, Julianne; Thomassen, Ernst Ivan Simon; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Kaino, Katrine; Sjøttem, Eva; Johansen, Terje

    2011-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:21935435

  1. Pax6 Represses Androgen Receptor-Mediated Transactivation by Inhibiting Recruitment of the Coactivator SPBP

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Kaino, Katrine; Sjøttem, Eva; Johansen, Terje

    2011-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:21935435

  2. The 6-Aminoquinolone WC5 Inhibits Human Cytomegalovirus Replication at an Early Stage by Interfering with the Transactivating Activity of Viral Immediate-Early 2 Protein ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Loregian, Arianna; Mercorelli, Beatrice; Muratore, Giulia; Sinigalia, Elisa; Pagni, Silvana; Massari, Serena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gatto, Barbara; Palumbo, Manlio; Tabarrini, Oriana; Cecchetti, Violetta; Palù, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    WC5 is a 6-aminoquinolone that potently inhibits the replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) but has no activity, or significantly less activity, against other herpesviruses. Here we investigated the nature of its specific anti-HCMV activity. Structure-activity relationship studies on a small series of analogues showed that WC5 possesses the most suitable pattern of substitutions around the quinolone scaffold to give potent and selective anti-HCMV activity. Studies performed to identify the possible target of WC5 indicated that it prevents viral DNA synthesis but does not significantly affect DNA polymerase activity. In yield reduction experiments with different multiplicities of infection, the anti-HCMV activity of WC5 appeared to be highly dependent on the viral inoculum, suggesting that WC5 may act at an initial stage of virus replication. Consistently, time-of-addition and time-of-removal studies demonstrated that WC5 affects a phase of the HCMV replicative cycle that precedes viral DNA synthesis. Experiments to monitor the effects of the compound on virus attachment and entry showed that it does not inhibit either process. Evaluation of viral mRNA and protein expression revealed that WC5 targets an event of the HCMV replicative cycle that follows the transcription and translation of immediate-early genes and precedes those of early and late genes. In cell-based assays to test the effects of WC5 on the transactivating activity of the HCMV immediate-early 2 (IE2) protein, WC5 markedly interfered with IE2-mediated transactivation of viral early promoters. Finally, WC5 combined with ganciclovir in checkerboard experiments exhibited highly synergistic activity. These findings suggest that WC5 deserves further investigation as a candidate anti-HCMV drug with a novel mechanism of action. PMID:20194695

  3. Nickel(II) Complex of Polyhydroxybenzaldehyde N4-Thiosemicarbazone Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Activity by Inhibiting NF-κB Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Sheng Wei; Looi, Chung Yeng; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Phan, Alicia Yi Ling; Wong, Won Fen; Wang, Hao; Paterson, Ian C.; Ea, Chee Kwee; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2014-01-01

    Background The biological properties of thiosemicarbazone have been widely reported. The incorporation of some transition metals such as Fe, Ni and Cu to thiosemicarbazone complexes is known to enhance its biological effects. In this study, we incorporated nickel(II) ions into thiosemicarbazone with N4-substitution groups H3L (H; H3L1, CH3; H3L2, C6H5; H3L3 and C2H5; H3L4) and examined its potential anti-inflammatory activity. Methodology/Principal Findings Four ligands (1–4) and their respective nickel-containing complexes (5–8) were synthesized and characterized. The compounds synthesized were tested for their effects on NF-κB nuclear translocation, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and NF-κB transactivation activity. The active compound was further evaluated on its ability to suppress carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in vivo. A potential binding target of the active compound was also predicted by molecular docking analysis. Conclusions/Significance Among all synthesized compounds tested, we found that complex [Ni(H2L1)(PPh3)]Cl (5) (complex 5), potently inhibited IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells as well as TNFα-stimulated HeLa S3 cells. In addition, complex 5 significantly down-regulated LPS- or TNFα-induced transcription of NF-κB target genes, including genes that encode the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IFNβ and IL6. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that complex 5 inhibited the transactivation activity of NF-κB. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory effect of complex 5 was also supported by its suppressive effect on carrageenan-induced paw edema formation in wild type C57BL/6 mice. Interestingly, molecular docking study showed that complex 5 potentially interact with the active site of IKKβ. Taken together, we suggest complex 5 as a novel NF-κB inhibitor with potent anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24977407

  4. Steric inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 Tat-dependent trans-activation in vitro and in cells by oligonucleotides containing 2′-O-methyl G-clamp ribonucleoside analogues

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Stephen C.; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Gait, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    We report the synthesis of a novel 2′-O-methyl (OMe) riboside phosphoramidite derivative of the G-clamp tricyclic base and incorporation into a series of small steric blocking OMe oligonucleotides targeting the apical stem–loop region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) trans- activation-responsive (TAR) RNA. Binding to TAR RNA is substantially enhanced for certain single site substitutions in the centre of the oligonucleotide, and doubly substituted anti-TAR OMe 9mers or 12mers exhibit remarkably low binding constants of <0.1 nM. G-clamp-containing oligomers achieved 50% inhibition of Tat-dependent in vitro transcription at ∼25 nM, 4-fold lower than for a TAR 12mer OMe oligonucleotide and better than found for any other oligonucleotide tested to date. Addition of one or two OMe G-clamps did not impart cellular trans-activation inhibition activity to cellularly inactive OMe oligonucleotides. Addition of an OMe G-clamp to a 12mer OMe–locked nucleic acid chimera maintained, but did not enhance, inhibition of Tat-dependent in vitro transcription and cellular trans-activation in HeLa cells. The results demonstrate clearly that an OMe G-clamp has remarkable RNA-binding enhancement ability, but that oligonucleotide effectiveness in steric block inhibition of Tat-dependent trans-activation both in vitro and in cells is governed by factors more complex than RNA-binding strength alone. PMID:12771202

  5. Triptonide Effectively Inhibits Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling via C-terminal Transactivation Domain of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Chinison, Jessica; Aguilar, Jose S; Avalos, Alan; Huang, Ying; Wang, Zhijun; Cameron, D Joshua; Hao, Jijun

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal activation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is implicated in many diseases including cancer. As a result, therapeutic agents that disrupt this signaling pathway have been highly sought after. Triptonide is a key bioactive small molecule identified in a traditional Chinese medicine named Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F., and it has a broad spectrum of biological functions. Here we show that triptonide can effectively inhibit canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling by targeting the downstream C-terminal transcription domain of β-catenin or a nuclear component associated with β-catenin. In addition, triptonide treatment robustly rescued the zebrafish "eyeless" phenotype induced by GSK-3β antagonist 6-bromoindirubin-30-oxime (BIO) for Wnt signaling activation during embryonic gastrulation. Finally, triptonide effectively induced apoptosis of Wnt-dependent cancer cells, supporting the therapeutic potential of triptonide. PMID:27596363

  6. Triptonide Effectively Inhibits Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling via C-terminal Transactivation Domain of β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Chinison, Jessica; Aguilar, Jose S.; Avalos, Alan; Huang, Ying; Wang, Zhijun; Cameron, D. Joshua; Hao, Jijun

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal activation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is implicated in many diseases including cancer. As a result, therapeutic agents that disrupt this signaling pathway have been highly sought after. Triptonide is a key bioactive small molecule identified in a traditional Chinese medicine named Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F., and it has a broad spectrum of biological functions. Here we show that triptonide can effectively inhibit canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling by targeting the downstream C-terminal transcription domain of β-catenin or a nuclear component associated with β-catenin. In addition, triptonide treatment robustly rescued the zebrafish “eyeless” phenotype induced by GSK-3β antagonist 6-bromoindirubin-30-oxime (BIO) for Wnt signaling activation during embryonic gastrulation. Finally, triptonide effectively induced apoptosis of Wnt-dependent cancer cells, supporting the therapeutic potential of triptonide. PMID:27596363

  7. Inhibition of IL-1β Transcription by Peptides Derived from the hCMV IE2 Transactivator

    PubMed Central

    Listman, James; Race, JoAnne E.; Walker-Kopp, Nancy; Unlu, Sebnem; Auron, Philip E.

    2008-01-01

    The immediate early (IE) proteins of human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) have diverse roles in directing viral and host cell transcription. Among these is the ability of IE2 to induce transcription of the IL1B gene that codes for IL-1β in monocytes. This function is partially explained by interaction between IE2 and the host cell transcription factor Spi-1/PU.1 (Spi-1). We now show that maximal IE2 function also depends on productive interactions localizing to two C/EBP sites on the IL1B promoter suggesting either bi- or tri-molecular interactions between IE2, Spi-1 and C/EBPβ at two different locations on the promoter. The IE2 interaction region on Spi-1 was previously mapped to the DNA-binding ETS domain and overlaps the region of Spi-1 that interacts with the transcription factor C/EBPβ, a factor known to be critical for the induction of IL1B in response to Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) family signal transduction. The Spi-1 interacting region of IE2 maps to amino acids 315–328, a sequence that also interacts with the bZIP domain of C/EBPβ. An expression vector coding for amino acids 291–364 of IE2 can suppress LPS induction of a cotransfected IL1B enhancer-promoter fragment in a monocyte cell line. This inhibition is likely the result of competition between Spi-1 and C/EBPβ, thus blunting gene induction. PMID:18308397

  8. In vivo screening of ligand-dependent hammerhead ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Saragliadis, Athanasios; Klauser, Benedikt; Hartig, Jörg S

    2012-01-01

    The development of artificial switches of gene expression is of high importance for future applications in biotechnology and synthetic biology. We have developed a powerful RNA-based system which allows for the ligand-dependent and reprogrammable control of gene expression in Escherichia coli. Our system makes use of the hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) which acts as molecular scaffold for the sequestration of the ribosome binding site (RBS), mimicking expression platforms in naturally occurring riboswitches. Aptamer domains can be attached to the ribozyme as exchangeable ligand-sensing modules. Addition of ligands to the bacterial growth medium changes the activity of the ligand-dependent self-cleaving ribozyme which in turn switches gene expression. In this chapter, we describe the in vivo screening procedure allowing for reprogramming the ligand-specificity of our system. PMID:22315086

  9. Inhibition of aryl hydrocarbon receptor transactivation and DNA adduct formation by CYP1 isoform-selective metabolic deactivation of benzo[a]pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Kaori; Uno, Shigeyuki; Seki, Taiichiro; Ariga, Toyohiko; Kusumi, Yoshiaki; Mitsumata, Masako; Yamada, Sachiko; Makishima, Makoto

    2008-07-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polyaromatic hydrocarbon produced by the combustion of cigarettes and coke ovens, is a known procarcinogen. BaP activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and induces the expression of a battery of genes, including CYP1A1, which metabolize BaP to toxic compounds. The possible role of CYP1 enzymes in mediating BaP detoxification or metabolic activation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we assessed the effects of CYP1 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1) on BaP-induced AhR transactivation and DNA adduct formation in HEK293 cells and HepG2 cells. Transfection of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, but not CYP1A2, suppressed BaP-induced activation of AhR. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, but not CYP1B1, inhibited DNA adduct formation in BaP-treated HepG2 cells. These results indicate that CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 play a role in deactivation of BaP on AhR and that CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 are involved in BaP detoxification by suppressing DNA adduct formation. BaP treatment did not induce DNA adduct formation in HEK293 cells, even after transfection of CYP1 enzymes, suggesting that expression of CYP1 enzymes is not sufficient for DNA adduct formation. Lower expression of epoxide hydrolase and higher expression of glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and GSTM1/M2 were observed in HEK293 cells compared with HepG2 cells. Dynamic expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 along with expression of other enzymes such as epoxide hydrolase and phase II enzymes may determine the detoxification or metabolic activation of BaP.

  10. Expression of microRNA-195 is transactivated by Sp1 but inhibited by histone deacetylase 3 in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Li, Siwen; Wang, Ruizhi; Xiao, Manhuan; Meng, Yu; Zeng, Chunxian; Fang, Jian-Hong; Yang, Jine; Zhuang, Shi-Mei

    2016-07-01

    MiR-195 expression is frequently reduced in various cancers, but its underlying mechanisms remain unknown. To explore whether abnormal transcription contributed to miR-195 downregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we characterized the -2165-bp site upstream of mature miR-195 as transcription start site and the -2.4 to -2.0-kb fragment as the promoter of miR-195 gene. Subsequent investigation showed that deletion of the predicted Sp1 binding site decreased the miR-195 promoter activity; Sp1 silencing significantly reduced the miR-195 promoter activity and the endogenous miR-195 level; Sp1 directly interacted with the miR-195 promoter in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest Sp1 as a transactivator for miR-195 transcription. Interestingly, miR-195 expression was also subjected to epigenetic regulation. Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) could anchor to the miR-195 promoter via interacting with Sp1 and consequently repress the Sp1-mediated miR-195 transactivation by deacetylating histone in HCC cells. Consistently, substantial increase of HDAC3 protein was detected in human HCC tissues and HDAC3 upregulation was significantly correlated with miR-195 downregulation, suggesting that HDAC3 elevation may represent an important cause for miR-195 reduction in HCC. Our findings uncover the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation and expression deregulation of miR-195 in HCC cells and provide new insight into microRNA biogenesis in cancer cells. PMID:27179445

  11. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat-dependent activation of translation in Xenopus oocytes by the benzodiazepine Ro24-7429 requires trans-activation response element loop sequences.

    PubMed

    Braddock, M; Cannon, P; Muckenthaler, M; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1994-01-01

    Two benzodiazepine compounds, [7-chloro-5-(2-pyrryl)-3H-1,4 benzodiazapin-2-(H)-one] (Ro5-3335) and [7-chloro-5-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-3H-benzo[e] [1,4] diazepin-2-yl]- methylamine (Ro24-7429), inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication via a specific effect on the function of the transactivator protein, Tat. To gain further insight into the mechanism of action of these compounds, we have tested their effects in an alternative assay for Tat activation in Xenopus oocytes. In this system, translation of trans-activation response element (TAR)-containing RNA is activated by Tat. Both compounds specifically blocked activation of translation in a dose-dependent fashion, with Ro24-7429 showing the greater potency. In the Xenopus oocyte system, as in mammalian cells, mutation of the TAR loop sequences abolishes Tat action. However, it is possible to obtain TAR-specific, Tat-dependent activation of a target RNA with a mutation in the loop provided that this target is in large excess. This result has been interpreted as indicating that a negative factor has been titrated (M. Braddock, R. Powell, A.D. Blanchard, A.J. Kingsman, and S.M. Kingsman, FASEB J. 7:214-222, 1993). Interestingly Ro24-7429 was unable to inhibit the TAR-specific but loop sequence-independent mode of translational activation. This finding suggests that a specific loop-binding cellular factor may mediate the effects of this inhibitor of Tat action. Consistent with this notion, we could not detect any effect of Ro24-7429 on the efficiency of specific Tat binding to TAR in vitro. PMID:8254735

  12. Structural requirements for ErbB2 transactivation.

    PubMed

    Penuel, E; Schaefer, G; Akita, R W; Sliwkowski, M X

    2001-12-01

    ErbB2 is a unique member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases that is distinguished by the fact that no ligand has yet been identified. Due to the absence of an ErbB2 ligand, alternative mechanisms are used for ErbB2 activation. As such, when ErbB2 is overexpressed, kinase activation occurs in the absence of ligand because of constitutive homodimerization. However, at normal expression levels ErbB2 acts as the shared coreceptor for the ErbB family, and these heterodimeric complexes are activated in response to the partner ligand. While the extracellular domain and transmembrane domains are necessary for ErbB2 transactivation, the carboxy terminus is also required. Specifically, ligand-dependent ErbB2 transactivation requires a discrete three-amino-acid segment, located at the C-terminus of ErbB family members ErbB3, ErbB4, and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Transactivation of ErbB2 via the three-amino-acid segment likely represents a conserved mechanism for regulated signaling by the ErbB family of receptors. PMID:11774204

  13. The transactivation domain AF-2 but not the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor is required to inhibit differentiation of avian erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed

    von Lindern, M; Boer, L; Wessely, O; Parker, M; Beug, H

    1998-02-01

    Earlier work demonstrated that an activated estrogen receptor (ER) is required for long-term self-renewal of c-ErbB-expressing avian erythroid progenitors. Here, we demonstrate that activation of the ER does not only arrest or retard differentiation of early progenitors but that it affects erythroid differentiation at all stages of erythroid maturation. A search for genes whose expression is affected by the ER showed that the 17beta-estradiol-activated receptor suppressed the differentiation-associated up-regulation of Gata-1, SCL-1, and globin genes in partially mature cells. In the same cells, the expression of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and histone H5 was enhanced. This led to premature expression of CAII, a possible explanation for the toxic effects of overexpressed ER. Repression specifically required the transactivation domain AF-2, but neither an intact DNA-binding domain (DBD) nor the AF-1 domain. The transcriptional activation of CAII, however, required both an intact AF-2 and a functional DBD. The requirement for the AF-2, but not the DBD, suggested that the ER may compete with other nuclear hormone receptors for transcriptional coactivators that bind AF-2, a domain well conserved within this family of transcription factors. We show, however, that this model does not apply for the most likely candidate, the avian thyroid hormone receptor. PMID:9482667

  14. Downregulation of SWI5 and CTC1 genes: hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase transactivated protein 1-mediated inhibition of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Yao, X-K; Pan, Z-P; Li, Y; Lun, Y-Z; Chi, Q; Jiang, S-J; Wang, F; Sui, W

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA polymerase transactivated protein 1 (HBVDNAPTP1) is a novel protein upregulated by HBV DNA polymerase, which has been screened by suppression subtractive hybridization technique (SSH) (GenBank Acc. No. AY450389). A vector pcDNA3.1 (-)/myc-His A-HBVDNAPTP1 was constructed and used to transfect acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. HBVDNAPTP1 expression was detected by Western blot analysis in the cells. A cDNA library of genes downregulated by HBVDNAPTP1 in THP-1 cells was made in pGEM-T Easy using SSH. The cDNAs were sequenced and analyzed with BLAST search against the sequences in GenBank. Some sequences, such as DNA repair protein SWI5 homolog (SWI5) and CTS telomere maintenance complex component 1 (CTC1), might be involved in DNA repair. Protein expression of SWI5 and CTC1 was identified by Western blot in THP-1 cells. HBVDNAPTP1 could downregulate the expression of SWI5 and CTC1 at translation level. PMID:27265469

  15. Oxidative Stress Promotes Ligand-independent and Enhanced Ligand-dependent Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Ozsoy, Hatice Z.; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Wieder, Eric D.; Pedersen, Steen; Mann, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1, p55) and 2 (TNFR2, p75) are characterized by several cysteine-rich modules in the extracellular domain, raising the possibility that redox-induced modifications of these cysteine residues might alter TNFR function. To test this possibility, we examined fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in 293T cells transfected with CFP- and YFP-tagged TNFRs exposed to the thiol oxidant diamide. Treatment with high concentrations of diamide (1 mm) resulted in an increase in the FRET signal that was sensitive to inhibition with the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting that oxidative stress resulted in TNFR self-association. Treatment of cells with low concentrations of diamide (1 μm) that was not sufficient to provoke TNFR self-association resulted in increased TNF-induced FRET signals relative to the untreated cells, suggesting that oxidative stress enhanced ligand-dependent TNFR signaling. Similar findings were obtained when the TNFR1- and TNFR2-transfected cells were pretreated with a cell-impermeable oxidase, DsbA, that catalyzes disulfide bond formation between thiol groups on cysteine residues. The changes in TNFR self-association were functionally significant, because pretreating the HeLa cells and 293T cells resulted in increased TNF-induced NF-κB activation and TNF-induced expression of IκB and syndecan-4 mRNA levels. Although pretreatment with DsbA did not result in an increase in TNF binding to TNFRs, it resulted in increased TNF-induced activation of NF-κB, consistent with an allosteric modification of the TNFRs. Taken together, these results suggest that oxidative stress promotes TNFR receptor self-interaction and ligand-independent and enhanced ligand-dependent TNF signaling. PMID:18544535

  16. Transactivation Function-2 of Estrogen Receptor α Contains Transactivation Function-1-regulating Element*

    PubMed Central

    Arao, Yukitomo; Coons, Laurel A.; Zuercher, William J.; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    ERα has a ligand-dependent transactivation function in the ligand binding domain of ERα C terminus (AF-2) and a ligand-independent activation function in the N terminus (AF-1). It is still not fully understood how AF-1 and AF-2 activities are regulated cooperatively by ligands. To evaluate the AF-1 involvement in the estrogenic activities of various compounds, we analyzed these transactivation functions using AF-1-truncated and AF-2-mutated ERα mutants. AF-2 is composed of two domains with flexible and static regions. We used an AF-2 flexible region mutant and an AF-2 static region mutant. Both mutants have been reported as non-E2 responsive due to disruption of E2-mediated coactivator recruitment to the AF-2. The AF-2 mutants were not activated by agonists, but surprisingly antagonists and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) activated the AF-2 mutants. This antagonist reversal activity was derived from AF-1. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the AF-2 contains an AF-1 suppression function using C-terminal-truncated ERα mutants. From these findings we hypothesized that the mutation of AF-2 disrupted its ability to suppress AF-1, causing the antagonist reversal. To assess the AF-2-mediated AF-1 suppression, we analyzed the transcription activity of physically separated AF-1 and AF-2 using a novel hybrid reporter assay. We observed that the AF-1 activity was not suppressed by the physically separated AF-2. Furthermore, SERMs did not induce the AF-1-mediated activity from the separated mutant AF-2, which differed from the intact protein. These results imply that SERM activity is dependent on a conformational change of the full-length ERα molecule, which allows for AF-1 activation. PMID:26028650

  17. Nepetaefuran and leonotinin isolated from Leonotis nepetaefolia R. Br. potently inhibit the LPS signaling pathway by suppressing the transactivation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Fumihito; Iizuka, Keito; Tago, Kenji; Narukawa, Yuji; Kiuchi, Fumiyuki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Tamura, Hiroomi; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi

    2015-10-01

    Leonotis nepetaefolia R. Br., also known as Klip Dagga or Lion's Ear, has traditionally been used as a folk medicine to treat inflammatory diseases such as rheumatism, bronchitis, and asthma; however, the components that exhibit its anti-inflammatory activity have not yet been identified. In the present study, we investigated the effects of three types of diterpenoids, nepetaefuran, leonotinin, and leonotin, which were isolated from L. nepetaefolia R. Br., on the LPS signaling pathway in order to elucidate the anti-inflammatory mechanism involved. Nepetaefuran more potently inhibited the LPS-induced production of NO and CCL2 than leonotinin by suppressing the expression of iNOS mRNA and CCL2 mRNA. On the other hand, leonotin failed to inhibit the production of NO and CCL2 induced by LPS. Although nepetaefuran and leonotinin had no effect on the LPS-induced degradation of IκBα or nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, they markedly inhibited the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. Nepetaefuran and leonotinin also inhibited the transcriptional activity of the GAL4-NF-κB p65 fusion protein. On the other hand, nepetaefuran, leonotinin and leonotin did not affect the LPS-induced activation of MAP kinase family members such as ERK, p38, and JNK. In addition, inhibitory effect of nepetaefuran and leonotinin on NF-κB activation is well correlated with their ability to induce activation of Nrf2 and ER stress. Taken together, these results demonstrated that nepetaefuran and leonotinin could be the components responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of L. nepetaefolia R. Br. by specifically inhibiting the LPS-induced activation of NF-κB. PMID:26319953

  18. Multiple, Ligand-Dependent Routes from the Active Site of Cytochrome P450 2C9

    SciTech Connect

    Cojocaru, Vlad; Winn, Peter J.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-02-13

    The active site of liver-specific, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases is deeply buried in the protein and is connected to the protein surface through multiple tunnels, many of which were found open in different CYP crystal structures. It has been shown that different tunnels could serve as ligand passage routes in different CYPs. However, it is not understood whether one CYP uses multiple routes for substrate access and product release and whether these routes depend on ligand properties. From 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations of CYP2C9, the second most abundant CYP in the human liver we found four main ligand exit routes, the occurrence of each depending on the ligand type and the conformation of the F-G loop, which is likely to be affected by the CYP-membrane interaction. A non-helical F-G loop favored exit towards the putative membrane-embedded region. Important protein features that direct ligand exit include aromatic residues that divide the active site and whose motions control access to two pathways. The ligands interacted with positively charged residues on the protein surface through hydrogen bonds that appear to select for acidic substrates. The observation of multiple, ligand-dependent routes in a CYP aids understanding of how CYP mutations affect drug metabolism and provides new possibilities for CYP inhibition.

  19. Sigma-1 receptor activation inhibits osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial (Müller) cells by transactivation of glutamatergic and purinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Stefanie; Winters, Helge; Pannicke, Thomas; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Water accumulation in retinal glial (Müller) and neuronal cells resulting in cellular swelling contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. Sigma (σ) receptor activation is known to have neuroprotective effects in the retina. Here, we show that the nonselective σ receptor agonist ditolylguanidine, and the selective σ1 receptor agonist PRE-084, inhibit the osmotic swelling of Müller cell somata induced by superfusion of rat retinal slices with a hypoosmotic solution containing barium ions. In contrast, PRE-084 did not inhibit the osmotic swelling of bipolar cell somata. The effects of σ receptor agonists on the Müller cell swelling were abrogated in the presence of blockers of metabotropic glutamate and purinergic P2Y1 receptors, respectively, suggesting that σ receptor activation triggers activation of a glutamatergic-purinergic signaling cascade which is known to prevent the osmotic Müller cell swelling. The swelling-inhibitory effect of 17β-estradiol was prevented by the σ1 receptor antagonist BD1047, suggesting that the effect is mediated by σ1 receptor activation. The data may suggest that the neuroprotective effect of σ receptor activation in the retina is in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic swelling of retinal glial cells. PMID:26499958

  20. NF2 loss promotes oncogenic RAS-induced thyroid cancers via YAP-dependent transactivation of RAS proteins and sensitizes them to MEK inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E.R.; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C.; Untch, Brian R.; Landa, Iňigo; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Voza, Francesca; Smith, Vicki E.; Ganly, Ian; Taylor, Barry S.; Persaud, Yogindra; Oler, Gisele; Fang, Yuqiang; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Viale, Agnes; Heguy, Adriana; Huberman, Kety H.; Giancotti, Filippo; Ghossein, Ronald; Fagin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Ch22q LOH is preferentially associated with RAS mutations in papillary and in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC). The 22q tumor suppressor NF2, encoding merlin, is implicated in this interaction because of its frequent loss of function in human thyroid cancer cell lines. Nf2 deletion or Hras mutation are insufficient for transformation, whereas their combined disruption leads to murine PDTC with increased MAPK signaling. Merlin loss induces RAS signaling in part through inactivation of Hippo, which activates a YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. We find that the three RAS genes are themselves YAP-TEAD1 transcriptional targets, providing a novel mechanism of promotion of RAS-induced tumorigenesis. Moreover, pharmacological disruption of YAP-TEAD with verteporfin blocks RAS transcription and signaling, and inhibits cell growth. The increased MAPK output generated by NF2 loss in RAS-mutant cancers may inform therapeutic strategies, as it generates greater dependency on the MAPK pathway for viability. PMID:26359368

  1. Upregulating endogenous genes by an RNA-programmable artificial transactivator

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    To promote expression of endogenous genes ad libitum, we developed a novel, programmable transcription factor prototype. Kept together via an MS2 coat protein/RNA interface, it includes a fixed, polypeptidic transactivating domain and a variable RNA domain that recognizes the desired gene. Thanks to this device, we specifically upregulated five genes, in cell lines and primary cultures of murine pallial precursors. Gene upregulation was small, however sufficient to robustly inhibit neuronal differentiation. The transactivator interacted with target gene chromatin via its RNA cofactor. Its activity was restricted to cells in which the target gene is normally transcribed. Our device might be useful for specific applications. However for this purpose, it will require an improvement of its transactivation power as well as a better characterization of its target specificity and mechanism of action. PMID:26152305

  2. Inhibition of Src kinase blocks high glucose-induced EGFR transactivation and collagen synthesis in mesangial cells and prevents diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Kanta; Xia, Ling; Goldberg, Howard J; Lee, Ken W K; Shah, Anu; Stavar, Laura; Masson, Elodie A Y; Momen, Abdul; Shikatani, Eric A; John, Rohan; Husain, Mansoor; Fantus, I George

    2013-11-01

    Chronic exposure to high glucose leads to diabetic nephropathy characterized by increased mesangial matrix protein (e.g., collagen) accumulation. Altered cell signaling and gene expression accompanied by oxidative stress have been documented. The contribution of the tyrosine kinase, c-Src (Src), which is sensitive to oxidative stress, was examined. Cultured rat mesangial cells were exposed to high glucose (25 mmol/L) in the presence and absence of Src inhibitors (PP2, SU6656), Src small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme (TACE) inhibitor, TAPI-2. Src was investigated in vivo by administration of PP2 to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic DBA2/J mice. High glucose stimulated Src, TACE, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2, p38), and collagen IV accumulation in mesangial cells. PP2 and SU6656 blocked high glucose-stimulated phosphorylation of Src Tyr-416, EGFR, and MAPKs. These inhibitors and Src knockdown by siRNA, as well as TAPI-2, also abrogated high glucose-induced phosphorylation of these targets and collagen IV accumulation. In STZ-diabetic mice, albuminuria, increased Src pTyr-416, TACE activation, ERK and EGFR phosphorylation, glomerular collagen accumulation, and podocyte loss were inhibited by PP2. These data indicate a role for Src in a high glucose-Src-TACE-heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-EGFR-MAPK-signaling pathway to collagen accumulation. Thus, Src may provide a novel therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23942551

  3. Inhibition of Src Kinase Blocks High Glucose–Induced EGFR Transactivation and Collagen Synthesis in Mesangial Cells and Prevents Diabetic Nephropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Kanta; Xia, Ling; Goldberg, Howard J.; Lee, Ken W.K.; Shah, Anu; Stavar, Laura; Masson, Elodie A.Y.; Momen, Abdul; Shikatani, Eric A.; John, Rohan; Husain, Mansoor; Fantus, I. George

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to high glucose leads to diabetic nephropathy characterized by increased mesangial matrix protein (e.g., collagen) accumulation. Altered cell signaling and gene expression accompanied by oxidative stress have been documented. The contribution of the tyrosine kinase, c-Src (Src), which is sensitive to oxidative stress, was examined. Cultured rat mesangial cells were exposed to high glucose (25 mmol/L) in the presence and absence of Src inhibitors (PP2, SU6656), Src small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme (TACE) inhibitor, TAPI-2. Src was investigated in vivo by administration of PP2 to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic DBA2/J mice. High glucose stimulated Src, TACE, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK1/2, p38), and collagen IV accumulation in mesangial cells. PP2 and SU6656 blocked high glucose–stimulated phosphorylation of Src Tyr-416, EGFR, and MAPKs. These inhibitors and Src knockdown by siRNA, as well as TAPI-2, also abrogated high glucose–induced phosphorylation of these targets and collagen IV accumulation. In STZ-diabetic mice, albuminuria, increased Src pTyr-416, TACE activation, ERK and EGFR phosphorylation, glomerular collagen accumulation, and podocyte loss were inhibited by PP2. These data indicate a role for Src in a high glucose-Src-TACE-heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-EGFR-MAPK–signaling pathway to collagen accumulation. Thus, Src may provide a novel therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23942551

  4. TopoisomeraseIIβ in HIV-1 transactivation.

    PubMed

    Chekuri, Anil; Bhaskar, C; Bollimpelli, V Satish; Kondapi, Anand K

    2016-03-01

    TopoisomeraseIIβ, an isoform of type II topoisomerase, was found to be functional in various viral infections. Its plausible role in HIV life cycle was also suggested earlier, but not clearly established. In the present study, we have investigated the role of TopoIIβ in HIV-1 infection by its gain and loss of function. Overexpression of TopoIIβ lead to an increase in viral replication, resulting in enhanced virion production. HIV-1 replication was impaired when TopoIIβ was down regulated by siRNA and inhibited by ICRF-193 and merbarone. The role of TopoIIβ in HIV-1 transcription was shown through its interaction with Tat and recruitement to long terminal repeat (LTR) region by co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assays. Involvement of TopoIIβ in transactivation of HIV-1 LTR was confirmed by luciferase assay in reporter cell line, TZM bl and also by transfection of reporter exogenously. It was also observed that LTR transactivation commensurated with the expression of TopoIIβ in the presence of Tat. In addition, a decreased viral gene expression on treatment with merbarone exemplifies the importance of catalytic activity of TopoIIβ in viral replication. These observations indicate that TopoIIβ is involved in the cascade of coactivator complexes that are recruited to LTR for regulation of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:26876283

  5. Fluoxetine-induced transactivation of the platelet-derived growth factor type β receptor reveals a novel heterologous desensitization process.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jeff S; Vasefi, Maryam S; Gondora, Nyasha; Ahmed, Nawaz; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including serotonin (5-HT) receptors promote the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) via intracellular signaling pathways in a process termed transactivation. Although transactivation pathways are commonly initiated by a GPCR, a recent report demonstrated that serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were able to block 5-HT-induced transactivation of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) type β receptor. We show that a 45 min pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with the SSRI fluoxetine indeed blocked 5-HT-induced transactivation of the PDGFβ receptor. However, upon further examination, we discovered that during the pretreatment period, fluoxetine itself was transiently transactivating the PDGFβ receptor via 5-HT2 receptor activation. After 45min, the increase in PDGFβ receptor phosphorylation induced by fluoxetine had returned to baseline, but a subsequent transactivating stimulus (5-HT) failed to "re-transactivate" the PDGFβ receptor. We further demonstrate that 45min, but not 3h, 5-HT pretreatment blocks dopamine-induced PDGFβ receptor transactivation. This did not involve changes in PDGF receptor function, since ligand (PDGF)-induced PDGFβ receptor activation was not inhibited by 5-HT pretreatment. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the heterologous desensitization of an RTK transactivation pathway and reveals a previously unknown short-term "blackout" period where no additional transactivation signaling is possible. PMID:25702926

  6. Ligand-dependent interaction of the glucocorticoid receptor with p53 enhances their degradation by Hdm2

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sagar; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2001-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the tumor supressor p53 mediate different stress responses. We have studied the mechanism of their mutual inhibition in normal endothelial cells (HUVEC) in response to hypoxia, a physiological stress, and mitomycin C, which damages DNA. Dexamethasone (Dex) stimulates the degradation of endogenous GR and p53 by the proteasome pathway in HUVEC under hypoxia and mitomycin C treatments, and also in hepatoma cells (HepG2) under normoxia. Dex inhibits the functions of p53 (apoptosis, Bax, and p21WAF1/CIP1 expression) and GR (PEPCK and G-6-Pase expression). Endogenous p53 and GR form a ligand-dependent trimeric complex with Hdm2 in the cytoplasm. Disruption of the p53–HDM2 interaction prevents Dex-induced ubiquitylation of GR and p53. The ubiquitylation of GR requires p53, the interaction of p53 with Hdm2, and E3 ligase activity of Hdm2. These results provide a mechanistic basis for GR and p53 acting as opposing forces in the decision between cell death and survival. PMID:11562347

  7. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence of riboswitch-regulated single mRNAs shows ligand-dependent accessibility bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Arlie J.; Lund, Paul E.; Blanco, Mario R.; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    In response to intracellular signals in Gram-negative bacteria, translational riboswitches--commonly embedded in messenger RNAs (mRNAs)--regulate gene expression through inhibition of translation initiation. It is generally thought that this regulation originates from occlusion of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence upon ligand binding; however, little direct evidence exists. Here we develop Single Molecule Kinetic Analysis of RNA Transient Structure (SiM-KARTS) to investigate the ligand-dependent accessibility of the SD sequence of an mRNA hosting the 7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine (preQ1)-sensing riboswitch. Spike train analysis reveals that individual mRNA molecules alternate between two conformational states, distinguished by `bursts' of probe binding associated with increased SD sequence accessibility. Addition of preQ1 decreases the lifetime of the SD's high-accessibility (bursting) state and prolongs the time between bursts. In addition, ligand-jump experiments reveal imperfect riboswitching of single mRNA molecules. Such complex ligand sensing by individual mRNA molecules rationalizes the nuanced ligand response observed during bulk mRNA translation.

  8. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence of riboswitch-regulated single mRNAs shows ligand-dependent accessibility bursts

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Arlie J.; Lund, Paul E.; Blanco, Mario R.; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    In response to intracellular signals in Gram-negative bacteria, translational riboswitches—commonly embedded in messenger RNAs (mRNAs)—regulate gene expression through inhibition of translation initiation. It is generally thought that this regulation originates from occlusion of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence upon ligand binding; however, little direct evidence exists. Here we develop Single Molecule Kinetic Analysis of RNA Transient Structure (SiM-KARTS) to investigate the ligand-dependent accessibility of the SD sequence of an mRNA hosting the 7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine (preQ1)-sensing riboswitch. Spike train analysis reveals that individual mRNA molecules alternate between two conformational states, distinguished by ‘bursts' of probe binding associated with increased SD sequence accessibility. Addition of preQ1 decreases the lifetime of the SD's high-accessibility (bursting) state and prolongs the time between bursts. In addition, ligand-jump experiments reveal imperfect riboswitching of single mRNA molecules. Such complex ligand sensing by individual mRNA molecules rationalizes the nuanced ligand response observed during bulk mRNA translation. PMID:26781350

  9. EGFR Transactivation by Peptide G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Nakamura, Taichi; Jensen, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer kills approximately 1.3 million citizens in the world annually. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) erlotinib and gefitinib are effective anti-tumor agents especially in lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. The goal is to increase the potency of TKI in lung cancer patients with wild type EGFR. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) transactivate the wild type EGFR in lung cancer cells. The GPCR can be activated by peptide agonists causing phosphatidylinositol turnover or stimulation of adenylylcyclase. Recently, nonpeptide antagonists were found to inhibit the EGFR transactivation caused by peptides. Nonpeptide antagonists for bombesin (BB), neurotensin (NTS) and cholecystokinin (CCK) inhibit lung cancer growth and increase the cytotoxicity of gefitinib. The results suggest that GPCR transactivation of the EGFR may play an important role in cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25563590

  10. Ligand-dependent Enhancer Activation Regulated by Topoisomerase-I Activity

    PubMed Central

    Puc, Janusz; Kozbial, Piotr; Li, Wenbo; Tan, Yuliang; Liu, Zhijie; Suter, Tom; Ohgi, Kenneth A.; Zhang, Jie; Aggarwal, Aneel K.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The discovery that enhancers are regulated transcription units, encoding eRNAs, has raised new questions about the mechanisms of their activation. Here, we report an unexpected molecular mechanism that underlies ligand-dependent enhancer activation, based on DNA nicking to relieve torsional stress from eRNA synthesis. Using dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced binding of androgen receptor (AR) to prostate cancer cell enhancers as a model, we show rapid recruitment, within minutes, of DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) to a large cohort of AR-regulated enhancers. Furthermore, we show that the DNA nicking activity of TOP1 is a prerequisite for robust eRNA synthesis and enhancer activation, and is kinetically accompanied by the recruitment of ATR and the MRN complex, followed by additional components of DNA damage repair machinery to the AR-regulated enhancers. Together, our studies reveal a linkage between eRNA synthesis and ligand-dependent TOP1-mediated nicking a strategy exerting quantitative effects on eRNA expression in regulating AR-bound enhancer-dependent transcriptional programs. PMID:25619691

  11. Ligand-dependent recruitment of the Arnt coregulator determines DNA recognition by the dioxin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitelaw, M.; Pongratz, I.; Wilhelmsson, A.; Gustafsson, J.; Poellinger, L. )

    1993-04-01

    Signal transduction by dioxins is mediated by the intracellular dioxin or aryl hydrocarbon receptor. This receptor binds dioxin and its planar aromatic congeners in a saturable manner with high affinity. The extreme toxicity of dioxin has been demonstrated in animals but not in humans. In animals, dioxin causes thymic wasting, immune suppression, severe epithelial disorders and tumor promotion. On a molecular level, dioxins are inducers of transcription of a battery of target genes encoding xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. Dioxin also appears to transcriptionally regulate the expression of the growth modulatory genes for interleukin-1 Beta and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2. The dioxin induction response is mediated by single or multiple copies of dioxin-inducible transcriptional control elements in target promoters. The research data detailed in this paper examines the ligand-dependent recruitment of the Arnt coregulator which determines DNA recognition by the dioxin receptor. This data suggests that dioxin receptor activity is governed by a complex pattern of combinatorial regulation involving repression by hsp90 and then by ligand-dependent recruitment of the positive coregulator Arnt and that the dioxin receptor system provides the first example of signal-controlled dimerization of bHLH factors.

  12. A structural view of ligand-dependent activation in thermoTRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ximena; Lespay-Rebolledo, Carolyne; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) proteins are a large family of ion channels, grouped into seven sub-families. Although great advances have been made regarding the activation and modulation of TRP channel activity, detailed molecular mechanisms governing TRP channel gating are still needed. Sensitive to electric, chemical, mechanical, and thermal cues, TRP channels are tightly associated with the detection and integration of sensory input, emerging as a model to study the polymodal activation of ion channel proteins. Among TRP channels, the temperature-activated kind constitute a subgroup by itself, formed by Vanilloid receptors 1–4, Melastatin receptors 2, 4, 5, and 8, TRPC5, and TRPA1. Some of the so-called “thermoTRP” channels participate in the detection of noxious stimuli making them an interesting pharmacological target for the treatment of pain. However, the poor specificity of the compounds available in the market represents an important obstacle to overcome. Understanding the molecular mechanics underlying ligand-dependent modulation of TRP channels may help with the rational design of novel synthetic analgesics. The present review focuses on the structural basis of ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 and TRPM8 channels. Special attention is drawn to the dissection of ligand-binding sites within TRPV1, PIP2-dependent modulation of TRP channels, and the structure of natural and synthetic ligands. PMID:24847275

  13. Conformational dynamics of ligand-dependent alternating access in LeuT.

    PubMed

    Kazmier, Kelli; Sharma, Shruti; Quick, Matthias; Islam, Shahidul M; Roux, Benoît; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; McHaourab, Hassane S

    2014-05-01

    The leucine transporter (LeuT) from Aquifex aeolicus is a bacterial homolog of neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) that catalyze reuptake of neurotransmitters at the synapse. Crystal structures of wild-type and mutants of LeuT have been interpreted as conformational states in the coupled transport cycle. However, the mechanistic identities inferred from these structures have not been validated, and the ligand-dependent conformational equilibrium of LeuT has not been defined. Here, we used distance measurements between spin-label pairs to elucidate Na(+)- and leucine-dependent conformational changes on the intracellular and extracellular sides of the transporter. The results identify structural motifs that underlie the isomerization of LeuT between outward-facing, inward-facing and occluded states. The conformational changes reported here present a dynamic picture of the alternating-access mechanism of LeuT and NSSs that is different from the inferences reached from currently available structural models. PMID:24747939

  14. Ligand-dependent localization and function of ORP-VAP complexes at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Kentala, Henriikka; Peränen, Johan; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2015-05-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein/OSBP-related proteins (ORPs) constitute a conserved family of sterol/phospholipid-binding proteins with lipid transporter or sensor functions. We investigated the spatial occurrence and regulation of the interactions of human OSBP/ORPs or the S. cerevisiae orthologs, the Osh (OSBP homolog) proteins, with their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) anchors, the VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs), by employing bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down set-ups. The ORP-VAP interactions localize frequently at distinct subcellular sites, shown in several cases to represent membrane contact sites (MCSs). Using established ORP ligand-binding domain mutants and pull-down assays with recombinant proteins, we show that ORP liganding regulates the ORP-VAP association, alters the subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes, or modifies organelle morphology. There is distinct protein specificity in the effects of the mutants on subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes. We provide evidence that complexes of human ORP2 and VAPs at ER-lipid droplet interfaces regulate the hydrolysis of triglycerides and lipid droplet turnover. The data suggest evolutionarily conserved, complex ligand-dependent functions of ORP-VAP complexes at MCSs, with implications for cellular lipid homeostasis and signaling. PMID:25420878

  15. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand. PMID:25916672

  16. Sox5 induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition by transactivation of Twist1

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Xin-Hong; Lv, Xin-Quan; Li, Hui-Xiang

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Depletion of Sox5 inhibits breast cancer proliferation, migration, and invasion. • Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression. • Sox5 induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition through transactivation of Twist1 expression. - Abstract: The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), a highly conserved cellular program, plays an important role in normal embryogenesis and cancer metastasis. Twist1, a master regulator of embryonic morphogenesis, is overexpressed in breast cancer and contributes to metastasis by promoting EMT. In exploring the mechanism underlying the increased Twist1 in breast cancer cells, we found that the transcription factor SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 5(Sox5) is up-regulation in breast cancer cells and depletion of Sox5 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, depletion of Sox5 in breast cancer cells caused a dramatic decrease in Twist1 and chromosome immunoprecipitation assay showed that Sox5 can bind directly to the Twist1 promoter, suggesting that Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression. We further demonstrated that knockdown of Sox5 up-regulated epithelial phenotype cell biomarker (E-cadherin) and down-regulated mesenchymal phenotype cell biomarkers (N-cadherin, Vimentin, and Fibronectin 1), resulting in suppression of EMT. Our study suggests that Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression and plays an important role in the regulation of breast cancer progression.

  17. Synthetic glucocorticoids that dissociate transactivation and AP-1 transrepression exhibit antiinflammatory activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vayssière, B M; Dupont, S; Choquart, A; Petit, F; Garcia, T; Marchandeau, C; Gronemeyer, H; Resche-Rigon, M

    1997-08-01

    Some of the most potent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive agents are synthetic glucocorticoids. However, major side effects severely limit their therapeutic use. The development of improved glucocorticoid-based drugs will require the separation of beneficial from deleterious effects. One possibility toward this goal is to try to dissociate two main activities of glucocorticoids, i.e. transactivation and transrepression. Screening of a library of compounds using transactivation and AP-1 transrepression models in transiently transfected cells identified dissociated glucocorticoids, which exert strong AP-1 inhibition but little or no transactivation. Importantly, despite high ligand binding affinity, the prototypic dissociated compound, RU24858, acted as a weak agonist and did not efficiently antagonize dexamethasone-induced transcription in transfected cells. Similar results were obtained in hepatic HTC cells for the transactivation of the endogenous tyrosine amino transferase gene (TAT), which encodes one of the enzymes involved in the glucocorticoid-dependent stimulation of neoglucogenesis. To investigate whether dissociated glucocorticoids retained the antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive potential of classic glucocorticoids, several in vitro and in vivo models were used. Indeed, secretion of the proinflammatory lymphokine interleukin-1beta was severely inhibited by dissociated glucocorticoids in human monocytic THP 1 cells. Moreover, in two in vivo models, these compounds exerted an antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive activity as potent as that of the classic glucocorticoid prednisolone. These results may lead to an improvement of antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive therapies and provide a novel concept for drug discovery. PMID:9259316

  18. Therapeutic benefit of a dissociated glucocorticoid and the relevance of in vitro separation of transrepression from transactivation activity.

    PubMed

    Belvisi, M G; Wicks, S L; Battram, C H; Bottoms, S E; Redford, J E; Woodman, P; Brown, T J; Webber, S E; Foster, M L

    2001-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the mainstay of asthma therapy; however, major side effects limit their therapeutic use. GCs influence the expression of genes either by transactivation or transrepression. The antiinflammatory effects of steroids are thought to be due to transrepression and the side effects, transactivation. Recently, a compound, RU 24858, has been identified that demonstrated dissociation between transactivation and transrepression in vitro. RU 24858 exerts strong AP-1 inhibition (transrepression), but little or no transactivation. We investigated whether this improved in vitro profile results in the maintenance of antiinflammatory activity (evaluated in the Sephadex model of lung edema) with reduced systemic toxicity (evaluated by loss in body weight, thymus involution, and bone turnover) compared with standard GCs. RU 24858 exhibits comparable antiinflammatory activity to the standard steroid, budesonide. However, the systemic changes observed indicate that transactivation events do occur with this GC with similar potency to the standard steroids. In addition, the GCs profiled showed no differentiation on quantitative osteopenia of the femur. These results suggest that in vitro separation of transrepression from transactivation activity does not translate to an increased therapeutic ratio for GCs in vivo or that adverse effects are a consequence of transrepression. PMID:11160246

  19. A Potent HER3 Monoclonal Antibody That Blocks Both Ligand-Dependent and -Independent Activities: Differential Impacts of PTEN Status on Tumor Response.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhan; Carrasco, Rosa A; Schifferli, Kevin; Kinneer, Krista; Tammali, Ravinder; Chen, Hong; Rothstein, Ray; Wetzel, Leslie; Yang, Chunning; Chowdhury, Partha; Tsui, Ping; Steiner, Philipp; Jallal, Bahija; Herbst, Ronald; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Tice, David A

    2016-04-01

    HER3/ERBB3 is a kinase-deficient member of the EGFR family receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) that is broadly expressed and activated in human cancers. HER3 is a compelling cancer target due to its important role in activation of the oncogenic PI3K/AKT pathway. It has also been demonstrated to confer tumor resistance to a variety of cancer therapies, especially targeted drugs against EGFR and HER2. HER3 can be activated by its ligand (heregulin/HRG), which induces HER3 heterodimerization with EGFR, HER2, or other RTKs. Alternatively, HER3 can be activated in a ligand-independent manner through heterodimerization with HER2 in HER2-amplified cells. We developed a fully human mAb against HER3 (KTN3379) that efficiently suppressed HER3 activity in both ligand-dependent and independent settings. Correspondingly, KTN3379 inhibited tumor growth in divergent tumor models driven by either ligand-dependent or independent mechanisms in vitro and in vivo Most intriguingly, while investigating the mechanistic underpinnings of tumor response to KTN3379, we discovered an interesting dichotomy in that PTEN loss, a frequently occurring oncogenic lesion in a broad range of cancer types, substantially blunted the tumor response in HER2-amplified cancer, but not in the ligand-driven cancer. To our knowledge, this represents the first study ascertaining the impact of PTEN loss on the antitumor efficacy of a HER3 mAb. KTN3379 is currently undergoing a phase Ib clinical trial in patients with advanced solid tumors. Our current study may help us optimize patient selection schemes for KTN3379 to maximize its clinical benefits. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 689-701. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26880266

  20. The bZIP transactivator of Epstein-Barr virus, BZLF1, functionally and physically interacts with the p65 subunit of NF-kappa B.

    PubMed Central

    Gutsch, D E; Holley-Guthrie, E A; Zhang, Q; Stein, B; Blanar, M A; Baldwin, A S; Kenney, S C

    1994-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BZLF1 (Z) immediate-early transactivator initiates the switch between latent and productive infection in B cells. The Z protein, which has homology to the basic leucine zipper protein c-Fos, transactivates the promoters of several replicative cycle proteins. Transactivation efficiency of the EBV BMRF1 promoter by Z is cell type dependent. In B cells, in which EBV typically exists in a latent form, Z activates the BMRF1 promoter inefficiently. We have discovered that the p65 component of the cellular factor NF-kappa B inhibits transactivation of several EBV promoters by Z. Furthermore, the inhibitor of NF-kappa B, I kappa B alpha, can augment Z-induced transactivation in the B-cell line Raji. Using glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins and coimmunoprecipitation studies, we demonstrate a direct interaction between Z and p65. This physical interaction, which requires the dimerization domain of Z and the Rel homology domain of p65, can be demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of Z transactivation function by NF-kappa B p65, or possibly by other Rel family proteins, may contribute to the inefficiency of Z transactivator function in B cells and may be a mechanism of maintaining B-cell-specific viral latency. Images PMID:8114725

  1. Pin1 promotes GR transactivation by enhancing recruitment to target genes

    PubMed Central

    Poolman, Toryn M.; Farrow, Stuart N.; Matthews, Laura; Loudon, Andrew S.; Ray, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ligand activated transcription factor, serving to regulate both energy metabolism and immune functions. Factors that influence cellular sensitivity to glucocorticoids (GC) are therefore of great interest. The N-terminal of the GR contains numerous potential proline-directed phosphorylation sites, some of which can regulate GR transactivation. Unrestricted proline isomerisation can be inhibited by adjacent serine phosphorylation and requires a prolyl isomerise, Pin1. Pin1 therefore determines the functional outcome of proline-directed kinases acting on the GR, as cis/trans isomers are distinct pools with different interacting proteins. We show that Pin1 mediates GR transactivation, but not GR trans-repression. Two N-terminal GR serines, S203 and S211, are targets for Pin1 potentiation of GR transactivation, establishing a direct link between Pin1 and the GR. We also demonstrate GC-activated co-recruitment of GR and Pin1 to the GILZ gene promoter. The Pin1 effect required both its WW and catalytic domains, and GR recruitment to its GRE was Pin1-dependent. Therefore, Pin1 is a selective regulator of GR transactivation, acting through N-terminal phospho-serine residues to regulate GR recruitment to its target sites in the genome. As Pin1 is dysregulated in disease states, this interaction may contribute to altered GC action in inflammatory conditions. PMID:23887939

  2. Essential role for ligand-dependent feedback antagonism of vertebrate hedgehog signaling by PTCH1, PTCH2 and HHIP1 during neural patterning

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Alexander M.; Peterson, Kevin A.; Nishi, Yuichi; Morin, Steves; Song, Jane Y.; Charron, Frédéric; McMahon, Andrew P.; Allen, Benjamin L.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is essential for vertebrate and invertebrate embryogenesis. In Drosophila, feedback upregulation of the HH receptor Patched (PTC; PTCH in vertebrates), is required to restrict HH signaling during development. By contrast, PTCH1 upregulation is dispensable for early HH-dependent patterning in mice. Unique to vertebrates are two additional HH-binding antagonists that are induced by HH signaling, HHIP1 and the PTCH1 homologue PTCH2. Although HHIP1 functions semi-redundantly with PTCH1 to restrict HH signaling in the developing nervous system, a role for PTCH2 remains unresolved. Data presented here define a novel role for PTCH2 as a ciliary localized HH pathway antagonist. While PTCH2 is dispensable for normal ventral neural patterning, combined removal of PTCH2- and PTCH1-feedback antagonism produces a significant expansion of HH-dependent ventral neural progenitors. Strikingly, complete loss of PTCH2-, HHIP1- and PTCH1-feedback inhibition results in ectopic specification of ventral cell fates throughout the neural tube, reflecting constitutive HH pathway activation. Overall, these data reveal an essential role for ligand-dependent feedback inhibition of vertebrate HH signaling governed collectively by PTCH1, PTCH2 and HHIP1. PMID:23900540

  3. Crosstalk between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human breast cancer cells: PPAR{gamma} binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} mediated transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Peng, Xinjian; Yuan, Liang; Mehta, Rajeshwari R.; Knethen, Andreas von; Choubey, Divaker; Mehta, Rajendra G.

    2012-11-15

    Heterodimerization and cross-talk between nuclear hormone receptors often occurs. For example, estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) physically binds to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and inhibits its transcriptional activity. The interaction between PPAR{gamma} and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) however, is unknown. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms linking PPAR{gamma} and VDR signaling, and for the first time we show that PPAR{gamma} physically associates with VDR in human breast cancer cells. We found that overexpression of PPAR{gamma} decreased 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) mediated transcriptional activity of the vitamin D target gene, CYP24A1, by 49% and the activity of VDRE-luc, a vitamin D responsive reporter, by 75% in T47D human breast cancer cells. Deletion mutation experiments illustrated that helices 1 and 4 of PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains, respectively, governed this suppressive function. Additionally, abrogation of PPAR{gamma}'s AF2 domain attenuated its repressive action on 1,25D{sub 3} transactivation, indicating that this domain is integral in inhibiting VDR signaling. PPAR{gamma} was also found to compete with VDR for their binding partner retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR{alpha}). Overexpression of RXR{alpha} blocked PPAR{gamma}'s suppressive effect on 1,25D{sub 3} action, enhancing VDR signaling. In conclusion, these observations uncover molecular mechanisms connecting the PPAR{gamma} and VDR pathways. -- Highlights: PPAR{gamma}'s role on 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} transcriptional activity is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} physically binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains are important for this inhibitory effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} competes with VDR for the availability of their binding partner, RXR{alpha}.

  4. Inhibition of Receptor Signaling and of Glioblastoma-derived Tumor Growth by a Novel PDGFRβ Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Camorani, Simona; Esposito, Carla L; Rienzo, Anna; Catuogno, Silvia; Iaboni, Margherita; Condorelli, Gerolama; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Cerchia, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) is a cell-surface tyrosine kinase receptor implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. It represents a compelling therapeutic target in many human tumors, including glioma. A number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors under development as antitumor agents have been found to inhibit PDGFRβ. However, they are not selective as they present multiple tyrosine kinase targets. Here, we report a novel PDGFRβ-specific antagonist represented by a nuclease-resistant RNA-aptamer, named Gint4.T. This aptamer is able to specifically bind to the human PDGFRβ ectodomain (Kd: 9.6 nmol/l) causing a strong inhibition of ligand-dependent receptor activation and of downstream signaling in cell lines and primary cultures of human glioblastoma cells. Moreover, Gint4.T aptamer drastically inhibits cell migration and proliferation, induces differentiation, and blocks tumor growth in vivo. In addition, Gint4.T aptamer prevents PDGFRβ heterodimerization with and resultant transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor. As a result, the combination of Gint4.T and an epidermal growth factor receptor–targeted aptamer is better at slowing tumor growth than either single aptamer alone. These findings reveal Gint4.T as a PDGFRβ-drug candidate with translational potential. PMID:24566984

  5. Cell-Surface Receptors Transactivation Mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Guerra, Germano; Parisi, Melania; De Marinis, Marta; Tafuri, Domenico; Cinelli, Mariapia; Ammendola, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to a large family of cell-surface receptors involved in many intracellular signaling cascades. Despite GPCRs lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, tyrosine phosphorylation of a tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK) occurs in response to binding of specific agonists of several such receptors, triggering intracellular mitogenic cascades. This suggests that the notion that GPCRs are associated with the regulation of post-mitotic cell functions is no longer believable. Crosstalk between GPCR and RTK may occur by different molecular mechanism such as the activation of metalloproteases, which can induce the metalloprotease-dependent release of RTK ligands, or in a ligand-independent manner involving membrane associated non-receptor tyrosine kinases, such as c-Src. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also implicated as signaling intermediates in RTKs transactivation. Intracellular concentration of ROS increases transiently in cells stimulated with GPCR agonists and their deliberated and regulated generation is mainly catalyzed by enzymes that belong to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase family. Oxidation and/or reduction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups of phosphatases tightly controls the activity of RTKs and ROS-mediated inhibition of cellular phosphatases results in an equilibrium shift from the non-phosphorylated to the phosphorylated state of RTKs. Many GPCR agonists activate phospholipase C, which catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate to produce inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and diacylglicerol. The consequent mobilization of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum leads to the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms. PKCα mediates feedback inhibition of RTK transactivation during GPCR stimulation. Recent data have expanded the coverage of transactivation to include Serine/Threonine kinase receptors and Toll-like receptors. Herein, we

  6. Isolation and identification of L-dopa decarboxylase as a protein that binds to and enhances transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor using the repressed transactivator yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed Central

    Wafa, Latif A; Cheng, Helen; Rao, Mira A; Nelson, Colleen C; Cox, Michael; Hirst, Martin; Sadowski, Ivan; Rennie, Paul S

    2003-01-01

    The AR (androgen receptor) is a ligand-regulated transcription factor, which belongs to the steroid receptor family and plays an essential role in growth and development of the prostate. Transcriptional activity of steroid receptors is modulated by interaction with co-regulator proteins and yeast two-hybrid analysis is commonly used to identify these steroid receptor-interacting proteins. However, a limitation of conventional two-hybrid systems for detecting AR protein partners has been that they only allow for analysis of the ligand- and DNA-binding domains of the receptor, as its NTD (N-terminal domain) possesses intrinsic transactivation activity. To identify AR N-terminus-interacting proteins, its NTD was used in the RTA (repressed transactivator) system, which is specifically designed for transactivator bait proteins and was shown to be suitable for two-hybrid analysis with the AR NTD. DDC (L-dopa decarboxylase) was detected multiple times as a novel AR-interacting protein, which was subsequently confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, transient transfection of DDC in prostate cancer cells strongly enhanced ligand-dependent AR transcriptional activity, an effect that was antagonized using high concentrations of the anti-androgen bicalutamide. Glucocorticoid receptor activity was also strongly enhanced with DDC co-transfection, while oestrogen receptor activity was only mildly affected. Together, our data demonstrate that DDC interacts with AR to enhance steroid receptor transactivation, which may have important implications in prostate cancer progression. PMID:12864730

  7. Antineoplastic effects of rosiglitazone and PPARγ transactivation in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cellai, I; Benvenuti, S; Luciani, P; Galli, A; Ceni, E; Simi, L; Baglioni, S; Muratori, M; Ottanelli, B; Serio, M; Thiele, C J; Peri, A

    2006-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumour in infants. Unfortunately, most children present with advanced disease and have a poor prognosis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist rosiglitazone (RGZ) in two NB cell lines (SK-N-AS and SH-SY5Y), which express PPARγ. Rosiglitazone decreased cell proliferation and viability to a greater extent in SK-N-AS than in SH-SY5Y. Furthermore, 20 μM RGZ significantly inhibited cell adhesion, invasiveness and apoptosis in SK-N-AS, but not in SH-SY5Y. Because of the different response of SK-N-AS and SH-SY5Y cells to RGZ, the function of PPARγ as a transcriptional activator was assessed. Noticeably, transient transcription experiments with a PPARγ responsive element showed that RGZ induced a three-fold increase of the reporter activity in SK-N-AS, whereas no effect was observed in SH-SY5Y. The different PPARγ activity may be likely due to the markedly lower amount of phopshorylated (i.e. inactive) protein observed in SK-N-AS. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that the differential response of NB cells to RGZ may be related to differences in PPARγ transactivation. This finding indicates that PPARγ activity may be useful to select those patients, for whom PPARγ agonists may have a beneficial therapeutic effect. PMID:16969347

  8. PU.1 induces apoptosis in myeloma cells through direct transactivation of TRAIL

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, S; Tatetsu, H; Hata, H; Iino, T; Niiro, H; Akashi, K; Tenen, DG.; Mitsuya, H; Okuno, Y

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that PU.1 was down-regulated in myeloma cell lines and myeloma cells in a subset of myeloma patients, and that conditional PU.1 expression in PU.1-negative myeloma cell lines, U266 and KMS12PE, induced growth arrest and apoptosis. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the growth arrest and apoptosis, we performed DNA microarray analyses to compare the difference in gene expression before and after PU.1 induction in U266 cells. Among cell cycle-related genes, cyclin A2, cyclin B1, CDK2 and CDK4 were down-regulated and p21 was up-regulated, while among apoptosis-related genes, TRAIL was found highly up-regulated. When TRAIL was knocked down by siRNAs, apoptosis of PU-1-expressing cells was inhibited, suggesting that TRAIL plays a critical role in PU.1-induced apoptosis in both U266 and KMS12PE myeloma cells. In both U266 and KMS12PE cells expressing PU.1, PU.1 directly bound to a region 30 bp downstream of the transcription start site of the TRAIL gene. Up-regulation of PU.1 induced transactivation of the TRAIL promoter in reporter assays, and disruption of the PU.1-binding site in the TRAIL promoter eliminated this transactivation. Therefore, we conclude that PU.1 is capable of inducing apoptosis in certain myeloma cells by direct transactivation of TRAIL. PMID:19749795

  9. Sulf1 has ligand-dependent effects on canonical and non-canonical Wnt signalling

    PubMed Central

    Fellgett, Simon W.; Maguire, Richard J.; Pownall, Mary Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Wnt signalling plays essential roles during embryonic development and is known to be mis-regulated in human disease. There are many molecular mechanisms that ensure tight regulation of Wnt activity. One such regulator is the heparan-sulfate-specific 6-O-endosulfatase Sulf1. Sulf1 acts extracellularly to modify the structure of heparan sulfate chains to affect the bio-availability of Wnt ligands. Sulf1 could, therefore, influence the formation of Wnt signalling complexes to modulate the activation of both canonical and non-canonical pathways. In this study, we use well-established assays in Xenopus to investigate the ability of Sulf1 to modify canonical and non-canonical Wnt signalling. In addition, we model the ability of Sulf1 to influence morphogen gradients using fluorescently tagged Wnt ligands in ectodermal explants. We show that Sulf1 overexpression has ligand-specific effects on Wnt signalling: it affects membrane accumulation and extracellular levels of tagged Wnt8a and Wnt11b ligands differently, and inhibits the activity of canonical Wnt8a but enhances the activity of non-canonical Wnt11b. PMID:25681501

  10. Transmembrane signal transduction in bacterial chemotaxis involves ligand-dependent activation of phosphate group transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Borkovich, K A; Kaplan, N; Hess, J F; Simon, M I

    1989-01-01

    Signal transduction in Escherichia coli involves the interaction of transmembrane receptor proteins such as the aspartate receptor, Tar, and the products of four chemotaxis genes, cheA, cheY, cheW, and cheZ. It was previously shown that the cheA gene product is an autophosphorylating protein kinase that transfers phosphate to CheY, whereas the cheZ gene product acts as a specific CheY phosphatase. Here we report that the system can be reconstituted in vitro and receptor function can be coupled to CheY phosphorylation. Coupling requires the presence of the CheW protein, the appropriate form of the receptor, and the CheA and CheY proteins. Under these conditions the accumulation of CheY-phosphate is enhanced approximately 300-fold. This rate enhancement is seen in reactions using wild-type and "tumble" mutant receptors but not "smooth" mutant receptors. The increased accumulation of phosphoprotein was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of aspartate, using wild-type, but not tumble, receptors. These results provide evidence that the signal transduction pathway in bacterial chemotaxis involves receptor-mediated alteration of the levels of phosphorylated proteins. They suggest that CheW acts as the coupling factor between receptor and phosphorylation. The results also support the suggestion that CheY-phosphate is the tumble signal. Images PMID:2645576

  11. Replication-dependent transactivation of the polyomavirus late promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, K B; Roome, A J; Carmichael, G G

    1990-01-01

    When a plasmid containing the wild-type polyomavirus intergenic regulatory region fused to the bacterial cat gene was introduced into mouse NIH 3T3 cells along with a plasmid coding for the early viral proteins (T antigens), chloramphenicol transacetylase enzyme activity and mRNA levels were increased about 10-fold over levels observed in the absence of early proteins. To investigate this transactivation phenomenon further, 11 specific deletion mutant derivatives of the wild-type parent plasmid were constructed and studied. One mutant (NAL) with a minimal level of chloramphenicol transacetylase expression in the absence of T antigens was capable of being transactivated more than 40-fold. A number of other mutants, however, had little capacity for transactivation. Each of these mutants had in common a defect in large T-antigen-mediated DNA replication. Interestingly, one of the transactivation-defective mutants showed a basal late promoter activity fivefold higher than that of wild type and replicated in mouse cells in the absence of large T antigen. Subsequently, a small deletion abolishing viral DNA replication was introduced into those mutants capable of transactivation. The effect of the second deletion was to eliminate both replication and transactivation. Finally, wild-type and mutant constructs were transfected into Fisher rat F-111 cells in the presence or absence of early proteins. No transactivation or replication was ever observed in these cells. We concluded from these studies that the observed transactivation of the polyomavirus late promoter by one or more of the viral early proteins was due to either higher template concentration resulting from DNA replication or replication-associated changes in template conformation. Images PMID:2154625

  12. ADAM-mediated amphiregulin shedding and EGFR transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kasina, S.; Scherle, P. A.; Hall, C. L.; Macoska, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The ectodomain shedding of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands, such as amphiregulin (AREG), by ADAMs (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteases) can be stimulated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists. Interactions between the CXCR4 GPCR and the CXCL12 chemokine have been shown to mediate gene transcription and cellular proliferation in non-transformed and transformed prostate epithelial cells, as well as motility/invasiveness in transformed cells. Objectives In this report, we investigated the ability of CXCL12 to stimulate amphiregulin ectodomain shedding in non-transformed and transformed prostate epithelial cells that respond proliferatively to sub-nanomolar levels of CXCL12 and amphiregulin. Materials and Methods Non-transformed N15C6 and transformed PC3 prostate epithelial cells were assessed for amphiregulin shedding, ADAM activation, Src phosphorylation and EGFR activation using ELISA, immunoblot, and immunoprecipitation techniques, and for proliferation using cell counting after stimulation with CXCL12 or vehicle. Results The results of these studies identify CXCL12 as a novel inducer of amphiregulin ectodomain shedding and show that both basal and CXCL12-mediated amphiregulin shedding are ADAM10- and Src kinase-dependent in non-transformed N15C6 cells. In contrast, amphiregulin shedding is not amplified subsequent to stimulation with exogenous CXCL12, and is not reduced subsequent to metalloprotease- or Src kinase-inhibition, in highly aggressive PC3 prostate cancer cells. These data also show that CXCL12-mediated cellular proliferation requires EGFR transactivation in a Src-and ADAM-dependent manner in non-transformed prostate epithelial cells. However, these same mechanisms are dysfunctional in highly transformed prostate cancer cells, which secrete amphiregulin in an autocrine manner that cannot be repressed through metalloprotease- or Src kinase inhibition. Conclusion These findings show that non-transformed and transformed

  13. NUCLEOPHOSMIN/B23 NEGATIVELY REGULATES GCN5-DEPENDENT HISTONE ACETYLATION AND TRANSACTIVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yonglong; Wu, Jun; Giannone, Richard J; Boucher, Lorrie; Du, Hansen; Huang, Ying; Johnson, Dabney K; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2007-01-01

    Nucleophosmin/B23 is a multifunctional phosphoprotein that is overexpressed in cancer cells and has been shown to be involved in both positive and negative regulation of transcription. In this study, we first identified GCN5 acetyltransferase as a B23-interacting protein by mass spectrometry, which was then confirmed by in vivo co-immunoprecipitation. In vitro assay demonstrated that B23 bound the PCAF-N domain of GCN5 and inhibited GCN5-mediated acetylation of both free and mononucleosomal histones, probably through interfering with GCN5 and masking histones from being acetylated. Mitotic B23 exhibited higher inhibitory activity on GCN5-mediated histone acetylation than interphase B23. Immunodepletion experiments of mitotic extracts revealed that phosphorylation of B23 at Thr199 enhanced the inhibition of GCN5-mediated histone acetylation. Moreover, luciferase reporter and microarray analyses suggested that B23 attenuated GCN5-mediated transactivation in vivo. Taken together, our studies suggest a molecular mechanism of B23 in the mitotic inhibition of GCN5-mediated histone acetylation and transactivation.

