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Sample records for inhibiting endothelial nitric

  1. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng; Cui, Jianxiu

    2016-09-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10(-8)~10(-6) mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10(-9) mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  2. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10–8~10–6 mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10–9 mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  3. Tryptic amaranth glutelin digests induce endothelial nitric oxide production through inhibition of ACE: antihypertensive role of amaranth peptides.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, A P Barba; Montoya, A Barba; Martínez-Cuevas, Pedro; Hernández-Ledesma, B; León-Galván, M F; De León-Rodríguez, A; González, C

    2010-09-15

    Amaranth seed proteins have a better balance of essential amino acids than cereals and legumes. In addition, the tryptic hydrolysis of amaranth proteins generates, among other peptides, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory (ACEi) peptides. ACE converts angiotensin I (Ang I) into Ang II, but is also responsible for the degradation of bradykinin (BK). In contrast to Ang II, BK stimulates vasodilation modulated through endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production. The aim of the present study was to characterize the ACEi activity of amaranth trypsin-digested glutelins (TDGs) and their ability to induce endothelial NO production. An IC(50) value of 200microgml(-1) was measured for TDG inhibition of ACE. TDGs stimulated endothelial NO production in coronary endothelial cells (CEC) by 52% compared to control. The effects of TDGs were comparable to those of BK and Captopril, both used as positive controls of NO production. Consistent with these effects, TDGs induced, in a dose-dependent manner, endothelial NO-dependent vasodilation in isolated rat aortic rings. These results suggest that TDGs induce endothelial NO production and consequent vasodilation through their ACEi activity. Amaranth TDGs have a high potential as a nutraceutical food in prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Further molecular, cellular and physiological studies are currently under way and the results may contribute to a better understanding and control of cardiovascular disorders. PMID:20435155

  4. Rho GTPase/Rho Kinase Negatively Regulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Phosphorylation through the Inhibition of Protein Kinase B/Akt in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xiu-Fen; Viswambharan, Hema; Barandier, Christine; Ruffieux, Jean; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Rusconi, Sandro; Yang, Zhihong

    2002-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is an important regulator of cardiovascular homeostasis by production of nitric oxide (NO) from vascular endothelial cells. It can be activated by protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt via phosphorylation at Ser-1177. We are interested in the role of Rho GTPase/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway in regulation of eNOS expression and activation. Using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we show here that both active RhoA and ROCK not only downregulate eNOS gene expression as reported previously but also inhibit eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1177 and cellular NO production with concomitant suppression of PKB activation. Moreover, coexpression of a constitutive active form of PKB restores the phosphorylation but not gene expression of eNOS in the presence of active RhoA. Furthermore, we show that thrombin inhibits eNOS phosphorylation, as well as expression via Rho/ROCK pathway. Expression of the active PKB reverses eNOS phosphorylation but has no effect on downregulation of eNOS expression induced by thrombin. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Rho/ROCK pathway negatively regulates eNOS phosphorylation through inhibition of PKB, whereas it downregulates eNOS expression independent of PKB. PMID:12446767

  5. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Hetero-adhesion of Cancer Cells to Endothelial Cells: Restraining Circulating Tumor Cells from Initiating Metastatic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yusheng; Yu, Ting; Liang, Haiyan; Wang, Jichuang; Xie, Jingjing; Shao, Jingwei; Gao, Yu; Yu, Suhong; Chen, Shuming; Wang, Lie; Jia, Lee

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to vascular endothelial bed becomes a crucial starting point in metastatic cascade. We hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) may prevent cancer metastasis from happening by its direct vasodilation and inhibition of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Here we show that S-nitrosocaptopril (CAP-NO, a typical NO donor) produced direct vasorelaxation that can be antagonized by typical NO scavenger hemoglobin and guanylate cyclase inhibitor. Cytokines significantly stimulated production of typical CAMs by the highly-purified human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). CAP-NO inhibited expression of the stimulated CAMs (particularly VCAM-1) and the resultant hetero-adhesion of human colorectal cancer cells HT-29 to the HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. The same concentration of CAP-NO, however, did not significantly affect cell viability, cell cycle and mitochondrial membrane potential of HT-29, thus excluding the possibility that inhibition of the hetero-adhesion was caused by cytotoxicity by CAP-NO on HT-29. Hemoglobin reversed the inhibition of CAP-NO on both the hetero-adhesion between HT-29 and HUVECs and VCAM-1 expression. These data demonstrate that CAP-NO, by directly releasing NO, produces vasorelaxation and interferes with hetero-adhesion of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via down-regulating expression of CAMs. The study highlights the importance of NO in cancer metastatic prevention.

  6. Caveolin-1 mediates endotoxin inhibition of endothelin-1-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Willson; Lee, Sang Ho; Culberson, Cathy; Korneszczuk, Katarzyna; Clemens, Mark G

    2009-11-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) plays a key role in the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). In the presence of endotoxin, an increase in caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression impairs ET-1/eNOS signaling; however, the molecular mechanism is unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of Cav-1 in the regulation of LPS suppression of ET-1-mediated eNOS activation in LSECs by examining the effect of caveolae disruption using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CD) and filipin. Treatment with 5 mM CD for 30 min increased eNOS activity (+255%, P < 0.05). A dose (0.25 microg/ml) of filipin for 30 min produced a similar effect (+111%, P < 0.05). CD induced the perinuclear localization of Cav-1 and eNOS and stimulated NO production in the same region. Readdition of 0.5 mM cholesterol to saturate CD reversed these effects. Both the combined treatment with CD and ET-1 (CD + ET-1) and with filipin and ET-1 stimulated eNOS activity; however, pretreatment with endotoxin (LPS) abrogated these effects. Following LPS pretreatment, CD + ET-1 failed to stimulate eNOS activity (+51%, P > 0.05), which contributed to the reduced levels of eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation and eNOS-Thr495 dephosphorylation, the LPS/CD-induced overexpression and translocation of Cav-1 in the perinuclear region, and the increased perinuclear colocalization of eNOS with Cav-1. These results supported the hypothesis that Cav-1 mediates the action of endotoxin in suppressing ET-1-mediated eNOS activation and demonstrated that the manipulation of caveolae produces significant effects on ET-1-mediated eNOS activity in LSECs. PMID:20501440

  7. Nitric oxide inhibition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vivian (Wai Chong); Lerner, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide is involved in many physiologic processes. There are efforts, described elsewhere in this volume, to deliver nitric oxide to tissues as a therapy. Nitric oxide also contributes to pathophysiologic processes. Inhibiting nitric oxide or its production can thus also be of therapeutic benefit. This article addresses such inhibitory strategies. PMID:26634146

  8. Chronic inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in nucleus tractus solitarii enhances baroreceptor reflex in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Hidefumi; Kasparov, Sergey; Wong, Liang-Fong; Murphy, David; Shimizu, Tsuyoshi; Paton, Julian F R

    2003-01-01

    In acute experiments, we demonstrated previously that nitric oxide (NO) donors exogenously applied to the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) depressed the baroreceptor cardiac reflex. In this study, we determined a role for endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in the NTS for chronically regulating baroreceptor reflex function in conscious rats. A recombinant adenoviral vector directing expression of a truncated form of eNOS was microinjected bilaterally into the NTS to inhibit endogenous eNOS activity. Arterial pressure was monitored continuously using radio-telemetry in freely moving animals and spontaneous baroreceptor reflex gain (sBRG) determined by a time-series method. sBRG showed a gradual increase from day 7 to 21 after gene transfer and the value at day 21 (1.68 ± 0.20 ms mmHg−1, n = 6) was significantly higher than that before gene transfer (1.13 ± 0.09 ms mmHg−1, P < 0.001). This value was also significantly higher than that in rats in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was expressed in the NTS (1.04 ± 0.21 ms mmHg−1; n = 6, P < 0.01) and saline-treated groups (1.12 ± 0.15 ms mmHg−1; n = 4, P < 0.05), which did not change from control levels. In addition, heart rate decreased from 336 ± 6 to 318 ± 8 b.p.m. (P < 0.05) 21 days after gene transfer. This value was also significantly lower than that in control groups (eGFP: 348 ± 9 b.p.m., n = 6, P < 0.01; saline: 347 ± 5 b.p.m., n = 4, P < 0.05). Gene transfer did not affect arterial pressure. These findings suggest that in the conscious rat eNOS is constitutively active within the NTS and is a factor regulating baroreceptor reflex gain and heart rate. PMID:12509491

  9. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:26739766

  10. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase decreases breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 adhesion to intact microvessels under physiological flows.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min; Fu, Bingmei M

    2016-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) at different concentrations may promote or inhibit tumor growth and metastasis under various conditions. To test the hypothesis that tumor cells prefer to adhere to the locations with a higher endothelial NO production in intact microvessels under physiological flows and to further test that inhibiting NO production decreases tumor cell adhesion, we used intravital fluorescence microscopy to measure NO production and tumor cell adhesion in postcapillary venules of rat mesentery under normal and reduced flow conditions, and in the presence of an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor, N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). Rats (SD, 250-300 g) were anesthetized. A midline incision (∼2 inch) was made in the abdominal wall, and the mesentery was taken out from the abdominal cavity and spread over a coverslip for the measurement. An individual postcapillary venule (35-50 μm) was first loaded with 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2 DA), a fluorescent indictor for NO. Then the DAF-2 intensity was measured for 30 min under a normal or reduced flow velocity, with and without perfusion with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, and in the presence of l-NMMA. We found that tumor cells prefer to adhere to the microvessel locations with a higher NO production such as curved portions. Inhibition of eNOS by l-NMMA attenuated the flow-induced NO production and reduced tumor cell adhesion. We also found that l-NMMA treatment for ∼40 min reduced microvessel permeability to albumin. Our results suggest that inhibition of eNOS is a good approach to preventing tumor cell adhesion to intact microvessels under physiological flows. PMID:27059076

  11. β2-Glycoprotein I Inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Angiogenesis by Suppressing the Phosphorylation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2, Akt, and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wen-Chin; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Chung, Meng-Ju; Chiang, An-Na

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of new blood vessel formation, and it plays a key role in various physiological and pathological conditions. The β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) is a plasma glycoprotein with multiple biological functions, some of which remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to identify the contribution of 2-GPI on the angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a pro-angiogenic factor that may regulate endothelial remodeling, and its underlying mechanism. Our results revealed that β2-GPI dose-dependently decreased the VEGF-induced increase in endothelial cell proliferation, using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays. Furthermore, incubation with both β2-GPI and deglycosylated β2-GPI inhibited the VEGF-induced tube formation. Our results suggest that the carbohydrate residues of β2-GPI do not participate in the function of anti-angiogenesis. Using in vivo Matrigel plug and angioreactor assays, we show that β2-GPI remarkably inhibited the VEGF-induced angiogenesis at a physiological concentration. Moreover, β2-GPI inhibited the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), Akt, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In summary, our in vitro and in vivo data reveal for the first time that β2-GPI inhibits the VEGF-induced angiogenesis and highlights the potential for β2-GPI in anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:27579889

  12. Nitric oxide induces polarization of actin in encephalitogenic T cells and inhibits their in vitro trans-endothelial migration in a p70S6 kinase-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Staykova, Maria A; Berven, Leise A; Cowden, William B; Willenborg, David O; Crouch, Michael F

    2003-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) inhibits both actively induced and transferred autoimmune encephalomyelitis. To explore potential mechanisms, we examined the ability of NO to inhibit migration of T lymphoblasts through both collagen matrices and monolayers of rat brain endothelial cells. The NO donor 1-hydroxy-2-oxo-3, 3-bis (2-aminoethyl)-1-triazene (HOBAT) inhibited migration in a concentration-dependent manner. NO pretreatment of T cells inhibited migration through untreated endothelial cells, but NO pretreatment of endothelial cells had no inhibitory effect on untreated T cells. Therefore NO's migration inhibitory action was mediated through its effect on T cells and not endothelial cells. HOBAT did not inhibit migration by inducing T-cell death but rather by polarizing the T cells, resulting in a morphology suggestive of migrating cells. P70S6 kinase, shown to have a role in NO-induced migration inhibition in fibroblasts, had no role in the inhibitory effect of NO on T-cell migration. Thus, HOBAT did not alter p70S6K activity nor did rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of p70S6K, inhibit HOBAT-induced T-cell morphological changes or T-cell migration. We suggest that NO-induced morphological changes result in T cells with predefined migratory directionality, thus limiting the ability of these cells to respond to other migratory signals. PMID:12759332

  13. Endostatin induces acute endothelial nitric oxide and prostacyclin release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chunying; Harris, M. Brennan; Venema, Virginia J.; Venema, Richard C. . E-mail: rvenema@mcg.edu

    2005-04-15

    Chronic exposure to endostatin (ES) blocks endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, and migration and induces EC apoptosis thereby inhibiting angiogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI{sub 2}), in contrast, play important roles in promoting angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the acute effects of ES on endothelial NO and PGI{sub 2} production. Unexpectedly, a cGMP reporter cell assay showed that ES-induced acute endothelial NO release in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Enzyme immunoassay showed that ES also induced an acute increase in PGI{sub 2} production in BAECs. These results were confirmed by ex vivo vascular ring studies that showed vascular relaxation in response to ES. Immunoblot analysis showed that ES stimulated acute phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser116, Ser617, Ser635, and Ser1179, and dephosphorylation at Thr497 in BAECs, events associated with eNOS activation. Short-term exposure of EC to ES, therefore, unlike long-term exposure which is anti-angiogenic, may be pro-angiogenic.

  14. Inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins, but not endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors, reduces blood flow and aerobic energy turnover in the exercising human leg.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; González-Alonso, José; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2007-06-01

    Prostaglandins, nitric oxide (NO) and endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) are substances that have been proposed to be involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during physical activity. We measured haemodynamics, plasma ATP at rest and during one-legged knee-extensor exercise (19 +/- 1 W) in nine healthy subjects with and without intra-arterial infusion of indomethacin (Indo; 621 +/- 17 microg min(-1)), Indo + N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 12.4 +/- 0.3 mg min(-1)) (double blockade) and Indo + L-NMMA + tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA; 12.4 +/- 0.3 mg min(-1)) (triple blockade). Double and triple blockade lowered leg blood flow (LBF) at rest (P<0.05), while it remained unchanged with Indo. During exercise, LBF and vascular conductance were 2.54 +/- 0.10 l min(-1) and 25 +/- 1 mmHg, respectively, in control and they were lower with double (33 +/- 3 and 36 +/- 4%, respectively) and triple (26 +/- 4 and 28 +/- 3%, respectively) blockade (P<0.05), while there was no difference with Indo. The lower LBF and vascular conductance with double and triple blockade occurred in parallel with a lower O(2) delivery, cardiac output, heart rate and plasma [noradrenaline] (P<0.05), while blood pressure remained unchanged and O(2) extraction and femoral venous plasma [ATP] increased. Despite the increased O(2) extraction, leg was 13 and 17% (triple and double blockade, respectively) lower than control in parallel to a lower femoral venous temperature and lactate release (P<0.05). These results suggest that NO and prostaglandins play important roles in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation during moderate intensity exercise and that EDHFs do not compensate for the impaired formation of NO and prostaglandins. Moreover, inhibition of NO and prostaglandin formation is associated with a lower aerobic energy turnover and increased concentration of vasoactive ATP in plasma. PMID:17347273

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells. PMID:26390975

  16. Shear-Induced Nitric Oxide Production by Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna; Laughlin, Justin G; Rangamani, Padmini; Tartakovsky, Daniel M

    2016-07-12

    We present a biochemical model of the wall shear stress-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in an endothelial cell. The model includes three key mechanotransducers: mechanosensing ion channels, integrins, and G protein-coupled receptors. The reaction cascade consists of two interconnected parts. The first is rapid activation of calcium, which results in formation of calcium-calmodulin complexes, followed by recruitment of eNOS from caveolae. The second is phosphorylation of eNOS by protein kinases PKC and AKT. The model also includes a negative feedback loop due to inhibition of calcium influx into the cell by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In this feedback, increased nitric oxide (NO) levels cause an increase in cGMP levels, so that cGMP inhibition of calcium influx can limit NO production. The model was used to predict the dynamics of NO production by an endothelial cell subjected to a step increase of wall shear stress from zero to a finite physiologically relevant value. Among several experimentally observed features, the model predicts a highly nonlinear, biphasic transient behavior of eNOS activation and NO production: a rapid initial activation due to the very rapid influx of calcium into the cytosol (occurring within 1-5 min) is followed by a sustained period of activation due to protein kinases. PMID:27410748