  14. Identification of diverse microbial metabolites as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 Tat transactivation.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Zink, Deborah L; Polishook, Jon D; Bills, Gerald F; Dombrowski, Anne W; Genilloud, Olga; Pelaez, Fernando F; Herranz, Lucia; Quamina, Donette; Lingham, Russell B; Danzeizen, Renee; Graham, Pia L; Tomassini, Joanne E; Singh, Sheo B

    2005-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is one of six regulatory proteins that are required for viral replication and is an attractive target for the development of new anti-HIV agents. Screening of microbial extracts using a whole cell Tat-dependent transactivation assay, which guided the separation of the active broths, led to the identification of five structurally diverse classes (M(R) range 232-1126) of natural products. These include i) three sesquiterpenoids, namely, sporogen-AO1, petasol, and 6-dehydropetasol, ii) two resorcylic 14-membered lactones, namely monorden and monocillin IV, iii) a ten-membered lactone, iv) a quinoline and quinoxiline bicyclic octadepsipeptides, namely echinomycin and UK-63598, and v) a cyclic heptapeptide, ternatin. These compounds displayed varying degrees of potencies with IC50 values ranging from 0.0002 to 100 microM. The most active compound was the quinoxiline bicyclic octadepsipeptides, UK-63598, which inhibited Tat-dependent transactivation with an IC50 value of 0.2 nM and exhibited a 100-fold therapeutic window with respect to toxicity. In a single-cycle antiviral assay, UK-6358 inhibited viral replication with an IC50 value of 0.5 nM; however, it appeared to be equally toxic at that concentration. Monocillin IV was significantly less active (Tat transactivation inhibitory IC50 of 5 microM) but was not toxic at 100 microM in an equivalent cytotoxicity assay. The compound exhibited antiviral activity with an IC50 value of 6.2 microM in the single-cycle antiviral assay and a sixfold therapeutic window. Details of the isolation, fermentation, and biological activities of these structurally diverse natural products are described. PMID:17191924

  15. TGF{beta} induces proHB-EGF shedding and EGFR transactivation through ADAM activation in gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ebi, Masahide; Kataoka, Hiromi; Shimura, Takaya; Kubota, Eiji; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizushima, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Mabuchi, Motoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Joh, Takashi

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} TGF{beta} induces EGFR transactivation through proHB-EGF shedding by activated ADAM members in gastric cancer cells. {yields} TGF{beta} induces nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF cleaved by ADAM members. {yields} TGF{beta} enhances cell growth by EGFR transactivation and HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and ADAM inhibitors block these effects. {yields} Silencing of ADAM17 also blocks EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and cancer cell growth by TGF{beta}. {yields} ADAM17 may play a crucial role in this TGF{beta}-HB-EGF signal transduction. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF{beta}) is known to potently inhibit cell growth. Loss of responsiveness to TGF{beta} inhibition on cell growth is a hallmark of many types of cancer, yet its mechanism is not fully understood. Membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) ectodomain is cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) members and is implicated in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Recently, nuclear translocation of the C-terminal fragment (CTF) of pro-HB-EGF was found to induce cell growth. We investigated the association between TGF{beta} and HB-EGF signal transduction via ADAM activation. Materials and methods: The CCK-8 assay in two gastric cancer cell lines was used to determine the effect for cell growth by TGF{beta}. The effect of two ADAM inhibitors was also evaluated. Induction of EGFR phosphorylation by TGF{beta} was analyzed and the effect of the ADAM inhibitors was also examined. Nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF by shedding through ADAM activated by TGF{beta} was also analyzed. EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation, and cell growth were examined under the condition of ADAM17 knockdown. Result: TGF{beta}-induced EGFR phosphorylation of which ADAM inhibitors were able to inhibit. TGF{beta} induced shedding of proHB-EGF allowing HB-EGF-CTF to

  16. Gli2 protein expression level is a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Sasajima, J; Mizukami, Y; Koizumi, K; Kawamoto, T; Ono, Y; Karasaki, H; Tanabe, H; Fujiya, M; Kohgo, Y

    2016-06-01

    The hedgehog pathway is known to promote proliferation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and has been shown to restrain tumor progression. To understand how hedgehog causes these effects, we sought to carefully examine protein expression of hedgehog signaling components during different tumor stages. Genetically engineered mice, Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+, were utilized to model distinct phases of tumorigenesis, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN) and PDA. Human pancreatic specimens of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and PDA were also employed. PanIN and IPMN lesions highly express Sonic Hedgehog, at a level that is slightly higher than that observed in PDA. GLI2 protein is also expressed in both PanIN/IPMN and PDA. Although there was no difference in the nuclear staining, the cytoplasmic GLI2 level in PDA was modest in comparison to that in PanIN/IPMN. Hedgehog interacting protein was strongly expressed in the precursors, whereas the level in PDA was significantly attenuated. There were no differences in expression of Patched1 at early and late stages. Finally, a strong correlation between Sonic Hedgehog and GLI2 staining was found in both human and murine pancreatic tumors. The results indicate that the GLI2 protein level could serve as a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:27543868

  17. Suppression of estrogen receptor-alpha transactivation by thyroid transcription factor-2 in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eunsook; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Lee, Keesook

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 was expressed in mammary glands and breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 repressed ER{alpha} transactivation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERs), which mediate estrogen actions, regulate cell growth and differentiation of a variety of normal tissues and hormone-responsive tumors through interaction with cellular factors. In this study, we show that thyroid transcription factor-2 (TTF-2) is expressed in mammary gland and acts as ER{alpha} co-repressor. TTF-2 inhibited ER{alpha} transactivation in a dose-dependent manner in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In addition, TTF-2 directly bound to and formed a complex with ER{alpha}, colocalizing with ER{alpha} in the nucleus. In MCF-7/TTF-2 stable cell lines, TTF-2 repressed the expression of endogenous ER{alpha} target genes such as pS2 and cyclin D1 by interrupting ER{alpha} binding to target promoters and also significantly decreased cell proliferation. Taken together, these data suggest that TTF-2 may modulate the function of ER{alpha} as a corepressor and play a role in ER-dependent proliferation of mammary cells.

  18. MCRS2 represses the transactivation activities of Nrf1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Long; Lin, Young-Sun; Yang, Chi-Chiang; Lin, Yu-Jen; Wu, Shan-Fu; Lin, Ying-Ting; Huang, Chien-Fu

    2009-01-01

    Background Nrf1 [p45 nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (p45 NF-E2)-related factor 1], a member of the CNC-bZIP (CNC basic region leucine zipper) family, is known to be a transcriptional activator by dimerization with distinct partners, such as Maf, FosB, c-Jun, JunD, etc. The transcriptional roles of CNC-bZIP family are demonstrated to be involved in globin gene expression as well as the antioxidant response. For example, CNC-bZIP factors can regulate the expression of detoxification proteins through AREs, such as expression of human gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetases (GCS), glutathione S-transferases (GST), UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UDP-GT), NADP (H) quinone oxidoreductase (NQOs), etc. To further explore other factor(s) in cells related to the function of Nrf1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening assay to identify any Nrf1-interacting proteins. In this study, we isolated a cDNA encoding residues 126–475 of MCRS2 from the HeLa cell cDNA library. Some functions of MCRS1 and its splice variant-MSP58 and MCRS2 have been previously identified, such as transforming, nucleolar sequestration, ribosomal gene regulation, telomerase inhibition activities, etc. Here, we demonstrated MCRS2 can function as a repressor on the Nrf1-mediated transactivation using both in vitro and in vivo systems. Results To find other proteins interacting with the CNC bZIP domain of Nrf1, the CNC-bZIP region of Nrf1 was used as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screening assay. MCRS2, a splicing variant of p78/MCRS1, was isolated as the Nrf1-interacting partner from the screenings. The interaction between Nrf1 and MCRS2 was confirmed in vitro by GST pull-down assays and in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation. Further, the Nrf1-MCRS2 interaction domains were mapped to the residues 354–447 of Nrf1 as well as the residues 314–475 of MCRS2 respectively, by yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down assays. By immunofluorescence, MCRS2-FLAG was shown to colocalize with HA-Nrf1 in the nucleus and didn't result

  19. Nuclear AURKA acquires kinase-independent transactivating function to enhance breast cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Feimeng; Yue, Caifeng; Li, Guohui; He, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Xi; Yan, Min; Long, Zijie; Qiu, Wanshou; Yuan, Zhongyu; Xu, Jie; Liu, Bing; Shi, Qian; Lam, Eric W.-F.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Liu, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Centrosome-localized mitotic Aurora kinase A (AURKA) facilitates G2/M events. Here we show that AURKA translocates to the nucleus and causes distinct oncogenic properties in malignant cells by enhancing breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) phenotype. Unexpectedly, this function is independent of its kinase activity. Instead, AURKA preferentially interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) in the nucleus and acts as a transcription factor in a complex that induces a shift in MYC promoter usage and activates the MYC promoter. Blocking AURKA nuclear localization inhibits this newly discovered transactivating function of AURKA, sensitizing resistant BCSC to kinase inhibition. These findings identify a previously unknown oncogenic property of the spatially deregulated AURKA in tumorigenesis and provide a potential therapeutic opportunity to overcome kinase inhibitor resistance. PMID:26782714

  20. A Functional Selectivity Mechanism at the Serotonin-2A GPCR Involves Ligand-Dependent Conformations of Intracellular Loop 2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With recent progress in determination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure with crystallography, a variety of other experimental approaches (e.g., NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent-based assays, mass spectrometry techniques) are also being used to characterize state-specific and ligand-specific conformational states. MD simulations offer a powerful complementary approach to elucidate the dynamic features associated with ligand-specific GPCR conformations. To shed light on the conformational elements and dynamics of the important aspect of GPCR functional selectivity, we carried out unbiased microsecond-length MD simulations of the human serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) in the absence of ligand and bound to four distinct serotonergic agonists. The 5-HT2AR is a suitable system to study the structural features involved in the ligand-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GPCRs because it is well-characterized experimentally and exhibits a strong agonist-specific phenotype in that some 5-HT2AR agonists induce LSD-like hallucinations, while others lack this psychoactive property entirely. Here we report evidence for structural and dynamic differences in 5-HT2AR interacting with such pharmacologically distinct ligands, hallucinogens, and nonhallucinogens obtained from all-atom MD simulations. Differential ligand binding contacts were identified for structurally similar hallucinogens and nonhallucinogens and found to correspond to different conformations in the intracellular loop 2 (ICL2). From the different ICL2 conformations, functional selective phenotypes are suggested through effects on dimerization and/or distinct direct interaction with effector proteins. The findings are presented in the context of currently proposed hallucinogenesis mechanisms, and ICL2 is proposed as a fine-tuning selective switch that can differentiates modes of 5-HT2AR activation. PMID:25314362

  1. Ligand-Dependent Disorder of Loop Observed in Extended-Spectrum SHV-Type beta-Lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    J Sampson; W Ke; C Bethel; S Pagadala; M Nottingham; R Bonomo; J Buynak; F van den Akker

    2011-12-31

    Among Gram-negative bacteria, resistance to {beta}-lactams is mediated primarily by {beta}-lactamases (EC 3.2.6.5), periplasmic enzymes that inactivate {beta}-lactam antibiotics. Substitutions at critical amino acid positions in the class A {beta}-lactamase families result in enzymes that can hydrolyze extended-spectrum cephalosporins, thus demonstrating an 'extended-spectrum' {beta}-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype. Using SHV ESBLs with substitutions in the {Omega} loop (R164H and R164S) as target enzymes to understand this enhanced biochemical capability and to serve as a basis for novel {beta}-lactamase inhibitor development, we determined the spectra of activity and crystal structures of these variants. We also studied the inactivation of the R164H and R164S mutants with tazobactam and SA2-13, a unique {beta}-lactamase inhibitor that undergoes a distinctive reaction chemistry in the active site. We noted that the reduced K{sub i} values for the R164H and R164S mutants with SA2-13 are comparable to those with tazobactam (submicromolar). The apo enzyme crystal structures of the R164H and R164S SHV variants revealed an ordered {Omega} loop architecture that became disordered when SA2-13 was bound. Important structural alterations that result from the binding of SA2-13 explain the enhanced susceptibility of these ESBL enzymes to this inhibitor and highlight ligand-dependent {Omega} loop flexibility as a mechanism for accommodating and hydrolyzing {beta}-lactam substrates.

  2. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P < 0.05) compared with unliganded conditions. The alterations in cell cycle duration were observed in the S and G2/M phases, whereas the G1 phase was indistinguishable under liganded and unliganded conditions. In addition, ERα knockdown in MCF-7 cells accelerated mitotic exit, whereas transfection of ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with exogenous ERα significantly shortened the S and G2/M phases (by 9.1 hours, P < 0.05) compared with parental cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with antiestrogens revealed that tamoxifen yields a slower cell cycle progression through the S and G2/M phases than fulvestrant does, presumably because of the destabilizing effect of fulvestrant on ERα protein. Together, these results show that ERα modulates breast cancer cell proliferation by regulating events during the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen. PMID:27049344

  3. Dimerization of melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) and MC5R creates a ligand-dependent signal modulation: Potential participation in physiological color change in the flounder.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Hamamoto, Akie; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Saito, Yumiko

    2016-05-01

    Vertebrates produce α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), which contains an N-terminal acetyl group, and desacetyl-α-MSH, which does not contain an N-terminal acetyl group. In teleosts and amphibians, α-MSH-related peptides stimulate pigment dispersion via melanocortin receptors 1-5 (MC1R-MC5R), which are members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. We previously reported an interesting phenomenon associated with physiological color changes in the skin of a flatfish, barfin flounder (bf). Specifically, pigments in xanthophores expressing only the bfMC5R gene were dispersed by both α-MSH and desacetyl-α-MSH, whereas those in melanophores expressing both the bfMC1R and bfMC5R genes were dispersed by desacetyl-α-MSH, but not by α-MSH. In this study, we examined whether heterodimers of bfMC1R and bfMC5R can act as significant inhibitory receptors for the N-terminal acetylation of α-MSH in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells. Immunofluorescence analyses showed that bfMC1R and bfMC5R were localized together at the plasma membrane when expressed in the same cells. Indeed, after coexpression of Flag-bfMC1R and HA-bfMC5R, immunoprecipitation with anti-Flag antibodies resulted in the presence of anti-HA immunoreactivity in the precipitate, and vice versa. Importantly, cyclic AMP assays showed that cotransfection of bfMC1R with bfMC5R inhibited the cyclic AMP accumulation induced by α-MSH to a greater extent than that observed after transfection of bfMC1R alone. Of note, this inhibitory response was not caused by desacetyl-α-MSH. Thus, we show a ligand-dependent signaling through functional heterodimerization of MC1R and MC5R in mammalian cells. The ligand-selective receptor complex also provide the first mechanistic implication that may play a role in the control of color change in teleosts. PMID:27080548

  4. Gastrointestinal hormones stimulate growth of Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors by transactivating the EGF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Di Florio, Alessia; Sancho, Veronica; Moreno, Paola; Fave, Gianfranco Delle; Jensen, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors[NETs] usually pursuit a benign course, but some show aggressive behavior. The treatment of patients with advanced NETs is marginally effective and new approaches are needed. In other tumors, transactivation of the EGF receptor(EGFR) by growth factors, gastrointestinal(GI) hormones and lipids can stimulate growth, which has led to new treatments. Recent studies show a direct correlation between NET malignancy and EGFR expression, EGFR inhibition decreases basal NET growth and an autocrine growth effect exerted by GI hormones, for some NETs. To determine if GI hormones can stimulate NET growth by inducing transactivation of EGFR, we examined the ability of EGF, TGFα and various GI hormones to stimulate growth of the human foregut carcinoid, BON, the somatostatinoma QGP-1 and the rat islet tumor, Rin-14B-cell lines. The EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, AG1478 strongly inhibited EGF and the GI hormones stimulated cell growth, both in BON and QGP-1 cells. In all the three neuroendocrine cell lines studied, we found EGF, TGFα and the other growth-stimulating GI hormones increased Tyr1068 EGFR phosphorylation. In BON cells, both the GI hormones neurotensin and a bombesin analogue caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in EGFR phosphorylation, which was strongly inhibited by AG1478. Moreover, we found this stimulated phosphorylation was dependent on Src kinases, PKCs, matrix metalloproteinase activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. These results raise the possibility that disruption of this signaling cascade by either EGFR inhibition alone or combined with receptor antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of foregut NETs/PETs. PMID:23220008

  5. Identification of nuclear localization, DNA binding, and transactivating mechanisms of Kruppel-like zinc finger protein Gli-similar 2 (Glis2).

    PubMed

    Vasanth, Shivakumar; ZeRuth, Gary; Kang, Hong Soon; Jetten, Anton M

    2011-02-11

    Gli-similar 1-3 (Glis1-3) constitute a subfamily of Krüppel-like zinc finger (ZF) transcription factors that are closely related to the Gli protein family. Mutations in GLIS2 are linked to nephronophthisis, a chronic kidney disease characterized by renal fibrosis and atrophy in children and young adults. Currently, very little information exists about the mechanism of action of Glis2, its target genes, or the signaling pathways that regulate its activity. In this study, we show that a region within ZF3 is required for the nuclear localization of Glis2. Analysis of Glis2 DNA binding demonstrated that Glis2 binds effectively to the consensus Glis binding sequence (GlisBS) (G/C)TGGGGGGT(A/C). Although Glis2 was unable to induce transactivation of a GlisBS-dependent reporter, it effectively inhibited the GlisBS-mediated transactivation by Gli1. Mutations that disrupt the tetrahedral configuration of each ZF within Glis2 abolished Glis2 binding to GlisBS and also abrogated its inhibition of Gli1-mediated transactivation. In contrast, Glis2 was able to activate the murine insulin-2 (Ins2) promoter by binding directly to two GlisBS elements located at -263 and -99 within the Ins2 promoter. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser(245) inhibited the binding of Glis2 to GlisBS and dramatically affected its transactivation of the Ins2 promoter and its ability to inhibit GlisBS-dependent transactivation by Gli1. In this study, we demonstrate that Glis2 can function as a transcriptional activator and that post-translational modification within its DNA-binding domain can regulate its transcriptional activity. This control may play a critical role in the Glis2-dependent regulation of target genes and renal function. PMID:21127075

  6. H3K27 demethylation by JMJD3 at a poised enhancer of anti-apoptotic gene BCL2 determines ERα ligand dependency

    PubMed Central

    Svotelis, Amy; Bianco, Stéphanie; Madore, Jason; Huppé, Gabrielle; Nordell-Markovits, Alexei; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Gévry, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin represents a repressive barrier to the process of ligand-dependent transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors. Here, we show that H3K27 methylation imposes ligand-dependent regulation of the oestrogen receptor α (ERα)-dependent apoptotic response via Bcl-2 in breast cancer cells. The activation of BCL2 transcription is dependent on the simultaneous inactivation of the H3K27 methyltransferase, EZH2, and the demethylation of H3K27 at a poised enhancer by the ERα-dependent recruitment of JMJD3 in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells. We also provide evidence that this pathway is modified in cells resistant to anti-oestrogen (AE), which constitutively express BCL2. We show that the lack of H3K27 methylation at BCL2 regulatory elements due to the inactivation of EZH2 by the HER2 pathway leads to this constitutive activation of BCL2 in these AE-resistant cells. Our results describe a mechanism in which the epigenetic state of chromatin affects ligand dependency during ERα-regulated gene expression. PMID:21841772

  7. Functional role of p35srj, a novel p300/CBP binding protein, during transactivation by HIF-1

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Michels, Catherine L.; Leung, Man-Kit; Arany, Zoltàn P.; Kung, Andrew L.; Livingston, David M.

    1999-01-01

    Recruitment of p300/CBP by the hypoxia-inducible factor, HIF-1, is essential for the transcriptional response to hypoxia and requires an interaction between the p300/CBP CH1 region and HIF-1α. A new p300-CH1 interacting protein, p35srj, has been identified and cloned. p35srj is an alternatively spliced isoform of MRG1, a human protein of unknown function. Virtually all endogenous p35srj is bound to p300/CBP in vivo, and it inhibits HIF-1 transactivation by blocking the HIF-1α/p300 CH1 interaction. p35srj did not affect transactivation by transcription factors that bind p300/CBP outside the CH1 region. Endogenous p35srj is up-regulated markedly by the HIF-1 activators hypoxia or deferoxamine, suggesting that it could operate in a negative-feedback loop. In keeping with this notion, a p300 CH1 mutant domain, defective in HIF-1 but not p35srj binding, enhanced endogenous HIF-1 function. In hypoxic cells, p35srj may regulate HIF-1 transactivation by controlling access of HIF-1α to p300/CBP, and may keep a significant portion of p300/CBP available for interaction with other transcription factors by partially sequestering and functionally compartmentalizing cellular p300/CBP. PMID:9887100

  8. PA1 protein, a new competitive decelerator acting at more than one step to impede glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transactivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Sun, Yunguang; Cho, Young-Wook; Chow, Carson C; Simons, S Stoney

    2013-01-01

    Numerous cofactors modulate the gene regulatory activity of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) by affecting one or more of the following three major transcriptional properties: the maximal activity of agonists (A(max)), the potency of agonists (EC(50)), and the partial agonist activity of antisteroids (PAA). Here, we report that the recently described nuclear protein, Pax2 transactivation domain interaction protein (PTIP)-associated protein 1 (PA1), is a new inhibitor of GR transactivation. PA1 suppresses A(max), increases the EC(50), and reduces the PAA of an exogenous reporter gene in a manner that is independent of associated PTIP. PA1 is fully active with, and strongly binds to, the C-terminal half of GR. PA1 reverses the effects of the coactivator TIF2 on GR-mediated gene induction but is unable to augment the actions of the corepressor SMRT. Analysis of competition assays between PA1 and TIF2 with an exogenous reporter indicates that the kinetic definition of PA1 action is a competitive decelerator at two sites upstream from where TIF2 acts. With the endogenous genes IGFBP1 and IP6K3, PA1 also represses GR induction, increases the EC(50), and decreases the PAA. ChIP and re-ChIP experiments indicate that PA1 accomplishes this inhibition of the two genes via different mechanisms as follows: PA1 appears to increase GR dissociation from and reduce GR transactivation at the IGFBP1 promoter regions but blocks GR binding to the IP6K3 promoter. We conclude that PA1 is a new competitive decelerator of GR transactivation and can act at more than one molecularly defined step in a manner that depends upon the specific gene. PMID:23161582

  9. Transactivation of programmed ribosomal frameshifting by a viral protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhua; Treffers, Emmely E; Napthine, Sawsan; Tas, Ali; Zhu, Longchao; Sun, Zhi; Bell, Susanne; Mark, Brian L; van Veelen, Peter A; van Hemert, Martijn J; Firth, Andrew E; Brierley, Ian; Snijder, Eric J; Fang, Ying

    2014-05-27

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is a widely used translational mechanism facilitating the expression of two polypeptides from a single mRNA. Commonly, the ribosome interacts with an mRNA secondary structure that promotes -1 frameshifting on a homopolymeric slippery sequence. Recently, we described an unusual -2 frameshifting (-2 PRF) signal directing efficient expression of a transframe protein [nonstructural protein 2TF (nsp2TF)] of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) from an alternative reading frame overlapping the viral replicase gene. Unusually, this arterivirus PRF signal lacks an obvious stimulatory RNA secondary structure, but as confirmed here, can also direct the occurrence of -1 PRF, yielding a third, truncated nsp2 variant named "nsp2N." Remarkably, we now show that both -2 and -1 PRF are transactivated by a protein factor, specifically a PRRSV replicase subunit (nsp1β). Embedded in nsp1β's papain-like autoproteinase domain, we identified a highly conserved, putative RNA-binding motif that is critical for PRF transactivation. The minimal RNA sequence required for PRF was mapped within a 34-nt region that includes the slippery sequence and a downstream conserved CCCANCUCC motif. Interaction of nsp1β with the PRF signal was demonstrated in pull-down assays. These studies demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that a protein can function as a transactivator of ribosomal frameshifting. The newly identified frameshifting determinants provide potential antiviral targets for arterivirus disease control and prevention. Moreover, protein-induced transactivation of frameshifting may be a widely used mechanism, potentially including previously undiscovered viral strategies to regulate viral gene expression and/or modulate host cell translation upon infection. PMID:24825891

  10. Tristetraprolin Represses Estrogen Receptor α Transactivation in Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Tecalco-Cruz, Angeles; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Meneses-Morales, Iván; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) mediates the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) in normal mammary gland, and it is a key participant in breast cancer tumor development. ERα transactivation activity is mediated by the synergistic interaction of two domains designated AF1 and AF2. The function of AF2 is to recruit coactivator and corepressor proteins that allow ERα to oscillate between the roles of transcriptional activator and repressor. In contrast, the mechanism responsible for AF-1 transcriptional activity is not completely understood. In this study, we identified tristetraproline (TTP) as a novel ERα-associated protein. TTP expression in MCF7 cells repressed ERα transactivation and reduced MCF7 cell proliferation and the ability of the cells to form tumors in a mouse model. We show that TTP transcriptional activity is mediated through its recruitment to the promoter region of ERα target genes and its interaction with histone deacetylases, in particular with HDAC1. TTP expression attenuates the coactivating activity of SRC-1, suggesting that exchange between TTP and other coactivators may play an important role in fine-tuning ERα transactivation. These results indicate that TTP acts as a bona fide ERα corepressor and suggest that this protein may be a contributing factor in the development of E2-dependent tumors in breast cancer. PMID:24737323

  11. Interleukin-1 beta transactivates epidermal growth factor receptor via the CXCL1-CXCR2 axis in oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Huei; Syu, Shih-Han; Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Chu, Pei-Yi; Yang, Wen-Chan; Lin, Pinpin; Shieh, Wan-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways and chronic inflammation are common characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Previously, we reported that OSCC cells secrete interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), which promotes the proliferation of the oral premalignant cell line, DOK, and stimulates DOK and OSCC cells to produce the chemokine CXCL1. CXCL1 functions through CXCR2, a G protein-coupled receptor that transactivates EGFR in ovarian and lung cancers. We hypothesized that IL-1β transactivates EGFR through the CXCL1–CXCR2 axis in OSCC. In this study, we demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR is crucial for the IL-1β-mediated proliferation and subsequent bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation of DOK cells because the EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and erlotinib inhibit these abilities in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of IL-1β instantly enhanced CXCL1 expression and secretion (within 15 min) in the DOK and OSCC cell lines. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR was significantly enhanced in DOK (1 h) and OSCC (20 min) cell lines after IL-1β treatment, and both cell lines were inhibited on the addition of an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra). CXCL1 treatment resulted in EGFR phosphorylation, whereas the knockdown of CXCL1 expression by lentivirus-mediated shRNA or the addition of the CXCR2 antagonist SB225002 dramatically reduced IL-1β-mediated EGFR phosphorylation and proliferation of DOK cells. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-1β or CXCL1 markedly inhibited the constitutive or IL-1β-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR in OSCC cells. IL-1β transactivates EGFR through the CXCL1-CXCR2 axis, revealing a novel molecular network in OSCC that is associated with autocrine IL-1β and EGFR signaling. PMID:26462152

  12. Degradation, Promoter Recruitment and Transactivation Mediated by the Extreme N-Terminus of MHC Class II Transactivator CIITA Isoform III

    PubMed Central

    Ethier, Sylvain; Gaudreau, Luc; Steimle, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Multiple relationships between ubiquitin-proteasome mediated protein turnover and transcriptional activation have been well documented, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. One way to induce degradation is via ubiquitination of the N-terminal α-amino group of proteins. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator CIITA is the master regulator of MHC class II gene expression and we found earlier that CIITA is a short-lived protein. Using stable and transient transfections of different CIITA constructs into HEK-293 and HeLa cell lines, we show here that the extreme N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III induces both rapid degradation and transactivation. It is essential that this sequence resides at the N-terminal end of the protein since blocking of the N-terminal end with an epitope-tag stabilizes the protein and reduces transactivation potential. The first ten amino acids of CIITA isoform III act as a portable degron and transactivation sequence when transferred as N-terminal extension to truncated CIITA constructs and are also able to destabilize a heterologous protein. The same is observed with the N-terminal ends of several known N-terminal ubiquitination substrates, such as Id2, Cdt1 and MyoD. Arginine and proline residues within the N-terminal ends contribute to rapid turnover. The N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III is responsible for efficient in vivo recruitment to the HLA-DRA promoter and increased interaction with components of the transcription machinery, such as TBP, p300, p400/Domino, the 19S ATPase S8, and the MHC-II promoter binding complex RFX. These experiments reveal a novel function of free N-terminal ends of proteins in degradation-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:26871568

  13. Degradation, Promoter Recruitment and Transactivation Mediated by the Extreme N-Terminus of MHC Class II Transactivator CIITA Isoform III.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Yves B; Leon Machado, Jorge A; Ethier, Sylvain; Gaudreau, Luc; Steimle, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Multiple relationships between ubiquitin-proteasome mediated protein turnover and transcriptional activation have been well documented, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. One way to induce degradation is via ubiquitination of the N-terminal α-amino group of proteins. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator CIITA is the master regulator of MHC class II gene expression and we found earlier that CIITA is a short-lived protein. Using stable and transient transfections of different CIITA constructs into HEK-293 and HeLa cell lines, we show here that the extreme N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III induces both rapid degradation and transactivation. It is essential that this sequence resides at the N-terminal end of the protein since blocking of the N-terminal end with an epitope-tag stabilizes the protein and reduces transactivation potential. The first ten amino acids of CIITA isoform III act as a portable degron and transactivation sequence when transferred as N-terminal extension to truncated CIITA constructs and are also able to destabilize a heterologous protein. The same is observed with the N-terminal ends of several known N-terminal ubiquitination substrates, such as Id2, Cdt1 and MyoD. Arginine and proline residues within the N-terminal ends contribute to rapid turnover. The N-terminal end of CIITA isoform III is responsible for efficient in vivo recruitment to the HLA-DRA promoter and increased interaction with components of the transcription machinery, such as TBP, p300, p400/Domino, the 19S ATPase S8, and the MHC-II promoter binding complex RFX. These experiments reveal a novel function of free N-terminal ends of proteins in degradation-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:26871568

  14. Structural and Functional Analysis of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3: Localization of the Transactivation and Autoinhibitory Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rongtuan; Mamane, Yael; Hiscott, John

    1999-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) gene encodes a 55-kDa protein which is expressed constitutively in all tissues. In unstimulated cells, IRF-3 is present in an inactive cytoplasmic form; following Sendai virus infection, IRF-3 is posttranslationally modified by protein phosphorylation at multiple serine and threonine residues located in the carboxy terminus. Virus-induced phosphorylation of IRF-3 leads to cytoplasmic to nuclear translocation of phosphorylated IRF-3, association with the transcriptional coactivator CBP/p300, and stimulation of DNA binding and transcriptional activities of virus-inducible genes. Using yeast and mammalian one-hybrid analysis, we now demonstrate that an extended, atypical transactivation domain is located in the C terminus of IRF-3 between amino acids (aa) 134 and 394. We also show that the C-terminal domain of IRF-3 located between aa 380 and 427 participates in the autoinhibition of IRF-3 activity via an intramolecular association with the N-terminal region between aa 98 and 240. After Sendai virus infection, an intermolecular association between IRF-3 proteins is detected, demonstrating a virus-dependent formation of IRF-3 homodimers; this interaction is also observed in the absence of virus infection with a constitutively activated form of IRF-3. Substitution of the C-terminal Ser-Thr phosphorylation sites with the phosphomimetic Asp in the region ISNSHPLSLTSDQ between amino acids 395 and 407 [IRF-3(5D)], but not the adjacent S385 and S386 residues, generates a constitutively activated DNA binding form of IRF-3. In contrast, substitution of S385 and S386 with either Ala or Asp inhibits both DNA binding and transactivation activities of the IRF-3(5D) protein. These studies thus define the transactivation domain of IRF-3, two domains that participate in the autoinhibition of IRF-3 activity, and the regulatory phosphorylation sites controlling IRF-3 dimer formation, DNA binding activity, and association with the CBP/p300

  15. A new Epstein-Barr virus transactivator, R, induces expression of a cytoplasmic early antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, J M; Lieberman, P M; Hayward, S D

    1988-01-01

    Several Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) early promoters respond to a new EBV transactivator encoded by BRLF1, designated R. Transactivation was measured in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays on Raji, BHK, and Vero cells that were cotransfected with the transactivator and target promoters linked to the cat gene. The divergent promoter of BamHI-H was particularly responsive to R transactivation. This large promoter region consists of a leftward TATA box for the NotI repeat gene (BHLF1) and a probable rightward TATA box for the EA-R gene (BHRF1) separated by 940 base pairs of unusual sequence complexity. Sequences within this divergent promoter region appear to confer inducibility by EBV transactivators R and Z (BZLF1). The Z transactivator stimulated expression in both the leftward and rightward directions, and R stimulated expression primarily in the rightward direction, but the MS transactivator (BMLF1) had no activity in either direction. The adenovirus E3 promoter also responded to the R transactivator, but several other herpesvirus and human promoters were nonresponsive. When the divergent promoter was linked to the EA-R gene as it is in the EBV genome, the R and Z transactivators also induced the expression of EA-R in cotransfected cells. This cytoplasmic early antigen is encoded by BHRF1 and may be anchored in intracellular membranes by a carboxy-terminal transmembrane region. Images PMID:2836611

  16. Role of EGFR transactivation in angiotensin II signaling to extracellular regulated kinase in preglomerular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Bradley T; Linnoila, Jenny J; Jackson, Edwin K; Romero, Guillermo G

    2003-03-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II promotes the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK); however, the mechanisms leading to Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation are debated. The currently accepted theory involves transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We have shown that generation of phosphatidic acid (PA) is required for the recruitment of Raf to membranes and the activation of ERK by multiple agonists, including Ang II. In the present report, we confirm that phospholipase D-dependent generation of PA is required for Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat preglomerular smooth muscle cells (PGSMCs). However, EGF stimulation does not activate phospholipase D or generate PA. These observations indicate that EGF recruits Raf to membranes via a mechanism that does not involve PA, and thus, Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK is partially independent of EGFR-mediated signaling cascades. We hypothesized that phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) can also act to recruit Raf to membranes; therefore, inhibition of PI3K should inhibit EGF signaling to ERK. Wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, inhibited EGF-mediated phosphorylation of ERK (IC50, approximately 14 nmol/L). To examine the role of the EGFR in Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK we utilized 100 nmol/L wortmannin to inhibit EGFR signaling to ERK and T19N RhoA to block Ang II-mediated ERK phosphorylation. Wortmannin treatment inhibited EGF-mediated but not Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK. Furthermore, T19N RhoA inhibited Ang II-mediated ERK phosphorylation, whereas T19N RhoA had significantly less effect on EGF-mediated ERK phosphorylation. We conclude that transactivation of the EGFR is not primarily responsible for Ang II-mediated activation of ERK in PGSMCs. PMID:12623996

  17. Stromelysin-3 induction and interstitial collagenase repression by retinoic acid. Therapeutical implication of receptor-selective retinoids dissociating transactivation and AP-1-mediated transrepression.

    PubMed

    Guérin, E; Ludwig, M G; Basset, P; Anglard, P

    1997-04-25

    Human stromelysin-3 and interstitial collagenase are matrix metalloproteinases whose expression by stromal cells in several types of carcinomas has been associated with cancer progression. We compared here the regulation of the expression of both proteinases by retinoids in human fibroblasts. Physiological concentrations of retinoic acid were found to simultaneously induce stromelysin-3 and repress interstitial collagenase. In both cases, the involvement of a transcriptional mechanism was supported by run-on assays. Furthermore, in transient transfection experiments, the activity of the stromelysin-3 promoter was induced by retinoic acid through endogenous receptors acting on a DR1 retinoic acid-responsive element. The ligand-dependent activation of the receptors was also investigated by using selective synthetic retinoids, and we demonstrated that retinoic acid-retinoid X receptor heterodimers were the most potent functional units controlling both stromelysin-3 induction and interstitial collagenase repression. However, specific retinoids dissociating the transactivation and the AP-1-mediated transrepression functions of the receptors were found to repress interstitial collagenase without inducing stromelysin-3. These findings indicate that such retinoids may represent efficient inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase expression in the treatment of human carcinomas. PMID:9111003

  18. Dual effects of daidzein on chicken hepatic vitellogenin II expression and estrogen receptor-mediated transactivation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ying-Dong; Hong, Wen-Jie; Zhou, Yu-Chuan; Grossmann, Roland; Zhao, Ru-Qian

    2010-03-01

    Two in vitro systems were employed to delineate the estrogenic activity of daidzein (Da), alone or in combination with high or low concentrations of estrogen in two cell types possessing different estrogen-receptor (ER) isoforms, ERalpha and/or ERbeta: (1) vitellogenin II (VTG), the egg yolk precursor protein and the endpoint biomarker for estrogenicity, in chicken primary hepatocytes, and (2) CHO-K1 cells transiently co-transfected with ERalpha or ERbeta and estrogen-response elements (ERE) linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Da (100 microM) alone induced VTG mRNA expression in chicken hepatocytes, albeit with much less potency compared to estradiol (E(2)). Da exhibited different effects in the presence of 1 microM and 10 microM E(2). At a concentration of 100 microM, Da enhanced 1 microM E(2)-induced VTG transcription by 2.4-fold, but significantly inhibited 10 microM E(2)-induced VTG mRNA expression in a dose-dependent fashion from 1 to 100 microM. Tamoxifen completely blocked the estrogenic effect of daidzein, alone or in combination with 1 microM of E(2), but did not influence its anti-estrogenic effect on 10 microM E(2)-induced VTG mRNA expression. Furthermore, neither E(2) nor daidzein, alone or in combination, affected ERalpha mRNA expression, yet all the treatments significantly up-regulated ERbeta mRNA expression in chicken hepatocytes. E(2) effectively triggered estrogen-response elements (ERE)-driven reporter gene transactivation in CHO-K1 cells expressing ERalpha or ERbeta and showed much greater potency with ERalpha than with ERbeta. In contrast, daidzein was 1000 times more powerful in stimulating ERbeta- over ERalpha-mediated transactivation. Daidzein, in concentrations ranging from 5 nM to 50 microM, did not affect ERbeta-mediated transactivation induced by 1 nM E(2), but it significantly inhibited ERbeta-mediated transactivation induced by 10 nM E(2) at 500 nM. Despite the tremendous difference in sensitivity between the two in vitro systems

  19. Notch Ankyrin Repeat Domain Variation Influences Leukemogenesis and Myc Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Aster, Jon C.; Bodnar, Nick; Xu, Lanwei; Karnell, Fredrick; Milholland, John M.; Maillard, Ivan; Histen, Gavin; Nam, Yunsun; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Pear, Warren S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The functional interchangeability of mammalian Notch receptors (Notch1-4) in normal and pathophysiologic contexts such as cancer is unsettled. We used complementary in vivo, cell-based and structural analyses to compare the abilities of activated Notch1-4 to support T cell development, induce T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL), and maintain T-ALL cell growth and survival. Principal Findings We find that the activated intracellular domains of Notch1-4 (ICN1-4) all support T cell development in mice and thymic organ culture. However, unlike ICN1-3, ICN4 fails to induce T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) and is unable to rescue the growth of Notch1-dependent T-ALL cell lines. The ICN4 phenotype is mimicked by weak gain-of-function forms of Notch1, suggesting that it stems from a failure to transactivate one or more critical target genes above a necessary threshold. Experiments with chimeric receptors demonstrate that the Notch ankyrin repeat domains differ in their leukemogenic potential, and that this difference correlates with activation of Myc, a direct Notch target that has an important role in Notch-associated T-ALL. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the leukemogenic potentials of Notch receptors vary, and that this functional difference stems in part from divergence among the highly conserved ankyrin repeats, which influence the transactivation of specific target genes involved in leukemogenesis. PMID:22022427

  20. β-Adrenergic Receptor-Mediated Transactivation Of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Decreases Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis Through Differential Subcellular Activation of ERK1/2 and Akt

    PubMed Central

    Grisanti, Laurel A.; Talarico, Jennifer A.; Carter, Rhonda L.; Yu, Justine E.; Repas, Ashley A.; Radcliffe, Scott W.; Tang, Hoang-ai; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Houser, Steven R.; Tilley, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale β-adrenergic receptor (βAR)-mediated transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to relay pro-survival effects via unknown mechanisms. Objective We hypothesized that acute βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation in the heart promotes differential subcellular activation of ERK1/2 and Akt, promoting cell survival through modulation of apoptosis. Methods and Results C57BL/6 mice underwent acute i.p. injection with isoproterenol (ISO) ± AG 1478 (EGFR antagonist) to assess the impact of βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation on phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (P-ERK1/2) and Akt (P-Akt) in distinct cardiac subcellular fractions. Increased P-ERK1/2 and P-Akt were observed in cytosolic, plasma membrane and nuclear fractions following ISO stimulation. Whereas the P-ERK1/2 response was EGFR-sensitive in all fractions, the P-Akt response was EGFR-sensitive only in the plasma membrane and nucleus, results confirmed in primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (RNCM). βAR-mediated EGFR-transactivation also decreased apoptosis in serum-depleted RNCM, as measured via TUNEL as well as caspase 3 activity/cleavage, which were sensitive to inhibition of either ERK1/2 (PD184352) or Akt (LY-294002) signaling. Caspase 3 activity/cleavage was also sensitive to inhibition of transcription, which, with an increase in nuclear P-ERK1/2 and P-Akt in response to ISO, suggested that βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation may regulate apoptotic gene transcription. An Apoptosis PCR Array identified tnfsf10 (TRAIL) to be altered by ISO in an EGFR-sensitive manner, results confirmed via RT-PCR and ELISA measurement of both membrane-bound and soluble cardiomyocyte TRAIL levels. Conclusions βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation induces differential subcellular activation of ERK1/2 and Akt leading to increased cell survival through the modulation of caspase 3 activity and apoptotic gene expression in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24566221

  1. Positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 silences class II transactivator expression in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, N; Gyory, I; Wright, G; Wood, J; Wright, K L

    2001-05-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA) acts as a master switch to activate expression of the genes required for MHC-II antigen presentation. During B-cell to plasma cell differentiation, MHC-II expression is actively silenced, but the mechanism has been unknown. In plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma the repression of MHC-II is associated with the loss of CIITA. We have identified that positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), a transcriptional repressor, inhibits CIITA expression in multiple myeloma cell lines. Repression of CIITA depends on the DNA binding activity of PRDI-BF1 and its specific binding site in the CIITA promoter. Deletion of a histone deacetylase recruitment domain in PRDI-BF1 does not inhibit repression of CIITA nor does blocking histone deacetylase activity. This is in contrast to PRDI-BF1 repression of the c-myc promoter. Repression of CIITA requires either the N-terminal acidic and conserved PR motif or the proline-rich domain. PRDI-BF1 has been shown to be a key regulator of B-cell and macrophage differentiation. These findings now indicate that PRDI-BF1 has at least two mechanisms of repression whose function is dependent on the nature of the target promoter. Importantly, PRDI-BF1 is defined as the key molecule in silencing CIITA and thus MHC-II in multiple myeloma cells. PMID:11279146

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2 regulates the class II transactivator.

    PubMed

    Voong, Lilien N; Slater, Allison R; Kratovac, Sebila; Cressman, Drew E

    2008-04-01

    The expression of major histocompatibility class II genes is necessary for proper antigen presentation and induction of an immune response. This expression is initiated by the class II transactivator, CIITA. The establishment of the active form of CIITA is controlled by a series of post-translational events, including GTP binding, ubiquitination, and dimerization. However, the role of phosphorylation is less clearly defined as are the consequences of phosphorylation on CIITA activity and the identity of the kinases involved. In this study we show that the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) interact directly with CIITA, targeting serine residues in the amino terminus of the protein, including serine 288. Inhibition of this phosphorylation by dominant-negative forms of ERK or by treatment of cells with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 resulted in the increase in CIITA-mediated gene expression from a class II promoter, enhanced the nuclear concentration of CIITA, and impaired its ability to bind to the nuclear export factor, CRM1. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2 activity had little effect on serine-to-alanine mutant forms of CIITA. These data suggest a model whereby ERK1/2-mediated phosphorylation of CIITA down-regulates CIITA activity by priming it for nuclear export, thus providing a means for cells to tightly regulate the extent of antigen presentation. PMID:18245089

  3. Are all regions of folded proteins that undergo ligand-dependent order-disorder transitions targets for allosteric peptide mimetics?†

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Aron W.

    2013-01-01

    Although the classical view of how proteins function relied on well folded structures, it is now recognized that the function of many proteins is dependent on being intrinsically disordered. The primary consideration in this work is the intermediate group of proteins that are overall well folded, but which contain small regions that undergo order/disorder transitions. In particular, the current focus is on those order/disorder transitions that are energetically coupled to ligand binding. As exemplified by the case of human liver pyruvate kinase (hL-PYK), peptides that mimic the sequence of the order/disorder region can be used as allosteric regulators of the enzyme. Based on this example and others reported in the literature, we propose that a similar use of peptides that mimic protein regions that experience ligand-dependent order-disorder transitions can be a generalized initiation point for the development of allosteric drugs. PMID:23520021

  4. In situ autoradiography and ligand-dependent tyrosine kinase activity reveal insulin receptors and insulin-like growth factor I receptors in prepancreatic chicken embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Girbau, M; Bassas, L; Alemany, J; de Pablo, F

    1989-01-01

    We previously reported specific cross-linking of 125I-labeled insulin and 125I-labeled insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the alpha subunit of their respective receptors in chicken embryos of 20 somites and older. To achieve adequate sensitivity and localize spatially the receptors in younger embryos, we adapted an autoradiographic technique using whole-mounted chicken blastoderms. Insulin receptors and IGF-I receptors were expressed and could be localized as early as gastrulation, before the first somite is formed. Relative density was analyzed by a computer-assisted image system, revealing overall slightly higher binding of IGF-I than of insulin. Structures rich in both types of receptors were predominantly of ectodermal origin: Hensen's node in gastrulating embryos and neural folds, neural tube and optic vesicles during neurulation. The signal transduction capability of the receptors in early organogenesis was assessed by their ability to phosphorylate the exogenous substrate poly(Glu80Tyr20). Ligand-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation was demonstrable with both insulin and IGF-I in glycoprotein-enriched preparations from embryos at days 2 through 6 of embryogenesis. There was a developmentally regulated change in ligand-dependent tyrosine kinase activity, with a sharp increase from day 2 to day 4, in contrast with a small increase in the ligand binding. Binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I was, with the solubilized receptors, severalfold higher than binding of 125I-labeled insulin. However, the insulin-dependent phosphorylation was as high as the IGF-I-dependent phosphorylation at each developmental stage. Images PMID:2548191

  5. The N-terminal part of TIF1, a putative mediator of the ligand-dependent activation function (AF-2) of nuclear receptors, is fused to B-raf in the oncogenic protein T18.

    PubMed Central

    Le Douarin, B; Zechel, C; Garnier, J M; Lutz, Y; Tora, L; Pierrat, P; Heery, D; Gronemeyer, H; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) bound to response elements mediate the effects of cognate ligands on gene expression. Their ligand-dependent activation function, AF-2, presumably acts on the basal transcription machinery through intermediary proteins/mediators. We have isolated a mouse nuclear protein, TIF1, which enhances RXR and RAR AF-2 in yeast and interacts in a ligand-dependent manner with several NRs in yeast and mammalian cells, as well as in vitro. Remarkably, these interactions require the amino acids constituting the AF-2 activating domain conserved in all active NRs. Moreover, the oestrogen receptor (ER) AF-2 antagonist hydroxytamoxifen cannot promote ER-TIF1 interaction. We propose that TIF1, which contains several conserved domains found in transcriptional regulatory proteins, is a mediator of ligand-dependent AF-2. Interestingly, the TIF1 N-terminal moiety is fused to B-raf in the mouse oncoprotein T18. Images PMID:7744009

  6. Acetylation reduces SOX9 nuclear entry and ACAN gene transactivation in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bar Oz, Michal; Kumar, Ashok; Elayyan, Jinan; Reich, Eli; Binyamin, Milana; Kandel, Leonid; Liebergall, Meir; Steinmeyer, Juergen; Lefebvre, Veronique; Dvir-Ginzberg, Mona

    2016-06-01

    Changes in the content of aggrecan, an essential proteoglycan of articular cartilage, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA), a prevalent age-related, degenerative joint disease. Here, we examined the effect of SOX9 acetylation on ACAN transactivation in the context of osteoarthritis. Primary chondrocytes freshly isolated from degenerated OA cartilage displayed lower levels of ACAN mRNA and higher levels of acetylated SOX9 compared with cells from intact regions of OA cartilage. Degenerated OA cartilage presented chondrocyte clusters bearing diffused immunostaining for SOX9 compared with intact cartilage regions. Primary human chondrocytes freshly isolated from OA knee joints were cultured in monolayer or in three-dimensional alginate microbeads (3D). SOX9 was hypo-acetylated in 3D cultures and displayed enhanced binding to a -10 kb ACAN enhancer, a result consistent with higher ACAN mRNA levels than in monolayer cultures. It also co-immunoprecipitated with SIRT1, a major deacetylase responsible for SOX9 deacetylation. Finally, immunofluorescence assays revealed increased nuclear localization of SOX9 in primary chondrocytes treated with the NAD SIRT1 cofactor, than in cells treated with a SIRT1 inhibitor. Inhibition of importin β by importazole maintained SOX9 in the cytoplasm, even in the presence of NAD. Based on these data, we conclude that deacetylation promotes SOX9 nuclear translocation and hence its ability to activate ACAN. PMID:26910618

  7. Global and local perturbation of the tomato microRNA pathway by a trans-activated DICER-LIKE 1 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Arazi, Tzahi

    2014-01-01

    DICER-like 1 (DCL1) is a major player in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and accordingly, its few known loss-of-function mutants are either lethal or display arrested development. Consequently, generation of dcl1 mutants by reverse genetics and functional analysis of DCL1 in late-developing organs are challenging. Here, these challenges were resolved through the unique use of trans-activated RNA interference. Global, as well as organ-specific tomato DCL1 (SlDCL1) silencing was induced by crossing the generated responder line (OP:SlDCL1IR) with the appropriate driver line. Constitutive trans-activation knocked down SlDCL1 levels by ~95%, resulting in severe abnormalities including post-germination growth arrest accompanied by decreased miRNA and 21-nucleotide small RNA levels, but prominently elevated levels of 22-nucleotide small RNAs. The increase in the 22-nucleotide small RNAs was correlated with specific up-regulation of SlDCL2b and SlDCL2d, which are probably involved in their biogenesis. Leaf- and flower-specific OP:SlDCL1IR trans-activation inhibited blade outgrowth, induced premature bud senescence and produced pale petals, respectively, emphasizing the importance of SlDCL1-dependent small RNAs in these processes. Together, these results establish OP:SlDCL1IR as an efficient tool for analysing processes regulated by SlDCL1-mediated gene regulation in tomato. PMID:24376253

  8. The Mediator complex subunit MED25 is targeted by the N-terminal transactivation domain of the PEA3 group members

    PubMed Central

    Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Verreman, Kathye; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; de Launoit, Yvan; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2013-01-01

    PEA3, ERM and ER81 belong to the PEA3 subfamily of Ets transcription factors and play important roles in a number of tissue-specific processes. Transcriptional activation by PEA3 subfamily factors requires their characteristic amino-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD). However, the cellular targets of this domain remain largely unknown. Using ERM as a prototype, we show that the minimal N-terminal TAD activates transcription by contacting the activator interacting domain (ACID)/Prostate tumor overexpressed protein 1 (PTOV) domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. We further show that depletion of MED25 disrupts the association of ERM with the Mediator in vitro. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of MED25 as well as the overexpression of MED25-ACID and MED25-VWA domains efficiently inhibit the transcriptional activity of ERM. Moreover, mutations of amino acid residues that prevent binding of MED25 to ERM strongly reduce transactivation by ERM. Finally we show that siRNA depletion of MED25 diminishes PEA3-driven expression of MMP-1 and Mediator recruitment. In conclusion, this study identifies the PEA3 group members as the first human transcriptional factors that interact with the MED25 ACID/PTOV domain and establishes MED25 as a crucial transducer of their transactivation potential. PMID:23531547

  9. Interactions between the Class II Transactivator and CREB Binding Protein Increase Transcription of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Kanazawa, Satoshi; Jean, Dickson; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (class II) genes are regulated in a B-cell-specific and gamma interferon-inducible fashion. The master switch for the expression of these genes is the class II transactivator (CIITA). In this report, we demonstrate that one of the functions of CIITA is to recruit the CREB binding protein (CBP) to class II promoters. Not only functional but also specific binding interactions between CIITA and CBP were demonstrated. Moreover, a dominant negative form of CBP decreased the activity of class II promoters and levels of class II determinants on the surface of cells. Finally, the inhibition of class II gene expression by the glucocorticoid hormone could be attributed to the squelching of CBP by the glucocorticoid receptor. We conclude that CBP, a histone acetyltransferase, plays an important role in the transcription of class II genes. PMID:9858618

  10. Ligand-dependent responses of the silkworm prothoracicotropic hormone receptor, Torso, are maintained by unusual intermolecular disulfide bridges in the transmembrane region

    PubMed Central

    Konogami, Tadafumi; Yang, Yiwen; Ogihara, Mari H.; Hikiba, Juri; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Saito, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    The insect membrane-protein, Torso, is a member of the receptor-tyrosine-kinase family, and is activated by its ligand, prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH). Although PTTH is one of the most important regulators of insect development, the mechanism of Torso activation by the hormone has remained elusive. In this study, using heterologous expression in cultured Drosophila S2 cells, we detected ligand-independent dimerization of silkworm Torso, and found that the receptor molecules in the dimer were linked by intermolecular disulfide bridges. By examining the oligomerization states of several truncation and substitution mutants of Torso, atypical cysteine residues in the transmembrane region were identified as being responsible for the intermolecular linkage in the dimer. The replacement of all of the cysteines in the region with phenylalanines abolished the disulfide-bond-mediated dimerization; however, non-covalent dimerization of the mutant was detected using a cross-linking reagent, both with and without ligand stimulation. This non-covalent dimerization caused apparent receptor autophosphorylation independently of the ligand stimulation, but did not promote the ERK phosphorylation in the downstream signaling pathway. The unique Torso structure with the intermolecular disulfide bridges in the transmembrane region is necessary to maintain the ligand-dependent receptor functions of autophosphorylation and downstream activation. PMID:26928300

  11. Ligand-dependent corepressor contributes to transcriptional repression by C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor ZBRK1 through association with KRAB-associated protein-1

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Mario R.; Verway, Mark; Benslama, Radia Ouelaa; Birlea, Mirela; Bouttier, Manuella; Dimitrov, Vassil; Mader, Sylvie; White, John H.

    2014-01-01

    We identified a novel interaction between ligand-dependent corepressor (LCoR) and the corepressor KRAB-associated protein-1 (KAP-1). The two form a complex with C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor ZBRK1 on an intronic binding site in the growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible α (GADD45A) gene and a novel site in the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) gene. Chromatin at both sites is enriched for histone methyltransferase SETDB1 and histone 3 lysine 9 trimethylation, a repressive epigenetic mark. Depletion of ZBRK1, KAP-1 or LCoR led to elevated GADD45A and FGF2 expression in malignant and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, and caused apoptotic death. Loss of viability could be rescued by simultaneous knockdowns of FGF2 and transcriptional coregulators or by blocking FGF2 function. FGF2 was not concurrently expressed with any of the transcriptional coregulators in breast malignancies, suggesting an inverse correlation between their expression patterns. We propose that ZBRK1, KAP-1 and LCoR form a transcriptional complex that silences gene expression, in particular FGF2, which maintains breast cell viability. Given the broad expression patterns of both LCoR and KAP-1 during development and in the adult, this complex may have several regulatory functions that extend beyond cell survival, mediated by interactions with ZBRK1 or other C2H2 zinc-finger proteins. PMID:24829459

  12. STAT3-dependent transactivation of miRNA genes following Toxoplasma gondii infection in macrophage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii can infect and replicate in virtually any nucleated cell in many species of warm-blooded animals; T. gondii has elaborate mechanisms to counteract host-cell apoptosis in order to maintain survival and breed in the host cells. Methods Using microarray profiling and a combination of conventional molecular approaches, we investigated the levels of microRNAs (miRNAs ) in human macrophage during T. gondii infection. We used molecular tools to examine Toxoplasma-upregualted miRNAs to revealed potential signal transducers and activators of transcription 3(STAT3) binding sites in the promoter elements of a subset of miRNA genes. We analysed the apoptosis of human macrophage with the functional inhibition of the STAT3-binding miRNAs by flow cytometry. Results Our results demonstrated differential alterations in the mature miRNA expression profile in human macrophage following T. gondii infection. Database analysis of Toxoplasma-upregulated miRNAs revealed potential STAT3 binding sites in the promoter elements of a subset of miRNA genes. We demonstrated that miR-30c-1, miR-125b-2, miR-23b-27b-24-1 and miR-17 ~ 92 cluster genes were transactivated through promoter binding of the STAT3 following T. gondii infection. Importantly, functional inhibition of selected STAT3-binding miRNAs in human macropahges increased apoptosis of host cells. Conclusions A panel of miRNAs is regulated through promoter binding of the STAT3 in human macrophage and these miRNAs are involved in anti-apoptosis in response to T. gondii infection. PMID:24341525

  13. Overexpression of RPS27a contributes to enhanced chemoresistance of CML cells to imatinib by the transactivated STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yi; Yang, Guang; Gao, Minjie; Xu, Hongwei; Zhan, Fenghuang; Shi, Jumei; Zhang, Yiwen; Wu, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    STAT3 plays a pivotal role in the hematopoietic system, which constitutively activated by BCR–ABL via JAK and Erk/MAP-kinase pathways. Phospho-STAT3 was overexpressed in imatinib-resistant CML patients as relative to imatinib responsive ones. By activation of the STAT3 pathway, BCR–ABL can promote cell cycling, and inhibit differentiation and apoptosis. Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) performs extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. RPS27a can promote proliferation, regulate cell cycle progression and inhibit apoptosis of leukemia cells. However, the relationship between STAT3 and RPS27a has not been reported. In this study, we detected a significantly increased expression of STAT3 and RPS27a in bone marrow samples from CML-AP/BP patients compared with those from CML-CP. In addition, we also demonstrated that it was a positive correlation between the level of STAT3 and that of RPS27a. Imatinib-resistant K562/G01 cells expressed significantly higher levels of STAT3 and RPS27a compared with those of K562 cells. RPS27a could be transactivated by p-STAT3 through the specific p-STAT3-binding site located nt −633 to −625 and −486 to −478 of the RPS27a gene promoter in a dose-dependent manner. The transactivated RPS27a could decrease the percentage of apoptotic CML cells induced by imatinib. And the effect of STAT3 overexpression could be counteracted by the p-STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 or RPS27a knockdown. These results suggest that drugs targeting STAT3/p-STAT3/RPS27a combining with TKI might represent a novel therapy strategy in patients with TKI-resistant CML. PMID:26942564

  14. A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation

    PubMed Central

    George, Amee J.; Purdue, Brooke W.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Thomas, Daniel W.; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A.; Morgan, Kylie A.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Thomas, Walter G.; Hannan, Ross D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R–EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R–EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R–EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR–EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

  15. A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation.

    PubMed

    George, Amee J; Purdue, Brooke W; Gould, Cathryn M; Thomas, Daniel W; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A; Morgan, Kylie A; Simpson, Kaylene J; Thomas, Walter G; Hannan, Ross D

    2013-12-01

    The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R-EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R-EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R-EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR-EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

  16. EGFRvIII-mediated transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases in glioma: mechanism and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Greenall, S A; Donoghue, J F; Van Sinderen, M; Dubljevic, V; Budiman, S; Devlin, M; Street, I; Adams, T E; Johns, T G

    2015-10-01

    A truncation mutant of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, is commonly expressed in glioma, an incurable brain cancer. EGFRvIII is tumorigenic, in part, through its transactivation of other receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Preventing the effects of this transactivation could form part of an effective therapy for glioma; however, the mechanism by which the transactivation occurs is unknown. Focusing on the RTK MET, we show that MET transactivation in U87MG human glioma cells in vitro is proportional to EGFRvIII activity and involves MET heterodimerization associated with a focal adhesion kinase (FAK) scaffold. The transactivation of certain other RTKs was, however, independent of FAK. Simultaneously targeting EGFRvIII (with panitumumab) and the transactivated RTKs themselves (with motesanib) in an intracranial mouse model of glioma resulted in significantly greater survival than with either agent alone, indicating that cotargeting these RTKs has potent antitumor efficacy and providing a strategy for treating EGFRvIII-expressing gliomas, which are usually refractory to treatment. PMID:25659577

  17. Pigment-cell-specific genes from fibroblasts are transactivated after chromosomal transfer into melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.P.; Davidson, R.L.; Shows, T.B.

    1994-02-01

    Human and mouse fibroblast chromosomes carrying tyrosinase or b-locus genes were introduced, by microcell hybridization, into pigmented Syrian hamster melanoma cells, and the microcell hybrids were tested for transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. By using species-specific PCR amplification to distinguish fibroblast and melanoma cDNAs, it was demonstrated that the previously silent fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes were transactivated following chromosomal transfer into pigmented melanoma cells. However, transactivation of the mouse fibroblast tyrosinase gene was unstable in microcell hybrid subclones and possibly dependent on a second fibroblast locus that could have segregated in the subclones. This second locus was not necessary for transactivation of the fibroblast b-locus gene, thus demonstrating noncoordinate transactivation of fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. Transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase gene in microcell hybrids apparently is dependent on the absence of a putative fibroblast extinguisher locus for tyrosinase gene expression, which presumably is responsible for the extinction of pigmentation in hybrids between karyotypically complete fibroblasts and melanoma cells. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Cell type-dependent divergence of transactivation by glucocorticoid receptor ligand.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Katsunao; Nagase, Hideki; Miyake, Hidekazu; Kiniwa, Mamoru; Ikizawa, Koichi

    2002-12-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor regulates gene expression mainly by two mechanisms; transactivation and trans-repression. A ligand with strong transrepression and weak transactivation activity is predicted to be a beneficial agent with potent anti-inflammatory activity and minor adverse effects. Recently, the profile of a synthetic steroid, RU24858, has been reported to fulfill this condition in vitro, but others have reported no dissociation between the anti-inflammatory activity and side effects in vivo. To gain further information on the profile of this compound, we evaluated its transactivation ability using a reporter gene analysis both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro analysis, RU24858 demonstrated only a weak transactivation activity in HeLa cells, when compared with prednisolone. In CV-1 cells, however, these two glucocorticoids exhibited equivalent transactivation activities. This behavior is independent of whether the reporter gene is regulated by mouse mammary tumor virus promoter or multiple copies of glucocorticoid response element. When the reporter plasmid was inoculated into mouse abdominal skin using a gene gun, followed by orally administration of glucocorticoids, RU24858 induced significantly higher reporter enzyme activity than prednisolone. These results suggest that the profile of RU24858 is divergent and its transactivation ability is comparable to prednisolone depending on the cell-type both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:12499651

  19. Analysis of Cytochrome P450 CYP119 Ligand-dependent Conformational Dynamics by Two-dimensional NMR and X-ray Crystallography*

    PubMed Central

    Basudhar, Debashree; Madrona, Yarrow; Kandel, Sylvie; Lampe, Jed N.; Nishida, Clinton R.; de Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz

    2015-01-01

    Defining the conformational states of cytochrome P450 active sites is critical for the design of agents that minimize drug-drug interactions, the development of isoform-specific P450 inhibitors, and the engineering of novel oxidative catalysts. We used two-dimensional 1H,15N HSQC chemical shift perturbation mapping of 15N-labeled Phe residues and x-ray crystallography to examine the ligand-dependent conformational dynamics of CYP119. Active site Phe residues were most affected by the binding of azole inhibitors and fatty acid substrates, in agreement with active site localization of the conformational changes. This was supported by crystallography, which revealed movement of the F-G loop with various azoles. Nevertheless, the NMR chemical shift perturbations caused by azoles and substrates were distinguishable. The absence of significant chemical shift perturbations with several azoles revealed binding of ligands to an open conformation similar to that of the ligand-free state. In contrast, 4-phenylimidazole caused pronounced NMR changes involving Phe-87, Phe-144, and Phe-153 that support the closed conformation found in the crystal structure. The same closed conformation is observed by NMR and crystallography with a para-fluoro substituent on the 4-phenylimidazole, but a para-chloro or bromo substituent engendered a second closed conformation. An open conformation is thus favored in solution with many azole ligands, but para-substituted phenylimidazoles give rise to two closed conformations that depend on the size of the para-substituent. The results suggest that ligands selectively stabilize discrete cytochrome P450 conformational states. PMID:25670859

  20. Human rhomboid family-1 gene RHBDF1 participates in GPCR-mediated transactivation of EGFR growth signals in head and neck squamous cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Huafei; Thomas, Sufi M.; Yan, Zhen-Wen; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Vogt, Andreas; Li, Lu-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an activated oncogene in many cancers. It can be transactivated by ligands of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We show here that a novel gene, human rhomboid family-1 (RHBDF1), which was recently reported to have a pivotal role in epithelial cancer cell growth in culture and in xenograft tumors, participates in the modulation of GPCR-mediated EGFR transactivation. The RHBDF1 protein localizes mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum. Silencing the RHBDF1 gene in head and neck squamous cancer cell line 1483 cells with siRNA causes an inhibition of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) -induced phosphorylation of EGFR and EGFR-dependent signaling proteins p44/42 MAPK and AKT, accompanied by an inhibition of GRP-induced survival, proliferation, and invasion of the cells. The EGFR signaling pathway itself remains intact, however, as the cells remain responsive to exogenous EGF. In addition, RHBDF1 gene silencing disrupts GRP-stimulated secretion of EGFR ligand TGF-α, but not the production of latent TGF-α, whereas engineered overexpression of RHBDF1 markedly accelerates the secretion of TGF-α. These findings are consistent with the view that RHBDF1 is critically involved in a GPCR ligand-stimulated process leading to the activation of latent EGFR ligands.—Zou, H., Thomas, S. M., Yan, Z.-W., Grandis, J. R., Vogt, A., Li, L.-Y. Human rhomboid family-1 gene RHBDF1 participates in GPCR-mediated transactivation of EGFR growth signals in head and neck squamous cancer cells. PMID:18832597

  1. Sp1 trans-activates the murine H(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(2)-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Li, Mei; Zhang, Dongyu; Xu, William; Kone, Bruce C

    2009-07-01

    The H(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(2) (HKalpha2) gene of the renal collecting duct and distal colon plays a central role in potassium and acid-base homeostasis, yet its transcriptional control remains poorly characterized. We previously demonstrated that the proximal 177 bp of its 5'-flanking region confers basal transcriptional activity in murine inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD3) cells and that NF-kappaB and CREB-1 bind this region to alter transcription. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the -144/-135 Sp element influences basal HKalpha2 gene transcription in these cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays using probes for -154/-127 revealed Sp1-containing DNA-protein complexes in nuclear extracts of mIMCD3 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated that Sp1, but not Sp3, binds to this promoter region of the HKalpha2 gene in mIMCD3 cells in vivo. HKalpha2 minimal promoter-luciferase constructs with point mutations in the -144/-135 Sp element exhibited much lower activity than the wild-type promoter in transient transfection assays. Overexpression of Sp1, but not Sp3, trans-activated an HKalpha2 proximal promoter-luciferase construct in mIMCD3 cells as well as in SL2 insect cells, which lack Sp factors. Conversely, small interfering RNA knockdown of Sp1 inhibited endogenous HKalpha2 mRNA expression, and binding of Sp1 to chromatin associated with the proximal HKalpha2 promoter without altering the binding or regulatory influence of NF-kappaB p65 or CREB-1 on the proximal HKalpha2 promoter. We conclude that Sp1 plays an important and positive role in controlling basal HKalpha2 gene expression in mIMCD3 cells in vivo and in vitro. PMID:19420113

  2. Stimulation of Inducible Nitric Oxide by Hepatitis B Virus Transactivator Protein HBx Requires MTA1 Coregulator*

    PubMed Central

    Bui-Nguyen, Tri M.; Pakala, Suresh B.; Sirigiri, Divijendranatha Reddy; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid; Kumar, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders, including hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. Transactivator protein HBx, a major regulator of cellular responses of hepatitis B virus, is known to induce the expression of MTA1 (metastasis-associated protein 1) coregulator via NF-κB signaling in hepatic cells. However, the underlying mechanism of HBx regulation of the inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) pathway remains unknown. Here we provide evidence that MTA1 is a positive regulator of iNOS transcription and plays a mechanistic role in HBx stimulation of iNOS expression and activity. We found that the HBx-MTA1 complex is recruited onto the human iNOS promoter in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Pharmacological inhibition of the NF-κB signaling prevented the ability of HBx to stimulate the transcription, the expression, and the activity of iNOS; nevertheless, these effects could be substantially rescued by MTA1 dysregulation. We further discovered that HBx-mediated stimulation of MTA1 is paralleled by the suppression of miR-661, a member of the small noncoding RNAs, recently shown to target MTA1. We observed that miR-661 controls of MTA1 expression contributed to the expression and activity of iNOS in HBx-expressing HepG2 cells. Accordingly, depletion of MTA1 by either miR-661 or siRNA in HBx-expressing cells severely impaired the ability of HBx to modulate the endogenous levels of iNOS and nitrite production. Together, these findings reveal an inherent role of MTA1 in HBx regulation of iNOS expression and consequently its function in the liver cancer cells. PMID:20022949

  3. Probing the structure and function of the estrogen receptor ligand binding domain by analysis of mutants with altered transactivation characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, F C; Lee, H S; Ferrara, J; Willson, T M; White, J H

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a genetic screen for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to isolate estrogen receptor (ER) mutants with altered transactivation characteristics. Use of a "reverse" ER, in which the mutagenized ligand binding domain was placed at the N terminus of the receptor, eliminated the isolation of truncated constitutively active mutants. A library was screened with a low-affinity estrogen, 2-methoxyestrone (2ME), at concentrations 50-fold lower than those required for activation of the unmutagenized ER. Several mutants displaying enhanced sensitivity to 2ME were isolated. We further characterized a mutant carrying the substitution L536P, which was located immediately N terminal to the AF-2-activating domain of the receptor. Amino acid 536 corresponds to a ligand contact residue in retinoic acid receptor gamma, suggesting that key contact points are conserved among receptors. Introduction of L536P into the original ER cDNA isolate HE0, which contains the substitution G400V, rendered the receptor more sensitive to a variety of agonists. When introduced into the wild-type ER HEG0, L536P also rendered the receptor more sensitive to agonists, and, in addition, induced high levels of constitutive activity that could be inhibited by antiestrogens. Estrogens containing a keto substitution in the steroid D ring, but not those containing a hydroxyl group, were full agonists of L536P-HEG0. Limited proteolytic analysis suggested that the L536P substitution, which is located immediately N terminal to the AF-2 domain, induces a conformational change in the ER that partially mimics binding by hormone. Both HEG0 and L536P-HEG0 formed complexes with hsp90 in vitro, indicating a lack of correlation between interaction with hsp90 in vitro and hormonal regulation of ER transactivation in vivo. This supports the idea that a factor(s) acting downstream of hsp90 is important for controlling activity of the hormone-free receptor. PMID:9234721

  4. p53 Transactivation and the Impact of Mutations, Cofactors and Small Molecules Using a Simplified Yeast-Based Screening System

    PubMed Central

    Bisio, Alessandra; Lion, Mattia; Jordan, Jennifer; Fronza, Gilberto; Menichini, Paola; Resnick, Michael A.; Inga, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Background The p53 tumor suppressor, which is altered in most cancers, is a sequence-specific transcription factor that is able to modulate the expression of many target genes and influence a variety of cellular pathways. Inactivation of the p53 pathway in cancer frequently occurs through the expression of mutant p53 protein. In tumors that retain wild type p53, the pathway can be altered by upstream modulators, particularly the p53 negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4. Methodology/Principal Findings Given the many factors that might influence p53 function, including expression levels, mutations, cofactor proteins and small molecules, we expanded our previously described yeast-based system to provide the opportunity for efficient investigation of their individual and combined impacts in a miniaturized format. The system integrates i) variable expression of p53 proteins under the finely tunable GAL1,10 promoter, ii) single copy, chromosomally located p53-responsive and control luminescence reporters, iii) enhanced chemical uptake using modified ABC-transporters, iv) small-volume formats for treatment and dual-luciferase assays, and v) opportunities to co-express p53 with other cofactor proteins. This robust system can distinguish different levels of expression of WT and mutant p53 as well as interactions with MDM2 or 53BP1. Conclusions/Significance We found that the small molecules Nutlin and RITA could both relieve the MDM2-dependent inhibition of WT p53 transactivation function, while only RITA could impact p53/53BP1 functional interactions. PRIMA-1 was ineffective in modifying the transactivation capacity of WT p53 and missense p53 mutations. This dual-luciferase assay can, therefore, provide a high-throughput assessment tool for investigating a matrix of factors that can influence the p53 network, including the effectiveness of newly developed small molecules, on WT and tumor-associated p53 mutants as well as interacting proteins. PMID:21674059

  5. Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor mediates muscarinic stimulation of focal adhesion kinase in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Calandrella, Sean O; Barrett, Kim E; Keely, Stephen J

    2005-04-01

    We have previously shown that the Gq protein coupled receptor (GqPCR) agonist, carbachol (CCh), transactivates and recruits epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr)-dependent signaling mechanisms in intestinal epithelial cells. Increasing evidence suggests that GqPCR agonists can also recruit focal adhesion-dependent signaling pathways in some cell types. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate if CCh stimulates activation of the focal adhesion-associated protein, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), in intestinal epithelia and, if so, to examine the signaling mechanisms involved. Experiments were carried out on monolayers of T84 cells grown on permeable supports. CCh rapidly induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK in T84 cells. This effect was accompanied by phosphorylation of another focal adhesion-associated protein, paxillin, and association of FAK with paxillin. CCh-stimulated FAK phosphorylation was inhibited by a chelator of intracellular Ca2+, BAPTA/AM (20 microM), and was mimicked by thapsigargin (2 microM), which mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ in a receptor-independent fashion. CCh also induced association of FAK with the EGFr and FAK phosphorylation was attenuated by an EGFr inhibitor, tyrphostin AG1478, and an inhibitor of Src family kinases, PP2. The actin cytoskeleton disruptor, cytochalasin D (20 microM), abolished FAK phosphorylation in response to CCh but did not alter CCh-induced EGFr or ERK MAPK activation. In summary, these data demonstrate that agonists of GqPCRs have the ability to induce FAK activation in intestinal epithelial cells. GqPCR-induced FAK activation is mediated by via a pathway involving transactivation of the EGFr and alterations in the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:15389641

  6. HDAC1 bound to the Cyp1a1 promoter blocks histone acetylation associated with Ah receptor-mediated transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Schnekenburger, Michael; Peng, Li; Puga, Alvaro

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic bioactivation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as the environmental procarcinogen benzo[a]pyrene, is catalyzed by a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase encoded by the substrate-inducible Cyp1a1 gene. Cyp1a1 induction requires trans-activation by the heterodimeric transcriptional complex formed by the liganded Ah receptor (AHR) and its partner, ARNT. Previously, we showed that constitutively bound HDAC1 dissociates from Cyp1a1 promoter chromatin after ligand-mediated induction, concomitantly with the recruitment of AHR/ARNT complexes and p300. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that HDAC1 binding maintains the Cyp1a1 gene in a silenced state in uninduced cells. We find that Cyp1a1 induction by the AHR/ARNT is associated with modification of specific chromatin marks, including hyperacetylation of histone H3K14 and H4K16, trimethylation of histone H3K4, and phosphorylation of H3S10. HDAC1 and DNMT1 form complexes on the Cyp1a1 promoter of uninduced cells but HDAC1 inhibition alone is not sufficient to induce Cyp1a1 expression, although it allows for the hyperacetylation of H3K14 and H4K16 to levels similar to those found in B[a]P-induced cells. These results show that by blocking modification of histone marks, HDAC1 plays a central role in Cyp1a1 expression and that its removal is a necessary but not sufficient condition for Cyp1a1 induction, underscoring the requirement for a concerted series of chromatin remodeling events to complete the initial steps of gene trans-activation by the Ah receptor. PMID:17707923

  7. MafA has strong cell transforming ability but is a weak transactivator.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Makoto; Kataoka, Kohsuke; Vogt, Peter K

    2003-09-11

    The maf oncogene of the avian oncogenic retrovirus AS42 encodes a nuclear bZip protein, v-Maf, that recognizes sequences related to the AP-1 target site. The corresponding cellular protein, c-Maf belongs to a family of related bZip proteins together with MafA and MafB. In this paper, we compare the transactivation and cell transforming abilities of MafA and MafB along with two forms of the c-Maf protein. These proteins induce cellular transformation when expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts. In reporter assays, MafA is a much less effective transactivator than the other Maf proteins, but unexpectedly shows the strongest activity in cell transformation. Chimeras of MafA and MafB correlate the strong cell transforming ability of MafA with its DNA-binding domain. The DNA-binding domain of MafA is also correlated with weak transactivation. Additional mutagenesis experiments show that transactivation and transformation by MafA are also controlled by phosphorylation of two conserved serine residues in the transactivation domain. Finally, we constructed MafA-estrogen receptor fusion molecules that show tightly hormone-dependent cell transforming ability. These regulatable constructs permit a kinetic characterization of target gene responses and facilitate discrimination between direct and indirect targets. PMID:12970735

  8. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  9. Molecular Basis of Ligand-Dependent Regulation of NadR, the Transcriptional Repressor of Meningococcal Virulence Factor NadA.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Alessia; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Fagnocchi, Luca; Cantini, Francesca; Haag, Andreas F; Brier, Sébastien; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Delany, Isabel; Bottomley, Matthew J

    2016-04-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is present on the meningococcal surface and contributes to adhesion to and invasion of human cells. NadA is also one of three recombinant antigens in the recently-approved Bexsero vaccine, which protects against serogroup B meningococcus. The amount of NadA on the bacterial surface is of direct relevance in the constant battle of host-pathogen interactions: it influences the ability of the pathogen to engage human cell surface-exposed receptors and, conversely, the bacterial susceptibility to the antibody-mediated immune response. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms which regulate nadA expression levels, which are predominantly controlled by the transcriptional regulator NadR (Neisseria adhesin A Regulator) both in vitro and in vivo. NadR binds the nadA promoter and represses gene transcription. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA), a catabolite present in human saliva both under physiological conditions and during bacterial infection, the binding of NadR to the nadA promoter is attenuated and nadA expression is induced. NadR also mediates ligand-dependent regulation of many other meningococcal genes, for example the highly-conserved multiple adhesin family (maf) genes, which encode proteins emerging with important roles in host-pathogen interactions, immune evasion and niche adaptation. To gain insights into the regulation of NadR mediated by 4-HPA, we combined structural, biochemical, and mutagenesis studies. In particular, two new crystal structures of ligand-free and ligand-bound NadR revealed (i) the molecular basis of 'conformational selection' by which a single molecule of 4-HPA binds and stabilizes dimeric NadR in a conformation unsuitable for DNA-binding, (ii) molecular explanations for the binding specificities of different hydroxyphenylacetate ligands, including 3Cl,4-HPA which is produced during inflammation, (iii) the presence of a leucine residue essential for dimerization and conserved in

  10. Molecular Basis of Ligand-Dependent Regulation of NadR, the Transcriptional Repressor of Meningococcal Virulence Factor NadA

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Alessia; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Fagnocchi, Luca; Cantini, Francesca; Haag, Andreas F.; Brier, Sébastien; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Delany, Isabel; Bottomley, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is present on the meningococcal surface and contributes to adhesion to and invasion of human cells. NadA is also one of three recombinant antigens in the recently-approved Bexsero vaccine, which protects against serogroup B meningococcus. The amount of NadA on the bacterial surface is of direct relevance in the constant battle of host-pathogen interactions: it influences the ability of the pathogen to engage human cell surface-exposed receptors and, conversely, the bacterial susceptibility to the antibody-mediated immune response. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms which regulate nadA expression levels, which are predominantly controlled by the transcriptional regulator NadR (Neisseria adhesin A Regulator) both in vitro and in vivo. NadR binds the nadA promoter and represses gene transcription. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA), a catabolite present in human saliva both under physiological conditions and during bacterial infection, the binding of NadR to the nadA promoter is attenuated and nadA expression is induced. NadR also mediates ligand-dependent regulation of many other meningococcal genes, for example the highly-conserved multiple adhesin family (maf) genes, which encode proteins emerging with important roles in host-pathogen interactions, immune evasion and niche adaptation. To gain insights into the regulation of NadR mediated by 4-HPA, we combined structural, biochemical, and mutagenesis studies. In particular, two new crystal structures of ligand-free and ligand-bound NadR revealed (i) the molecular basis of ‘conformational selection’ by which a single molecule of 4-HPA binds and stabilizes dimeric NadR in a conformation unsuitable for DNA-binding, (ii) molecular explanations for the binding specificities of different hydroxyphenylacetate ligands, including 3Cl,4-HPA which is produced during inflammation, (iii) the presence of a leucine residue essential for dimerization and conserved in

  11. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tat protein enhances Cryptosporidium parvum-induced apoptosis in cholangiocytes via a Fas ligand-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Steven P; Small, Aaron J; Nelson, Jeremy B; Badley, Andrew D; Chen, Xian-Ming; Gores, Gregory J; Larusso, Nicholas F

    2007-02-01

    While Cryptosporidium parvum infection of the intestine has been reported in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, biliary infection is seen primarily in adult AIDS patients and is associated with development of AIDS cholangiopathy. However, the mechanisms of pathogen-induced AIDS cholangiopathy remain unclear. Since we previously demonstrated that the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system is involved in paracrine-mediated C. parvum cytopathicity in cholangiocytes, we also tested the potential synergistic effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transactivator of transcription (Tat)-mediated FasL regulation on C. parvum-induced apoptosis in cholangiocytes by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence analysis, and immunogold electron microscopy. H69 cells do not express CXCR4 and CCR5, which are receptors required for direct HIV-1 viral infection. However, recombinant biologically active HIV-1-associated Tat protein increased FasL expression in the cytoplasm of cholangiocytes without a significant increase in apoptosis. We found that C. parvum-induced apoptosis was associated with translocation of intracellular FasL to the cell membrane surface and release of full-length FasL from infected H69 cells. Tat significantly (P < 0.05) increased C. parvum-induced apoptosis in bystander cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, Tat enhanced both C. parvum-induced FasL membrane translocation and release of full-length FasL. In addition, the FasL neutralizing antibody NOK-1 and the caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-fmk both blocked C. parvum-induced apoptosis in cholangiocytes. The data demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat enhances C. parvum-induced cholangiocyte apoptosis via a paracrine-mediated, FasL-dependent mechanism. Our results suggest that concurrent active HIV replication, with associated production of Tat protein, and C. parvum infection synergistically increase cholangiocyte apoptosis and thus jointly contribute to

  12. Phage Lambda P Protein: Trans-Activation, Inhibition Phenotypes and their Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sidney; Erker, Craig; Horbay, Monique A.; Marciniuk, Kristen; Wang, Wen; Hayes, Connie

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of bacteriophage λ replication depends upon interactions between the oriλ DNA site, phage proteins O and P, and E. coli host replication proteins. P exhibits a high affinity for DnaB, the major replicative helicase for unwinding double stranded DNA. The concept of P-lethality relates to the hypothesis that P can sequester DnaB and in turn prevent cellular replication initiation from oriC. Alternatively, it was suggested that P-lethality does not involve an interaction between P and DnaB, but is targeted to DnaA. P-lethality is assessed by examining host cells for transformation by ColE1-type plasmids that can express P, and the absence of transformants is attributed to a lethal effect of P expression. The plasmid we employed enabled conditional expression of P, where under permissive conditions, cells were efficiently transformed. We observed that ColE1 replication and plasmid establishment upon transformation is extremely sensitive to P, and distinguish this effect from P-lethality directed to cells. We show that alleles of dnaB protect the variant cells from P expression. P-dependent cellular filamentation arose in ΔrecA or lexA[Ind-] cells, defective for SOS induction. Replication propagation and restart could represent additional targets for P interference of E. coli replication, beyond the oriC-dependent initiation step. PMID:23389467

  13. Evolution of p53 transactivation specificity through the lens of a yeast-based functional assay.

    PubMed

    Lion, Mattia; Raimondi, Ivan; Donati, Stefano; Jousson, Olivier; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Co-evolution of transcription factors (TFs) with their respective cis-regulatory network enhances functional diversity in the course of evolution. We present a new approach to investigate transactivation capacity of sequence-specific TFs in evolutionary studies. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as an in vivo test tube and p53 proteins derived from human and five commonly used animal models were chosen as proof of concept. p53 is a highly conserved master regulator of environmental stress responses. Previous reports indicated conserved p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro, even for evolutionary distant species. We used isogenic yeast strains where p53-dependent transactivation was measured towards chromosomally integrated p53 response elements (REs). Ten REs were chosen to sample a wide range of DNA binding affinity and transactivation capacity for human p53 and proteins were expressed at two levels using an inducible expression system. We showed that the assay is amenable to study thermo-sensitivity of frog p53, and that chimeric constructs containing an ectopic transactivation domain could be rapidly developed to enhance the activity of proteins, such as fruit fly p53, that are poorly effective in engaging the yeast transcriptional machinery. Changes in the profile of relative transactivation towards the ten REs were measured for each p53 protein and compared to the profile obtained with human p53. These results, which are largely independent from relative p53 protein levels, revealed widespread evolutionary divergence of p53 transactivation specificity, even between human and mouse p53. Fruit fly and human p53 exhibited the largest discrimination among REs while zebrafish p53 was the least selective. PMID:25668429

  14. Cooperation between bovine leukaemia virus transactivator protein and Ha-ras oncogene product in cellular transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Willems, L; Heremans, H; Chen, G; Portetelle, D; Billiau, A; Burny, A; Kettmann, R

    1990-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLV-I and -II) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) express transactivator proteins able to increase long terminal repeat (LTR) directed viral expression. These transacting factors are though to be involved in the induction of leukaemia by these viruses. Transfection of BLV transactivator p34tax together with Ha-ras immortalizes and transforms rat embryo fibroblasts, in vitro. The transformed cell induce tumours in nude mice. These data emphasize the causal role exerted by p34tax in in vivo tumorigenesis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2158445

  15. Transactivation and transformation by Myb are negatively regulated by a leucine-zipper structure.

    PubMed Central

    Kanei-Ishii, C; MacMillan, E M; Nomura, T; Sarai, A; Ramsay, R G; Aimoto, S; Ishii, S; Gonda, T J

    1992-01-01

    The negative regulatory domain of the c-myb protooncogene product (c-Myb) normally represses transcriptional activation by c-Myb. We show here that a leucine-zipper structure is a component of the negative regulatory domain, because its disruption markedly increases both the transactivating and transforming capacities of c-Myb. We also demonstrate that this leucine-zipper structure can interact with cellular proteins. Our results suggest that an inhibitor that suppresses transactivation binds to c-Myb through the leucine zipper and that c-Myb can be oncogenically activated by missense mutation. Images PMID:1557416

  16. Normal Myeloid Development Requires Both the Glutamine-Rich Transactivation Domain and the PEST Region of Transcription Factor PU.1 but Not the Potent Acidic Transactivation Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Robert C.; Olson, Marilyn C.; Pongubala, Jagan M. R.; Perkel, Jeffrey M.; Atchison, Michael L.; Scott, Edward W.; Simon, M. Celeste

    1998-01-01

    Gene targeting of transcription factor PU.1 results in an early block to fetal hematopoiesis, with no detectable lymphoid or myeloid cells produced in mouse embryos. Furthermore, PU.1−/− embryonic stem (ES) cells fail to differentiate into Mac-1+ and F4/80+ macrophages in vitro. We have previously shown that a PU.1 transgene under the control of its own promoter restores the ability of PU.1−/− ES cells to differentiate into macrophages. In this study, we take advantage of our PU.1−/− ES cell rescue system to genetically test which previously identified PU.1 functional domains are necessary for the development of mature macrophages. PU.1 functional domains include multiple N-terminal acidic and glutamine-rich transactivation domains, a PEST domain, several serine phosphorylation sites, and a C-terminal Ets DNA binding domain, all delineated and characterized by using standard biochemical and transactivational assays. By using the production of mature macrophages as a functional readout in our assay system, we have established that the glutamine-rich transactivation domain, a portion of the PEST domain, and the DNA binding domain are required for myelopoiesis. Deletion of three acidic domains, which exhibit potent transactivation potential in vitro, had no effect on the ability of PU.1 to promote macrophage development. Furthermore, mutagenesis of four independent sites of serine phosphorylation also had no effect on myelopoiesis. Collectively, our results indicate that PU.1 interacts with important regulatory proteins during macrophage development via the glutamine-rich and PEST domains. The PU.1−/− ES cell rescue system represents a powerful, in vitro strategy to functionally map domains of PU.1 essential for normal hematopoiesis and the generation of mature macrophages. PMID:9632818

  17. The C-terminal region of Drosophila heat shock factor (HSF) contains a constitutively functional transactivation domain.

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, J; Orosz, A; Allada, R; Wu, C

    1996-01-01

    The heat shock transcription factor (HSF) is constitutively expressed in Drosophila cells as an inactive monomer. Upon heat shock HSF undergoes trimerization and acquires high affinity DNA binding ability leading to specific interaction with its cognate elements in heat shock promoters. Here we show that the transactivation function of HSF is conferred by the extreme C-terminal region of the protein. Deletion analysis of HSF fragments fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain demonstrates that transactivation is dependent on HSF residues 610-691. This domain is located beyond the C-terminal heptad repeat (leucine zipper 4) whose presence or integrity is dispensable for transactivation. The transactivation domain is functional in the absence of heat shock and can be replaced by the extreme C-terminal region of human HSF1. The Drosophila and human HSF transactivation domains are both rich in hydrophobic and acidic residues and may be structurally conserved, despite limited sequence identity. PMID:8628664

  18. Structure of the EGF receptor transactivation circuit integrates multiple signals with cell context

    SciTech Connect

    Joslin, Elizabeth J.; Shankaran, Harish; Opresko, Lee K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H. S.

    2010-05-10

    Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been proposed to be a mechanism by which a variety of cellular inputs can be integrated into a single signaling pathway, but the regulatory topology of this important system is unclear. To understand the transactivation circuit, we first created a “non-binding” reporter for ligand shedding. We then quantitatively defined how signals from multiple agonists were integrated both upstream and downstream of the EGFR into the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) cascade in human mammary epithelial cells. We found that transactivation is mediated by a recursive autocrine circuit where ligand shedding drives EGFR-stimulated ERK that in turn drives further ligand shedding. The time from shedding to ERK activation is fast (<5 min) whereas the recursive feedback is slow (>15 min). Simulations showed that this delay in positive feedback greatly enhanced system stability and robustness. Our results indicate that the transactivation circuit is constructed so that the magnitude of ERK signaling is governed by the sum of multiple direct inputs, while recursive, autocrine ligand shedding controls signal duration.

  19. The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transactivator and repressor proteins use different nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed

    Skiadopoulos, M H; McBride, A A

    1996-02-01

    The E2 gene of bovine papillomavirus type 1 encodes at least three nuclear phosphoproteins that regulate viral transcription and DNA replication. All three proteins have a common C-terminal domain that has DNA-binding and dimerization activities. A basic region in this domain forms an alpha helix which makes direct contact with the DNA target. In this study, it is shown that in addition to its role in DNA binding, this basic region functions as a nuclear localization signal both in the E2 DNA-binding domain and in a heterologous protein. Deletion of this signal sequence resulted in increased accumulation of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins in the cytoplasm, but nuclear localization was not eliminated. In the full-length transactivator protein, another signal, present in the N-terminal transactivation domain, is used for transport to the nucleus, and the C-terminal nuclear localization signal(s) are masked. The use of different nuclear localization signals could potentially allow differential regulation of the subcellular localization of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins at some stage in the viral life cycle. PMID:8551571

  20. The growth-inhibitory function of p53 is separable from transactivation, apoptosis and suppression of transformation by E1a and Ras.

    PubMed

    Hansen, R S; Braithwaite, A W

    1996-09-01

    p53 is known to suppress oncogenic cell transformation, inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and activate and repress gene transcription. To investigate the relationships between these functions, we have examined various mutant forms of p53 for their abilities to perform each activity. This study has shown that growth inhibition is not a prerequisite for apoptotic cell death as these two functions are separate and alternative activities of p53. Additionally, we have demonstrated that the ability of p53 to suppress transformation (by adenovirus E1a and activated Ras) correlates with its ability to induce apoptosis and not with its ability to inhibit cell growth. Although p53 is thought to inhibit growth through the transactivation of p21WAFI, our study has demonstrated that transcriptional activation and repression are neither sufficient nor necessary for growth inhibition. This indicates that p53 has more than one mechanism for inhibiting cell growth and that another type of biochemical function must be involved. Furthermore, we have shown that transcriptional activation and repression may each be necessary, and the combination of these activities may even be sufficient, for p53-dependent apoptosis. In summary, our results have provided new information about the cellular and biochemical mechanisms through which p53 acts as a tumor suppressor. PMID:8806689

  1. N- and C-terminal Transactivation Domains of GATA1 Protein Coordinate Hematopoietic Program*

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eri; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Shimizu, Ritsuko

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factor GATA1 regulates the expression of a cluster of genes important for hematopoietic cell differentiation toward erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages. Three functional domains have been identified in GATA1, a transactivation domain located in the N terminus (N-TAD) and two zinc finger domains located in the middle of the molecule. Although N-TAD is known as a solitary transactivation domain for GATA1, clinical observations in Down syndrome leukemia suggest that there may be additional transactivation domains. In this study, we found in reporter co-transfection assays that transactivation activity of GATA1 was markedly reduced by deletion of the C-terminal 95 amino acids without significant attenuation of the DNA binding activity or self-association potential. We therefore generated transgenic mouse lines that expressed GATA1 lacking the C-terminal region (GATA1-ΔCT). When we crossed these transgenic mouse lines to the Gata1-deficient mouse, we found that the GATA1-ΔCT transgene rescued Gata1-deficient mice from embryonic lethality. The embryos rescued with an almost similar level of GATA1-ΔCT to endogenous GATA1 developed beyond embryonic 13.5 days, showing severe anemia with accumulation of immature erythroid cells, as was the case for the embryos rescued by endogenous levels of GATA1 lacking N-TAD (GATA1-ΔNT). Distinct sets of target genes were affected in the embryos rescued by GATA1-ΔCT and GATA1-ΔNT. We also found attenuated GATA1 function in cell cycle control of immature megakaryocytes in both lines of rescued embryos. These results thus demonstrate that GATA1 has two independent transactivation domains, N-TAD and C-TAD. Both N-TAD and C-TAD retain redundant as well as specific activities for proper hematopoiesis in vivo. PMID:22556427

  2. Cyclin E/Cdk2, P/CAF, and E1A regulate the transactivation of the c-myc promoter by FOXM1

    SciTech Connect

    Wierstra, Inken Alves, Juergen

    2008-03-28

    FOXM1c transactivates the c-myc promoter by binding directly to its TATA-boxes. The present study demonstrates that the transactivation of the c-myc promoter by FOXM1c is enhanced by the key proliferation signal cyclin E/Cdk2, but repressed by P/CAF and the adenoviral oncoprotein E1A. Furthermore, FOXM1c interacts with the coactivator and histone acetyltransferase P/CAF. This study shows that, on the c-myc-P1 TATA-box, FOXM1c does not function simply as normal transcription factor just binding to an unusual site. Moreover, the inhibitory N-terminus of FOXM1c does not inhibit its transrepression domain or its EDA. Others reported that a cyclin/Cdk-binding LXL-motif of the splice variant FoxM1b is required for its interaction with Cdk2, Cdk1, and p27, its phosphorylation by Cdk1 and its activation by Cdc25B. In contrast, we now demonstrate that this LXL-motif is not required for the activation of FOXM1c by cyclin D1/Cdk4, cyclin E/Cdk and cyclin A/Cdk2 or for the repression of FOXM1c by p27.

  3. Transactivation specificity is conserved among p53 family proteins and depends on a response element sequence code

    PubMed Central

    Ciribilli, Yari; Monti, Paola; Bisio, Alessandra; Nguyen, H. Thien; Ethayathulla, Abdul S.; Ramos, Ana; Foggetti, Giorgia; Menichini, Paola; Menendez, Daniel; Resnick, Michael A.; Viadiu, Hector; Fronza, Gilberto; Inga, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Structural and biochemical studies have demonstrated that p73, p63 and p53 recognize DNA with identical amino acids and similar binding affinity. Here, measuring transactivation activity for a large number of response elements (REs) in yeast and human cell lines, we show that p53 family proteins also have overlapping transactivation profiles. We identified mutations at conserved amino acids of loops L1 and L3 in the DNA-binding domain that tune the transactivation potential nearly equally in p73, p63 and p53. For example, the mutant S139F in p73 has higher transactivation potential towards selected REs, enhanced DNA-binding cooperativity in vitro and a flexible loop L1 as seen in the crystal structure of the protein–DNA complex. By studying, how variations in the RE sequence affect transactivation specificity, we discovered a RE-transactivation code that predicts enhanced transactivation; this correlation is stronger for promoters of genes associated with apoptosis. PMID:23892287

  4. Crystal structure of the E2 transactivation domain of human papillomavirus type 11 bound to a protein interaction inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Coulombe, René; Cameron, Dale R; Thauvette, Louise; Massariol, Marie-Josée; Amon, Lynn M; Fink, Dominique; Titolo, Steve; Welchner, Ewald; Yoakim, Christiane; Archambault, Jacques; White, Peter W

    2004-02-20

    Interaction between the E2 protein and E1 helicase of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is essential for the initiation of viral DNA replication. We recently described a series of small molecules that bind to the N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of HPV type 11 E2 and inhibits its interaction with E1 in vitro and in cellular assays. Here we report the crystal structures of both the HPV11 TAD and of a complex between this domain and an inhibitor, at 2.5- and 2.4-A resolution, respectively. The HPV11 TAD structure is very similar to that of the analogous domain of HPV16. Inhibitor binding caused no significant alteration of the protein backbone, but movements of several amino acid side chains at the binding site, in particular those of Tyr-19, His-32, Leu-94, and Glu-100, resulted in the formation of a deep hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the indandione moiety of the inhibitor. Mutational analysis provides functional evidence for specific interactions between Tyr-19 and E1 and between His-32 and the inhibitor. A second inhibitor molecule is also present at the binding pocket. Although evidence is presented that this second molecule makes only weak interactions with the protein and is likely an artifact of crystallization, its presence defines additional regions of the binding pocket that could be exploited to design more potent inhibitors. PMID:14634007

  5. Glucocorticoid Repression of Inflammatory Gene Expression Shows Differential Responsiveness by Transactivation- and Transrepression-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    King, Elizabeth M.; Chivers, Joanna E.; Rider, Christopher F.; Minnich, Anne; Giembycz, Mark A.; Newton, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Binding of glucocorticoid to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR/NR3C1) may repress inflammatory gene transcription via direct, protein synthesis-independent processes (transrepression), or by activating transcription (transactivation) of multiple anti-inflammatory/repressive factors. Using human pulmonary A549 cells, we showed that 34 out of 39 IL-1β-inducible mRNAs were repressed to varying degrees by the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone. Whilst these repressive effects were GR-dependent, they did not correlate with either the magnitude of IL-1β-inducibility or the NF-κB-dependence of the inflammatory genes. This suggests that induction by IL-1β and repression by dexamethasone are independent events. Roles for transactivation were investigated using the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. However, cycloheximide reduced the IL-1β-dependent expression of 13 mRNAs, which, along with the 5 not showing repression by dexamethasone, were not analysed further. Of the remaining 21 inflammatory mRNAs, cycloheximide significantly attenuated the dexamethasone-dependent repression of 11 mRNAs that also showed a marked time-dependence to their repression. Such effects are consistent with repression occurring via the de novo synthesis of a new product, or products, which subsequently cause repression (i.e., repression via a transactivation mechanism). Conversely, 10 mRNAs showed completely cycloheximide-independent, and time-independent, repression by dexamethasone. This is consistent with direct GR transrepression. Importantly, the inflammatory mRNAs showing attenuated repression by dexamethasone in the presence of cycloheximide also showed a significantly greater extent of repression and a higher potency to dexamethasone compared to those mRNAs showing cycloheximide-independent repression. This suggests that the repression of inflammatory mRNAs by GR transactivation-dependent mechanisms accounts for the greatest levels of repression and the most potent

  6. Characterization of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene promoter: an AP1 complex and an Sp1-related complex transactivate the promoter activity that is suppressed by a YY1 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, J; Zhang, X; Dong, Z

    1996-01-01

    It is well documented that a repeated CATT element in the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene promoter is required for promoter activity. However, the transcription factors that are able to transactivate this enhancer element remain unidentified. Recently, we have found that nuclear factor YY1 can interact with the enhancer element. Here, we report that in addition to YY1, two other nuclear factors have been identified in the DNA-protein complexes formed by the CATT oligonucleotide and the Jurkat T-cell nuclear protein. One of these factors is AP1, and the other one is an Sp1-related protein. Results from transient transfection of Jurkat T cells have revealed that formation of both AP1 and the Sp1-related complex is required for the full enhancer activity of the CATT element. This result is supported by cotransfection of a c-jun expression vector and mutational analysis of the AP1 site or the Sp1-related protein binding site. In contrast, formation of the YY1 complex suppresses enhancer activity, since deletion of the YY1 complex induces an augmentation of the enhancer activity and overexpression of YY1 results in an attenuation of the enhancer activity. Results from the mechanism study have revealed that YY1 is able to inhibit transactivation mediated by either AP1 or the Sp1-related protein, and YY1 suppressive activity is DNA binding dependent. Taken together, these data support the ideas that AP1 and the Sp1-related nuclear protein are required for transactivation of the human GM-CSF gene promoter and that YY1 can suppress transactivation of the promoter even under inducible conditions. PMID:8524292

  7. A novel antagonist anti-cMet antibody with antitumor activities targeting both ligand-dependent and ligand-independent c-Met receptors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alexandra; Broussas, Matthieu; Beau-Larvor, Charlotte; Haeuw, Jean-François; Boute, Nicolas; Robert, Alain; Champion, Thierry; Beck, Alain; Bailly, Christian; Corvaïa, Nathalie; Goetsch, Liliane

    2016-10-15

    c-Met is a prototypic member of a sub-family of RTKs. Inappropriate c-Met activation plays a crucial role in tumor formation, proliferation and metastasis. Using a key c-Met dimerization assay, a set of 12 murine whole IgG1 monoclonal antibodies was selected and a lead candidate, m224G11, was humanized by CDR-grafting and engineered to generate a divalent full antagonist humanized IgG1 antibody, hz224G11. Neither m224G11 nor hz224G11 bind to the murine c-Met receptor. Their antitumor activity was investigated in vitro in a set of experiments consistent with the reported pleiotropic effects mediated by c-Met and, in vivo, using several human tumor xenograft models. Both m224G11 and hz224G11 exhibited nanomolar affinities for the receptor and inhibited HGF binding, c-Met phosphorylation, and receptor dimerization in a similar fashion, resulting in a profound inhibition of all c-Met functions in vitro. These effects were presumably responsible for the inhibition of c-Met's major functions including cell proliferation, migration, invasion scattering, morphogenesis and angiogenesis. In addition to these in vitro properties, hz224G11 dramatically inhibits the growth of autocrine, partially autophosphorylated and c-Met amplified cell lines in vivo. Pharmacological studies performed on Hs746T gastric cancer xenografts demonstrate that hz224G11 strongly downregulates c-Met expression and phosphorylation. It also decreases the tumor mitotic index (Ki67) and induces apoptosis. Taken together, the in vitro and in vivo data suggest that hz224G11 is a promising candidate for the treatment of tumors. This antibody, now known as ABT-700 and currently in Phase I clinical trials, may provide a novel therapeutic approach to c-Met-expressing cancers. PMID:27144973

  8. A novel SREBP-1 splice variant: tissue abundance and transactivation potency.

    PubMed

    Felder, Thomas Klaus; Klein, Kerstin; Patsch, Wolfgang; Oberkofler, Hannes

    2005-10-15

    Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) belong to the family of basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factors. The SREBP-1 gene encodes two different isoforms, SREBP-1a and -1c, that are expressed at varying levels in different tissues and cultured cells and exhibit common and distinct functions. We identified an additional SREBP-1 isoform, termed SREBP-1ac, and determined its mRNA abundance in different human tissues and cell lines. SREBP-1ac mRNA was detectable in all tissues studied, although at lower levels than the major SREBP-1a and -1c isoforms. Transcription of the novel SREBP isoform was not induced by insulin or cholesterol depletion. SREBP-1ac did not transactivate the human LDLR and UCP2 promoters but robustly attenuated the transactivation capacity of SREBP-1a, -1c and -2 in cotransfection experiments. PMID:16153721

  9. The 9aaTAD Transactivation Domains: From Gal4 to p53.

    PubMed

    Piskacek, Martin; Havelka, Marek; Rezacova, Martina; Knight, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The family of the Nine amino acid Transactivation Domain, 9aaTAD family, comprises currently over 40 members. The 9aaTAD domains are universally recognized by the transcriptional machinery from yeast to man. We had identified the 9aaTAD domains in the p53, Msn2, Pdr1 and B42 activators by our prediction algorithm. In this study, their competence to activate transcription as small peptides was proven. Not surprisingly, we elicited immense 9aaTAD divergence in hundreds of identified orthologs and numerous examples of the 9aaTAD species' convergence. We found unforeseen similarity of the mammalian p53 with yeast Gal4 9aaTAD domains. Furthermore, we identified artificial 9aaTAD domains generated accidentally by others. From an evolutionary perspective, the observed easiness to generate 9aaTAD transactivation domains indicates the natural advantage for spontaneous generation of transcription factors from DNA binding precursors. PMID:27618436

  10. Transactivation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor by G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Recent Progress, Challenges and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Both G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor-tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate large signaling networks, control multiple cell functions and are implicated in many diseases including various cancers. Both of them are also the top therapeutic targets for disease treatment. The discovery of the cross-talk between GPCRs and RTKs connects these two vast signaling networks and complicates the already complicated signaling networks that regulate cell signaling and function. In this review, we focus on the transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a subfamily of RTKs, by GPCRs. Since the first report of EGFR transactivation by GPCR, significant progress has been made including the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the transactivation. Here, we first provide a basic picture for GPCR, EGFR and EGFR transactivation by GPCR. We then discuss the progress made in the last five years and finally provided our view of the future challenge and future researches needed to overcome these challenges. PMID:26771606

  11. EPAS1 trans-activation during hypoxia requires p42/p44 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Freeman, T L; Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1999-11-19

    Hypoxia is a common environmental stress that regulates gene expression and cell function. A number of hypoxia-regulated transcription factors have been identified and have been shown to play critical roles in mediating cellular responses to hypoxia. One of these is the endothelial PAS-domain protein 1 (EPAS1/HIF2-alpha/HLF/HRF). This protein is 48% homologous to hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1-alpha). To date, virtually nothing is known about the signaling pathways that lead to either EPAS1 or HIF1-alpha activation. Here we show that EPAS1 is phosphorylated when PC12 cells are exposed to hypoxia and that p42/p44 MAPK is a critical mediator of EPAS1 activation. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with the MEK inhibitor, PD98059, completely blocked hypoxia-induced trans-activation of a hypoxia response element (HRE) reporter gene by transfected EPAS1. Likewise, expression of a constitutively active MEK1 mimicked the effects of hypoxia on HRE reporter gene expression. However, pretreatment with PD98059 had no effect on EPAS1 phosphorylation during hypoxia, suggesting that MAPK targets other proteins that are critical for the trans-activation of EPAS1. We further show that hypoxia-induced trans-activation of EPAS1 is independent of Ras. Finally, pretreatment with calmodulin antagonists nearly completely blocked both the hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and the EPAS1 trans-activation of HRE-Luc. These results demonstrate that the MAPK pathway is a critical mediator of EPAS1 activation and that activation of MAPK and EPAS1 occurs through a calmodulin-sensitive pathway and not through the GTPase, Ras. These results are the first to identify a specific signaling pathway involved in EPAS1 activation. PMID:10559262

  12. Identification of Essential Genetic Baculoviral Elements for Recombinant Protein Expression by Transactivation in Sf21 Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang-Fang; Yen, Zen-Zen; Lindemann, Nils; Meyer, Steffen; Spehr, Johannes; van den Heuvel, Joop

    2016-01-01

    The Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) is widely used to produce high amounts of recombinant proteins. Nevertheless, generating recombinant baculovirus in high quality is rather time-consuming and labor-intensive. Alternatively, virus-free expression in insect cells did not achieve similar expression levels for most proteins so far. The transactivation method is a promising approach for protein expression in Sf21 cells. It combines advantages of BEVS and plasmid-based expression by activating strong virus-dependent promoters on a transfected plasmid by baculoviral coinfection. Here, we identified expression elements required for transactivation. Therefore, we designed several vectors comprising different viral promoters or promoter combinations and tested them for eGFP expression using the automated BioLector microcultivation system. Remarkably, only the combination of the very late promoter p10 together with the homologous region 5 (hr5) could boost expression during transactivation. Other elements, like p10 alone or the late viral promoter polH, did not respond to transactivation. A new combination of hr5 and p10 with the strongest immediate early OpMNPV viral promoter OpIE2 improved the yield of eGFP by ~25% in comparison to the previous applied hr5-IE1-p10 expression cassette. Furthermore, we observed a strong influence of the transcription termination sequence and vector backbone on the level of expression. Finally, the expression levels for transactivation, BEVS and solely plasmid-based expression were compared for the marker protein eGFP, underlining the potential of transactivation for fast recombinant protein expression in Sf21 cells. In conclusion, essential elements for transactivation could be identified. The optimal elements were applied to generate an improved vector applicable in virus-free plasmid-based expression, transactivation and BEVS. PMID:26934632

  13. EGF transactivation of Trk receptors regulates the migration of newborn cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Puehringer, Dirk; Orel, Nadiya; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Subramanian, Narayan; Herrmann, Thomas; Chao, Moses V; Sendtner, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The development of neuronal networks in the neocortex depends on control mechanisms for mitosis and migration that allow newborn neurons to find their accurate position. Multiple mitogens, neurotrophic factors, guidance molecules and their corresponding receptors are involved in this process, but the mechanisms by which these signals are integrated are only poorly understood. We found that TrkB and TrkC, the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), are activated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling rather than by BDNF or NT-3 in embryonic mouse cortical precursor cells. This transactivation event regulated migration of early neuronal cells to their final position in the developing cortex. Transactivation by EGF led to membrane translocation of TrkB, promoting its signaling responsiveness. Our results provide genetic evidence that TrkB and TrkC activation in early cortical neurons do not depend on BDNF and NT-3, but instead on transactivation by EGFR signaling. PMID:23416450

  14. EGF transactivation of Trk receptors regulates the migration of newborn cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Puehringer, Dirk; Orel, Nadiya; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Subramanian, Narayan; Herrmann, Thomas; Chao, Moses V; Sendtner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The development of neuronal networks in the neocortex depends on control mechanisms for mitosis and migration that allow newborn neurons to find their accurate position. Multiple mitogens, neurotrophic factors, guidance molecules and their corresponding receptors are involved in this process, but the mechanisms by which these signals are integrated are only poorly understood. We found that TrkB and TrkC, the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), are activated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling rather than by BDNF or NT-3 in embryonic mouse cortical precursor cells. This transactivation event regulated migration of early neuronal cells to their final position in the developing cortex. Transactivation by EGF led to membrane translocation of TrkB, promoting its signaling responsiveness. Our results provide genetic evidence that TrkB and TrkC activation in early cortical neurons do not depend on BDNF and NT-3, but instead on transactivation by EGFR signaling. PMID:23416450

  15. Phosphorylation of Src by phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulates beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated EGFR transactivation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Lewis J; Alexander, Kevin M; Mohan, Maradumane L; Bowman, Amber L; Mangmool, Supachoke; Xiao, Kunhong; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Rockman, Howard A

    2016-10-01

    β2-Adrenergic receptors (β2AR) transactivate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) through formation of a β2AR-EGFR complex that requires activation of Src to mediate signaling. Here, we show that both lipid and protein kinase activities of the bifunctional phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) enzyme are required for β2AR-stimulated EGFR transactivation. Mechanistically, the generation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-tris-phosphate (PIP3) by the lipid kinase function stabilizes β2AR-EGFR complexes while the protein kinase activity of PI3K regulates Src activation by direct phosphorylation. The protein kinase activity of PI3K phosphorylates serine residue 70 on Src to enhance its activity and induce EGFR transactivation following βAR stimulation. This newly identified function for PI3K, whereby Src is a substrate for the protein kinase activity of PI3K, is of importance since Src plays a key role in pathological and physiological signaling. PMID:27169346

  16. RELIEF OF PROFOUND FEEDBACK INHIBITION OF MITOGENIC SIGNALING BY RAF INHIBITORS ATTENUATES THEIR ACTIVITY IN BRAFV600E MELANOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Lito, Piro; Pratilas, Christine A.; Joseph, Eric W.; Tadi, Madhavi; Halilovic, Ensar; Zubrowski, Matthew; Huang, Alan; Wong, Wai Lin; Callahan, Margaret K.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Poulikakos, Poulikos I.; Fagin, James A.; Rosen, Neal

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY BRAFV600E drives tumors by dysregulating ERK signaling. In these tumors, we show that high levels of ERK-dependent negative feedback potently suppress ligand-dependent mitogenic signaling and Ras function. BRAFV600E activation is Ras-independent and it signals as a RAF-inhibitor sensitive monomer. RAF inhibitors potently inhibit RAF monomers and ERK signaling, causing relief of ERK-dependent feedback, reactivation of ligand-dependent signal transduction, increased Ras-GTP and generation of RAF inhibitor-resistant RAF dimers. This results in a rebound in ERK activity and culminates in a new steady state, wherein ERK signaling is elevated compared to its initial nadir after RAF inhibition. In this state, ERK signaling is RAF inhibitor resistant, and MEK inhibitor sensitive, and combined inhibition results in enhancement of ERK-pathway inhibition and antitumor activity. PMID:23153539

  17. Mycobacterium-Specific γ9δ2 T Cells Mediate Both Pathogen-Inhibitory and CD40 Ligand-Dependent Antigen Presentation Effects Important for Tuberculosis Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Charles T.; Hamzabegovic, Fahreta; Blazevic, Azra; Xia, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, can activate human γ9δ2 T cells to proliferate and express effector mechanisms. γ9δ2 T cells can directly inhibit the growth of intracellular mycobacteria and may also act as antigen-presenting cells (APC). Despite evidence for γδ T cells having the capacity to function as APC, the mechanisms involved and importance of these effects on overall tuberculosis (TB) immunity are unknown. We prepared M. tuberculosis-specific γ9δ2 T cell lines to study their direct protective effects and APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells. The direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria were measured, and the enhancing effects on proliferative and effector responses of αβ T cells assessed. Furthermore, the importance of cell-to-cell contact and soluble products for γ9δ2 T cell effector responses and APC functions were investigated. We demonstrate, in addition to direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria, the following: (i) γ9δ2 T cells enhance the expansion of M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells and increase the ability of αβ T cells to inhibit intracellular mycobacteria; (ii) although soluble mediators are critical for the direct inhibitory effects of γ9δ2 T cells, their APC functions do not require soluble mediators; (iii) the APC functions of γ9δ2 T cells involve cell-to-cell contact that is dependent on CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) interactions; and (iv) fully activated CD4+ αβ T cells and γ9δ2 T cells provide similar immune enhancing/APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific T cells. These effector and helper effects of γ9δ2 T cells further indicate that these T cells should be considered important new targets for new TB vaccines. PMID:26644385

  18. Autoregulation of the NF-kappa B transactivator RelA (p65) by multiple cytoplasmic inhibitors containing ankyrin motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, S C; Ganchi, P A; Béraud, C; Ballard, D W; Greene, W C

    1994-01-01

    RelA (p65) functions as the critical transactivating component of the heterodimeric p50-p65 NF-kappa B complex and contains a high-affinity binding site for its cytoplasmic inhibitor, I kappa B alpha. After cellular activation, I kappa B alpha is rapidly degraded in concert with the induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B. The present study demonstrates that tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced degradation of I kappa B alpha in human T cells is preceded by its rapid phosphorylation in vivo. However, these effects on I kappa B alpha result in nuclear mobilization of only a fraction of the entire cytoplasmic pool of RelA. Subsequent studies have revealed that (i) cytoplasmic RelA is stably associated not only with I kappa B alpha but also with other ankyrin motif-rich proteins including the products of the NF-kappa B2 (p100) and NF-kappa B1 (p105) genes; (ii) in contrast to RelA-I kappa B alpha, RelA-p100 cytoplasmic complexes are not dissociated following tumor necrosis factor alpha activation; (iii) p100 functions as a potent inhibitor of RelA-mediated transcription in vivo; (iv) the interaction of RelA and p100 involves the conserved Rel homology domain of both proteins but not the nuclear localization signal of RelA, which is required for I kappa B alpha binding; (v) p100 inhibition of RelA function requires the C-terminal ankyrin motif domain, which mediates cytoplasmic retention of RelA; and (vi) as observed with I kappa B alpha, nuclear RelA stimulates p100 mRNA and protein expression. These findings thus reveal the presence of a second inducible autoregulated inhibitory pathway that helps ensure the rapid but transient action of nuclear NF-kappa B. Images PMID:8108414

  19. NF-kappaB p65-Dependent Transactivation of miRNA Genes following Cryptosporidium parvum Infection Stimulates Epithelial Cell Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Gong, Ai-Yu; Drescher, Kristen M.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite that infects the gastrointestinal epithelium and causes diarrheal disease worldwide. Innate epithelial immune responses are key mediators of the host's defense to C. parvum. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Using an in vitro model of human cryptosporidiosis, we analyzed C. parvum-induced miRNA expression in biliary epithelial cells (i.e., cholangiocytes). Our results demonstrated differential alterations in the mature miRNA expression profile in cholangiocytes following C. parvum infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Database analysis of C. parvum-upregulated miRNAs revealed potential NF-κB binding sites in the promoter elements of a subset of miRNA genes. We demonstrated that mir-125b-1, mir-21, mir-30b, and mir-23b-27b-24-1 cluster genes were transactivated through promoter binding of the NF-κB p65 subunit following C. parvum infection. In contrast, C. parvum transactivated mir-30c and mir-16 genes in cholangiocytes in a p65-independent manner. Importantly, functional inhibition of selected p65-dependent miRNAs in cholangiocytes increased C. parvum burden. Thus, we have identified a panel of miRNAs regulated through promoter binding of the NF-κB p65 subunit in human cholangiocytes in response to C. parvum infection, a process that may be relevant to the regulation of epithelial anti-microbial defense in general. PMID:19997496

  20. Identification of TRIML2, a Novel p53 Target, that Enhances p53-SUMOylation and Regulates the Transactivation of Pro-apoptotic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Che-Pei; Khaku, Sakina; Jennis, Matthew; Zhou, Yan; Murphy, Maureen E.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53, encoded by TP53, inhibits tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. Several genetic polymorphisms exist in TP53, including a proline to arginine variant at amino acid 72 (P72 and R72, respectively); this polymorphism alters p53 function. In general, the P72 variant shows increased ability to induce cell cycle arrest, while the R72 variant possesses increased ability to induce apoptosis, relative to P72. At present, the underlying mechanisms for these functional differences are not fully understood. Toward elucidating the molecular basis for these differences a gene expression microarray analysis was conducted on normal human fibroblast cells that are homozygous for P72 and R72 variants, along with subclones of these lines that express a p53 short hairpin (shp53). Approximately three dozen genes were identified whose transactivation is affected by the codon 72 polymorphism. One of these is the tripartite motif family-like 2 (TRIML2) gene, which is preferentially induced by the R72 variant. Importantly, the accumulated data indicate that TRIML2 interacts with p53, and facilitates the modification of p53 with SUMO2. TRIML2 also enhances the ability of p53 to transactivate a subset of pro-apoptotic target genes associated with prolonged oxidative stress, including PIDD, PIG3 (TP53I3) and PIG6 (PRODH). These data indicate that TRIML2 is part of a feed-forward loop that activates p53 in cells expressing the R72 variant, particularly after prolonged stress. PMID:25256710

  1. 5-HT(1A) receptors transactivate the platelet-derived growth factor receptor type beta in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jeff S; Vasefi, Maryam S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of ligand, certain growth factor receptors can be activated via G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation in a process termed transactivation. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors can transactivate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors in smooth muscle cells, but it is not known if similar pathways occur in neuronal cells. Here we show that 5-HT can transiently increase the phosphorylation of PDGFβ receptors through 5-HT(1A) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. 5-HT also transactivates PDGFβ receptors in primary cortical neurons. This transactivation pathway is pertussis-toxin sensitive and Src tyrosine kinase-dependent. This pathway is also dependent on phospholipase C activity and intracellular calcium signaling. Several studies involving PDGFβ receptor transactivation by GPCRs have also demonstrated a PDGFβ receptor-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Yet in SH-SY5Y cells, 5-HT treatment causes a PDGFβ receptor-independent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This crosstalk between 5-HT and PDGFβ receptors identifies a potentially important signaling link between the serotonergic system and growth factor signaling in neurons. PMID:23006663

  2. Piroxicam and c-phycocyanin prevent colon carcinogenesis by inhibition of membrane fluidity and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling while up-regulating ligand dependent transcription factor PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-06-01

    The colon cancer tissues from DMH treated rats exhibited higher membrane potential, fluidity and changed lipid order as examined by Merocyanine 540 and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, respectively. A transition from gel to liquid crystalline state was observed by Laurdan fluorescence and also reduced fluorescence quenching of NBD-PE as contributed in the decreased membrane lipid phase separation. With piroxicam, a traditional NSAID and c-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis, these effects were normalized. An augmented intracellular Ca(+2) had contributed to the drug mediated apoptosis which is supported by an elevated calpain-9 expression. Histopathologically, a large pool of secreted acid/neutral mucopolysaccrides as well as the presence of blood vessels and dysplastic crypts signifies invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma while both the drugs reduced these neoplastic alterations. Wnt/β-catenin pathway was also found to be up-regulated which served as a crucial indicator for cancer cell growth. A concomitant down regulation of PPARγ was noted in DMH treatment which is associated with tumor progression. The expression of PPARα and δ, the other two isoforms of PPAR family was also modulated. We conclude that piroxicam and c-phycocyanin exert their anti-neoplastic effects via regulating membrane properties, raising calpain-9 and PPARγ expression while suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in experimental colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24721324

  3. Super-Transactivation TP53 Variant in the Germline of a Family with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Id Said, Badr; Kim, Han; Tran, James; Novokmet, Ana; Malkin, David

    2016-09-01

    Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant familial cancer syndrome, characterized by multiple malignancies and frequent germline alterations in TP53. In this study, we highlight four unclassified exonic TP53 variants detected in patients with a suspected diagnosis of LFS. Most intriguing was the discovery of a "super-transactivation" variant within Exon 10 of TP53 (c.1079G>T/p.G360V). Functional analysis of this novel variant revealed a paradoxical "super-transactivation" effect on tp53 response elements and a corresponding tumor suppressive effect on colony formation and apoptosis. While unlikely to be disease-causing, we propose that this variant may represent a novel tp53 polymorphism and potential phenotypic modifier in LFS. In the future, the enhanced transactivation effects of p.G360V-tp53 may also prove useful in designing more efficacious tp53-based gene therapies. PMID:27297285

  4. A versatile cis-blocking and trans-activation strategy for ribozyme characterization

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Andrew B.; Liang, Joe C.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic RNA control devices that use ribozymes as gene-regulatory components have been applied to controlling cellular behaviors in response to environmental signals. Quantitative measurement of the in vitro cleavage rate constants associated with ribozyme-based devices is essential for advancing the molecular design and optimization of this class of gene-regulatory devices. One of the key challenges encountered in ribozyme characterization is the efficient generation of full-length RNA from in vitro transcription reactions, where conditions generally lead to significant ribozyme cleavage. Current methods for generating full-length ribozyme-encoding RNA rely on a trans-blocking strategy, which requires a laborious gel separation and extraction step. Here, we develop a simple two-step gel-free process including cis-blocking and trans-activation steps to support scalable generation of functional full-length ribozyme-encoding RNA. We demonstrate our strategy on various types of natural ribozymes and synthetic ribozyme devices, and the cleavage rate constants obtained for the RNA generated from our strategy are comparable with those generated through traditional methods. We further develop a rapid, label-free ribozyme cleavage assay based on surface plasmon resonance, which allows continuous, real-time monitoring of ribozyme cleavage. The surface plasmon resonance-based characterization assay will complement the versatile cis-blocking and trans-activation strategy to broadly advance our ability to characterize and engineer ribozyme-based devices. PMID:23155065

  5. Limited species differences in estrogen receptor alpha-medicated reporter gene transactivation by xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Kayo; Ooe, Norihisa; Saito, Koichi; Kaneko, Hideo

    2003-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) play an important role in estrogen function. However, it is well known that there are species differences in amino acid sequences of the ligand binding domains. Here, we report on the analysis of species differences in ER-dependent transactivation with some chemicals using reporter gene assays. Full-length ER cDNAs from human, rat, chicken, alligator (Caiman), whiptail lizard, African clawed frog and rainbow trout were prepared from hepatic mRNA by the RT-PCR method and inserted into expression plasmids. Both expression and reporter plasmids were transiently transfected into HeLa cells, and then the estrogenic effects of chemicals were analyzed in terms of induction of luciferase activity. No species differences in transactivation were found among human, rat, chicken, alligator, whiptail lizard and African clawed frog ERs. However, thermo-dependent alteration in susceptibility to 17-beta-estradiol was observed with the rainbow trout ER because of thermo-dependence of estrogen binding. PMID:12648522

  6. Enhancement of transactivation activity of Rta of Epstein-Barr virus by RanBPM.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung; Kuo, Chung-Wen; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2008-05-30

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses the immediate-early protein Rta to activate the transcription of EBV lytic genes and the lytic cycle. We show that RanBPM acts as a binding partner of Rta in yeast two-hybrid analysis. The binding was confirmed by glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assay. A coimmunoprecipitation experiment and confocal microscopy revealed that RanBPM and Rta interact in vivo and colocalize in the nucleus. The interaction appears to involve the SPRY domain in RanBPM and the region between amino acid residues 416 to 476 in Rta. The interaction promotes the transactivation activity of Rta in activating the transcription of BMLF1 and p21 in transient transfection assays. Additionally, RanBPM interacts with SUMO-E2 (Ubc9) to promote sumoylation of Rta by SUMO-1. This fact explains why the expression of RanBPM enhances the transactivation activity of Rta. Taken together, the present results indicate a new role of RanBPM in regulating a viral protein that is critical to EBV lytic activation. PMID:18455188

  7. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A; Lizee, Gregory A; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-05-24

    Cancer cells develop under immune surveillance, thus necessitating immune escape for successful growth. Loss of MHC class I expression provides a key immune evasion strategy in many cancers, although the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. MHC class I transactivator (CITA), known as "NLRC5" [NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5], has recently been identified as a critical transcriptional coactivator of MHC class I gene expression. Here we show that the MHC class I transactivation pathway mediated by CITA/NLRC5 constitutes a target for cancer immune evasion. In all the 21 tumor types we examined, NLRC5 expression was highly correlated with the expression of MHC class I, with cytotoxic T-cell markers, and with genes in the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway, including LMP2/LMP7, TAP1, and β2-microglobulin. Epigenetic and genetic alterations in cancers, including promoter methylation, copy number loss, and somatic mutations, were most prevalent in NLRC5 among all MHC class I-related genes and were associated with the impaired expression of components of the MHC class I pathway. Strikingly, NLRC5 expression was significantly associated with the activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells and patient survival in multiple cancer types. Thus, NLRC5 constitutes a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cancers. PMID:27162338

  8. Enhancement of alkaloid production in opium and California poppy by transactivation using heterologous regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Apuya, Nestor R; Park, Joon-Hyun; Zhang, Liping; Ahyow, Maurice; Davidow, Patricia; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Rarang, Joel C; Hippley, Matthew; Johnson, Thomas W; Yoo, Hye-Dong; Trieu, Anthony; Krueger, Shannon; Wu, Chuan-yin; Lu, Yu-ping; Flavell, Richard B; Bobzin, Steven C

    2008-02-01

    Genes encoding regulatory factors isolated from Arabidopsis, soybean and corn have been screened to identify those that modulate the expression of genes encoding for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of morphinan alkaloids in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and benzophenanthridine alkaloids in California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). In opium poppy, the over-expression of selected regulatory factors increased the levels of PsCOR (codeinone reductase), Ps4'OMT (S-adenosyl-l-methionine:3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase) and Ps6OMT [(R,S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase] transcripts by 10- to more than 100-fold. These transcriptional activations translated into an enhancement of alkaloid production in opium poppy of up to at least 10-fold. In California poppy, the transactivation effect of regulatory factor WRKY1 resulted in an increase of up to 60-fold in the level of EcCYP80B1 [(S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase] and EcBBE (berberine bridge enzyme) transcripts. As a result, the accumulations of selected alkaloid intermediates were enhanced up to 30-fold. The transactivation effects of other regulatory factors led to the accumulation of the same intermediates. These regulatory factors also led to the production of new alkaloids in California poppy callus culture. PMID:17961129

  9. Equilibrium dissociation and unfolding of human papillomavirus E2 transactivation domain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nitu; Kanthaje, Shruthi; Bose, Kakoli

    2015-08-01

    Papillomavirus E2 protein that performs essential functions such as viral oncogene expression and replication represents specific target for therapeutic intervention. DNA-binding activity is associated with its C-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD), while the N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) is responsible for replication and transactivation functions. Although both demonstrate large dependence on dimerization for mediating their functions, KD for N-terminal dimerization is significantly high suggesting more dynamic role of this domain. However, unlike DBD, very little information is available on TAD dimerization, its folding and stability. Therefore, with an aim at delineating the regulatory switch of its dimerization, we have characterized high-risk HPV18 E2 TAD. Our studies demonstrate that E2 TAD is a weak but thermodynamically stable dimer (KD ∼ 1.8 μM, [Formula: see text]  = 18.8 kcal mol(-1)) with α2-α3 helices forming the interface. It follows a three-state folding pathway, in which unfolding involves dissociation of a dimeric intermediate. Interestingly, 90% of the conformational free energy is associated with dimer dissociation (16.9 of 18.8 kcal mol(-1)) suggesting dimerization significantly contributes to its overall thermodynamic stability. These revelations might be important toward designing inhibitors for targeting dimerization or folding intermediates and hence multiple functions that E2 performs. PMID:26091566

  10. Inhibition of HIV-1 reactivation by a telomerase-derived peptide in a HSP90-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide vaccine designed to induce T-cell immunity to telomerase, GV1001, has been shown to modulate cellular signaling pathways and confer a direct anti-cancer effect through the interaction with heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and 70. Here, we have found that GV1001 can modulate transactivation protein-mediated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. GV1001 treatment resulted in significant suppression of HIV-1 replication and rescue of infected cells from death by HIV-1. Transactivation of HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR) was inhibited by GV1001, indicating that GV1001 suppressed the transcription from proviral HIV DNA. The anti-HIV-1 activity of GV1001 was completely abrogated by an HSP90-neutralizing antibody, indicating that the antiviral activity depends on HSP90. Further mechanistic studies revealed that GV1001 suppresses basal NF-κB activation, which is required for HIV-1 LTR transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. Inhibition of LTR transactivation by GV1001 suggests its potential to suppress HIV-1 reactivation from latency. Indeed, PMA-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latent infected cells was suppressed by GV1001. The results suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001, a peptide proven to be safe for human use, as an anti-HIV-1 agent to suppress the reactivation from latently infected cells. PMID:27363520

  11. Inhibition of HIV-1 reactivation by a telomerase-derived peptide in a HSP90-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide vaccine designed to induce T-cell immunity to telomerase, GV1001, has been shown to modulate cellular signaling pathways and confer a direct anti-cancer effect through the interaction with heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and 70. Here, we have found that GV1001 can modulate transactivation protein-mediated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. GV1001 treatment resulted in significant suppression of HIV-1 replication and rescue of infected cells from death by HIV-1. Transactivation of HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR) was inhibited by GV1001, indicating that GV1001 suppressed the transcription from proviral HIV DNA. The anti-HIV-1 activity of GV1001 was completely abrogated by an HSP90-neutralizing antibody, indicating that the antiviral activity depends on HSP90. Further mechanistic studies revealed that GV1001 suppresses basal NF-κB activation, which is required for HIV-1 LTR transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. Inhibition of LTR transactivation by GV1001 suggests its potential to suppress HIV-1 reactivation from latency. Indeed, PMA-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latent infected cells was suppressed by GV1001. The results suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001, a peptide proven to be safe for human use, as an anti-HIV-1 agent to suppress the reactivation from latently infected cells. PMID:27363520

  12. Mutational analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev transactivator: essential residues near the amino terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Hope, T J; McDonald, D; Huang, X J; Low, J; Parslow, T G

    1990-01-01

    The expression of certain mRNAs from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is controlled by the viral transactivator Rev, a nucleolar protein that binds a cis-acting element in these mRNAs. Rev is encoded by two viral exons that specify amino acids 1 to 26 and 27 to 116, respectively. Earlier studies have mapped essential regions of the protein that are encoded in the second exon. By further mutational analysis of Rev, we have now identified a novel locus encoded by the first exon that also is essential for transactivation in vivo. Defined by mutations at residues 14 to 20, this locus coincides with a cluster of positively charged and nonpolar amino acids that is conserved in Rev proteins of all known primate immunodeficiency viruses. Rev proteins that contained mutations at this site were defective in both nuclear localization and transactivation and did not function as trans-dominant inhibitors of wild-type Rev. Fusion of these mutants to a heterologous nuclear protein complemented the defect in localization but did not restore biological activity. Our findings suggest that this N-terminal locus may play a direct role in transactivation, perhaps contributing to essential protein-protein interactions or forming part of the RNA-binding domain of Rev. Images PMID:2120472

  13. Bovine papillomavirus type 1 genomes and the E2 transactivator protein are closely associated with mitotic chromatin.

    PubMed

    Skiadopoulos, M H; McBride, A A

    1998-03-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transactivator protein is required for viral transcriptional regulation and DNA replication and may be important for long-term episomal maintenance of viral genomes within replicating cells (M. Piirsoo, E. Ustav, T. Mandel, A. Stenlund, and M. Ustav, EMBO J. 15:1-11, 1996). We have evidence that, in contrast to most other transcriptional transactivators, the E2 transactivator protein is associated with mitotic chromosomes in dividing cells. The shorter E2-TR and E8/E2 repressor proteins do not bind to mitotic chromatin, and the N-terminal transactivation domain of the E2 protein is necessary for the association. However, the DNA binding function of E2 is not required. We have found that bovine papillomavirus type 1 genomes are also associated with mitotic chromosomes, and we propose a model in which E2-bound viral genomes are transiently associated with cellular chromosomes during mitosis to ensure that viral genomes are segregated to daughter cells in approximately equal numbers. PMID:9499063

  14. Phosphorylation of RAF Kinase Dimers Drives Conformational Changes that Facilitate Transactivation.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, Pablo G; Rauch, Nora; Pilkington, Ruth; Rybakova, Katja; Nguyen, Lan K; Kholodenko, Boris N; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Kolch, Walter; Rosta, Edina

    2016-01-18

    RAF kinases are key players in the MAPK signaling pathway and are important targets for personalized cancer therapy. RAF dimerization is part of the physiological activation mechanism, together with phosphorylation, and is known to convey resistance to RAF inhibitors. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations are used to show that phosphorylation of a key N-terminal acidic (NtA) motif facilitates RAF dimerization by introducing several interprotomer salt bridges between the αC-helix and charged residues upstream of the NtA motif. Additionally, we show that the R-spine of RAF interacts with a conserved Trp residue in the vicinity of the NtA motif, connecting the active sites of two protomers and thereby modulating the cooperative interactions in the RAF dimer. Our findings provide a first structure-based mechanism for the auto-transactivation of RAF and could be generally applicable to other kinases, opening new pathways for overcoming dimerization-related drug resistance. PMID:26644280

  15. Sterol fatty acid esters from the mushroom Hericium erinaceum and their PPAR transactivational effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhou, Wei; Song, Seok Bean; Shim, Sang Hee; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-12-26

    Six new (erinarols A-F, 1-6) and five known (7-11) ergostane-type sterol fatty acid esters were isolated from the methanol extract of the dried fruiting bodies of Hericium erinaceum. Their chemical structures were elucidated using chemical and physical methods as well as through comparison of NMR and mass spectral data with those reported previously. This is the first comprehensive investigation on ergostane-type sterol fatty acid esters from H. erinaceum. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their PPAR transactivational effects using a luciferase reporter system. Compounds 1 and 2 significantly activated the transcriptional activity of PPARs in a dose-dependent manner, with EC50 values of 8.2 and 6.4 μM, respectively. Moreover, compounds 1 and 2 also activated PPARα and PPARγ transcriptional activity, with stimulation from 1.3- to 3.9-fold at 20 μM concentrations. PMID:25437304

  16. Enhancement of gene transactivation activity of androgen receptor by hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Yanyan; Chen Wenling; Ma, W.-L. Maverick; Chang Chawnshang; Ou, J.-H. James . E-mail: jamesou@hsc.usc.edu

    2007-07-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) is a regulatory protein that is required for efficient replication of HBV in its natural host. In this report, we demonstrate by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that HBx can physically bind to the androgen receptor (AR), which is a nuclear hormone receptor that is expressed in many different tissues including the liver. This observation is further supported by confocal microscopy, which reveals that HBx can alter the subcellular localization of the AR both in the presence and in the absence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Further studies indicate that HBx can enhance the gene transactivation activity of AR by enhancing its DNA binding activity in a DHT-dependent manner. However, HBx does not remain associated with AR on the DNA. As AR can regulate the expression of a number of cellular genes, our results raise the possibility that HBV pathogenesis may be mediated in part via the interaction between HBx and AR.

  17. Sox transcription factors require selective interactions with Oct4 and specific transactivation functions to mediate reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Irene; Jauch, Ralf; Eras, Volker; Chng, Wen-Bin Alfred; Chen, Jiaxuan; Divakar, Ushashree; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Stanton, Lawrence W

    2013-12-01

    The unique ability of Sox2 to cooperate with Oct4 at selective binding sites in the genome is critical for reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We have recently demonstrated that Sox17 can be converted into a reprogramming factor by alteration of a single amino acid (Sox17EK) within its DNA binding HMG domain. Here we expanded this study by introducing analogous mutations to 10 other Sox proteins and interrogated the role of N-and C-termini on the reprogramming efficiency. We found that point-mutated Sox7 and Sox17 can convert human and mouse fibroblasts into iPSCs, but Sox4, Sox5, Sox6, Sox8, Sox9, Sox11, Sox12, Sox13, and Sox18 cannot. Next we studied regions outside the HMG domain and found that the C-terminal transactivation domain of Sox17 and Sox7 enhances the potency of Sox2 in iPSC assays and confers weak reprogramming potential to the otherwise inactive Sox4EK and Sox18EK proteins. These results suggest that the glutamate (E) to lysine (K) mutation in the HMG domain is necessary but insufficient to swap the function of Sox factors. Moreover, the HMG domain alone fused to the VP16 transactivation domain is able to induce reprogramming, albeit at low efficiency. By molecular dissection of the C-terminus of Sox17, we found that the β-catenin interaction region contributes to the enhanced reprogramming efficiency of Sox17EK. To mechanistically understand the enhanced reprogramming potential of Sox17EK, we analyzed ChIP-sequencing and expression data and identified a subset of candidate genes specifically regulated by Sox17EK and not by Sox2. PMID:23963638

  18. Identification of transcriptional regulatory nodes in soybean defense networks using transient co-transactivation assays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongli; Wang, Hui; Ma, Yujie; Du, Haiping; Yang, Qing; Yu, Deyue

    2015-01-01

    Plant responses to major environmental stressors, such as insect feeding, not only occur via the functions of defense genes but also involve a series of regulatory factors. Our previous transcriptome studies proposed that, in addition to two defense-related genes, GmVSPβ and GmN:IFR, a high proportion of transcription factors (TFs) participate in the incompatible soybean-common cutworm interaction networks. However, the regulatory mechanisms and effects of these TFs on those induced defense-related genes remain unknown. In the present work, we isolated and identified 12 genes encoding MYB, WRKY, NAC, bZIP, and DREB TFs from a common cutworm-induced cDNA library of a resistant soybean line. Sequence analysis of the promoters of three co-expressed genes, including GmVSPα, GmVSPβ, and GmN:IFR, revealed the enrichment of various TF-binding sites for defense and stress responses. To further identify the regulatory nodes composed of these TFs and defense gene promoters, we performed extensive transient co-transactivation assays to directly test the transcriptional activity of the 12 TFs binding at different levels to the three co-expressed gene promoters. The results showed that all 12 TFs were able to transactivate the GmVSPβ and GmN:IFR promoters. GmbZIP110 and GmMYB75 functioned as distinct regulators of GmVSPα/β and GmN:IFR expression, respectively, while GmWRKY39 acted as a common central regulator of GmVSPα/β and GmN:IFR expression. These corresponding TFs play crucial roles in coordinated plant defense regulation, which provides valuable information for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in insect-induced transcriptional regulation in soybean. More importantly, the identified TFs and suitable promoters can be used to engineer insect-resistant plants in molecular breeding studies. PMID:26579162

  19. Functional characterization of the transactivation properties of the PDX-1 homeodomain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Peshavaria, M; Henderson, E; Sharma, A; Wright, C V; Stein, R

    1997-01-01

    Pancreas formation is prevented in mice carrying a null mutation in the PDX-1 homeoprotein, demonstrating a key role for this factor in development. PDX-1 can also bind to and activate transcription from cis-acting regulatory sequences in the insulin and somatostatin genes, which are expressed in pancreatic islet beta and delta cells, respectively. In this study, we compared the functional properties of PDX-1 with those of the closely related Xenopus homeoprotein XIHbox8. Analysis of chimeras between PDX-1, XIHbox8, and the DNA-binding domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor GAL4 revealed that their transactivation domain was contained within the N-terminal region (amino acids 1 to 79). Detailed mutagenesis of this region indicated that transactivation is mediated by three highly conserved sequences, spanning amino acids 13 to 22 (subdomain A), 32 to 38 (subdomain B), and 60 to 73 (subdomain C). These sequences were also required by PDX-1 to synergistically activate insulin enhancer-mediated transcription with another key insulin gene activator, the E2A-encoded basic helix-loop-helix E2-5 and E47 proteins. These results indicated that N-terminal sequences conserved between the mammalian PDX-1 and Xenopus XIHbox8 proteins are important in transcriptional activation. Stable expression of the PDX-1 deltaABC mutant in the insulin- and PDX-1-expressing betaTC3 cell line resulted in a threefold reduction in the rate of endogenous insulin gene transcription. Strikingly, the level of the endogenous PDX-1 protein was reduced to very low levels in these cells. These results suggest that PDX-1 is not absolutely essential for insulin gene expression in betaTC3 cells. We discuss the possible significance of these findings for insulin gene transcription in islet beta cells. PMID:9199333

  20. A novel simian virus 40 early-region domain mediates transactivation of the cyclin A promoter by small-t antigen and is required for transformation in small-t antigen-dependent assays.

    PubMed Central

    Porrás, A; Bennett, J; Howe, A; Tokos, K; Bouck, N; Henglein, B; Sathyamangalam, S; Thimmapaya, B; Rundell, K

    1996-01-01

    At least three regions of the simian virus 40 small-t antigen (small-t) contribute to the protein's ability to enhance cellular transformation. As we showed previously for rat F111 cells, one region includes sequences from residues 97 to 103 that are involved in the binding and inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A. In the present study, the role of the protein phosphatase 2A binding region was confirmed in two additional small-t-dependent transformation systems. Second, small-t was found to provide a function previously identified as a large-T transformation domain. Mutations in residues 19 to 28 of large-T affected its transforming ability, but these mutations were complemented by a wild-type small-t. A third region of small-t was also required for efficient transformation. This region, the 42-47 region, is shared by large-T and small-t and contains a conserved HPDKGG hexapeptide. The 42-47 region function could be provided by either small-t or large-T in small-t-dependent systems. Mutations in the 42-47 region reduced the ability of small-t to transactivate the cyclin A promoter, of interest because small-t increased endogenous cyclin A mRNA levels in both human and monkey cells, as well as transactivating the promoter in transient assays. PMID:8794333

  1. Ligand-dependent serum response factor activation by the human CC chemokine receptors CCR2a and CCR2b is mediated by G proteins of the Gq family.