  17. Hydrogen sulfide and endothelial dysfunction: relationship with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Altaany, Zaid; Moccia, Francesco; Munaron, Luca; Mancardi, Daniele; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is a cellular monolayer that lines the inner surface of blood vessels and plays a central role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis by controlling platelet aggregation, vascular tone, blood fluidity and fibrinolysis, adhesion and transmigration of inflammatory cells, and angiogenesis. Endothelial dysfunctions are associated with various cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Numerous studies have established the anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the latest member to join the gasotransmitter family along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, on vascular endothelium. In addition, H2S may prime endothelial cells (ECs) toward angiogenesis and contribute to wound healing, besides to its well-known ability to relax vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and thereby reducing blood pressure. Finally, H2S may inhibit VSMC proliferation and platelet aggregation. Consistently, a deficit in H2S homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and of hyperglycaemic endothelial injury. Therefore, the application of H2S-releasing drugs or using gene therapy to increase endogenous H2S level may help restore endothelial function and antagonize the progression of cardiovascular diseases. The present article reviews recent studies on the role of H2S in endothelial homeostasis, under both physiological and pathological conditions, and its putative therapeutic applications. PMID:25005182

  18. Nitric oxide modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression via interleukin-10.

    PubMed

    Hebeda, C B; Teixeira, S A; Tamura, E K; Muscará, M N; de Mello, S B V; Markus, R P; Farsky, S H P

    2011-08-01

    We have shown previously that nitric oxide (NO) controls platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) expression on both neutrophils and endothelial cells under physiological conditions. Here, the molecular mechanism by which NO regulates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endothelial PECAM-1 expression and the role of interleukin (IL)-10 on this control was investigated. For this purpose, N-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20 mg/kg/day for 14 days dissolved in drinking water) was used to inhibit both constitutive (cNOS) and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) synthase activities in LPS-stimulated Wistar rats (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). This treatment resulted in reduced levels of serum NO. Under this condition, circulating levels of IL-10 was enhanced, secreted mainly by circulating lymphocytes, dependent on transcriptional activation, and endothelial PECAM-1 expression was reduced independently on reduced gene synthesis. The connection between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 expression was examined by incubating LPS-stimulated (1 µg/ml) cultured endothelial cells obtained from naive rats with supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes, which were obtained from blood of control or L-NAME-treated rats. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from L-NAME-treated rats, which contained higher levels of IL-10, reduced LPS-induced PECAM-1 expression by endothelial cells, and this reduction was reversed by adding the anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody. Therefore, an association between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 was found and may represent a novel mechanism by which NO controls endothelial cell functions. PMID:21564091

  19. Endothelial cell expression of haemoglobin α regulates nitric oxide signalling.

    PubMed

    Straub, Adam C; Lohman, Alexander W; Billaud, Marie; Johnstone, Scott R; Dwyer, Scott T; Lee, Monica Y; Bortz, Pamela Schoppee; Best, Angela K; Columbus, Linda; Gaston, Benjamin; Isakson, Brant E

    2012-11-15

    Models of unregulated nitric oxide (NO) diffusion do not consistently account for the biochemistry of NO synthase (NOS)-dependent signalling in many cell systems. For example, endothelial NOS controls blood pressure, blood flow and oxygen delivery through its effect on vascular smooth muscle tone, but the regulation of these processes is not adequately explained by simple NO diffusion from endothelium to smooth muscle. Here we report a new model for the regulation of NO signalling by demonstrating that haemoglobin (Hb) α (encoded by the HBA1 and HBA2 genes in humans) is expressed in human and mouse arterial endothelial cells and enriched at the myoendothelial junction, where it regulates the effects of NO on vascular reactivity. Notably, this function is unique to Hb α and is abrogated by its genetic depletion. Mechanistically, endothelial Hb α haem iron in the Fe(3+) state permits NO signalling, and this signalling is shut off when Hb α is reduced to the Fe(2+) state by endothelial cytochrome b5 reductase 3 (CYB5R3, also known as diaphorase 1). Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of CYB5R3 increases NO bioactivity in small arteries. These data reveal a new mechanism by which the regulation of the intracellular Hb α oxidation state controls NOS signalling in non-erythroid cells. This model may be relevant to haem-containing globins in a broad range of NOS-containing somatic cells. PMID:23123858

  20. Nitric Oxide Mediates Tightening of the Endothelial Barrier by Ascorbic Acid

    PubMed Central

    May, James M.; Qu, Zhi-chao

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, decreases paracellular endothelial permeability in a process that requires rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. To define the proximal mechanism of this effect, we tested whether it might involve enhanced generation and/or sparing of nitric oxide (NO) by the vitamin. EA.hy926 endothelial cells cultured on semi-porous filter supports showed decreased endothelial barrier permeability to radiolabeled inulin in response to exogenous NO provided by the NO donor spermine NONOATE, as well as to activation of the downstream NO pathway by 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, a cell-penetrant cyclic GMP analog. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester increased endothelial permeability, indicating a role constitutive NO generation by eNOS in maintaining the permeability barrier. Inhibition of guanylate cyclase by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one also increased endothelial permeability and blocked barrier tightening by spermine NONOATE. Loading cells with what are likely physiologic concentrations of ascorbate decreased endothelial permeability. This effect was blocked by inhibition of either eNOS or guanylate cyclase, suggesting that it involved generation of NO by eNOS and subsequent NO-dependent activation of guanylate cyclase. These results show that endothelial permeability barrier function depends on constitutive generation of NO and that ascorbate-dependent tightening of this barrier involves maintaining NO through the eNOS/guanylate cyclase pathway. PMID:21156160

  1. NOSTRIN: A protein modulating nitric oxide release and subcellular distribution of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Kirstin; Opitz, Nils; Dedio, Jürgen; Renné, Christoph; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Oess, Stefanie

    2002-01-01

    Activity and localization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is regulated in a remarkably complex fashion, yet the complex molecular machinery mastering stimulus-induced eNOS translocation and trafficking is poorly understood. In a search by the yeast two-hybrid system using the eNOS oxygenase domain as bait, we have identified a previously uncharacterized eNOS-interacting protein, dubbed NOSTRIN (for eNOS traffic inducer). NOSTRIN contains a single polypeptide chain of 506-aa residues of 58 kDa with an N-terminal cdc15 domain and a C-terminal SH3 domain. NOSTRIN mRNA is abundant in highly vascularized tissues such as placenta, kidney, lung, and heart, and NOSTRIN protein is expressed in vascular endothelial cells. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated the eNOS–NOSTRIN interaction in vitro and in vivo, and NOSTRIN's SH3 domain was essential and sufficient for eNOS binding. NOSTRIN colocalized extensively with eNOS at the plasma membrane of confluent human umbilical venous endothelial cells and in punctate cytosolic structures of CHO-eNOS cells. NOSTRIN overexpression induced a profound redistribution of eNOS from the plasma membrane to vesicle-like structures matching the NOSTRIN pattern and at the same time led to a significant inhibition of NO release. We conclude that NOSTRIN contributes to the intricate protein network controlling activity, trafficking, and targeting of eNOS. PMID:12446846

  2. Protein kinase Cδ regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression via Akt activation and nitric oxide generation

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Wedgwood, Stephen; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explore the roles of the delta isoform of PKC (PKCδ) in the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells isolated from fetal lambs (FPAECs). Pharmacological inhibition of PKCδ with either rottlerin or with the peptide, δV1-1, acutely attenuated NO production, and this was associated with a decrease in phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 (S1177). The chronic effects of PKCδ inhibition using either rottlerin or the overexpression of a dominant negative PKCδ mutant included the downregulation of eNOS gene expression that was manifested by a decrease in both eNOS promoter activity and protein expression after 24 h of treatment. We also found that PKCδ inhibition blunted Akt activation as observed by a reduction in phosphorylated Akt at position Ser473. Thus, we conclude that PKCδ is actively involved in the activation of Akt. To determine the effect of Akt on eNOS signaling, we overexpressed a dominant negative mutant of Akt and determined its effect of NO generation, eNOS expression, and phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177. Our results demonstrated that Akt inhibition was associated with decreased NO production that correlated with reduced phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177, and decreased eNOS promoter activity. We next evaluated the effect of endogenously produced NO on eNOS expression by incubating FPAECs with the eNOS inhibitor 2-ethyl-2-thiopseudourea (ETU). ETU significantly inhibited NO production, eNOS promoter activity, and eNOS protein levels. Together, our data indicate involvement of PKCδ-mediated Akt activation and NO generation in maintaining eNOS expression. PMID:18192589

  3. Carnosine facilitates nitric oxide production in endothelial f-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoru; Nakashima, Yukiko; Toda, Ken-Ichi

    2009-11-01

    We examined the effect of carnosine (beta-alanyl-histidine) on nitric oxide (NO) production and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activation in endothelial F-2 cells. Carnosine enhanced NO production in a dose-dependent manner, and the stimulatory effect of carnosine was observed at concentrations exceeding 5 mM. The carnosine-stimulated NO production was inhibited by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but not by N(G)-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester. In contrast, beta-alanine, histidine (carnosine components) and anserine (N-methyl carnosine) failed to increase NO production. Carnosine had no effect on NO production for the initial 5 min, but thereafter resulted in a gradual increase in NO production up to 15 min. Carnosine did not induce phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177. The carnosine-induced increase in NO production was observed even when extracellular Ca2+ was depleted by ethylene glycol bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N'-N'-tetraacetic acid however, the effect was abolished upon depletion of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA. After F-2 cells were incubated with carnosine for 4 min, intracellular Ca2+ concentration gradually increased. The carnosine-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration occurred even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. These results indicate that carnosine facilitates NO production in endothelial F-2 cells. It is also suggested that eNOS is activated by Ca2+, which might be released from intracellular Ca2+ stores in response to carnosine. PMID:19881293

  4. Arsenite induces endothelial cytotoxicity by down-regulation of vascular endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, T.-C. . E-mail: tctsou@nhri.org.tw; Tsai, F.-Y.; Hsieh, Y.-W.; Li, L.-A.; Yeh, S.C; Chang, L.W.

    2005-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a high association of inorganic arsenic exposure with vascular diseases. Recent research has also linked this vascular damage to impairment of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function by arsenic exposure. However, the role of eNOS in regulating the arsenite-induced vascular dysfunction still remains to be clarified. In our present study, we investigated the effect of arsenite on Akt1 and eNOS and its involvement in cytotoxicity of vascular endothelial cells. Our study demonstrated that arsenite decreased the protein levels of both Akt1 and eNOS accompanied with increased levels of ubiquitination of total cell lysates. We found that inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway by MG-132 could partially protect Akt1 and eNOS from degradation by arsenite together with a proportional protection from the arsenite-induced cytoxicity. Moreover, up-regulation of eNOS protein expression significantly attenuated the arsenite-induced cytotoxicity and eNOS activity could be significantly inhibited after incubation with arsenite for 24 h in a cell-free system. Our study indicated that endothelial eNOS activity could be attenuated by arsenite via the ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of Akt1/eNOS as well as via direct inhibition of eNOS activity. Our study also demonstrated that eNOS actually played a protective role in arsenite-induced cytoxicity. These observations supported the hypothesis that the impairment of eNOS function by arsenite is one of the mechanisms leading to vascular changes and diseases.

  5. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates microvascular hyperpermeability in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Takuya; Pappas, Peter J; Hobson, Robert W; Boric, Mauricio P; Sessa, William C; Durán, Walter N

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of blood flow, but its role in permeability is still challenged. We tested in vivo the hypotheses that: (a) endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is not essential for regulation of baseline permeability; (b) eNOS is essential for hyperpermeability responses in inflammation; and (c) molecular inhibition of eNOS with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain (AP-Cav) reduces eNOS-regulated hyperpermeability. We used eNOS-deficient (eNOS−/−) mice and their wild-type control as experimental animals, platelet-activating factor (PAF) at 10−7 m as the test pro-inflammatory agent, and integrated optical intensity (IOI) as an index of microvascular permeability. PAF increased permeability in wild-type cremaster muscle from a baseline of 2.4 ± 2.2 to a peak net value of 84.4 ± 2.7 units, while the corresponding values in cremaster muscle of eNOS−/− mice were 1.0 ± 0.3 and 15.6 ± 7.7 units (P < 0.05). Similarly, PAF increased IOI in the mesentery of wild-type mice but much less in the mesentery of eNOS−/− mice. PAF increased IOI to comparable values in the mesenteries of wild-type mice and those lacking the gene for inducible NOS (iNOS). Administration of AP-Cav blocked the microvascular hyperpermeability responses to 10−7 m PAF. We conclude that: (1) baseline permeability does not depend on eNOS; (2) eNOS and NO are integral elements of the signalling pathway for the hyperpermeability response to PAF; (3) iNOS does not affect either baseline permeability or hyperpermeability responses to PAF; and (4) caveolin-1 inhibits eNOS regulation of microvascular permeability in vivo. Our results establish eNOS as an important regulator of microvascular permeability in inflammation. PMID:16675496

  6. Copper deficiency attenuates endothelial nitric oxide release

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The attenuation of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation is a consistent finding in both conduit and resistance vessels during dietary copper deficiency. While the effect is well established, evidence for the mechanism is still circumstantial. This study was designed to deter...

  7. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family. There is now information on the enzyme structure at all levels from primary (amino acid sequence) to quaternary (dimerization, association with other proteins) structure. The crystal structures of the oxygenase domains of inducible NOS (iNOS) and vascular endothelial NOS (eNOS) allow us to interpret other information in the context of this important part of the enzyme, with its binding sites for iron protoporphyrin IX (haem), biopterin, L-arginine, and the many inhibitors which interact with them. The exact nature of the NOS reaction, its mechanism and its products continue to be sources of controversy. The role of the biopterin cofactor is now becoming clearer, with emerging data implicating one-electron redox cycling as well as the multiple allosteric effects on enzyme activity. Regulation of the NOSs has been described at all levels from gene transcription to covalent modification and allosteric regulation of the enzyme itself. A wide range of NOS inhibitors have been discussed, interacting with the enzyme in diverse ways in terms of site and mechanism of inhibition, time-dependence and selectivity for individual isoforms, although there are many pitfalls and misunderstandings of these aspects. Highly selective inhibitors of iNOS versus eNOS and neuronal NOS have been identified and some of these have potential in the treatment of a range of inflammatory and other conditions in which iNOS has been implicated. PMID:11463332

  8. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  9. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  10. Modulation of endothelial nitric oxide by plant-derived products.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christoph A; Dirsch, Verena M

    2009-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), is recognised as a central anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic principle in the vasculature. Decreased availability of NO in the vasculature promotes the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that a growing list of natural products, as components of the daily diet or phytomedical preparations, may improve vascular function by enhancing NO bioavailability. In this article we first outline common pathways modulating endothelial NO production or bioavailability to provide a basis for subsequent mechanistic discussions. Then we comprehensively review natural products and plant extracts known to positively influence eNOS activity and/or endothelial function in vitro or in vivo. We will discuss red wine, highlighting polyphenols, oligomeric procyanidins (OPC) and resveratrol as modulators of endothelial NO production. Other dietary products and their active components known to activate eNOS include cocoa (OPC and its monomer (-)-epicatechin), pomegranates (polyphenols), black and green tea (flavanoids, especially epigallocatechin gallate), olive oil (oleic acid and polyphenols), soy (genistein), and quercetin, one of the most abundant flavonoids in plants. In addition, phytomedical preparations made from ginkgo, hawthorn and ginseng, as well as formulations used in traditional Chinese Medicine, have been shown to affect endothelial NO production. Recurring phytochemical patterns among active fractions and purified compounds are discussed. In summary, there is increasing evidence that several single natural products and plant extracts influence endothelial NO production. Identification of such compounds and characterisation of their cellular actions may increase our knowledge of the regulation of endothelial NO production and could provide valuable clues for the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19497380

  11. Extract of Meretrix meretrix Linnaeus induces angiogenesis in vitro and activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Wei, Jianteng; Wang, Hui; Ding, Lili; Zhang, Yuyan; Lin, Xiukun

    2012-09-01

    Meretrix meretrix Linnaeus has long been used as traditional Chinese medicine in oriental medicine. The angiogentic activity of the extract of M. meretrix was investigated in this study, using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Extract of M. meretrix Linnaeus (AFG-25) was prepared with acetone and ethanol precipitation, and further separated by Sephadex G-25 column. The results show that AFG-25 promoted proliferation, migration, and capillary-like tube formation in HUVECs, and in the presence of eNOS inhibitor NMA, the tube formation induced by AFG-25 is inhibited significantly. Moreover, AFG-25 could also promote the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the resultant elevation of nitric oxide (NO) production. The results suggested that M. meretrix contains active ingredients with angiogentic activity and eNOS/NO signal pathway is in part involved in the proangiogenesis effect induced by AFG-25.

  12. Tipping off endothelial tubes: nitric oxide drives tip cells.

    PubMed

    Priya, Mani Krishna; Sahu, Giriraj; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Goldy, Naga; Sundaresan, Abaya Meenakshi; Jadhav, Vivek; Barathkumar, T R; Saran, Uttara; Jaffar Ali, B M; Roberts, David D; Bera, Amal Kanti; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2015-04-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is a complex process that warrants cell migration, proliferation, tip cell formation, ring formation, and finally tube formation. Angiogenesis is initiated by a single leader endothelial cell called "tip cell," followed by vessel elongation by "stalk cells." Tip cells are characterized by their long filopodial extensions and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and endocan. Although nitric oxide (NO) is an important modulator of angiogenesis, its role in angiogenic sprouting and specifically in tip cell formation is poorly understood. The present study tested the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/NO/cyclic GMP (cGMP) signaling in tip cell formation. In primary endothelial cell culture, about 40% of the tip cells showed characteristic sub-cellular localization of eNOS toward the anterior progressive end of the tip cells, and eNOS became phosphorylated at serine 1177. Loss of eNOS suppressed tip cell formation. Live cell NO imaging demonstrated approximately 35% more NO in tip cells compared with stalk cells. Tip cells showed increased level of cGMP relative to stalk cells. Further, the dissection of NO downstream signaling using pharmacological inhibitors and inducers indicates that NO uses the sGC/cGMP pathway in tip cells to lead angiogenesis. Taken together, the present study confirms that eNOS/NO/cGMP signaling defines the direction of tip cell migration and thereby initiates new blood vessel formation. PMID:25510468

  13. Syringaresinol causes vasorelaxation by elevating nitric oxide production through the phosphorylation and dimerization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Byung-Hee; Kim, Sookon; Kim, Jong-Dai; Lee, Jung Joon; Baek, Yi-Yong; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Choe, Jongseon; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Won, Moo-Ho; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in vascular functions, including vasorelaxation. We here investigated the pharmacological effect of the natural product syringaresinol on vascular relaxation and eNOS-mediated NO production as well as its underlying biochemical mechanism in endothelial cells. Treatment of aortic rings from wild type, but not eNOS-/- mice, with syringaresinol induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was abolished by addition of the NOS inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. Treatment of human endothelial cells and mouse aortic rings with syringaresinol increased NO production, which was correlated with eNOS phosphorylation via the activation of Akt and AMP kinase (AMPK) as well as elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels. A phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor blocked the increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels, AMPK-dependent eNOS phosphorylation, and NO production, but not Akt activation, in syringaresinol-treated endothelial cells. Syringaresinol-induced AMPK activation was inhibited by co-treatment with PLC inhibitor, Ca2+ chelator, calmodulin antagonist, and CaMKKβ siRNA. This compound also increased eNOS dimerization, which was inhibited by a PLC inhibitor and a Ca2+-chelator. The chemicals that inhibit eNOS phosphorylation and dimerization attenuated vasorelaxation and cGMP production. These results suggest that syringaresinol induces vasorelaxation by enhancing NO production in endothelial cells via two distinct mechanisms, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt- and PLC/Ca2+/CaMKKβ-dependent eNOS phosphorylation and Ca2+-dependent eNOS dimerization. PMID:22170035

  14. Endothelial cell nitric oxide production in acute chest syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hammerman, S I; Klings, E S; Hendra, K P; Upchurch, G R; Rishikof, D C; Loscalzo, J; Farber, H W

    1999-10-01

    Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is the most common form of acute pulmonary disease associated with sickle cell disease. To investigate the possibility that alterations in endothelial cell (EC) production and metabolism of nitric oxide (NO) products might be contributory, we measured NO products from cultured pulmonary EC exposed to red blood cells and/or plasma from sickle cell patients during crisis. Exposure to plasma from patients with ACS caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in S-nitrosothiol (RSNO) and a 7- to 14-fold increase in total nitrogen oxide (NO(x)) production by both pulmonary arterial and microvascular EC. Increases occurred within 2 h of exposure to plasma in a concentration-dependent manner and were associated with increases in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein and eNOS enzymatic activity, but not with changes in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) III or NOS II transcripts, inducible NOS (iNOS) protein nor iNOS enzymatic activity. RSNO and NO(x) increased whether plasma was obtained from patients with ACS or other forms of vasoocclusive crisis. Furthermore, an oxidative state occurred and oxidative metabolites of NO, particularly peroxynitrite, were produced. These findings suggest that altered NO production and metabolism to damaging oxidative molecules contribute to the pathogenesis of ACS. PMID:10516198

  15. L-theanine promotes nitric oxide production in endothelial cells through eNOS phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Siamwala, Jamila H; Dias, Paul M; Majumder, Syamantak; Joshi, Manoj K; Sinkar, Vilas P; Banerjee, Gautam; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-03-01

    Consumption of tea (Camellia sinensis) improves vascular function and is linked to lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial nitric oxide is the key regulator of vascular functions in endothelium. In this study, we establish that l-theanine, a non-protein amino-acid found in tea, promotes nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. l-theanine potentiated NO production in endothelial cells was evaluated using Griess reaction, NO sensitive electrode and a NO specific fluorescent probe (4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluororescein diacetate). l-Theanine induced NO production was partially attenuated in presence of l-NAME or l-NIO and completely abolished using eNOS siRNA. eNOS activation was Ca(2+) and Akt independent, as assessed by fluo-4AM and immunoblotting experiments, respectively and was associated with phosphorylation of eNOS Ser 1177. eNOS phosphorylation was inhibited in the presence of ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD-98059 and partially inhibited by PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002 and Wortmanin suggesting PI3K-ERK1/2 dependent pathway. Increased NO production was associated with vasodilation in ex ovo (chorioallantoic membrane) model. These results demonstrated that l-theanine administration in vitro activated ERK/eNOS resulting in enhanced NO production and thereby vasodilation in the artery. The results of our experiments are suggestive of l-theanine mediated vascular health benefits of tea. PMID:22819553

  16. A protective role for endothelial nitric oxide synthase in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Peter; Steenbergen, Eric; van Goor, Harry

    2002-03-01

    In acute glomerulonephritis (GN), increased nitric oxide (NO) production occurs, suggesting a pathophysiological role for NO in the disease process. Although NO potentially could have both toxic as well as protective effects, its exact role in the pathophysiology of GN is unclear and may depend on the NOS isoform generating NO. The protective effects of NO such as prevention of leukocyte and platelet activation and adhesion have been attributed to NO generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Evidence for a beneficial role for eNOS includes the demonstration of reduced eNOS expression in experimental models of GN as well as human biopsy specimens that is mostly likely due to endothelial cell necrosis. Reduced NO production in GN also may occur through reaction of NO with superoxide anions or the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/hypochlorous acid (HOCL) system. Further evidence has been provided by the observation that in several experimental models of GN, glomerular injury is exacerbated following treatment with non-selective NO inhibitors. Finally, the development of GN is severely aggravated in mice lacking a functional gene for eNOS as compared to wild-type mice, providing direct support for a protective role of eNOS-derived NO in acute GN. PMID:11849432

  17. Targeting of nitric oxide synthase to endothelial cell caveolae via palmitoylation: implications for nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cardeña, G; Oh, P; Liu, J; Schnitzer, J E; Sessa, W C

    1996-01-01

    The membrane association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) in vascular endothelium. Previously, we have shown that in cultured endothelial cells and in intact blood vessels, eNOS is found primarily in the perinuclear region of the cells and in discrete regions of the plasma membrane, suggesting trafficking of the protein from the Golgi to specialized plasma membrane structures. Here, we show that eNOS is found in Triton X-100-insoluble membranes prepared from cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells and colocalizes with caveolin, a coat protein of caveolae, in cultured bovine lung microvascular endothelial cells as determined by confocal microscopy. To examine if eNOS is indeed in caveolae, we purified luminal endothelial cell plasma membranes and their caveolae directly from intact, perfused rat lungs. eNOS is found in the luminal plasma membranes and is markedly enriched in the purified caveolae. Because palmitoylation of eNOS does not significantly influence its membrane association, we next examined whether this modification can affect eNOS targeting to caveolae. Wild-type eNOS, but not the palmitoylation mutant form of the enzyme, colocalizes with caveolin on the cell surface in transfected NIH 3T3 cells, demonstrating that palmitoylation of eNOS is necessary for its targeting into caveolae. These data suggest that the subcellular targeting of eNOS to caveolae can restrict NO signaling to specific targets within a limited microenvironment at the cell surface and may influence signal transduction through caveolae. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692835

  18. Phosphorylation inactivation of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudakshina; Gupta, Manveen; Xu, Weiling; Mavrakis, Deloris A; Janocha, Allison J; Comhair, Suzy A A; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Yu, Jun; Polgar, Peter; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2016-06-01

    The impairment of vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) production is well accepted as a typical marker of endothelial dysfunction in vascular diseases, including in the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the molecular mechanisms accounting for loss of NO production are unknown. We hypothesized that low NO production by pulmonary arterial endothelial cells in PAH is due to inactivation of NO synthase (eNOS) by aberrant phosphorylation of the protein. To test the hypothesis, we evaluated eNOS levels, dimerization, and phosphorylation in the vascular endothelial cells and lungs of patients with PAH compared with controls. In mechanistic studies, eNOS activity in endothelial cells in PAH lungs was found to be inhibited due to phosphorylation at T495. Evidence pointed to greater phosphorylation/activation of protein kinase C (PKC) α and its greater association with eNOS as the source of greater phosphorylation at T495. The presence of greater amounts of pT495-eNOS in plexiform lesions in lungs of patients with PAH confirmed the pathobiological mechanism in vivo. Transfection of the activating mutation of eNOS (T495A/S1177D) restored NO production in PAH cells. Pharmacological blockade of PKC activity by β-blocker also restored NO formation by PAH cells, identifying one mechanism by which β-blockers may benefit PAH and cardiovascular diseases through recovery of endothelial functions. PMID:27130529

  19. Nitric oxide up-regulates endothelial expression of angiotensin II type 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Medini, Sawsan; Bisha, Marion; Balz, Vera; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Bas, Murat; Kojda, Georg

    2016-07-15

    Increasing vascular NO levels following up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is considered beneficial in cardiovascular disease. Whether such beneficial effects exerted by increased NO-levels include the vascular renin-angiotensin system remains elucidated. Exposure of endothelial cells originated from porcine aorta, mouse brain and human umbilical veins to different NO-donors showed that expression of the angiotensin-II-type-2-receptor (AT2) mRNA and protein is up-regulated by activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase without changing AT2 mRNA stability. In mice, endothelial-specific overexpression of eNOS stimulated, while chronic treatment with the NOS-blocker l-nitroarginine inhibited AT2 expression. The NO-induced AT2 up-regulation was associated with a profound inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-activity. In endothelial cells this reduction of ACE-activity was reversed by either the AT2 antagonist PD 123119 or by inhibition of transcription with actinomycin D. Furthermore, in C57Bl/6 mice an acute i.v. bolus of l-nitroarginine did not change AT2-expression and ACE-activity suggesting that inhibition of ACE-activity by endogenous NO is crucially dependent on AT2 protein level. Likewise, three weeks of either voluntary or forced exercise training increased AT2 expression and reduced ACE-activity in C57Bl/6 but not in mice lacking eNOS suggesting significance of this signaling interaction for vascular physiology. Finally, aortic AT2 expression is about 5 times greater in female as compared to male C57Bl/6 and at the same time aortic ACE activity is reduced in females by more than 50%. Together these findings imply that endothelial NO regulates AT2 expression and that AT2 may regulate ACE-activity. PMID:27235748

  20. (-)-Epicatechin-induced recovery of mitochondria from simulated diabetes: Potential role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sánchez, Israel; Rodríguez, Alonso; Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2016-05-01

    (-)-Epicatechin increases indicators associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in endothelial cells and myocardium. We investigated endothelial nitric oxide synthase involvement on (-)-epicatechin-induced increases in indicators associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in human coronary artery endothelial cells cultured in normal-glucose and high-glucose media, as well as to restore indicators of cardiac mitochondria from the effects of simulated diabetes. Here, we demonstrate the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase on (-)-epicatechin-induced increases in mitochondrial proteins, transcription factors and sirtuin 1 under normal-glucose conditions. In simulated diabetes endothelial nitric oxide synthase function, mitochondrial function-associated and biogenesis-associated indicators were adversely impacted by high glucose, effects that were reverted by (-)-epicatechin. As an animal model of type 2 diabetes, 2-month old C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet for 16 weeks. Fasting and fed blood glucose levels were increased and NO plasma levels decreased. High-fat-diet-fed mice myocardium revealed endothelial nitric oxide synthase dysfunction, reduced mitochondrial activity and markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. The administration of 1 mg/kg (-)-epicatechin for 15 days by oral gavage shifted these endpoints towards control mice values. Results suggest that endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates (-)-epicatechin-induced increases of indicators associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in endothelial cells. (-)-Epicatechin also counteracts the negative effects that high glucose or simulated type 2 diabetes has on endothelial nitric oxide synthase function. PMID:26993496

  1. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R.; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells. PMID:26977592

  2. Dexamethasone, tetrahydrobiopterin and uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Silke; Habermeier, Alice; Siuda, Daniel; Reifenberg, Gisela; Xia, Ning; Closs, Ellen I; Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2015-01-01

    Objective To find out whether dexamethasone induces an uncoupling of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Methods & Results A major cause of eNOS uncoupling is a deficiency of its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Treatment of human EA.hy 926 endothelial cells with dexamethasone decreased mRNA and protein expression of both BH4-synthesizing enzymes: GTP cyclohydrolase I and dihydrofolate reductase. Consistently, a concentration- and time-dependent reduction of BH4, dihydrobiopterin (BH2) as well as BH4: BH2 ratio was observed in dexamethasone-treated cells. Surprisingly, no evidence for eNOS uncoupling was found. We then analyzed the expression and phosphorylation of the eNOS enzyme. Dexamethasone treatment led to a down-regulation of eNOS protein and a reduction of eNOS phosphorylation at serine 1177. A reduction of eNOS expression may lead to a relatively normal BH4: eNOS molar ratio in dexamethasone-treated cells. Because the BH4-eNOS stoichiometry rather than the absolute BH4 amount is the key determinant of eNOS functionality (i.e., coupled or uncoupled), the down-regulation of eNOS may represent an explanation for the absence of eNOS uncoupling. Phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1177 is needed for both the NO-producing activity of the coupled eNOS and the superoxide-producing activity of the uncoupled eNOS. Thus, a reduction of serine 1177 phosphorylation may render a potentially uncoupled eNOS hardly detectable. Conclusions Although dexamethasone reduces BH4 levels in endothelial cells, eNOS uncoupling is not evident. The reduction of NO production in dexamethasone-treated endothelial cells is mainly attributable to reduced eNOS expression and decreased eNOS phosphorylation at serine 1177. PMID:26512245

  3. Xiaokening stimulates endothelial nitric oxide release in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong; Liu, Lei; Wei, Qunli; Cui, Jie; Yan, Changdong; Wang, Xin; Wu, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus induces microangiopathic changes that lead to endothelial dysfunction. This study investigated the effect of Xiaokening, a type of Chinese compound medicine, on the mesenteric arteriolar endothelial cell function of diabetic rats and its underlying mechanism. METHODS Diabetes mellitus was induced in rat models via intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin and observed over three weeks. Mesenteric arterioles, which were isolated in a cannulated and pressurised state, were incubated with intravascular injections of 1, 3 or 5 g/L Xiaokening for 24, 48 or 72 hours. The effects of Xiaokening on the release of nitric oxide (NO) on the mesenteric arterioles were detected under shear stress of 1, 10 and 20 dyn/cm2. Biochemical methods were used to determine the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and xanthine oxidase (XO). The expressions of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), SOD and XO in the mesenteric arterioles were assessed using Western blot. RESULTS Compared to normal rat arterioles, less NO was released in the mesenteric arterioles of diabetic rats. Xiaokening was found to have a concentration- and time-dependent effect on NO release; when the shear stress was increased, there was a gradual increase in the release of NO. Compared to normal arterioles, the expression of eNOS in the mesenteric arterioles of diabetic rats was lower. Incubation with Xiaokening increased SOD activity and expression, and decreased XO activity and expression in the mesenteric arterioles of the diabetic rats. CONCLUSION Xiaokening was able to significantly increase NO release and improve the endothelial function of mesenteric arterioles through antioxidative mechanisms. PMID:26243977