    PubMed

    Vatter, Petra; Schuhholz, Julia; Koenig, Carolin; Pfreimer, Mariana; Moepps, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Expression of the human CCR2 receptors, CCR2a and CCR2b, in mammalian cells results in ligand-dependent changes in the activity of multiple cellular signal transduction pathways, mediated in most cases by pertussis toxin-sensitive heterotrimeric G proteins of the Gi/o subfamily. In addition, CCR2a and CCR2b receptors have been shown to couple to Gq family members, triggering the canonical activation of phospholipase Cβ isoenzymes. Activation of pertussis toxin-insensitive Gq proteins by cell-surface receptors is not only coupled to activation of phospholipase isoenzymes but also to Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors, which in turn mediate activation of the Rho GTPases. Activated Rho GTPases regulate numerous cellular functions, including the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and gene transcription, such as the transcription factor serum response factor. These findings prompted us to investigate whether CCR2a and/or CCR2b stimulate serum response factor activity. The results presented herein demonstrate that stimulation of human CCR2a- or CCR2b-expressing COS-7 cells caused a vigorous induction of serum response factor activity. This effect was specifically mediated by Gq and/or G14, as well as Rho A and/or a closely related Rho GTPase. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect of CCR2a and CCR2b and Gαq was sensitive to coexpression of the Gαq-interacting leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The findings of the work indicate a role for Gαq and/or Gα14 and in CCR2a/CCR2b-stimulated Rho A GTPase-mediated serum response factor activation and introduce a noncanonical pathway activated by CCR2 receptors by coupling to Gq proteins. PMID:26823487

  2. MDM2 binds and inhibits vitamin D receptor

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Kristina; Heil, Tessa-Carina; Bette, Birgit; Reichrath, Jörg; Roemer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase and transcriptional repressor MDM2 is a potent inhibitor of the p53 family of transcription factors and tumor suppressors. Herein, we report that vitamin D receptor (VDR), another transcriptional regulator and probably, tumor suppressor, is also bound and inhibited by MDM2. This interaction was not affected by vitamin D ligand. VDR was ubiquitylated in the cell and its steady-state level was controlled by the proteasome. Strikingly, overproduced MDM2 reduced the level of VDR whereas knockdown of endogenous MDM2 increased the level of VDR. In addition to ubiquitin-marking proteins for degradation, MDM2, once recruited to promoters by DNA-binding interaction partners, can inhibit the transactivation of genes. Transient transfections with a VDR-responsive luciferase reporter revealed that low levels of MDM2 potently suppress VDR-mediated transactivation. Conversely, knockdown of MDM2 resulted in a significant increase of transcript from the CYP24A1 and p21 genes, noted cellular targets of transactivation by liganded VDR. Our findings suggest that MDM2 negatively regulates VDR in some analogy to p53. PMID:25969952

  3. The cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 transactivates epithelial membrane protein 2, a potential tumor suppressor in the urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Feng; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Wu, Wen-Ren; Liao, Yu-Jing; Chen, Lih-Ren; Huang, Chun-Nung; Li, Ching-Chia; Li, Wei-Ming; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ling; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chow, Nan-Haw; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2015-04-20

    In this study, we report that EMP2 plays a tumor suppressor role by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest, suppressing cell viability, proliferation, colony formation/anchorage-independent cell growth via regulation of G2/M checkpoints in distinct urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC)-derived cell lines. Genistein treatment or exogenous expression of the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) gene in different UBUC-derived cell lines induced EMP2 transcription and subsequent translation. Mutagenesis on either or both cAMP-responsive element(s) dramatically decreased the EMP2 promoter activity with, without genistein treatment or exogenous CREB1 expression, respectively. Significantly correlation between the EMP2 immunointensity and primary tumor, nodal status, histological grade, vascular invasion and mitotic activity was identified. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that low EMP2 immunoexpression is an independent prognostic factor for poor disease-specific survival. Genistein treatments, knockdown of EMP2 gene and double knockdown of CREB1 and EMP2 genes significantly inhibited tumor growth and notably downregulated CREB1 and EMP2 protein levels in the mice xenograft models. Therefore, genistein induced CREB1 transcription, translation and upregulated pCREB1(S133) protein level. Afterward, pCREB1(S133) transactivated the tumor suppressor gene, EMP2, in vitro and in vivo. Our study identified a novel transcriptional target, which plays a tumor suppressor role, of CREB1. PMID:25940704

  4. Neuroprotective effects of a chromatin modifier on ischemia/reperfusion neurons: implication of its regulation of BCL2 transactivation by ERα signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun; Zhang, Tao; Yu, Jia; Li, Hong-Zeng; Zhao, Cong; Qiu, Jing; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Jie; Li, Wei; Zhao, Tian-Zhi

    2016-06-01

    An understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-mediated neuroprotective effects is valuable for the development of therapeutic strategy against neuronal ischemic injury. Here, we report the upregulated expression of metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1), a master chromatin modifier and transcriptional regulator, in the murine middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model. Inhibition of MTA1 expression by in vivo short interfering RNA treatment potentiated neuronal apoptosis in a caspase-3-dependent manner and thereafter aggravated MCAO-induced neuronal damage. Mechanistically, the pro-survival effects of MTA1 required the participation of ERα signaling. We also provide in vitro evidence that MTA1 enhances the binding of ERα with the BCL2 promoter upon ischemic insults via recruitment of HDAC2 together with other unidentified coregulators, thus promoting the ERα-mediated transactivation of the BCL2 gene. Collectively, our results suggest that the augmentation of endogenous MTA1 expression during neuronal ischemic injury acts additionally to an endocrinous cascade orchestrating intimate interactions between ERα and BCL2 pathways and operates as an indispensable defensive mechanism in response to neuronal ischemia/reperfusion stress. Future studies in this field will shed light on the modulation of the complicated neuroprotective effects by estrogen signaling. PMID:26728277

  5. The cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 transactivates epithelial membrane protein 2, a potential tumor suppressor in the urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Ren; Liao, Yu-Jing; Chen, Lih-Ren; Huang, Chun-Nung; Li, Ching-Chia; Li, Wei-Ming; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ling; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chow, Nan-Haw; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report that EMP2 plays a tumor suppressor role by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest, suppressing cell viability, proliferation, colony formation/anchorage-independent cell growth via regulation of G2/M checkpoints in distinct urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC)-derived cell lines. Genistein treatment or exogenous expression of the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) gene in different UBUC-derived cell lines induced EMP2 transcription and subsequent translation. Mutagenesis on either or both cAMP-responsive element(s) dramatically decreased the EMP2 promoter activity with, without genistein treatment or exogenous CREB1 expression, respectively. Significantly correlation between the EMP2 immunointensity and primary tumor, nodal status, histological grade, vascular invasion and mitotic activity was identified. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that low EMP2 immunoexpression is an independent prognostic factor for poor disease-specific survival. Genistein treatments, knockdown of EMP2 gene and double knockdown of CREB1 and EMP2 genes significantly inhibited tumor growth and notably downregulated CREB1 and EMP2 protein levels in the mice xenograft models. Therefore, genistein induced CREB1 transcription, translation and upregulated pCREB1(S133) protein level. Afterward, pCREB1(S133) transactivated the tumor suppressor gene, EMP2, in vitro and in vivo. Our study identified a novel transcriptional target, which plays a tumor suppressor role, of CREB1. PMID:25940704

  6. Activating transcription factor 4 mediates a multidrug resistance phenotype of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells through transactivation of STAT3 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongwu; Chen, Xiong; Chen, Bin; Chen, Bei; Fan, Jianyong; Song, Weibing; Xie, Ziying; Jiang, Dan; Li, Qiuqiong; Zhou, Meihua; Sun, Dayong; Zhao, Yagang

    2014-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major challenge to the clinical treatment of esophageal cancer. The stress response gene activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is involved in homeostasis and cellular protection. However, relatively little is known about the expression and function of ATF4 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) MDR. In this study, we investigate the potential role and mechanisms of ATF4 in ESCC MDR. We demonstrated that overexpression of ATF4 promotes the MDR phenotype in ESCC cells, while depletion of ATF4 in the MDR ESCC cell line induces drug re-sensitization. We also demonstrated that ATF4 transactivates STAT3 expression by directly binding to the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) promoter, resulting in MDR in ESCC cells. Significantly, inhibition of STAT3 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or a selective inhibitor (JSI-124) reintroduces therapeutic sensitivity. In addition, increased Bcl-2, survivin, and MRP1 expression levels were observed in ATF4-overexpressing cells. In conclusion, ATF4 may promote MDR in ESCC cells through the up-regulation of STAT3 expression, and thus is an attractive therapeutic target to combat therapeutic resistance in ESCC. PMID:25130172

  7. miR-16 Targets Transcriptional Corepressor SMRT and Modulates NF-kappaB-Regulated Transactivation of Interleukin-8 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoku; Gong, Ai-Yu; Drescher, Kristen M.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The signaling pathways associated with the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) are essential to pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression, as well as initiating innate epithelial immune responses. The TLR/NF-κB signaling pathways must be stringently controlled through an intricate network of positive and negative regulatory elements. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding small RNAs that regulate the stability and/or translation of protein-coding mRNAs. Herein we report that miR-16 promotes NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene by suppression of the silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT). LPS stimulation activated miR-16 gene transcription in human monocytes (U937) and biliary epithelial cells (H69) through MAPK-dependent mechanisms. Transfection of cells with the miR-16 precursor promoted LPS-induced production of IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1α, without a significant effect on their RNA stability. Instead, an increase in NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene was confirmed in cells following transfection of miR-16 precursor. Importantly, miR-16 targeted the 3′-untranslated region of SMRT and caused translational suppression of SMRT. LPS decreased SMRT expression via upregulation of miR-16. Moreover, functional manipulation of SMRT altered NF-κB-regulated transactivation of LPS-induced IL-8 expression. These data suggest that miR-16 targets SMRT and modulates NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene. PMID:22292036

  8. Non-transactivational, dual pathways for LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation in primary cultures of brown pre-adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Holmstroem, Therese E.; Mattsson, Charlotte L.; Wang, Yanling; Iakovleva, Irina; Petrovic, Natasa; Nedergaard, Jan

    2010-10-01

    In many cell types, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-induced Erk1/2 MAP kinase activation is mediated via receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) transactivation, in particular via the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting via GPCRs, is a mitogen and MAP kinase activator in many systems, and LPA can regulate adipocyte proliferation. The mechanism by which LPA activates the Erk1/2 MAP kinase is generally accepted to be via EGF receptor transactivation. In primary cultures of brown pre-adipocytes, EGF can induce Erk1/2 activation, which is obligatory and determinant for EGF-induced proliferation of these cells. Therefore, we have here examined whether LPA, via EGF transactivation, can activate Erk1/2 in brown pre-adipocytes. We found that LPA could induce Erk1/2 activation. However, the LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation was independent of transactivation of EGF receptors (or PDGF receptors) in these cells (whereas in transformed HIB-1B brown adipocytes, the LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation indeed proceeded via EGF receptor transactivation). In the brown pre-adipocytes, LPA instead induced Erk1/2 activation via two distinct non-transactivational pathways, one G{sub i}-protein dependent, involving PKC and Src activation, the other, a PTX-insensitive pathway, involving PI3K (but not Akt) activation. Earlier studies showing LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation being fully dependent on RTK transactivation have all been performed in cell lines and transfected cells. The present study implies that in non-transformed systems, RTK transactivation may not be involved in the mediation of GPCR-induced Erk1/2 MAP kinase activation.

  9. Alpha1a-Adrenoceptor Genetic Variant Triggers Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Hyperproliferation and Agonist Induced Hypertrophy via EGFR Transactivation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schwinn, Debra A.; Oganesian, Anush

    2015-01-01

    α1a Adrenergic receptors (α1aARs) are the predominant AR subtype in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). α1aARs in resistance vessels are crucial in the control of blood pressure, yet the impact of naturally occurring human α1aAR genetic variants in cardiovascular disorders remains poorly understood. To this end, we present novel findings demonstrating that 3D cultures of vascular SMCs expressing human α1aAR-247R (247R) genetic variant demonstrate significantly increased SMC contractility compared with cells expressing the α1aAR-WT (WT) receptor. Stable expression of 247R genetic variant also triggers MMP/EGFR-transactivation dependent serum- and agonist-independent (constitutive) hyperproliferation and agonist-dependent hypertrophy of SMCs. Agonist stimulation reduces contractility Using pathway-specific inhibitors we determined that the observed hyperproliferation of 247R-expressing cells is triggered via β-arrestin1/Src/MMP-2/EGFR/ERK-dependent mechanism. MMP-2-specific siRNA inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation indicating MMP-2 involvement in 247R-triggered hyperproliferation in SMCs. β-arrestin1-specific shRNA also inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation but did not affect hypertrophy in 247R-expressing SMCs, indicating that agonist-dependent hypertrophy is independent of β-arrestin1. Our data reveal that in different cardiovascular cells the same human receptor genetic variant can activate alternative modulators of the same signaling pathway. Thus, our findings in SMCs demonstrate that depending on the type of cells expressing the same receptor (or receptor variant), different target-specific inhibitors could be used to modulate aberrant hyperproliferative or hypertrophic pathways in order to restore normal phenotype. PMID:26571308

  10. Lysophosphatidic Acid-induced ERK Activation and Chemotaxis in MC3T3-E1 Preosteoblasts are Independent of EGF Receptor Transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Chrisler, William B.; Bollinger, Nikki; Karin, Norman J.

    2009-06-01

    Growing evidence indicates that bone-forming osteoblasts and their progenitors are target cells for the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) which is produced by degranulating platelets at sites of injury. LPA is a potent inducer of bone cell migration, proliferation and survival in vitro and an attractive candidate to facilitate preosteoblast chemotaxis during skeletal regeneration in vivo, but the intracellular signaling pathways mediating the effects of this lipid on bone cells are not defined. In this study we measured the ability of LPA to stimulate extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2) in MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells and determined the contribution of this pathway to LPA-stimulated chemotaxis. LPA-treated cells exhibited a bimodal activation of ERK1/2 with maximal phosphorylation at 5 and 60 minutes. The kinetics of ERK1/2 phosphorylation were not coupled to Ras activation or LPA-induced elevations in cytosolic Ca2+. While LPA is coupled to the transactivation of the EGF receptor in many cell types, LPA-stimulated ERK1/2 activation in MC3T3-E1 cells was unaffected by inhibition of EGF receptor function. ERK isoforms rapidly accumulated at nuclear sites in LPA-treated cells, a process that was blocked if ERK1/2 phosphorylation was prevented with the MEK1 inhibitor U0126. Blocking ERK1/2 phosphorylation with U0126 also diminished MC3T3-E1 cell migration and altered the normal disassembly of LPA-induced stress fibers, while the inhibition of EGF receptor function had no effect on LPA-coupled preosteoblast motility. Our results identify ERK1/2 activation as a mediatora mediator of LPA-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cell migration that may be relevant to preosteoblast motility during bone repair in vivo.

  11. Neutrophil elastase enhances IL-12p40 production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages via transactivation of the PAR-2/EGFR/TLR4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are involved in innate immune responses and signaling cross-talk between these receptor molecules has the potential to augment an ongoing inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible cooperative influence of PAR-2 and TLR4 on IL-12p40 production by macrophages after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). During culture, GM-CSF upregulated PAR-2 expression by macrophages in a time-dependent manner. Stimulation with LPS enhanced IL-12p40 production by macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. While human neutrophil elastase (HNE) did not induce IL-12p40 production, pretreatment of macrophages with HNE synergistically increased the IL-12p40 protein level after LPS exposure. Silencing of TLR4 with small interfering RNA blunted the synergistic enhancement of IL-12p40 by HNE combined with LPS. Silencing of β-arrestin 2, p22phox, or ERK1/2 also inhibited an increase of IL-12p40. Interestingly, transfection of macrophages with small interfering RNA duplexes for DUOX-2, EGFR, TLR4, or TRAF6 significantly blunted the increase of IL-12p40 in response to treatment with HNE plus LPS. U73122 and Rottlerin also inhibited the increased production of IL-12p40. In conclusion, HNE is involved in transactivation of TLR4 through activation of DUOX-2/EGFR and synergistically enhances IL-12p40 production by macrophages stimulated with LPS. PMID:27282560

  12. Transactivation of dianthin transgene expression by African cassava mosaic virus AC2.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y; Saunders, K; Stanley, J

    1997-02-17

    We have recently described a novel strategy for engineering resistance to African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a virus-inducible promoter to control the expression of a plant ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) transgene (Y. Hong et al., Virology 220, 119-127, 1996). Here, we have used a potato virus X (PVX) vector to express the ACMV transactivator protein, AC2, in planta. We confirm that amplification of RIP activity in transgenic plants is mediated by AC2; disruption of AC2 expression by either the introduction of an in-frame stop codon or the deletion of 5'-terminal or 3'-terminal coding sequences reduced RIP expression to the basal level associated with PVX-infected plants. AC2 expression from the PVX vector induced necrosis in nontransformed plants as well as in plants containing the RIP transgene, suggesting that the protein can functionally interact with PVX and/or host factors. The potential of this system to provide a direct and sensitive assay to investigate AC2 function in planta is discussed. PMID:9123846

  13. An alternative model of H ferritin promoter transactivation by c-Jun.

    PubMed Central

    Faniello, Maria C; Chirico, Giuseppa; Quaresima, Barbara; Cuda, Giovanni; Allevato, Giovanna; Bevilacqua, Maria A; Baudi, Francesco; Colantuoni, Vittorio; Cimino, Filiberto; Venuta, Salvatore; Avvedimento, Vittorio E; Costanzo, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    c-Jun is a member of the activator protein 1 family, and its interaction with different nuclear factors generates a wide spectrum of complexes that regulate transcription of different promoters. H ferritin promoter transcription is tightly dependent on nuclear factor Y (NFY). Ferritin transcription is activated by c-Jun, although the promoter does not contain a canonical binding site. NFY, on the other hand, does not bind c-Jun in vitro, whereas in vivo c-Jun is found in the complex containing NFY. Moreover, a c-Jun-GCN4 chimaeric construct containing only the transactivation domain of Jun and the basic-region leucine-zipper domain of GCN4 stimulates the H ferritin promoter. A synthetic GAL4 promoter and the cognate activator, the fusion protein NFY-GAL4, are potently activated by c-Jun. Titration of p300 by co-expressing E1A abolishes the stimulatory effect. Moreover, another p300-dependent promoter, the cAMP-response element, can be superactivated by c-Jun using the same mechanism. These data indicate that c-Jun, when activated or overexpressed, is recruited to the H ferritin promoter by p300, which links NFY, bound to DNA, to the complex. These results add a new level of complexity to transcriptional regulation by c-Jun, which can activate p300-dependent promoters without binding directly to the target DNA. PMID:11903046

  14. The Baculovirus PE38 Protein Augments Apoptosis Induced by Transactivator IE1

    PubMed Central

    Prikhod’ko, Elena A.; Miller, Lois K.

    1999-01-01

    While studying apoptosis induced by baculovirus transactivator IE1 in SF-21 cells, we found that the levels of IE1-induced apoptosis were increased approximately twofold upon cotransfection with the baculovirus early pe38 gene. However, no apoptotic activity was observed in cells transfected with pe38 alone, even when placed under the control of a constitutive promoter. Thus, pe38 was able to augment IE1-induced apoptosis but was unable to induce apoptosis when expressed in SF-21 cells alone. PE38, the full-length product of pe38, is a nuclear protein with RING finger and leucine zipper motifs. Deletion of the amino-terminal region, which contains a putative nuclear localization motif, resulted in cytoplasmic localization of the PE38 mutants. These N-terminal deletion mutants were unable to enhance IE1-induced apoptosis. Mutation of a single conserved leucine (L242) of the leucine zipper motif also eliminated the ability of PE38 to augment apoptosis induced by IE1. In contrast, PE38 mutants with alanine substitutions for conserved cysteine residues (C109 or C138) of the RING finger motif were able to increase IE1-induced apoptosis to levels equivalent to those of wild-type PE38. We propose that PE38 is one of at least two viral factors which collectively evoke a cellular apoptotic response during baculovirus infection. PMID:10400766

  15. Trans-activation of TRPV1 by D1R in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woo; Cho, Pyung Sun; Lee, Han Kyu; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Oh, Seog Bae

    2015-10-01

    TRPV1, a ligand-gated ion channel expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons is modulated by a variety of intracellular signaling pathways. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that plays important roles in motor control, cognition, and pain modulation in the CNS, and acts via a variety of dopamine receptors (D1R-D5R), a class of GPCRs. Although nociceptive sensory neurons express D1-like receptors, very little is known about the effect of dopamine on TRPV1 in the peripheral nervous system. Therefore, in this study, we examined the effects of D1R activation on TRPV1 in mouse DRG neurons using Ca(2+) imaging and immunohistochemical analysis. The D1R agonist SKF-38393 induced reproducible Ca(2+) responses via Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 rather than Ca(2+) mobilization from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed co-expression of D1R and TRPV1 in mouse DRG neurons. The PLC-specific inhibitor blocked the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response, whereas the PKC, DAG lipase, AC, and PKA inhibitors had no effect on the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response. Taken together, our results suggest that the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response results from the direct activation of TRPV1 by a PLC/DAG-mediated membrane-delimited pathway. These results provide evidence that the trans-activation of TRPV1 following D1R activation may contribute to the modulation of pain signaling in nociceptive sensory neurons. PMID:26319554

  16. Radical acceleration of nuclear reprogramming by chromatin remodeling with the transactivation domain of MyoD.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Tani, Tetsuya; Katoku-Kikyo, Nobuko; Kellner, Steven; Karian, Peter; Firpo, Meri; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2011-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be created by reprogramming differentiated cells through introduction of defined genes, most commonly Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM). However, this process is slow and extremely inefficient. Here, we demonstrate radical acceleration of iPSC creation with a fusion gene between Oct4 and the powerful transactivation domain (TAD) of MyoD (M(3)O). Transduction of M(3) O as well as Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc into fibroblasts effectively remodeled patterns of DNA methylation, chromatin accessibility, histone modifications, and protein binding at pluripotency genes, raising the efficiency of making mouse and human iPSCs more than 50-fold in comparison to OSKM. These results identified that one of the most critical barriers to iPSC creation is poor chromatin accessibility and protein recruitment to pluripotency genes. The MyoD TAD has a capability of overcoming this problem. Our approach of fusing TADs to unrelated transcription factors has far-reaching implications as a powerful tool for transcriptional reprogramming beyond application to iPSC technology. PMID:21732495

  17. Brain-Targeted Delivery of Trans-Activating Transcriptor-Conjugated Magnetic PLGA/Lipid Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifang; Sun, Tingting; Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jian; Fu, Yanyan; Du, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Ying; Liu, YongHai; Ma, Kai; Liu, Hongzhi; Song, Yuanjian

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs) were fabricated from PLGA, L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol) (DSPE-PEG-NH2), and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES), naringin (NAR), and glutathione (GSH) were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10%) and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%). The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain. PMID:25187980

  18. SIP1/NHERF2 enhances estrogen receptor alpha transactivation in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Meneses-Morales, Ivan; Tecalco-Cruz, Angeles C.; Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Trujillo-González, Isis; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Méndez-Enríquez, Erika; Cervantes-Roldán, Rafael; Pérez-Sánchez, Víctor; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that possesses two activating domains designated AF-1 and AF-2 that mediate its transcriptional activity. The role of AF-2 is to recruit coregulator protein complexes capable of modifying chromatin condensation status. In contrast, the mechanism responsible for the ligand-independent AF-1 activity and for its synergistic functional interaction with AF-2 is unclear. In this study, we have identified the protein Na+/H+ Exchanger RegulatoryFactor 2 (NHERF2) as an ERα-associated coactivator that interacts predominantly with the AF-1 domain of the nuclear receptor. Overexpression of NHERF2 in breast cancer MCF7 cells produced an increase in ERα transactivation. Interestingly, the presence of SRC-1 in NHERF2 stably overexpressing MCF7 cells produced a synergistic increase in ERα activity. We show further that NHERF2 interacts with ERα and SRC-1 in the promoter region of ERα target genes. The binding of NHERF2 to ERα in MCF7 cells increased cell proliferation and the ability of MCF7 cells to form tumors in a mouse model. We analyzed the expression of NHERF2 in breast cancer tumors finding a 2- to 17-fold increase in its mRNA levels in 50% of the tumor samples compared to normal breast tissue. These results indicate that NHERF2 is a coactivator of ERα that may participate in the development of estrogen-dependent breast cancer tumors. PMID:24771346

  19. Abnormal XPD-induced nuclear receptor transactivation in DNA repair disorders: trichothiodystrophy and xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Khan, Sikandar G; Tamura, Deborah; Ueda, Takahiro; Boyle, Jennifer; Compe, Emmanuel; Egly, Jean-Marc; DiGiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2013-08-01

    XPD (ERCC2) is a DNA helicase involved in nucleotide excision repair and in transcription as a structural bridge tying the transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) core with the cdk-activating kinase complex, which phosphorylates nuclear receptors. Mutations in XPD are associated with several different phenotypes, including trichothiodystrophy (TTD), with sulfur-deficient brittle hair, bone defects, and developmental abnormalities without skin cancer, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), with pigmentary abnormalities and increased skin cancer, or XP/TTD with combined features, including skin cancer. We describe the varied clinical features and mutations in nine patients examined at the National Institutes of Health who were compound heterozygotes for XPD mutations but had different clinical phenotypes: four TTD, three XP, and two combined XP/TTD. We studied TFIIH-dependent transactivation by nuclear receptor for vitamin D (VDR) and thyroid in cells from these patients. The vitamin D stimulation ratio of CYP24 and osteopontin was associated with specific pairs of mutations (reduced in 5, elevated in 1) but not correlated with distinct clinical phenotypes. Thyroid receptor stimulation ratio for KLF9 was not significantly different from normal. XPD mutations frequently were associated with abnormal VDR stimulation in compound heterozygote patients with TTD, XP, or XP/TTD. PMID:23232694

  20. BFV activates the NF-kappaB pathway through its transactivator (BTas) to enhance viral transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jian; Tan Juan; Zhang Xihui; Guo Hongyan; Zhang Qicheng; Guo Tingting; Geng Yunqi; Qiao Wentao

    2010-05-10

    Multiple families of viruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to regulate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling, which plays a pivotal role in diverse cellular events, including virus-host interactions. In this study, we report that bovine foamy virus (BFV) is able to activate the NF-kappaB pathway through the action of its transactivator, BTas. Both cellular IKKbeta and IkappaBalpha also participate in this activation. In addition, we demonstrate that BTas induces the processing of p100, which implies that BTas can activate NF-kappaB through a noncanonical pathway as well. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis shows that BTas interacts with IKK catalytic subunits (IKKalpha and IKKbeta), which may be responsible for regulation of IKK kinase activity and persistent NF-kappaB activation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the level of BTas-mediated LTR transcription correlates with the activity of cellular NF-kappaB. Together, this study suggests that BFV activates the NF-kappaB pathway through BTas to enhance viral transcription.

  1. Structure-based design of a potent artificial transactivation domain based on p53.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Chantal; Del Gatto, Annarita; Arseneault, Geneviève; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; De Simone, Mariarosaria; Morse, Thomas; de Paola, Ivan; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Legault, Pascale; Pedone, Carlo; Zaccaro, Laura; Omichinski, James G

    2012-01-25

    Malfunctions in transcriptional regulation are associated with a number of critical human diseases. As a result, there is considerable interest in designing artificial transcription activators (ATAs) that specifically control genes linked to human diseases. Like native transcriptional activator proteins, an ATA must minimally contain a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a transactivation domain (TAD) and, although there are several reliable methods for designing artificial DBDs, designing artificial TADs has proven difficult. In this manuscript, we present a structure-based strategy for designing short peptides containing natural amino acids that function as artificial TADs. Using a segment of the TAD of p53 as the scaffolding, modifications are introduced to increase the helical propensity of the peptides. The most active artificial TAD, termed E-Cap-(LL), is a 13-mer peptide that contains four key residues from p53, an N-capping motif and a dileucine hydrophobic bridge. In vitro analysis demonstrates that E-Cap-(LL) interacts with several known p53 target proteins, while in vivo studies in a yeast model system show that it is a 20-fold more potent transcriptional activator than the native p53-13 peptide. These results demonstrate that structure-based design represents a promising approach for developing artificial TADs that can be combined with artificial DBDs to create potent and specific ATAs. PMID:22191432

  2. Transactivation of the proximal promoter of human oxytocin gene by TR4 orphan receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-P.; Lee, Y.-F.; Chang, C.; Lee, H.-J. . E-mail: hjlee@mail.ndhu.edu.tw

    2006-12-08

    The human testicular receptor 4 (TR4) shares structural homology with members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Some other members of this superfamily were able to regulate the transcriptional activity of the human oxytocin (OXT) promoter by binding to the first DR0 regulatory site. However, little investigation was conducted systematically in the study of the second dDR4 site of OXT proximal promoter, and the relationship between the first and the second sites of OXT promoter. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that TR4 could increase the proximal promoter activity of the human OXT gene via DR0, dDR4, and OXT (both DR0 and dDR4) elements, respectively. TR4 might induce OXT gene expression through the OXT element in a dose-dependent manner. However, there is no synergistic effect between DR0 and dDR4 elements during TR4 transactivation. Taken together, these results suggested that TR4 should be one of important regulators of OXT gene expression.

  3. Different Modes of Transactivation of Bacteriophage Mu Late Promoters by Transcription Factor C.

    PubMed

    Swapna, Ganduri; Kumari, Vandana; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-01-01

    Transactivator protein C is required for the expression of bacteriophage Mu late genes from lys, I, P and mom promoters during lytic life cycle of the phage. The mechanism of transcription activation of mom gene by C protein is well understood. C activates transcription at Pmom by initial unwinding of the promoter DNA, thereby facilitating RNA polymerase (RNAP) recruitment. Subsequently, C interacts with the ß' subunit of RNAP to enhance promoter clearance. The mechanism by which C activates other late genes of the phage is not known. We carried out promoter-polymerase interaction studies with all the late gene promoters to determine the individual step of C mediated activation. Unlike at Pmom, at the other three promoters, RNAP recruitment and closed complex formation are not C dependent. Instead, the action of C at Plys, PI, and PP is during the isomerization from closed complex to open complex with no apparent effect at other steps of initiation pathway. The mechanism of transcription activation of mom and other late promoters by their common activator is different. This distinction in the mode of activation (promoter recruitment and escape versus isomerization) by the same activator at different promoters appears to be important for optimized expression of each of the late genes. PMID:26058069

  4. Platelet transactivation by monocytes promotes thrombosis in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Tutwiler, Valerie; Madeeva, Daria; Ahn, Hyun Sook; Andrianova, Izabella; Hayes, Vincent; Zheng, X Long; Cines, Douglas B; McKenzie, Steven E; Poncz, Mortimer; Rauova, Lubica

    2016-01-28

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is characterized by a high incidence of thrombosis, unlike other antibody-mediated causes of thrombocytopenia. We have shown that monocytes complexed with surface-bound platelet factor 4 (PF4) activated by HIT antibodies contribute to the prothrombotic state in vivo, but the mechanism by which this occurs and the relationship to the requirement for platelet activation via fragment crystallizable (Fc)γRIIA is uncertain. Using a microfluidic model and human or murine blood, we confirmed that activation of monocytes contributes to the prothrombotic state in HIT and showed that HIT antibodies bind to monocyte FcγRIIA, which activates spleen tyrosine kinase and leads to the generation of tissue factor (TF) and thrombin. The combination of direct platelet activation by HIT immune complexes through FcγRIIA and transactivation by monocyte-derived thrombin markedly increases Annexin V and factor Xa binding to platelets, consistent with the formation of procoagulant coated platelets. These data provide a model of HIT wherein a combination of direct FcγRIIA-mediated platelet activation and monocyte-derived thrombin contributes to thrombosis in HIT and identifies potential new targets for lessening this risk. PMID:26518435

  5. Amino acids critical for the functions of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transactivator.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, J L; Blanco, M; McBride, A A

    1996-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 protein is important for viral DNA replication, for transcriptional transactivation, and for interaction with the E1 protein. To determine which residues of this 200-amino-acid domain are important for these activities, single conservative amino acid substitutions have been generated in 17 residues that are invariant among all papillomavirus E2 proteins. The resulting mutated E2 proteins were tested for the ability to support viral DNA replication, activate transcription, and cooperatively bind to the origin of replication with the E1 protein. We identified five mutated proteins that were completely defective for transcriptional activation and either were defective or could support viral DNA replication at only low levels. However, several of these proteins could still interact efficiently with the E1 protein. In addition, we identified several mutated proteins that were unable to efficiently cooperatively bind to the origin with the E1 protein. Although a number of the mutated proteins demonstrated wild-type activity in all of the functions tested, only 3 out of 17 mutated viral genomes were able to induce foci in a C127 focus formation assay when the mutations were generated in the background of the entire bovine papillomavirus type 1 genome. This finding suggests that the E2 protein may have additional activities that are important for the viral life cycle. PMID:8523530

  6. C-terminal activating and inhibitory domains determine the transactivation potential of BSAP (Pax-5), Pax-2 and Pax-8.

    PubMed Central

    Dörfler, P; Busslinger, M

    1996-01-01

    Pax-5 encodes the transcription factor BSAP which plays an essential role in early B cell development and midbrain patterning. In this study we have analysed the structural requirements for transcriptional activation by BSAP. In vitro mutagenesis and transient transfection experiments indicate that the C-terminal serine/threonine/proline-rich region of BSAP contains a potent transactivation domain of 55 amino acids which is active from promoter and enhancer positions. This transactivation domain was found to be inactivated by a naturally occurring frameshift mutation in one PAX-5 allele of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line REH. The function of the transactivation domain is negatively regulated by adjacent sequences from the extreme C-terminus. The activating and inhibitory domains function together as an independent regulatory module in different cell types as shown by fusion to the GAL4 DNA binding domain. The same arrangement of positively and negatively acting sequences has been conserved in the mammalian Pax-2 and Pax-8, the zebrafish Pax-b as well as the sea urchin Pax-258 proteins. These data demonstrate that the transcriptional competence of a subfamily of Pax proteins is determined by a C-terminal regulatory module composed of activating and inhibitory sequences. Images PMID:8617244

  7. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection.

  8. Localization of sequences responsible for trans-activation of the equine infectious anemia virus long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, L; Gazit, A; Yaniv, A; Kawakami, T; Dahlberg, J E; Tronick, S R

    1988-01-01

    We used the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) to study sequences that influence expression of the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) genome. The EIAV long terminal repeat (LTR) directed CAT activity in a canine cell line, but at levels much lower than those achieved with other eucaryotic viral promoters. In the same cells infected with EIAV or cotransfected with molecularly cloned EIAV genomic DNA, LTR-directed activity was markedly enhanced. Comparison of cat mRNA and protein levels in these cells indicated that this trans-activating effect could be accounted for by a bimodal mechanism in which both transcriptional and posttranscriptional events are enhanced. trans-Activation but not promoter activity was abolished by deletion of the R-U5 region of the EIAV LTR. EIAV sequences responsible for the trans-activating function could be localized to a region encompassing the 3' and 5' termini of the pol and env genes, respectively (nucleotides 4474 to 5775). Interestingly, this stretch harbors a short open reading frame with some amino acid sequence similarity to the human immunodeficiency virus type I tat gene product. Images PMID:2824840

  9. Omega 3 but not omega 6 fatty acids inhibit AP-1 activity and cell transformation in JB6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangming; Bibus, Douglas M.; Bode, Ann M.; Ma, Wei-Ya; Holman, Ralph T.; Dong, Zigang

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal-based investigations have indicated that the development of skin cancer is in part associated with poor dietary practices. Lipid content and subsequently the derived fatty acid composition of the diet are believed to play a major role in the development of tumorigenesis. Omega 3 (ω3) fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), can effectively reduce the risk of skin cancer whereas omega 6 (ω6) fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA) reportedly promote risk. To investigate the effects of fatty acids on tumorigenesis, we performed experiments to examine the effects of the ω3 fatty acids EPA and DHA and of the ω6 fatty acid AA on phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA)-induced or epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription activator protein 1 (AP-1) transactivation and on the subsequent cellular transformation in a mouse epidermal JB6 cell model. DHA treatment resulted in marked inhibition of TPA- and EGF-induced cell transformation by inhibiting AP-1 transactivation. EPA treatment also inhibited TPA-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation but had no effect on EGF-induced transformation. AA treatment had no effect on either TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation or transformation, but did abrogate the inhibitory effects of DHA on TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation in a dose-dependent manner. The results of this study demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of ω3 fatty acids on tumorigenesis are more significant for DHA than for EPA and are related to an inhibition of AP-1. Similarly, because AA abrogates the beneficial effects of DHA, the dietary ratio of ω6 to ω3 fatty acids may be a significant factor in mediating tumor development. PMID:11416221

  10. Protein kinase C modulates aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator protein-mediated transactivation potential in a dimer context.

    PubMed

    Long, W P; Chen, X; Perdew, G H

    1999-04-30

    Protein kinase C (PKC)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated modulation of the transactivation potential of human aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (hARNT), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS transcription factor, and the bHLH-ZIP transcription factors USF-1 (for upstream regulatory factor 1) and c-Myc were examined. An 81 nM dose of the PKC activator phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), shown here to specifically activate PKC in COS-1 cells, or a 1 nM dose of the PKA activator 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP) results in 2. 6- and 1.9-fold enhancements, respectively, in hARNT-mediated transactivation of the class B, E-box-driven reporter pMyc3E1bLuc relative to identically transfected, carrier solvent-treated COS-1 cells. In contrast, 81 nM PMA and 1 nM 8-Br-cAMP did not enhance transactivation of pMyc3E1bLuc-driven by USF-1 and c-Myc expression relative to identically transfected, carrier-treated COS-1 cells. Co-transfection of pcDNA3/ARNT-474-Flag, expressing a hARNT carboxyl-terminal transactivation domain deletion, and pMyc3E1bLuc does not result in induction of reporter activity, suggesting PMA's effects do not involve formation of unknown hARNT-protein heterodimers. Additionally, PMA had no effect on hARNT expression relative to Me2SO-treated cells. Metabolic 32P labeling of hARNT in cells treated with carrier solvent or 81 nM PMA demonstrates that PMA does not increase the overall phosphorylation level of hARNT. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that the transactivation potential of ARNT in a dimer context can be specifically modulated by PKC or PKA stimulation and that the bHLH-PAS and bHLH-ZIP transcription factors are differentially regulated by these pathways in COS-1 cells. PMID:10212212

  11. Exosomes derived from HIV-1-infected cells contain trans-activation response element RNA.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-07-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 10(4)-10(6) copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 10(3) copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS. PMID:23661700

  12. Dimerization and Transactivation Domains as Candidates for Functional Modulation and Diversity of Sox9

    PubMed Central

    Geraldo, Marcos Tadeu; Valente, Guilherme Targino; Nakajima, Rafael Takahiro; Martins, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Sox9 plays an important role in a large variety of developmental pathways in vertebrates. It is composed of three domains: high-mobility group box (HMG box), dimerization (DIM) and transactivation (TAD). One of the main processes for regulation and variability of the pathways involving Sox9 is the self-gene expression regulation of Sox9. However, the subsequent roles of the Sox9 domains can also generate regulatory modulations. Studies have shown that TADs can bind to different types of proteins and its function seems to be influenced by DIM. Therefore, we hypothesized that both domains are directly associated and can be responsible for the functional variability of Sox9. We applied a method based on a broad phylogenetic context, using sequences of the HMG box domain, to ensure the homology of all the Sox9 copies used herein. The data obtained included 4,921 sequences relative to 657 metazoan species. Based on coevolutionary and selective pressure analyses of the Sox9 sequences, we observed coevolutions involving DIM and TADs. These data, along with the experimental data from literature, indicate a functional relationship between these domains. Moreover, DIM and TADs may be responsible for the functional plasticity of Sox9 because they are more tolerant for molecular changes (higher Ka/Ks ratio than the HMG box domain). This tolerance could allow a differential regulation of target genes or promote novel targets during transcriptional activation. In conclusion, we suggest that DIM and TADs functional association may regulate differentially the target genes or even promote novel targets during transcription activation mediated by Sox9 paralogs, contributing to the subfunctionalization of Sox9a and Sox9b in teleosts. PMID:27196604

  13. Arsenic trioxide phosphorylates c-Fos to transactivate p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zimiao; Huang, H.-S.

    2008-12-01

    An infamous poison, arsenic also has been used as a drug for nearly 2400 years; in recently years, arsenic has been effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Increasing evidence suggests that opposite effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO) on tumors depend on its concentrations. For this reason, the mechanisms of action of the drug should be elucidated, and it should be used therapeutically only with extreme caution. Previously, we demonstrated the opposing effects of ERK1/2 and JNK on p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} (p21) expression in response to ATO in A431 cells. In addition, JNK phosphorylates c-Jun (Ser{sup 63/73}) to recruit TGIF/HDAC1 to suppress p21 gene expression. Presently, we demonstrated that a high concentration of ATO sustains ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increases c-Fos biosynthesis and stability, which enhances p21 gene expression. Using site-directed mutagenesis, a DNA affinity precipitation assay, and functional assays, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of the C-terminus of c-Fos (Thr{sup 232}, Thr{sup 325}, Thr{sup 331}, and Ser{sup 374}) plays an important role in its binding to the p21 promoter, and in conjunction with N-terminus phosphorylation of c-Fos (Ser{sup 70}) to transactivate p21 promoter expression. In conclusion, a high concentration of ATO can sustain ERK1/2 activation to enhance c-Fos expression, then dimerize with dephosphorylated c-Jun (Ser{sup 63/73}) and recruit p300/CBP to the Sp1 sites (- 84/- 64) to activate p21 gene expression in A431 cells.

  14. TAR-independent transactivation by Tat in cells derived from the CNS: a novel mechanism of HIV-1 gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J P; Pomerantz, R; Bagasra, O; Chowdhury, M; Rappaport, J; Khalili, K; Amini, S

    1992-01-01

    The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is essential for productive infection and is a potential target for antiviral therapy. Tat, a potent activator of HIV-1 gene expression, serves to greatly increase the rate of transcription directed by the viral promoter. This induction, which seems to be an important component in the progression of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), may be due to increased transcriptional initiation, increased transcriptional elongation, or a combination of these processes. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of Tat with a specific RNA target termed TAR (transactivation responsive) which is present in the leader sequence of all HIV-1 mRNAs. This interaction is believed to be an important component of the mechanism of transactivation. In this report we demonstrate that in certain CNS-derived cells Tat is capable of activating HIV-1 through a TAR-independent pathway. A Tat-responsive element is found upstream within the viral promoter that in glial-derived cell lines allows transactivation in the absence of TAR. Deletion mapping and hybrid promoter constructs demonstrate that the newly identified Tat-responsive element corresponds to a sequence within the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) previously identified as the HIV-1 enhancer, or NF-kappa B domain. DNA band-shift analysis reveals NF-kappa B binding activity in glial cells that differs from that present in T lymphoid cells. Further, we observe that TAR-deleted mutants of HIV-1 demonstrate normal late gene expression in glial cells as evidenced by syncytia formation and production of viral p24 antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1505523

  15. FOXM1c transactivates the human c-myc promoter directly via the two TATA boxes P1 and P2.

    PubMed

    Wierstra, Inken; Alves, Jürgen

    2006-10-01

    FOXM1c transactivates the c-myc promoter via the P1 and P2 TATA boxes using a new mechanism. Whereas the P1 TATA box TATAATGC requires its sequence context to be FOXM1c responsive, the P2 TATA box TATAAAAG alone is sufficient to confer FOXM1c responsiveness to any minimal promoter. FOXM1c transactivates by binding to the TATA box as well as directly to TATA-binding protein, transcription factor IIB and transcription factor IIA. This new transactivation mechanism is clearly distinguished from the function of FOXM1c as a conventional transcription factor. The central domain of FOXM1c functions as an essential domain for activation via the TATA box, but as an inhibitory domain (retinoblastoma protein-independent transrepression domain and retinoblastoma protein-recruiting negative regulatory domain) for transactivation via conventional FOXM1c-binding sites. Each promoter with the P2 TATA box TATAAAAG is postulated to be transactivated by FOXM1c. This was demonstrated for the promoters of c-fos, hsp70 and histone H2B/a. A database search revealed almost 300 probable FOXM1c target genes, many of which function in proliferation and tumorigenesis. Accordingly, dominant-negative FOXM1c proteins reduced cell growth approximately threefold, demonstrating a proliferation-stimulating function for wild-type FOXM1c. PMID:16965535

  16. Rat beta 1-adrenergic receptor regulatory region containing consensus AP-2 elements recognizes novel transactivator proteins.

    PubMed

    Kirigiti, P; Yang, Y F; Li, X; Li, B; Midson, C N; Machida, C A

    2000-03-01

    will bind to both the beta 1-AR GS-1 promoter fragment and commercially available AP-2 consensus element control probes. Interestingly, using antibody supershift and immunoblotting experiments, no supershifts were observed and the major 117-kDa protein was not immunoreactive to antibodies recognizing either AP-2 alpha or AP-2 beta. These results support our contention that this beta 1-AR regulatory region contains AP-2 consensus elements that recognize novel transactivator proteins. PMID:10860867

  17. Ets transcription factors bind and transactivate the core promoter of the von Willebrand factor gene.

    PubMed

    Schwachtgen, J L; Janel, N; Barek, L; Duterque-Coquillaud, M; Ghysdael, J; Meyer, D; Kerbiriou-Nabias, D

    1997-12-18

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene expression is restricted to endothelial cells and megakaryocytes. Previous results demonstrated that basal transcription of the human vWF gene is mediated through a promoter located between base pairs -89 and +19 (cap site: +1) which is functional in endothelial and non endothelial cells. Two DNA repeats TTTCCTTT correlating with inverted consensus binding sites for the Ets family of transcription factors are present in the -56/-36 sequence. In order to analyse whether these DNA elements are involved in transcription, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), bovine calf pulmonary endothelial cell line (CPAE), HeLa and COS cells were transfected with constructs containing deletions of the -89/+19 fragment, linked to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene. The -60/+19 region exhibits significant promoter activity in HUVEC and CPAE cells only. The -42/+19 fragment is not active. Mutations of the -60/+19 promoter fragment in the 5' (-56/-49) Ets binding site abolish transcription in endothelial cells whereas mutations in the 3' (-43/-36) site does not. The -60/-33 fragment forms three complexes with proteins from HUVEC nuclear extracts in electrophoretic mobility shift assay which are dependent on the presence of the 5' Ets binding site. Binding of recombinant Ets-1 protein to the -60/-33 fragment gives a complex which also depends on the 5' site. The -60/+19 vWF gene core promoter is transactivated in HeLa cells by cotransfecting with Ets-1 or Erg (Ets-related gene) expression plasmids. In contrast to the wild type construct, transcription of the 5' site mutants is not increased by these expressed proteins. The results indicate that the promoter activity of the -60/+19 region of the vWF gene depends on transcription factors of the Ets family of which several members like Ets-1, Ets-2 and Erg are expressed in endothelium. Cotransfection of Ets-1 and Erg expression plasmids is sufficient to induce the -60/+19 v

  18. Interactions between human cyclin T, Tat, and the transactivation response element (TAR) are disrupted by a cysteine to tyrosine substitution found in mouse cyclin T

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Koh; Taube, Ran; Wimmer, Jörg; Cujec, Thomas P.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    The transcriptional transactivator Tat from HIV binds to the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA to increase rates of elongation of viral transcription. Human cyclin T supports these interactions between Tat and TAR. In this study, we report the sequence of mouse cyclin T and identify the residues from positions 1 to 281 in human cyclin T that bind to Tat and TAR. Mouse cyclin T binds to Tat weakly and is unable to facilitate interactions between Tat and TAR. Reciprocal exchanges of the cysteine and tyrosine at position 261 in human and mouse cyclin T proteins also render human cyclin T inactive and mouse cyclin T active. These findings reveal the molecular basis for the restriction of Tat transactivation in rodent cells. PMID:9990016

  19. Inhibition of the FACT Complex Reduces Transcription from the Human Cytomegalovirus Major Immediate Early Promoter in Models of Lytic and Latent Replication.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Christine M; Nukui, Masatoshi; Gurova, Katerina V; Murphy, Eain A

    2016-04-01

    The successful colonization of the majority of the population by human cytomegalovirus is a direct result of the virus's ability to establish and, more specifically, reactivate from latency. The underlying cellular factors involved in viral reactivation remain unknown. Here, we show that the host complexfacilitateschromatintranscription (FACT) binds to the major immediate early promoter (MIEP) and that inhibition of this complex reduces MIEP transactivation, thus inhibiting viral reactivation. PMID:26865717

  20. Transactivation of human osteopontin promoter by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-encoded Tax protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Chagan-Yasutan, Haorile; Hattori, Toshio

    2010-06-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a cytokine that contributes substantially to the growth and metastasis in a wide spectrum of malignancies. We report here that OPN gene is transactivated by Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Northern blot showed enhanced OPN gene expression in cells stably expressing Tax. Co-expression of Tax increased the reporter gene expression directed by OPN promoter. Tax-induced OPN activation was abrogated by treatment with LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor) or co-transfection with AKT siRNA, suggesting PI3K/AKT pathway is involved in Tax-mediated transactivation. Reporter assay with deletion mutants showed that the 5'-partial sequence between -765 and -660 of the OPN promoter is the region responsive to Tax, and further, disrupting the AP-1 site within this region abolished the OPN induction by Tax, indicating that Tax activation of OPN promoter is likely mediated by AP-1 site. This study suggests that OPN is one of the downstream mediators of aberrantly activated PI3K/AKT signaling by Tax, which may partially contribute to HTLV-1-associated leukemogenesis. PMID:19767100

  1. Transactivation of ErbB receptors by leptin in the cardiovascular system: mechanisms, consequences and target for therapy.

    PubMed

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Jazmroz-Wiśniewska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Many experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that elevated leptin concentration in patients with obesity/metabolic syndrome contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders including arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis after coronary angioplasty and myocardial hypertrophy. Receptor tyrosine kinases belonging to the ErbB family, especially ErbB1 (epidermal growth factor receptor) and ErbB2 are abundantly expressed in the blood vessels and the heart. EGFR is activated not only by its multiple peptide ligands but also by many other factors including angiotensin II, endothelin-1, norepinephrine, thrombin and prorenin; the phenomenon referred to as "transactivation". Augmented EGFR signaling contributes to abnormalities of vascular tone and renal sodium handling as well as vascular remodeling and myocardial hypertrophy through various intracellular mechanisms, in particular extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Recent experimental studies indicate that chronically elevated leptin transactivates the EGFR through the mechanisms requiring reactive oxygen species and cytosolic tyrosine kinase, c-Src. In addition, hyperleptinemia increases ErbB2 activity in the arterial wall. Stimulation of EGFR and ErbB2 downstream signaling pathways such as ERK and PI3K in the vascular wall and the kidney may contribute to the increase in vascular tone, enhanced tubular sodium reabsorption as well as vascular and renal lesions in hyperleptinemic obese subjects. PMID:23688012

  2. Characterization of ERM transactivation domain binding to the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator subunit MED25

    PubMed Central

    Landrieu, Isabelle; Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Rucktooa, Prakash; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD) of ERM/ETV5 (ERM38–68), a PEA3 group member of Ets-related transcription factors, directly interacts with the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. Molecular details of this interaction were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The TAD is disordered in solution but has a propensity to adopt local transient secondary structure. We show that it folds upon binding to MED25 and that the resulting ERM–MED25 complex displays characteristics of a fuzzy complex. Mutational analysis further reveals that two aromatic residues in the ERM TAD (F47 and W57) are involved in the binding to MED25 and participate in the ability of ERM TAD to activate transcription. Mutation of a key residue Q451 in the VP16 H1 binding pocket of MED25 affects the binding of ERM. Furthermore, competition experiments show that ERM and VP16 H1 share a common binding interface on MED25. NMR data confirms the occupancy of this binding pocket by ERM TAD. Based on these experimental data, a structural model of a functional interaction is proposed. This study provides mechanistic insights into the Mediator–transactivator interactions. PMID:26130716

  3. Phosphorylation-Induced Dimerization of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Unmasks DNA Binding and a Bipartite Transactivation Domain

    PubMed Central

    Marié, Isabelle; Smith, Eric; Prakash, Arun; Levy, David E.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is an interferon (IFN)-inducible transcription factor required for activation of a subset of IFN-α genes that are expressed with delayed kinetics following viral infection. IRF7 is synthesized as a latent protein and is posttranslationally modified by protein phosphorylation in infected cells. Phosphorylation required a carboxyl-terminal regulatory domain that controlled the retention of the active protein exclusively in the nucleus, as well as its binding to specific DNA target sequences, multimerization, and ability to induce target gene expression. Transcriptional activation by IRF7 mapped to two distinct regions, both of which were required for full activity, while all functions were masked in latent IRF7 by an autoinhibitory domain mapping to an internal region. A conditionally active form of IRF7 was constructed by fusing IRF7 with the ligand-binding and dimerization domain of estrogen receptor (ER). Hormone-dependent dimerization of chimeric IRF7-ER stimulated DNA binding and transcriptional transactivation of endogenous target genes. These studies demonstrate the regulation of IRF7 activity by phosphorylation-dependent allosteric changes that result in dimerization and that facilitate nuclear retention, derepress transactivation, and allow specific DNA binding. PMID:11073981

  4. The length and location of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the androgen receptor N-terminal domain affect transactivation function.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, N L; Driver, E D; Miesfeld, R L

    1994-01-01

    Some transcription factors contain stretches of polyglutamine encoded by repeats of the trinucleotide CAG. Expansion of the CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR) has been correlated with the incidence and severity of X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease). In order to understand the relationship of this mutation to AR function, we constructed ARs that varied in the position and size of the polyglutamine tract, and assayed for the abilities of these mutant receptors to bind androgen and to activate transcription of several different AR-responsive reporter genes. Elimination of the tract in both human and rat AR resulted in elevated transcriptional activation activity, strongly suggesting that the presence of the polyglutamine tract is inhibitory to transactivation. Progressive expansion of the CAG repeat in human AR caused a linear decrease of transactivation function. Importantly, expansion of the tract did not completely eliminate AR activity. We postulate that this residual AR activity may be sufficient for development of male primary and secondary sex characteristics, but may fall below a threshold level of activity necessary for normal maintenance of motor neuron function. This functional abnormality may be representative of other genetic diseases that are associated with CAG expansion mutations in open reading frames, such as spinocerebellar ataxia type I and Huntington's disease. Images PMID:8065934

  5. Low Levels of the Reverse Transactivator Fail to Induce Target Transgene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Viceconte, Nikenza; McKenna, Tomás; Eriksson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a genetic disease with multiple features that are suggestive of premature aging. Most patients with HGPS carry a mutation on one of their copies of the LMNA gene. The LMNA gene encodes the lamin A and lamin C proteins, which are the major proteins of the nuclear lamina. The organs of the cardiovascular system are amongst those that are most severely affected in HGPS, undergoing a progressive depletion of vascular smooth muscle cells, and most children with HGPS die in their early teens from cardio-vascular disease and other complications from atherosclerosis. In this study, we developed a transgenic mouse model based on the tet-ON system to increase the understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the most lethal aspect of HGPS. To induce the expression of the most common HGPS mutation, LMNA c.1824C>T; p.G608G, in the vascular smooth muscle cells of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, we used the previously described reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator, sm22α-rtTA. However, the expression of the reverse sm22α-transactivator was barely detectable in the arteries, and this low level of expression was not sufficient to induce the expression of the target human lamin A minigene. The results from this study are important because they suggest caution during the use of previously functional transgenic animal models and emphasize the importance of assessing transgene expression over time. PMID:25090270

  6. Specific binding of a HeLa cell nuclear protein to RNA sequences in the human immunodeficiency virus transactivating region.

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, R; Soultanakis, E; Kuwabara, M; Garcia, J; Sigman, D S

    1989-01-01

    The transactivator protein, tat, encoded by the human immunodeficiency virus is a key regulator of viral transcription. Activation by the tat protein requires sequences downstream of the transcription initiation site called the transactivating region (TAR). RNA derived from the TAR is capable of forming a stable stem-loop structure and the maintenance of both the stem structure and the loop sequences located between +19 and +44 is required for complete in vivo activation by tat. Gel retardation assays with RNA from both wild-type and mutant TAR constructs generated in vitro with SP6 polymerase indicated specific binding of HeLa nuclear proteins to the TAR. To characterize this RNA-protein interaction, a method of chemical "imprinting" has been developed using photoactivated uranyl acetate as the nucleolytic agent. This reagent nicks RNA under physiological conditions at all four nucleotides in a reaction that is independent of sequence and secondary structure. Specific interaction of cellular proteins with TAR RNA could be detected by enhanced cleavages or imprints surrounding the loop region. Mutations that either disrupted stem base-pairing or extensively changed the primary sequence resulted in alterations in the cleavage pattern of the TAR RNA. Structural features of the TAR RNA stem-loop essential for tat activation are also required for specific binding of the HeLa cell nuclear protein. Images PMID:2544877

  7. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-3 alpha (HNF-3{alpha}) negatively regulates androgen receptor transactivation in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Hwang, Miok; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Lee, Keesook

    2008-03-07

    The androgen receptor (AR) is involved in the development and progression of prostate cancers. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs remain incompletely understood. In previous reports, hepatocyte nuclear factor-3{alpha} (HNF-3{alpha}) has been shown to be expressed in the epithelia of the prostate gland, and has been determined to regulate the transcription of prostate-specific genes. In this study, we report that HNF-3{alpha} functions as a novel corepressor of AR in prostatic cells. HNF-3{alpha} represses AR transactivation on target promoters containing the androgen response element (ARE) in a dose-dependent manner. HNF-3{alpha} interacts physically with AR, and negatively regulates AR transactivation via competition with AR coactivators, including GRIP1. Furthermore, HNF-3{alpha} overexpression reduces the androgen-induced expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in LNCaP cells. Taken together, our findings indicate that HNF-3{alpha} is a novel corepressor of AR, and predict its effects on the proliferation of prostate cancer cells.

  8. Activation of human papillomavirus type 18 gene expression by herpes simplex virus type 1 viral transactivators and a phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Gius, D.; Laimins, L.A.

    1989-02-01

    Several viral trans-activators and a tumor promoter were examined for the ability to activate human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) gene expression. A plasmid containing the HPV-18 noncoding region placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene was cotransfected with different herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genes into several cell lines. Both HSV-1 TIF and ICPO activated HPV-18 expression; however, activation by TIF was observed only in epithelial cells, while ICPO stimulated expression in a wide variety of cells. The element activated by both TIF and ICOP was mapped to a 229-base-pair fragment which also contains an HPV-18 epithelial cell-preferred enhancer. The inclusion of a papillomavirus E2 trans-activator with TIF and ICOP further increased HPV-18 expression. In contrast, the HSV-1 ICP4 and ICP27 genes, as well as the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tat genes, were found to have no effect on HPV-18 expression. In transient assays, the addition of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also activated HPV-18 expression. The region of HPV-18 activated by TPA was localized to a sequence which is homologous to other TPA-responsive elements.

  9. Fusion of adenovirus E1A to the glucocorticoid receptor by high-resolution deletion cloning creates a hormonally inducible viral transactivator.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, D M; Hollenberg, S M; Ricciardi, R P

    1989-01-01

    The 289-amino-acid E1A protein of adenovirus type 2 stimulates transcription from early viral and certain cellular promoters. Its mechanism is not known, and there exist no temperature-sensitive mutants of E1A that could help to elucidate the details of E1A transcriptional activation. To create for E1A such a conditional phenotype, we fused portions of E1A to the human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to make transactivation by E1A dependent on the presence of dexamethasone. Nested subsets of the E1A coding region, centered around the 46-amino-acid transactivating domain, were substituted for the DNA-binding domain of the GR. One of the resulting chimeric proteins (GR/E1A-99), which included the entire E1A transactivating domain, stimulated expression from a viral early promoter (E3) exclusively in the presence of hormone. GR/E1A-99 did not transactivate a GR-responsive promoter. It therefore exhibited the promoter specificity of E1A while possessing the hormone inducibility of the GR. Two smaller chimeras that contained only portions of the E1A transactivating domain failed to transactivate E3. These three chimeras were constructed by a novel strategy, high-resolution deletion cloning. In this procedure, series of unidirectional deletions were made with exonuclease III on each side of the E1A coding region at a resolution of 1 to 2 nucleotides. The large number of in-frame fragments present in the collection of deleted clones facilitated the construction of the GR/E1A chimeras and can be used to create many additional fusions. Images PMID:2550806

  10. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived Soluble Protein, p40, Stimulates Ligand Release from Intestinal Epithelial Cells to Transactivate Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Liu, Liping; Dempsey, Peter J.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Raines, Elaine W.; Wilson, Carole L.; Cao, Hailong; Cao, Zheng; Liu, LinShu; Polk, D. Brent

    2013-01-01

    p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis, and preserves barrier function by transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study is to determine the mechanisms by which p40 transactivates the EGFR in intestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that p40-conditioned medium activates EGFR in young adult mouse colon epithelial cells and human colonic epithelial cell line, T84 cells. p40 up-regulates a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17) catalytic activity, and broad spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitors block EGFR transactivation by p40 in these two cell lines. In ADAM17-deficient mouse colonic epithelial (ADAM17−/− MCE) cells, p40 transactivation of EGFR is blocked, but can be rescued by re-expression with WT ADAM17. Furthermore, p40 stimulates release of heparin binding (HB)-EGF, but not transforming growth factor (TGF)α or amphiregulin, in young adult mouse colon cells and ADAM17−/− MCE cells overexpressing WT ADAM17. Knockdown of HB-EGF expression by siRNA suppresses p40 effects on transactivating EGFR and Akt, preventing apoptosis, and preserving tight junction function. The effects of p40 on HB-EGF release and ADAM17 activation in vivo are examined after administration of p40-containing pectin/zein hydrogel beads to mice. p40 stimulates ADAM17 activity and EGFR activation in colonic epithelial cells and increases HB-EGF levels in blood from WT mice, but not from mice with intestinal epithelial cell-specific ADAM17 deletion. Thus, these data define a mechanism of a probiotic-derived soluble protein in modulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis through ADAM17-mediated HB-EGF release, leading to transactivation of EGFR. PMID:24043629

  11. Critical role of tyrosine 277 in the ligand-binding and transactivating properties of retinoic acid receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Mailfait, S; Belaiche, D; Kouach, M; Dallery, N; Chavatte, P; Formstecher, P; Sablonnière, B

    2000-03-01

    Retinoic acid receptors specifically bind all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) and function as RA-inducible transcriptional regulatory factors. Binding of RA to RARalpha, beta, and gamma is sensitive to nitration with tetranitromethane, a tyrosine-specific modifying reagent. To identify tyrosine residue(s) that are important for RA binding, we carried out chemical modification experiments with purified RARalpha ligand-binding domain (RARalpha-LBD) subjected to partial acid hydrolysis and selective proteolysis. The chemically modified peptides containing each of the three Tyr residues present in the RARalpha-LBD sequence were then analyzed and identified by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS). We found that RA binding to RARalpha-LBD protected Tyr(277)-containing peptides from nitration. Protection of Tyr(277) could result either from direct masking by the bound ligand or from ligand-induced changes in receptor conformation and tyrosine accessibility. The role of Tyr residues was further documented by site directed mutagenesis using three site-specific RARalpha mutants: Y208A, Y277A, and Y362A. The affinity for RA of these mutant receptors was in the range of that of the wild-type protein, except for the Y277A receptor mutant, which displays a 15-20-fold reduction in affinity and transactivation activity for RA. Whereas mutation of Tyr(277) into alanine had a variable effect on different agonists and antagonists binding, it caused a dramatic decrease of retinoid-dependent transactivation activity. This later effect was also observed with mutation of Tyr(277) into phenylalanine. It is unlikely that major conformational changes are responsible for the lower affinity of RA binding and RA-dependent transactivation since these mutants displayed wild-type dimerization and DNA-binding activities. Limited proteolysis revealed that upon ligand binding, the Y277A mutant induced a conformational change slightly

  12. The hepatitis B virus X protein increases the cellular level of TATA-binding protein, which mediates transactivation of RNA polymerase III genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Horng-Dar; Johnson, D.L.; Yuh, Chio-Hwa

    1995-12-01

    This report decribes the mechanism by which the hepatitis B virus X gene product induces RNA polymerase III genes. The RNA pol III transcription system serves as model for understanding the mechanism of X in the transactivation of cellular genes in both Drosophila and rat cell lines. 53 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Phenotypic Complementation Establishes Requirements for Specific POU Domain and Generic Transactivation Function of Oct-3/4 in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Hitoshi; Masui, Shinji; Chambers, Ian; Smith, Austin G.; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi

    2002-01-01

    Transcription factors of the POU family govern cell fate through combinatorial interactions with coactivators and corepressors. The POU factor Oct-3/4 can define differentiation, dedifferentation, or self-renewal of pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells in a sensitive, dose-dependent manner (H. Niwa, J.-I. Miyazali, and A. G. Smith, Nat. Genet. 24:372-376, 2000). Here we have developed a complementation assay based on the ability of Oct-3/4 transgenes to rescue self-renewal in conditionally null ES cells and used this to define which domains of Oct-3/4 are required to sustain the undifferentiated stem cell phenotype. Surprisingly, we found that molecules lacking either the N-terminal or C-terminal transactivation domain, though not both, can effectively replace full-length Oct-3/4. Furthermore, a fusion of the heterologous transactivation domain of Oct-2 to the Oct-3/4 POU domain can also sustain self-renewal. Thus, the unique function of Oct-3/4 in ES cell propagation resides in combination of the specific POU domain with a generic proline-rich transactivation domain. Interestingly, however, Oct-3/4 target gene expression elicited by the N- and C-terminal transactivation domains is not identical, indicating that at least one class of genes activated by Oct-3/4 is not required for ES cell propagation. PMID:11839818

  14. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation Is Required for Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in HaCaT Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ockenga, Wymke; Kühne, Sina; Bocksberger, Simone; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2014-01-01

    Non-neuronal acetylcholine plays a substantial role in the human skin by influencing adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. These processes are regulated by the Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) kinase cascade. Here we show that in HaCaT keratinocytes all five muscarinic receptor subtypes are expressed, but M1 and M3 are the subtypes involved in mitogenic signaling. Stimulation with the cholinergic agonist carbachol leads to activation of the MAP kinase extracellular signal regulated kinase, together with the protein kinase Akt. The activation is fully dependent on the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which even appears to be the sole pathway for the muscarinic receptors to facilitate MAP kinase activation in HaCaT cells. The transactivation pathway involves a triple-membrane-passing process, based on activation of matrix metalloproteases, and extracellular ligand release; whereas phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Src family kinases or protein kinase C do not appear to be involved in MAP kinase activation. Furthermore, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and endocytosis of the EGF receptor after cholinergic transactivation are different from that induced by a direct stimulation with EGF, suggesting that ligands other than EGF itself mediate the cholinergic transactivation. PMID:25421240

  15. Overlap of Viviparous1 (VP1) and abscisic acid response elements in the Em promoter: G-box elements are sufficient but not necessary for VP1 transactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Vasil, V; Marcotte, W R; Rosenkrans, L; Cocciolone, S M; Vasil, I K; Quatrano, R S; McCarty, D R

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between promoter sequences that mediate Viviparous1 (VP1) transactivation and regulation by abscisic acid (ABA) in the wheat Em promoter was investigated using deletion analysis and directed mutagenesis. The Em1a G-box is strongly coupled to VP1 transactivation as well as to ABA regulation; however, the Em promoter includes additional components that can support VP1 transactivation without ABA responsiveness or synergism. Oligonucleotide tetramers of several G-box sequences, including Em1a, Em1b, and the dyad G-box element from the UV light-regulated parsley chalcone synthase gene, were sufficient to confer VP1 transactivation and the synergistic interaction with ABA to the -45 cauliflower mosaic virus 35S core promoter. These data suggest that VP1 can activate transcription through at least two classes of cis-acting sequences, including the G-box elements and the Sph regulatory motif found in the C1 promoter. The contrasting roles of these motifs in the Em and C1 promoters suggest a basis for the differential regulation of the corresponding genes by VP1. PMID:8589631

  16. E2 polypeptides encoded by bovine papillomavirus type 1 form dimers through the common carboxyl-terminal domain: transactivation is mediated by the conserved amino-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    McBride, A A; Byrne, J C; Howley, P M

    1989-01-01

    The E2 open reading frame (ORF) of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) encodes positive- and negative-acting factors that regulate viral gene expression. The full-length ORF encodes a transactivator, and two transcriptional repressors are expressed from the 3' half of the ORF. Previous analysis has shown that a conserved C-terminal region of 101 amino acids, which is shared by E2 transactivator and repressor proteins, contains the specific DNA binding activity. Further analysis of the E2 transactivator shows that a conserved N-terminal domain of approximately 220 amino acids is crucial for the transcriptional activation function, whereas the variable internal region is not required. The E2 proteins bind to a sequence, ACCGN4CGGT, several copies of which are sufficient to constitute an E2-dependent enhancer. By using a gel retardation assay and proteins derived by in vitro transcription and translation, we were able to show that the E2 polypeptides bind as dimers to a single DNA binding site. The dimeric E2 proteins are stable in the absence of DNA and dimerization is mediated through the DNA binding domain. This may reveal an additional mechanism of repression that could potentially result from the formation of inactive heterodimers between transactivator and repressor species. PMID:2536165

  17. Recent advances in the identification of Tat-mediated transactivation inhibitors: progressing toward a functional cure of HIV.