  4. Genistein activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase in broiler pulmonary arterial endothelial cells by an Akt-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Nie, Wei; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhang, Bingkun; Wang, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Deregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in the development of multiple cardiovascular diseases. Our recent study demonstrated that genistein supplementation attenuates pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers by restoration of endothelial function. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by using broiler pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs). Our results showed that genistein stimulated a rapid phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179 which was associated with activation of eNOS/NO axis. Further study indicated that the activation of eNOS was not mediated through estrogen receptors or tyrosine kinase inhibition, but via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt-dependent signaling pathway, as the eNOS activity and related NO release were largely abolished by pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K or Akt. Thus, our findings revealed a critical function of Akt in mediating genistein-stimulated eNOS activity in PAECs, partially accounting for the beneficial effects of genistein on the development of cardiovascular diseases observed in animal models. PMID:20926919

  5. Anti-obesogenic role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Brian E.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased remarkably in the past four decades. Because obesity can promote the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, understanding the mechanisms that engender weight gain and discovering safe anti-obesity therapies are of critical importance. In particular, the gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO), appears to be a central factor regulating adiposity and systemic metabolism. Obese and diabetic states are characterized by a deficit in bioavailable NO, with such decreases commonly attributed to downregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), loss of eNOS activity, or quenching of NO by its reaction with oxygen radicals. Gain-of-function studies, in which vascular-derived NO has been increased pharmacologically or genetically, reveal remarkable actions of NO on body composition and systemic metabolism. This review addresses the metabolic actions of eNOS and the potential therapeutic utility of harnessing its anti-obesogenic effects. PMID:25189393

  6. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates arteriolar vasodilatation after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Schwarzmaier, Susanne M; Terpolilli, Nicole A; Dienel, Ari; Gallozzi, Micaela; Schinzel, Reinhard; Tegtmeier, Frank; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2015-05-15

    Brain edema and increased cerebral blood volume (CBV) contribute to intracranial hypertension and hence to unfavorable outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The increased post-traumatic CBV may be caused in part by arterial vasodilatation. The aim of the current study was to uncover the largely unknown mechanisms of post-traumatic arteriolar vasodilatation. The diameter of pial arterioles and venules was monitored by intravital fluorescence microscopy before (baseline) and for 30 min after controlled cortical impact in C57BL/6 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-/- mice (n=5-6/group) and in C57BL/6 mice (n=6/group) receiving vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]) or 4-amino-tetrahydro-L-biopterine (VAS203), a NOS inhibitor previously shown to reduce post-traumatic intracranial hypertension. Temperature, end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO₂), and mean arterial blood pressure were kept within the physiological range throughout the experiments. Arteriolar diameters were stable during baseline monitoring but increased significantly in C57BL/6 mice after controlled cortical impact (136±7% of baseline; p<0.001 vs. baseline). This response was reduced by 78% in eNOS-/- mice (108±3% of baseline; p<0.005 vs. wild-type). Application of VAS203, a NOS inhibitor, or PBS did not affect vessels diameter before TBI. After trauma, however, administration of VAS203 reduced arteriolar diameter to 92±2% of baseline (p<0.05). The diameter of pial veins was not affected. Our results suggest that arteriolar vasodilatation after TBI is largely mediated by excess production of endothelial nitric oxide. Accordingly, our data may explain the beneficial effects of the NOS inhibitor VAS203 in the early phase after TBI and suggest that inhibition of excess endothelial nitric oxide production may represent a novel therapeutic strategy following TBI. PMID:25363688

  7. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lahdenranta, Johanna; Hagendoorn, Jeroen; Padera, Timothy P.; Hoshida, Tohru; Nelson, Gregory; Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai

    2009-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis is a critical determinant of cancer prognosis. Recently, several lymphangiogenic molecules such as vafscular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C and -D were identified. However, the mechanistic understanding of lymphatic metastasis is still in infancy. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in regulating blood vessel growth and function as well as lymphatic vessel function. NOS expression correlates with lymphatic metastasis. However, causal relationship between NOS and lymphatic metastasis has not been documented. To this end, we first show that both VEGF receptor-2 and -3 stimulation activate eNOS in lymphatic endothelial cells and that NO donors induce proliferation and/or survival of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells in a dose dependent manner. We find that an NOS inhibitor L-NMMA blocked regeneration of lymphatic vessels. Using intravital microscopy that allows us to visualize the steps of lymphatic metastasis, we show that genetic deletion of eNOS as well as NOS blockade attenuates peritumor lymphatic hyperplasia of VEGF-C-overexpressing T241 fibrosarcomas and decreases the delivery of metastatic tumor cells to the draining lymph nodes. Genetic deletion of eNOS in the host also leads to a decrease in T241 tumor cell dissemination to the lymph nodes and macroscopic lymph node metastasis of B16F10 melanoma. These findings indicate that eNOS mediates VEGF-C induced lymphangiogenesis and, consequently, plays a critical role in lymphatic metastasis. Our findings explain the correlation between NOS and lymphatic metastasis seen in a number of human tumors and open the door for potential therapies exploiting NO signaling to treat diseases of the lymphatic system. PMID:19318557

  8. Cadmium attenuates bradykinin-driven nitric oxide production by interplaying with the localization pattern of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Syamantak; Gupta, Ravi; Reddy, Himabindu; Sinha, Swaraj; Muley, Ajit; Kolluru, Gopi Krishna; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium, a ubiquitous heavy metal, interferes with endothelial functions and angiogenesis. Bradykinin is a Ca-mobilizing soluble peptide that acts via nitric oxide to promote vasodilation and capillary permeability. The objective of the present study was to explore the Cd implications in bradykinin-dependent endothelial functions. An egg yolk angiogenesis model was employed to evaluate the effect of Cd on bradykinin-induced angiogenesis. The results demonstrate that 100 nmol/L Cd attenuated bradykinin-dependent angiogenesis. The results of the in vitro wound healing and tube formation assays by using EAhy 926, a transformed endothelial cell line, suggest that Cd blocked bradykinin-mediated endothelial migration and tube formation by 38% and 67%, respectively, while nitric oxide supplementation could reverse the effect of Cd on bradykinin-induced endothelial migration by 94%. The detection of nitric oxide by using a DAF-2DA fluorescent probe, Griess assay, and ultrasensitive electrode suggests that Cd blocked bradykinin-induced nitric oxide production. Fluorescence imaging of eNOS-GFP transfected endothelial cells, immunofluorescence, and Western blot studies of Cd and bradykinin-treated cells show that Cd interfered with the localization pattern of eNOS, which possibly attenuates nitric oxide production in part. Additionally, Ca imaging of Cd- and bradykinin-treated cells suggests that Cd blocked bradykinin-dependent Ca influx into the cells, thus partially blocking Ca-dependent nitric oxide production in endothelial cells. The results of this study conclude that Cd blunted the effect of bradykinin by interfering with the Ca-associated NOS activity specifically by impeding subcellular trafficking of eNOS. PMID:19767824

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Dancs, Péter; Kerék, Margit; Németh, Tamás; Faragó, Bernadett; Balogh, Andrea; Patil, Renukadevi; Jennings, Brett L.; Liliom, Károly; Malik, Kafait U.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Tigyi, Gabor; Benyó, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been implicated as a mediator of several cardiovascular functions, but its potential involvement in the control of vascular tone is obscure. Here, we show that both LPA (18:1) and VPC31143 (a synthetic agonist of LPA1–3 receptors) relax intact mouse thoracic aorta with similar Emax values (53.9 and 51.9% of phenylephrine-induced precontraction), although the EC50 of LPA- and VPC31143-induced vasorelaxations were different (400 vs. 15 nM, respectively). Mechanical removal of the endothelium or genetic deletion of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) not only diminished vasorelaxation by LPA or VPC31143 but converted it to vasoconstriction. Freshly isolated mouse aortic endothelial cells expressed LPA1, LPA2, LPA4 and LPA5 transcripts. The LPA1,3 antagonist Ki16425, the LPA1 antagonist AM095, and the genetic deletion of LPA1, but not that of LPA2, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3 kinase–protein kinase B/Akt pathway by wortmannin or MK-2206 failed to influence the effect of LPA. However, pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) by U73122 or edelfosine, but not genetic deletion of PLCε, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation and indicated that a PLC enzyme, other than PLCε, mediates the response. In summary, the present study identifies LPA as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator substance acting via LPA1, PLC, and eNOS.—Ruisanchez, É., Dancs, P., Kerék, M., Németh, T., Faragó, B., Balogh, A., Patil, R., Jennings, B. L., Liliom, K., Malik, K. U., Smrcka, A. V., Tigyi, G., Benyó, Z. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. PMID:24249637

  10. Effects of statins on nitric oxide/cGMP signaling in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Meda, Claudia; Plank, Christian; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Schmidt, Kurt; Mayer, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were established as in vitro models for the modulation of endothelial function and cell viability by statins. Emphasis was placed on the biphasic effects of the drugs on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and cytotoxicity, as well as drug interference with the interaction of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) with caveolin-1 (Cav-1). Incubation of HUVECs with fluvastatin, lovastatin or cerivastatin for 24 h caused an approximately 3-fold upregulation of eNOS expression that was associated with increased eNOS activity and accumulation of cGMP. Cerivastatin exhibited the highest potency with an EC50 of 13.8 +/- 2 nM after 24 h, while having no effect after only 30 min. The effects of statins on eNOS expression were similar in control and Cav-1 knockdown cells, but the increase in eNOS activity was less pronounced in Cav-1-deficient cells. Statin-triggered cytotoxicity occurred at approximately 10-fold higher drug concentrations (maximal toxicity at 1-10 microM), was sensitive to mevalonate, and was significantly enhanced in the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine. The overexpression of eNOS induced by clinically relevant concentrations of statins may contribute to the beneficial vascular effects of the drugs in patients. Stimulation of NO synthesis and cytotoxicity appear to share a common initial mechanism but involve distinct downstream signaling cascades that exhibit differential sensitivity to HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. PMID:20360620

  11. Endothelin-1 Impairs Nitric Oxide Signaling in Endothelial Cells Through a Protein Kinase Cδ-Dependent Activation of STAT3 and Decreased Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu

    2009-01-01

    In an ovine model of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression is increased, while endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression is decreased. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ET-1 attenuates eNOS expression in endothelial cells are not completely understood. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine if the overexpression of ET-1 decreases eNOS expression in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells isolated from fetal lambs. To increase the ET-1 expression, cells were transfected with a plasmid coding for Prepro-ET-1, a precursor of ET-1. After overexpression of Prepro-ET-1, ET-1 levels in the culture medium were significantly increased (control = 805.3 ± 69.8; Prepro-ET-1 overexpression = 1351 ± 127.9). eNOS promoter activity, protein levels, and NO generation were all significantly decreased by the overexpression of Prepro-ET-1. The decrease in transcription correlated with increased activity of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) and STAT3. Further, DNA binding activity of STAT3 was also increased by Prepro-ET-1 overexpression. The increase in STAT3 activity and decrease in eNOS promoter activity were inhibited by the overexpression of dominant negative mutants of PKCδ or STAT3. Further, a 2 bp mutation in the STAT3 binding site in the eNOS promoter inhibited STAT3 binding and led to enhanced promoter activity in the presence of Prepro-ET-1 overexpression. In conclusion, ET-1 secretion is increased by Prepro-ET-1 overexpression. This results in activation of PKCδ, which phosphorylates STAT3, increasing its binding to the eNOS promoter. This in turn decreases eNOS promoter activity, protein levels, and NO production. Thus, ET-1 can reduce eNOS expression and NO generation in fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cells through PKCδ-mediated activation of STAT3. PMID:19754268

  12. Preserved Microvascular Endothelial Function in Young, Obese Adults with Functional Loss of Nitric Oxide Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Harrell, John W.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Evans, Trent D.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Schrage, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Data indicate endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) may be preserved in the skeletal muscle microcirculation of young, obese adults. Preserved EDD might be mediated by compensatory mechanisms, impeding insight into preclinical vascular dysfunction. We aimed to determine the functional roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) toward EDD in younger obese adults. We first hypothesized EDD would be preserved in young, obese adults. Further, we hypothesized a reduced contribution of NOS in young, obese adults would be replaced by increased COX signaling. Microvascular EDD was assessed with Doppler ultrasound and brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) in younger (27 ± 1 year) obese (n = 29) and lean (n = 46) humans. Individual and combined contributions of NOS and COX were examined with intra-arterial infusions of l-NMMA and ketorolac, respectively. Vasodilation was quantified as an increase in forearm vascular conductance (ΔFVC). Arterial endothelial cell biopsies were analyzed for protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). ΔFVC to ACh was similar between groups. After l-NMMA, ΔFVC to ACh was greater in obese adults (p < 0.05). There were no group differences in ΔFVC to ACh with ketorolac. With combined NOS-COX inhibition, ΔFVC was greater in obese adults at the intermediate dose of ACh. Surprisingly, arterial endothelial cell eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS were similar between groups. Younger obese adults exhibit preserved EDD and eNOS expression despite functional dissociation of NOS-mediated vasodilation and similar COX signaling. Compensatory NOS- and COX-independent vasodilatory mechanisms conceal reduced NOS contributions in otherwise healthy obese adults early in life, which may contribute to vascular dysfunction. PMID:26733880

  13. Functional role of NF-κB in expression of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Joohwan; Kwak, Su-Nam; Lee, Kwang-Soon; Lee, Dong-Keon; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Won, Moo-Ho; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Kwon, Young-Guen; Kim, Young-Myeong

    2014-05-23

    The transcription factor NF-κB has an essential role in inflammation in endothelial cells. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO) prevents vascular inflammation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying NF-κB-mediated regulation of eNOS expression has not been clearly elucidated. We here found that NF-κB-activating stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β, suppressed eNOS mRNA and protein levels by decreasing mRNA stability, without affecting promoter activity. TNF-α-mediated suppression of eNOS expression, mRNA stability, and 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) activity were inhibited by NF-κB inhibitors and Dicer knockdown, but not by p38 MAPK and MEK inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of NF-κB-responsive miRNAs in eNOS expression. Moreover, TNF-α increased MIR155HG expression and promoter activity as well as miR-155 biogenesis, and these increases were blocked by NF-κB inhibitors. Transfection with antagomiR-155 blocked TNF-α-mediated suppression of eNOS 3'UTR activity, eNOS mRNA and protein levels, and NO and cGMP production. These data provide evidence that NF-κB is a negative regulator of eNOS expression via upregulation of miR-155 under inflammatory conditions. These results suggest that NF-κB is a potential therapeutic target for preventing vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction induced by suppression of miR-155-mediated eNOS expression. PMID:24769202

  14. Endothelial dysfunction in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice: role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Silva, Grazielle C; Silva, Josiane F; Diniz, Thiago F; Lemos, Virginia S; Cortes, Steyner F

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a common problem associated with hypertension and is considered a precursor to the development of micro- and macro-vascular complications. The present study investigated the involvement of nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) and H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) in the impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the mesenteric arteries of DOCA (deoxycorticosterone acetate)-salt-hypertensive mice. Myograph studies were used to investigate the endothelium-dependent vasodilator effect of ACh (acetylcholine). The expression and phosphorylation of nNOS and eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) were studied by Western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence was used to examine the localization of nNOS and eNOS in the endothelial layer of the mesenteric artery. The vasodilator effect of ACh is strongly impaired in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Non-selective inhibition of NOS sharply reduced the effect of ACh in both DOCA-salt-hypertensive and sham mice. Selective inhibition of nNOS and catalase led to a higher reduction in the effect of ACh in sham than in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Production of H2O2 induced by ACh was significantly reduced in vessels from DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, and it was blunted after nNOS inhibition. The expression of both eNOS and nNOS was considerably lower in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, whereas phosphorylation of their inhibitory sites was increased. The presence of nNOS was confirmed in the endothelial layer of mesenteric arteries from both sham and DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. These results demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction in the mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice is associated with reduced expression and functioning of nNOS and impaired production of nNOS-derived H2O2 Such findings offer a new perspective for the understanding of endothelial dysfunction in hypertension. PMID:26976926

  15. Adenosine preconditioning attenuates hepatic reperfusion injury in the rat by preventing the down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Virlos, Ioannis T; Habib, Nagy A; Williamson, Robin CN; Mathie, Robert T

    2002-01-01

    Background Previous work has suggested that in the liver, adenosine preconditioning is mediated by nitric oxide. Whether the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase plays a part in this mechanism has however not yet been investigated. Methods Wistar rats were used (6 in each group) – Groups: (1) sham, (2) ischemia-reperfusion, (3) adenosine + ischemia-reperfusion, (4) endothelial isoform inhibitor + adenosine + ischemia-reperfusion. Results Using immunohistochemistry, this study has revealed a decrease in the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase following hepatic ischemia-reperfusion. This was prevented by adenosine pre-treatment. When an inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase was administered prior to adenosine pre-treatment, pre-conditioning did not occur despite normal expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Conclusions These findings suggest that adenosine attenuates hepatic injury by preventing the downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase that occurs during ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:12241560

  16. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation in endothelial cells by S1P1 and S1P3.