    PubMed

    Tabarrini, Oriana; Desantis, Jenny; Massari, Serena

    2016-03-01

    The current anti-HIV combination therapy does not eradicate the virus that persists mainly in quiescent infected CD4(+) T cells as a latent integrated provirus that resumes after therapy interruption. The Tat-mediated transactivation (TMT) is a critical step in the HIV replication cycle that could give the opportunity to reduce the size of latent reservoirs. More than two decades of research led to the identification of various TMT inhibitors. While none of them met the criteria to reach the market, the search for a suitable TMT inhibitor is still actively pursued. Really promising compounds, including one in a Phase III clinical trial, have been recently identified, thus warranting an update. PMID:26933891

  18. The viral transactivator HBx protein exhibits a high potential for regulation via phosphorylation through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) encodes an oncogenic factor, HBx, which is a multifunctional protein that can induce dysfunctional regulation of signaling pathways, transcription, and cell cycle progression, among other processes, through interactions with target host factors. The subcellular localization of HBx is both cytoplasmic and nuclear. This dynamic distribution of HBx could be essential to the multiple roles of the protein at different stages during HBV infection. Transactivational functions of HBx may be exerted both in the nucleus, via interaction with host DNA-binding proteins, and in the cytoplasm, via signaling pathways. Although there have been many studies describing different pathways altered by HBx, and its innumerable binding partners, the molecular mechanism that regulates its different roles has been difficult to elucidate. Methods In the current study, we took a bioinformatics approach to investigate whether the viral protein HBx might be regulated via phosphorylation by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Results We found that the phylogenetically conserved residues Ser25 and Ser41 (both within the negative regulatory domain), and Thr81 (in the transactivation domain) are predicted to be phosphorylated. By molecular 3D modeling of HBx, we further show these residues are all predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein, making them easily accesible to these types of modifications. Furthermore, we have also identified Yin Yang sites that might have the potential to be phosphorylated and O-β-GlcNAc interplay at the same residues. Conclusions Thus, we propose that the different roles of HBx displayed in different subcellular locations might be regulated by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of posttranslational modification, via phosphorylation. PMID:23079056

  19. PEBP2 alpha B/mouse AML1 consists of multiple isoforms that possess differential transactivation potentials.

    PubMed

    Bae, S C; Ogawa, E; Maruyama, M; Oka, H; Satake, M; Shigesada, K; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; Ito, Y

    1994-05-01

    A murine transcription factor, PEBP2, is composed of two subunits, alpha and beta. There are two genes in the mouse genome, PEBP2 alpha A and PEBP2 alpha B, which encode the alpha subunit. Two types of the alpha B cDNA clones, alpha B1 and alpha B2, were isolated from mouse fibroblasts and characterized. They were found to represent 3.8- and 7.9-kb transcripts, respectively. The 3.8-kb RNA encodes the previously described alpha B protein referred to as alpha B1, while the 7.9-kb RNA encodes a 387-amino-acid protein, termed alpha B2, which is identical to alpha B1 except that it has an internal deletion of 64 amino acid residues. Both alpha B1 and alpha B2 associate with PEBP2 beta and form a heterodimer. The alpha B2/beta complex binds to the PEBP2 binding site two- to threefold more strongly than the alpha B1/beta complex does. alpha B1 stimulates transcription through the PEBP2 site about 40-fold, while alpha B2 is only about 25 to 45% as active as alpha B1. Transactivation domain is located downstream of the 128-amino-acid runt homology region, referred to as the Runt domain. Mouse chromosome mapping studies revealed that alpha A, alpha B, and beta genes are mapped to chromosomes 17, 16, and 8, respectively. The last two genes are syntenic with the human AML1 on chromosome 21q22 and PEBP2 beta/CBF beta on 16q22 detected at the breakpoints of characteristic chromosome translocations of the two different subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia. These results suggest that previously described chimeric gene products, AML1/MTG8(ETO) and AML1-EAP generated by t(8;21) and t(3;21), respectively, lack the transactivation domain of AML1. PMID:8164679

  20. ETS1 transactivates the human GM-CSF promoter in Jurkat T cells stimulated with PMA and ionomycin.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R S; Tymms, M J; Seth, A; Shannon, M F; Kola, I

    1995-11-16

    Activation of T helper cells results in coordinate expression of a number of cytokines involved in differentiation, proliferation and activation of the haematopoietic system. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is one such cytokine whose increased expression results partly from increases in transcription. Cis-acting elements with NF kappa B, AP-1 and ETS-like motifs have been identified in the promoter region of the GM-CSF gene, which are important for transcriptional activity following PMA and ionomycin stimulation. A number of the ETS family of transcription factors are expressed in T cells, including ETS1 and ELF1. Here we describe the ability of these factors to interact with a site (GM5), located within the CLE0 element, -47 to -40 upstream of the GM-CSF transcription initiation site. Exogenous ETS1, but not ELF1, can transactivate GM-CSF, through the GM5 site, in a PMA/ionomycin dependent manner. Other unidentified ETS-like factors present in Jurkat cells are also capable of binding GM5. Mutation of the core ETS binding site from -GGAA- to -GGAT- prevents the binding of ETS-like factors with the exception of ETS1. The GM-CSF promoter, modified in this way to be ETS1 specific, is fully responsive to PMA/ionomycin induction, in addition to ETS1 transactivation in the presence of PMA and ionomycin. Together these data suggest that ETS1 may be involved in mediating the increased GM-CSF production associated with T cell activation. PMID:7478534

  1. Effect of p40tax trans-activator of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I on expression of autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Banki, K; Ablonczy, E; Nakamura, M; Perl, A

    1994-03-01

    The possibility of a retroviral etiology has long been raised in a number of autoimmune disorders. More recently, Sjögren's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis were noted in transgenic mice carrying the tax gene of human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I). To evaluate the involvement of HTLV-I Tax in autoimmunity, its effect on expression of autoantigens was investigated. A metallothionein promoter-driven p40tax expression plasmid, pMAXRHneo-1, was stably transfected into Molt4 and Jurkat cells and the p40tax protein was induced with CdCl2. trans-Activation or trans-repression of autoantigens by HTLV-I Tax was studied by Western blot analysis utilizing autoantigen-specific murine monoclonal and rabbit polyvalent antibodies as well as sera from 161 autoimmune patients. Induction of p40tax of HTLV-I had no significant effect on levels of expression of common autoantigens U1 snRNP, Sm, Ro, La, HSP-70, topoisomerase I/Scl70, PCNA, and HRES-1. Expression of two potentially novel autoantigens, 44 and 46 kDa, was induced by p40tax as detected by sera of progressive systemic sclerosis patients, BAK and VAR. By contrast, expression of 24- and 34-kDa proteins was suppressed in response to induction of p40tax as detected by sera of systemic lupus erythematosus patients PUS and HOR. Because none of these patients were infected by HTLV-I, a protein functionally similar to p40tax may be involved in eliciting autoantigen expression and a subsequent autoantibody response in a minority of patients with PSS and SLE. Sera of autoimmune patients may also be utilized to detect novel proteins trans-activated or trans-repressed by p40tax of HTLV-I. PMID:8018391

  2. Modified GFAP promoter auto-regulates tet-activator expression for increased transactivation and reduced tTA-associated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael D; Dunlop, J W; Psaltis, G; Kulik, J; DeGennaro, L; Kwak, Seung P

    2002-05-30

    Transactivator tTA is a necessary component of the tetracycline-regulated inducible gene system. While several transgenic animals have been described that express tTA in the central nervous system (CNS), their tTA levels are often limited, presumably due to toxic effects. We evaluated methods for auto-regulating tTA levels in astrocytes by modifying the transgenic promoter human GFAP (hGFAP). The hGFAP promoter carrying a single copy of the tet-operon in place of a native enhancer element (GFAPtetO1) drove expression of tTA at low levels during un-stimulated, basal condition. However the same promoter auto-induced expression of tTA to significant levels after tetracycline withdrawal. Glial cell-specificity of the promoter remained uncompromised during both basal and induced conditions. Transgenic rats were developed using the auto-inducible GFAPtetO1 promoter that expressed tTA mRNA to high levels in the brain. Expression was widespread within the CNS but enriched in astrocyte-rich regions including the cerebellum. Primary cerebellar astrocytes from GFAPtetO1 rats transfected with 07LacZ produced substantially greater inducibility of reporter gene compared to GFAP-tTA transgenic rats. Finally, GFAPtetO1 rats exhibited severe motor/gait deficit when bred to homozygosity. This phenotype was attributable to developmental abnormalities of the cerebellum and was completely abrogated by doxycycline administration. These results suggest that developmental toxicity resulting from tTA expression can be circumvented and tTA transgenics with high transactivation potential can be developed using the auto-activation strategy. Promoter modification presented here may be useful in developing highly inducible transgenic strategies without loss in tissue-specificity. PMID:12007834

  3. Splicing is required for transactivation by the immediate early gene 1 of the Lymantria dispar multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M N; Rohrmann, G F

    1997-08-18

    A region of the Lymantria disper multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdMNPV) genome containing the homolog of the baculovirus ie-1 gene was identified using a series of overlapping cosmids and individual plasmids in a transient transcriptional expression assay. Sequence analysis of the active region identified two ORFs, one of which is 32% identical to AcMNPV ORF141 (ie-0) and contains a putative splice donor site and the other of which is 29% identical to AcMNPV ie-1 and contains a highly conserved splice acceptor consensus sequences. Plasmids containing the LdMNPV ORF141 and ie-1 regions were able to stimulate expression of a GUS reporter gene, while plasmids containing the ie-1 region alone were inactive, suggesting that only the spliced, IE-0 form of the gene product is an active transactivator. Primer extension analysis confirmed the presence of spliced ie-0 mRNA transcripts starting at 6 hr and continuing throughout the time course of viral infection of the L dispar cell line Ld652Y. Using a plasmid containing the ie-0 spliced form of the gene as a transactivator, hr4, one of the eight homologous regions of LdMNPV, was shown to act as a transcriptional enhancer. In contrast, a reporter plasmid containing the AcMNPV hr5 enhancer did not show increased activity when cotransfected with LdMNPV ie-0, suggesting that these enhancer sequences are viral specific. In a transient replication assay system. LdMNPV ie-0 acted as an essential replication gene, but LdMNPV ie-1 was inactive. These results indicate that splicing is required to obtain an active gene product in LdMNPV in the Ld652Y cell line. PMID:9300047

  4. The EBNA-2 N-Terminal Transactivation Domain Folds into a Dimeric Structure Required for Target Gene Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Janosch; Zou, Peijian; Nössner, Elfriede; Ling, Paul D.; Sattler, Michael; Kempkes, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a γ-herpesvirus that may cause infectious mononucleosis in young adults. In addition, epidemiological and molecular evidence links EBV to the pathogenesis of lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. EBV has the unique ability to transform resting B cells into permanently proliferating, latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2) is a key regulator of viral and cellular gene expression for this transformation process. The N-terminal region of EBNA-2 comprising residues 1-58 appears to mediate multiple molecular functions including self-association and transactivation. However, it remains to be determined if the N-terminus of EBNA-2 directly provides these functions or if these activities merely depend on the dimerization involving the N-terminal domain. To address this issue, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the EBNA-2 N-terminal dimerization (END) domain by heteronuclear NMR-spectroscopy. The END domain monomer comprises a small fold of four β-strands and an α-helix which form a parallel dimer by interaction of two β-strands from each protomer. A structure-guided mutational analysis showed that hydrophobic residues in the dimer interface are required for self-association in vitro. Importantly, these interface mutants also displayed severely impaired self-association and transactivation in vivo. Moreover, mutations of solvent-exposed residues or deletion of the α-helix do not impair dimerization but strongly affect the functional activity, suggesting that the EBNA-2 dimer presents a surface that mediates functionally important intra- and/or intermolecular interactions. Our study shows that the END domain is a novel dimerization fold that is essential for functional activity. Since this specific fold is a unique feature of EBNA-2 it might provide a novel target for anti-viral therapeutics. PMID:26024477

  5. Integrin-mediated transactivation of P2X7R via hemichannel-dependent ATP release stimulates astrocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Alvaro; Lagos-Cabré, Raúl; Kong, Milene; Cárdenas, Areli; Burgos-Bravo, Francesca; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F G; Leyton, Lisette

    2016-09-01

    Our previous reports indicate that ligand-induced αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 engagement increases focal adhesion formation and migration of astrocytes. Additionally, ligated integrins trigger ATP release through unknown mechanisms, activating P2X7 receptors (P2X7R), and the uptake of Ca(2+) to promote cell adhesion. However, whether the activation of P2X7R and ATP release are required for astrocyte migration and whether αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 receptors communicate with P2X7R via ATP remains unknown. Here, cells were stimulated with Thy-1, a reported αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 ligand. Results obtained indicate that ATP was released by Thy-1 upon integrin engagement and required the participation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospholipase-C gamma (PLCγ) and inositol trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3R). IP3R activation leads to increased intracellular Ca(2+), hemichannel (Connexin-43 and Pannexin-1) opening, and ATP release. Moreover, silencing of the P2X7R or addition of hemichannel blockers precluded Thy-1-induced astrocyte migration. Finally, Thy-1 lacking the integrin-binding site did not stimulate ATP release, whereas Thy-1 mutated in the Syndecan-4-binding domain increased ATP release, albeit to a lesser extent and with delayed kinetics compared to wild-type Thy-1. Thus, hemichannels activated downstream of an αVβ3 integrin-PI3K-PLCγ-IP3R pathway are responsible for Thy-1-induced, hemichannel-mediated and Syndecan-4-modulated ATP release that transactivates P2X7Rs to induce Ca(2+) entry. These findings uncover a hitherto unrecognized role for hemichannels in the regulation of astrocyte migration via P2X7R transactivation induced by integrin-mediated ATP release. PMID:27235833

  6. Quercetin-induced downregulation of phospholipase D1 inhibits proliferation and invasion in U87 glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Mi Hee; Min, Do Sik

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Quercetin, a bioactive flavonoid, suppresses expression and enzymatic activity of phospholipase D1. {yields} Quercetin abolishes NFkB-induced phospholipase D1 expression via inhibition of NFkB transactivation. {yields} Quercetin-induced suppression of phospholipase D1 inhibits invasion and proliferation of human glioma cells. -- Abstract: Phospholipase D (PLD) has been recognized as a regulator of cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, but little is known about the molecules regulating PLD expression. Thus, the identification of small molecules inhibiting PLD expression would be an important advance in PLD-mediated physiology. Quercetin, a ubiquitous bioactive flavonoid, is known to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the effect of quercetin on the expression of PLD in U87 glioma cells. Quercetin significantly suppressed the expression of PLD1 at the transcriptional level. Moreover, quercetin abolished the protein expression of PLD1 in a time and dose-dependent manner, as well as inhibited PLD activity. Quercetin suppressed NF{kappa}B-induced PLD1 expression via inhibition of NFkB transactivation. Furthermore, quercetin inhibited activation and invasion of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), a key modulator of glioma cell invasion, induced by phosphatidic acid (PA), a product of PLD activity. Taken together these data demonstrate that quercetin abolishes PLD1 expression and subsequently inhibits invasion and proliferation of glioma cells.

  7. Low-affinity E2-binding site mediates downmodulation of E2 transactivation of the human papillomavirus type 8 late promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Stubenrauch, F; Pfister, H

    1994-01-01

    The constitutively active promoter P7535 of the epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus type 8 (HPV8) is transactivated by the viral E2 protein. The distribution of potential E2-binding sites (ACCN6GGT) in the viral transcription control region is highly conserved among epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated human papillomaviruses and differs completely from that of other papillomaviruses. To investigate the role of E2-binding sites P0 to P4 in P7535 regulation, we analyzed their binding affinities in gel retardation experiments using a full-length HPV8 E2 protein expressed from a recombinant baculovirus. Binding site P1 within a transcriptional silencer showed the highest affinity, followed by P0 within the L1 gene and P3 downstream of P7535. P2, 33 nucleotides upstream of the mRNA cap site, and P4 were very weak binders. There is some indication that the number of A/T pairs in the nonconserved core of the recognition sequence is critical for the binding of HPV8 E2. Transient transfection experiments were carried out with an HPV8 E2 expression vector and reporter plasmids containing mutated E2-binding sites in the context of the HPV8 regulatory region. The knockout of the strongest binding site P1 sufficed to clearly diminish transactivation. P0, P3, and P4 mutations had little effect on their own, whereas double mutations P01 and P34 strongly reduced E2 inducibility. Both mutations in P2 severely affected constitutive promoter activity but had opposite effects on transactivation. They revealed an inverse correlation between E2-binding strength and the extent of E2 transactivation. This finding suggests that P2 mediates a negative control of P7535 by E2, counteracting E2 transactivation exerted via the four distal E2 target sequences. Images PMID:7933077

  8. Trans-activation function of a 3 prime truncated X gene-cell fusion product from integrated hepatitis B virus DNA in chronic hepatitis tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Shinako; Koike, Katsuro )

    1990-08-01

    To investigate the expression and transactivation function of the X gene in integrated hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA from chronic hepatitis tissues, a series of transfectants containing cloned integrated HBV DNAs was made and analyzed for X mRNA expression and trans-activation activity by using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay. Most of the integrated HBV DNAs expressed X mRNA and encoded a product with trans-activation activity in spite of the loss of the 3{prime} end region of the X gene due to integration. From cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of X mRNA transcribed from native or integrated HBV DNA, the X protein was found to be translated from the X open reading frame without splicing. For integrated HBV DNA, transcription was extended to a cellular flanking DNA and an X gene-cell fusion transcript was terminated by using a cellular poly(A) signal. The amino acid sequence deduced from an X-cell fusion transcript indicated truncation of the carboxyl-terminal five amino acids, but the upstream region of seven amino acids conserved among hepadnaviruses was retained in the integrated HBV DNA, suggesting that this conserved region is essential for the transactivation function of the X protein. These findings support the following explanation for hepatocarcinogenesis by HBV DNA integration: the expression of a cellular oncogene(s) is transactivated at the time of chronic infection by the increasing amounts of the integrated HBV gene product(s), such as the X-cell fusion product.

  9. Estrogen receptor transcription and transactivation: Estrogen receptor knockout mice: what their phenotypes reveal about mechanisms of estrogen action.

    PubMed

    Curtis Hewitt, S; Couse, J F; Korach, K S

    2000-01-01

    Natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens have numerous effects on the development and physiology of mammals. Estrogen is primarily known for its role in the development and functioning of the female reproductive system. However, roles for estrogen in male fertility, bone, the circulatory system and immune system have been established by clinical observations regarding sex differences in pathologies, as well as observations following menopause or castration. The primary mechanism of estrogen action is via binding and modulation of activity of the estrogen receptors (ERs), which are ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factors. ERs are found in highest levels in female tissues critical to reproduction, including the ovaries, uterus, cervix, mammary glands and pituitary gland. Since other affected tissues have extremely low levels of ER, indirect effects of estrogen, for example induction of pituitary hormones that affect the bone, have been proposed. The development of transgenic mouse models that lack either estrogen or ER have proven to be valuable tools in defining the mechanisms by which estrogen exerts its effects in various systems. The aim of this article is to review the mouse models with disrupted estrogen signaling and describe the associated phenotypes. PMID:11250727

  10. Efficient expression of the human papillomavirus type 16 L1 protein in epithelial cells by using Rev and the Rev-responsive element of human immunodeficiency virus or the cis-acting transactivation element of simian retrovirus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W; Felber, B K; Zolotukhin, A S; Pavlakis, G N; Schwartz, S

    1995-01-01

    Production of the human papillomavirus (HPV) late gene products L1 and L2 is limited to terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Here, we demonstrate that mRNA encoding the HPV-16 L1 capsid protein contains cis-acting RNA elements that inhibit expression at the posttranscriptional level. While cytoplasmic L1 mRNA is detectable in transfected HeLa cells, L1 protein is not produced. We have identified at least one major inhibitory element that is located within the L1 open reading frame, whereas another negative element had been reported to lie in the 3'-untranslated region of L1. The presence of these elements may explain the lack of HPV late gene expression in undifferentiated epithelial cells. Efficient production of HPV-16 L1 could be achieved with posttranscriptional regulatory elements of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or simian retrovirus type 1. L1 protein was expressed in the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev from hybrid mRNAs containing the RNA binding site for Rev (Rev-responsive element). In addition, we have achieved efficient expression of L1 from hybrid mRNAs containing a cis-acting transactivation element from simian retrovirus type 1. Our data show that HPV-16 L1 protein production is regulated posttranscriptionally. This regulated expression may allow virus production in terminally differentiated epithelial cells and is probably a conserved and important mechanism for HPV expression. PMID:7637007

  11. Adeno-associated virus type 2 rep protein inhibits human papillomavirus type 16 E2 recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator p300.

    PubMed

    Marcello, A; Massimi, P; Banks, L; Giacca, M

    2000-10-01

    Infection by human adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) is a possible protective factor in the development of cervical carcinomas associated with human papillomaviruses (HPV). The replicative proteins of AAV2 (Rep) have been implicated in the inhibition of papillomavirus replication and transforming activities, although the molecular events underlying these effects are poorly understood. We observed that each of the four forms of AAV2 Rep inhibited the E1- and E2-driven replication of oncogenic HPV type 16 (HPV16). Rep40, corresponding to the C-terminal domain of all Rep proteins, inhibited both HPV DNA replication and HPV16 E2-mediated transactivation. Rep40 specifically bound the N-terminal transactivation domain of HPV16 E2 both in vitro and in vivo. This interaction was found to specifically disrupt the binding of E2 to the cellular transcriptional coactivator p300. Accordingly, the inhibitory effect of Rep on HPV16 E2 transactivation was rescued by the overexpression of p300. These data indicate a novel role of Rep in the down-regulation of papillomaviruses through inhibition of complex formation between the HPV16 E2 transcriptional activator and its cellular coactivator, p300. PMID:10982355

  12. Angiotensin II-Induced Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Is Mediated by p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated c-Src Through Spleen Tyrosine Kinase and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Mugabe, Benon E.; Yaghini, Fariborz A.; Song, Chi Young; Buharalioglu, Cuneyt K.; Waters, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates protein synthesis by activating spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and DNA synthesis through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). This study was conducted to determine whether Syk mediates Ang II-induced migration of aortic VSMCs using a scratch wound approach. Treatment with Ang II (200 nM) for 24 h increased VSMC migration by 1.56 ± 0.14-fold. Ang II-induced VSMC migration and Syk phosphorylation as determined by Western blot analysis were minimized by the Syk inhibitor piceatannol (10 μM) and by transfecting VSMCs with dominant-negative but not wild-type Syk plasmid. Ang II-induced VSMC migration and Syk phosphorylation were attenuated by inhibitors of c-Src [4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2)], p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) [4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole (SB202190)], and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 [1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio) butadiene (U0126)]. SB202190 attenuated p38 MAPK and c-Src but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that p38 MAPK acts upstream of c-Src and Syk. The c-Src inhibitor PP2 attenuated Syk and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting that c-Src acts upstream of Syk and ERK1/2. Ang II- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced VSMC migration and EGFR phosphorylation were inhibited by the EGFR blocker 4-(3-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline (AG1478) (2 μM). Neither the Syk inhibitor piceatannol nor the dominant-negative Syk mutant altered EGF-induced cell migration or Ang II- and EGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation. The c-Src inhibitor PP2 diminished EGF-induced VSMC migration and EGFR, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (10 μM) attenuated EGF-induced cell migration and ERK1/2 but not EGFR phosphorylation. These data suggest that Ang II stimulates VSMC migration via p38 MAPK-activated c-Src through

  13. Angiotensin II-induced migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated c-Src through spleen tyrosine kinase and epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation.

    PubMed

    Mugabe, Benon E; Yaghini, Fariborz A; Song, Chi Young; Buharalioglu, Cuneyt K; Waters, Christopher M; Malik, Kafait U

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates protein synthesis by activating spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and DNA synthesis through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). This study was conducted to determine whether Syk mediates Ang II-induced migration of aortic VSMCs using a scratch wound approach. Treatment with Ang II (200 nM) for 24 h increased VSMC migration by 1.56 +/- 0.14-fold. Ang II-induced VSMC migration and Syk phosphorylation as determined by Western blot analysis were minimized by the Syk inhibitor piceatannol (10 microM) and by transfecting VSMCs with dominant-negative but not wild-type Syk plasmid. Ang II-induced VSMC migration and Syk phosphorylation were attenuated by inhibitors of c-Src [4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2)], p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) [4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole (SB202190)], and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 [1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio) butadiene (U0126)]. SB202190 attenuated p38 MAPK and c-Src but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that p38 MAPK acts upstream of c-Src and Syk. The c-Src inhibitor PP2 attenuated Syk and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting that c-Src acts upstream of Syk and ERK1/2. Ang II- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced VSMC migration and EGFR phosphorylation were inhibited by the EGFR blocker 4-(3-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline (AG1478) (2 microM). Neither the Syk inhibitor piceatannol nor the dominant-negative Syk mutant altered EGF-induced cell migration or Ang II- and EGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation. The c-Src inhibitor PP2 diminished EGF-induced VSMC migration and EGFR, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (10 microM) attenuated EGF-induced cell migration and ERK1/2 but not EGFR phosphorylation. These data suggest that Ang II stimulates VSMC migration via p38 MAPK-activated c

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Ischemia-Derived Astrocytes (IDAs) with Ability to Transactivate Quiescent Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Alejandro; Rosciszewski, Gerardo; Murta, Veronica; Cadena, Vanesa; Usach, Vanina; Dodes-Traian, Martin M.; Setton-Avruj, Patricia; Barbeito, Luis H.; Ramos, Alberto J.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive gliosis involving activation and proliferation of astrocytes and microglia, is a widespread but largely complex and graded glial response to brain injury. Astroglial population has a previously underestimated high heterogeneity with cells differing in their morphology, gene expression profile, and response to injury. Here, we identified a subset of reactive astrocytes isolated from brain focal ischemic lesions that show several atypical characteristics. Ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDAs) were isolated from early ischemic penumbra and core. IDA did not originate from myeloid precursors, but rather from pre-existing local progenitors. Isolated IDA markedly differ from primary astrocytes, as they proliferate in vitro with high cell division rate, show increased migratory ability, have reduced replicative senescence and grow in the presence of macrophages within the limits imposed by the glial scar. Remarkably, IDA produce a conditioned medium that strongly induced activation on quiescent primary astrocytes and potentiated the neuronal death triggered by oxygen-glucose deprivation. When re-implanted into normal rat brains, eGFP-IDA migrated around the injection site and induced focal reactive gliosis. Inhibition of gamma secretases or culture on quiescent primary astrocytes monolayers facilitated IDA differentiation to astrocytes. We propose that IDA represent an undifferentiated, pro-inflammatory, highly replicative and migratory astroglial subtype emerging from the ischemic microenvironment that may contribute to the expansion of reactive gliosis. Main Points: Ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDA) were isolated from brain ischemic tissue IDA show reduced replicative senescence, increased cell division and spontaneous migration IDA potentiate death of oxygen-glucose deprived cortical neurons IDA propagate reactive gliosis on quiescent astrocytes in vitro and in vivo Inhibition of gamma secretases facilitates IDA differentiation to astrocytes PMID:27313509

  15. β-Catenin Binds to the Activation Function 2 Region of the Androgen Receptor and Modulates the Effects of the N-Terminal Domain and TIF2 on Ligand-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liang-Nian; Herrell, Roger; Byers, Stephen; Shah, Salimuddin; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; Gelmann, Edward P.

    2003-01-01

    β-Catenin is a multifunctional molecule that is activated by signaling through WNT receptors. β-Catenin can also enhance the transcriptional activity of some steroid hormone receptors such as the androgen receptor and retinoic acid receptor α. Androgens can affect nuclear translocation of β-catenin and influence its subcellular distribution. Using mammalian two-hybrid binding assays, analysis of reporter gene transcription, and coimmunoprecipitation, we now show that β-catenin binds to the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (LBD) and modulates the transcriptional effects of TIF2 and the androgen receptor N-terminal domain (NTD). In functional assays, β-catenin bound to androgen receptor only in the presence of ligand agonists, not antagonists. β-Catenin binding to the androgen receptor LBD was independent of and cooperative with the androgen receptor NTD and the p160 coactivator TIF2, both of which bind to the activation function 2 (AF-2) region of the androgen receptor. Different mutations of androgen receptor helix 3 amino acids disrupted binding of androgen receptor NTD and β-catenin. β-Catenin, androgen receptor NTD, and TIF2 binding to the androgen receptor LBD were affected similarly by a subset of helix 12 mutations, but disruption of two sites on helix 12 affected only binding of β-catenin and not of TIF2 or the androgen receptor NTD. Mutational disruption of each of five LXXLL peptide motifs in the β-catenin armadillo repeats did not disrupt either binding to androgen receptor or transcriptional coactivation. ICAT, an inhibitor of T-cell factor 4 (TCF-4), and E-cadherin binding to β-catenin also blocked binding of the androgen receptor LBD. We also demonstrated cross talk between the WNT and androgen receptor signaling pathways because excess androgen receptor could interfere with WNT signaling and excess TCF-4 inhibited the interaction of β-catenin and androgen receptor. Taken together, the data show that β-catenin can bind to the

  16. Cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus L. suppresses photoaging of skin by inhibiting the transcription activity of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka Tsuda; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tomoji; Masutani, Teruaki; Tsuboi, Makoto; Akao, Yukihiro

    2013-01-15

    Aging of skin is characterized by skin wrinkling, laxity, and pigmentation induced by several environmental stress factors. Histological changes during the photoaging of skin include hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes causing skin wrinkles and pigmentation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the representative transcription factors active in conjunction with inflammation. NF-κB is activated by stimulation such as ultraviolet rays and inflammatory cytokines and induces the expression of various genes such as those of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1). We screened several plant extracts for their possible inhibitory effect on the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. One of them, an extract from Cynara scolymus L., showed a greatest effect on the suppression of NF-κB transactivation. As a result, we found that cynaropicrin, which is a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the NF-κB-mediated transactivation of bFGF and MMP-1. Furthermore, it was confirmed that in an in vivo mouse model cynaropicrin prevented skin photoaging processes leading to the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. These findings taken together indicate that cynaropicrin is an effective antiphotoaging agent that acts by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated transactivation. PMID:23232059

  17. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-03-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses.

  18. Loss of DNA-binding and new transcriptional trans-activation function in polyomavirus large T-antigen with mutation of zinc finger motif.

    PubMed Central

    Bergqvist, A; Nilsson, M; Bondeson, K; Magnusson, G

    1990-01-01

    A putative zinc finger in polyomavirus large T-antigen was investigated. We were unable to demonstrate unequivocally a requirement for zinc in specific DNA-binding using the chelating agent 1, 10-phenanthroline. An involvement of the putative zinc finger in specific DNA-binding was nevertheless suggested by the properties of a mutant protein with a cys----ser replacement in the finger motif. Probably as a result of the defective DNA-binding, the mutant protein had lost its activity in initiation of viral DNA-replication and in negative regulation of viral early transcription. However, the trans-activation of the viral late promoter was normal. The analysis also revealed a previously unrecognized activity of large T-antigen. The mutant protein trans-activated the viral early promoter. In the wild-type protein this activity is probably concealed by the separate, negative regulatory function. Images PMID:2160069

  19. Divergent Binding and Transactivation by Two Related Steroid Receptors at the Same Response Element.

    PubMed

    Tesikova, Martina; Dezitter, Xavier; Nenseth, Hatice Z; Klokk, Tove I; Mueller, Florian; Hager, Gordon L; Saatcioglu, Fahri

    2016-05-27

    Transcription factor (TF) recruitment to chromatin is central to activation of transcription. TF-chromatin interactions are highly dynamic, which are evaluated by recovery half time (t1/2) in seconds, determined by fluorescence recovery experiments in living cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis, measured in minutes. These two states are related: the larger the t1/2, the longer the ChIP occupancy resulting in increased transcription. Here we present data showing that this relationship does not always hold. We found that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) significantly increased t1/2 of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused androgen receptor (AR) on a tandem array of positive hormone response elements (HREs) in chromatin. This resulted in increased ChIP signal of GFP-AR. Unexpectedly, however, transcription was inhibited. In contrast, the GFP-fused glucocorticoid receptor (GR), acting through the same HREs, displayed a profile consistent with current models. We provide evidence that these differences are mediated, at least in part, by HDACs. Our results provide insight into TF action in living cells and show that very closely related TFs may trigger significantly divergent outcomes at the same REs. PMID:27056330

  20. E1A inhibits transforming growth factor-beta signaling through binding to Smad proteins.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, A; Hanai, J; Imamura, T; Miyazono, K; Kawabata, M

    1999-10-01

    Smads form a recently identified family of proteins that mediate intracellular signaling of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta superfamily. Smads bind to DNA and act as transcriptional regulators. Smads interact with a variety of transcription factors, and the interaction is likely to determine the target specificity of gene induction. Smads also associate with transcriptional coactivators such as p300 and CBP. E1A, an adenoviral oncoprotein, inhibits TGF-beta-induced transactivation, and the ability of E1A to bind p300/CBP is required for the inhibition. Here we determined the Smad interaction domain (SID) in p300 and found that two adjacent regions are required for the interaction. One of the regions is the C/H3 domain conserved between p300 and CBP, and the other is a nonconserved region. p300 mutants containing SID inhibit transactivation by TGF-beta in a dose-dependent manner. E1A inhibits the interaction of Smad3 with a p300 mutant that contains SID but lacks the E1A binding domain. We found that E1A interacts specifically with receptor-regulated Smads, suggesting a novel mechanism whereby E1A antagonizes TGF-beta signaling. PMID:10497242

  1. Transcriptional repressor NIR interacts with the p53-inhibiting ubiquitin ligase MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Kristina; Förster, Juliane; Schüle, Roland; Roemer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    NIR (novel INHAT repressor) can bind to p53 at promoters and inhibit p53-mediated gene transactivation by blocking histone acetylation carried out by p300/CBP. Like NIR, the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 can also bind and inhibit p53 at promoters. Here, we present data indicating that NIR, which shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, not only binds to p53 but also directly to MDM2, in part via the central acidic and zinc finger domain of MDM2 that is also contacted by several other nucleolus-based MDM2/p53-regulating proteins. Like some of these, NIR was able to inhibit the ubiquitination of MDM2 and stabilize MDM2; however, unlike these nucleolus-based MDM2 regulators, NIR did not inhibit MDM2 to activate p53. Rather, NIR cooperated with MDM2 to repress p53-induced transactivation. This cooperative repression may at least in part involve p300/CBP. We show that NIR can block the acetylation of p53 and MDM2. Non-acetylated p53 has been documented previously to more readily associate with inhibitory MDM2. NIR may thus help to sustain the inhibitory p53:MDM2 complex, and we present evidence suggesting that all three proteins can indeed form a ternary complex. In sum, our findings suggest that NIR can support MDM2 to suppress p53 as a transcriptional activator. PMID:24413661

  2. Human Checkpoint Protein hRad9 Functions as a Negative Coregulator To Repress Androgen Receptor Transactivation in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Ni, Jing; Wang, Peng-Hui; Yeh, Shuyuan; Keng, Peter; Chang, Chawnshang

    2004-01-01

    Positive responses to combined androgen elimination therapy and radiation therapy have been well documented in the treatment of prostate cancer patients. The detailed mechanisms how androgen-androgen receptor (AR) cross talks to the radiation-related signal pathways, however, remain largely unknown. Here we report the identification of hRad9, a key member of the checkpoint Rad protein family, as a coregulator to suppress androgen-AR transactivation in prostate cancer cells. In vivo and in vitro interaction assays using Saccharomyces cerevisiae two-hybrid, mammalian two-hybrid, glutathione S-transferase pull-down, and coimmunoprecipitation methods prove that AR can interact with the C terminus of hRad9 via its ligand binding domain. The FXXLF motif within the C terminus of hRad9 interrupts the androgen-induced interaction between the N terminus and C terminus of AR. This interaction between AR and hRad9 may result in the suppression of AR transactivation, demonstrated by the repressed AR transactivation in androgen-induced luciferase reporter assay and the reduced endogenous prostate-specific antigen expression in Western blot assay. Addition of small interfering RNA of hRad9 can reverse hRad9 suppression effects, which suggests that hRad9 functions as a repressor of AR transactivation in vivo. Together, our data provide the first linkage between androgen-AR signals and radiation-induced responses. Further studies of the influence of hRad9 on prostate cancer growth may provide potential new therapeutic approaches. PMID:14966297

  3. The basic domain/leucine zipper protein hXBP-1 preferentially binds to and transactivates CRE-like sequences containing an ACGT core.

    PubMed Central

    Clauss, I M; Chu, M; Zhao, J L; Glimcher, L H

    1996-01-01

    The transcription factor hXBP-1 belongs to the family of basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) proteins and interacts with the cAMP responsive element (CRE) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II A alpha, DR alpha and DP beta genes. However, the developmental expression of hXBP-1 as revealed by in situ hybridization in mouse embryos, has suggested that it interacts with the promoter of additional genes. To identify other potential target genes of this factor, we performed binding site selection experiments with recombinant hXBP-1 protein. The results indicated that hXBP-1 binds preferably to the CRE-like element GAT-GACGTG(T/G)NNN(A/T)T, wherein the core sequence ACGT is highly conserved, and that it also binds to some TPA response elements (TRE). hXBP-1 can transactivate multimers of the target sequences to which it binds in COS cells, and the level of transactivation directly correlates with the extent of binding as observed in gel retardation experiments. One target sequence that is strongly bound by hXBP-1 is the 21 bp repeat in the HTLV-1 LTR, and we demonstrate here that hXBP-1 can transactivate the HTLV-1 LTR. Further, the transactivation domain of hXBP-1 encompasses a large C-terminal region of the protein, containing domains rich in glutamine, serine and threonine, and proline and glutamine residues, as shown in transient transfection experiments using hXBP-1-GAL4 fusion proteins and a reporter gene under the control of GAL4-binding sites. PMID:8657566

  4. EBNA-2 transactivates a lymphoid-specific enhancer in the BamHI C promoter of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, N S; Kenney, S; Gutsch, D; Pagano, J S

    1991-01-01

    Among the few Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genes expressed during latency are the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigens (EBNAs), at least one of which contributes to the ability of the virus to transform B lymphocytes. We have analyzed a promoter located in the BamHI-C fragment of EBV which is responsible for the expression of EBNA-1 in some cell lines. Deletion analysis of a 1.4-kb region 5' of the RNA start site has identified a 700-bp fragment that is required for optimal promoter activity in latently infected B lymphocytes, as shown by promoter constructs linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. This fragment is also able to enhance activity, in an orientation-independent manner, of the simian virus 40 early promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. The enhancer element has some constitutive activity in EBV-negative lymphoid cells, which is increased in the presence of the EBNA-2 gene product. Further deletions have shown that the EBNA-2-responsive region requires a 98-bp region that contains a degenerate octamer-binding motif. In epithelial cells there was no enhancer activity regardless of the presence of EBNA-2. These results demonstrate that BamHI-C promoter activity may be dependent not on an enhancer contained in the ori-P, as was previously assumed, but rather on EBNA-2 transactivation of this more proximal enhancer located in the upstream region of the BamHI C promoter itself. Images PMID:1850003

  5. Structural basis for recruitment of CBP/p300 coactivators by STAT1 and STAT2 transactivation domains

    PubMed Central

    Wojciak, Jonathan M; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2009-01-01

    CBP/p300 transcriptional coactivators mediate gene expression by integrating cellular signals through interactions with multiple transcription factors. To elucidate the molecular and structural basis for CBP-dependent gene expression, we determined structures of the CBP TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains in complex with the transactivation domains (TADs) of signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2) and STAT1, respectively. Despite the topological similarity of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains, subtle differences in helix packing and surface grooves constitute major determinants of target selectivity. Our results suggest that TAZ1 preferentially binds long TADs capable of contacting multiple surface grooves simultaneously, whereas smaller TADs that are restricted to a single contiguous binding surface form complexes with TAZ2. Complex formation for both STAT TADs involves coupled folding and binding, driven by intermolecular hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Phosphorylation of S727, required for maximal transcriptional activity of STAT1, does not enhance binding to any of the CBP domains. Because the different STAT TADs recognize different regions of CBP/p300, there is a potential for multivalent binding by STAT heterodimers that could enhance the recruitment of the coactivators to promoters. PMID:19214187

  6. Transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide– chitosan functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a potential drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xia; Liu, Lanxia; Zhu, Dunwan; Zhang, Hailing; Leng, Xigang

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based drug delivery vehicles might find great potential in cancer therapy via the combination of chemotherapy with photothermal therapy due to the strong optical absorbance of CNTs in the near-infrared region. However, the application of CNTs in cancer therapy was considerably constrained by their lack of solubility in aqueous medium, as well as the cytotoxicity caused by their hydrophobic surface. Intracellular delivery efficiency is another factor determining the application potential of CNTs in cancer therapy. In the present study, low-molecular-weight chitosan conjugated with transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide was used for noncovalent functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), aiming at providing a more efficient drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy. The TAT–chitosan-conjugated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-TC) were further investigated for their water solubility, cytotoxicity, cell-penetrating capability, and accumulation in tumor. It was found that MWCNTs-TC were essentially nontoxic with satisfying water solubility, and they were more efficient in terms of cancer-targeted intracellular transport both in vitro and in vivo as compared with chitosan-modified MWCNTs (MWCNTs-CS), suggesting the great application potential of MWCNTs-TC in cancer therapy. PMID:26082633

  7. The GATA-4 transcription factor transactivates the cardiac muscle-specific troponin C promoter-enhancer in nonmuscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ip, H S; Wilson, D B; Heikinheimo, M; Tang, Z; Ting, C N; Simon, M C; Leiden, J M; Parmacek, M S

    1994-01-01

    The unique contractile phenotype of cardiac myocytes is determined by the expression of a set of cardiac muscle-specific genes. By analogy to other mammalian developmental systems, it is likely that the coordinate expression of cardiac genes is controlled by lineage-specific transcription factors that interact with promoter and enhancer elements in the transcriptional regulatory regions of these genes. Although previous reports have identified several cardiac muscle-specific transcriptional elements, relatively little is known about the lineage-specific transcription factors that regulate these elements. In this report, we demonstrate that the slow/cardiac muscle-specific troponin C (cTnC) enhancer contains a specific binding site for the lineage-restricted zinc finger transcription factor GATA-4. This GATA-4-binding site is required for enhancer activity in primary cardiac myocytes. Moreover, the cTnC enhancer can be transactivated by overexpression of GATA-4 in non-cardiac muscle cells such as NIH 3T3 cells. In situ hybridization studies demonstrate that GATA-4 and cTnC have overlapping patterns of expression in the hearts of postimplantation mouse embryos and that GATA-4 gene expression precedes cTnC expression. Indirect immunofluorescence reveals GATA-4 expression in cultured cardiac myocytes from neonatal rats. Taken together, these results are consistent with a model in which GATA-4 functions to direct tissue-specific gene expression during mammalian cardiac development. Images PMID:7935467

  8. Nuclear import of prototype foamy virus transactivator Bel1 is mediated by KPNA1, KPNA6 and KPNA7

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jihui; Tang, Zhiqin; Mu, Hong; Zhang, Guojun

    2016-01-01

    Bel1, a transactivator of the prototype foamy virus (PFV), plays pivotal roles in the replication of PFV. Previous studies have demonstrated that Bel1 bears a nuclear localization signal (NLS); however, its amino acid sequence remains unclear and the corresponding adaptor importins have not yet been identified. In this study, we inserted various fragments of Bel1 into an EGFP-GST fusion protein and investigated their subcellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. We found that the 215PRQKRPR221 fragment, which accords with the consensus sequence K(K/R)X(K/R) of the monopartite NLS, directed the nuclear translocation of Bel1. Point mutation experiments revealed that K218, R219 and R221 were essential for the nuclear localization of Bel1. The results of GST pull-down assay revealed that the Bel1 peptide 215-221, which bears the NLS, interacted with the nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors, karyopherin alpha 1 (importin alpha 5) (KPNA1), karyopherin alpha 6 (importin alpha 7) (KPNA6) and karyopherin alpha 7 (importin alpha 8) (KPNA7). Finally, in vitro nuclear import assays demonstrated that KPNA1, KPNA6 or KPNA7, along with other necessary nuclear factors, caused Bel1 to localize to the nucleus. Thus, the findings of our study indicate that KPNA1, KPNA6 and KPNA7 are involved in Bel1 nuclear distribution. PMID:27277550

  9. Structural characterization of a noncovalent complex between ubiquitin and the transactivation domain of the erythroid-specific factor EKLF.

    PubMed

    Raiola, Luca; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Gagnon, David; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Mascle, Xavier; Arseneault, Genevieve; Legault, Pascale; Archambault, Jacques; Omichinski, James G

    2013-11-01

    Like other acidic transactivation domains (TAD), the minimal TAD from the erythroid-specific transcription factor EKLF (EKLFTAD) has been shown to contribute both to its transcriptional activity as well as to its ubiquitin(UBI)-mediated degradation. In this article, we examine the activation-degradation role of the acidic TAD of EKLF and demonstrate that the first 40 residues (EKLFTAD1) within this region form a noncovalent interaction with UBI. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies of an EKLFTAD1-UBI complex show that EKLFTAD1 adopts a 14-residue α helix that forms the recognition interface with UBI in a similar manner as the UBI-interacting helix of Rabex5. We also identify a similar interaction between UBI and the activation-degradation region of SREBP1a, but not with the activation-degradation regions of p53, GAL4, and VP16. These results suggest that select activation-degradation regions like the ones found in EKLF and SREBP1a function in part through their ability to form noncovalent interactions with UBI. PMID:24139988

  10. Improvement of the reverse tetracycline transactivator by single amino acid substitutions that reduce leaky target gene expression to undetectable levels.

    PubMed

    Roney, Ian J; Rudner, Adam D; Couture, Jean-François; Kærn, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Conditional gene expression systems that enable inducible and reversible transcriptional control are essential research tools and have broad applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. The reverse tetracycline transcriptional activator is a canonical system for engineered gene expression control that enables graded and gratuitous modulation of target gene transcription in eukaryotes from yeast to human cell lines and transgenic animals. However, the system has a tendency to activate transcription even in the absence of tetracycline and this leaky target gene expression impedes its use. Here, we identify single amino-acid substitutions that greatly enhance the dynamic range of the system in yeast by reducing leaky transcription to undetectable levels while retaining high expression capacity in the presence of inducer. While the mutations increase the inducer concentration required for full induction, additional sensitivity-enhancing mutations can compensate for this effect and confer a high degree of robustness to the system. The novel transactivator variants will be useful in applications where tight and tunable regulation of gene expression is paramount. PMID:27323850

  11. Improvement of the reverse tetracycline transactivator by single amino acid substitutions that reduce leaky target gene expression to undetectable levels

    PubMed Central

    Roney, Ian J.; Rudner, Adam D.; Couture, Jean-François; Kærn, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Conditional gene expression systems that enable inducible and reversible transcriptional control are essential research tools and have broad applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. The reverse tetracycline transcriptional activator is a canonical system for engineered gene expression control that enables graded and gratuitous modulation of target gene transcription in eukaryotes from yeast to human cell lines and transgenic animals. However, the system has a tendency to activate transcription even in the absence of tetracycline and this leaky target gene expression impedes its use. Here, we identify single amino-acid substitutions that greatly enhance the dynamic range of the system in yeast by reducing leaky transcription to undetectable levels while retaining high expression capacity in the presence of inducer. While the mutations increase the inducer concentration required for full induction, additional sensitivity-enhancing mutations can compensate for this effect and confer a high degree of robustness to the system. The novel transactivator variants will be useful in applications where tight and tunable regulation of gene expression is paramount. PMID:27323850

  12. Association of transcription factor YY1 with the high molecular weight Notch complex suppresses the transactivation activity of Notch.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Tien-Shun; Lin, Yu-Min; Hsieh, Rong-Hong; Tseng, Min-Jen

    2003-10-24

    Notch receptors are evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to human and play important roles in cell fate decisions. After ligand binding, Notch receptors are cleaved to release their intracellular domains. The intracellular domains, the activated form of Notch receptors, are then translocated into the nucleus where they interact with other transcriptional machinery to regulate the expression of cellular genes. To dissect the molecular mechanisms of Notch signaling, the cellular targets that interact with Notch1 receptor intracellular domain (N1IC) were screened. In this study, we found that endogenous transcription factor Ying Yang 1 (YY1) was associated with exogenous N1IC in human K562 erythroleukemic cells. The ankyrin (ANK) domain of N1IC and zinc finger domains of YY1 were essential for the association of N1IC and YY1 according to the pull-down assay of glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins. Furthermore, both YY1 and N1IC were present in a large complex of the nucleus to suppress the luciferase reporter activity transactivated by Notch signaling. The transcription factor YY1 indirectly regulated the transcriptional activity of the wild-type CBF1-response elements via the direct interaction of N1IC and CBF1. We also demonstrated the association between endogenous N1IC and intrinsic YY1 in human acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. Taken together, these results indicate that transcription factor YY1 may modulate Notch signaling via association with the high molecular weight Notch complex. PMID:12913000

  13. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the E2 transactivation domain from papillomavirus type 16.

    PubMed

    Burns, J E; Moroz, O V; Antson, A A; Sanders, C M; Wilson, K S; Maitland, N J

    1998-11-01

    The N-terminal transactivation domain of the E2 protein from human papillomavirus type 16 has been crystallized by vapour diffusion. Crystals belong to the space group P3121 (or P3221) with unit-cell dimensions a = b = 54.3, c = 155.5 A. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 55%. Crystals diffract to at least 2.5 A resolution and complete X-ray data to 3.4 A have been collected on a conventional laboratory source. This 201 amino-acid domain of the E2 protein has been shown to interact functionally with both the HPV E1 protein and at least three cellular transcription factors, to fulfil its role in the control of viral transcription and replication. A knowledge of the structural basis of these multiple interactions should lead to a fuller understanding of the mechanism of action of this key regulator of the HPV life cycle. PMID:10089541

  14. Transient expression of Nxf, a bHLH-PAS transactivator induced by neuronal preconditioning, confers neuroprotection in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Hester, Ian; McKee, Sarah; Pelletier, Phillip; Thompson, Charles; Storbeck, Christopher; Mears, Alan; Schulz, Jörg B; Hakim, Antoine A; Sabourin, Luc A

    2007-03-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) induces waves of neuronal depolarization that confer neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic events in the rat brain. To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms elicited by CSD, we used representational difference analysis (RDA) to identify mRNAs induced by potassium depolarization in vivo. Using this approach, we have isolated a cDNA encoding the SIM2-related bHLH-PAS protein Nxf. Our results confirm that Nxf mRNA and protein are rapidly and transiently expressed in cortical neurons following CSD. Reporter assays show that Nxf is a transcriptional activator that associates with the bHLH-PAS sub-class co-factor ARNT2. Adenovirus-mediated expression of epitope-tagged Nxf results in cell death and the direct activation of the Bax gene in cultured cells. However, RNA interference studies show that endogenous Nxf is required for optimal neuroprotection by preconditioning in cultured F-11 cells. Together, our data indicate that Nxf is a novel bHLH-PAS transactivator transiently induced by preconditioning and that its sustained expression is detrimental. The identification of Nxf may represent an important step in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of brain preconditioning and injury. PMID:17214977

  15. The Ability of Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b To Transactivate Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transcription Depends on a Functional Kinase Domain, Cyclin T1, and Tat

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Koh; Cujec, Thomas P.; Peng, Junmin; Garriga, Judit; Price, David H.; Graña, Xavier; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1998-01-01

    By binding to the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA, the transcriptional transactivator (Tat) from the human immunodeficiency virus increases rates of elongation rather than initiation of viral transcription. Two cyclin-dependent serine/threonine kinases, CDK7 and CDK9, which phosphorylate the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, have been implicated in Tat transactivation in vivo and in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate that CDK9, which is the kinase component of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex, can activate viral transcription when tethered to the heterologous Rev response element RNA via the regulator of expression of virion proteins (Rev). The kinase activity of CDK9 and cyclin T1 is essential for these effects. Moreover, P-TEFb binds to TAR only in the presence of Tat. We conclude that Tat–P-TEFb complexes bind to TAR, where CDK9 modifies RNA polymerase II for the efficient copying of the viral genome. PMID:9696809

  16. Site-specific cleavage of the transactivation response site of human immunodeficiency virus RNA with a tat-based chemical nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, S D; Johnston, B H

    1992-01-01

    tat, an essential transactivator of gene transcription in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is believed to activate viral gene expression by binding to the transactivation response (TAR) site located at the 5' end of all viral mRNAs. The TAR element forms a stem-loop structure containing a 3-nucleotide bulge that is the site for tat binding and is required for transactivation. Here we report the synthesis of a site-specific chemical ribonuclease based on the TAR binding domain of the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) tat. A peptide consisting of this 24-amino acid domain plus an additional C-terminal cysteine residue was chemically synthesized and covalently linked to 1,10-phenanthroline at the cysteine residue. The modified peptide binds to TAR sequences of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 and, in the presence of cupric ions and a reducing agent, cleaves these RNAs at specific sites. Cleavage sites on TAR sequences are consistent with peptide binding to the 3-nucleotide bulge, and the relative displacement of cleavage sites on the two strands suggests peptide binding to the major groove of the RNA. These results and existing evidence of the rapid cellular uptake of tat-derived peptides suggest that chemical nucleases based on tat may be useful for inactivating HIV mRNA in vivo. Images PMID:1565648

  17. Targeting ADAM-mediated ligand cleavage to inhibit HER3 and EGFR pathways in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bin-Bing S.; Peyton, Michael; He, Biao; Liu, Changnian; Girard, Luc; Caudler, Eian; Lo, Yvonne; Baribaud, Frederic; Mikami, Iwao; Reguart, Noemi; Yang, Gengjie; Li, Yanlong; Yao, Wenqing; Vaddi, Kris; Gazdar, Adi F.; Friedman, Steven M.; Jablons, David M.; Newton, Robert C.; Fridman, Jordan S.; Minna, John D.; Scherle, Peggy A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We describe here the existence of a heregulin-HER3 autocrine loop, and the contribution of heregulin-dependent, HER2-mediated HER3 activation to gefitinib insensitivity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ADAM17 protein, a major ErbB ligand sheddase, is upregulated in NSCLC and is required not only for heregulin-dependent HER3 signaling, but also for EGFR ligand-dependent signaling in NSCLC cell lines. A selective ADAM inhibitor, INCB3619, prevents the processing and activation of multiple ErbB ligands, including heregulin. In addition, INCB3619 inhibits gefitinib-resistant HER3 signaling and enhances gefitinib inhibition of EGFR signaling in NSCLC. These results show that ADAM inhibition affects multiple ErbB pathways in NSCLC and thus offers an excellent opportunity for pharmacological intervention, either alone or in combination with other drugs. PMID:16843264

  18. Inhibition of ErbB3 by a monoclonal antibody that locks the extracellular domain in an inactive configuration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangwon; Greenlee, Etienne B.; Amick, Joseph R.; Ligon, Gwenda F.; Lillquist, Jay S.; Natoli, Edward J.; Hadari, Yaron; Alvarado, Diego; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ErbB3 (HER3) is a member of the EGF receptor (EGFR) family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which, unlike the other three family members, contains a pseudo kinase in place of a tyrosine kinase domain. In cancer, ErbB3 activation is driven by a ligand-dependent mechanism through the formation of heterodimers with EGFR, ErbB2, or ErbB4 or via a ligand-independent process through heterodimerization with ErbB2 overexpressed in breast tumors or other cancers. Here we describe the crystal structure of the Fab fragment of an antagonistic monoclonal antibody KTN3379, currently in clinical development in human cancer patients, in complex with the ErbB3 extracellular domain. The structure reveals a unique allosteric mechanism for inhibition of ligand-dependent or ligand-independent ErbB3-driven cancers by binding to an epitope that locks ErbB3 in an inactive conformation. Given the similarities in the mechanism of ErbB receptor family activation, these findings could facilitate structure-based design of antibodies that inhibit EGFR and ErbB4 by an allosteric mechanism. PMID:26460020

  19. Differential transactivation of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene promoter by Tax1 and Tax2 of human T-cell leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Y; Hayashi, M; Takagi, S; Yoshie, O

    1996-01-01

    Previously, we showed that surface expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was strongly upregulated in T cells carrying proviral human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and that the viral transactivator protein Tax1 was capable of inducing the ICAM-1 gene. To determine the responsive elements in the human ICAM-1 gene promoter, a reporter construct in which the 5'-flanking 4.4-kb region of the ICAM-1 gene was linked to the promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was cotransfected with expression vectors for Tax1 and Tax2, both of which were separately confirmed to be potent transactivators of the HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). Tax1 strongly activated the ICAM-1 promoter in all the cell lines tested: three T-cell lines (Jurkat, MOLT-4, and CEM), one monocytoid cell line (U937), and HeLa. Unexpectedly, Tax2 activated the ICAM-1 promoter only in HeLa. By deletion and mutation analyses of the 1.3-kb 5'-flanking region, we found that Tax1 transactivated the ICAM-1 promoter mainly via a cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE)-like site at -630 to -624 in the Jurkat T-cell line and via an NF-kappaB site at -185 to -177 and an SP-1 site at -59 to -54 in HeLa. On the other hand, Tax2 was totally inactive on the ICAM-1 promoter in Jurkat but transactivated the promoter via the NF-kappaB site at -185 to -177 in HeLa. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated proteins specifically binding to the CRE-like site at -630 to -624 in Tax1-expressing T-cell lines. Stable expression of Tax1 but not Tax2 in Jurkat subclones enhanced the surface expression of ICAM-1. The differential ability of Tax1 and Tax2 in transactivation of the ICAM-1 gene may be related to the differential pathogenicity of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. PMID:8970974

  20. Tumor cell-specific inhibition of MYC function using small molecule inhibitors of the HUWE1 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Peter, Stefanie; Bultinck, Jennyfer; Myant, Kevin; Jaenicke, Laura A; Walz, Susanne; Müller, Judith; Gmachl, Michael; Treu, Matthias; Boehmelt, Guido; Ade, Carsten P; Schmitz, Werner; Wiegering, Armin; Otto, Christoph; Popov, Nikita; Sansom, Owen; Kraut, Norbert; Eilers, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Deregulated expression of MYC is a driver of colorectal carcinogenesis, necessitating novel strategies to inhibit MYC function. The ubiquitin ligase HUWE1 (HECTH9, ARF-BP1, MULE) associates with both MYC and the MYC-associated protein MIZ1. We show here that HUWE1 is required for growth of colorectal cancer cells in culture and in orthotopic xenograft models. Using high-throughput screening, we identify small molecule inhibitors of HUWE1, which inhibit MYC-dependent transactivation in colorectal cancer cells, but not in stem and normal colon epithelial cells. Inhibition of HUWE1 stabilizes MIZ1. MIZ1 globally accumulates on MYC target genes and contributes to repression of MYC-activated target genes upon HUWE1 inhibition. Our data show that transcriptional activation by MYC in colon cancer cells requires the continuous degradation of MIZ1 and identify a novel principle that allows for inhibition of MYC function in tumor cells. PMID:25253726

  1. CITED2 silencing sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin by inhibiting p53 trans-activation and chromatin relaxation on the ERCC1 DNA repair gene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Chin; Chang, Pu-Yuan; Chao, Chuck C.-K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we show that silencing of CITED2 using small-hairpin RNA (shCITED2) induced DNA damage and reduction of ERCC1 gene expression in HEK293, HeLa and H1299 cells, even in the absence of cisplatin. In contrast, ectopic expression of ERCC1 significantly reduced intrinsic and induced DNA damage levels, and rescued the effects of CITED2 silencing on cell viability. The effects of CITED2 silencing on DNA repair and cell death were associated with p53 activity. Furthermore, CITED2 silencing caused severe elimination of the p300 protein and markers of relaxed chromatin (acetylated H3 and H4, i.e. H3K9Ac and H3K14Ac) in HEK293 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that DNA damage induced binding of p53 along with H3K9Ac or H3K14Ac at the ERCC1 promoter, an effect which was almost entirely abrogated by silencing of CITED2 or p300. Moreover, lentivirus-based CITED2 silencing sensitized HeLa cell line-derived tumor xenografts to cisplatin in immune-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that CITED2/p300 can be recruited by p53 at the promoter of the repair gene ERCC1 in response to cisplatin-induced DNA damage. The CITED2/p300/p53/ERCC1 pathway is thus involved in the cell response to cisplatin and represents a potential target for cancer therapy. PMID:26384430

  2. CITED2 silencing sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin by inhibiting p53 trans-activation and chromatin relaxation on the ERCC1 DNA repair gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Chin; Chang, Pu-Yuan; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2015-12-15

    In this study, we show that silencing of CITED2 using small-hairpin RNA (shCITED2) induced DNA damage and reduction of ERCC1 gene expression in HEK293, HeLa and H1299 cells, even in the absence of cisplatin. In contrast, ectopic expression of ERCC1 significantly reduced intrinsic and induced DNA damage levels, and rescued the effects of CITED2 silencing on cell viability. The effects of CITED2 silencing on DNA repair and cell death were associated with p53 activity. Furthermore, CITED2 silencing caused severe elimination of the p300 protein and markers of relaxed chromatin (acetylated H3 and H4, i.e. H3K9Ac and H3K14Ac) in HEK293 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that DNA damage induced binding of p53 along with H3K9Ac or H3K14Ac at the ERCC1 promoter, an effect which was almost entirely abrogated by silencing of CITED2 or p300. Moreover, lentivirus-based CITED2 silencing sensitized HeLa cell line-derived tumor xenografts to cisplatin in immune-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that CITED2/p300 can be recruited by p53 at the promoter of the repair gene ERCC1 in response to cisplatin-induced DNA damage. The CITED2/p300/p53/ERCC1 pathway is thus involved in the cell response to cisplatin and represents a potential target for cancer therapy. PMID:26384430

  3. Temperature inducible β-sheet structure in the transactivation domains of retroviral regulatory proteins of the Rev family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumb, Werner; Graf, Christine; Parslow, Tristram; Schneider, Rainer; Auer, Manfred

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory protein Rev with cellular cofactors is crucial for the viral life cycle. The HIV-1 Rev transactivation domain is functionally interchangeable with analog regions of Rev proteins of other retroviruses suggesting common folding patterns. In order to obtain experimental evidence for similar structural features mediating protein-protein contacts we investigated activation domain peptides from HIV-1, HIV-2, VISNA virus, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by CD spectroscopy, secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis. Although different in polarity and hydrophobicity, all peptides showed a similar behavior with respect to solution conformation, concentration dependence and variations in ionic strength and pH. Temperature studies revealed an unusual induction of β-structure with rising temperatures in all activation domain peptides. The high stability of β-structure in this region was demonstrated in three different peptides of the activation domain of HIV-1 Rev in solutions containing 40% hexafluoropropanol, a reagent usually known to induce α-helix into amino acid sequences. Sequence alignments revealed similarities between the polar effector domains from FIV and EIAV and the leucine rich (hydrophobic) effector domains found in HIV-1, HIV-2 and VISNA. Studies on activation domain peptides of two dominant negative HIV-1 Rev mutants, M10 and M32, pointed towards different reasons for the biological behavior. Whereas the peptide containing the M10 mutation (L 78E 79→D 78L 79) showed wild-type structure, the M32 mutant peptide (L 78L 81L 83→A 78A 81A 83) revealed a different protein fold to be the reason for the disturbed binding to cellular cofactors. From our data, we conclude, that the activation domain of Rev proteins from different viral origins adopt a similar fold and that a β-structural element is involved in binding to a

  4. Exosomes from HIV-1-infected Cells Stimulate Production of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines through Trans-activating Response (TAR) RNA.

    PubMed

    Sampey, Gavin C; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Schwab, Angela; Barclay, Robert; Punya, Shreya; Chung, Myung-Chul; Hakami, Ramin M; Zadeh, Mohammad Asad; Lepene, Benjamin; Klase, Zachary A; El-Hage, Nazira; Young, Mary; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-15

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic illness because long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy can lower viral titers to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases virus burden. Moreover, patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy frequently develop various metabolic disorders, neurocognitive abnormalities, and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that exosomes containing trans-activating response (TAR) element RNA enhance susceptibility of undifferentiated naive cells to HIV-1 infection. This study indicates that exosomes from HIV-1-infected primary cells are highly abundant with TAR RNA as detected by RT-real time PCR. Interestingly, up to a million copies of TAR RNA/μl were also detected in the serum from HIV-1-infected humanized mice suggesting that TAR RNA may be stable in vivo. Incubation of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells with primary macrophages resulted in a dramatic increase of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-β, indicating that exosomes containing TAR RNA could play a direct role in control of cytokine gene expression. The intact TAR molecule was able to bind to PKR and TLR3 effectively, whereas the 5' and 3' stems (TAR microRNAs) bound best to TLR7 and -8 and none to PKR. Binding of TAR to PKR did not result in its phosphorylation, and therefore, TAR may be a dominant negative decoy molecule in cells. The TLR binding through either TAR RNA or TAR microRNA potentially can activate the NF-κB pathway and regulate cytokine expression. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes containing TAR RNA could directly affect the proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and may explain a possible mechanism of inflammation observed in HIV-1-infected patients under cART. PMID:26553869

  5. Modulation of the Disordered Conformational Ensembles of the p53 Transactivation Domain by Cancer-Associated Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Debabani; Chen, Jianhan

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are frequently associated with human diseases such as cancers, and about one-fourth of disease-associated missense mutations have been mapped into predicted disordered regions. Understanding how these mutations affect the structure-function relationship of IDPs is a formidable task that requires detailed characterization of the disordered conformational ensembles. Implicit solvent coupled with enhanced sampling has been proposed to provide a balance between accuracy and efficiency necessary for systematic and comparative assessments of the effects of mutations as well as post-translational modifications on IDP structure and interaction. Here, we utilize a recently developed replica exchange with guided annealing enhanced sampling technique to calculate well-converged atomistic conformational ensembles of the intrinsically disordered transactivation domain (TAD) of tumor suppressor p53 and several cancer-associated mutants in implicit solvent. The simulations are critically assessed by quantitative comparisons with several types of experimental data that provide structural information on both secondary and tertiary levels. The results show that the calculated ensembles reproduce local structural features of wild-type p53-TAD and the effects of K24N mutation quantitatively. On the tertiary level, the simulated ensembles are overly compact, even though they appear to recapitulate the overall features of transient long-range contacts qualitatively. A key finding is that, while p53-TAD and its cancer mutants sample a similar set of conformational states, cancer mutants could introduce both local and long-range structural modulations to potentially perturb the balance of p53 binding to various regulatory proteins and further alter how this balance is regulated by multisite phosphorylation of p53-TAD. The current study clearly demonstrates the promise of atomistic simulations for detailed characterization of IDP conformations, and

  6. Interaction of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 tax transactivator with transcription factor IIA.

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, K E; Piras, G; Radonovich, M F; Choi, K S; Duvall, J F; DeJong, J; Roeder, R; Brady, J N

    1996-01-01

    The Tax protein of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a 40-kDa transcriptional activator which is critical for HTLV-1 gene regulation and virus-induced cellular transformation. Tax is localized to the DNA through its interaction with the site-specific activators cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein, NF-kappaB, and serum response factor. It has been suggested that the recruitment of Tax to the DNA positions Tax for interaction with the basal transcriptional machinery. On the basis of several independent assays, we now report a physical and functional interaction between Tax and the transcription factor, TFIIA. First, Tax was found to interact with the 35-kDa (alpha) subunit of TFIIA in the yeast two-hybrid interaction system. Importantly, two previously characterized mutants with point mutations in Tax, M32 (Y196A, K197S) and M41 (H287A, P288S), which were shown to be defective in Tax-activated transcription were unable to interact with TFIIA in this assay. Second, a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) affinity-binding assay showed that the interaction of holo-TFIIA with GST-Tax was 20-fold higher than that observed with either the GST-Tax M32 activation mutant or the GST control. Third, a coimmunoprecipitation assay showed that in HTLV-1-infected human T lymphocytes, Tax and TFIIA were associated. Finally, TFIIA facilitates Tax transactivation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro transcription studies showed reduced levels of Tax-activated transcription in cell extracts depleted of TFIIA. In addition, transfection of human T lymphocytes with TFIIA expression vectors enhanced Tax-activated transcription of an HTLV-1 long terminal repeat-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter construct. Our study suggests that the interaction of Tax with the transcription factor TFIIA may play a role in Tax-mediated transcriptional activation. PMID:8756622

  7. Expression of the MHC Class II Transactivator (CIITA) type IV promoter in B lymphocytes and regulation by IFN-γ

    PubMed Central

    Piskurich, Janet F.; Gilbert, Carolyn A.; Ashley, Brittany D.; Zhao, Mojun; Chen, Han; Wu, Jian; Wright, Kenneth L.

    2006-01-01

    The MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), the master regulator of MHC class II (MHC II) expression, is a co-activator that controls MHC II transcription. Human B lymphocytes express MHC II constitutively due to persistent activity of CIITA promoter III (pIII), one of the four potential promoters (pI-pIV) of this gene. Although increases in MHC II expression in B cells in response to cytokines have been observed and induction of MHC II and CIITA by IFN-γ has been studied in a number of different cell types, the specific effects of IFN-γ on CIITA expression in B cells have not been studied. To investigate the regulation of CIITA expression by IFN-γ in B cells, RT-PCR, in vivo and in vitro protein/DNA binding studies, and functional promoter analyses were performed. Both MHC II and CIITA type IV-specific RNAs increased in human B lymphocytes in response to IFN-γ treatment. CIITA promoter analysis confirmed that pIV is IFN-γ inducible in B cells and that the GAS and IRF-E sites are necessary for full induction. DNA binding of IRF-1 and IRF-2, members of the IFN regulatory factor family, was up-regulated in B cells in response to IFN-γ and increased the activity of CIITA pIV. In vivo genomic footprint analysis demonstrated proteins binding at the GAS, IRF-E and E box sites of CIITA pIV. Although CIITA pIII is considered to be the hematopoietic-specific promoter of CIITA, these findings demonstrate that pIV is active in B lymphocytes and potentially contributes to the expression of CIITA and MHC II in these cells. PMID:15950283

  8. Nuclear import of prototype foamy virus transactivator Bel1 is mediated by KPNA1, KPNA6 and KPNA7.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jihui; Tang, Zhiqin; Mu, Hong; Zhang, Guojun

    2016-08-01

    Bel1, a transactivator of the prototype foamy virus (PFV), plays pivotal roles in the replication of PFV. Previous studies have demonstrated that Bel1 bears a nuclear localization signal (NLS); however, its amino acid sequence remains unclear and the corresponding adaptor importins have not yet been identified. In this study, we inserted various fragments of Bel1 into an EGFP-GST fusion protein and investigated their subcellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. We found that the 215PRQKRPR221 fragment, which accords with the consensus sequence K(K/R)X(K/R) of the monopartite NLS, directed the nuclear translocation of Bel1. Point mutation experiments revealed that K218, R219 and R221 were essential for the nuclear localization of Bel1. The results of GST pull-down assay revealed that the Bel1 peptide 215-221, which bears the NLS, interacted with the nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors, karyopherin alpha 1 (importin alpha 5) (KPNA1), karyopherin alpha 6 (importin alpha 7) (KPNA6) and karyopherin alpha 7 (importin alpha 8) (KPNA7). Finally, in vitro nuclear import assays demonstrated that KPNA1, KPNA6 or KPNA7, along with other necessary nuclear factors, caused Bel1 to localize to the nucleus. Thus, the findings of our study indicate that KPNA1, KPNA6 and KPNA7 are involved in Bel1 nuclear distribution. PMID:27277550

  9. Transient gene expression control: effects of transfected DNA stability and trans-activation by viral early proteins.

    PubMed

    Alwine, J C

    1985-05-01

    The effects of trans-acting factors and transfected DNA stability on promoter activity were examined with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) transient expression analysis. With cotransfection into CV-1P and HeLa cells, simian virus 40 T antigen, adenovirus E1a, and herpes-virus IE proteins were compared for their ability to trans-activate a variety of eucaryotic promoters constructed into CAT plasmids. T antigen and the IE protein were promiscuous activators of all the promoters tested [the simian virus 40 late promoter, the adenovirus E3 promoter, the alpha 2(I) collagen promoter, and the promoter of the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat]. Conversely the E1a protein was specific, activating only the adenovirus E3 promoter and suppressing the basal activity of the other promoters. This specificity of activation by E1a contrasted with the high activity generated by all of the promoter-CAT plasmids when transfected into 293 cells, which endogenously produce E1a protein. Examination of transfected 293 cells determined that they stabilized much greater amounts of plasmid DNA than any other cells tested (CV-1P, COS, NIH-3T3, KB). Thus the high activity of nonadenovirus promoter-CAT plasmids in 293 cells results from the cumulative effect of basal promoter activity from a very large number of gene copies, not from E1a activation. This conclusion was supported by similar transfection analysis of KB cell lines which endogenously produce E1a protein. These cells stabilize plasmid DNA at a level comparable to that of CV-1P cells and, in agreement with the CV-1P cotransfection results, did not activate a nonadenovirus promoter-CAT plasmid. These results indicate that the stability of plasmid DNA must be considered when transient gene expression is being compared between cell lines. The use of relative plasmid copy numbers for the standardization of transient expression results is discussed. PMID:2987671

  10. Transient gene expression control: effects of transfected DNA stability and trans-activation by viral early proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Alwine, J C

    1985-01-01

    The effects of trans-acting factors and transfected DNA stability on promoter activity were examined with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) transient expression analysis. With cotransfection into CV-1P and HeLa cells, simian virus 40 T antigen, adenovirus E1a, and herpes-virus IE proteins were compared for their ability to trans-activate a variety of eucaryotic promoters constructed into CAT plasmids. T antigen and the IE protein were promiscuous activators of all the promoters tested [the simian virus 40 late promoter, the adenovirus E3 promoter, the alpha 2(I) collagen promoter, and the promoter of the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat]. Conversely the E1a protein was specific, activating only the adenovirus E3 promoter and suppressing the basal activity of the other promoters. This specificity of activation by E1a contrasted with the high activity generated by all of the promoter-CAT plasmids when transfected into 293 cells, which endogenously produce E1a protein. Examination of transfected 293 cells determined that they stabilized much greater amounts of plasmid DNA than any other cells tested (CV-1P, COS, NIH-3T3, KB). Thus the high activity of nonadenovirus promoter-CAT plasmids in 293 cells results from the cumulative effect of basal promoter activity from a very large number of gene copies, not from E1a activation. This conclusion was supported by similar transfection analysis of KB cell lines which endogenously produce E1a protein. These cells stabilize plasmid DNA at a level comparable to that of CV-1P cells and, in agreement with the CV-1P cotransfection results, did not activate a nonadenovirus promoter-CAT plasmid. These results indicate that the stability of plasmid DNA must be considered when transient gene expression is being compared between cell lines. The use of relative plasmid copy numbers for the standardization of transient expression results is discussed. Images PMID:2987671

  11. Recognition of the disordered p53 transactivation domain by the transcriptional adapter zinc finger domains of CREB-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Krois, Alexander S; Ferreon, Josephine C; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2016-03-29

    An important component of the activity of p53 as a tumor suppressor is its interaction with the transcriptional coactivators cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300, which activate transcription of p53-regulated stress response genes and stabilize p53 against ubiquitin-mediated degradation. The highest affinity interactions are between the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of p53 and the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains of CBP/p300. The NMR spectra of simple binary complexes of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains with the p53TAD suffer from exchange broadening, but innovations in construct design and isotopic labeling have enabled us to obtain high-resolution structures using fusion proteins, uniformly labeled in the case of the TAZ2-p53TAD fusion and segmentally labeled through transintein splicing for the TAZ1-p53TAD fusion. The p53TAD is bipartite, with two interaction motifs, termed AD1 and AD2, which fold to form short amphipathic helices upon binding to TAZ1 and TAZ2 whereas intervening regions of the p53TAD remain flexible. Both the AD1 and AD2 motifs bind to hydrophobic surfaces of the TAZ domains, with AD2 making more extensive hydrophobic contacts consistent with its greater contribution to the binding affinity. Binding of AD1 and AD2 is synergistic, and structural studies performed with isolated motifs can be misleading. The present structures of the full-length p53TAD complexes demonstrate the versatility of the interactions available to an intrinsically disordered domain containing bipartite interaction motifs and provide valuable insights into the structural basis of the affinity changes that occur upon stress-related posttranslational modification. PMID:26976603

  12. Urinary miR-16 transactivated by C/EBPβ reduces kidney function after ischemia/reperfusion–induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsi-Hsien; Lan, Yi-Fan; Li, Hsiao-Fen; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Lai, Pei-Fang; Li, Wei-Hua; Lin, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is regulated by transcriptional factors and microRNAs (miRs). However, modulation of miRs by transcriptional factors has not been characterized in AKI. Here, we found that urinary miR-16 was 100-fold higher in AKI patients. MiR-16 was detected earlier than creatinine in mouse after I/R. Using TargetScan, the 3′UTR of B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) was found complementary to miR-16 to decrease the fluorescent reporter activity. Overexpression of miR-16 in mice significantly attenuated renal function and increased TUNEL activity in epithelium tubule cells. The CCAAT enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBP-β) increased the expression of miR-16 after I/R injury. The ChIP and luciferase promoter assay indicated that about −1.0 kb to −0.5 kb upstream of miR-16 genome promoter region containing C/EBP-β binding motif transcriptionally regulated miR-16 expression. Meanwhile, the level of pri-miR-16 was higher in mice infected with lentivirus containing C/EBP-β compared with wild-type (WT) mice and overexpression of C/EBP-β in the kidney of WT mice reduced kidney function, increased kidney apoptosis, and elevated urinary miR-16 level. Our results indicated that miR-16 was transactivated by C/EBP-β resulting in aggravated I/R induced AKI and that urinary miR-16 may serve as a potential biomarker for AKI. PMID:27297958

  13. Positive Regulatory Domain I-Binding Factor 1 mediates repression of the MHC Class II Transactivator (CIITA) type IV promoter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han; Gilbert, Carolyn A.; Hudson, John A.; Bolick, Sophia C.; Wright, Kenneth L.; Piskurich, Janet F.

    2006-01-01

    MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), a co-activator that controls MHC class II (MHC II) transcription, functions as the master regulator of MHC II expression. Persistent activity of the CIITA type III promoter (pIII), one of the four potential promoters of this gene, is responsible for constitutive expression of MHC II by B lymphocytes. In addition, IFN-γ induces expression of CIITA in these cells through the type IV promoter (pIV). Positive regulatory domain 1-binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), called B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1) in mice, represses the expression of CIITA pIII in plasma and multiple myeloma cells. To investigate regulation of CIITA pIV expression by PRDI-BF1 in the B lymphocyte lineage, protein/DNA binding studies, and functional promoter analyses were performed. PRDI-BF1 bound to the IRF-E site in CIITA pIV. Ectopic expression of either PRDI-BF1 or Blimp-1 repressed this promoter in B lymphocytes. In vitro binding and functional analyses of CIITA pIV demonstrated that the IFN regulatory factor-element (IRF-E) is the target of this repression. In vivo genomic footprint analysis demonstrated protein binding at the IRF-E site of CIITA pIV in U266 myeloma cells, which express PRDI-BF1. PRDI-BF1β, a truncated form of PRDI-BF1 that is co-expressed in myeloma cells, also bound to the IRF-E site and repressed CIITA pIV. These findings demonstrate for the first time that, in addition to silencing expression of CIITA pIII in B lymphocytes, PRDI-BF1 is capable of binding and suppressing CIITA pIV. PMID:16765445

  14. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α transactivates the mitochondrial alanine aminotransferase gene in the kidney of Sparus aurata.