    PubMed

    Tölle, M; Klöckl, L; Wiedon, A; Zidek, W; van der Giet, M; Schuchardt, M

    2016-08-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Lysophospholipid interaction with sphingosine 1-phosphat (S1P) receptors results in eNOS activation in different cells. In endothelial cells, eNOS activation via S1P1 or S1P3 was shown controversially. The aim of this study is to investigate the meaning of both S1P receptors for eNOS activation in human endothelial cells. Therefore, several S1P1 and S1P3 agonists in combination with antagonists and specific RNAi approach were used. eNOS activation was measured in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) via DAF2-DA-based fluorescence microscopy. For investigation of the signaling pathway, agonists/antagonist studies, RNAi approach, Luminex™ multiplex, and Western Blot were used. In HUVEC, both the S1P1 agonist AUY954 as well as the S1P1,3 agonist FTY720P induced eNOS activation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Other S1P1 agonists activated eNOS to a lesser extent. The AUY954-induced eNOS activation was blocked by the S1P1 antagonist W146, the combination of W146 and the S1P3 antagonist CAY10444 and the S1P1,3 antagonist VPC23019, but not by CAY10444 indicating the meaning of S1P1 for the AUY954-induced eNOS activation. The FTY720P-induced eNOS activation was blocked only by the combination of W146 and CAY10444 and the combined S1P1,3 antagonist VPC23019, but not by W146 or CAY10444 indicating the importance of both S1P1 and S1P3 for FTY720-induced eNOS activation. These results were confirmed using specific siRNA against S1P1 and S1P3. The S1P1,3 activation results in Akt phosphorylation and subsequent activation of eNOS via phosphorylation at serine(1177) and dephosphorylation at threonine(495). Beside former investigations with rather unspecific S1P receptor activation these data show potent selective S1P1 activation by using AUY954 and with selective S1P receptor inhibition evidence was provided that both S1P1 and S1P3 lead to downstream activation of eNOS in

  17. CYP1B1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase combine to sustain proangiogenic functions of endothelial cells under hyperoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yixin; Scheef, Elizabeth A.; Gurel, Zafer; Sorenson, Christine M.; Jefcoate, Colin R.

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that deletion of constitutively expressed CYP1B1 is associated with attenuation of retinal endothelial cell (EC) capillary morphogenesis (CM) in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. This was largely caused by increased intracellular oxidative stress and increased production of thrombospondin-2, an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression is dramatically decreased in the ECs prepared from retina, lung, heart, and aorta of CYP1B1-deficient (CYP1B1−/−) mice compared with wild-type (CYP1B1+/+) mice. The eNOS expression was also decreased in retinal vasculature of CYP1B1−/− mice. Inhibition of eNOS activity in cultured CYP1B1+/+ retinal ECs blocked CM and was concomitant with increased oxidative stress, like in CYP1B1−/− retinal ECs. In addition, expression of eNOS in CYP1B1−/− retinal ECs or their incubation with a nitric oxide (NO) donor enhanced NO levels, lowered oxidative stress, and improved cell migration and CM. Inhibition of CYP1B1 activity in the CYP1B1+/+ retinal ECs resulted in reduced NO levels and attenuation of CM. In contrast, expression of CYP1B1 increased NO levels and enhanced CM of CYP1B1−/− retinal ECs. Furthermore, attenuation of CYP1B1 expression with small interfering RNA proportionally lowered eNOS expression and NO levels in wild-type cells. Together, our results link CYP1B1 metabolism in retinal ECs with sustained eNOS activity and NO synthesis and/or bioavailability and low oxidative stress and thrombospondin-2 expression. Thus CYP1B1 and eNOS cooperate in different ways to lower oxidative stress and thereby to promote CM in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:20032512

  18. Acute laminar shear stress reversibly increases human glomerular endothelial cell permeability via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Heather S; Slater, Sadie C; Clarke, Hayley; Cahill, Paul A; Mathieson, Peter W; Welsh, Gavin I; Satchell, Simon C

    2011-10-01

    Laminar shear stress is a key determinant of systemic vascular behavior, including through activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), but little is known of its role in the glomerulus. We confirmed eNOS expression by glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC) in tissue sections and examined effects of acute exposure (up to 24 h) to physiologically relevant levels of laminar shear stress (10-20 dyn/cm(2)) in conditionally immortalized human GEnC. Laminar shear stress caused an orientation of GEnC and stress fibers parallel to the direction of flow and induced Akt and eNOS phosphorylation along with NO production. Inhibition of the phophatidylinositol (PI)3-kinase/Akt pathway attenuated laminar shear stress-induced eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Laminar shear stress of 10 dyn/cm(2) had a dramatic effect on GEnC permeability, reversibly decreasing the electrical resistance across GEnC monolayers. Finally, the laminar shear stress-induced reduction in electrical resistance was attenuated by the NOS inhibitors l-N(G)-monomethyl arginine (l-NMMA) and l-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and also by inhibition of the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Hence we have shown for GEnC in vitro that acute permeability responses to laminar shear stress are dependent on NO, produced via activation of the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway and increased eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest the importance of laminar shear stress and NO in regulating the contribution of GEnC to the permeability properties of the glomerular capillary wall. PMID:21775480

  19. Nitric oxide and hypoxia stimulate erythropoietin receptor via MAPK kinase in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cokic, Bojana B Beleslin; Cokic, Vladan P; Suresh, Sukanya; Wirt, Stacey; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-03-01

    Erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression level determines the extent of erythropoietin (EPO) response. Previously we showed that EPOR expression in endothelial cells is increased at low oxygen tension and that EPO stimulation of endothelial cells during hypoxia can increase endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) expression and activation as well as NO production. We now observe that while EPO can stimulate NO production, NO in turn can regulate EPOR expression. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) treated with 10-50 μM of NO donor diethylenetriamine NONOate (DETANO) for 24h showed significant induction of EPOR gene expression at 5% and 2% of oxygen. Also human bone marrow microvascular endothelial cell line (TrHBMEC) cultured at 21 and 2% oxygen with 50 μM DETANO demonstrated a time and oxygen dependent induction of EPOR mRNA expression after 24 and 48 h, particularly at low oxygen tension. EPOR protein was also induced by DETANO at 2% oxygen in TrHBMEC and HUVEC. The activation of signaling pathways by NO donor stimulation appeared to be distinct from EPO stimulation. In reporter gene assays, DETANO treatment of HeLa cells at 2% oxygen increased EPOR promoter activity indicated by a 48% increase in luciferase activity with a 2 kb EPOR promoter fragment and a 71% increase in activity with a minimal EPOR promoter fragment containing 0.2 kb 5'. We found that DETANO activated MAPK kinase in TrHBMEC both in normoxia and hypoxia, while MAPK kinase inhibition showed significant reduction of EPOR mRNA gene expression at low oxygen tension, suggesting MAPK involvement in NO mediated induction of EPOR. Furthermore, DETANO stimulated Akt anti-apoptotic activity after 30 min in normoxia, whereas it inhibited Akt phosphorylation in hypoxia. In contrast, EPO did not significantly increase MAPK activity while EPO stimulated Akt phosphorylation in TrHBMEC in normoxia and hypoxia. These observations provide a new effect of NO on EPOR expression to enhance EPO

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates the nitric oxide component of reflex cutaneous vasodilatation during dynamic exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Tanner C; Keen, Jeremy T; Simmons, Grant H; Alexander, Lacy M; Wong, Brett J

    2014-12-01

    Recent data suggests neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) mediates the NO component of reflex cutaneous vasodilatation with passive heat stress. We tested the hypothesis that nNOS inhibition would attenuate reflex cutaneous vasodilatation during sustained dynamic exercise in young healthy humans. All subjects first performed an incremental V̇O2, peak test to exhaustion on a custom-built supine cycle ergometer. On a separate day, subjects were instrumented with four intradermal microdialysis fibres on the forearm and each randomly assigned as: (1) lactated Ringer's (control); (2) 20 mm Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (non-selective NOS inhibitor); (3) 5 mm N-propyl-l-arginine (nNOS inhibitor); and (4) 10 mm N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)-l-ornithine dihydrochloride [endothelial NOS (eNOS) inhibitor]. Following microdialysis placement, subjects performed supine cycling with the experimental arm at heart level at 60% V̇O2, peak for a period sufficient to raise core temperature 0.8°C. At the end of cycling, all microdialysis sites were locally heated to 43°C and sodium nitroprusside was perfused to elicit maximal vasodilatation. Mean arterial pressure, skin blood flow via laser-Doppler flowmetry and core temperature via ingestible telemetric pill were measured continuously; cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as laser-Doppler flowmetry/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximum. There was no significant difference between control (58 ± 2%CVCmax) and nNOS-inhibited (56 ± 3%CVCmax) sites in response to exercise-induced hyperthermia. The increase in CVC at eNOS-inhibited (41 ± 3%CVCmax) and non-selective NOS-inhibited (40 ± 4%CVCmax) sites were significantly attenuated compared to control and nNOS-inhibited (P < 0.001 all conditions) but there was no difference between eNOS-inhibited and non-selective NOS-inhibited sites. These data suggest eNOS, not nNOS, mediate NO synthesis during reflex cutaneous vasodilatation with

  1. Roles of cardiovascular risk factors in endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulation: an update.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Liang, Zhengdong; Lu, Jian-Ming; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the number one killer in the United States and many other countries. Each year, there are enormous research efforts on its pathogenesis, prevention and treatment led by scientists worldwide. One of the most significant research areas is the impact and mechanisms of existing or new cardiovascular risk factors on the vascular system. The current review provides the most updated research advances in the area of the regulation of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide (eNOS-NO) system by several cardiovascular risk factors. There are many exciting discoveries made from the studies of several major cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus as well as emerging risk factors such as HIV infection, antiretroviral therapy, genomic variability, and cytokines. In general, cardiovascular risk factors could impair the eNOS-NO system with a variety of molecular mechanisms including decrease in NO bioavailability by excess reactive oxygen species, inhibition of eNOS expression and activity, and deficiency of eNOS cofactors. Special attention is paid to the impact of several new or emerging risk factors on cardiovascular disease and the eNOS-NO system. These mechanistic studies are clinically significant because they may lead towards new and effective strategies for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:24180390

  2. Ambient ultrafine particles reduce endothelial nitric oxide production via S-glutathionylation of eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yunfeng; Navab, Mohamad; Shen, Melody; Hill, James; Pakbin, Payam; Sioutas, Constantinos; Hsiai, Tzung; Li, Rongsong

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate pollutants is intimately linked to vascular oxidative stress and inflammatory responses with clinical relevance to atherosclerosis. Particulate matter (PM) has been reported to induce endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Here, we tested whether ambient ultrafine particles (UFP, diameter < 200 nm) modulate eNOS activity in terms of nitric oxide (NO) production via protein S-glutathionylation. Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) with UFP significantly reduced NO production. UFP-mediated reduction in NO production was restored in the presence of JNK inhibitor (SP600125), NADPH oxidase inhibitor (Apocynin), anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine), and superoxide dismutase mimetics (Tempol and MnTMPyP). UFP exposure increased the GSSG/GSH ratio and eNOS S-glutathionylation, whereas over-expression of Glutaredoxin-1 (to inhibit S-glutathionylation) restored UFP-mediated reduction in NO production by nearly 80%. Thus, our findings suggest that eNOS S-glutathionylation is a potential mechanism underlying ambient UFP-induced reduction of NO production. PMID:23751346

  3. Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress, and p66Shc Interplay in Diabetic Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Simona; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Gaetano, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability play a causal role in endothelial cell dysfunction occurring in the vasculature of diabetic patients. In this review, we summarized the molecular mechanisms underpinning diabetic endothelial and vascular dysfunction. In particular, we focused our attention on the complex interplay existing among NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and one crucial regulator of intracellular ROS production, p66Shc protein. PMID:24734227

  4. Korean Red Ginseng Water Extract Restores Impaired Endothelial Function by Inhibiting Arginase Activity in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwanhoon; Yoon, Jeongyeon

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the prime cause of morbidity and mortality and the population ages that may contribute to increase in the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Arginase upregulation is associated with impaired endothelial function in aged vascular system and thus may contribute to cardiovascular disease. According to recent research, Korean Red Ginseng water extract (KRGE) may reduce cardiovascular disease risk by improving vascular system health. The purpose of this study was to examine mechanisms contributing to age-related vascular endothelial dysfunction and to determine whether KRGE improves these functions in aged mice. Young (10±3 weeks) and aged (55±5 weeks) male mice (C57BL/6J) were orally administered 0, 10, or 20 mg/mouse/day of KRGE for 4 weeks. Animals were sacrificed and the aortas were removed. Endothelial arginase activity, nitric oxide (NO) generation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) coupling, vascular tension, and plasma peroxynitrite production were measured. KRGE attenuated arginase activity, restored nitric oxide (NO) generation, reduced ROS production, and enhanced eNOS coupling in aged mice. KRGE also improved vascular tension in aged vessels, as indicated by increased acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation and improved phenylephrine-stimulated vasoconstriction. Furthermore, KRGE prevented plasma peroxynitrite formation in aged mice, indicating reduced lipid peroxidation. These results suggest KRGE exerts vasoprotective effects by inhibiting arginase activity and augmenting NO signaling and may be a useful treatment for age-dependent vascular diseases. PMID:24757370

  5. Delta- and gamma-tocotrienol isomers are potent in inhibiting inflammation and endothelial activation in stimulated human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Muid, Suhaila; Froemming, Gabriele R. Anisah; Rahman, Thuhairah; Ali, A. Manaf; Nawawi, Hapizah M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tocotrienols (TCTs) are more potent antioxidants than α-tocopherol (TOC). However, the effectiveness and mechanism of the action of TCT isomers as anti-atherosclerotic agents in stimulated human endothelial cells under inflammatory conditions are not well established. Aims 1) To compare the effects of different TCT isomers on inflammation, endothelial activation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). 2) To identify the two most potent TCT isomers in stimulated human endothelial cells. 3) To investigate the effects of TCT isomers on NFκB activation, and protein and gene expression levels in stimulated human endothelial cells. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with various concentrations of TCT isomers or α-TOC (0.3–10 µM), together with lipopolysaccharides for 16 h. Supernatant cells were collected and measured for protein and gene expression of cytokines (interleukin-6, or IL-6; tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or TNF-α), adhesion molecules (intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, or ICAM-1; vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, or VCAM-1; and e-selectin), eNOS, and NFκB. Results δ-TCT is the most potent TCT isomer in the inhibition of IL-6, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and NFκB, and it is the second potent in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS. γ-TCT isomer is the most potent isomer in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS, and it is the second most potent in inhibiting is IL-6, VCAM-1, and NFκB. For ICAM-1 protein expression, the most potent is δ-TCT followed by α-TCT. α- and β-TCT inhibit IL-6 at the highest concentration (10 µM) but enhance IL-6 at lower concentrations. γ-TCT markedly increases eNOS expression by 8–11-fold at higher concentrations (5–10 µM) but exhibits neutral effects at lower concentrations. Conclusion δ- and γ-TCT are the two most potent TCT isomers in terms of the inhibition of inflammation and endothelial activation whilst enhancing eNOS, possibly mediated via the NFκB pathway. Hence, there is a

  6. Pterostilbene, an Active Constituent of Blueberries, Stimulates Nitric Oxide Production via Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Hoon; Jeong, Sun-Oh; Chung, Hun-Teag; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, a key process in development of cardiovascular diseases, is largely due to reduced nitric oxide (NO) derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Resveratrol has been reported to stimulate NO production via estrogen receptor α (ERα) activation in endothelial cells. Here, we investigated whether two natural methylated analogs of resveratrol, pterostilbene (Pts) and trans-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene (TMS), similarly to resveratrol, could influence endothelial NO release in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In HUVECs exposed to Pts or TMS, NO production and phosphorylation of eNOS, protein kinase B (Akt), and ERα were measured by using a fluorimetric NO assay kit and Western blot analysis, respectively. Dimethylated Pts, but not trimethylated TMS, stimulated dose-dependent NO production via eNOS phosphorylation. Pts also stimulated dose-dependent phosphorylation of Akt, but not of ERα. NO production and eNOS phosphorylation in response to Pts were significantly abolished by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt inhibitor LY294002, but not by the ERα antagonist ICI182780. Our results suggest that Pts, but not TMS, is capable of inducing eNOS phosphorylation and the subsequent NO release, presumably, by activating PI3K/Akt pathway. The potential efficacy of Pts, an active constituent of blueberries, may aid in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases characterized by endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26008990

  7. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Coxiella burnetii Replication and Parasitophorous Vacuole Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Dale; Barrows, Lorraine F.; Lindstrom, Nicole M.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a recognized cytotoxic effector against facultative and obligate intracellular bacteria. This study examined the effect of nitric oxide produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) up-regulated in response to cytokine stimulation, or by a synthetic nitric oxide donor, on replication of obligately intracellular Coxiella burnetii in murine L-929 cells. Immunoblotting and nitrite assays revealed that C. burnetii infection of L-929 cells augments expression of iNOS up-regulated in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Infection in the absence of cytokine stimulation did not result in demonstrable up-regulation of iNOS expression or in increased nitrite production. Nitrite production by cytokine-treated cells was significantly inhibited by the iNOS inhibitor S-methylisothiourea (SMT). Treatment of infected cells with IFN-γ and TNF-α or the synthetic nitric oxide donor 2,2′-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (DETA/NONOate) had a bacteriostatic effect on C. burnetii replication. Inhibition of replication was reversed upon addition of SMT to the culture medium of cytokine-treated cells. Microscopic analysis of infected cells revealed that nitric oxide (either cytokine induced or donor derived) inhibited formation of the mature (large) parasitophorous vacuole that is characteristic of C. burnetii infection of host cells. Instead, exposure of infected cells to nitric oxide resulted in the formation of multiple small, acidic vacuoles usually containing one C. burnetii cell. Removal of nitrosative stress resulted in the coalescence of small vacuoles to form a large vacuole harboring multiple C. burnetii cells. These experiments demonstrate that nitric oxide reversibly inhibits replication of C. burnetii and formation of the parasitophorous vacuole. PMID:12183564

  8. Tissue-engineered endothelial cell layers on surface-modified Ti for inhibiting in vitro platelet adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiupeng; He, Fupo; Li, Xia; Ito, Atsuo; Sogo, Yu; Maruyama, Osamu; Kosaka, Ryo; Ye, Jiandong

    2013-06-01

    A tissue-engineered endothelial layer was prepared by culturing endothelial cells on a fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-l-ascorbic acid phosphate magnesium salt n-hydrate (AsMg)-apatite (Ap) coated titanium plate. The FGF-2-AsMg-Ap coated Ti plate was prepared by immersing a Ti plate in supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions supplemented with FGF-2 and AsMg. The FGF-2-AsMg-Ap layer on the Ti plate accelerated proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and showed slightly higher, but not statistically significant, nitric oxide release from HUVECs than on as-prepared Ti. The endothelial layer maintained proper function of the endothelial cells and markedly inhibited in vitro platelet adhesion. The tissue-engineered endothelial layer formed on the FGF-2-AsMg-Ap layer is promising for ameliorating platelet activation and thrombus formation on cardiovascular implants.

  9. L-arginine inhibits isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy through nitric oxide and polyamine pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Li-Na; Xi, Yu-Hui; Li, Hong-Zhu; Xiao, Feng-Gang; Zhao, Ya-Jun; Tian, Ye; Yang, Bao-Feng; Xu, Chang-Qing

    2008-08-01

    Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Nitric oxide exhibits antihypertrophic functions and inhibits cardiac remodelling. However, the metabolism of polyamines and the potential interactions with nitric oxide in cardiac hypertrophy remain unclear. We randomly divided Wistar rats into four treatment groups: controls, isoproterenol (ISO), ISO and L-arginine, and L-arginine. Isoproterenol (5 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) and/or L-arginine (800 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally) was administered once daily for 7 days. The expression of atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and fibrogenesis of heart was assessed by Van Gieson staining. Polyamines were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography, and plasma nitric oxide content and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined with a spectrophotometer. The expression levels of ornithine decarboxylase, spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were analysed by Western blot. Heart-to-body weight ratio, left ventricle-to-body weight ratio, atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA expression, collagen fibres and LDH activity were elevated, both ornithine decarboxylase and SSAT proteins were up-regulated, and total polyamines were increased in the group treated with ISO. Additionally, the expression of iNOS was up-regulated, eNOS was down-regulated, and nitric oxide levels were low. Notably, cotreatment with L-arginine reversed most of these changes except for SSAT expression,which was further up-regulated. We propose that increased polyamines and decreased nitric oxide are involved in cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO and suggest that L-arginine pre-treatment can attenuate cardiac hypertrophy through the regulation of key enzymes of the polyamine and nitric oxide pathways. PMID:18816294

  10. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung Min; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis plays an essential role in embryo development, tissue repair, inflammatory diseases, and tumor growth. In the present study, we showed that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) regulates retinal angiogenesis. Mice that lack eNOS showed growth retardation, and retinal vessel development was significantly delayed. In addition, the number of tip cells and filopodia length were significantly reduced in mice lacking eNOS. Retinal endothelial cell proliferation was significantly blocked in mice lacking eNOS, and EMG-2-induced endothelial cell sprouting was significantly reduced in aortic vessels isolated from eNOS-deficient mice. Finally, pericyte recruitment to endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cell coverage to blood vessels were attenuated in mice lacking eNOS. Taken together, we suggest that the endothelial cell function and blood vessel maturation are regulated by eNOS during retinal angiogenesis. PMID:27610040

  11. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung Min; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an essential role in embryo development, tissue repair, inflammatory diseases, and tumor growth. In the present study, we showed that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) regulates retinal angiogenesis. Mice that lack eNOS showed growth retardation, and retinal vessel development was significantly delayed. In addition, the number of tip cells and filopodia length were significantly reduced in mice lacking eNOS. Retinal endothelial cell proliferation was significantly blocked in mice lacking eNOS, and EMG-2-induced endothelial cell sprouting was significantly reduced in aortic vessels isolated from eNOS-deficient mice. Finally, pericyte recruitment to endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cell coverage to blood vessels were attenuated in mice lacking eNOS. Taken together, we suggest that the endothelial cell function and blood vessel maturation are regulated by eNOS during retinal angiogenesis. PMID:27610040

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury Disrupts Cerebrovascular Tone Through Endothelial Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression and Nitric Oxide Gain of Function

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Nuria; Sonkusare, Swapnil K.; Longden, Thomas A.; Tran, Tram L.; Sackheim, Adrian M.; Nelson, Mark T.; Wellman, George C.; Freeman, Kalev

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been reported to increase the concentration of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain and can lead to loss of cerebrovascular tone; however, the sources, amounts, and consequences of excess NO on the cerebral vasculature are unknown. Our objective was to elucidate the mechanism of decreased cerebral artery tone after TBI. Methods and Results Cerebral arteries were isolated from rats 24 hours after moderate fluid‐percussion TBI. Pressure‐induced increases in vasoconstriction (myogenic tone) and smooth muscle Ca2+ were severely blunted in cerebral arteries after TBI. However, myogenic tone and smooth muscle Ca2+ were restored by inhibition of NO synthesis or endothelium removal, suggesting that TBI increased endothelial NO levels. Live native cell NO, indexed by 4,5‐diaminofluorescein (DAF‐2 DA) fluorescence, was increased in endothelium and smooth muscle of cerebral arteries after TBI. Clamped concentrations of 20 to 30 nmol/L NO were required to simulate the loss of myogenic tone and increased (DAF‐2T) fluorescence observed following TBI. In comparison, basal NO in control arteries was estimated as 0.4 nmol/L. Consistent with TBI causing enhanced NO‐mediated vasodilation, inhibitors of guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G, and large‐conductance Ca2+‐activated potassium (BK) channel restored function of arteries from animals with TBI. Expression of the inducible isoform of NO synthase was upregulated in cerebral arteries isolated from animals with TBI, and the inducible isoform of NO synthase inhibitor 1400W restored myogenic responses following TBI. Conclusions The mechanism of profound cerebral artery vasodilation after TBI is a gain of function in vascular NO production by 60‐fold over controls, resulting from upregulation of the inducible isoform of NO synthase in the endothelium. PMID:25527626

  13. Triazine herbicides inhibit relaxin signaling and disrupt nitric oxide homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Si Eun; Lim, Sa Rang; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Bae, Jeehyeon

    2016-09-15

    Triazines are herbicides that are widely used worldwide, and we previously observed that the maternal exposure of mice to simazine (50 or 500μg/kg) resulted in smaller ovaries and uteri of their female offspring. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism that may account for the reproductive dysfunction induced by simazine. We found that following maternal exposure, simazine is transmitted to the offspring, as evidenced by its presence in the offspring ovaries. Analyses of the simazine-exposed offspring revealed that the expression of the relaxin hormone receptor, relaxin-family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), prominently decreased in their ovaries and uteri. In addition, downstream target genes of the relaxin pathway including nitric oxide (NO) synthase 2 (Nos2), Nos3, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Mmp9), and vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) were downregulated in their ovaries. Moreover, AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) levels and their phosphorylated active forms decreased in simazine-exposed ovaries. In vitro exposure of the human ovarian granulosa cells (KGN) and uterine endometrium cells (Hec-1A) to very low concentrations (0.001 to 1nM) of triazines including atrazine, terbuthylazine, and propazine repressed NO production with a concurrent reduction in RXFP1, NOS2, and NOS3. The inhibitory action of triazines on NO release was dependent on RXFP1, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, and ERK. Radioligand-binding assay also confirmed that triazines competitively inhibited the binding of relaxin to its receptor. Therefore, the present study suggests that triazine herbicides act as endocrine disrupters by interfering with relaxin hormone signaling. Thus, further evaluation of their impact on human health is imperative. PMID:27431321

  14. Role of nitric oxide in tumor microcirculation. Blood flow, vascular permeability, and leukocyte-endothelial interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Fukumura, D.; Yuan, F.; Endo, M.; Jain, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    The present study was designed to define the role of nitric oxide (NO) in tumor microcirculation, through the direct intravital microcirculatory observations after administration of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor and NO donor both regionally and systemically. More specifically, we tested the following hypotheses: 1) endogenous NO derived from tumor vascular endothelium and/or tumor cells increases and/or maintains tumor blood flow, decreases leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and increases vascular permeability, 2) exogenous NO can increase tumor blood flow via vessel dilatation and decrease leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and 3) NO production and tissue responses to NO are tumor dependent. To this end, a murine mammary adenocarcinoma (MCaIV) and a human colon adenocarcinoma (LS174T) were implanted in the dorsal skinfold chamber in C3H and severe combined immunodeficient mice, respectively, and observed by means of intravital fluorescence microscopy. Both regional and systemic inhibition of endogenous NO by N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 mumol/L superfusion or 10 mg/kg intravenously) significantly decreased vessel diameter and local blood flow rate. The diameter change was dominant on the arteriolar side. Superfusion of NO donor (spermine NO, 100 mumol/L) increased tumor vessel diameter and flow rate, whereas systemic injection of spermine NO (2.62 mg/kg) had no significant effect on these parameters. Rolling and stable adhesion of leukocytes were significantly increased by intravenous injection of L-NAME. In untreated animals, both MCaIV and LS174T tumor vessels were leaky to albumin. Systemic NO inhibition significantly attenuated tumor vascular permeability of MCaIV but not of LS174T tumor. Immunohistochemical studies, using polyclonal antibodies to endothelial NOS and inducible NOS, revealed a diffuse pattern of positive labeling in both MCaIV and LS174T tumors. Nitrite and nitrate levels in tumor interstitial fluid of MCaIV but not of LS

  15. Ventilator-induced lung injury is reduced in transgenic mice that overexpress endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Kaori; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Nishiuma, Teruaki; Sakashita, Akihiro; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Satouchi, Miyako; Ishida, Tatsuro; Kawashima, Seinosuke; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro

    2006-06-01

    Although mechanical ventilation (MV) is an important supportive strategy for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, MV itself can cause a type of acute lung damage termed ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Because nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to play roles in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury, the present study explores the effects on VILI of NO derived from chronically overexpressed endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Anesthetized eNOS-transgenic (Tg) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice were ventilated at high or low tidal volume (Vt; 20 or 7 ml/kg, respectively) for 4 h. After MV, lung damage, including neutrophil infiltration, water leakage, and cytokine concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma, was evaluated. Some mice were given N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a potent NOS inhibitor, via drinking water (1 mg/ml) for 1 wk before MV. Histological analysis revealed that high Vt ventilation caused severe VILI, whereas low Vt ventilation caused minimal VILI. Under high Vt conditions, neutrophil infiltration and lung water content were significantly attenuated in eNOS-Tg mice compared with WT animals. The concentrations of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in BALF and plasma, as well as plasma tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, also were decreased in eNOS-Tg mice. L-NAME abrogated the beneficial effect of eNOS overexpression. In conclusion, chronic eNOS overexpression may protect the lung from VILI by inhibiting the production of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines that are associated with neutrophil infiltration into the air space. PMID:16399791

  16. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  17. Exercise improves endothelial function: a local analysis of production of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Leonardo Yuji; Bechara, Luiz Roberto Grassmann; dos Santos, Adriana Marques; Jordão, Camila Paixão; de Sousa, Luís Gustavo Oliveira; Bartholomeu, Teresa; Ventura, Laura Inês; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael Martins; Ramires, Paulo Rizzo

    2015-02-15

    This study aimed at investigating the acute effects of aerobic exercise on endothelium-dependent vasomotor function of rat aorta, as well as mechanisms involved in endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity. Wistar rats were assigned to either a resting control (C, n = 21) or acutely exercised (E, n = 21) groups (60 min, 55-60% of maximum speed). After exercise, thoracic aorta was excised and cut into rings. Two rings were promptly applied to evaluate vasomotor function and the rest of aorta was used for additional measurements. Acute exercise significantly improved maximum ACh-induced relaxation (C, 91.6 ± 1.2 vs. E, 102.4 ± 1.7%, p < 0.001) and sensitivity to ACh (C, -7.3 ± 0.06 vs. E, -7.3 ± 0.02 log M, p < 0.01), and was accompanied by significantly increases on serine1177 eNOS phosphorylation, reflecting its enhanced activation. However, acute exercise also enhanced both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production, as assayed by dihydroethidium oxidation, lucigenin chemiluminescence and Amplex Red assays. We also provided evidence for Nox2 NADPH oxidase (Nox) activation through gp91dstat-mediated inhibition of superoxide signals. Enhanced arterial relaxations associated with acute exercise were nearly-completely prevented by catalase, suggesting a role for paracrine hydrogen peroxide. Despite increased detectable oxidant generation, cellular oxidative stress was not evident, as suggested by unaltered GSH:GSSG ratio and lipid hydroperoxides. Collectively, these results demonstrate that one bout of moderate aerobic exercise improves endothelial function by increasing NO bioavailability, while superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are generated in a controlled fashion. PMID:25619203

  18. Cell Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Caveolae-Dependent Activation of Lung Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Tarun E; Hu, Hanbo; Patel, Jawaharlal M

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides can be used as therapeutic agents via modulation of selective cell functions. Nitric oxide (NO) generated by vascular endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays a critical role in the NO/ cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate (cGMP)-mediated pulmonary vascular function. Here we examined whether internalization of a fifteen amino acid (KRFNSISCSSWRRKR) synthetic peptide (P3) enhances the catalytic activity of eNOS via caveolae/eNOS dissociation leading to NO release and increased cGMP production in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (EC). ECs were treated with varying concentrations of P3 and used to monitor internalization, isolation of caveolae-enriched fraction, the catalytic activity of eNOS, NO/cGMP production, and intracellular Ca(2+) release. Confocal images show timedependent internalization of P3 in EC. Treatment of EC with P3, but not scrambled P3, increased the catalytic activity of eNOS in a dose-dependent manner without change in eNOS expression or phosphorylation. Treatment of EC with P3 stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) release, increased the catalytic activity of phospatidylinsositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and resulted in eNOS/caveolae-1 (Cav-1) dissociation leading to translocation of eNOS to intracellular compartment in EC. P3- mediated activation of eNOS was abolished by intracellular Ca(2+) chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenooxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'- tertraacetic acid-AM (BAPTA-AM), PI3K inhibition, or by siRNA-mediated Cav-1 suppression. These results demonstrate that exogenous peptide consisting of cationic amino acids can internalize and enhance the catalytic activity of eNOS via modulation of caveolar signaling and intracellular Ca(2+) release in EC. PMID:26655728

  19. Arginase inhibition restores NOS coupling and reverses endothelial dysfunction and vascular stiffness in old rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Bugaj, Lukasz J; Oh, Young Jun; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Soucy, Kevin G; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Webb, Alanah; Camara, Andre; Sikka, Gautam; Nyhan, Daniel; Shoukas, Artin A; Ilies, Monica; Christianson, David W; Champion, Hunter C; Berkowitz, Dan E