    PubMed

    Salgado, María C; Metón, Isidoro; Anemaet, Ida G; González, J Diego; Fernández, Felipe; Baanante, Isabel V

    2012-02-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) plays an important role in amino acid metabolism and gluconeogenesis. The preference of carnivorous fish for protein amino acids instead of carbohydrates as a source of energy lead us to study the transcriptional regulation of the mitochondrial ALT (mALT) gene and to characterize the enzyme kinetics and modulation of mALT expression in the kidney of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) under different nutritional and hormonal conditions. 5'-Deletion analysis of mALT promoter in transiently transfected HEK293 cells, site-directed mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays allowed us to identify HNF4α as a new factor involved in the transcriptional regulation of mALT expression. Quantitative RT-PCR assays showed that starvation and the administration of streptozotocin (STZ) decreased HNF4α levels in the kidney of S. aurata, leading to the downregulation of mALT transcription. Analysis of the tissue distribution showed that kidney, liver, and intestine were the tissues with higher mALT and HNF4α expression. Kinetic analysis indicates that mALT enzyme is more efficient in catalyzing the conversion of L: -alanine to pyruvate than the reverse reaction. From these results, we conclude that HNF4α transactivates the mALT promoter and that the low levels of mALT expression found in the kidney of starved and STZ-treated fish result from a decreased expression of HNF4α. Our findings suggest that the mALT isoenzyme plays a major role in oxidazing dietary amino acids, and points to ALT as a target for a biotechnological action to spare protein and optimize the use of dietary nutrients for fish culture. PMID:21607544

  15. Urinary miR-16 transactivated by C/EBPβ reduces kidney function after ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsi-Hsien; Lan, Yi-Fan; Li, Hsiao-Fen; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Lai, Pei-Fang; Li, Wei-Hua; Lin, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is regulated by transcriptional factors and microRNAs (miRs). However, modulation of miRs by transcriptional factors has not been characterized in AKI. Here, we found that urinary miR-16 was 100-fold higher in AKI patients. MiR-16 was detected earlier than creatinine in mouse after I/R. Using TargetScan, the 3'UTR of B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) was found complementary to miR-16 to decrease the fluorescent reporter activity. Overexpression of miR-16 in mice significantly attenuated renal function and increased TUNEL activity in epithelium tubule cells. The CCAAT enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBP-β) increased the expression of miR-16 after I/R injury. The ChIP and luciferase promoter assay indicated that about -1.0 kb to -0.5 kb upstream of miR-16 genome promoter region containing C/EBP-β binding motif transcriptionally regulated miR-16 expression. Meanwhile, the level of pri-miR-16 was higher in mice infected with lentivirus containing C/EBP-β compared with wild-type (WT) mice and overexpression of C/EBP-β in the kidney of WT mice reduced kidney function, increased kidney apoptosis, and elevated urinary miR-16 level. Our results indicated that miR-16 was transactivated by C/EBP-β resulting in aggravated I/R induced AKI and that urinary miR-16 may serve as a potential biomarker for AKI. PMID:27297958

  16. GATA-1 associates with and inhibits p53

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Caroline; Archambault, Patrick; Di Lello, Paola

    2009-01-01

    In addition to orchestrating the expression of all erythroid-specific genes, GATA-1 controls the growth, differentiation, and survival of the erythroid lineage through the regulation of genes that manipulate the cell cycle and apoptosis. The stages of mammalian erythropoiesis include global gene inactivation, nuclear condensation, and enucleation to yield circulating erythrocytes, and some of the genes whose expression are altered by GATA-1 during this process are members of the p53 pathway. In this study, we demonstrate a specific in vitro interaction between the transactivation domain of p53 (p53TAD) and a segment of the GATA-1 DNA-binding domain that includes the carboxyl-terminal zinc-finger domain. We also show by immunoprecipitation that the native GATA-1 and p53 interact in erythroid cells and that activation of p53-responsive promoters in an erythroid cell line can be inhibited by the overexpression of GATA-1. Mutational analysis reveals that GATA-1 inhibition of p53 minimally requires the segment of the GATA-1 DNA-binding domain that interacts with p53TAD. This inhibition is reciprocal, as the activation of a GATA-1–responsive promoter can be inhibited by p53. Based on these findings, we conclude that inhibition of the p53 pathway by GATA-1 may be essential for erythroid cell development and survival. PMID:19411634

  17. GATA-1 associates with and inhibits p53.

    PubMed

    Trainor, Cecelia D; Mas, Caroline; Archambault, Patrick; Di Lello, Paola; Omichinski, James G

    2009-07-01

    In addition to orchestrating the expression of all erythroid-specific genes, GATA-1 controls the growth, differentiation, and survival of the erythroid lineage through the regulation of genes that manipulate the cell cycle and apoptosis. The stages of mammalian erythropoiesis include global gene inactivation, nuclear condensation, and enucleation to yield circulating erythrocytes, and some of the genes whose expression are altered by GATA-1 during this process are members of the p53 pathway. In this study, we demonstrate a specific in vitro interaction between the transactivation domain of p53 (p53TAD) and a segment of the GATA-1 DNA-binding domain that includes the carboxyl-terminal zinc-finger domain. We also show by immunoprecipitation that the native GATA-1 and p53 interact in erythroid cells and that activation of p53-responsive promoters in an erythroid cell line can be inhibited by the overexpression of GATA-1. Mutational analysis reveals that GATA-1 inhibition of p53 minimally requires the segment of the GATA-1 DNA-binding domain that interacts with p53TAD. This inhibition is reciprocal, as the activation of a GATA-1-responsive promoter can be inhibited by p53. Based on these findings, we conclude that inhibition of the p53 pathway by GATA-1 may be essential for erythroid cell development and survival. PMID:19411634

  18. Zinc finger protein 131 inhibits estrogen signaling by suppressing estrogen receptor {alpha} homo-dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Yohan; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding affinity of ZNF131 to ER{alpha} increases upon E2 stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-dimerization and E2-induced breast cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor. -- Abstract: Steroid hormone estrogen elicits various physiological functions, many of which are mediated through two structurally and functionally distinct estrogen receptors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}. The functional role of zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131) is poorly understood, but it is assumed to possess transcriptional regulation activity due to the presence of a DNA binding motif. A few recent reports, including ours, revealed that ZNF131 acts as a negative regulator of ER{alpha} and that SUMO modification potentiates the negative effect of ZNF131 on estrogen signaling. However, its molecular mechanism for ER{alpha} inhibition has not been elucidated in detail. Here, we demonstrate that ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}, which consequently inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Moreover, we show that the C-terminal region of ZNF131 containing the SUMOylation site is necessary for its inhibition of estrogen signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor.

  19. Ligand-dependent Bohr effect of Chrionomus hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Steffens, G; Buse, G; Wollmer, A

    1977-01-01

    The O2 and CO Bohr effects of monomeric and dimeric hemoglobins of the insect Chironomus thummi thummi were determined as proton releases upon ligation. For the O2 Bohr effect of the monomeric hemoglobin III a maximum value of 0.20 H+/heme was obtained at pH 7.5. Upon ligation with CO, however, only 0.04 H+/heme were released at the same pH. In agreement with this finding isoelectric focusing experiments revealed different isoelectric points for O2-liganded and CO-liganded states of hemoglobin III. Analogous results were obtained in the cases of the monomeric hemoglobin IV and the dimeric hemoglobins of Chironomus thummi thummi; here O2 Bohr effects of 0.43 and 0.86 H+/heme were observed. For the corresponding CO Bohr effects values of 0.08 and 0.31 H+/heme were obtained respectively. On the basis of the available structural data the reduced CO Bohr effect in hemoglobin III is discussed as arising from a steric hindrance of the CO ligand by the side chain of isoleucine-E11, obstructing the movement of the heme-iron upon reaction with carbon monoxide. It should, however, be noted that ligands, according to their different electron donor and acceptor properties, may generally induce different conformational changes and thus different Bohr effects, in those hemoglobins in which distinct tertiary and/or quaternary constraints have not evolved. The general utilization of CO instead of O2 as allosteric effector is ruled out by the results reported here. PMID:12977

  20. Ligand-Dependent Conformational Dynamics of Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Reddish, Michael J.; Vaughn, Morgan B.; Fu, Rong; Dyer, R. Brian

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are known to change among several conformational states during turnover. The role of such dynamic structural changes in catalysis is not fully understood. The influence of dynamics in catalysis can be inferred, but not proven, by comparison of equilibrium structures of protein variants and protein–ligand complexes. A more direct way to establish connections between protein dynamics and the catalytic cycle is to probe the kinetics of specific protein motions in comparison to progress along the reaction coordinate. We have examined the enzyme model system dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli with tryptophan fluorescence-probed temperature-jump spectroscopy. We aimed to observe the kinetics of the ligand binding and ligand-induced conformational changes of three DHFR complexes to establish the relationship among these catalytic steps. Surprisingly, in all three complexes, the observed kinetics do not match a simple sequential two-step process. Through analysis of the relationship between ligand concentration and observed rate, we conclude that the observed kinetics correspond to the ligand binding step of the reaction and a noncoupled enzyme conformational change. The kinetics of the conformational change vary with the ligand's identity and presence but do not appear to be directly related to progress along the reaction coordinate. These results emphasize the need for kinetic studies of DHFR with highly specific spectroscopic probes to determine which dynamic events are coupled to the catalytic cycle and which are not. PMID:26901612

  1. In vitro and in silico evaluation of transactivation potencies of avian AHR1 and AHR2 by endogenous ligands: Implications for the physiological role of avian AHR2.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Sung; Hwang, Ji-Hee; Hirano, Masashi; Iwata, Hisato; Kim, Eun-Young

    2016-09-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is well conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, and it mediates the toxic effects of exogenous ligands, including dioxins. Recent studies reported that AHRs activated by endogenous ligands play critical roles in mammalian physiological homeostasis. Avian species possess at least two AHR isoforms (AHR1 and AHR2), which exhibit species- and isoform-specific transactivation potencies to exogenous ligands, whereas mammals possess a single AHR. To delineate the profiles and roles of endogenous ligands for avian AHR isoforms, we investigated in vitro transactivation potencies of avian AHRs (AHR1 and AHR2 from the jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos; common cormorant, Phalacrocorax carbo; and black-footed albatross, Phoebastria nigripes) treated with the endogenous tryptophan metabolites 6-formylindolo [3,2-b] carbazole (FICZ), l-kynurenine (l-Kyn), kynurenic acid (KYNA), and indoxyl sulfate (IS). Furthermore, we analyzed the binding mode of these ligands to each avian AHR isoform by in silico docking simulations. The EC50 of FICZ (0.009-0.032nM) was similar regardless of the species or isoform of AHR. The estimated in silico binding mode of FICZ to AHRs was well conserved in both isoforms. The transactivation potencies of avian AHRs to other tryptophan metabolites were 10(5)-10(7) fold lower than those for FICZ, and EC50 values varied in a species- and isoform-specific manner. This was consistent with poor conservation of the binding mode of l-Kyn, KYNA, and IS predicted in in silico docking simulations. Our results suggest that in avian species, FICZ is the most potent endogenous AHR ligand, and that AHR1 and AHR2 are physiologically functional. PMID:27060260

  2. Superactivation of Pax6-mediated transactivation from paired domain-binding sites by dna-independent recruitment of different homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed

    Mikkola, I; Bruun, J A; Holm, T; Johansen, T

    2001-02-01

    The Pax6 genes encode evolutionary conserved transcription factors that act high up in the regulatory hierarchy controlling development of central organs such as the eyes and the central nervous system. These proteins contain two DNA-binding domains. The N-terminal paired domain is separated from a paired-type homeodomain by a linker region, and a transactivation domain is located C-terminal to the homeodomain. Vertebrate Pax6 genes express a paired-less isoform of Pax6 (Pax6DeltaPD) from an internal start codon in the coding region between the paired domain and homeodomain. We now provide evidence for an interaction between the full-length isoform and Pax6DeltaPD, which enhances the transactivation activity of Pax6 from paired domain-binding sites. The paired-like homeodomain protein Rax behaved similarly to Pax6DeltaPD. Both Pax6DeltaPD and Rax bound to the homeodomain of Pax6 in vitro in the absence of specific DNA binding. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments following cotransfection confirmed the existence of complexes between Pax6 and Pax6DeltaPD, Pax6 and Rax, and Pax6DeltaPD and Rax in vivo. Interestingly, the C-terminal subdomain of the paired domain and the homeodomain can interact with each other. The paired domain can also interact with itself. Surprisingly, GST pull-down assays revealed that the homeodomains of such diverse proteins as Chx10, Six3, Lhx2, En-1, Prep1, Prox1, and HoxB1 could all bind to Pax6, and several of these enhanced Pax6-mediated transactivation upon coexpression. Since many homeodomain proteins are coexpressed with Pax6 in several tissues during development, our results indicate the existence of novel regulatory interactions that may be important for fine tuning of gene regulation. PMID:11069920

  3. Evidence for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-independent transactivation by the vitamin D receptor: uncoupling the receptor and ligand in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Tara I; Eckert, Richard L; MacDonald, Paul N

    2007-04-13

    The vitamin D endocrine system plays critical although poorly understood roles in skin. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) knock-out (VDRKO) mice have defects in hair follicle cycling and keratinocyte proliferation leading to epidermal thickening, dermal cyst formation, and alopecia. Surprisingly, skin defects are not apparent in mice lacking 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1alpha-hydroxylase, the enzyme required for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) hormone biosynthesis. These disparate phenotypes indicate that VDR effects in skin are independent of the 1,25(OH)2D3 ligand. However, cellular or molecular data supporting this hypothesis are lacking. Here, we show transcriptional activation of the vitamin D-responsive 24-hydroxylase promoter by VDR in primary keratinocytes that is independent of the 1,25(OH)2D3 ligand. This activity required functional vitamin D-responsive promoter elements as well as an intact VDR DNA binding domain and thus could not be distinguished from 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent VDR transactivation. The 1,25(OH)2D3-independent activation of VDR was also observed in keratinocytes from 1alpha-hydroxylase knock-out mice, indicating that it is not due to endogenous 1,25(OH)2D3 production. Mammalian two-hybrid studies showed strong, 1,25(OH)2D3-independent interaction between VDR and retinoid X receptors in primary keratinocytes, indicating that enhanced heterodimerization of these receptors was involved. Indeed, this 1,25(OH)2D3-independent VDR-RXR heterodimerization was sufficient to drive transactivation by VDR(L233S), an inactive ligand binding mutant of VDR that was previously shown to rescue the skin phenotype of VDR null mice. Cumulatively, these studies support the concept that transactivation by VDR in keratinocytes may be uncoupled from the 1,25(OH)2D3 ligand. PMID:17310066

  4. Effect of triterpenes and triterpene saponins from the stem bark of Kalopanax pictus on the transactivational activities of three PPAR subtypes.

    PubMed

    Quang, Tran Hong; Ngan, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Minh, Chau Van; Kiem, Phan Van; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Tai, Bui Huu; Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Song, Seok Bean; Kim, Young Ho

    2011-11-29

    Kalopanax pictus (Araliaceae) is a deciduous tree that grows in East Asian countries. Its stem bark and leaves have been used in traditional medicine to treat rheumatic arthritis, neurotic pain, and diabetes mellitus. A phytochemical study on a methanol extract of the stem bark of K. pictus resulted in the isolation of three new compounds, 6β,16α-dihydroxy-hederagenin 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (1), 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-6β,16α-dihydroxy-oleanolic acid (2), and 3-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl(1→3)-α-L-arabinopyranosyl hederagenin 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (3), along with eight known compounds (4-11). Their structures were established on the basis of chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, 1D and 2D NMR, and HRESITOFMS). Compounds 1-6 and 8-10 upregulated PPARs transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 cells, with EC(50) values in the range 0.20-15.5 μM. Moreover, the specific PPAR transactivational effects of compounds 1-6 and 8-10 on separate PPAR subtypes, PPARα, -γ, and -β(δ) were further investigated. Compounds 4, 5, 8, and 10 showed significant PPARα transactivational activity, with EC(50) values of 7.8, 8.0, 10.3, and 17.3 μM, respectively. Compounds 2, 4, 6, and 8-10 exhibited PPARγ dose-dependent transactivational activity, with EC(50) values of 14.7, 15.5, 14.8, 10.9, 17.1, and 16.3 μM, whereas compounds 8 and 10 significantly upregulated PPARβ(δ) transcriptional activity, with EC(50) values of 15.7 and 17.7 μM, respectively. PMID:21996602

  5. NCOA3 is a selective co-activator of estrogen receptor α-mediated transactivation of PLAC1 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The placenta-specific 1 (PLAC1) gene encodes a membrane-associated protein which is selectively expressed in the placental syncytiotrophoblast and in murine fetal tissues during embryonic development. In contrast to its transcriptional repression in all other adult normal tissues, PLAC1 is frequently activated and highly expressed in a variety of human cancers, in particular breast cancer, where it associates with estrogen receptor α (ERα) positivity. In a previous study, we showed that ERα-signaling in breast cancer cells transactivates PLAC1 expression in a non-classical pathway. As the members of the p160/nuclear receptor co-activator (NCOA) family, NCOA1, NCOA2 and NCOA3 are known to be overexpressed in breast cancer and essentially involved in estrogen-mediated cancer cell proliferation we asked if these proteins are involved in the ERα-mediated transactivation of PLAC1 in breast cancer cells. Methods Applying quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), Western Blot analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we analyzed the involvement of NCOA1, NCOA2, NCOA3 in the ERα-mediated transactivation of PLAC1 in the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and SK-BR-3. RNAi-mediated silencing of NCOA3, qRT-PCR, Western blot analysis and ERα activation assays were used to examine the role of NCOA3 in the ERα-mediated regulation of PLAC1 in further detail. Transcript expression of NCOA3 and PLAC1 in 48 human breast cancer samples was examined by qRT-PCR and statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test. Results We detected selective recruitment of NCOA3 but not NCOA1 or NCOA2 to the PLAC1 promoter only in ERα-positive MCF-7 cells but not in ERα-negative SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrate that silencing of NCOA3 results in a remarkable decrease of PLAC1 expression levels in MCF-7 cells which cannot be restored by treatment with estradiol (E2). Moreover, significant higher transcript levels of PLAC1 were found only in ER

  6. Transactivation of involucrin, a marker of differentiation in keratinocytes, by lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF).

    PubMed

    Kubo, E; Fatma, N; Sharma, P; Shinohara, T; Chylack, L T; Akagi, Y; Singh, D P

    2002-07-26

    Human involucrin (hINV), first appears in the cytosol of keratinocytes and ultimately cross-linked to membrane proteins via transglutaminase and forms a protective barrier as an insoluble envelope beneath the plasma membrane. Although the function and evolution of involucrin is known, the regulation of its gene expression is not well understood. An analysis of the hINV gene sequence, upstream of the transcription start site (-534 to +1 nt) revealed the presence of potential sites for binding of lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF); stress response element (STRE; A/TGGGGA/T) and heat shock element (HSE; nGAAn). We reported earlier that LEDGF activates stress-associated genes by binding to these elements and elevates cellular resistance to various stresses. Here, gel-shift and super-shift assays confirm the binding of LEDGF to the DNA fragments containing HSEs and STREs that are present in the involucrin gene promoter. Furthermore, hINV promoter linked to CAT reporter gene, cotransfected in human corneal simian virus 40-transformed keratinocytes (HCK), was transactivated by LEDGF significantly. In contrast, the activity of hINV promoter bearing mutations at the WT1 (containing HSE and STRE), WT2 (containing STRE) and WT3 (containing STRE) binding sites was diminished. In addition, in HCK cell over-expressing LEDGF, the levels of hINV mRNA and hINV protein are increased by four to five-fold. LEDGF is inducible to oxidants. Cells treated with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), known to stimulate production of H(2)O(2), showed higher levels of LEDGF mRNA. Furthermore, our immunohistochemical studies revealed that hINV protein is found in the cytoplasm of HCK cells over-expressing LEDGF, but not detectable in the normal HCK cells or HCK cells transfected with vector. This regulation appears to be physiologically important, as over-expression of HCK with LEDGF increases the expression of the endogenous hINV gene and may provide new insight to understand

  7. Deregulation of Rb-E2F1 Axis Causes Chromosomal Instability by Engaging the Transactivation Function of Cdc20–Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Somsubhra; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Dey, Sanjib; Roychoudhury, Anirban; Ganguly, Abira; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2014-01-01

    The E2F family of transcription factors regulates genes involved in various aspects of the cell cycle. Beyond the well-documented role in G1/S transition, mitotic regulation by E2F has also been reported. Proper mitotic progression is monitored by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). The SAC ensures bipolar separation of chromosomes and thus prevents aneuploidy. There are limited reports on the regulation of the SAC by E2F. Our previous work identified the SAC protein Cdc20 as a novel transcriptional regulator of the mitotic ubiquitin carrier protein UbcH10. However, none of the Cdc20 transcription complex proteins have any known DNA binding domain. Here we show that an E2F1-DP1 heterodimer is involved in recruitment of the Cdc20 transcription complex to the UBCH10 promoter and in transactivation of the gene. We further show that inactivation of Rb can facilitate this transactivation process. Moreover, this E2F1-mediated regulation of UbcH10 influences mitotic progression. Deregulation of this pathway results in premature anaphase, chromosomal abnormalities, and aneuploidy. We conclude that excess E2F1 due to Rb inactivation recruits the complex of Cdc20 and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (Cdc20-APC/C) to deregulate the expression of UBCH10, leading to chromosomal instability in cancer cells. PMID:25368385

  8. Subcellular localisation of BAG-1 and its regulation of vitamin D receptor-mediated transactivation and involucrin expression in oral keratinocytes: Implications for oral carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, San San; Crabb, Simon J.; Janghra, Nari; Carlberg, Carsten; Williams, Ann C.; Cutress, Ramsey I.; Packham, Graham; Hague, Angela

    2007-09-10

    In oral cancers, cytoplasmic BAG-1 overexpression is a marker of poor prognosis. BAG-1 regulates cellular growth, differentiation and survival through interactions with diverse proteins, including the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a key regulator of keratinocyte growth and differentiation. BAG-1 is expressed ubiquitously in human cells as three major isoforms of 50 kDa (BAG-1L), 46 kDa (BAG-1M) and 36 kDa (BAG-1S) from a single mRNA. In oral keratinocytes BAG-1L, but not BAG-1M and BAG-1S, enhanced VDR transactivation in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3.} BAG-1L was nucleoplasmic and nucleolar, whereas BAG-1S and BAG-1M were cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic in localisation. Having identified the nucleolar localisation sequence in BAG-1L, we showed that mutation of this sequence did not prevent BAG-1L from potentiating VDR activity. BAG-1L also potentiated transactivation of known vitamin-D-responsive gene promoters, osteocalcin and 24-hydroxylase, and enhanced VDR-dependent transcription and protein expression of the keratinocyte differentiation marker, involucrin. These results demonstrate endogenous gene regulation by BAG-1L by potentiating nuclear hormone receptor function and suggest a role for BAG-1L in 24-hydroxylase regulation of vitamin D metabolism and the cellular response of oral keratinocytes to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. By contrast to the cytoplasmic BAG-1 isoforms, BAG-1L may act to suppress tumorigenesis.

  9. Transactivation of a cellular promoter by the NS1 protein of the parvovirus minute virus of mice through a putative hormone-responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Vanacker, J M; Corbau, R; Adelmant, G; Perros, M; Laudet, V; Rommelaere, J

    1996-01-01

    The promoter of the thyroid hormone receptor alpha gene (c-erbA-1) is activated by the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of parvovirus minute virus of mice (prototype strain [MVMp]) in ras-transformed FREJ4 cells that are permissive for lytic MVMp replication. This stimulation may be related to the sensitivity of host cells to MVMp, as it does not take place in parental FR3T3 cells, which are resistant to the parvovirus killing effect. The analysis of a series of deletion and point mutants of the c-erbA-1 promoter led to the identification of an upstream region that is necessary for NS1-driven transactivation. This sequence harbors a putative hormone-responsive element and is sufficient to render a minimal promoter NS1 inducible in FREJ4 but not in FR3T3 cells, and it is involved in distinct interactions with proteins from the respective cell lines. The NS1-responsive element of the c-erbA-1 promoter bears no homology with sequences that were previously reported to be necessary for NS1 DNA binding and transactivation. Altogether, our data point to a novel, cell-specific mechanism of promoter activation by NS1. PMID:8642664

  10. A unique transactivation sequence motif is found in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the single-strand-binding protein FBP.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, R; Collins, I; Tomonaga, T; Zhang, T; Levens, D

    1996-01-01

    The far-upstream element-binding protein (FBP) is one of several recently described factors which bind to a single strand of DNA in the 5' region of the c-myc gene. Although cotransfection of FBP increases expression from a far-upstream element-bearing c-myc promoter reporter, the mechanism of this stimulation is heretofore unknown. Can a single-strand-binding protein function as a classical transactivator, or are these proteins restricted to stabilizing or altering the conformation of DNA in an architectural role? Using chimeric GAL4-FBP fusion proteins we have shown that the carboxyl-terminal region (residues 448 to 644) is a potent transcriptional activation domain. This region contains three copies of a unique amino acid sequence motif containing tyrosine diads. Analysis of deletion mutants demonstrated that a single tyrosine motif alone (residues 609 to 644) was capable of activating transcription. The activation property of the C-terminal domain is repressed by the N-terminal 107 amino acids of FBP. These results show that FBP contains a transactivation domain which can function alone, suggesting that FBP contributes directly to c-myc transcription while bound to a single-strand site. Furthermore, activation is mediated by a new motif which can be negatively regulated by a repression domain of FBP. PMID:8628294

  11. The Wedelolactone Derivative Inhibits Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Breast, Endometrial, and Ovarian Cancer Cells Growth

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Defeng; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Cheng, Max A.; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in the etiology and progression of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Attenuating ER activities by natural products and their derivatives is a relatively practical strategy to control and reduce breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk. Here, we found 3-butoxy-1,8,9-trihydroxy-6H-benzofuro[3,2-c]benzopyran-6-one (BTB), a new derivative of wedelolactone, could effectively inhibit the 17-estradiol (E2)-induced ER transactivation and suppress the growth of breast cancer as well as endometrial and ovarian cancer cells. Our results indicate that 2.5 μM BTB effectively suppresses ER-positive, but not ER-negative, breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that BTB can modulate ER transactivation and suppress the expression of E2-mediated ER target genes (Cyclin D1, E2F1, and TERT) in the ER-positive MCF-7, Ishikawa, and SKOV-3 cells. Importantly, this BTB mediated inhibition of ER activity is selective since BTB does not suppress the activities of other nuclear receptors, including glucocorticoid receptor and progesterone receptor, suggesting that BTB functions as a selective ER signaling inhibitor with the potential to treat breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. PMID:25221777

  12. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. PMID:26976217

  13. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription and replication by DNA sequence-selective plant lignans.

    PubMed

    Gnabre, J N; Brady, J N; Clanton, D J; Ito, Y; Dittmer, J; Bates, R B; Huang, R C

    1995-11-21

    A plant lignan, 3'-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (3'-O-methyl NDGA, denoted Malachi 4:5-6 or Mal.4; molecular weigth 316), was isolated from Larrea tridentata and found to be able to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Tat-regulated transactivation in vivo, induce protection of lymphoblastoid CEM-SS cells from HIV (strain IIIB) killing, and suppress the replication of five HIV-1 strains (WM, MN, VS, JR-CSF, and IIIB) in mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, all in a dose-dependent manner. Mal.4 inhibits both basal transcription and Tat-regulated transactivation in vitro. The target of Mal.4 has been localized to nucleotides -87 to -40 of the HIV long terminal repeat. Mal.4 directly and specifically interferes with the binding of Sp1 to Sp1 sites in the HIV long terminal repeat. By inhibiting proviral expression, Mal.4 may be able to interrupt the life cycles of both wild-type and reverse transcriptase or protease mutant viruses in HIV-infected patients. PMID:7479972

  14. Identification of flavopiridol analogues that selectively inhibit positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb) and block HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akbar; Ghosh, Animesh; Nathans, Robin S; Sharova, Natalia; O'Brien, Siobhan; Cao, Hong; Stevenson, Mario; Rana, Tariq M

    2009-08-17

    The positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb; CDK9/cyclin T1) regulates RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription of cellular and integrated viral genes. It is an essential cofactor for HIV-1 Tat transactivation, and selective inhibition of P-TEFb blocks HIV-1 replication without affecting cellular transcription; this indicates that P-TEFb could be a potential target for developing anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. Flavopiridol, a small molecule CDK inhibitor, blocks HIV-1 Tat transactivation and viral replication by inhibiting P-TEFb kinase activity, but it is highly cytotoxic. In the search for selective and less cytotoxic P-TEFb inhibitors, we prepared a series of flavopiridol analogues and evaluated their kinase inhibitory activity against P-TEFb and CDK2/cyclin A, and tested their cellular antiviral potency and cytotoxicity. We identified several analogues that selectively inhibit P-TEFb kinase activity in vitro and show antiviral potency comparable to that of flavopiridol, but with significantly reduced cytotoxicity. These compounds are valuable molecular probes for understanding P-TEFb-regulated cellular and HIV-1 gene transcription and provide potential anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:19603446

  15. HIV-1 TAT Inhibits Microglial Phagocytosis of Aβ Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Brian; Zhou, Yuyan; Hou, Huayan; Rrapo, Elona; Fernandez, Francisco; Tan, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated dementia (HAD) is a subcortical neuropsychiatric syndrome that has increased in prevalence in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Several studies demonstrated increased amyloidosis in brains of HIV patients and suggested that there may be a significant number of long-term HIV survivors with co-morbid Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the future. We show HIV-1 Tat protein inhibits microglial uptake of Aβ1-42 peptide, a process that is enhanced by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and rescued by the STAT1 inhibitor (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). It is hypothesized that reduced Aβ uptake occurs through IFN-γ mediated STAT1 activation. This process promotes a switch from a phagocytic to an antigen presenting phenotype in microglia through activation of class II transactivator (CIITA). Additionally, we show that HIV-1 Tat significantly disrupts apolipoprotein-3 (Apo-E3) promoted microglial Aβ uptake. As Tat has been shown to directly interact with the low density lipoprotein (LRP) receptor and thus inhibit the uptake of its ligands including apolipoprotein E4 (Apo-E4) and Aβ peptide in neurons, we further hypothesize that a similar inhibition of LRP may occur in microglia. Future studies will be required to fully characterize the mechanisms underlying IFN-γ enhancement of HIV-1 Tats disruption of microglial phagocytosis of Aβ and Apo-E3. PMID:18784813

  16. The AD1 and AD2 Transactivation Domains of E2A Are Essential for the Antiapoptotic Activity of the Chimeric Oncoprotein E2A-HLF

    PubMed Central

    Inukai, Takeshi; Inaba, Toshiya; Ikushima, Satoshi; Look, A. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The chimeric oncoprotein E2A-HLF, generated by the t(17;19) chromosomal translocation in pro-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, incorporates the transactivation domains of E2A and the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA-binding and protein dimerization domain of HLF (hepatic leukemic factor). The ability of E2A-HLF to prolong the survival of interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine pro-B cells after IL-3 withdrawal suggests that it disrupts signaling pathways normally responsible for cell suicide, allowing the cells to accumulate as transformed lymphoblasts. To determine the structural motifs that contribute to this antiapoptotic effect, we constructed a panel of E2A-HLF mutants and programmed their expression in IL-3-dependent murine pro-B cells (FL5.12 line), using a zinc-inducible vector. Neither the E12 nor the E47 product of the E2A gene nor the wild-type HLF protein was able to protect the cells from apoptosis induced by IL-3 deprivation. Surprisingly, different combinations of disabling mutations within the HLF bZIP domain had little effect on the antiapoptotic property of the chimeric protein, so long as the amino-terminal portion of E2A remained intact. In the context of a bZIP domain defective in DNA binding, mutants retaining either of the two transactivation domains of E2A were able to extend cell survival after growth factor deprivation. Thus, the block of apoptosis imposed by E2A-HLF in pro-B lymphocytes depends critically on the transactivating regions of E2A. Since neither DNA binding nor protein dimerization through the bZIP domain of HLF is required for this effect, we propose mechanisms whereby protein-protein interactions with the amino-terminal region of E2A allow the chimera to act as a transcriptional cofactor to alter the expression of genes regulating the apoptotic machinery in pro-B cells. PMID:9742120

  17. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Complex between the Acidic Transactivation Domain of EBNA2 and the Tfb1/p62 Subunit of TFIIH

    PubMed Central

    Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Morse, Thomas; Arseneault, Genevieve; Archambault, Jacques; Omichinski, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can lead to a number of human diseases including Hodgkin's and Burkitt's lymphomas. The development of these EBV-linked diseases is associated with the presence of nine viral latent proteins, including the nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2). The EBNA2 protein plays a crucial role in EBV infection through its ability to activate transcription of both host and viral genes. As part of this function, EBNA2 associates with several host transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the Tfb1/p62 (yeast/human) subunit of the general transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) and the histone acetyltransferase CBP(CREB-binding protein)/p300, through interactions with its C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD). In this manuscript, we examine the interaction of the acidic TAD of EBNA2 (residues 431–487) with the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH and CBP/p300 using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) and transactivation studies in yeast. NMR studies show that the TAD of EBNA2 binds to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of Tfb1 (Tfb1PH) and that residues 448–471 (EBNA2448–471) are necessary and sufficient for this interaction. NMR structural characterization of a Tfb1PH-EBNA2448–471 complex demonstrates that the intrinsically disordered TAD of EBNA2 forms a 9-residue α-helix in complex with Tfb1PH. Within this helix, three hydrophobic amino acids (Trp458, Ile461 and Phe462) make a series of important interactions with Tfb1PH and their importance is validated in ITC and transactivation studies using mutants of EBNA2. In addition, NMR studies indicate that the same region of EBNA2 is also required for binding to the KIX domain of CBP/p300. This study provides an atomic level description of interactions involving the TAD of EBNA2 with target host proteins. In addition, comparison of the Tfb1PH-EBNA2448–471 complex with structures of the TAD of p53 and VP16 bound to Tfb1PH highlights the versatility of

  18. Structural and functional characterization of a complex between the acidic transactivation domain of EBNA2 and the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Philippe R; Raiola, Luca; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Morse, Thomas; Arseneault, Genevieve; Archambault, Jacques; Omichinski, James G

    2014-03-01

    Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can lead to a number of human diseases including Hodgkin's and Burkitt's lymphomas. The development of these EBV-linked diseases is associated with the presence of nine viral latent proteins, including the nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2). The EBNA2 protein plays a crucial role in EBV infection through its ability to activate transcription of both host and viral genes. As part of this function, EBNA2 associates with several host transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the Tfb1/p62 (yeast/human) subunit of the general transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) and the histone acetyltransferase CBP(CREB-binding protein)/p300, through interactions with its C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD). In this manuscript, we examine the interaction of the acidic TAD of EBNA2 (residues 431-487) with the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH and CBP/p300 using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) and transactivation studies in yeast. NMR studies show that the TAD of EBNA2 binds to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of Tfb1 (Tfb1PH) and that residues 448-471 (EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁) are necessary and sufficient for this interaction. NMR structural characterization of a Tfb1PH-EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁ complex demonstrates that the intrinsically disordered TAD of EBNA2 forms a 9-residue α-helix in complex with Tfb1PH. Within this helix, three hydrophobic amino acids (Trp458, Ile461 and Phe462) make a series of important interactions with Tfb1PH and their importance is validated in ITC and transactivation studies using mutants of EBNA2. In addition, NMR studies indicate that the same region of EBNA2 is also required for binding to the KIX domain of CBP/p300. This study provides an atomic level description of interactions involving the TAD of EBNA2 with target host proteins. In addition, comparison of the Tfb1PH-EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁ complex with structures of the TAD of p53 and VP16 bound to Tfb1

  19. The ICP0 protein of equine herpesvirus 1 is an early protein that independently transactivates expression of all classes of viral promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, D E; Holden, V R; Zhao, Y; O'Callaghan, D J

    1997-01-01

    To assess the role of the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) ICP0 protein (EICP0) in gene regulation, a variety of molecular studies on the EICP0 gene and gene products of both the attenuated cell culture-adapted Kentucky A (KyA) strain and the Ab4p strain were conducted. These investigations revealed that (i) the ICP0 open reading frame (ORF) of the KyA virus strain is 1,257 bp in size and would encode a protein of 419 amino acids, and in comparison to the ICP0 gene (ORF63) of the Ab4p strain of 1,596 bp (E. A. Telford, M. S. Watson, K. McBride, and A. J. Davison, Virology 189:304-316, 1992), it has an internal in-frame deletion of 339 bp; (ii) one early transcript of 1.4 kb predicted to encode the EICP0 protein and a late transcript of 1.8 kb are detected in Northern blot analyses using probes containing the EICP0 ORF; (iii) the KyA EICP0 protein (50 kDa) and the Ab4p EICP0 protein (80 kDa) are expressed as several species of early proteins that are first detected at 3 to 4 h postinfection by Western blot analyses of infected-cell polypeptides, using an antiserum generated to a TrpE fusion protein that harbors amino acids 46 to 153 of the EICP0 protein; and (iv) the EICP0 protein of both EHV-1 strains is a potent transactivator of EHV-1 genes. Transient expression assays using a simian virus 40 expression construct of the EICP0 protein of the KyA strain showed that the EICP0 protein independently transactivated chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter constructs under the control of the immediate-early promoter (3.9-fold), the early thymidine kinase promoter (95-fold), the late (gamma1) IR5 promoter (85-fold), and the late (gamma2) glycoprotein K promoter (21-fold). The finding that the EICP0 protein of the KyA virus can function as an activator of gene expression indicates that amino acids corresponding to residues 319 to 431 of the Ab4p EICP0 protein are not essential for EICP0 transactivation of EHV-1 promoters. PMID:9188552

  20. Resveratrol inhibits LXRα-dependent hepatic lipogenesis through novel antioxidant Sestrin2 gene induction

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, So Hee; Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Seo, Kyuhwa; Shin, Sang Mi; Cho, Il Je; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2013-08-15

    Liver X receptor-α (LXRα), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors, regulates de novo fatty acid synthesis that leads to stimulate hepatic steatosis. Although, resveratrol has beneficial effects on metabolic disease, it is not known whether resveratrol affects LXRα-dependent lipogenic gene expression. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanism. Resveratrol inhibited the ability of LXRα to activate sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and thereby inhibited target gene expression in hepatocytes. Moreover, resveratrol decreased LXRα–RXRα DNA binding activity and LXRE-luciferase transactivation. Resveratrol is known to activate Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), although its precise mechanism of action remains controversial. We found that the ability of resveratrol to repress T0901317-induced SREBP-1c expression was not dependent on AMPK and Sirt1. It is well established that hepatic steatosis is associated with antioxidant and redox signaling. Our data showing that expression of Sestrin2 (Sesn2), which is a novel antioxidant gene, was significantly down-regulated in the livers of high-fat diet-fed mice. Moreover, resveratrol up-regulated Sesn2 expression, but not Sesn1 and Sesn3. Sesn2 overexpression repressed LXRα-activated SREBP-1c expression and LXRE-luciferase activity. Finally, Sesn2 knockdown using siRNA abolished the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-induced FAS luciferase gene transactivation. We conclude that resveratrol affects Sesn2 gene induction and contributes to the inhibition of LXRα-mediated hepatic lipogenesis. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis. • Resveratrol attenuated the ability of the LXRα-mediated lipogenic gene expression. • Resveratrol’s effects on T090-induced lipogenesis is not dependent on Sirt1 or AMPK.

  1. Cobaltous chloride and hypoxia inhibit aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated responses in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shaheen; Liu Shengxi; Stoner, Matthew; Safe, Stephen

    2007-08-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is expressed in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive ZR-75 breast cancer cells. Treatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces CYP1A1 protein and mRNA levels and also activates inhibitory AhR-ER{alpha} crosstalk associated with hormone-induced reporter gene expression. In ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxia, induction of these AhR-mediated responses by TCDD was significantly inhibited. This was not accompanied by decreased nuclear AhR levels or decreased interaction of the AhR complex with the CYP1A1 gene promoter as determined in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Hypoxia-induced loss of Ah-responsiveness was not associated with induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} or other factors that sequester the AhR nuclear translocation (Arnt) protein, and overexpression of Arnt under hypoxia did not restore Ah-responsiveness. The p65 subunit of NF{kappa}B which inhibits AhR-mediated transactivation was not induced by hypoxia and was primarily cytosolic in ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. In ZR-75 cells maintained under hypoxic conditions for 24 h, BRCA1 (an enhancer of AhR-mediated transactivation in breast cancer cells) was significantly decreased and this contributed to loss of Ah-responsiveness. In cells grown under hypoxia for 6 h, BRCA1 was not decreased, but induction of CYP1A1 by TCDD was significantly decreased. Cotreatment of ZR-75 cells with TCDD plus the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide for 6 h enhanced CYP1A1 expression in cells grown under hypoxia and normoxia. These results suggest that hypoxia rapidly induces protein(s) that inhibit Ah-responsiveness and these may be similar to constitutively expressed inhibitors of Ah-responsiveness (under normoxia) that are also inhibited by cycloheximide.

  2. Human papillomavirus 16 E6 oncoprotein binds to interferon regulatory factor-3 and inhibits its transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Ronco, Lucienne V.; Karpova, Alla Y.; Vidal, Marc; Howley, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3) was found to specifically interact with HPV16 E6 in a yeast two-hybrid screen. IRF-3 is activated by the presence of double-stranded RNA or by virus infection to form a stable complex with other transcriptional regulators that bind to the regulatory elements of the IFNβ promoter. We show that IRF-3 is a potent transcriptional activator and demonstrate that HPV16 E6 can inhibit its transactivation function. The expression of HPV16 E6 in primary human keratinocytes inhibits the induction of IFNβ mRNA following Sendai virus infection. The binding of HPV16 E6 to IRF-3 does not result in its ubiquitination or degradation. We propose that the interaction of E6 with IRF-3 and the inhibition of IRF-3’s transcriptional activity may provide the virus a means to circumvent the normal antiviral response of an HPV16-infected cell. PMID:9649509

  3. Pur-1, a zinc-finger protein that binds to purine-rich sequences, transactivates an insulin promoter in heterologous cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, G C; Rutter, W J

    1992-01-01

    Purine-rich stretches of nucleotides (GAGA boxes) are often found just upstream of transcription start sites in many genes, including insulin. Mutational analysis suggests that the GAGA box plays an important role in transcription of the rat insulin I gene. We identify here at least four different proteins that bind specifically to the insulin GAGA box. Using a GAGA oligonucleotide, we have isolated a cDNA encoding a sequence-specific protein from a HIT (hamster insulinoma cell line) lambda gt11 library. This protein, which we designate Pur-1 (for purine binding), binds to the GAGA boxes of the rat insulin I and II genes and the human islet amyloid polypeptide gene. Pur-1 is a potent transactivator in both pancreatic and nonpancreatic cells. Furthermore, Pur-1 is able to activate an intact insulin promoter in HeLa cells, where it is normally inactive. Images PMID:1454839

  4. Endosomolytic activity of cationic liposomes enhances the delivery of human immunodeficiency virus-1 trans-activator protein (TAT) to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Farhood, H; Serbina, N; Teepe, A G; Barsoum, J

    1995-12-26

    We have explored the use of cationic liposomes to deliver the human immunodeficiency virus-1 trans-activator protein tat using a reporter gene expression assay. The human epidermoid carcinoma cell A431 stably transfected with a reporter gene under the control of human immunodeficiency virus-1 promoter was used as a target cell. Phosphatidylcholine-containing cationic liposomes had no detectable tat delivery activity. In contrast, delivery of tat was enhanced by up to 150-fold using cationic liposomes enriched with dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), a lipid which readily transforms a bilayer into a nonbilayer structure. Enhanced delivery of tat by DOPE-containing liposomes was most likely the result of the endosomolytic activity of the liposome. This phospholipid-rich formulation showed no toxicity at concentrations sufficient for maximal delivery of tat. A variety of cationic liposome formulations which contain DOPE were tested successfully for tat delivery. PMID:8554596

  5. Phosphorylation within the transactivation domain of adenovirus E1A protein by mitogen-activated protein kinase regulates expression of early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, S G; Marcellus, R C; Whalen, A; Ahn, N G; Ricciardi, R P; Branton, P E

    1997-01-01

    A critical role of the 289-residue (289R) E1A protein of human adenovirus type 5 during productive infection is to transactivate expression of all early viral transcription. Sequences within and proximal to conserved region 3 (CR3) promote expression of these viral genes through interactions with a variety of transcription factors requiring the zinc binding motif in CR3 and in some cases a region at the carboxy-terminal end of CR3, including residues 183 to 188. It is known that 3',5' cyclic AMP (cAMP) reduces the level of phosphorylation of the 289R E1A protein through the activation of protein phosphatase 2A by the E4orf4 protein. This study was designed to identify the E1A phosphorylation sites affected by E4orf4 expression and to determine their importance in regulation of E1A activity. We report here that two previously unidentified sites at Ser-185 and Ser-188 are the targets for decreased phosphorylation in response to cAMP. At least one of these sites, presumably Ser-185, is phosphorylated in vitro by purified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and both are hyperphosphorylated in cells which express a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase. Analysis of E1A-mediated transactivation activity indicated that elevated phosphorylation at these sites increased expression of the E4 promoter but not that of E3. We have recently shown that one or more E4 products induce cell death due to p53-independent apoptosis, and thus it seems likely that one role of the E4orf4 protein is to limit production of toxic E4 products by limiting expression of the E4 promoter. PMID:9094626

  6. Activation of the human keratinocyte B1 bradykinin receptor induces expression and secretion of metalloproteases 2 and 9 by transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Matus, Carola E; Ehrenfeld, Pamela; Pavicic, Francisca; González, Carlos B; Concha, Miguel; Bhoola, Kanti D; Burgos, Rafael A; Figueroa, Carlos D

    2016-09-01

    The B1 bradykinin receptor (BDKRB1) is a component of the kinin cascade localized in the human skin. Some of the effects produced by stimulation of BDKRB1 depend on transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but the mechanisms involved in this process have not been clarified yet. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a BDKRB1 agonist on wound healing in a mouse model and the migration and secretion of metalloproteases 2 and 9 from human HaCaT keratinocytes and delineate the signalling pathways that triggered their secretion. Although stimulation of BDKRB1 induces weak chemotactic migration of keratinocytes and wound closure in an in vitro scratch-wound assay, the BDKRB1 agonist improved wound closure in a mouse model. BDKRB1 stimulation triggers synthesis and secretion of both metalloproteases, effects that depend on the activity of EGFR and subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and PI3K/Akt. In the mouse model, immunoreactivity for both gelatinases was concentrated around wound borders. EGFR transactivation by BDKRB1 agonist involves Src kinases family and ADAM17. In addition to extracellular matrix degradation, metalloproteases 2 and 9 regulate cell migration and differentiation, cell functions that are associated with the role of BDKRB1 in keratinocyte differentiation. Considering that BDKRB1 is up-regulated by inflammation and/or by cytokines that are abundant in the inflammatory milieu, more stable BDKRB1 agonists may be of therapeutic value to modulate wound healing. PMID:27093919

  7. Baicalin induces NAD(P)H:quinone reductase through the transactivation of AP-1 and NF-kappaB in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, H J; Lee, Y W; Lee, S K

    2004-12-01

    Baicalin (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone-7-O-D-glucuronic acid, BA) is a flavone isolated from Scutellariae radix. In our previous report BA was a major active principle of NAD(P)H:quinone reductase (QR) induction mediated by Scutellariae radix extract and the induction was related to the transcriptional activation of the QR gene in Hepa 1c1c7 cells. The primary aim of the present study was to determine the molecular mechanism of QR gene expression by baicalin. The antioxidant or electrophile response element (ARE/EpRE) found at the 5'-flanking region of phase II genes may play an important role in mediating their induction by xenobiotics, including chemopreventive agents. In accordance, to study the molecular mechanisms of QR gene expression by BA, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), using nuclear extracts of treated and untreated cells against ARE, activator protein-1 (AP-1) or nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) binding sites, showed that BA increased the binding levels of the parameters in a dose-dependent manner. Further, Hepa 1c1c7 cells were transiently transfected with a plasmid containing three copies of the AP-1- or NF-kappaB-binding site linked to a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene. Using the CAT reporter gene assay, a dose-dependent transactivation of AP-1- or NF-kappaB-mediated CAT expression was observed with the treatment of BA. These results clearly indicate that BA induces the QR gene expression and activity by transactivation of AP-1 and NF-kappaB, and thus BA may be considered as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent with the induction of phase II detoxification enzyme. PMID:15548947

  8. Ligand-Mediated cis-Inhibition of Receptor Signaling in the Self-Incompatibility Response of the Brassicaceae1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tantikanjana, Titima; Nasrallah, June B.

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of self-pollination in self-incompatible Brassicaceae is based on allele-specific trans-activation of the highly polymorphic S-locus receptor kinase (SRK), which is displayed at the surface of stigma epidermal cells, by its even more polymorphic pollen coat-localized ligand, the S-locus cysteine-rich (SCR) protein. In an attempt to achieve constitutive activation of SRK and thus facilitate analysis of self-incompatibility (SI) signaling, we coexpressed an Arabidopsis lyrata SCR variant with its cognate SRK receptor in the stigma epidermal cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants belonging to the C24 accession, in which expression of SRK and SCR had been shown to exhibit a robust SI response. Contrary to expectation, however, coexpression of SRK and SCR was found to inhibit SRK-mediated signaling and to disrupt the SI response. This phenomenon, called cis-inhibition, is well documented in metazoans but has not as yet been reported for plant receptor kinases. We demonstrate that cis-inhibition of SRK, like its trans-activation, is based on allele-specific interaction between receptor and ligand. We also show that stigma-expressed SCR causes entrapment of its SRK receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum, thus disrupting the proper targeting of SRK to the plasma membrane, where the receptor would be available for productive interaction with its pollen coat-derived SCR ligand. Although based on an artificial cis-inhibition system, the results suggest novel strategies of pollination control for the generation of hybrid cultivars and large-scale seed production from hybrid plants in Brassicaceae seed crops and, more generally, for inhibiting cell surface receptor function and manipulating signaling pathways in plants. PMID:26269543

  9. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4⁺ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  10. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A.; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4+ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  11. Silymarin Inhibits Morphological Changes in LPS-Stimulated Macrophages by Blocking NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Min Young

    2015-01-01

    The present study showed that silymarin, a polyphenolic flavonoid isolated from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced morphological changes in the mouse RAW264.7 macrophage cell line. We also showed that silymarin inhibited the nuclear translocation and transactivation activities of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), which is important for macrophage activation-associated changes in cell morphology and gene expression of inflammatory cytokines. BAY-11-7085, an NF-κB inhibitor, abrogated LPS-induced morphological changes and NO production, similar to silymarin. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with silymarin also inhibited LPS-stimulated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Collectively, these experiments demonstrated that silymarin inhibited LPS-induced morphological changes in the RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cell line. Our findings indicated that the most likely mechanism underlying this biological effect involved inhibition of the MAPK pathway and NF-κB activity. Inhibition of these activities by silymarin is a potentially useful strategy for the treatment of inflammation because of the critical roles played by MAPK and NF-κB in mediating inflammatory responses in macrophages. PMID:25954125

  12. ZAP inhibits murine gammaherpesvirus 68 ORF64 expression and is antagonized by RTA.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Yifang; Gong, Danyang; Qi, Jing; Han, Chuanhui; Deng, Hongyu; Gao, Guangxia

    2013-03-01

    Zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP) is an interferon-inducible host antiviral factor that specifically inhibits the replication of certain viruses, including HIV-1 and Ebola virus. ZAP functions as a dimer formed through intermolecular interactions of its N-terminal tails. ZAP binds directly to specific viral mRNAs and inhibits their expression by repressing translation and/or promoting degradation of the target mRNA. ZAP is not a universal antiviral factor, since some viruses grow normally in ZAP-expressing cells. It is not fully understood what determines whether a virus is susceptible to ZAP. We explored the interaction between ZAP and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68), whose life cycle has latent and lytic phases. We previously reported that ZAP inhibits the expression of M2, which is expressed mainly in the latent phase, and regulates MHV-68 latency in cultured cells. Here, we report that ZAP inhibits the expression of ORF64, a tegument protein that is expressed in the lytic phase and is essential for lytic replication. MHV-68 infection induced ZAP expression. However, ZAP did not inhibit lytic replication of MHV-68. We provide evidence showing that the antiviral activity of ZAP is antagonized by MHV-68 RTA, a critical viral transactivator expressed in the lytic phase. We further show that RTA inhibits the antiviral activity of ZAP by disrupting the N-terminal intermolecular interaction of ZAP. Our results provide an example of how a virus can escape ZAP-mediated immunity. PMID:23255809

  13. Anti-Inflammatory and PPAR Transactivational Effects of Oleanane-Type Triterpenoid Saponins from the Roots of Pulsatilla koreana

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yan, Xi Tao; Sun, Ya Nan; Ngan, Thi Thanh; Shim, Sang Hee; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 23 oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins were isolated from a methanol extract of the roots of Pulsatilla koreana. The NF-κB inhibitory activity of the isolated compounds was measured in TNFα-treated HepG2 cells using a luciferase reporter system. Compounds 19–23 inhibited TNFα-stimulated NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values ranging from 0.75–8.30 μM. Compounds 19 and 20 also inhibited the TNFα-induced expression of iNOS and ICAM-1 mRNA. Moreover, effect of the isolated compounds on PPARs transcriptional activity was assessed. Compounds 7–11 and 19–23 activated PPARs the transcriptional activity significantly in a dose-dependent manner, with EC50 values ranging from 0.9–10.8 μM. These results suggest the presence of potent anti-inflammatory components in P. koreana, and will facilitate the development of novel anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25143813

  14. ITF2357 transactivates Id3 and regulate TGFβ/BMP7 signaling pathways to attenuate corneal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Rayne R.; Tan, Alison; Liu, Yu-Chi; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Mohan, Rajiv R.; Mehta, Jodhbir S.; Chaurasia, Shyam S.

    2016-01-01

    Corneal fibrosis is often seen in patients with ocular trauma and infection that compromises corneal transparency resulting in vision loss. Treatment strategies including NSAIDs, steroids, MMC and corneal transplants have shown tremendous success but with several side effects and cellular toxicity. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to inhibit corneal fibrosis via TGFβ signaling pathway. In this study, we investigated safety, efficacy and mechanism of action of a HDACi, ITF2357 in TGFβ-stimulated in vitro primary human cornea stromal fibroblasts (pHCSFs) and in vivo in a photorefractive keratectomy-treated rabbit model of corneal fibrosis. We found that in vivo ITF2357 decreased collagen I, collagen IV, fibronectin, integrin αVβ3 expression with a reduction in corneal haze. In addition, ITF2357 reduced myofibroblast formation, suppressed phosphorylation of Smad proteins in TGFβ pathway and inhibited key responsive protein, P4HA1 involved in pro-collagen synthesis. Treatment of pHCSFs with ITF2357 activated BMP7 levels and expressed all the members of inhibitor of differentiation proteins (Id1-Id4), however, it failed to rescue TGFβ-driven transdifferentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts in the presence of siRNA specific to Id3. We conclude that ITF2357 is a potential anti-fibrotic drug that exerts its action via activation of Id3, a downstream target of TGFβ/BMP7 signaling pathways. PMID:26865052

  15. Identification of small molecules that induce apoptosis in a Myc-dependent manner and inhibit Myc-driven transformation

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Hao; Henriksson, Marie

    2006-01-01

    The Myc transcription factor plays a central role in the regulation of cell cycle progression, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and cellular transformation. Myc is a potent oncoprotein that is deregulated in a wide variety of human tumors and is therefore an attractive target for novel cancer therapies. Using a cellular screening approach, we have identified low-molecular-weight compounds, Myc pathway response agents (MYRAs), that induce apoptosis in a c-Myc-dependent manner and inhibit Myc-driven cellular transformation. MYRA-A inhibits Myc transactivation and interferes with the DNA-binding activity of Myc family proteins but has no effect on the E-box-binding protein USF. In contrast, MYRA-B induces Myc-dependent apoptosis without affecting Myc transactivation or Myc/Max DNA binding. Our data show that cellular screening assays can be a powerful strategy for the identification of candidate substances that modulate the Myc pathway. These compounds can be useful tools for studying Myc function and may also be of therapeutic potential as leads for drug development. PMID:16606833

  16. The truncated C-terminal E2 (E2-TR) protein of bovine papillomavirus (BPV) type-1 is a transactivator that modulates transcription in vivo and in vitro in a manner distinct from the E2-TA and E8^E2 gene products.

    PubMed

    Lace, Michael J; Ushikai, Masato; Yamakawa, Yasushi; Anson, James R; Ishiji, Takaoki; Turek, Lubomir P; Haugen, Thomas H

    2012-08-01

    The E2 open reading frame of bovine papillomavirus (BPV)-1 encodes a 410 amino acid (aa) transcriptional activator, E2-TA, and collinear polypeptides--E2-TR (243 aa) and E8^E2 (196 aa). E8^E2 and E2-TR share the DNA-binding domain of E2-TA, and both have been defined as transcriptional repressors. Although purified E2-TR and E8^E2 proteins specifically bound E2 sites with similar affinities, only the E2-TR stimulated transcription. Here we show that E2-TR trans-activates E2-dependent promoters 5 to 10-fold in cooperation with cellular factors and in a dose-dependent fashion in epithelial cells and fibroblasts of animal or human origin while E2-TA activated >100-fold and the E8^E2 had no effect. However, in contrast to E2-TA, E2-TR activated transcription from a promoter-proximal position. E2-TR also partially inhibited the BPV-1 P89 or heterologous promoters whereas E8^E2 led to complete repression. Thus, the BPV-1 E2-TR modulates viral gene expression in a manner distinct from other E2 proteins. PMID:22551766

  17. Inhibition of Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB and Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in HepG2 Cells by Cucurbitane-Type Triterpene Glycosides from Momordica charantia

    PubMed Central

    Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Yen, Pham Hai; Ngan, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Quang, Tran Hong; Kiem, Phan Van; Minh, Chau Van; Tai, Bui Huu; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Song, Seok Bean

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Momordica charantia: is used to treat various diseases, including inflammatory conditions. Previous reports indicated that the extract of this plant inhibits activation of nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB) but activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR). Additionally, cucurbitane-type triterpene glycosides are the main bioactive components of the fruit of M. charantia. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 17 cucurbitane-type triterpene glycosides (1–17) isolated from this plant. Their inhibition of NF-κB and activation of PPAR activities in HepG2 cells were measured using luciferase reporter and PPAR subtype transactivation assays. Compounds 6 and 8 were found to inhibit NF-κB activation stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) in a dose-dependent manner. With 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values of 0.4 μM, compounds 6 and 8 were more potent inhibitors than the positive control, sulfasalazine (IC50=0.9 μM). Compounds 4, 6, and 8 also inhibited TNFα-induced expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA. However, only compound 13 significantly increased PPARγ transactivation. PMID:22248180

  18. Orthovanadate-induced vasocontraction is mediated by the activation of Rho-kinase through Src-dependent transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yayama, Katsutoshi; Sasahara, Tomoya; Ohba, Hisaaki; Funasaka, Ayaka; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Orthovanadate (OVA), a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) inhibitor, exerts contractile effects on smooth muscle in a Rho-kinase-dependent manner, but the precise mechanisms are not elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the potential roles of Src and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the OVA-induced contraction of rat aortas and the phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1; an index of Rho-kinase activity) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Aortic contraction by OVA was significantly blocked not only by Rho kinase inhibitors Y-27632 [R-[+]-trans-N-[4-pyridyl]-4-[1-aminoethyl]-cyclohexanecarboxamide] and hydroxyfasudil [1-(1-hydroxy-5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)homopiperazine] but also by Src inhibitors PP2 [4-amino-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(t-butyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine] and Src inhibitor No. 5 [4-(3′-methoxy-6′-chloro-anilino)-6-methoxy-7(morpholino-3-propoxy)-quinazoline], and the EGFR inhibitors AG1478 [4-(3-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline] and EGFR inhibitor 1 [cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-(3-(6-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenylamino)-pyrimidin-4-ylamino)-phenyl)-amide]. OVA induced rapid increases in the phosphorylation of MYPT1 (Thr-853), Src (Tyr-416), and EGFR (Tyr-1173) in VSMCs, and Src inhibitors abolished these effects. OVA-induced Src phosphorylation was abrogated by Src inhibitors, but not affected by inhibitors of EGFR and Rho-kinase. Inhibitors of Src and EGFR, but not Rho-kinase, also blocked OVA-induced EGFR phosphorylation. Furthermore, a metalloproteinase inhibitor TAPI-0 [N-(R)-[2-(hydroxyaminocarbonyl) methyl]-4-methylpentanoyl-l-naphthylalanyl-l-alanine amide] and an inhibitor of heparin-binding EGF (CRM 197) not only abrogated the OVA-induced aortic contraction, but also OVA-induced EGFR and MYPT1 phosphorylation, suggesting the involvement of EGFR transactivation. OVA also induced EGFR phosphorylation at Tyr-845, one of residues phosphorylated by Src. These results suggest that OVA

  19. Evaluation of colocalization interactions between the IE110, IE175, and IE63 transactivator proteins of herpes simplex virus within subcellular punctate structures.

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, M A; Gerstberger, S; Ciufo, D M; Mosca, J D; Hayward, G S

    1995-01-01

    A number of previous studies have implied that three herpes simplex virus-encoded nuclear transactivator proteins, IE175 (ICP4), IE110 (ICP0), and IE63 (ICP27), may cooperate in transcriptional and posttranscriptional stimulation of viral gene expression. Using double-label immunofluorescence assays (IFA) in transient expression assays, we have examined the intracellular localization of these three proteins in DNA-transfected cells. The IE110 protein on its own forms spherical punctate domains within the nucleus, whereas the IE175 and IE63 proteins alone give uniform and speckled diffuse patterns, respectively. In infected cells, the IE110 punctate granules have been shown to correspond to novel preexisting subnuclear structures referred to as ND10 domains or PODs that contain a variety of cellular proteins, including SP100 and the PML proto-oncogene product. Cotransfection experiments with wild-type nuclear forms of both IE175 and IE110 provided direct evidence for partial redistribution of IE175 into the same punctate granules that contained IE110. Surprisingly, nuclear forms of IE110 were found to move a cytoplasmic form of IE175 into nuclear punctate structures, and a cytoplasmic form of IE110 was able to retain nuclear forms of IE175 in cytoplasmic punctate structures. Therefore, the punctate characteristic of IE110 appeared to both dominate the interactions and override the normal nuclear localization signals. The domains responsible for the interaction mapped to between codons 518 and 768 in 1E110 and to between codons 835 and 1029 in IE175. Importantly, a truncated nuclear form of the 1,298-amino-acid IE175 protein, which lacked the C-terminal domain beyond codon 834, was found to be excluded from the IE110 punctate granules. Cotransfection of nuclear or cytoplasmic IE110 with a truncated nuclear form of IE63 also led to partial redistribution of IE63 into either nuclear or cytoplasmic punctate granules containing IE110. Both the IE63-IE110 and IE175-IE110

  20. Inhibition of pregnane X receptor pathway contributes to the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis of anticancer agents in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Masuyama, Hisashi; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Nobumoto, Etsuko; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the most devastating gynecologic cancer with drug resistance and rapid recurrence. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that affects drug metabolism/efflux and drug-drug interaction through control of multiple drug resistance 1 (MDR1), which implies a major role in multidrug resistance, and other genes. We examined whether the inhibition of PXR-mediated pathway using siRNA interference and an antagonist for PXR could influence the paclitaxel and cisplatin cytotoxicity in ovarian cancer cells. PXR agonists, phthalate and pregnenolone had significant positive effects on cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 expression and PXR-mediated transcription through the CYP3A4 promoter, whereas MDR1 expression and PXR-mediated transcription though the MDR1 promoter were significantly increased in the presence of paclitaxel or cisplatin. Downregulation of PXR suppressed the augmented MDR1 expression and PXR-mediated transcription by PXR ligands, and significantly enhanced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in the presence of paclitaxel or cisplatin. Additionally, ketoconazole, a PXR antagonist, suppressed the augmented MDR1 expression and PXR-mediated transactivation by paclitaxel and cisplatin, and enhanced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in their presence. In conclusion, inhibition of PXR-mediated pathways could be a novel means of augmenting sensitivity, or overcoming resistance to anticancer agents for ovarian cancer. PMID:27572875

  1. Estrogen Receptor β Activation Rapidly Modulates Male Sexual Motivation through the Transactivation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1a.

    PubMed

    Seredynski, Aurore L; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F; Cornil, Charlotte A

    2015-09-23

    In addition to the transcriptional activity of their liganded nuclear receptors, estrogens, such as estradiol (E2), modulate cell functions, and consequently physiology and behavior, within minutes through membrane-initiated events. The membrane-associated receptors (mERs) underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. We determined here, by acute intracerebroventricular injections of specific agonists and antagonists, the type(s) of mERs that modulate rapid effects of brain-derived estrogens on sexual motivation in male Japanese quail. Brain aromatase blockade acutely inhibited sexual motivation. Diarylpropionitrile (DPN), an estrogen receptor β (ERβ)-specific agonist, and to a lesser extent 17α-estradiol, possibly acting through ER-X, prevented this effect. In contrast, drugs targeting ERα (PPT and MPP), GPR30 (G1 and G15), and the Gq-mER (STX) did not affect sexual motivation. The mGluR1a antagonist LY367385 significantly inhibited sexual motivation but mGluR2/3 and mGluR5 antagonists were ineffective. LY367385 also blocked the behavioral restoration induced by E2 or DPN, providing functional evidence that ERβ interacts with metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a (mGluR1a) signaling to acutely regulate male sexual motivation. Together these results show that ERβ plays a key role in sexual behavior regulation and the recently uncovered cooperation between mERs and mGluRs is functional in males where it mediates the acute effects of estrogens produced centrally in response to social stimuli. The presence of an ER-mGluR interaction in birds suggests that this mechanism emerged relatively early in vertebrate history and is well conserved. Significance statement: The membrane-associated receptors underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females, where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. Using acute

  2. Estrogen Receptor β Activation Rapidly Modulates Male Sexual Motivation through the Transactivation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1a

    PubMed Central

    Seredynski, Aurore L.; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the transcriptional activity of their liganded nuclear receptors, estrogens, such as estradiol (E2), modulate cell functions, and consequently physiology and behavior, within minutes through membrane-initiated events. The membrane-associated receptors (mERs) underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. We determined here, by acute intracerebroventricular injections of specific agonists and antagonists, the type(s) of mERs that modulate rapid effects of brain-derived estrogens on sexual motivation in male Japanese quail. Brain aromatase blockade acutely inhibited sexual motivation. Diarylpropionitrile (DPN), an estrogen receptor β (ERβ)-specific agonist, and to a lesser extent 17α-estradiol, possibly acting through ER-X, prevented this effect. In contrast, drugs targeting ERα (PPT and MPP), GPR30 (G1 and G15), and the Gq-mER (STX) did not affect sexual motivation. The mGluR1a antagonist LY367385 significantly inhibited sexual motivation but mGluR2/3 and mGluR5 antagonists were ineffective. LY367385 also blocked the behavioral restoration induced by E2 or DPN, providing functional evidence that ERβ interacts with metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a (mGluR1a) signaling to acutely regulate male sexual motivation. Together these results show that ERβ plays a key role in sexual behavior regulation and the recently uncovered cooperation between mERs and mGluRs is functional in males where it mediates the acute effects of estrogens produced centrally in response to social stimuli. The presence of an ER–mGluR interaction in birds suggests that this mechanism emerged relatively early in vertebrate history and is well conserved. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The membrane-associated receptors underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females, where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. Using acute

  3. Src Is a Potential Therapeutic Target in Endocrine-Resistant Breast Cancer Exhibiting Low Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transactivation.