    2009-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that upregulation of arginase contributes to impaired endothelial function in aging. In this study, we demonstrate that arginase upregulation leads to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling and that in vivo chronic inhibition of arginase restores nitroso-redox balance, improves endothelial function, and increases vascular compliance in old rats. Arginase activity in old rats was significantly increased compared with that shown in young rats. Old rats had significantly lower nitric oxide (NO) and higher superoxide (O2(-)) production than young. Acute inhibition of both NOS, with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and arginase, with 2S-amino- 6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH), significantly reduced O2(-) production in old rats but not in young. In addition, the ratio of eNOS dimer to monomer in old rats was significantly decreased compared with that shown in young rats. These results suggest that eNOS was uncoupled in old rats. Although the expression of arginase 1 and eNOS was similar in young and old rats, inducible NOS (iNOS) was significantly upregulated. Furthermore, S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 was significantly elevated in old rats. These findings support our previously published finding that iNOS nitrosylates and activates arginase 1 (Santhanam et al., Circ Res 101: 692-702, 2007). Chronic arginase inhibition in old rats preserved eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratio and significantly reduced O2(-) production and enhanced endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation to ACh. In addition, ABH significantly reduced vascular stiffness in old rats. These data indicate that iNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 and the increase in arginase activity lead to eNOS uncoupling, contributing to the nitroso-redox imbalance, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular stiffness observed in vascular aging. We suggest that arginase is a viable target for therapy in age-dependent vascular stiffness. PMID:19661445

  20. Arginase inhibition restores NOS coupling and reverses endothelial dysfunction and vascular stiffness in old rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Bugaj, Lukasz J.; Oh, Young Jun; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Soucy, Kevin G.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Webb, Alanah; Camara, Andre; Sikka, Gautam; Nyhan, Daniel; Shoukas, Artin A.; Ilies, Monica; Christianson, David W.; Champion, Hunter C.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that upregulation of arginase contributes to impaired endothelial function in aging. In this study, we demonstrate that arginase upregulation leads to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling and that in vivo chronic inhibition of arginase restores nitroso-redox balance, improves endothelial function, and increases vascular compliance in old rats. Arginase activity in old rats was significantly increased compared with that shown in young rats. Old rats had significantly lower nitric oxide (NO) and higher superoxide (O2−) production than young. Acute inhibition of both NOS, with NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and arginase, with 2(S)-amino- 6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH), significantly reduced O2− production in old rats but not in young. In addition, the ratio of eNOS dimer to monomer in old rats was significantly decreased compared with that shown in young rats. These results suggest that eNOS was uncoupled in old rats. Although the expression of arginase 1 and eNOS was similar in young and old rats, inducible NOS (iNOS) was significantly upregulated. Furthermore, S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 was significantly elevated in old rats. These findings support our previously published finding that iNOS nitrosylates and activates arginase 1 (Santhanam et al., Circ Res 101: 692–702, 2007). Chronic arginase inhibition in old rats preserved eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratio and significantly reduced O2− production and enhanced endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation to ACh. In addition, ABH significantly reduced vascular stiffness in old rats. These data indicate that iNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 and the increase in arginase activity lead to eNOS uncoupling, contributing to the nitroso-redox imbalance, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular stiffness observed in vascular aging. We suggest that arginase is a viable target for therapy in age-dependent vascular stiffness. PMID:19661445

  1. Elimination of aggressive behavior in male mice lacking endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Demas, G E; Kriegsfeld, L J; Blackshaw, S; Huang, P; Gammie, S C; Nelson, R J; Snyder, S H

    1999-10-01

    Male mice with targeted deletion of the gene encoding the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS(-/-)) display increased aggressive behavior compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Specific pharmacological inhibition of nNOS with 7-nitroindazole also augments aggressive behavior. We report here that male mice with targeted deletion of the gene encoding endothelial NOS (eNOS(-/-)) display dramatic reductions in aggression. The effects are selective, because an extensive battery of behavioral tests reveals no other deficits. In the resident-intruder model of aggression, resident eNOS(-/-) males show virtually no aggression. Latency for aggression onset is 25-30 times longer in eNOS(-/-) males compared with WT males in the rare instances of aggressive behaviors. Similarly, a striking lack of aggression is noted in tests of aggression among groups of four mice monitored in neutral cages. Although eNOS(-/-) mice are hypertensive ( approximately 14 mmHg blood pressure elevation), hypertension does not appear responsible for the diminished aggression. Reduction of hypertension with hydralazine does not change the prevalence of aggression in eNOS(-/-) mice. Extensive examination of brains from eNOS(-/-) male mice reveals no obvious neural damage from chronic hypertension. In situ hybridization in WT animals reveals eNOS mRNA in the brain associated exclusively with blood vessels and no neuronal localizations. Accordingly, vascular eNOS in the brain appears capable of influencing behavior with considerable selectivity. PMID:10493775

  2. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase deficiency influences normal cell cycle progression and apoptosis in trabecular meshwork cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qiong; Huang, Yan-Ming; Fan, Wei; Li, Chan; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify how the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) make effect on outflow facility through the trabecular meshwork (TM). METHODS Inhibition of NOS3 gene expression in human TM cells were conducted by three siRNAs. Then the mRNA and protein levels of NOS3 in siRNA-treated and negative control (NC) cells were determined, still were the collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1) and fibronectin 1 by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. In addition, NOS3 concentrations in culture supernatant fluids of TM cells were measured. Cell cycle and cell apoptosis analysis were performed using flow cytometry. RESULTS The mRNA level of NOS3 was decreased by three different siRNA interference, similar results were obtained not only of the relative levels of NOS3 protein, but also the expression levels of COL4A1 and fibronectin 1. The number of cells in S phase was decreased, while contrary result was obtained in G2 phase. The number of apoptotic cells in siRNA-treated groups were significant increased compared to the NC samples. CONCLUSION Abnormal NOS3 expression can make effects on the proteins levels of extracellular matrix component (e.g. fibronectin 1 and COL4A1). Reduced NOS3 restrains the TM cell cycle progression at the G2/M-phase transition and induced cell apoptosis. PMID:27366677

  3. Hyperhomocysteinemia impairs regional blood flow: involvements of endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Okamura, Tomio

    2016-09-01

    Increasing evidence support the idea that hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is responsible for pathogenesis underlying cerebral, coronary, renal, and other vascular circulatory disorders and for hypertension. Impaired synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) in the endothelium or increased production of asymmetric dimethylarginine and activated oxygen species are involved in the impairment of vasodilator effects of NO. Impaired circulation in the brain derived from reduced synthesis and actions of NO would be an important triggering factor to dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Reduced actions of NO and brain hypoperfusion trigger increased production of amyloid-β that inhibits endothelial function, thus establishing a vicious cycle for impairing brain circulation. HHcy is involved in the genesis of anginal attack and coronary myocardial infarction. HHcy is also involved in renal circulatory diseases. The homocysteine (Hcy)-induced circulatory failure is promoted by methionine and is prevented by increased folic acid and vitamin B6/B12. Eliminating poor life styles, such as smoking and being sedentary; keeping favorable dietary habits; and early treatment maintaining constitutive NOS functions healthy, reducing oxidative stresses would be beneficial in protecting HHcy-induced circulatory failures. PMID:27417104

  4. The Effect of Quercus salicina Leaf Extracts on Vascular Endothelial Function: Role of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Yoon, Jun-Seong; Lee, Hye-Won; Park, Gye-Choon; Yi, Eunyoung; Yoon, Goo; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Oak, Min-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium is reported as a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases. Many evidences suggest that polyphenols are associated with a decreased global mortality and might be involved in protection against cardiovascular risk. This beneficial effect of polyphenol may be due to many actions as antioxidant that increases bioavailability of nitric oxide, vasodilation or anti-hypertensive properties. To identify new natural medicine candidate for cardiovascular protection, plant extracts used in traditional medicine were evaluated by vascular reactivity system. Porcine coronary artery rings were suspended in organ chambers for the measurement of changes in isometric tension. Screening results indicated that the ethanolic extract of leaf from Quercus salicina (QSE) has been found to exhibit potent vasorelaxant activity. QSE dose-dependently induced endothelium-dependent relaxations, which were abolished by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (Nomega-nitro-L-arginine). In addition, QSE strongly and dose-dependently activate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in porcine coronary artery endothelial cell. Taken together, the present study has demonstrated that QSE is a powerful endothelium-dependentvasodilator and that this effect involves increased nitric oxide bioavailability. In conclusion, QSE could be a cardiovascular protective herbal medicine candidate associated with cardiovascular diseases and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27433730

  5. Caffeic Acid, a Phenol Found in White Wine, Modulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Production and Protects from Oxidative Stress-Associated Endothelial Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mannari, Claudio; Bertelli, Alberto A. E.; Medica, Davide; Quercia, Alessandro Domenico; Navarro, Victor; Scatena, Alessia; Giovannini, Luca; Biancone, Luigi; Panichi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several studies demonstrated that endothelium dependent vasodilatation is impaired in cardiovascular and chronic kidney diseases because of oxidant stress-induced nitric oxide availability reduction. The Mediterranean diet, which is characterized by food containing phenols, was correlated with a reduced incidence of cardiovascular diseases and delayed progression toward end stage chronic renal failure. Previous studies demonstrated that both red and white wine exert cardioprotective effects. In particular, wine contains Caffeic acid (CAF), an active component with known antioxidant activities. Aim of the study The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of low doses of CAF on oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Results CAF increased basal as well as acetylcholine—induced NO release by a mechanism independent from eNOS expression and phosphorylation. In addition, low doses of CAF (100 nM and 1 μM) increased proliferation and angiogenesis and inhibited leukocyte adhesion and endothelial cell apoptosis induced by hypoxia or by the uremic toxins ADMA, p-cresyl sulfate and indoxyl sulfate. The biological effects exerted by CAF on endothelial cells may be at least in part ascribed to modulation of NO release and by decreased ROS production. In an experimental model of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice, CAF significantly decreased tubular cell apoptosis, intraluminal cast deposition and leukocyte infiltration. Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that CAF, at very low dosages similar to those observed after moderate white wine consumption, may exert a protective effect on endothelial cell function by modulating NO release independently from eNOS expression and phosphorylation. CAF-induced NO modulation may limit cardiovascular and kidney disease progression associated with oxidative stress-mediated endothelial injury. PMID:25853700

  6. Effective treatment of vascular endothelial growth factor refractory hindlimb ischemia by a mutant endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Qian, H S; Liu, P; Huw, L-Y; Orme, A; Halks-Miller, M; Hill, S M; Jin, F; Kretschmer, P; Blasko, E; Cashion, L; Szymanski, P; Vergona, R; Harkins, R; Yu, J; Sessa, W C; Dole, W P; Rubanyi, G M; Kauser, K

    2006-09-01

    Gene delivery of angiogenic growth factors is a promising approach for the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular diseases. However, success of this new therapeutic principle is hindered by the lack of critical understanding as to how disease pathology affects the efficiency of gene delivery and/or the downstream signaling pathways of angiogenesis. Critical limb ischemia occurs in patients with advanced atherosclerosis often exhibiting deficiency in endothelial nitric oxide production. Similar to these patients, segmental femoral artery resection progresses into severe ischemic necrosis in mice deficient in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS-KO) as well as in balb/c mice. We used these models to evaluate the influence of severe ischemia on transfection efficiency and duration of transgene expression in the skeletal muscle following plasmid injection in combination with electroporation. Subsequently, we also explored the potential therapeutic effect of the phosphomimetic mutant of ecNOS gene (NOS1177D) using optimized delivery parameters, and found significant benefit both in ecNOS-KO and balb/c mice. Our results indicate that NOS1177D gene delivery to the ischemic skeletal muscle can be efficient to reverse critical limb ischemia in pathological settings, which are refractory to treatments with a single growth factor, such as vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:16642030

  7. Sexual dimorphism in rat aortic endothelial function of streptozotocin-induced diabetes: possible involvement of superoxide and nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Rui; Anderson, Leigh; Rahimian, Roshanak

    2013-01-01

    Little is known of the interactions between diabetes and sex on vascular function. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether there were sex differences in rat aortic endothelial function one week after the induction of streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetes, and to examine the potential roles of superoxide and nitric oxide (NO) in this sex-specific effect. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to acetylcholine (ACh) was measured in rat aortic rings before and after treatment with MnTMPyP (25 μM), a superoxide dismutase. Contractile responses to phenylephrine (PE) were generated before and after treatment with L-NAME (200 μM), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor. The mRNA expression of NADPH oxidase (Nox) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were also determined. We demonstrated that 1) STZ-diabetes impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to ACh to a greater extent in female than male aortae, 2) inhibition of superoxide enhanced sensitivity to ACh only in diabetic females, and 3) Nox1 and Nox4 mRNA expression was significantly elevated only in aortic tissue of diabetic females. Furthermore, incubation of aortic rings with L-NAME potentiated PE responses in all groups, but aortae from control females showed a greater potentiation of the PE response after NOS inhibition compared with others. STZ-diabetes reduced the extent of PE potentiation after L-NAME and the aortic eNOS mRNA expression in females to the same levels as seen in males. These data suggest that a decrease in NO, resulting from either decreased eNOS or elevated superoxide, may partially contribute to the predisposition of the female aorta to injury early in diabetes. PMID:24211329

  8. Endothelial nitric oxide modulates perivascular sensory neurotransmission in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed

    PubMed Central

    Ralevic, Vera

    2002-01-01

    A possible role of nitric oxide (NO) as a modulator of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurotransmission in blood vessels was investigated in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of methoxamine-preconstricted mesenteric beds elicited frequency-dependent vasorelaxation mediated by capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 and 300 μM) and 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, 100 μM), inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), augmented sensory neurogenic vasorelaxation. D-NAME (300 μM), 6-aminoindazole (100 μM) and Nω-propyl-L-arginine (50 nM), a selective inhibitor of neuronal NOS, were without effect. The effect of 10 μM L-NAME was reversed by L-arginine (1 mM), the substrate for NOS. L-NAME (300 μM) and 7-NI (100 μM) had no significant effect on vasorelaxations to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), the principal motor neurotransmitter of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves in rat mesenteric arteries, or to capsaicin, indicating a prejunctional action. The inhibitors of NOS had no effect on vasorelaxation to forskolin, but augmented vasorelaxation to sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Removal of the endothelium augmented sensory neurogenic vasorelaxation, but did not affect vasorelaxation to CGRP, indicating a prejunctional action of endothelial NO. In the absence of endothelium, L-NAME (300 μM) inhibited, and 7-NI (100 μM) caused no further augmentation of sensory neurotransmission. SNP (100 nM), a nitric oxide donor, attenuated sensory neurogenic relaxations to EFS. In rat isolated thoracic aortic rings, L-NAME (100 μM) and 7-NI (100 μM) attenuated concentration-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine. These data show that NO modulates sensory neurotransmission evoked by EFS of the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed, and that when NO synthesis is blocked sensory neurogenic relaxation is augmented. The source of NO is the vascular endothelium. PMID:12183327

  9. Ginsenoside Rg3 increases nitric oxide production via increases in phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: Essential roles of estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hien, Tran Thi; Kim, Nak Doo; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Oh, Seok Jeong; Lee, Moo Yeol; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-08-01

    We previously showed that ginsenosides increase nitric oxide (NO) production in vascular endothelium and that ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) is the most active one among ginseng saponins. However, the mechanism for Rg3-mediated nitric oxide production is still uncertain. In this study, we determined whether Rg3 affects phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in ECV 304 human endothelial cells. Rg3 increased both the phosphorylation and the expression of eNOS in a concentration-dependent manner and a maximal effect was found at 10 {mu}g/ml of Rg3. The enzyme activities of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 kinase were enhanced as were estrogen receptor (ER)- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent reporter gene transcriptions in Rg3-treated endothelial cells. Rg3-induced eNOS phosphorylation required the ER-mediated PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Moreover, Rg3 activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through up-regulation of CaM kinase II and Rg3-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation was reversed by AMPK inhibition. The present results provide a mechanism for Rg3-stimulated endothelial NO production.