    PubMed

    Guest, Stephanie K; Ribas, Ricardo; Pancholi, Sunil; Nikitorowicz-Buniak, Joanna; Simigdala, Nikiana; Dowsett, Mitch; Johnston, Stephen R; Martin, Lesley-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of endocrine therapies in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, approximately 40% of patients relapse. Previously, we identified the Focal-adhesion kinase canonical pathway as a major contributor of resistance to estrogen deprivation and cellular-sarcoma kinase (c-src) as a dominant gene in this pathway. Dasatinib, a pan-src inhibitor, has recently been used in clinical trials to treat ER+ patients but has shown mixed success. In the following study, using isogenic cell line models, we provide a potential explanation for these findings and suggest a sub-group that may benefit. A panel of isogenic cell lines modelling resistance to aromatase inhibitors (LTED) and tamoxifen (TAMR) were assessed for response to dasatinib ± endocrine therapy. Dasatinib caused a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation in MCF7-TAMR cells and resensitized them to tamoxifen and fulvestrant but not in HCC1428-TAMR. In contrast, in estrogen-deprived conditions, dasatinib increased the proliferation rate of parental-MCF7 cells and had no effect on MCF7-LTED or HCC1428-LTED. Treatment with dasatinib caused a decrease in src-phosphorylation and inhibition of downstream pathways, including AKT and ERK1/2 in all cell lines tested, but only the MCF7-TAMR showed a concomitant decrease in markers of cell cycle progression. Inhibition of src also caused a significant decrease in cell migration in both MCF7-LTED and MCF7-TAMR cells. Finally, we showed that, in MCF7-TAMR cells, in contrast to tamoxifen sensitive cell lines, ER is expressed throughout the cell rather than being restricted to the nucleus and that treatment with dasatinib resulted in nuclear shuttling of ER, which was associated with an increase in ER-mediated transcription. These data suggest that src has differential effects in endocrine-resistant cell lines, particularly in tamoxifen resistant models, with low ER genomic activity, providing further evidence of the importance of patient selection

  4. Src Is a Potential Therapeutic Target in Endocrine-Resistant Breast Cancer Exhibiting Low Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Pancholi, Sunil; Nikitorowicz-Buniak, Joanna; Simigdala, Nikiana; Dowsett, Mitch; Johnston, Stephen R.; Martin, Lesley-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of endocrine therapies in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, approximately 40% of patients relapse. Previously, we identified the Focal-adhesion kinase canonical pathway as a major contributor of resistance to estrogen deprivation and cellular-sarcoma kinase (c-src) as a dominant gene in this pathway. Dasatinib, a pan-src inhibitor, has recently been used in clinical trials to treat ER+ patients but has shown mixed success. In the following study, using isogenic cell line models, we provide a potential explanation for these findings and suggest a sub-group that may benefit. A panel of isogenic cell lines modelling resistance to aromatase inhibitors (LTED) and tamoxifen (TAMR) were assessed for response to dasatinib ± endocrine therapy. Dasatinib caused a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation in MCF7-TAMR cells and resensitized them to tamoxifen and fulvestrant but not in HCC1428-TAMR. In contrast, in estrogen-deprived conditions, dasatinib increased the proliferation rate of parental-MCF7 cells and had no effect on MCF7-LTED or HCC1428-LTED. Treatment with dasatinib caused a decrease in src-phosphorylation and inhibition of downstream pathways, including AKT and ERK1/2 in all cell lines tested, but only the MCF7-TAMR showed a concomitant decrease in markers of cell cycle progression. Inhibition of src also caused a significant decrease in cell migration in both MCF7-LTED and MCF7-TAMR cells. Finally, we showed that, in MCF7-TAMR cells, in contrast to tamoxifen sensitive cell lines, ER is expressed throughout the cell rather than being restricted to the nucleus and that treatment with dasatinib resulted in nuclear shuttling of ER, which was associated with an increase in ER-mediated transcription. These data suggest that src has differential effects in endocrine-resistant cell lines, particularly in tamoxifen resistant models, with low ER genomic activity, providing further evidence of the importance of patient selection

  5. HER kinase axis receptor dimer partner switching occurs in response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibition despite failure to block cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anjali; Penuel, Elicia; Mink, Sheldon; Schmidt, Joanna; Hodge, Amanda; Favero, Kristin; Tindell, Charles; Agus, David B

    2010-03-01

    The human epidermal receptor (HER) axis consists of a dynamic, interconnected family of receptors that make critical contributions to a number of malignancies. Therapeutics targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are unable to effectively inhibit tumor growth in a majority of cases. These tumors are assumed to possess primary resistance to anti-EGFR therapies, but the consequence of inhibiting EGFR in these tumors is unclear. We established isogenic cell lines by prolonged gefitinib treatment at concentrations that are in excess of that which is required for complete EGFR kinase inhibition but only minimally affected growth. Subsequently, we monitored the ligand-dependent HER profiles based on receptor expression, phosphorylation, and dimerization in conjunction with measurements of cellular susceptibility to gefitinib. Chronic EGFR kinase inhibition rapidly switched the HER network from dependence on EGFR to HER2. However, both receptors activated the critical signaling proteins AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase, and in both cases, HER3 was the common association partner. Remarkably, the switch in receptor dimers caused diminished susceptibility to EGFR-targeted inhibitors gefitinib and cetuximab but acquired susceptibility to the HER2-targeted inhibitor pertuzumab. Overall, our study indicates that the EGFR pathway is responsive to EGFR inhibiting therapies that are not dependent on EGFR for their growth and survival, thus challenging the current definition of primary therapeutic resistance. Furthermore, EGFR kinase inhibition induces HER kinase receptors to engage in alternative dimerization that can ultimately influence therapeutic selection and responsiveness. PMID:20160029

  6. HER-kinase Axis Receptor Dimer Partner Switching Occurs in Response to EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Despite Failure to Block Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anjali; Penuel, Elicia; Mink, Sheldon; Schmidt, Joanna; Hodge, Amanda; Favero, Kristin; Tindell, Charles; Agus, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The HER-axis consists of a dynamic, interconnected family of receptors that make critical contributions to a number of malignancies. Therapeutics targeting EGFR, are unable to effectively inhibit tumor growth in a majority of cases. These tumors are assumed to possess primary resistance to anti-EGFR therapies but the consequence of inhibiting EGFR in these tumors is unclear. We established isogenic cell lines by prolonged gefitinib treatment at concentrations that are in excess of that which is required for complete EGFR kinase inhibition but only minimally effected growth. Subsequently, we monitored the ligand-dependent HER profiles based on receptor expression, phosphorylation and dimerization in conjunction with measurements of cellular susceptibility to gefitinib. Chronic EGFR kinase inhibition rapidly switched the HER network from dependence on EGFR to HER2. However, both receptors activated the critical signaling proteins, AKT and MAPK and in both cases HER3 was the common association partner. Remarkably, the switch in receptor dimers caused diminished susceptibility to EGFR-targeted inhibitors, gefitinib and cetuximab, but acquired susceptibility to the HER2-targeted inhibitor, pertuzumab. Overall, our study indicates that the EGFR pathway is responsive to EGFR inhibiting therapies that are not dependent on EGFR for their growth and survival thus challenging the current definition of primary therapeutic resistance. Further, EGFR kinase inhibition induces HER-kinase receptors to engage in alternative dimerization that can ultimately influence therapeutic selection and responsiveness. PMID:20160029

  7. NF-κB-mediated transactivation of telomerase prevents intimal smooth muscle cell from replicative senescence during vascular repair

    PubMed Central

    Bu, De-xiu; Johansson, Maria E; Ren, Jingyi; Xu, Da-wei; Johnson, F Brad; Edfeldt, Kristina; Yan, Zhong-qun

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Functional telomerase is essential to the replicative longevity of vascular cells. To gain insights into mechanisms by which intimal hyperplasia interferes with the repair process, expression and function of the telomerase catalytic subunit (TERT) were investigated following vascular injury. METHODS AND RESULTS We found that TERT was de novo activated in intima of the injured arteries, involving activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Stimulation of the isolated intimal smooth muscle cell (SMC) by basic fibroblast growth factor or tumor necrosis factor α resulted in increased TERT activity. This depends on the activation of c-Myc signaling since mutation of the E-box in the promoter or over-expression of MAD1, a c-Myc competitor, abrogated the transcriptional activity. Inhibition of NF-κB in both intimal SMC and in the injured artery attenuated TERT transcriptional activity through reduction of c-Myc expression. Pharmacological blockade of TERT led to SMC senescence. Finally, depletion of telomerase function in mice resulted in severe intimal SMC senescence following vascular injury. CONCLUSIONS These results support a model whereby vascular injury induces de novo expression of TERT in intimal SMC via activation of NF-κB and up-regulation of c-Myc. The resumed TERT activity is critical for intimal hyperplasia. PMID:20864668

  8. Proteasome inhibitors induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor transactivation through RXR accumulation and a protein kinase C-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, W.-C.; Wu, H.-M.; Chi, K.-H.; Chang, Y.-H.; Lin, W.-W. . E-mail: wwl@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-03-10

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a member of nuclear hormone receptors, forms a heterodimeric DNA binding complex with retinoid X receptor (RXR) and serves as a transcriptional regulator of gene expression. In this study, using luciferase assay of a reporter gene containing PPAR response element (PPRE), we found PPRE transactivity was additively induced by PPAR{gamma} activator (15dPGJ{sub 2}) and RXR activator (9-cis retinoic acid, 9-cis RA). Proteasome inhibitors MG132 and MG262 also stimulate PPRE transactivity in a concentration-dependent manner, and this effect is synergistic to 15dPGJ{sub 2} and 9-cis RA. PKC activation by 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate (IDB) also led to an increased PPRE activation, and this action was additive to PPAR{gamma} activators and 9-cis RA, but not to proteasome inhibitors. Results indicate that the PPAR{gamma} enhancing effect of proteasome inhibitors was attributed to redox-sensitive PKC activation. Western blot analysis showed that the protein level of RXR{alpha}, but not PPAR{gamma}, RXR{beta}, or PKC isoforms, was accumulated in the presence of proteasome inhibitors. Taken together, we conclude that proteasome inhibitors can upregulate PPRE activity through RXR{alpha} accumulation and a PKC-dependent pathway. The former is due to inhibition of RXR{alpha} degradation through ubiquitin-dependent proteasome system, while the latter is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

  9. Interferon-γ Induces Major Histocompatibility Class II Transactivator (CIITA) That Mediates Collagen Repression and Major Histocompatibility Class II Activation by Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Butticè, Giovanna; Miller, Janice; Wang, Lin; Smith, Barbara D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis is responsible for plaque instability through alterations in extracellular matrix. Previously, we demonstrated that major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) transactivator (CIITA) in a complex with regulatory factor for X box 5 (RFX5) is a crucial protein mediating interferon (IFN)-γ–induced repression of collagen type I gene transcription in fibroblasts. This article demonstrates that, in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), IFN-γ dramatically increases the expression of CIITA isoforms III and IV, with no increase in expression of CIITA isoform I. Expression of CIITA III and IV correlates with decreased collagen type I and increased MHC II gene expression. Exogenous expression of CIITA I, III, and IV, in transiently transfected SMCs, represses collagen type I promoters (COL1A1 and COL1A2) and activates MHC II promoter. Levels of CIITA and RFX5 increase in the nucleus of cells treated with IFN-γ. Moreover, simvastatin lowers the IFN-γ–induced expression of RFX5 and MHC II in addition to repressing collagen expression. However, simvastatin does not block the IFN-γ–induced expression of CIITA III and IV, suggesting a CIITA-independent mechanism. This first demonstration that RFX5 and CIITA isoforms are expressed in SMCs after IFN-γ stimulation suggest that CIITA could be a key factor in plaque stability in atherosclerosis. PMID:16439692

  10. Promoter-specific transactivation of hepatitis B virus transcription by a glutamine- and proline-rich domain of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Raney, A K; Easton, A J; Milich, D R; McLachlan, A

    1991-01-01

    The cloned transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1) transactivates transcription from the hepatitis B virus (HBV) large surface antigen promoter but does not influence the transcriptional activities of the other three HBV promoters. This indicates that this transcription factor can differentially influence the activities of the HBV promoter. By using a transient-transfection system, the major domain of the HNF1 polypeptide involved in transcriptional activation of the large surface antigen promoter in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2.1 has been mapped to a region that is rich in glutamine and proline residues (9 of 18) and is different from the previously identified regions of this factor responsible for in vitro transcriptional activation of a promoter containing human albumin promoter HNF1 binding sites. The human albumin promoter HNF1 binding site mediates transcriptional activation through the same HNF1 polypeptide domain as the HBV large surface antigen promoter HNF1 binding site in transient-transfection assays with HepG2.1 cells, suggesting that HNF1 may possess multiple transcriptional activation domains. Images PMID:1656070

  11. A cis-element with mixed G-quadruplex structure of NPGPx promoter is essential for nucleolin-mediated transactivation on non-targeting siRNA stress

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Pei-Chi; Wang, Zi-Fu; Lo, Wen-Ting; Su, Mei-I; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Chang, Ta-Chau; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    We reported that non-targeting siRNA (NT-siRNA) stress induces non-selenocysteine containing phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (NPGPx) expression to cooperate with exoribonuclease XRN2 for releasing the stress [Wei,P.C., Lo,W.T., Su,M.I., Shew,J.Y. and Lee,W.H. (2011) Non-targeting siRNA induces NPGPx expression to cooperate with exoribonuclease XRN2 for releasing the stress. Nucleic Acids Res., 40, 323–332]. However, how NT-siRNA stress inducing NPGPx expression remains elusive. In this communication, we showed that the proximal promoter of NPGPx contained a mixed G-quadruplex (G4) structure, and disrupting the structure diminished NT-siRNA induced NPGPx promoter activity. We also demonstrated that nucleolin (NCL) specifically bonded to the G4-containing sequences to replace the originally bound Sp1 at the NPGPx promoter on NT-siRNA stress. Consistently, overexpression of NCL further increased NPGPx promoter activity, whereas depletion of NCL desensitized NPGPx promoter to NT-siRNA stress. These results suggest that the cis-element with mixed G4 structure at the NPGPx promoter plays an essential role for its transactivation mediated by NCL to release cells from NT-siRNA stress. PMID:23241391

  12. All-trans retinoic acid increases expression of aquaporin-5 and plasma membrane water permeability via transactivation of Sp1 in mouse lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Johji; Horie, Ichiro; Seto, Mayumi; Nagai, Kazufumi; Hisatsune, Akinori; Miyata, Takeshi; Isohama, Yoichiro

    2006-12-29

    Aquaporin-5 (AQP5) is a water-selective channel protein that is expressed in lacrimal glands, salivary glands, and distal lung. Several studies using AQP5 knockout mice have revealed that AQP5 plays an important role in maintaining water homeostasis in the lung. We report here that all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) increases plasma membrane water permeability, AQP5 mRNA and protein expression, and AQP5 promoter activity in MLE-12 cells. The promoter activation induced by atRA was diminished by mutation at the Sp1/Sp3 binding element (SBE), suggesting that the SBE mediates the effects of atRA. In addition, atRA increased the binding of Sp1 to the SBE without changing the levels of Sp1 in the nucleus. Taken together, our data indicate that atRA increases AQP5 expression through transactivation of Sp1, leading to an increase in plasma membrane water permeability. PMID:17097063

  13. The C-terminal domain of the nuclear factor I-B2 isoform is glycosylated and transactivates the WAP gene in the JEG-3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S. . E-mail: suditmukhopadhy@yahoo.com; Rosen, Jeffrey M. . E-mail: jrosen@bcm.tmc.edu

    2007-07-06

    The transcription factor nuclear factor I (NFI) has been shown previously both in vivo and in vitro to be involved in the cooperative regulation of whey acidic protein (WAP) gene transcription along with the glucocorticoid receptor and STAT5. In addition, one of the specific NFI isoforms, NFI-B2, was demonstrated in transient co-transfection experiments in JEG cells, which lack endogenous NFI, to be preferentially involved in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene expression. A comparison of the DNA-binding specificities of the different NFI isoforms only partially explained their differential ability to activate the WAP gene transcription. Here, we analyzed the transactivation regions of two NFI isoforms by making chimeric proteins between the NFI-A and B isoforms. Though, their DNA-binding specificities were not altered as compared to the corresponding wild-type transcription factors, the C-terminal region of the NFI-B isoform was shown to preferentially activate WAP gene transcription in cooperation with GR and STAT5 in transient co-transfection assays in JEG-3 cells. Furthermore, determination of serine and threonine-specific glycosylation (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine) of the C-terminus of the NFI-B isoform suggested that the secondary modification by O-GlcNAc might play a role in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene transcription by NFI-B2 and STAT5.

  14. A cis-element with mixed G-quadruplex structure of NPGPx promoter is essential for nucleolin-mediated transactivation on non-targeting siRNA stress.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pei-Chi; Wang, Zi-Fu; Lo, Wen-Ting; Su, Mei-I; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Chang, Ta-Chau; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2013-02-01

    We reported that non-targeting siRNA (NT-siRNA) stress induces non-selenocysteine containing phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (NPGPx) expression to cooperate with exoribonuclease XRN2 for releasing the stress [Wei,P.C., Lo,W.T., Su,M.I., Shew,J.Y. and Lee,W.H. (2011) Non-targeting siRNA induces NPGPx expression to cooperate with exoribonuclease XRN2 for releasing the stress. Nucleic Acids Res., 40, 323-332]. However, how NT-siRNA stress inducing NPGPx expression remains elusive. In this communication, we showed that the proximal promoter of NPGPx contained a mixed G-quadruplex (G4) structure, and disrupting the structure diminished NT-siRNA induced NPGPx promoter activity. We also demonstrated that nucleolin (NCL) specifically bonded to the G4-containing sequences to replace the originally bound Sp1 at the NPGPx promoter on NT-siRNA stress. Consistently, overexpression of NCL further increased NPGPx promoter activity, whereas depletion of NCL desensitized NPGPx promoter to NT-siRNA stress. These results suggest that the cis-element with mixed G4 structure at the NPGPx promoter plays an essential role for its transactivation mediated by NCL to release cells from NT-siRNA stress. PMID:23241391

  15. A novel SNP in a vitamin D response element of the CYP24A1 promoter reduces protein binding, transactivation, and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Roff, Alanna; Wilson, Robin Taylor

    2008-11-01

    The active form of vitamin D (1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)) is known to have antiproliferative effects and has been implicated in cancers of the colon, breast, and prostate. These cancers occur more frequently among African Americans than Caucasians, and individuals with African ancestry are known to have approximately twofold lower levels of serum vitamin D (25(OH)D) compared with individuals of European ancestry. However, epidemiological studies of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) have shown inconsistent associations with cancer risk, suggesting that differences in other genes in the pathway may be important. We sought to identify functionally significant polymorphic variants in CYP24A1, a gene that is highly inducible by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) and that encodes the primary catabolic enzyme in the pathway. Here we report the identification of six novel SNPs in the human CYP24A1 promoter, including one at nucleotide -279 occurring within the distal vitamin D response element (VDRE2). Our experiments demonstrate that the VDRE2 variant results in decreased protein binding and transactivation in vitro, and reduced expression of CYP24A1 in cultured primary human lymphocytes provides evidence for an effect in vivo. This variant was only observed in our African American population, and represents a first step toward understanding differences in disease risk among racial/ethnic groups. PMID:18824104

  16. Human TAFII55 Interacts with the Vitamin D3 and Thyroid Hormone Receptors and with Derivatives of the Retinoid X Receptor That Have Altered Transactivation Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lavigne, Anne-Claire; Mengus, Gabrielle; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Wurtz, Jean-Marie; Davidson, Irwin

    1999-01-01

    We have identified novel interactions between the human (h)TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAFII55 and the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of the nuclear receptors for vitamin D3 (VDR) and thyroid hormone (TRα). Following expression in Cos cells, hTAFII55 interacts with the VDR and TRα LBDs in a ligand-independent manner whereas no interactions with the retinoid X receptors (RXRs) or with other receptors were observed. Deletion mapping indicates that hTAFII55 interacts with a 40-amino-acid region spanning α-helices H3 to H5 of the VDR and TRα LBDs but not with the equivalent highly related region of RXRγ. TAFII55 also interacts with chimeric receptors in which the H3-to-H5 region of RXRγ has been replaced with that of the VDR or TRα. Furthermore, replacement of two single amino acids of the RXRγ LBD with their VDR counterparts allows the RXRγ LBD to interact with hTAFII55 while the corresponding double substitution allows a much stronger interaction. In transfection experiments, the single mutated RXRγ LBDs activate transcription to fivefold higher levels than wild-type RXRγ while the double mutation activates transcription to a level comparable to that observed with the VDR. There is therefore a correlation between the ability of the modified RXRs to interact with hTAFII55 and transactivation. These results strongly suggest that the TAFII55 interactions with the modified RXR LBDs modulate transcriptional activation. PMID:10409738

  17. Quantitative analysis of multisite protein ligand interactions by NMR: binding of intrinsically disordered p53 transactivation subdomains with the TAZ2 domain of CBP

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Munehito; Ferreon, Josephine C.; Wright, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Determination of affinities and binding sites involved in protein-ligand interactions is essential for understanding molecular mechanisms in biological systems. Here we combine singular value decomposition, and global analysis of NMR chemical shift perturbations caused by protein-protein interactions to determine the number and location of binding sites on the protein surface and to measure the binding affinities. Using this method we show that the isolated AD1 and AD2 binding motifs, derived from the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain of the tumor suppressor p53, both interact with the TAZ2 domain of the transcriptional coactivator CBP at two binding sites. Simulations of titration curves and lineshapes show that a primary dissociation constant as small as 1~10 nM can be accurately estimated by NMR titration methods, provided that the primary and secondary binding processes are coupled. Unexpectedly, the site of binding of AD2 on the hydrophobic surface of TAZ2 overlaps with the binding site for AD1, but AD2 binds TAZ2 more tightly. The results highlight the complexity of interactions between intrinsically disordered proteins and their targets. Furthermore, the association rate of AD2 to TAZ2 is estimated to be 1.7 × 1010 M−1 s−1, approaching the diffusion-controlled limit and indicating that intrinsic disorder plus complementary electrostatics can significantly accelerate protein binding interactions. PMID:22280219

  18. SCF/c-kit transactivates CXCR4-serine 339 phosphorylation through G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 and regulates cardiac stem cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ke; Kuang, Dong; Wang, Ying; Xia, Yanli; Tong, Weilin; Wang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Yaobin; Duan, Yaqi; Wang, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    C-kit positive cardiac stem cells (CSCs) have been shown to contribute to myocardial regeneration after infarction. Previously, we have shown that the c-kit ligand stem cell factor (SCF) can induce CSC migration into the infarcted area during myocardial infarction (MI). However, the precise mechanism involved is not fully understood. In this study, we found that CSCs also express C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), which is a typical member of the seven transmembrane-spanning G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In vitro, activation of c-kit signalling by SCF promotes migration of CSCs with increased phosphorylation of CXCR4-serine 339, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Knockdown of CXCR4 expression by siRNA reduces SCF/c-kit-induced migration and downstream signalling. As previously reported, CXCR4-serine 339 phosphorylation is mainly regulated by GPCR kinase 6 (GRK6); thus, silencing of GRK6 expression by siRNA impairs CXCR4-serine 339 phosphorylation and migration of CSCs caused by SCF. In vivo, knockdown of GRK6 impairs the ability of CSCs to migrate into peri-infarcted areas. These results demonstrate that SCF-induced CSC migration is regulated by the transactivation of CXCR4-serine 339 phosphorylation, which is mediated by GRK6. PMID:27245949

  19. Stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}/CXCL12) stimulates ovarian cancer cell growth through the EGF receptor transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Porcile, Carola; Bajetto, Adriana . E-mail: bajetto@cba.unige.it; Barbieri, Federica; Barbero, Simone; Bonavia, Rudy; Biglieri, Marianna; Pirani, Paolo; Florio, Tullio . E-mail: florio@cba.unige.it; Schettini, Gennaro

    2005-08-15

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death in gynecologic diseases in which there is evidence for a complex chemokine network. Chemokines are a family of proteins that play an important role in tumor progression influencing cell proliferation, angiogenic/angiostatic processes, cell migration and metastasis, and, finally, regulating the immune cells recruitment into the tumor mass. We previously demonstrated that astrocytes and glioblastoma cells express both the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and that SDF-1{alpha} treatment induced cell proliferation, supporting the hypothesis that chemokines may play an important role in tumor cells' growth in vitro. In the present study, we report that CXCR4 and SDF-1 are expressed in OC cell lines. We demonstrate that SDF-1{alpha} induces a dose-dependent proliferation in OC cells, by the specific interaction with CXCR4 and a biphasic activation of ERK1/2 and Akt kinases. Our results further indicate that CXCR4 activation induces EGF receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation that in turn was linked to the downstream intracellular kinases activation, ERK1/2 and Akt. In addition, we provide evidence for cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (c-Src) involvement in the SDF-1/CXCR4-EGFR transactivation. These results suggest a possible important 'cross-talk' between SDF-1/CXCR4 and EGFR intracellular pathways that may link signals of cell proliferation in ovarian cancer.

  20. Nucleolin binds specifically to an AP-1 DNA sequence and represses AP1-dependent transactivation of the matrix metalloproteinase-13 gene.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Shaija; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Beifuss, Katherine K; Bernstein, Lori R

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation via activator protein-1 (AP-1) protein binding to AP-1 binding sites within gene promoter regions of AP-1 target genes plays a key role in controlling cellular invasion, proliferation, and oncogenesis, and is important to pathogenesis of arthritis and cardiovascular disease. To identify new proteins that interact with the AP-1 DNA binding site, we performed the DNA affinity chromatography-based Nucleotide Affinity Preincubation Specificity TEst of Recognition (NAPSTER) assay, and discovered a 97 kDa protein that binds in vitro to a minimal AP-1 DNA sequence element. Mass spectrometric fragmentation sequencing determined that p97 is nucleolin. Immunoblotting of DNA affinity-purified material with anti-nucleolin antibodies confirmed this identification. Nucleolin also binds the AP-1 site in gel shift assays. Nucleolin interacts in NAPSTER with the AP-1 site within the promoter sequence of the metalloproteinase-13 gene (MMP-13), and binds in vivo in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in the vicinity of the AP-1 site in the MMP-13 promoter. Overexpression of nucleolin in human HeLa cervical carcinoma cells significantly represses AP-1 dependent gene transactivation of a minimal AP-1 reporter construct and of an MMP-13 promoter reporter sequence. This is the first report of nucleolin binding and transregulation at the AP-1 site. PMID:17626252

  1. SCF/c-kit transactivates CXCR4-serine 339 phosphorylation through G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 and regulates cardiac stem cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Ke; Kuang, Dong; Wang, Ying; Xia, Yanli; Tong, Weilin; Wang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Yaobin; Duan, Yaqi; Wang, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    C-kit positive cardiac stem cells (CSCs) have been shown to contribute to myocardial regeneration after infarction. Previously, we have shown that the c-kit ligand stem cell factor (SCF) can induce CSC migration into the infarcted area during myocardial infarction (MI). However, the precise mechanism involved is not fully understood. In this study, we found that CSCs also express C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), which is a typical member of the seven transmembrane-spanning G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In vitro, activation of c-kit signalling by SCF promotes migration of CSCs with increased phosphorylation of CXCR4-serine 339, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Knockdown of CXCR4 expression by siRNA reduces SCF/c-kit-induced migration and downstream signalling. As previously reported, CXCR4-serine 339 phosphorylation is mainly regulated by GPCR kinase 6 (GRK6); thus, silencing of GRK6 expression by siRNA impairs CXCR4-serine 339 phosphorylation and migration of CSCs caused by SCF. In vivo, knockdown of GRK6 impairs the ability of CSCs to migrate into peri-infarcted areas. These results demonstrate that SCF-induced CSC migration is regulated by the transactivation of CXCR4-serine 339 phosphorylation, which is mediated by GRK6. PMID:27245949

  2. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Deyu; Zhang, Zhixia; Guo, Huarong

    2012-01-01

    p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase) and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase) into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG) cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C) and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation), but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner. PMID:25585933

  3. Use of protein A gene fusions for the analysis of structure-function relationship of the transactivator protein C of bacteriophage Mu.

    PubMed

    De, A; Paul, B D; Ramesh, V; Nagaraja, V

    1997-08-01

    A sensitive dimerization assay for DNA binding proteins has been developed using gene fusion technology. For this purpose, we have engineered a gene fusion using protein A gene of Staphylococcus aureus and C gene, the late gene transactivator of bacteriophage Mu. The C gene was fused to the 3' end of the gene for protein A to generate an A-C fusion. The overexpressed fusion protein was purified in a single step using immunoglobulin affinity chromatography. Purified fusion protein exhibits DNA binding activity as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. When the fusion protein A-C was mixed with C and analyzed for DNA binding, in addition to C and A-C specific complexes, a single intermediate complex comprising of a heterodimer of C and A-C fusion proteins was observed. Further, the protein A moiety in the fusion protein A-C does not contribute to DNA binding as demonstrated by proteolytic cleavage and circular dichroism (CD) analysis. The assay has also been applied to analyze the DNA binding domain of C protein by generating fusions between protein A and N- and C-terminal deletion mutants of C. The results indicate a role for the region towards the carboxy terminal of the protein in DNA binding. The general applicability of this method is discussed. PMID:9415443

  4. ZBTB32 is an early repressor of the class II transactivator and MHC class II gene expression during B cell differentiation to plasma cells1

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyesuk; Scharer, Christopher D.; Majumder, Parimal; Davis, Carl W.; Butler, Royce; Zinzow-Kramer, Wendy; Skountzou, Ioanna; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G.; Ahmed, Rafi; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    The MHC class II transactivator (CIITA) and MHC class II expression is silenced during the differentiation of B cells to plasma cells. When B cell differentiation is carried out ex vivo, CIITA silencing occurs rapidly but the factors contributing to this event are not known. ZBTB32, also known as repressor of GATA3, was identified as an early repressor of CIITA in an ex vivo plasma cell differentiation model. ZBTB32 activity occurred at a time when Blimp-1, the regulator of plasma cell fate and suppressor of CIITA, was minimally induced. Ectopic expression of ZBTB32 suppressed CIITA and I-A gene expression in B cells. ShRNA depletion of ZBTB32 in a plasma cell line resulted in reexpression of CIITA and I-A. Compared to conditional Blimp-1 knock out and wild-type B cells, B cells from ZBTB32/ROG-knock out mice displayed delayed kinetics in silencing CIITA during ex vivo plasma cell differentiation. ZBTB32 was found to bind to the CIITA gene, suggesting that ZBTB32 directly regulates CIITA. Lastly, ZBTB32 and Blimp-1 coimmunoprecipitated, suggesting that the two repressors may ultimately function together to silence CIITA expression. These results introduce ZBTB32 as a novel regulator of MHC-II gene expression and a potential regulatory partner of Blimp-1 in repressing gene expression. PMID:22851713

  5. Sequence-specific and general transcriptional activation by the bovine papillomavirus-1 E2 trans-activator require an N-terminal amphipathic helix-containing E2 domain.

    PubMed

    Haugen, T H; Turek, L P; Mercurio, F M; Cripe, T P; Olson, B J; Anderson, R D; Seidl, D; Karin, M; Schiller, J

    1988-12-20

    The sequence-specific trans-activator protein of bovine papillomavirus (BPV)-1, E2, strongly increases transcription at promoters containing papillomaviral ACCG(N)4CGGT (E2P) cis motifs, but can also activate a wide range of co-transfected promoters without E2P cores to a lower extent. Analysis of multiple E2 mutants in transfected cells revealed that the C-terminal DNA binding E2 domain binds to the E2P cis sequences in the form of pre-existing nuclear dimers. The DNA binding function of E2 was required for specific trans-activation of the E2P elements, as well as for the function of the previously described C-terminal 'short E2' transrepressor. In addition to the C terminus, specific trans-activation also required an intact N-terminal half of the E2 protein. When expressed alone, the N-terminal E2 domain was found to activate heterologous promoters without E2P elements to an extent comparable to wild-type E2, and therefore represents the functional transcription activation domain of the E2 factor. In contrast to other DNA-binding activator proteins described to date, the transcriptional activation by the E2 factor can occur without specific DNA binding. Its mechanism may thus involve protein--protein interactions between common transcription factors and the N-terminal E2 domain which contains amphipathic helix motifs. PMID:2854060

  6. The dual action of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1 (PARP-1) inhibition in HIV-1 infection: HIV-1 LTR inhibition and diminution in Rho GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Rom, Slava; Reichenbach, Nancy L.; Dykstra, Holly; Persidsky, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Multifactorial mechanisms comprising countless cellular factors and virus-encoded transactivators regulate the transcription of HIV-1 (HIV). Since poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) regulates numerous genes through its interaction with various transcription factors, inhibition of PARP-1 has surfaced recently as a powerful anti-inflammatory tool. We suggest a novel tactic to diminish HIV replication via PARP-1 inhibition in an in vitro model system, exploiting human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). PARP-1 inhibition was capable to lessen HIV replication in MDM by 60–80% after 7 days infection. Tat, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are known triggers of the Long Terminal Repeat (LTR), which can switch virus replication. Tat overexpression in MDM transfected with an LTR reporter plasmid resulted in a 4.2-fold increase in LTR activation; PARP inhibition caused 70% reduction of LTR activity. LTR activity, which increased 3-fold after PMA or TNFα treatment, was reduced by PARP inhibition (by 85–95%). PARP inhibition in MDM exhibited 90% diminution in NFκB activity (known to mediate TNFα- and PMA-induced HIV LTR activation). Cytoskeleton rearrangements are important in effective HIV-1 infection. PARP inactivation reduced actin cytoskeleton rearrangements by affecting Rho GTPase machinery. These discoveries suggest that inactivation of PARP suppresses HIV replication in MDM by via attenuation of LTR activation, NFκB suppression and its effects on the cytoskeleton. PARP appears to be essential for HIV replication and its inhibition may provide an effective approach to management of HIV infection. PMID:26379653

  7. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor interacts with HBx and inhibits its apoptotic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shimeng; Lin Ruxian; Zhou Zhe; Wen Siyuan; Lin Li; Chen Suhong; Shan Yajun; Cong Yuwen; Wang Shengqi . E-mail: sqwang@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2006-04-07

    HBx, a transcriptional transactivating protein of hepatitis B virus (HBV), is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the precise molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. We used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify that HBx interacts with MIF directly. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is implicated in the regulation of inflammation, cell growth, and even tumor formation. The interaction between HBx and MIF was verified with co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, and cellular colocalization. The expression of MIF was up-regulated in HBV particle producing cell 2.2.15 compared with HepG2 cell. Both HBx and MIF cause HepG2 cell G /G{sub 1} phase arrest, proliferation inhibition, and apoptosis. However, MIF can counteract the apoptotic effect of HBx. These results may provide evidence to explain the link between HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  8. The protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT6 inhibits HIV-1 Tat nucleolar retention.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Alex J; Sivakumaran, Haran; Jin, Hongping; Rawle, Daniel J; Harrich, David; Jans, David A

    2016-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivator protein Tat is known to play a key role in HIV infection, integrally related to its role in the host cell nucleus/nucleolus. Here we show for the first time that Tat localisation can be modulated by specific methylation, whereby overexpression of active but not catalytically inactive PRMT6 methyltransferase specifically leads to exclusion of Tat from the nucleolus. An R52/53A mutated Tat derivative does not show this redistribution, implying that R52/53, within Tat's nuclear/nucleolar localisation signal, are the targets of PRMT6 activity. Analysis using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching indicate that Tat nucleolar accumulation is largely through binding to nucleolar components, with methylation of Tat by PRMT6 preventing this. To our knowledge, this is the first report of specific protein methylation inhibiting nucleolar retention. PMID:26611710

  9. Ligand independent aryl hydrocarbon receptor inhibits lung cancer cell invasion by degradation of Smad4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Yang, Wen-Hao; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Chi-Hao; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2016-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent-activated transcriptional factor that regulates the metabolism of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. Although AhR plays a crucial role in air toxicant-induced carcinogenesis, AhR expression was shown to negatively regulate tumorigenesis. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of AhR without ligand treatment on cancer invasion in lung cancer cell lines. Lung cancer cells expressing lower levels of AhR showed higher invasion ability (H1299 cells) compared with cells expressing higher levels of AhR (A549 cells). Overexpression of AhR in H1299 cells inhibited the invasion ability. We found that vimentin expression was inhibited in AhR-overexpressing H1299 cells. Additionally, the expression of EMT-related transcriptional factors Snail and ID-1 decreased. Interestingly, we found that Smad4 degradation was induced in AhR-overexpressing H1299 cells. Our data showed that AhR could interact with Jun-activation domain binding protein (Jab1) and Smad4, which may cause degradation of Smad4 by the proteasome. Our data suggest that AhR affects the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway by inducing Smad4 degradation by the proteasome and suppressing tumor metastasis via epithelial to mesenchymal transition reduction in lung cancer cells. PMID:27060206

  10. A Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist N-Arachidonoyl Dopamine Inhibits Adipocyte Differentiation in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seyeon; Yi, Sodam; Seo, Won Jong; Lee, Myeong Jung; Song, Young Keun; Baek, Seung Yong; Yu, Jinha; Hong, Soo Hyun; Lee, Jinyoung; Shin, Dong Wook; Jeong, Lak Shin; Noh, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids can affect multiple cellular targets, such as cannabinoid (CB) receptors, transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). The stimuli to induce adipocyte differentiation in hBM-MSCs increase the gene transcription of the CB1 receptor, TRPV1 and PPARγ. In this study, the effects of three endocannabinoids, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (AEA), N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), on adipogenesis in hBM-MSCs were evaluated. The adipocyte differentiation was promoted by AEA whereas inhibited by NADA. No change was observed by the treatment of non-cytotoxic concentrations of 2-AG. The difference between AEA and NADA in the regulation of adipogenesis is associated with their effects on PPARγ transactivation. AEA can directly activate PPARγ. The effect of AEA on PPARγ in hBM-MSCs may prevail over that on the CB1 receptor mediated signal transduction, giving rise to the AEA-induced promotion of adipogenesis. In contrast, NADA had no effect on the PPARγ activity in the PPARγ transactivation assay. The inhibitory effect of NADA on adipogenesis in hBM-MSCs was reversed not by capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist, but by rimonabant, a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist. Rimonabant by itself promoted adipogenesis in hBM-MSCs, which may be interpreted as the result of the inverse agonism of the CB1 receptor. This result suggests that the constantly active CB1 receptor may contribute to suppress the adipocyte differentiation of hBM-MSCs. Therefore, the selective CB1 agonists that are unable to affect cellular PPARγ activity inhibit adipogenesis in hBM-MSCs. PMID:25995819

  11. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  12. Ribozyme cleaves rex/tax mRNA and inhibits bovine leukemia virus expression.

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, G H; McElwain, T F; Birkebak, T A; Palmer, G H

    1993-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) encodes at least two regulatory proteins, Rex and Tax. Tax, the transactivating protein, stimulates the long terminal repeat to promote viral transcription and may be involved in tumorigenesis. Rex is involved in the transition from early expression of regulatory proteins to later expression of viral structural proteins. We have targeted ribozymes against the mRNA encoding Rex and Tax. The ribozymes consist of the hammer-head catalytic motif flanked by antisense sequences that hybridize with the complementary rex/tax mRNA. To evaluate cleavage in a cell-free system, we transcribed portions of rex/tax mRNA and incubated them with synthetic RNA ribozymes. A ribozyme was identified that cleaves > 80% of the target RNA. Synthetic DNA encoding this ribozyme was cloned into the expression vector pRc/RSV and transfected into BLV-infected bat lung cells. Intracellular cleavage of rex/tax mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcriptase PCR. In cells expressing the ribozyme, viral expression was markedly inhibited. Expression of the BLV core protein p24 was inhibited by 61%, and reverse transcriptase activity in supernatant was inhibited by 92%. Ribozyme inhibition of BLV expression suggests that cattle expressing these sequences may be able to control BLV replication. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7504287

  13. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  14. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  15. Runx1 Phosphorylation by Src Increases Trans-activation via Augmented Stability, Reduced Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Binding, and Increased DNA Affinity, and Activated Runx1 Favors Granulopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wan Yee; Guo, Hong; Ma, Ou; Huang, Hui; Cantor, Alan B; Friedman, Alan D

    2016-01-01

    Src phosphorylates Runx1 on one central and four C-terminal tyrosines. We find that activated Src synergizes with Runx1 to activate a Runx1 luciferase reporter. Mutation of the four Runx1 C-terminal tyrosines to aspartate or glutamate to mimic phosphorylation increases trans-activation of the reporter in 293T cells and allows induction of Cebpa or Pu.1 mRNAs in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells, whereas mutation of these residues to phenylalanine to prevent phosphorylation obviates these effects. Three mechanisms contribute to increased Runx1 activity upon tyrosine modification as follows: increased stability, reduced histone deacetylase (HDAC) interaction, and increased DNA binding. Mutation of the five modified Runx1 tyrosines to aspartate markedly reduced co-immunoprecipitation with HDAC1 and HDAC3, markedly increased stability in cycloheximide or in the presence of co-expressed Cdh1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase coactivator, with reduced ubiquitination, and allowed DNA-binding in gel shift assay similar to wild-type Runx1. In contrast, mutation of these residues to phenylalanine modestly increased HDAC interaction, modestly reduced stability, and markedly reduced DNA binding in gel shift assays and as assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation with the -14-kb Pu.1 or +37-kb Cebpa enhancers after stable expression in 32Dcl3 cells. Affinity for CBFβ, the Runx1 DNA-binding partner, was not affected by these tyrosine modifications, and in vitro translated CBFβ markedly increased DNA affinity of both the translated phenylalanine and aspartate Runx1 variants. Finally, further supporting a positive role for Runx1 tyrosine phosphorylation during granulopoiesis, mutation of the five Src-modified residues to aspartate but not phenylalanine allows Runx1 to increase Cebpa and granulocyte colony formation by Runx1-deleted murine marrow. PMID:26598521

  16. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 gene product interacts with and trans-activates the AP1 family of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Antinore, M J; Birrer, M J; Patel, D; Nader, L; McCance, D J

    1996-01-01

    The E7 gene product of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds to the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) and dissociates pRb-E2F complexes. However, the observation that the ability of E7 to bind pRb is not required for the HPV16-induced immortalization of primary keratinocytes prompted a search for other cellular factors bound by E7. Using a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein system, we show that E7 complexes with AP1 transcription factors including c-Jun, JunB, JunD and c-Fos. The ability of E7 to complex with c-Jun in vivo is demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and the yeast two-hybrid system. An analysis of E7 point mutants in the GST system indicates that the E7 zinc-finger motif, but not the pRb binding domain, is involved in these interactions. Using c-Jun deletion mutants, E7 binding maps between amino acids 224 and 286 of c-Jun. E7 trans-activates c-Jun-induced transcription from a Jun responsive promoter, and this activity correlates with the ability of E7 mutants to bind Jun proteins. Finally, a transcriptionally inactive c-Jun deletion, which can bind E7, interferes with the E7-induced transformation of rat embryo fibroblasts in cooperation with an activated ras, indicating that the Jun-E7 interaction is physiologically relevant and that Jun factors may be targeted in the E7 transformation pathway. Images PMID:8617242

  17. An in vivo bioassay for detecting antiandrogens using humanized transgenic mice coexpressing the tetracycline-controlled transactivator and human CYP1B1 gene.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dae Y; Cho, Jung S; Oh, Jae H; Shim, Sun B; Jee, Seung W; Lee, Su H; Seo, Su J; Kang, Hyun G; Sheen, Yhun Y; Lee, Seok H; Kim, Yong K

    2005-01-01

    The typical strategy used in analysis of antiandrogens involves the morphological changes of a marker in castrated rats Hershberger assay for the prostate, seminal vesicle, levator ani plus bulbocavernosus muscles (LABC), Cowper's gland, and glans penis. However, there are disadvantages to this approach, such as the time required, and the results may not correspond to those in actual human exposure. To evaluate its ability for detecting antiandrogens, in vivo the dose effect of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and time effect of five antiandrogens, DEHP, di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), linuron (3-(4-dichlorophenyl)-methoxy-1-methylurea), and 2,4'-DDE (1,1-dichloro-2-(p-chlorophenyl)-2-(o-chlorophenyl)ethylene), were investigated using humanized transgenic mice coexpressing tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA) and the human cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme CYP1B1 (hCYP1B1). Adult transgenic males were treated with each of the five antiandrogens, and their tTA-driven hCYP1B1 expressions analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or Western blot and for O-debenzylation activity. Herein, the treatments of adult males with the five antiandrogens were shown to affect the increased levels of tTA-driven hCYP1B1 expression in both dose-dependent and repeated experiments. Thus, this novel in vivo bioassay, using humanized transgenic mice, is useful for measuring antiandrogens, and is a means to a more relevant bioassay relating to actual human exposure. PMID:16040568

  18. Interaction Analysis between HLA-DRB1 Shared Epitope Alleles and MHC Class II Transactivator CIITA Gene with Regard to Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ronninger, Marcus; Seddighzadeh, Maria; Eike, Morten Christoph; Plant, Darren; Daha, Nina A.; Skinningsrud, Beate; Worthington, Jane; Kvien, Tore K.; Toes, Rene E. M.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Alfredsson, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE) alleles are the strongest genetic determinants for autoantibody positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). One of the key regulators in expression of HLA class II receptors is MHC class II transactivator (CIITA). A variant of the CIITA gene has been found to associate with inflammatory diseases. We wanted to explore whether the risk variant rs3087456 in the CIITA gene interacts with the HLA-DRB1 SE alleles regarding the risk of developing RA. We tested this hypothesis in a case-control study with 11767 individuals from four European Caucasian populations (6649 RA cases and 5118 controls). We found no significant additive interaction for risk alleles among Swedish Caucasians with RA (n = 3869, attributable proportion due to interaction (AP) = 0.2, 95%CI: −0.2–0.5) or when stratifying for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) presence (ACPA positive disease: n = 2945, AP = 0.3, 95%CI: −0.05–0.6, ACPA negative: n = 2268, AP = −0.2, 95%CI: −1.0–0.6). We further found no significant interaction between the main subgroups of SE alleles (DRB1*01, DRB1*04 or DRB1*10) and CIITA. Similar analysis of three independent RA cohorts from British, Dutch and Norwegian populations also indicated an absence of significant interaction between genetic variants in CIITA and SE alleles with regard to RA risk. Our data suggest that risk from the CIITA locus is independent of the major risk for RA from HLA-DRB1 SE alleles, given that no significant interaction between rs3087456 and SE alleles was observed. Since a biological link between products of these genes is evident, the genetic contribution from CIITA and class II antigens in the autoimmune process may involve additional unidentified factors. PMID:22461888

  19. MHC class II transactivator represses human IL-4 gene transcription by interruption of promoter binding with CBP/p300, STAT6 and NFAT1 via histone hypoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaorong; Jiang, Yang; Lu, Liming; Ding, Qing; Jiao, Zhijun; Zhou, Yun; Xin, Lijun; Chou, Kuang-Yen

    2007-01-01

    In addition to its property of enhancing major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression, the class II transactivator (CIITA) was recently demonstrated to be involved in T helper type 1/type 2 (Th1/Th2) differentiation by regulating interleukin-4 (IL-4) gene transcription. There was however, controversy regarding whether CIITA promotes or suppresses IL-4 expression in the experiments with transgenic mice. To clarify the discrepancy by using simpler experimental systems, human Jurkat T cells that express IL-4 but not interferon-γ, even if stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin, were used for CIITA transfection. Significant suppression of IL-4 gene expression was demonstrated. Simultaneously, histones H3 and H4 in the IL-4 promoter were hypoacetylated. The suppression could be totally reversed by the histone deacetylatase inhibitor trichostatin A. Furthermore, the IL-4 expression was determined in primarily established human Th1/Th2 cells to which CIITA small interference RNA (siRNA) had been introduced. A substantially increased level of IL-4 was recorded in the CIITA siRNA-transfected Th1 cells, which was in parallel with significantly enhanced acetylation in histone H3 of the IL-4 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that CIITA abrogated the binding of coactivator CBP/p300 and transcription factors STAT6/NFAT1 to IL-4 promoter in the CIITA-transfected cells. In conclusion, CIITA was active in the repression of transcription activation of human IL-4 gene in both the T-cell line and the primary human CD4 T cells by preventing transcription factors from binding to IL-4 promoter through histone hypoacetylation. Our data confirm a potential significant role of CIITA in controlling Th1/Th2 differentiation via modulation of IL-4 gene activation. PMID:17645498

  20. Transcriptional regulation of the human cystathionine beta-synthase -1b basal promoter: synergistic transactivation by transcription factors NF-Y and Sp1/Sp3.

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Y; Konrad, M A; Matherly, L H; Taub, J W

    2001-01-01

    Cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) catalyses the condensation of serine and homocysteine to form cystathionine, an intermediate step in the synthesis of cysteine. Human CBS encodes five distinct 5' non-coding exons, the most frequent termed CBS -1a and CBS -1b, each transcribed from its own unique GC-rich TATA-less promoter. The minimal transcriptional region (-3792 to -3667) of the CBS -1b promoter was defined by 5'- and 3'-deletions, and transient transfections of reporter gene constructs in HepG2 cells, characterized by CBS transcription exclusively from the -1b promoter. Included in this 125 bp region are 3 GC-boxes (termed GC-a, GC-b and GC-c), an inverted CAAT-box and an E-box. By gel-shift and supershift assays, binding of specificity protein (Sp)1 and Sp3 to the GC-box elements, upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF-1) to the E-box, and both nuclear factor (NF)-Y and an NF-1-like factor to the CAAT box could be demonstrated. By transient trans fections and reporter gene assays in HepG2 and Drosophila SL2 cells, a functional interplay was indicated between NF-Y binding to the CAAT-box, or between USF-1 binding to the E-box, and Sp1/Sp3 binding to the GC-box elements. In SL2 cells, NF-Y and Sp1/Sp3 were synergistic. Furthermore, both Sp1 and the long Sp3 isoform transactivated the CBS -1b minimal promoter; however, the short Sp3 isoforms were potent repressors. These results may explain the cell- or tissue-specific regulation of CBS transcription, and clarify the bases for alterations in CBS gene expression in human disease and Down's syndrome. PMID:11415440

  1. Oxidative stress contributes to the enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and hypertrophy of VSMC from SHR: role of growth factor receptor transactivation.

    PubMed

    Atef, Mohammed Emehdi; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2016-03-01

    We showed previously that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) exhibit overexpression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins, which contribute to increased protein synthesis through the activation of MAP kinase signaling. Because oxidative stress has been shown to be increased in hypertension, the present study was undertaken to examine the role of oxidative stress and underlying mechanisms in enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and VSMC hypertrophy. Protein expression was determined by Western blotting, whereas protein synthesis and cell volume, markers for VSMC hypertrophy, were determined by [(3)H]-leucine incorporation and three-dimensional confocal imaging, respectively. The increased expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins, increased protein synthesis, and augmented cell volume exhibited by VSMCs from SHRs were significantly attenuated by antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a scavenger of superoxide anion, DPI, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase. In addition, PP2, AG1024, AG1478, and AG1295, inhibitors of c-Src, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), respectively, also attenuated the enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and enhanced protein synthesis in VSMCs from SHRs toward control levels. Furthermore, the levels of IGF-1R and EGFR proteins and not of PDGFR were also enhanced in VSMCs from SHRs, which were attenuated significantly by NAC, DPI, and PP2. In addition, NAC, DPI, and PP2 also attenuated the enhanced phosphorylation of IGF-1R, PDGFR, EGFR, c-Src, and EKR1/2 in VSMCs from SHRs. These data suggest that enhanced oxidative stress in VSMCs from SHRs activates c-Src, which through the transactivation of growth factor receptors and MAPK signaling contributes to enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and resultant VSMC hypertrophy. PMID:26747500

  2. The Rel/NF-κB pathway and transcription of immediate early genes in T cell activation are inhibited by microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tammy T.; Walther, Isabelle; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Galleri, Grazia; Meloni, Maria Antonia; Pippia, Proto; Cogoli, Augusto; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that transcription of immediate early genes is inhibited in T cells activated in μg. Immunosuppression during spaceflight is a major barrier to safe, long-term human space habitation and travel. The goals of these experiments were to prove that μg was the cause of impaired T cell activation during spaceflight, as well as understand the mechanisms controlling early T cell activation. T cells from four human donors were stimulated with Con A and anti-CD28 on board the ISS. An on-board centrifuge was used to generate a 1g simultaneous control to isolate the effects of μg from other variables of spaceflight. Microarray expression analysis after 1.5 h of activation demonstrated that μg- and 1g-activated T cells had distinct patterns of global gene expression and identified 47 genes that were significantly, differentially down-regulated in μg. Importantly, several key immediate early genes were inhibited in μg. In particular, transactivation of Rel/NF-κB, CREB, and SRF gene targets were down-regulated. Expression of cREL gene targets were significantly inhibited, and transcription of cREL itself was reduced significantly in μg and upon anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation in simulated μg. Analysis of gene connectivity indicated that the TNF pathway is a major early downstream effector pathway inhibited in μg and may lead to ineffective proinflammatory host defenses against infectious pathogens during spaceflight. Results from these experiments indicate that μg was the causative factor for impaired T cell activation during spaceflight by inhibiting transactivation of key immediate early genes. PMID:22750545

  3. Tumor cell-specific inhibition of MYC function using small molecule inhibitors of the HUWE1 ubiquitin ligase

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Stefanie; Bultinck, Jennyfer; Myant, Kevin; Jaenicke, Laura A; Walz, Susanne; Müller, Judith; Gmachl, Michael; Treu, Matthias; Boehmelt, Guido; Ade, Carsten P; Schmitz, Werner; Wiegering, Armin; Otto, Christoph; Popov, Nikita; Sansom, Owen; Kraut, Norbert; Eilers, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Deregulated expression of MYC is a driver of colorectal carcinogenesis, necessitating novel strategies to inhibit MYC function. The ubiquitin ligase HUWE1 (HECTH9, ARF-BP1, MULE) associates with both MYC and the MYC-associated protein MIZ1. We show here that HUWE1 is required for growth of colorectal cancer cells in culture and in orthotopic xenograft models. Using high-throughput screening, we identify small molecule inhibitors of HUWE1, which inhibit MYC-dependent transactivation in colorectal cancer cells, but not in stem and normal colon epithelial cells. Inhibition of HUWE1 stabilizes MIZ1. MIZ1 globally accumulates on MYC target genes and contributes to repression of MYC-activated target genes upon HUWE1 inhibition. Our data show that transcriptional activation by MYC in colon cancer cells requires the continuous degradation of MIZ1 and identify a novel principle that allows for inhibition of MYC function in tumor cells. See also: FX Schaub & JL Cleveland (December 2014) PMID:25253726

  4. Reversible cell cycle inhibition and premature aging features imposed by conditional expression of p16Ink4a

    PubMed Central

    Boquoi, Amelie; Arora, Sanjeevani; Chen, Tina; Litwin, Sam; Koh, James; Enders, Greg H

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p16Ink4a (p16) is a canonical mediator of cellular senescence and accumulates in aging tissues, where it constrains proliferation of some progenitor cells. However, whether p16 induction in tissues is sufficient to inhibit cell proliferation, mediate senescence, and/or impose aging features has remained unclear. To address these issues, we generated transgenic mice that permit conditional p16 expression. Broad induction at weaning inhibited proliferation of intestinal transit-amplifying and Lgr5+ stem cells and rapidly imposed features of aging, including hair loss, skin wrinkling, reduced body weight and subcutaneous fat, an increased myeloid fraction in peripheral blood, poor dentition, and cataracts. Aging features were observed with multiple combinations of p16 transgenes and transactivators and were largely abrogated by a germline Cdk4 R24C mutation, confirming that they reflect Cdk inhibition. Senescence markers were not found, and de-induction of p16, even after weeks of sustained expression, allowed rapid recovery of intestinal cell proliferation and reversal of aging features in most mice. These results suggest that p16-mediated inhibition of Cdk activity is sufficient to inhibit cell proliferation and impose aging features in somatic tissues of mammals and that at least some of these aging features are reversible. PMID:25481981

  5. Reversible cell cycle inhibition and premature aging features imposed by conditional expression of p16Ink4a.

    PubMed

    Boquoi, Amelie; Arora, Sanjeevani; Chen, Tina; Litwin, Sam; Koh, James; Enders, Greg H

    2015-02-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p16(Ink4a) (p16) is a canonical mediator of cellular senescence and accumulates in aging tissues, where it constrains proliferation of some progenitor cells. However, whether p16 induction in tissues is sufficient to inhibit cell proliferation, mediate senescence, and/or impose aging features has remained unclear. To address these issues, we generated transgenic mice that permit conditional p16 expression. Broad induction at weaning inhibited proliferation of intestinal transit-amplifying and Lgr5+ stem cells and rapidly imposed features of aging, including hair loss, skin wrinkling, reduced body weight and subcutaneous fat, an increased myeloid fraction in peripheral blood, poor dentition, and cataracts. Aging features were observed with multiple combinations of p16 transgenes and transactivators and were largely abrogated by a germline Cdk4 R24C mutation, confirming that they reflect Cdk inhibition. Senescence markers were not found, and de-induction of p16, even after weeks of sustained expression, allowed rapid recovery of intestinal cell proliferation and reversal of aging features in most mice. These results suggest that p16-mediated inhibition of Cdk activity is sufficient to inhibit cell proliferation and impose aging features in somatic tissues of mammals and that at least some of these aging features are reversible. PMID:25481981

  6. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein complements adenovirus type 5 E1A amino-terminus-dependent transactivation of adenovirus type 5 early genes and increases ATF and Oct-1 DNA binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, H K; Ziff, E B

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that conserved region 1 (CR1) of the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1A protein synergizes with CR3 in the transactivation of Ad5 early genes (H.K. Wong and E. B. Ziff, J. Virol. 68:4910-4920, 1994). CR1 lies within the E1A amino terminus and binds host regulatory proteins such as the RB protein, p107, p130, and p300. Since simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E7 protein also bind host regulatory factors, we investigated whether these viral proteins can complement E1A mutants which are defective in early gene activation. We show that the HPV16 E7 protein but not SV40 T antigen can complement mutations in the Ad5 E1A CR1 in the transactivation of viral early promoters. The inability of SV40 T antigen to complement suggests that RB binding on its own is not sufficient for early promoter transactivation by the E1A amino terminus. Nuclear runoff assays show that complementation by HPV16 E7 restores the ability of the E1A mutants to stimulate early gene expression at the level of transcription. Furthermore, nuclear extracts from the E7-transformed cells show increased binding activity of ATF and Oct-1, factors that can recognize the elements of Ad5 early genes, consistent with gene activation by E1A and E7 at the transcriptional level. PMID:8523545

  7. Protein and DNA elements involved in transactivation of the promoter of the bovine herpesvirus (BHV) 1 IE-1 transcription unit by the BHV alpha gene trans-inducing factor.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, V; Bratanich, A C; Carpenter, D; O'Hare, P

    1994-01-01

    In herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells, the transcription of immediate-early (alpha) genes is regulated by a virion component, the alpha gene trans-inducing factor (alpha TIF). This protein forms a complex with cellular factors and TAATGARAT motifs present in one or more copies in the promoters of all alpha genes. We have characterized the bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) homolog of this protein. Like its HSV counterpart, the BHV alpha TIF was synthesized in the later stages of infection and could be demonstrated to be a component of purified virions. In transient expression assays, BHV alpha TIF was a strong transactivator and stimulated the activity of IE-1, the major BHV-1 alpha gene promoter, with an efficiency comparable to that of HSV alpha TIF. This stimulation was largely dependent on a TAATGAGCT sequence present in a single copy in IE-1, and BHV alpha TIF, in conjunction with cellular factors, formed a complex with oligonucleotides containing this sequence. Despite these similarities between the two alpha TIFs, our preliminary observations suggest that the proteins may activate transcription by different mechanisms. Although BHV alpha TIF strongly transactivated IE-1, it differed from its HSV counterpart in that the carboxyl terminus of BHV alpha TIF, when fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4, was a relatively poor stimulator of a promoter containing GAL4-binding sites. Also unlike HSV alpha TIF, removal of the carboxyl terminus of BHV alpha TIF reduced but did not eliminate the ability of the protein to transactivate IE-1. These results are discussed in view of the structural similarities and differences among the alpha TIFs of alphaherpes-viruses. Images PMID:8035488

  8. Mechanisms of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Inhibition by Lysyl-Peptidyl-Anthraquinone Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sosic, Alice; Sinigaglia, Laura; Cappellini, Marta; Carli, Ilaria; Parolin, Cristina; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Rovero, Paolo; Fabris, Dan; Gatto, Barbara

    2016-01-20

    The Nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone responsible for essential steps of the HIV-1 life cycle and an attractive candidate for drug development. NC destabilizes nucleic acid structures and promotes the formation of annealed substrates for HIV-1 reverse transcription elongation. Short helical nucleic acid segments bordered by bulges and loops, such as the Trans-Activation Response element (TAR) of HIV-1 and its complementary sequence (cTAR), are nucleation elements for helix destabilization by NC and also preferred recognition sites for threading intercalators. Inspired by these observations, we have recently demonstrated that 2,6-disubstituted peptidyl-anthraquinone-conjugates inhibit the chaperone activities of recombinant NC in vitro, and that inhibition correlates with the stabilization of TAR and cTAR stem-loop structures. We describe here enhanced NC inhibitory activity by novel conjugates that exhibit longer peptidyl chains ending with a conserved N-terminal lysine. Their efficient inhibition of TAR/cTAR annealing mediated by NC originates from the combination of at least three different mechanisms, namely, their stabilizing effects on nucleic acids dynamics by threading intercalation, their ability to target TAR RNA substrate leading to a direct competition with the protein for the same binding sites on TAR, and, finally, their effective binding to the NC protein. Our results suggest that these molecules may represent the stepping-stone for the future development of NC-inhibitors capable of targeting the protein itself and its recognition site in RNA. PMID:26666402

  9. COUP-TFII inhibits NFkappaB activation in endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Lacey M; Appana, Savitri N; Datta, Susmita; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2014-01-25

    Reduced COUP-TFII expression contributes to endocrine resistance in breast cancer cells. Endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells have higher NFkappa B (NFκB) activity and target gene expression. The goal of this study was to determine if COUP-TFII modulates NFκB activity. Endocrine-resistant LCC9 cells with low endogenous COUP-TFII displayed ∼5-fold higher basal NFκB activity than parental endocrine-sensitive MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Transient transfection of LCC9 cells with COUP-TFII inhibited NFκB activation and reduced NFκB target gene expression. COUP-TFII and NFκB were inversely correlated in breast cancer patient samples. Endogenous COUP-TFII coimmunoprecipitated with NFκB subunits RelB and NFκB1 in MCF-7 cells. COUP-TFII inhibited NFκB-DNA binding in vitro and impaired coactivator induced NFκB transactivation. LCC9 cells were growth-inhibited by an NFκB inhibitor and 4-hydroxytamoxifen compared to MCF-7 cells. Together these data indicate a novel role for COUP-TFII in suppression of NFκB activity and explain, in part, why decreased COUP-TFII expression results in an endocrine-resistant phenotype. PMID:24141032

  10. Prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of wild type BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Hui Ethan; Walker, Ameae M

    2016-06-01

    Even though mutations in the tumor suppressor, BRCA1, markedly increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, most breast and ovarian cancers express wild type BRCA1. An important question is therefore how the tumor-suppressive function of normal BRCA1 is overcome during development of most cancers. Because prolactin promotes these and other cancers, we investigated the hypothesis that prolactin interferes with the ability of BRCA1 to inhibit the cell cycle. Examining six different cancer cell lines with wild type BRCA1, and making use of both prolactin and the growth-inhibiting selective prolactin receptor modulator, S179D PRL, we demonstrate that prolactin activation of Stat5 results in the formation of a complex between phospho-Stat5 and BRCA1. Formation of this complex does not interfere with nuclear translocation or binding of BRCA1 to the p21 promoter, but does interfere with the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate the p21 promoter. Overexpression of a dominant-negative Stat5 in prolactin-stimulated cells resulted in increased p21 expression. We conclude that prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of BRCA1 by interfering with BRCA1's upregulation of expression of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21. PMID:26970274

  11. Nuclear Factor 90(NF90) targeted to TAR RNA inhibits transcriptional activation of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Agbottah, Emmanuel T; Traviss, Christine; McArdle, James; Karki, Sambhav; St Laurent, Georges C; Kumar, Ajit

    2007-01-01

    Background Examination of host cell-based inhibitors of HIV-1 transcription may be important for attenuating viral replication. We describe properties of a cellular double-stranded RNA binding protein with intrinsic affinity for HIV-1 TAR RNA that interferes with Tat/TAR interaction and inhibits viral gene expression. Results Utilizing TAR affinity fractionation, North-Western blotting, and mobility-shift assays, we show that the C-terminal variant of nuclear factor 90 (NF90ctv) with strong affinity for the TAR RNA, competes with Tat/TAR interaction in vitro. Analysis of the effect of NF90ctv-TAR RNA interaction in vivo showed significant inhibition of Tat-transactivation of HIV-1 LTR in cells expressing NF90ctv, as well as changes in histone H3 lysine-4 and lysine-9 methylation of HIV chromatin that are consistent with the epigenetic changes in transcriptionally repressed gene. Conclusion Structural integrity of the TAR element is crucial in HIV-1 gene expression. Our results show that perturbation Tat/TAR RNA interaction by the dsRNA binding protein is sufficient to inhibit transcriptional activation of HIV-1. PMID:17565699

  12. Inhibition of ERK Oscillations by Ionizing Radiation and Reactive Oxygen Species

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Chrisler, William B; Sontag, Ryan L; Weber, Thomas J

    2010-12-28

    The shuttling of activated protein kinases between the cytoplasm and nucleus is an essential feature of normal growth factor signaling cascades. Here we demonstrate that transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) induces oscillations in extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) cytoplasmic-nuclear translocations in human keratinocytes. TGFα-dependent ERK oscillations mediated through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are inhibited by low dose X-irradiation (10 cGy) and low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (0.32–3.26 µM H2O2) used as a model reactive oxygen species (ROS). A fluorescent indicator dye (H2-DCFDA) was used to measure cellular ROS levels following X-irradiation, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and H2O2. X-irradiation did not generate significant ROS production while 0.32 µM H2O2 and TPA induced significant increases in ROS levels with H2O2 > TPA. TPA alone induced transactivation of the EGFR but did not induce ERK oscillations. TPA as a cotreatment did not inhibit TGFα-stimulated ERK oscillations but qualitatively altered TGFα-dependent ERK oscillation characteristics (amplitude, time-period). Collectively, these observations demonstrate that TGFα-induced ERK oscillations are inhibited by ionizing radiation/ROS and perturbed by epigenetic carcinogen in human keratinocytes. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Residues R{sup 199}H{sup 200} of prototype foamy virus transactivator Bel1 contribute to its binding with LTR and IP promoters but not its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Qinglin; Tan, Juan; Cui, Xiaoxu; Luo, Di; Yu, Miao; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2014-01-20

    Prototype foamy virus encodes a transactivator called Bel1 that enhances viral gene transcription and is essential for PFV replication. Nuclear localization of Bel1 has been reported to rely on two proximal basic motifs R{sup 199}H{sup 200} and R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} that likely function together as a bipartite nuclear localization signal. In this study, we report that mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}, but not R{sup 199}H{sup 200}, relocates Bel1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, suggesting an essential role for R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} in the nuclear localization of Bel1. Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. Results of EMSA reveal that the R{sup 199}H{sup 200} residues are vital for the binding of Bel1 to viral promoter DNA. Moreover, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}. Collectively, our findings suggest that R{sup 199}H{sup 200} directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA and are indispensible for Bel1 transactivation activity. - Highlights: • The R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} residues are essential for the nuclear localization of Bel1. • Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. • The R{sup 199}H{sup 200} residues directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA. • Mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}.

  14. MYBPH inhibits NM IIA assembly via direct interaction with NMHC IIA and reduces cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, Yasuyuki; Usukura, Jiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Motoshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH inhibits NMHC IIA assembly and cell motility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH interacts to assembly-competent NM IIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA. -- Abstract: Actomyosin filament assembly is a critical step in tumor cell migration. We previously found that myosin binding protein H (MYBPH) is directly transactivated by the TTF-1 lineage-survival oncogene in lung adenocarcinomas and inhibits phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) of non-muscle myosin IIA (NM IIA) via direct interaction with Rho kinase 1 (ROCK1). Here, we report that MYBPH also directly interacts with an additional molecule, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMHC IIA), which was found to occur between MYBPH and the rod portion of NMHC IIA. MYBPH inhibited NMHC IIA assembly and reduced cell motility. Conversely, siMYBPH-induced increased motility was partially, yet significantly, suppressed by blebbistatin, a non-muscle myosin II inhibitor, while more profound effects were attained by combined treatment with siROCK1 and blebbistatin. Electron microscopy observations showed well-ordered paracrystals of NMHC IIA reflecting an assembled state, which were significantly less frequently observed in the presence of MYBPH. Furthermore, an in vitro sedimentation assay showed that a greater amount of NMHC IIA was in an unassembled state in the presence of MYBPH. Interestingly, treatment with a ROCK inhibitor that impairs transition of NM IIA from an assembly-incompetent to assembly-competent state reduced the interaction between MYBPH and NMHC IIA, suggesting that MYBPH has higher affinity to assembly-competent NM IIA. These results suggest that MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA, and negatively regulates actomyosin organization at 2 distinct steps, resulting in firm inhibition of NM IIA assembly.

  15. Inhibiting the Activity of CA1 Hippocampal Neurons Prevents the Recall of Contextual Fear Memory in Inducible ArchT Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Kim, Karam; Yu, Lily Mae Yee; Hashikawa, Yoshiko; Sekine, Yukiko; Okumura, Yuki; Kawano, Masako; Hayashi, Masanobu; Kumar, Deependra; Boyden, Edward S.; McHugh, Thomas J.; Hayashi, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    The optogenetic manipulation of light-activated ion-channels/pumps (i.e., opsins) can reversibly activate or suppress neuronal activity with precise temporal control. Therefore, optogenetic techniques hold great potential to establish causal relationships between specific neuronal circuits and their function in freely moving animals. Due to the critical role of the hippocampal CA1 region in memory function, we explored the possibility of targeting an inhibitory opsin, ArchT, to CA1 pyramidal neurons in mice. We established a transgenic mouse line in which tetracycline trans-activator induces ArchT expression. By crossing this line with a CaMKIIα-tTA transgenic line, the delivery of light via an implanted optrode inhibits the activity of excitatory CA1 neurons. We found that light delivery to the hippocampus inhibited the recall of a contextual fear memory. Our results demonstrate that this optogenetic mouse line can be used to investigate the neuronal circuits underlying behavior. PMID:26075894

  16. Two phenylalanines in the C-terminus of Epstein-Barr virus Rta protein reciprocally modulate its DNA binding and transactivation function

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.-W.; Raghavan, Vineetha; Chang, Pey-Jium; Shedd, Duane; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2009-04-10

    The Rta (R transactivator) protein plays an essential role in the Epstein-Barr viral (EBV) lytic cascade. Rta activates viral gene expression by several mechanisms including direct and indirect binding to target viral promoters, synergy with EBV ZEBRA protein, and stimulation of cellular signaling pathways. We previously found that Rta proteins with C-terminal truncations of 30 aa were markedly enhanced in their capacity to bind DNA (Chen, L.W., Chang, P.J., Delecluse, H.J., and Miller, G., (2005). Marked variation in response of consensus binding elements for the Rta protein of Epstein-Barr virus. J. Virol. 79(15), 9635-9650.). Here we show that two phenylalanines (F600 and F605) in the C-terminus of Rta play a crucial role in mediating this DNA binding inhibitory function. Amino acids 555 to 605 of Rta constitute a functional DNA binding inhibitory sequence (DBIS) that markedly decreased DNA binding when transferred to a minimal DNA binding domain of Rta (aa 1-350). Alanine substitution mutants, F600A/F605A, abolished activity of the DBIS. F600 and F605 are located in the transcriptional activation domain of Rta. Alanine substitutions, F600A/F605A, decreased transcriptional activation by Rta protein, whereas aromatic substitutions, such as F600Y/F605Y or F600W/F605W, partially restored transcriptional activation. Full-length Rta protein with F600A/F605A mutations were enhanced in DNA binding compared to wild-type, whereas Rta proteins with F600Y/F605Y or F600W/F605W substitutions were, like wild-type Rta, relatively poor DNA binders. GAL4 (1-147)/Rta (416-605) fusion proteins with F600A/F605A mutations were diminished in transcriptional activation, relative to GAL4/Rta chimeras without such mutations. The results suggest that, in the context of a larger DBIS, F600 and F605 play a role in the reciprocal regulation of DNA binding and transcriptional activation by Rta. Regulation of DNA binding by Rta is likely to be important in controlling its different modes of

  17. Saccadic Inhibition in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reingold, Eyal M.; Stampe, Dave M.

    2004-01-01

    In 5 experiments, participants read text that was briefly replaced by a transient image for 33 ms at random intervals. A decrease in saccadic frequency, referred to as saccadic inhibition, occurred as early as 60-70 ms following the onset of abrupt changes in visual input. It was demonstrated that the saccadic inhibition was influenced by the…

  18. Strategies Targeting Telomerase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaping; Li, Yuanyuan; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2008-01-01

    Telomerase plays a pivotal role in cellular immortality and tumorigenesis. Its activity is normally not detectable in most somatic cells while it is reactivated in the vast majority of cancer cells. Therefore, inhibition of telomerase has been viewed as a promising anticancer approach due to its specificity for cancer cells. Studies so far have shown that telomerase inhibition can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells or cause apoptosis while it has no effect on most normal cells. Strategies currently being applied to induce telomerase inhibition target virtually all of the major components of the ribonucleoprotein holoenzyme and related cell signal pathways that regulate its activity. These strategies include inhibition of telomerase through targeting at the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) catalytic subunit, the telomerase RNA (TR) component, and associated proteins. Other strategies have been developed to target the proteins associated with telomerase at the telomeric ends of chromosomes such as tankyrase. The specific mechanisms that mediate those inhibition effects include small molecules, antisense RNA, and ribozymes. Although the beneficial evidence of telomerase inhibition is obvious, limitations of strategies remain to be resolved to increase the feasibility of clinical application. This analysis will summarize recent developments of strategies in telomerase inhibition. PMID:18956258

  19. 2-Cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oic acid and related compounds inhibit growth of colon cancer cells through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Papineni, Sabitha; Konopleva, Marina; Andreef, Michael; Samudio, Ismael; Safe, Stephen

    2005-07-01

    2-Cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO) and the corresponding methyl (CDDO-Me) and imidazole (CDDO-Im) esters induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma)-dependent transactivation in SW-480 colon cancer cells, and these responses were inhibited by small inhibitory RNA for PPARgamma. Moreover, in a mammalian two-hybrid assay using the PPARgamma(2)-VP16 fusion plasmid and GAL4-coactivator/corepressor chimeras and a construct (pGAL4) containing five tandem GAL4 response elements, CDDO, CDDO-Me, and CDDO-IM induce transactivation and PPARgamma interaction with multiple coactivators. A major difference among the three PPARgamma agonists was the higher activity of CDDO-Im to induce PPARgamma interactions with the corepressor SMRT. CDDO, CDDO-Me, and CDDO-Im inhibited SW-480, HCT-116, and HT-29 colon cancer cell proliferation at low concentrations and induced cell death at higher concentrations. Growth inhibition at lower concentrations correlated with induction of the tumor suppressor gene caveolin-1 which is known to inhibit colon cancer cell growth. Induction of caveolin-1 by CDDO, CDDO-Me, and CDDO-Im was inhibited by the PPARgamma antagonist N-(4'-aminopyridyl-2-chloro-5-nitrobenzamide (T007), whereas higher doses induced apoptosis [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage], which was not inhibited by T007. These results illustrate that CDDO-, CDDO-Me, and CDDO-Im induce both PPARgamma-dependent and -independent responses in colon cancer cells, and activation of these pathways are separable and concentration-dependent for all three compounds. PMID:15798084

  20. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  1. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  2. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  3. Methods of Telomerase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Lucy G.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Telomerase is central to cellular immortality and is a key component of most cancer cells although this enzyme is rarely expressed to significant levels in normal cells. Therefore, the inhibition of telomerase has garnered considerable attention as a possible anticancer approach. Many of the methods applied to telomerase inhibition focus on either of the two major components of the ribonucleoprotein holoenzyme, that is, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) catalytic subunit or the telomerase RNA (TR) component. Other protocols have been developed to target the proteins, such as tankyrase, that are associated with telomerase at the ends of chromosomes. This chapter summarizes some of these recent advances in telomerase inhibition. PMID:18369812

  4. Resveratrol Inhibits Ionising Irradiation-Induced Inflammation in MSCs by Activating SIRT1 and Limiting NLRP-3 Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Du, Liqing; Xu, Chang; Cao, Jia; Fan, Tiqiang; Liu, Jianxiang; Su, Xu; Fan, Saijun; Liu, Qiang; Fan, Feiyue

    2013-01-01

    IL-1β, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, has been shown to contribute to radiation injury. Sirt1, an NAD+-dependent class III protein deacetylase, plays an important role in the regulation of the proinflammatory cytokines involved in inflammation-associated diseases. The relationship between Sirt1 and IL-1β, however, has remained elusive. The present study was designed to explore the potential effect of Sirt1 on IL-1β expression induced by radiation and to provide a new target for the development of radiation protection drugs. Our results showed that radiation significantly increased IL-1β mRNA and protein expression and that pretreatment with resveratrol, a Sirt1 activator, inhibited the radiation-induced IL-1β expression in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the knockdown or inhibition of Sirt1 by nicotinamide significantly enhanced radiation-induced IL-1β expression. This effect can likely be attributed to Sirt1-mediated inhibition of NLRP-3 inflammasome activation because Sirt1 inhibits the transactivation potential of NF-κb by deacetylation, which then suppresses NLRP3 transcription. Taken together, the results demonstrate that Sirt1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects by regulating NLRP3 expression partially through the NF-κb pathway in mesenchymal stem cells. More importantly, our findings suggest that resveratrol is an effective agent in protecting against radiation injury, and we provide a theoretical basis for developing a drug to protect against radiation injury by targeting Sirt1. PMID:23880858

  5. Structure-dependent inhibition of the ETS-family transcription factor PU.1 by novel heterocyclic diamidines

    PubMed Central

    Munde, Manoj; Wang, Shuo; Kumar, Arvind; Stephens, Chad E.; Farahat, Abdelbasset A.; Boykin, David W.; Wilson, W. David; Poon, Gregory M. K.

    2014-01-01

    ETS transcription factors mediate a wide array of cellular functions and are attractive targets for pharmacological control of gene regulation. We report the inhibition of the ETS-family member PU.1 with a panel of novel heterocyclic diamidines. These diamidines are derivatives of furamidine (DB75) in which the central furan has been replaced with selenophene and/or one or both of the bridging phenyl has been replaced with benzimidazole. Like all ETS proteins, PU.1 binds sequence specifically to 10-bp sites by inserting a recognition helix into the major groove of a 5′-GGAA-3′ consensus, accompanied by contacts with the flanking minor groove. We showed that diamidines target the minor groove of AT-rich sequences on one or both sides of the consensus and disrupt PU.1 binding. Although all of the diamidines bind to one or both of the expected sequences within the binding site, considerable heterogeneity exists in terms of stoichiometry, site–site interactions and induced DNA conformation. We also showed that these compounds accumulate in live cell nuclei and inhibit PU.1-dependent gene transactivation. This study demonstrates that heterocyclic diamidines are capable of inhibiting PU.1 by targeting the flanking sequences and supports future efforts to develop agents for inhibiting specific members of the ETS family. PMID:24157839

  6. JAZ mediates G1 cell cycle arrest by interacting with and inhibiting E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingli; Wu, Song; Jia, Jinghua

    2011-01-01

    We discovered and reported JAZ as a unique dsRNA binding zinc finger protein that functions as a direct, positive regulator of p53 transcriptional activity to mediate G1 cell cycle arrest in a mechanism involving upregulation of the p53 target gene, p21. We now find that JAZ can also negatively regulate the cell cycle in a novel, p53-independent mechanism resulting from the direct interaction with E2F1, a key intermediate in regulating cell proliferation and tumor suppression. JAZ associates with E2F1's central DNA binding/dimerization region and its C-terminal transactivation domain. Functionally, JAZ represses E2F1 transcriptional activity in association with repression of cyclin A expression and inhibition of G1/S transition. This mechanism involves JAZ-mediated inhibition of E2F1's specific DNA binding activity. JAZ directly binds E2F1 in vitro in a dsRNA-independent manner, and JAZ's dsRNA binding ZF domains, which are necessary for localizing JAZ to the nucleus, are required for repression of transcriptional activity in vivo. Importantly for specificity, siRNA-mediated “knockdown” of endogenous JAZ increases E2F transcriptional activity and releases cells from G1 arrest, indicating a necessary role for JAZ in this transition. Although JAZ can directly inhibit E2F1 activity independently of p53, if functional p53 is expressed, JAZ may exert a more potent inhibition of cell cycle following growth factor withdrawal. Therefore, JAZ plays a dual role in cell cycle regulation by both repressing E2F1 transcriptional activity and activating p53 to facilitate efficient growth arrest in response to cellular stress, which may potentially be exploited therapeutically for tumor growth inhibition. PMID:21715977

  7. AOP description: Acetylcholinesterase inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This adverse outcome pathway (AOP) leverages existing knowledge in the open literature to describe the linkage between inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the subsequent mortality resulting from impacts at cholinergic receptors. The AOP takes a chemical category approa...

  8. Method for inhibiting corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Stapp, P. R.

    1985-12-03

    A composition comprising the reaction adduct or neutralized product resulting from the reaction of a maleic anhydride and an oil containing a polynuclear aromatic compound is provided which, when applied to a metal surface, forms a corrosion-inhibiting film thereon. The composition is particularly useful in the treatment of down-hole metal surfaces in oil and gas wells to inhibit the corrosion of the metal.

  9. p-HPEA-EDA, a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, activates AMP-activated protein kinase to inhibit carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Prem; Oh, Won-Keun; Yun, Hyo Jeong; Namgoong, Gwang Mo; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Kwon, Seong-Min; Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Choi, Hong Seok

    2011-04-01

    Phenolic constituents of virgin olive oil are reported to have antitumor activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and specific target proteins of virgin olive oil remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycone (p-HPEA-EDA), a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, inhibits tumor promoter-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells and suppress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumorigenicity by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in HT-29 cells. p-HPEA-EDA inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and p90RSK in JB6 Cl41 cells, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation, activator protein-1 transactivation and cell transformation promoted by TPA. Moreover, p-HPEA-EDA strongly inhibited the cell viability and COX-2 expression by activation of AMPK activity in HT-29 cells, resulted from depletion of intracellular adenosine triphosphate. p-HPEA-EDA-induced activation of caspase-3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase, phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and DNA fragmentation in HT-29 cells, leading to apoptosis. Importantly, p-HPEA-EDA suppressed the colony formation of HT-29 cells in soft agar. In contrast, Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor, blocked the p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited colony formation in HT-29 cells. In vivo chorioallantoic membrane assay also showed that p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited tumorigenicity of HT-29 cells. These findings revealed that targeted activation of AMPK and inhibition of COX-2 expression by p-HPEA-EDA contribute to the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential of virgin olive oil against colon cancer cells. PMID:21216846

  10. CAMK2N1 inhibits prostate cancer progression through androgen receptor-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Guo, Shuiming; Liu, Zhuo; Wu, Licheng; Li, Mingchao; Yang, Jun; Chen, Ruibao; Liu, Xiaming; Xu, Hua; Cai, Shaoxin; Chen, Hui; Li, Weiyong; Xu, Shaohua; Wang, Liang; Hu, Zhiquan; Zhuang, Qianyuan; Wang, Liping; Wu, Kongming; Liu, Jihong; Ye, Zhangqun; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Wang, Chenguang; Chen, Ke

    2014-11-15

    Castration resistance is a major obstacle to hormonal therapy for prostate cancer patients. Although androgen independence of prostate cancer growth is a known contributing factor to endocrine resistance, the mechanism of androgen receptor deregulation in endocrine resistance is still poorly understood. Herein, the CAMK2N1 was shown to contribute to the human prostate cancer cell growth and survival through AR-dependent signaling. Reduced expression of CAMK2N1 was correlated to recurrence-free survival of prostate cancer patients with high levels of AR expression in their tumor. CAMK2N1 and AR signaling form an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop: CAMK2N1 expression was down-regulated by AR activation; while CAMK2N1 inhibited AR expression and transactivation through CAMKII and AKT pathways. Knockdown of CAMK2N1 in prostate cancer cells alleviated Casodex inhibition of cell growth, while re-expression of CAMK2N1 in castration-resistant cells sensitized the cells to Casodex treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that CAMK2N1 plays a tumor suppressive role and serves as a crucial determinant of the resistance of prostate cancer to endocrine therapies. PMID:25296973

  11. Galvanic zinc-copper microparticles inhibit melanogenesis via multiple pigmentary pathways.

    PubMed

    Won, Yen-Kim; Lin, Connie B; Seiberg, Miri; Chen, Nannan; Hu, Yaping; Rossetti, Dianne; Saliou, Claude; Loy, Chong-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous electrical field of human skin plays an important role in many skin functions. However, the biological effects and mechanism of action of externally applied electrical stimulation on skin remain unclear. Recent study showed that galvanic zinc-copper microparticles produce electrical stimulation and reduce inflammatory and immune responses in intact skin, suggesting the important role of electrical stimulation in non-wounded skin. The objective of this study is to investigate the biological effect of galvanic zinc-copper microparticles on skin pigmentation. Our findings showed that galvanic zinc-copper microparticles inhibited melanogenesis in a human melanoma cell line (MNT-1), human keratinocytes and melanoma cells co-cultures, and in pigmented epidermal equivalents. Treatment of galvanic zinc-copper microparticles inhibited melanogenesis by reducing the promoter transactivation of tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-1 in human melanoma cells. In a co-culture Transwell system of keratinocytes and melanoma cells, galvanic zinc-copper microparticles reduced melanin production via downregulation of endothelin-1 secretion from keratinocytes and reduced tyrosinase gene expression in melanoma cells. In addition, exposure of pigmented epidermal equivalents to galvanic zinc-copper microparticles resulted in reduced melanin deposition. In conclusion, our data demonstrated for the first time that galvanic zinc-copper microparticles reduced melanogenesis in melanoma cells and melanin deposition in pigmented epidermal equivalents by affecting multiple pigmentary pathways. PMID:23700242

  12. BRCA1 and its phosphorylation involved in caffeine-inhibitable event upstream of G2 checkpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Yanling; Hao, Jifang

    2010-07-01

    Caffeine, which specifically inhibits ATM/ATR kinases, efficiently abrogates the ionizing radiation (IR)-induced G2 arrest and increases the sensitivity of various tumor cells to IR. Mechanisms for the effect of caffeine remain to be elucidated. As a target of ATM/ATR kinases, BRCA1 becomes activated and phosphorylated in response to IR. Thus, in this work, we investigated the possible role of BRCA1 in the effect of caffeine on G2 checkpoint and observed how BRCA1 phosphorylation was regulated in this process. For these purposes, the BRCA1 protein level and the phosphorylation states were analyzed by Western blotting by using an antibody against BRCA1 and phospho-specific antibodies against Ser-1423 and Ser-1524 residues in cells exposed to a combination of IR and caffeine. The results showed that caffeine down-regulated IR-induced BRCA1 expression and specifically abolished BRCA1 phosphorylation of Ser-1524, which was followed by an override of G2 arrest by caffeine. In addition, the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate p21 may be required for MCF-7 but not necessary for Hela response to caffeine. These data suggest that BRCA1 may be a potential target of caffeine. BRCA1 and its phosphorylation are most likely to be involved in the caffeine-inhibitable event upstream of G2 arrest.

  13. Blocking p55PIK signaling inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation of leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Deng, Y; Cao, X; Lai, S; Tong, Y; Luo, X; Feng, Y; Xia, X; Gong, J; Hu, J

    2012-11-01

    p55PIK, a regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases, promotes cell cycle progression by interacting with cell cycle modulators such as retinoblastoma protein (Rb) via its unique amino-terminal 24 amino-acid residue (N24). Overexpression of N24 specifically inhibits these interactions and leads to cell cycle arrest. Herein, we describe the generation of a fusion protein (Tat transactivator protein (TAT)-N24) that contains the protein transduction domain and N24, and examined its effects on the proliferation and differentiation of leukemia cells. TAT-N24 not only blocks cell proliferation but remarkably induces differentiation of leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. Systemically administered TAT-N24 also significantly decreases growth of leukemia cell tumors in animal models. Furthermore, overexpression of p55PIK in leukemia cells leads to increased proliferation; however, TAT-N24 blocks this effect and concomitantly induces differentiation. There is significant upregulation of p55PIK mRNA and protein expression in leukemia cells from patients. TAT-N24 inhibits cell cycle progression and induces differentiation of bone marrow cells derived from patients with several different types of leukemia. These results show that cell-permeable N24 peptide induces leukemia cell differentiation and suggest that p55PIK may be a novel drug target for the treatment of hematopoetic malignancies. PMID:22722333

  14. Pharmacologic efficacy of PU.1 inhibition by heterocyclic dications: a mechanistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Dominique C; Kim, Hye Mi; Kumar, Arvind; Farahat, Abdelbasset A; Boykin, David W; K Poon, Gregory M

    2016-05-19

    Heterocyclic dications are receiving increasing attention as targeted inhibitors of transcription factors. While many dications act as purely competitive inhibitors, some fail to displace protein efficiently at drug concentrations expected to saturate their DNA target. To achieve a mechanistic understanding of these non-competitive effects, we used a combination of dications, which are intrinsically fluorescent and spectrally-separated fluorescently labeled DNA to dissect complex interactions in multi-component drug/DNA/protein systems. Specifically, we interrogated site-specific binding by the transcription factor PU.1 and its perturbation by DB270, a furan-bisbenzimidazole-diamidine that strongly targets PU.1 binding sites yet poorly inhibits PU.1/DNA complexes. By titrating DB270 and/or cyanine-labeled DNA with protein or unlabeled DNA, and following the changes in their fluorescence polarization, we found direct evidence that DB270 bound protein independently of their mutual affinities for sequence-specific DNA. Each of the three species competed for the other two, and this interplay of mutually dependent equilibria abrogated DB270's inhibitory activity, which was substantively restored under conditions that attenuated DB270/PU.1 binding. PU.1 binding was consistent with DB270's poor inhibitory efficacy of PU.1 in vivo, while its isosteric selenophene analog (DB1976), which did not bind PU.1 and strongly inhibited the PU.1/DNA complex in vitro, fully antagonized PU.1-dependent transactivation in vivo. PMID:27079976

  15. Drug 9AA reactivates p21/Waf1 and Inhibits HIV-1 progeny formation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weilin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Pedati, Caitlin; Zweier, Lynnsey; Castro, Iris; Klase, Zachary; Dowd, Cynthia S; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Bukrinsky, Michael; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2008-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the p53 pathway plays an important role in HIV-1 infection. Previous work from our lab has established a model demonstrating how p53 could become inactivated in HIV-1 infected cells through binding to Tat. Subsequently, p53 was inactivated and lost its ability to transactivate its downstream target gene p21/waf1. P21/waf1 is a well-known cdk inhibitor (CKI) that can lead to cell cycle arrest upon DNA damage. Most recently, the p21/waf1 function was further investigated as a molecular barrier for HIV-1 infection of stem cells. Therefore, we reason that the restoration of the p53 and p21/waf1 pathways could be a possible theraputical arsenal for combating HIV-1 infection. In this current study, we show that a small chemical molecule, 9-aminoacridine (9AA) at low concentrations, could efficiently reactivate p53 pathway and thereby restoring the p21/waf1 function. Further, we show that the 9AA could significantly inhibit virus replication in activated PBMCs, likely through a mechanism of inhibiting the viral replication machinery. A mechanism study reveals that the phosphorylated p53ser15 may be dissociated from binding to HIV-1 Tat protein, thereby activating the p21/waf1 gene. Finally, we also show that the 9AA-activated p21/waf1 is recruited to HIV-1 preintegration complex, through a mechanism yet to be elucidated. PMID:18348731

  16. Pharmacologic efficacy of PU.1 inhibition by heterocyclic dications: a mechanistic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Dominique C.; Kim, Hye Mi; Kumar, Arvind; Farahat, Abdelbasset A.; Boykin, David W.; K. Poon, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Heterocyclic dications are receiving increasing attention as targeted inhibitors of transcription factors. While many dications act as purely competitive inhibitors, some fail to displace protein efficiently at drug concentrations expected to saturate their DNA target. To achieve a mechanistic understanding of these non-competitive effects, we used a combination of dications, which are intrinsically fluorescent and spectrally-separated fluorescently labeled DNA to dissect complex interactions in multi-component drug/DNA/protein systems. Specifically, we interrogated site-specific binding by the transcription factor PU.1 and its perturbation by DB270, a furan-bisbenzimidazole-diamidine that strongly targets PU.1 binding sites yet poorly inhibits PU.1/DNA complexes. By titrating DB270 and/or cyanine-labeled DNA with protein or unlabeled DNA, and following the changes in their fluorescence polarization, we found direct evidence that DB270 bound protein independently of their mutual affinities for sequence-specific DNA. Each of the three species competed for the other two, and this interplay of mutually dependent equilibria abrogated DB270's inhibitory activity, which was substantively restored under conditions that attenuated DB270/PU.1 binding. PU.1 binding was consistent with DB270's poor inhibitory efficacy of PU.1 in vivo, while its isosteric selenophene analog (DB1976), which did not bind PU.1 and strongly inhibited the PU.1/DNA complex in vitro, fully antagonized PU.1-dependent transactivation in vivo. PMID:27079976

  17. Brown Pine Leaf Extract and Its Active Component Trans-Communic Acid Inhibit UVB-Induced MMP-1 Expression by Targeting PI3K.

    PubMed

    Huh, Won Bum; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kang, Young-Gyu; Park, Gaeun; Lim, Tae-gyu; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Song, Da Som; Jeong, Eun Hee; Lee, Charles C; Son, Joe Eun; Seo, Sang Gwon; Lee, Eunjung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Lee, Chang Yong; Park, Jun Seong; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) is widely present in China, Japan, and Korea. Its green pine leaves have traditionally been used as a food as well as a coloring agent. After being shed, pine leaves change their color from green to brown within two years, and although the brown pine leaves are abundantly available, their value has not been closely assessed. In this study, we investigated the potential anti-photoaging properties of brown pine leaves for skin. Brown pine leaf extract (BPLE) inhibited UVB-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) expression to a greater extent than pine leaf extract (PLE) in human keratinocytes and a human skin equivalent model. HPLC analysis revealed that the quantity of trans-communic acid (TCA) and dehydroabietic acid (DAA) significantly increases when the pine leaf color changes from green to brown. BPLE and TCA elicited reductions in UVB-induced MMP-1 mRNA expression and activator protein-1 (AP-1) transactivation by reducing DNA binding activity of phospho-c-Jun, c-fos and Fra-1. BPLE and TCA also inhibited UVB-induced Akt phosphorylation, but not mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), known regulators of AP-1 transactivation. We additionally found that BPLE and TCA inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), the upstream kinase of Akt, in vitro. In summary, both BPLE and its active component TCA exhibit protective effects against UVB-induced skin aging. Taken together, these findings underline the potential for BPLE and TCA to be utilized as anti-wrinkling agents and cosmetic ingredients, as they suppress UVB-induced MMP-1 expression. PMID:26066652

  18. Brown Pine Leaf Extract and Its Active Component Trans-Communic Acid Inhibit UVB-Induced MMP-1 Expression by Targeting PI3K

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gaeun; Lim, Tae-gyu; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Song, Da Som; Jeong, Eun Hee; Lee, Charles C.; Son, Joe Eun; Seo, Sang Gwon; Lee, Eunjung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Lee, Chang Yong; Park, Jun Seong; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) is widely present in China, Japan, and Korea. Its green pine leaves have traditionally been used as a food as well as a coloring agent. After being shed, pine leaves change their color from green to brown within two years, and although the brown pine leaves are abundantly available, their value has not been closely assessed. In this study, we investigated the potential anti-photoaging properties of brown pine leaves for skin. Brown pine leaf extract (BPLE) inhibited UVB-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) expression to a greater extent than pine leaf extract (PLE) in human keratinocytes and a human skin equivalent model. HPLC analysis revealed that the quantity of trans-communic acid (TCA) and dehydroabietic acid (DAA) significantly increases when the pine leaf color changes from green to brown. BPLE and TCA elicited reductions in UVB-induced MMP-1 mRNA expression and activator protein-1 (AP-1) transactivation by reducing DNA binding activity of phospho-c-Jun, c-fos and Fra-1. BPLE and TCA also inhibited UVB-induced Akt phosphorylation, but not mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), known regulators of AP-1 transactivation. We additionally found that BPLE and TCA inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), the upstream kinase of Akt, in vitro. In summary, both BPLE and its active component TCA exhibit protective effects against UVB-induced skin aging. Taken together, these findings underline the potential for BPLE and TCA to be utilized as anti-wrinkling agents and cosmetic ingredients, as they suppress UVB-induced MMP-1 expression. PMID:26066652

  19. Pharmacology of cortical inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Krnjević, K.; Randić, Mirjana; Straughan, D. W.

    1966-01-01

    1. We have studied the effects of various pharmacological agents on the cortical inhibitory process described in the previous two papers (Krnjević, Randić & Straughan, 1966a, b); the drugs were mostly administered directly by iontophoresis from micropipettes and by systemic injection (I.V.). 2. Strychnine given by iontophoresis or by the application of a strong solution to the cortical surface potentiated excitatory effects, but very large iontophoretic doses also depressed neuronal firing. Subconvulsive and even convulsive systemic doses had little or no effect at the cortical level. There was no evidence, with any method of application, that strychnine directly interferes with the inhibitory process. 3. Tetanus toxin, obtained from two different sources and injected into the cortex 12-48 hr previously, also failed to block cortical inhibition selectively. As with strychnine, there was some evidence of increased responses to excitatory inputs. 4. Other convulsant drugs which failed to block cortical inhibition included picrotoxin, pentamethylene tetrazole, thiosemicarbazide, longchain ω-amino acids and morphine. 5. The inhibition was not obviously affected by cholinomimetic agents or by antagonists of ACh. 6. α- and β-antagonists of adrenergic transmission were also ineffective. 7. Cortical inhibition was fully developed in the presence of several general anaesthetics, including ether, Dial, pentobarbitone, Mg and chloralose. A temporary reduction in inhibition which is sometimes observed after systemic doses of pentobarbitone, is probably secondary to a fall in blood pressure. 8. Several central excitants such as amphetamine, caffeine and lobeline also failed to show any specific antagonistic action on cortical inhibition. 9. In view of the possibility that GABA is the chemical agent mediating cortical inhibition, an attempt was made to find a selective antagonist of its depressant action on cortical neurones. None of the agents listed above, nor any other

  20. Inhibition of Axl improves the targeted therapy against ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Fei; Li, Hongling; Sun, Yong

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • First reported Axl is co-expressed with ALK in neuroblastoma tissues and cell lines. • Axl activation promotes cell growth and impairs the efficiency of ALK inhibitor. • Further found silence of Axl leads to increased sensitivity to ALK inhibitors. • Axl inhibitor promotes the efficiency of targeted therapy in vitro and in vivo. • Axl activation should be considered in the clinical application of ALK inhibitors. - Abstract: Neuroblastoma (NB) patients harboring mutated ALK can be expected to potentially benefit from targeted therapy based on ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), such as crizotinib and ceritinib. However, the effect of the treatment varies with different individuals, although with the same genic changes. Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is expressed in a variety of human cancers, but little data are reported in NB, particularly in which carrying mutated ALK. In this study, we focus on the roles of Axl in ALK-mutated NB for investigating rational therapeutic strategy. We found that Axl is expressed in ALK-positive NB tissues and cell lines, and could be effectively activated by its ligand GAS6. Ligand-dependent Axl activation obviously rescued crizotinib-mediated suppression of cell proliferation in ALK-mutated NB cells. Genetic inhibition of Axl with specific small interfering RNA markedly increased the sensitivity of cells to ALK-TKIs. Furthermore, a small-molecule inhibitor of Axl significantly enhanced ALK-targeted therapy, as an increased frequency of apoptosis was observed in NB cells co-expressing ALK and Axl. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of Axl could lead to insensitivity to ALK inhibitors, and dual inhibition of ALK and Axl might be a potential therapeutic strategy against ALK-mutated NB.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBNA1 inhibits the canonical NF-κB pathway in carcinoma cells by inhibiting IKK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded EBNA1 protein is expressed in all EBV-associated tumours, including undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), where it is indispensable for viral replication, genome maintenance and viral gene expression. EBNA1's transcription factor-like functions also extend to influencing the expression of cellular genes involved in pathways commonly dysregulated during oncogenesis, including elevation of AP-1 activity in NPC cell lines resulting in enhancement of angiogenesis in vitro. In this study we sought to extend these observations by examining the role of EBNA1 upon another pathway commonly deregulated during carcinogenesis; namely NF-κB. Results In this report we demonstrate that EBNA1 inhibits the canonical NF-κB pathway in carcinoma lines by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IKKα/β. In agreement with this observation we find a reduction in the phosphorylation of IκBα and reduced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65, resulting in a reduction in the amount of p65 in nuclear NF-κB complexes. Similar effects were also found in carcinoma lines infected with recombinant EBV and in the EBV-positive NPC-derived cell line C666-1. Inhibition of NF-κB was dependent upon regions of EBNA1 essential for gene transactivation whilst the interaction with the deubiquitinating enzyme, USP7, was entirely dispensable. Furthermore, in agreement with EBNA1 inhibiting p65 NF-κB we demonstrate that p65 was exclusively cytoplasmic in 11 out of 11 NPC tumours studied. Conclusions Inhibition of p65 NF-κB in murine and human epidermis results in tissue hyperplasia and the development of squamous cell carcinoma. In line with this, p65 knockout fibroblasts have a transformed phenotype. Inhibition of p65 NF-κB by EBNA1 may therefore contribute to the development of NPC by inducing tissue hyperplasia. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-κB is employed by viruses as an immune evasion strategy which is also closely linked to

  2. Biomechanical Signals Inhibit IKK Activity to Attenuate NF-κB Transcription Activity in Inflamed Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dossumbekova, Anar; Anghelina, Mirela; Madhavan, Shashi; He, Lingli; Quan, Ning; Knobloch, Thomas; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Objective While the effects of biomechanical signals in the form of joint movement and exercise are known to be beneficial to inflamed joints, limited information is available regarding the intracellular mechanisms of their actions. This study was undertaken to examine the intracellular mechanisms by which biomechanical signals suppress proinflammatory gene induction by the interleukin-1-β (IL-1β)–induced NF-κB signaling cascade in articular chondrocytes. Methods Primary rat articular chondrocytes were exposed to biomechanical signals in the form of cyclic tensile strain, and the effects on the NF-κB signaling cascade were examined by Western blot analysis, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence. Results Cyclic tensile strain rapidly inhibited the IL-1β–induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, but not its IL-1β–induced phosphorylation at serine 276 and serine 536, which are necessary for its transactivation and transcriptional efficacy, respectively. Examination of upstream events revealed that cyclic tensile strain also inhibited the cytoplasmic protein degradation of IκBβ and IκBα, as well as repressed their gene transcription. Additionally, cyclic tensile strain induced a rapid nuclear translocation of IκBα to potentially prevent NF-κB binding to DNA. Furthermore, the inhibition of IL-1β–induced degradation of IκB by cyclic tensile strain was mediated by down-regulation of IκB kinase activity. Conclusion These results indicate that the signals generated by cyclic tensile strain act at multiple sites within the NF-κB signaling cascade to inhibit IL-1β–induced proinflammatory gene induction. Taken together, these findings provide insight into how biomechanical signals regulate and reduce inflammation, and underscore their potential in enhancing the ability of chondrocytes to curb inflammation in diseased joints. PMID:17907174

  3. Celastrol Inhibits Tat-mediated Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Transcription and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vivek; Kodihalli, Ravindra C.; Chiaro, Chris; Cary, Daniele; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Henderson, Andrew J.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    Current drugs used for anti-retroviral therapy against HIV have a narrow spectrum of activity, and more often have associated toxicities and severe side effects in addition to developing resistance. Thus, there is a need to develop new therapeutic strategies against HIV/AIDS to complement the already existing ones. Surprisingly, Tat, an early virus encoded protein required for the efficient transcription of the HIV genome, has not been developed as a target for small molecular therapeutics. We have previously described the ability of an endogenous Michael acceptor electrophile (MAE), 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), to inhibit Tat-dependent transcription, by targeting its cysteine (Cys) rich domain. In an effort to identify other MAEs possessing inhibitory activity against HIV-1 Tat, we tested a collection of plant-derived compounds with electrophilic properties, including curcumin, rosmarinic acid, and gambogic acid, for their ability to inhibit Tat. Celastrol (Cel), a triterpenoid MAE isolated from T. wilfordii, exhibited the highest inhibitory activity against Tat. Using biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that Cel by covalently modifying the cysteine thiols inhibits Tat transactivation function. Using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, we show that alklylation of Tat brought about a change in the secondary structure of Tat, which inhibited the transcription elongation of the HIV proviral genome by effecting mechanisms other than Tat-TAR interaction. Our results demonstrate the underlying mechanism of anti-retroviral activity of the plant-derived MAEs, and suggest that Cel could serve as a lead compound to develop novel anti-viral therapeutics. PMID:21763500

  4. Identification of functional domains of the IR2 protein of equine herpesvirus 1 required for inhibition of viral gene expression and replication

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seong K. Kim, Seongman; Dai Gan; Zhang Yunfei; Ahn, Byung C.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J.

    2011-09-01

    The equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) negative regulatory IR2 protein (IR2P), an early 1,165-amino acid (aa) truncated form of the 1487-aa immediate-early protein (IEP), lacks the trans-activation domain essential for IEP activation functions but retains domains for binding DNA, TFIIB, and TBP and the nuclear localization signal. IR2P mutants of the N-terminal region which lack either DNA-binding activity or TFIIB-binding activity were unable to down-regulate EHV-1 promoters. In EHV-1-infected cells expressing full-length IR2P, transcription and protein expression of viral regulatory IE, early EICP0, IR4, and UL5, and late ETIF genes were dramatically inhibited. Viral DNA levels were reduced to 2.1% of control infected cells, but were vey weakly affected in cells that express the N-terminal 706 residues of IR2P. These results suggest that IR2P function requires the two N-terminal domains for binding DNA and TFIIB as well as the C-terminal residues 707 to 1116 containing the TBP-binding domain. - Highlights: > We examine the functional domains of IR2P that mediates negative regulation. > IR2P inhibits at the transcriptional level. > DNA-binding mutant or TFIIB-binding mutant fails to inhibit. > C-terminal aa 707 to 1116 are required for full inhibition. > Inhibition requires the DNA-binding domain, TFIIB-binding domain, and C-terminus.

  5. XPO1 (CRM1) inhibition represses STAT3 activation to drive a survivin-dependent oncogenic switch in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yan; Holloway, Michael P; Nguyen, Kevin; McCauley, Dilara; Landesman, Yosef; Kauffman, Michael G; Shacham, Sharon; Altura, Rachel A

    2014-03-01

    Inhibition of XPO1 (CRM1)-mediated nuclear export of multiple tumor suppressor proteins has been proposed as a novel cancer therapeutic strategy to turn off oncogenic signals and enhance tumor suppression. Survivin is a multifunctional protein with oncogenic properties when expressed in the cytoplasm that requires the XPO1-RanGTP complex for its nuclear export. We investigated the antitumor mechanisms of the drug-like selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE) XPO1 antagonists KPT-185, KPT-251 KPT-276, and KPT-330 in estrogen receptor-positive and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines and xenograft models of human breast tumors. KPT compounds significantly inhibited breast cancer cell growth and induced tumor cell death, both in vitro and in vivo. These drugs initially promoted survivin accumulation within tumor cell nuclei. However, their major in vitro effect was to decrease survivin cytoplasmic protein levels, correlating with the onset of apoptosis. XPO1 inhibition repressed Survivin transcription by inhibiting CREB-binding protein-mediated STAT3 acetylation, and blocking STAT3 binding to the Survivin promoter. In addition, caspase-3 was activated to cleave survivin, rendering it unavailable to bind X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and block the caspase cascade. Collectively, these data demonstrate that XPO1 inhibition by SINE compounds represses STAT3 transactivation to block the selective oncogenic properties of survivin and supports their clinical use in TNBC. PMID:24431073

  6. In brown adipocytes, adrenergically induced β{sub 1}-/β{sub 3}-(G{sub s})-, α{sub 2}-(G{sub i})- and α{sub 1}-(G{sub q})-signalling to Erk1/2 activation is not mediated via EGF receptor transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanling; Fälting, Johanna M.; Mattsson, Charlotte L.; Holmström, Therése E.; Nedergaard, Jan

    2013-10-15

    Brown adipose tissue is unusual in that the neurotransmitter norepinephrine influences cell destiny in ways generally associated with effects of classical growth factors: regulation of cell proliferation, of apoptosis, and progression of differentiation. The norepinephrine effects are mediated through G-protein-coupled receptors; further mediation of such stimulation to e.g. Erk1/2 activation is in cell biology in general accepted to occur through transactivation of the EGF receptor (by external or internal pathways). We have examined here the significance of such transactivation in brown adipocytes. Stimulation of mature brown adipocytes with cirazoline (α{sub 1}-adrenoceptor coupled via G{sub q}), clonidine (α{sub 2} via G{sub i}) or CL316243 (β{sub 3} via G{sub s}) or via β{sub 1}-receptors significantly activated Erk1/2. Pretreatment with the EGF receptor kinase inhibitor AG1478 had, remarkably, no significant effect on Erk1/2 activation induced by any of these adrenergic agonists (although it fully abolished EGF-induced Erk1/2 activation), demonstrating absence of EGF receptor-mediated transactivation. Results with brown preadipocytes (cells in more proliferative states) were not qualitatively different. Joint stimulation of all adrenoceptors with norepinephrine did not result in synergism on Erk1/2 activation. AG1478 action on EGF-stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation showed a sharp concentration–response relationship (IC{sub 50} 0.3 µM); a minor apparent effect of AG1478 on norepinephrine-stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation showed nonspecific kinetics, implying caution in interpretation of partial effects of AG1478 as reported in other systems. Transactivation of the EGF receptor is clearly not a universal prerequisite for coupling of G-protein coupled receptors to Erk1/2 signalling cascades. - Highlights: • In brown adipocytes, norepinephrine regulates proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation. • EGF receptor transactivation is supposed to mediate GPCR

  7. Regulation of Lysophosphatidic Acid-induced Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation and Interleukin-8 Secretion in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells by Protein Kinase Cδ, Lyn Kinase, and Matrix Metalloproteinases*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yutong; He, Donghong; Saatian, Bahman; Watkins, Tonya; Spannhake, Ernst Wm.; Pyne, Nigel J.; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2009-01-01

    We have demonstrated earlier that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion is regulated by protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ)-dependent NF-κB activation in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEpCs). Here we provide evidence for signaling pathways that regulate LPA-mediated transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the role of cross-talk between G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor-tyrosine kinases in IL-8 secretion in HBEpCs. Treatment of HBEpCs with LPA stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, which was attenuated by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor (GM6001), heparin binding (HB)-EGF inhibitor (CRM 197), and HB-EGF neutralizing antibody. Overexpression of dominant negative PKCδ or pretreatment with a PKCδ inhibitor (rottlerin) or Src kinase family inhibitor (PP2) partially blocked LPA-induced MMP activation, proHB-EGF shedding, and EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation. Down-regulation of Lyn kinase, but not Src kinase, by specific small interfering RNA mitigated LPA-induced MMP activation, proHB-EGF shedding, and EGFR phosphorylation. In addition, overexpression of dominant negative PKCδ blocked LPA-induced phosphorylation and translocation of Lyn kinase to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, down-regulation of EGFR by EGFR small interfering RNA or pretreatment of cells with EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and PD158780 almost completely blocked LPA-dependent EGFR phosphorylation and partially attenuated IL-8 secretion, respectively. These results demonstrate that LPA-induced IL-8 secretion is partly dependent on EGFR transactivation regulated by PKCδ-dependent activation of Lyn kinase and MMPs and proHB-EGF shedding, suggesting a novel mechanism of cross-talk and interaction between G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor-tyrosine kinases in HBEpCs. PMID:16687414

  8. Identification of cellular target genes of the Epstein-Barr virus transactivator Zta: activation of transforming growth factor beta igh3 (TGF-beta igh3) and TGF-beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Cayrol, C; Flemington, E K

    1995-01-01

    The lytic switch transactivator Zta initiates the ordered cascade of Epstein-Barr virus gene expression that culminates in virus production. Zta is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that transactivates early viral promotes via cis-acting sequences. Activation of some of these genes is mediated through binding to consensus AP-1 promoter elements. This observation suggests that Zta may also regulate the expression of cellular genes. While many targets of Zta have been identified in the Epstein-Barr virus genome, putative host cell targets remain largely unknown. To address this issue, a tetracycline-regulated Zta expression system was generated, and differential hybridization screening was used to isolate Zta-responsive cellular genes. The major target identified by this analysis is a gene encoding a fasciclin-like secreted factor, transforming growth factor beta igh3 (TGF-beta igh3), that was originally identified as a gene that is responsive to the potent immunosuppressor TGF-beta 1. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated that induction of Zta expression results in a 10-fold increase in TGF-beta igh3 mRNA levels. Zta was also found to increase TGF-beta 1 mRNA levels as well as the amount of active TGF-beta 1 secreted into the medium. Interestingly, alpha 1-collagen IV, which has been shown to potentiate the effects of TGF-beta 1, is also a cellular target of Zta. These results suggest that Zta could play a role in modulating the host cell environment through activating the expression of secreted factors. PMID:7769680

  9. Efficient translation of distal cistrons of a polycistronic mRNA of a plant pararetrovirus requires a compatible interaction between the mRNA 3' end and the proteinaceous trans-activator.

    PubMed

    Edskes, H K; Kiernan, J M; Shepherd, R J

    1996-10-15

    Caulimoviruses, a type of plant pararetrovirus, employ a highly unusual mechanism to express the multiple cistrons of their pregenomic RNA. It involves translation of a polycistronic mRNA utilizing cis-acting viral RNA sequences and a transacting virus-encoded protein (P6). In addition to its role in polycistronic translation, the translational trans-activator protein P6 also activates its own expression from a monocistronic subgenomic RNA. Using Nicotiana Edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts, we analyzed the ability of P6 proteins from three different caulimoviruses to activate viral RNA-based reporter constructs. Cis-acting elements present in figwort mosaic caulimovirus (FMV) are functional not only in the presence of the cognate P6 activator protein, but also in the presence of the heterologous activators from cauliflower mosaic caulimovirus (CaMV) and peanut chlorotic streak caulimovirus (PCISV). However, when 3' cis-acting elements essential for efficient polycistronic expression of FMV are replaced by their counterparts from PCISV, reporter gene expression is only observed in the presence of PCISV P6. Derepression of monocistronic reporter constructs tailed with FMV or CaMV 3' proximal sequences is less efficient in the presence of PCISV P6 than with either FMV or CaMV P6, but more efficient when the constructs contain a cognate PCISV 3' cis-element. Efficient expression of polycistronic and monocistronic caulimovirus mRNAs in plant cells thus requires compatible interactions between P6, a translational trans-activator, and its cognate cis-element at the 3' end of the mRNA. PMID:8874519

  10. Addiction of lung cancer cells to GOF p53 is promoted by up-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor through multiple contacts with p53 transactivation domain and promoter

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Catherine A.; Pearsall, Isabella; Singh, Shilpa; Windle, Brad; Deb, Swati P.; Grossman, Steven R.; Yeudall, W. Andrew; Deb, Sumitra

    2016-01-01

    Human lung cancers harboring gain-of-function (GOF) p53 alleles express higher levels of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We demonstrate that a number of GOF p53 alleles directly upregulate EGFR. Knock-down of p53 in lung cancer cells lowers EGFR expression and reduces tumorigenicity and other GOF p53 properties. However, addiction of lung cancer cells to GOF p53 can be compensated by overexpressing EGFR, suggesting that EGFR plays a critical role in addiction. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using lung cancer cells expressing GOF p53 alleles showed that GOF p53 localized to the EGFR promoter. The sequence where GOF p53 is found to interact by ChIP seq can act as a GOF p53 response element. The presence of GOF p53 on the EGFR promoter increased histone H3 acetylation, indicating a mechanism whereby GOF p53 enhances chromatin opening for improved access to transcription factors (TFs). ChIP and ChIP-re-ChIP with p53, Sp1 and CBP histone acetylase (HAT) antibodies revealed docking of GOF p53 on Sp1, leading to increased binding of Sp1 and CBP to the EGFR promoter. Up-regulation of EGFR can occur via GOF p53 contact at other novel sites in the EGFR promoter even when TAD-I is inactivated; these sites are used by both intact and TAD-I mutated GOF p53 and might reflect redundancy in GOF p53 mechanisms for EGFR transactivation. Thus, the oncogenic action of GOF p53 in lung cancer is highly dependent on transactivation of the EGFR promoter via a novel transcriptional mechanism involving coordinated interactions of TFs, HATs and GOF p53. PMID:26820293

  11. Inhibition of nitrosation.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, H; Pignatelli, B; Calmels, S; Ohshima, H

    1993-01-01

    Humans are exposed through ingestion or inhalation to preformed N-nitroso compounds (NOC) in the environment and through the endogenous nitrosation of amino precursors in the body. Activated macrophages and bacterial strains isolated from human infections can enzymatically produce nitrosating agents and NOC from precursors at neutral pH. As a consequence, endogenous nitrosation may occur at various sites of the body, such as the oral cavity, stomach, urinary bladder, and at other sites of infection or inflammation. Numerous substances to which humans are exposed have been identified and shown to inhibit formation of NOC. Such inhibitors include vitamins C and E, certain phenolic compounds, and complex mixtures such as fruit and vegetable juices or other plant extracts. Nitrosation inhibitors normally destroy the nitrosating agents and, thus, act as competitors for the amino compound that serves as substrate for the nitrosating species. Independently, epidemiological studies have already established that fresh fruits and vegetables that are sources of vitamin C, other vitamins, and polyphenols have a protective effect against cancers at various sites and in particular gastric cancer. This article briefly reviews (a) the chemistry of NOC formation and inhibition; (b) the studies in experimental animals that showed that inhibition of endogenous NOC synthesis leads to a reduction of toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effects; (c) recent studies in humans where the degree of inhibition of endogenous NOC synthesis was directly quantified; and (d) the possible contribution of nitrosation inhibitors to human cancer prevention. PMID:8304939

  12. Nitric oxide inhibition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vivian (Wai Chong); Lerner, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide is involved in many physiologic processes. There are efforts, described elsewhere in this volume, to deliver nitric oxide to tissues as a therapy. Nitric oxide also contributes to pathophysiologic processes. Inhibiting nitric oxide or its production can thus also be of therapeutic benefit. This article addresses such inhibitory strategies. PMID:26634146

  13. Zinc Inhibits Hedgehog Autoprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Owen, Timothy; Xia, Ke; Singh, Ajay Vikram; Tou, Emiley; Li, Lingyun; Arduini, Brigitte; Li, Hongmin; Wan, Leo Q.; Callahan, Brian; Wang, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element with wide-ranging biological functions, whereas the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays crucial roles in both development and disease. Here we show that there is a mechanistic link between zinc and Hh signaling. The upstream activator of Hh signaling, the Hh ligand, originates from Hh autoprocessing, which converts the Hh precursor protein to the Hh ligand. In an in vitro Hh autoprocessing assay we show that zinc inhibits Hh autoprocessing with a Ki of 2 μm. We then demonstrate that zinc inhibits Hh autoprocessing in a cellular environment with experiments in primary rat astrocyte culture. Solution NMR reveals that zinc binds the active site residues of the Hh autoprocessing domain to inhibit autoprocessing, and isothermal titration calorimetry provided the thermodynamics of the binding. In normal physiology, zinc likely acts as a negative regulator of Hh autoprocessing and inhibits the generation of Hh ligand and Hh signaling. In many diseases, zinc deficiency and elevated level of Hh ligand co-exist, including prostate cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, and autism. Our data suggest a causal relationship between zinc deficiency and the overproduction of Hh ligand. PMID:25787080

  14. Mutations which affect the inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A by simian virus 40 small-t antigen in vitro decrease viral transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Mungre, S; Enderle, K; Turk, B; Porrás, A; Wu, Y Q; Mumby, M C; Rundell, K

    1994-01-01

    Three independent point mutations within residues 97 to 103 of the simian virus 40-small-t antigen (small-t) greatly reduced the ability of purified small-t to inhibit protein phosphatase 2A in vitro. These mutations affected the interaction of small-t antigen with the protein phosphatase 2A A subunit translated in vitro, and a peptide from the region identified by these mutations released the A subunit from immune complexes. When introduced into virus, the mutations eliminated the ability of small-t to enhance viral transformation of growth-arrested rat F111 cells. In contrast, the mutant small-t antigens were unimpaired in the transactivation of the adenovirus E2 promoter, an activity which was reduced by a double mutation in small-t residues 43 and 45. Images PMID:8107228

  15. Drugs that inhibit complement.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Höchsmann, Britta

    2012-02-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune system. Complement plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of many disorders. Despite the pivotal role of the complement system, an approved targeted inhibitor of a complement factor became available only recently. Eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits complement factor C5. It is a targeted, disease modifying, treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). It was approved be the US FDA and the European Commission in 2007. In this review we will update the experience with eculizumab in PNH and discuss potential use of eculizumab in other disorders (e.g. cold agglutinin disease; atypical HUS) and new approaches to complement inhibition with drugs other than eculizumab. PMID:22169380

  16. Substrate inhibition of transketolase.

    PubMed

    Solovjeva, Olga N; Kovina, Marina V; Kochetov, German A

    2016-03-01

    We studied the influence of the acceptor substrate of transketolase on the activity of the enzyme in the presence of reductants. Ribose-5-phosphate in the presence of cyanoborohydride decreased the transketolase catalytic activity. The inhibition is caused by the loss of catalytic function of the coenzyme-thiamine diphosphate. Similar inhibitory effect was observed in the presence of NADPH. This could indicate its possible regulatory role not only towards transketolase, but also towards the pentose phosphate pathway of carbohydrate metabolism overall, taking into account the fact that it inhibits not only transketolase but also another enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway--glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase [Eggleston L.V., Krebs H.A. Regulation of the pentose phosphate cycle, Biochem. J. 138 (1974) 425-435]. PMID:26708478

  17. Substrate-dependent inhibition of human MATE1 by cationic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guerrero, Lucy J; Wright, Stephen H

    2013-09-01

    The multidrug and toxin extruders 1- and 2-K (MATE1 and MATE2-K) are expressed in the luminal membrane of renal proximal tubule cells and provide the active step in the secretion of molecules that carry a net positive charge at physiologic pH, so-called organic cations. The present study tested whether structurally distinct MATE substrates can display different quantitative profiles of inhibition when interacting with structurally distinct ligands. The tested ligands were three structurally similar cationic ionic liquids (ILs, salts in the liquid state: N-butylpyridinium, NBuPy; 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium, Bmim; and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium, BmPy). Uptake was measured using Chinese hamster ovary cells that stably expressed MATE1 or MATE2-K. By trans-stimulation, all three ILs were transported by both MATE transporters. The three ILs also inhibited uptake of three structurally distinct MATE substrates: 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP), triethylmethylammonium (TEMA), and N,N,N-trimethyl-2-[methyl(7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)amino]ethanaminium (NBD-MTMA). MATE1 displayed a higher affinity for the pyridinium-based NBuPy (IC50 values, 2-4 µM) than for either the pyrrolidinium- (BmPy; 20-70 µM) or imidazolium-based ILs (Bmim; 15-60 µM). Inhibition of MPP, TEMA, and NBD-MTMA transport by NBuPy was competitive, with comparable Ki values against all substrates. Bmim also competitively blocked the three substrates but with Ki values that differed significantly (20 µM against MPP and 30 µM against NBD-MTMA versus 60 µM against TEMA). Together, these data indicate that renal secretion of ILs by the human kidney involves MATE transporters and suggest that the mechanism of transport inhibition is ligand-dependent, supporting the hypothesis that the binding of substrates to MATE transporters involves interaction with a binding surface with multiple binding sites. PMID:23785176

  18. Simvastatin Inhibits Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Amir A.; Franzi, Lisa; Last, Jerold; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Statin use has been linked to improved lung health in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We hypothesize that statins inhibit allergic airway inflammation and reduce airway hyperreactivity via a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. Objectives: To determine whether simvastatin attenuates airway inflammation and improves lung physiology by mevalonate pathway inhibition. Methods: BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin over 4 weeks and exposed to 1% ovalbumin aerosol over 2 weeks. Simvastatin (40 mg/kg) or simvastatin plus mevalonate (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally before each ovalbumin exposure. Measurements and Main Results: Simvastatin reduced total lung lavage leukocytes, eosinophils, and macrophages (P < 0.05) in the ovalbumin-exposed mice. Cotreatment with mevalonate, in addition to simvastatin, reversed the antiinflammatory effects seen with simvastatin alone (P < 0.05). Lung lavage IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were all reduced by treatment with simvastatin (P < 0.05). Simvastatin treatment before methacholine bronchial challenge increased lung compliance and reduced airway hyperreactivity (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Simvastatin attenuates allergic airway inflammation, inhibits key helper T cell type 1 and 2 chemokines, and improves lung physiology in a mouse model of asthma. The mevalonate pathway appears to modulate allergic airway inflammation, while the beneficial effects of simvastatin on lung compliance and airway hyperreactivity may be independent of the mevalonate pathway. Simvastatin and similar agents that modulate the mevalonate pathway may prove to be treatments for inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma. PMID:19608720

  19. Ligand-dependent occupancy of the retinoic acid receptor beta 2 promoter in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Dey, A; Minucci, S; Ozato, K

    1994-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) activates transcription of the RA receptor beta 2 (RAR beta 2) gene in embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells. This activation involves binding of the RAR/retinoid X receptor (RAR/RXR) heterodimer to the RA-responsive element (beta RARE). Dimethyl sulfate-based genomic footprinting was performed to examine occupancy of this promoter in P19 EC cells. No footprint was detected at the beta RARE prior to RA treatment, but a footprint was detected within the first hour of RA treatment. Concomitantly, other elements in the promoter, the cyclic AMP-responsive element and tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-like-responsive element became footprinted. Footprints at these elements were induced by RA without requiring new protein synthesis and remained for the entire duration of RA treatment but rapidly reversed upon withdrawal of RA. A delayed protection observed at the initiator site was also reversed upon RA withdrawal. The RA-inducible footprint was not due to induction of factors that bind to these element, since in vitro assays showed that these factors are present in P19 cell extracts before RA treatment. Significantly, no RA-induced footprint was observed at any of these elements in P19 cells expressing a dominant negative RXR beta, in which RXR heterodimers are unable to bind to the beta RARE. Results indicate that binding of a liganded heterodimer receptor to the beta RARE is the initial event that allows other elements to gain access to the factors. In accordance, reporter analyses showed that a mutation in the beta RARE, but not those in other elements, abrogates RA activation of the promoter. It is likely that the RAR beta 2 promoter opens in a hierarchically ordered manner, signalled by the occupancy of liganded heterodimers. Images PMID:7969156

  20. Ligand-dependent genomic function of glucocorticoid receptor in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Lan, Xun; Wu, Dayong; Sunkel, Benjamin; Ye, Zhenqing; Huang, Jiaoti; Liu, Zhihua; Clinton, Steven K; Jin, Victor X; Wang, Qianben

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been widely used as coadjuvants in the treatment of solid tumours, but GC treatment may be associated with poor pharmacotherapeutic response or prognosis. The genomic action of GC in these tumours is largely unknown. Here we find that dexamethasone (Dex, a synthetic GC)-regulated genes in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells are associated with drug resistance. Importantly, these GC-regulated genes are aberrantly expressed in TNBC patients and are associated with unfavourable clinical outcomes. Interestingly, in TNBC cells, Compound A (CpdA, a selective GR modulator) only regulates a small number of genes not involved in carcinogenesis and therapy resistance. Mechanistic studies using a ChIP-exo approach reveal that Dex- but not CpdA-liganded glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds to a single glucocorticoid response element (GRE), which drives the expression of pro-tumorigenic genes. Our data suggest that development of safe coadjuvant therapy should consider the distinct genomic function between Dex- and CpdA-liganded GR. PMID:26374485

  1. Ligand-dependent genomic function of glucocorticoid receptor in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhong; Lan, Xun; Wu, Dayong; Sunkel, Benjamin; Ye, Zhenqing; Huang, Jiaoti; Liu, Zhihua; Clinton, Steven K.; Jin, Victor X.; Wang, Qianben

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been widely used as coadjuvants in the treatment of solid tumours, but GC treatment may be associated with poor pharmacotherapeutic response or prognosis. The genomic action of GC in these tumours is largely unknown. Here we find that dexamethasone (Dex, a synthetic GC)-regulated genes in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells are associated with drug resistance. Importantly, these GC-regulated genes are aberrantly expressed in TNBC patients and are associated with unfavourable clinical outcomes. Interestingly, in TNBC cells, Compound A (CpdA, a selective GR modulator) only regulates a small number of genes not involved in carcinogenesis and therapy resistance. Mechanistic studies using a ChIP-exo approach reveal that Dex- but not CpdA-liganded glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds to a single glucocorticoid response element (GRE), which drives the expression of pro-tumorigenic genes. Our data suggest that development of safe coadjuvant therapy should consider the distinct genomic function between Dex- and CpdA-liganded GR. PMID:26374485

  2. Ligand-Dependent Nanoparticle Clustering within Lipid Membranes Induced by Surrounding Medium.

    PubMed

    Šegota, Suzana; Vojta, Danijela; Kendziora, Dania; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana; Baranović, Goran

    2015-04-23

    The interactions between hydrophobic or semihydrophobic gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs) and a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer as a model cell membrane in two ionic solutions result in the structural reorganization within the bilayer manifested as locally increased nanomechanical compaction in the vicinity of NP clusters as well as changed overall thermotropic properties. The effects of NP surface charge and hydrophobicity were examined using AFM imaging, force spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy. The NP clustering occurred during hydration process of dry films containing both the DMPC molecules and the NPs by the mechanism in which the number of bilayer deformations was reduced by NP clustering. The force spectroscopy showed increased bilayer density around (semi)hydrophobic NP clusters and thus locally increased lateral compaction of the bilayer. The strengthening effect was observed for both the silver and the gold NPs in a high ionic strength solution such as seawater, while it was absent under physiological conditions. The local lipid rearrangement induces the long-range lipid reorganization resulting in the bilayer phase transition shifting toward lower or higher temperatures depending on the solution ionic strength (at the most by -1.0 °C in phosphate buffered saline and at the most by +0.5 °C in seawater). PMID:25831116

  3. Dipyridylamide ligand dependent dimensionality in luminescent zinc 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylate coordination complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wudkewych, Megan J.; LaDuca, Robert L.

    2016-09-01

    Zinc nitrate, 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (2,4-pdcH2), and a hydrogen-bonding capable dipyridylamide ligand were combined in aqueous solution and subjected to hydrothermal reaction conditions. Three new crystalline coordination complexes were generated; their dimensionality depends crucially on the dipyridylamide length and geometric disposition of the pyridyl nitrogen donors. The three new phases were structurally characterized via single-crystal X-ray diffraction. {[H23-pina][Zn(2,4-pdc)2(H2O)2]·H2O} (1, 3-pina = 3-pyridylisonicotinamide) is a salt with protonated dipyridylamide cations and coordination complex anions. {[Zn2(2,4-pdc)2(H2O)4(3-pna)]·3H2O}n (2, 3-pna = 3-pyridylnicotinamide) shows a system of two-fold interpenetrated ruffled (6,3) coordination polymer layers. {[Zn(2,4-pdc)(H2O)2(3-pmna)]n (3, 3-pmna = 3-pyridylmethylnicotinamide) manifests a simple 1D chain topology. Luminescence was observed for two of the zinc complexes; this behavior is attributed to π-π* or π-n molecular orbital transitions. Thermal decomposition properties of the new phases are also probed.

  4. Feline Tritrichomonas foetus adhere to intestinal epithelium by receptor-ligand-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, M K; Stauffer, S H; Gookin, J L

    2013-02-18

    Tritrichomonas foetus (TF) is a protozoan that infects the feline ileum and colon resulting in chronic diarrhea. Up to 30% of young purebred cats are infected with TF and the infection is recognized as pandemic. Only a single drug, characterized by a narrow margin of safety and emerging development of resistance, is effective for treatment. While the venereal pathogenicity of bovine TF is attributed to adherence to uterovaginal epithelium, the pathogenesis of diarrhea in feline TF infection is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro model of feline TF adhesion to intestinal epithelium. Confluent monolayers of porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) were infected with axenic cultures of feline TF that were labeled with [(3)H] thymidine or CFSE and harvested at log-phase. The effect of multiplicity and duration of infection, viability of TF, binding competition, formalin fixation and cytoskeletal inhibitors on adherence of feline TF to IPEC-J2 monolayers was quantified by liquid scintillation counting and immunofluorescence. [(3)H] thymidine and CFSE-labeled TF reproducibly adhered to IPEC-J2 monolayers. Clinical isolates of feline TF adhered to the intestinal epithelium in significantly greater numbers than Pentatrichomonas hominis, the latter of which is a presumably nonpathogenic trichomonad. Adhesion of TF required viable trophozoites but was independent of cytoskeletal activity. Based on saturation and competition binding experiments, adherence of feline TF to the epithelium occurred via specific receptor-ligand interactions. The developed model provides a valuable resource for assessing pathogenic mechanisms of feline TF and developing novel pharmacologic therapies for blocking the adhesion of feline TF to the intestinal epithelium. PMID:23182300

  5. FELINE TRITRICHOMONAS FOETUS ADHERE TO INTESTINAL EPITHELIUM BY RECEPTOR-LIGAND-DEPENDENT MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, M.K.; Stauffer, S.H.; Gookin, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus (TF) is a protozoan that infects the feline ileum and colon resulting in chronic diarrhea. Up to 30% of young purebred cats are infected with TF and the infection is recognized as pandemic. Only a single drug, characterized by a narrow margin of safety and emerging development of resistance, is effective for treatment. While the venereal pathogenicity of bovine TF is attributed to adherence to uterovaginal epithelium, the pathogenesis of diarrhea in feline TF infection is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro model of feline TF adhesion to intestinal epithelium. Confluent monolayers of porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) were infected with axenic cultures of feline TF that were labeled with [3H] thymidine or CFSE and harvested at log-phase. The effect of multiplicity and duration of infection, viability of TF, binding competition, formalin fixation and cytoskeletal inhibitors on adherence of feline TF to IPEC-J2 monolayers was quantified by liquid scintillation counting and immunofluorescence. [3H] thymidine and CFSE-labeled TF reproducibly adhered to IPEC-J2 monolayers. Clinical isolates of feline TF adhered to the intestinal epithelium in significantly greater numbers than Pentatrichomonas hominis, the latter of which is a presumably nonpathogenic trichomonad. Adhesion of TF required viable trophozoites but was independent of cytoskeletal activity. Based on saturation and competition binding experiments, adherence of feline TF to the epithelium occurred via specific receptor-ligand interactions. The developed model provides a valuable resource for assessing pathogenic mechanisms of feline TF and developing novel pharmacologic therapies for blocking the adhesion of feline TF to the intestinal epithelium. PMID:23182300

  6. Ligand-dependent contribution of RXRβ to cholesterol homeostasis in Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Mascrez, Bénédicte; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Chambon, Pierre; Auwerx, Johan; Mark, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    We show that mice expressing retinoid X receptor β (RXRβ) impaired in its transcriptional activation function AF-2 (Rxrbaf20 mutation) do not display the spermatid release defects observed in RXRβ-null mutants, indicating that the role of RXRβ in spermatid release is ligand-independent. In contrast, like RXRβ-null mutants, Rxrbaf20 mice accumulate cholesteryl esters in Sertoli cells (SCs) due to reduced ABCA1 transporter-mediated cholesterol efflux. We provide genetic and molecular evidence that cholesterol homeostasis in SCs does not require PPARα and β, but depends upon the TIF2 coactivator and RXRβ/LXRβ heterodimers, in which RXRβ AF-2 is transcriptionally active. Our results also indicate that RXRβ may be activated by a ligand distinct from 9-cis retinoic acid. PMID:14993927

  7. Igf2 ligand dependency of Pten(+/-) developmental and tumour phenotypes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Church, D N; Phillips, B R; Stuckey, D J; Barnes, D J; Buffa, F M; Manek, S; Clarke, K; Harris, A L; Carter, E J; Hassan, A B

    2012-08-01

    The tumour suppressor PTEN is a key negative regulator of the PI3K-Akt pathway, and is frequently either reduced or lost in human tumours. Murine genetic studies have confirmed that reduction of Pten promotes tumourigenesis in multiple organs, and demonstrated dependency of tumour development on the activation of downstream components such as Akt. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) act via IGF1R to activate the PI3K-Akt pathway, and are commonly upregulated in cancer. A context-dependent interplay between IGFs and PTEN exists in normal tissue and tumours; increased IGF2 ligand supply induces Pten expression creating an autoregulatory negative feedback loop, whereas complete loss of PTEN may either cooperate with IGF overexpression in tumour promotion, or result in desensitisation to IGF ligand. However, it remains unknown whether neoplasia associated with Pten loss is dependent on upstream IGF ligand supply in vivo. We evaluated this by generation of Pten(+/-) mice with differing allelic dosage of Igf2, an imprinted gene encoding the potent embryonic and tumour growth factor Igf2. We show that biallelic Igf2 supply potentiates a previously unreported Pten(+/-) placental phenotype and results in strain-dependent cardiac hyperplasia and neonatal lethality. Importantly, we also show that the effects of Pten loss in vivo are modified by Igf2 supply, as lack of Igf2 results in extended survival and delayed tumour development while biallelic supply is associated with reduced lifespan and accelerated neoplasia in females. Furthermore, we demonstrate that reduction of PTEN protein to heterozygote levels in human MCF7 cells is associated with increased proliferation in response to IGF2, and does not result in desensitisation to IGF2 signalling. These data indicate that the effects of Pten loss at heterozygote levels commonly observed in human tumours are modified by Igf2 ligand, and emphasise the importance of the evaluation of upstream pathways in tumours with Pten loss. PMID:22120709

  8. Structural basis for ligand-dependent dimerization of phenylalanine hydroxylase regulatory domain

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipali; Kopec, Jolanta; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; McCorvie, Thomas J.; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2016-01-01

    The multi-domain enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) catalyzes the hydroxylation of dietary I-phenylalanine (Phe) to I-tyrosine. Inherited mutations that result in PAH enzyme deficiency are the genetic cause of the autosomal recessive disorder phenylketonuria. Phe is the substrate for the PAH active site, but also an allosteric ligand that increases enzyme activity. Phe has been proposed to bind, in addition to the catalytic domain, a site at the PAH N-terminal regulatory domain (PAH-RD), to activate the enzyme via an unclear mechanism. Here we report the crystal structure of human PAH-RD bound with Phe at 1.8 Å resolution, revealing a homodimer of ACT folds with Phe bound at the dimer interface. This work delivers the structural evidence to support previous solution studies that a binding site exists in the RD for Phe, and that Phe binding results in dimerization of PAH-RD. Consistent with our structural observation, a disease-associated PAH mutant impaired in Phe binding disrupts the monomer:dimer equilibrium of PAH-RD. Our data therefore support an emerging model of PAH allosteric regulation, whereby Phe binds to PAH-RD and mediates the dimerization of regulatory modules that would bring about conformational changes to activate the enzyme. PMID:27049649

  9. Multilayered proteomics reveals molecular switches dictating ligand-dependent EGFR trafficking.

    PubMed

    Francavilla, Chiara; Papetti, Moreno; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Pedersen, Anna-Kathrine; Sigurdsson, Jon O; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Karemore, Gopal; Blagoev, Blagoy; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-06-01

    A fascinating conundrum in cell signaling is how stimulation of the same receptor tyrosine kinase with distinct ligands generates specific outcomes. To decipher the functional selectivity of EGF and TGF-α, which induce epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) degradation and recycling, respectively, we devised an integrated multilayered proteomics approach (IMPA). We analyzed dynamic changes in the receptor interactome, ubiquitinome, phosphoproteome, and late proteome in response to both ligands in human cells by quantitative MS and identified 67 proteins regulated at multiple levels. We identified RAB7 phosphorylation and RCP recruitment to EGFR as switches for EGF and TGF-α outputs, controlling receptor trafficking, signaling duration, proliferation, and migration. By manipulating RCP levels or phosphorylation of RAB7 in EGFR-positive cancer cells, we were able to switch a TGF-α-mediated response to an EGF-like response or vice versa as EGFR trafficking was rerouted. We propose IMPA as an approach to uncover fine-tuned regulatory mechanisms in cell signaling. PMID:27136326

  10. Disruption of transforming growth factor beta signaling by a novel ligand-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Tania; Amoroso, Stephanie; Sharpe, Shellyann; Jones, Gary M; Bliskovski, Valery; Kovalchuk, Alexander; Wakefield, Lalage M; Kim, Seong-Jin; Potter, Michael; Letterio, John J

    2002-05-20

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta is the prototype in a family of secreted proteins that act in autocrine and paracrine pathways to regulate cell development and function. Normal cells typically coexpress TGF-beta receptors and one or more isoforms of TGF-beta, thus the synthesis and secretion of TGF-beta as an inactive latent complex is considered an essential step in regula-ting the activity of this pathway. To determine whether intracellular activation of TGF-beta results in TGF-beta ligand-receptor interactions within the cell, we studied pristane-induced plasma cell tumors (PCTs). We now demonstrate that active TGF-beta1 in the PCT binds to intracellular TGF-beta type II receptor (TbetaRII). Disruption of the expression of TGF-beta1 by antisense TGF-beta1 mRNA restores localization of TbetaRII at the PCT cell surface, indicating a ligand-induced impediment in receptor trafficking. We also show that retroviral expression of a truncated, dominant-negative TbetaRII (dnTbetaRII) effectively competes for intracellular binding of active ligand in the PCT and restores cell surface expression of the endogenous TbetaRII. Analysis of TGF-beta receptor-activated Smad2 suggests the intracellular ligand-receptor complex is not capable of signaling. These data are the first to demonstrate the formation of an intracellular TGF-beta-receptor complex, and define a novel mechanism for modulating the TGF-beta signaling pathway. PMID:12021305

  11. Ligand-dependent dynamics of the active-site lid in bacterial dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Masooma; Richter, Christine; Chisty, Liisa T; Kirkpatrick, John; Blackledge, Martin; Webb, Martin R; Driscoll, Paul C

    2014-02-18

    The dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) enzyme family has been the subject of substantial investigation as a potential therapeutic target for the regulation of vascular tension. DDAH enzymes catalyze the conversion of asymmetric N(η),N(η)-dimethylarginine (ADMA) to l-citrulline. Here the influence of substrate and product binding on the dynamic flexibility of DDAH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PaDDAH) has been assessed. A combination of heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy, static and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations was employed. A monodisperse monomeric variant of the wild-type enzyme binds the reaction product l-citrulline with a low millimolar dissociation constant. A second variant, engineered to be catalytically inactive by substitution of the nucleophilic Cys249 residue with serine, can still convert the substrate ADMA to products very slowly. This PaDDAH variant also binds l-citrulline, but with a low micromolar dissociation constant. NMR and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site "lid", formed by residues Gly17-Asp27, exhibits a high degree of internal motion on the picosecond-to-nanosecond time scale. This suggests that the lid is open in the apo state and allows substrate access to the active site that is otherwise buried. l-Citrulline binding to both protein variants is accompanied by an ordering of the lid. Modification of PaDDAH with a coumarin fluorescence reporter allowed measurement of the kinetic mechanism of the PaDDAH reaction. A combination of NMR and kinetic data shows that the catalytic turnover of the enzyme is not limited by release of the l-citrulline product. The potential to develop the coumarin-PaDDAH adduct as an l-citrulline sensor is discussed. PMID:24484052

  12. Elucidation of Ligand-Dependent Modulation of Disorder-Order Transitions in the Oncoprotein MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A.; Michel, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Numerous biomolecular interactions involve unstructured protein regions, but how to exploit such interactions to enhance the affinity of a lead molecule in the context of rational drug design remains uncertain. Here clarification was sought for cases where interactions of different ligands with the same disordered protein region yield qualitatively different results. Specifically, conformational ensembles for the disordered lid region of the N-terminal domain of the oncoprotein MDM2 in the presence of different ligands were computed by means of a novel combination of accelerated molecular dynamics, umbrella sampling, and variational free energy profile methodologies. The resulting conformational ensembles for MDM2, free and bound to p53 TAD (17-29) peptide identify lid states compatible with previous NMR measurements. Remarkably, the MDM2 lid region is shown to adopt distinct conformational states in the presence of different small-molecule ligands. Detailed analyses of small-molecule bound ensembles reveal that the ca. 25-fold affinity improvement of the piperidinone family of inhibitors for MDM2 constructs that include the full lid correlates with interactions between ligand hydrophobic groups and the C-terminal lid region that is already partially ordered in apo MDM2. By contrast, Nutlin or benzodiazepinedione inhibitors, that bind with similar affinity to full lid and lid-truncated MDM2 constructs, interact additionally through their solubilizing groups with N-terminal lid residues that are more disordered in apo MDM2. PMID:26046940

  13. Long noncoding RNA ANRIL could be transactivated by c-Myc and promote tumor progression of non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Zhou, Xiaohui; Xu, Ling; Rong, Chaohui; Shen, Ce; Bian, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been demonstrated to play important roles in the development of human cancer. We assessed the role of lncRNA ANRIL in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was employed to detect the expression of ANRIL in NSCLC tissues and paired nontumor tissues. The high expression level of ANRIL was positively correlated with advanced tumor–node–metastasis stage and greater tumor diameter. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the physical interaction between c-Myc and ANRIL. ANRIL silencing significantly inhibited NSCLC cell proliferation. Together, we showed that ANRIL is involved in the oncogenesis of NSCLC, and ANRIL may be a potential therapeutic target for patients with NSCLC. PMID:27307748

  14. Transactivation of MicroRNA-320 by MicroRNA-383 Regulates Granulosa Cell Functions by Targeting E2F1 and SF-1 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mianmian; Wang, Xiaorong; Yao, Guidong; Lü, Mingrong; Liang, Meng; Sun, Yingpu; Sun, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that microRNA-320 (miR-320) is one of the most down-regulated microRNAs (miRNA) in mouse ovarian granulosa cells (GCs) after TGF-β1 treatment. However, the underlying mechanisms of miR-320 involved in GC function during follicular development remain unknown. In this study, we found that pregnant mare serum gonadotropin treatment resulted in the suppression of miR-320 expression in a time-dependent manner. miR-320 was mainly expressed in GCs and oocytes of mouse ovarian follicles in follicular development. Overexpression of miR-320 inhibited estradiol synthesis and proliferation of GCs through targeting E2F1 and SF-1. E2F1/SF-1 mediated miR-320-induced suppression of GC proliferation and of GC steroidogenesis. FSH down-regulated the expression of miR-320 and regulated the function of miR-320 in mouse GCs. miR-383 promoted the expression of miR-320 and enhanced miR-320-mediated suppression of GC proliferation. Injection of miR-320 into the ovaries of mice partially promoted the production of testosterone and progesterone but inhibited estradiol release in vivo. Moreover, the expression of miR-320 and miR-383 was up-regulated in the follicular fluid of polycystic ovarian syndrome patients, although the expression of E2F1 and SF-1 was down-regulated in GCs. These data demonstrated that miR-320 regulates the proliferation and steroid production by targeting E2F1 and SF-1 in the follicular development. Understanding the regulation of miRNA biogenesis and function in the follicular development will potentiate the usefulness of miRNA in the treatment of reproduction and some steroid-related disorders. PMID:24828505

  15. Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation and Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor Transactivational Effects of Chemical Components of the Roots of Polygonum multiflorum

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ya Nan; Li, Wei; Song, Seok Bean; Yan, Xi Tao; Yang, Seo Young; Kim, Young Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polygonum multiflorum is well-known as “Heshouwu” in traditional Chinese herbal medicine. In Northeast Asia, it is often used as a tonic to prevent premature aging of the kidney and liver, tendons, and bones and strengthening of the lower back and knees. Objective: To research the anti-inflammatory activities of components from P. multiflorum. Materials and Methods: The compounds were isolated by a combination of silica gel and YMC R-18 column chromatography, and their structures were identified by analysis of spectroscopic data (1D, 2D-nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry). The anti-inflammatory activities of the isolated compounds 1−15 were evaluated by luciferase reporter gene assays. Results: Fifteen compounds (1–15) were isolated from the roots of P. multiflorum. Compounds 1−5 and 14−15 significantly inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α-induced nuclear factor kappa B-luciferase activity, with IC50 values of 24.16-37.56 μM. Compounds 1−5 also greatly enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors transcriptional activity with EC50 values of 18.26−31.45 μM. Conclusion: The anthraquinone derivatives were the active components from the roots of P. multiflorum as an inhibitor on inflammation-related factors in human hepatoma cells. Therefore, we suggest that the roots of P. multiflorum can be used to treat natural inflammatory diseases. SUMMARY This study presented that fifteen compounds (1-15) isolated from the roots of Polygonum multiflrum exert signifiant anti inflmmatory effects by inhibiting TNF α induced NF κB activation and PPARs transcription. Abbreviation used: NF κB: Nuclear factor kappa B, PPARs: Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, PPREs: Peroxisome proliferator response elements, TNF α: Tumor necrosis factor α, ESI-MS: Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, HepG2: Human hepatoma cells PMID:27019559

  16. Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein Inhibits the NLRP3 Inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Woo-Chang; Kang, Hye-Ri; Yoon, Hyunyee; Kang, Suk-Jo; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.; Song, Moon Jung

    2015-01-01

    The inflammasome is a molecular platform that stimulates the activation of caspase-1 and the processing of pro-interleukin (IL)-1β and pro-IL-18 for secretion. The NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) protein is activated by diverse molecules and pathogens, leading to the formation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Recent studies showed that the NLRP3 inflammasome mediates innate immunity against influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In this study, we investigated the function of the IAV non-structural protein 1 (NS1) in the modulation of NLRP3 inflammasome. We found that NS1 proteins derived from both highly pathogenic and low pathogenic strains efficiently decreased secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 from THP-1 cells treated with LPS and ATP. NS1 overexpression significantly impaired the transcription of proinflammatory cytokines by inhibiting transactivation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a major transcription activator. Furthermore, NS1 physically interacted with endogenous NLRP3 and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome was abrogated in NS1-expressing THP-1 cells. These findings suggest that NS1 downregulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation by targeting NLRP3 as well as NF-κB, leading to a reduction in the levels of inflammatory cytokines as a viral immune evasion strategy. PMID:25978411

  17. Cell cycle-dependent inhibition of 53BP1 signaling by BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Li, Nan; Li, Yujing; Wang, Jiadong; Gao, Min; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage response mediator protein 53BP1 is a key regulator of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair. 53BP1 protects DNA broken ends from resection by recruiting two downstream factors, RIF1 (RAP1-interacting factor 1) and PTIP (Pax transactivation domain-interacting protein), to double-stranded breaks (DSBs) via ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-mediated 53BP1 phosphorylation, and competes with