  10. Perivascular Adipose Tissue Inhibits Endothelial Function of Rat Aortas via Caveolin-1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle Hui-Hsin; Chen, Shiu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT)-derived factors have been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), occupying the calcium/calmodulin binding site of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and then inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) production, is also involved in the development of atherosclerosis. Thus, we investigated whether PVAT regulated vascular tone via Cav-1 and/or endothelial NO pathways. Isometric tension studies were carried out in isolated thoracic aortas from Wistar rats in the presence and absence of PVAT. Concentration-response curves of phenylephrine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside were illustrated to examine the vascular reactivity and endothelial function. The protein expressions of eNOS and Cav-1 were also examined in aortic homogenates. Our results demonstrated that PVAT significantly enhanced vasoconstriction and inhibited vasodilatation via endothelium-dependent mechanism. The aortic NO production was diminished after PVAT treatment, whereas protein expression and activity of eNOS were not significantly affected. In addition, Cav-1 protein expression was significantly increased in aortas with PVAT transfer. Furthermore, a caveolae depleter methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished the effect of PVAT on the enhancement of vasoconstriction, and reversed the impairment of aortic NO production. In conclusion, unknown factor(s) released from PVAT may inhibit endothelial NO production and induce vasocontraction via an increase of Cav-1 protein expression. PMID:24926683

  11. Does nitric oxide allow endothelial cells to sense hypoxia and mediate hypoxic vasodilatation? in vivo and in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Nicholas J; Moncada, Salvador; Marshall, Janice M

    2003-01-01

    Hypoxia-evoked vasodilatation is a fundamental regulatory mechanism that is often attributed to adenosine. The identity of the O2 sensor is unknown. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibits endothelial mitochondrial respiration and ATP generation by competing with O2 for its binding site on cytochrome oxidase. We proposed that in vivo this interaction allows endothelial cells to release adenosine when O2 tension falls or NO concentration increases. Using anaesthetised rats, we confirmed that the increase in femoral vascular conductance (FVC, hindlimb vasodilatation) evoked by systemic hypoxia is attenuated by NO synthesis blockade with l-NAME, but restored when baseline FVC is restored by infusion of NO donor. This ‘restored’ hypoxic response, like the control hypoxic response, is inhibited by the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. Similarly, the FVC increase evoked by adenosine infusion was attenuated by l-NAME but restored by infusion of NO donor. However, when baseline FVC was restored after l-NAME with 8-bromo-cGMP, the FVC increase evoked by adenosine infusion was restored, but not in response to systemic hypoxia, suggesting that adenosine was no longer released by hypoxia. Infusion of NO donor at a given rate after treatment with l-NAME evoked a greater FVC increase during systemic hypoxia than during normoxia, both responses being reduced by 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. Finally, both bradykinin and NO donor released adenosine from superfused endothelial cells in vitro; l-NAME attenuated only the former response. We propose that in vivo, shear-released NO increases the apparent Km of endothelial cytochrome oxidase for O2, allowing the endothelium to act as an O2 sensor, releasing adenosine in response to moderate falls in O2. PMID:12527738

  12. Nitric oxide decreases the sensitivity of pulmonary endothelial cells to LPS-induced apoptosis in a zinc-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zi-Lue; Wasserloos, Karla J; Liu, Xianghong; Stitt, Molly S; Reynolds, Ian J; Pitt, Bruce R; St Croix, Claudette M

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that: (a) S-nitrosylation of metallothionein (MT) is a component of pulmonary endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) signaling that is associated with an increase in labile zinc; and (b) NO mediated increases in labile zinc in turn reduce the sensitivity of pulmonary endothelium to LPS-induced apoptosis. We used microspectrofluorometric techniques to show that exposing mouse lung endothelial cells (MLEC) to the NO-donor, S-nitrosocysteine, resulted in a 45% increase in fluorescence of the Zn2+-specific fluorophore, Zinquin, that was rapidly reversed by exposure to the Zn2+ chelator, NNN'N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine; TPEN). The absence of a NO-mediated increase in labile Zn2+ in MLEC from MT-I and -II knockout mice inferred a critical role for MT in the regulation of Zn2+ homeostasis by NO. Furthermore, we found that prior exposure of cultured endothelial cells from sheep pulmonary artery (SPAEC), to the NO-donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) reduced their sensitivity to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced apoptosis. The anti-apoptotic effects of NO were significantly inhibited by Zn2+ chelation with low doses of TPEN (10 microM). Collectively, these data suggest that S-nitrosylation of MT is associated with an increase in labile (TPEN chelatable) zinc and NO-mediated MT dependent zinc release is associated with reduced sensitivity to LPS-induced apoptosis in pulmonary endothelium. PMID:12162436

  13. Oleoyl-Lysophosphatidylcholine Limits Endothelial Nitric Oxide Bioavailability by Induction of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kozina, Andrijana; Opresnik, Stefan; Wong, Michael Sze Ka; Hallström, Seth; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Malli, Roland; Schröder, Katrin; Schmidt, Kurt; Frank, Saša

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported modulation of endothelial prostacyclin and interleukin-8 production, cyclooxygenase-2 expression and vasorelaxation by oleoyl- lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC 18:1). In the present study, we examined the impact of this LPC on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in vascular endothelial EA.hy926 cells. Basal NO formation in these cells was decreased by LPC 18:1. This was accompanied with a partial disruption of the active endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)- dimer, leading to eNOS uncoupling and increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The LPC 18:1-induced ROS formation was attenuated by the superoxide scavenger Tiron, as well as by the pharmacological inhibitors of eNOS, NADPH oxidases, flavin-containing enzymes and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Intracellular ROS-formation was most prominent in mitochondria, less pronounced in cytosol and undetectable in endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, Tiron completely prevented the LPC 18:1-induced decrease in NO bioavailability in EA.hy926 cells. The importance of the discovered findings for more in vivo like situations was analyzed by organ bath experiments in mouse aortic rings. LPC 18:1 attenuated the acetylcholine-induced, endothelium dependent vasorelaxation and massively decreased NO bioavailability. We conclude that LPC 18:1 induces eNOS uncoupling and unspecific superoxide production. This results in NO scavenging by ROS, a limited endothelial NO bioavailability and impaired vascular function. PMID:25419657

  14. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  15. Prolonged cyclic strain inhibits human endothelial cell growth.

    PubMed

    Peyton, Kelly J; Liu, Xiao-ming; Durante, William

    2016-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is continuously exposed to cyclic mechanical strain due to the periodic change in vessel diameter as a result of pulsatile blood flow. Since emerging evidence indicates the cyclic strain plays an integral role in regulating endothelial cell function, the present study determined whether application of a physiologic regimen of cyclic strain (6% at 1 hertz) influences the proliferation of human arterial endothelial cells. Prolonged exposure of human dermal microvascular or human aortic endothelial cells to cyclic strain for up to 7 days resulted in a marked decrease in cell growth. The strain-mediated anti-proliferative effect was associated with the arrest of endothelial cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, did not involve cell detachment or cytotoxicity, and was due to the induction of p21. Interestingly, the inhibition in endothelial cell growth was independent of the strain regimen since prolonged application of constant or intermittent 6% strain was also able to block endothelial cell proliferation. The ability of chronic physiologic cyclic strain to inhibit endothelial cell growth represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which hemodynamic forces maintain these cells in a quiescent, non-proliferative state. PMID:26709656

  16. Trans Fatty Acids Induce Vascular Inflammation and Reduce Vascular Nitric Oxide Production in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Naomi G.; Pham, Matilda; Rizzo, Norma O.; Cheng, Andrew M.; Maloney, Ezekiel; Kim, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA), which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from ruminant-derived—dairy products and meat) on endothelial NF-κB activation and nitric oxide (NO) production. Human endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Elaidic (trans-C18:1 (9 trans)), Linoelaidic (trans-C18:2 (9 trans, 12 trans)), and Transvaccenic (trans-C18:1 (11 trans)) for 3 h. Both Elaidic and Linoelaidic acids were associated with increasing NF-κB activation as measured by IL-6 levels and phosphorylation of IκBα, and impairment of endothelial insulin signaling and NO production, whereas Transvaccenic acid was not associated with these responses. We also measured superoxide production, which has been hypothesized to be necessary in fatty acid-dependent activation of NF-κB. Both Elaidic acid and Linoelaidic acid are associated with increased superoxide production, whereas Transvaccenic acid (which did not induce inflammatory responses) did not increase superoxide production. We observed differential activation of endothelial superoxide production, NF-κB activation, and reduction in NO production by different C18 isomers suggesting that the location and number of trans double bonds effect endothelial NF-κB activation. PMID:22216328

  17. Pulmonary vasodilation by inhaled nitric oxide after endothelial injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rimar, S.; Gillis, C.N. )

    1992-11-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide gas (NO) has recently been shown to reverse experimentally induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. To examine the effect of free radical injury and methylene blue exposure on inhaled NO-induced pulmonary vasodilation the authors studied ventilated rabbit lungs perfused with Krebs solution containing 3% dextran and indomethacin. When NO gas (120 ppm) was added to the inhaled mixture for 3 min, the elevated pulmonary arterial perfusion pressure (Ppa) induced by the thromboxane analogue U-46619 was significantly reduced [8 [+-] 2 (SE) mmHg]. Acetylcholine similarly reduced Ppa (9 [+-] 1 mmHg). After free radical injury and methylene blue exposure, inhaled NO again produced significant vasodilation (5 [+-] 1 and 9 [+-] 2 mmHg, respectively), but acetylcholine resulted in an increase in Ppa ([minus]9 [+-] 3 and [minus]4 [+-] 1 mmHg, respectively). These data demonstrate that pulmonary vasodilation produced by inhaled NO is unaffected by free radical injury or methylene blue in the intact lung despite concomitant reversal of acetylcholine-induced vasodilation. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Ras, Rac1, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in nitric oxide induced endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Eller-Borges, Roberta; Batista, Wagner L; da Costa, Paulo E; Tokikawa, Rita; Curcio, Marli F; Strumillo, Scheilla T; Sartori, Adriano; Moraes, Miriam S; de Oliveira, Graciele A; Taha, Murched O; Fonseca, Fábio V; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo P

    2015-05-01

    The small GTP-binding proteins Ras and Rac1 are molecular switches exchanging GDP for GTP and converting external signals in response to a variety of stimuli. Ras and Rac1 play an important role in cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cell migration. Rac1 is directly involved in the reorganization and changes in the cytoskeleton during cell motility. Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates the Ras - ERK1/2 MAP kinases signaling pathway and is involved in the interaction between Ras and the phosphatidyl-inositol-3 Kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway and cell migration. This study utilizes bradykinin (BK), which promotes endogenous production of NO, in an investigation of the role of NO in the activation of Rac1 in rabbit aortic endothelial cells (RAEC). NO-derived from BK stimulation of RAEC and incubation of the cells with the s-nitrosothiol S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) activated Rac1. NO-derived from BK stimulation promoted RAEC migration over a period of 12 h. The use of RAEC permanently transfected with the dominant negative mutant of Ras (Ras(N17)) or with the non-nitrosatable mutant of Ras (Ras(C118S)); and the use of specific inhibitors of: Ras, PI3K, and Rac1 resulted in inhibition of NO-mediated Rac1 activation. BK-stimulated s-nitrosylation of Ras in RAEC mediates Rac1 activation and cell migration. Inhibition of NO-mediated Rac1 activation resulted in inhibition of endothelial cell migration. In conclusion, the NO indirect activation of Rac1 involves the direct participation of Ras and PI3K in the migration of endothelial cells stimulated with BK. PMID:25819133

  19. Electric fields caused by blood flow modulate vascular endothelial electrophysiology and nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Darshan P; Hallock, Kevin J; Bergethon, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells are exposed to a ubiquitous, yet unexamined electrical force caused by blood flow: the electrokinetic vascular streaming potential (EVSP). In this study, the hypothesis that extremely low frequency (ELF) electric fields parameterized by the EVSP have significant biological effects on endothelial cell properties was studied by measuring membrane potential and nitric oxide production under ELF stimulation between 0 and 2 Hz and 0-6.67 V/m. Using membrane potential and nitric oxide sensitive fluorescent dyes, bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) in culture were studied in the presence and absence of EVSP-modeled electric fields. The transmembrane potential of BAECs was shown to depolarize between 1 and 7 mV with a strong dependency on both the magnitude and frequency of the isolated ELF field. The findings also support a field interaction with a frequency-dependent tuning curve. The ELF field complexly modulates the nitric oxide response to adenosine triphosphate stimulation with potentiation seen with up to a sevenfold increase. This potentiation was also frequency and magnitude dependent. An early logarithmic phase of NO production is enhanced in a field strength-dependent manner, but the ELF field does not modify a later exponential phase. This study shows that using electric fields on the order of those generated by blood flow influences the essential biology of endothelial cells. The inclusion of ELF electric fields in the paradigm of vascular biology may create novel opportunities for advancing both the understanding and therapies for treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:22674251

  20. Impaired Endothelial Repair Capacity of Early Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Hypertensive Patients With Primary Hyperaldosteronemia: Role of 5,6,7,8-Tetrahydrobiopterin Oxidation and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Ding, Mei-Lin; Wu, Fang; He, Wen; Li, Jin; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Xie, Wen-Li; Duan, Sheng-Zhong; Xia, Wen-Hao; Tao, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Although hyperaldosteronemia exerts detrimental impacts on vascular endothelium in addition to elevating blood pressure, the effects and molecular mechanisms of hyperaldosteronemia on early endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-mediated endothelial repair after arterial damage are yet to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the endothelial repair capacity of early EPCs from hypertensive patients with primary hyperaldosteronemia (PHA). In vivo endothelial repair capacity of early EPCs from PHAs (n=20), age- and blood pressure-matched essential hypertension patients (n=20), and age-matched healthy subjects (n=20) was evaluated by transplantation into a nude mouse carotid endothelial denudation model. Endothelial function was evaluated by flow-mediated dilation of brachial artery in human subjects. In vivo endothelial repair capacity of early EPCs and flow-mediated dilation were impaired both in PHAs and in essential hypertension patients when compared with age-matched healthy subjects; however, the early EPC in vivo endothelial repair capacity and flow-mediated dilation of PHAs were impaired more severely than essential hypertension patients. Oral spironolactone improved early EPC in vivo endothelial repair capacity and flow-mediated dilation of PHAs. Increased oxidative stress, oxidative 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin degradation, endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling and decreased nitric oxide production were found in early EPCs from PHAs. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunit p47(phox) knockdown or 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin supplementation attenuated endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling and enhanced in vivo endothelial repair capacity of early EPCs from PHAs. In conclusion, PHAs exhibited more impaired endothelial repair capacity of early EPCs than did essential hypertension patients independent of blood pressure, which was associated with mineralocorticoid receptor-dependent oxidative stress and subsequently 5

  1. Critical Role for Tetrahydrobiopterin Recycling by Dihydrofolate Reductase in Regulation of Endothelial Nitric-oxide Synthase Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Mark J.; Tatham, Amy L.; Hale, Ashley B.; Alp, Nicholas J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    Tetrahyrobiopterin (BH4) is a required cofactor for the synthesis of nitric oxide by endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS), and BH4 bioavailability within the endothelium is a critical factor in regulating the balance between NO and superoxide production by eNOS (eNOS coupling). BH4 levels are determined by the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), the rate-limiting enzyme in de novo BH4 biosynthesis. However, BH4 levels may also be influenced by oxidation, forming 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (BH2), which promotes eNOS uncoupling. Conversely, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) can regenerate BH4 from BH2, but the functional importance of DHFR in maintaining eNOS coupling remains unclear. We investigated the role of DHFR in regulating BH4 versus BH2 levels in endothelial cells and in cell lines expressing eNOS combined with tet-regulated GTPCH expression in order to compare the effects of low or high levels of de novo BH4 biosynthesis. Pharmacological inhibition of DHFR activity by methotrexate or genetic knockdown of DHFR protein by RNA interference reduced intracellular BH4 and increased BH2 levels resulting in enzymatic uncoupling of eNOS, as indicated by increased eNOS-dependent superoxide but reduced NO production. In contrast to the decreased BH4:BH2 ratio induced by DHFR knockdown, GTPCH knockdown greatly reduced total biopterin levels but with no change in BH4:BH2 ratio. In cells expressing eNOS with low biopterin levels, DHFR inhibition or knockdown further diminished the BH4:BH2 ratio and exacerbated eNOS uncoupling. Taken together, these data reveal a key role for DHFR in eNOS coupling by maintaining the BH4:BH2 ratio, particularly in conditions of low total biopterin availability. PMID:19666465

  2. Constitutive eNOS-derived nitric oxide is a determinant of endothelial junctional integrity.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Dan; Predescu, Sanda; Shimizu, Jun; Miyawaki-Shimizu, Kayo; Malik, Asrar B

    2005-09-01

    Basal vascular endothelial permeability is normally kept low in part by the restrictiveness of interendothelial junctions (IEJs). We investigated the possible role of nitric oxide (NO) in controlling IEJ integrity and thereby regulating basal vascular permeability. We determined the permeability of continuous endothelia in multiple murine vascular beds, including lung vasculature, of wild-type mice, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) null mice, and mice treated with NOS inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Light and electron microscopic studies revealed that L-NAME treatment resulted in IEJs opening within a few minutes with a widespread response within 30 min. We observed a 35% increase in transendothelial transport of albumin, using as tracer dinitrophenylated albumin in mouse lungs and other organs studied. To rule out the involvement of blood cells in the mechanism of increased endothelial permeability, vascular beds were flushed free of blood, treated with L-NAME, and perfused with the tracer. The open IEJs observed in these studies indicated a direct role for NO in preserving the normal structure of endothelial junctions. We also used the electron-opaque tracer lanthanum chloride to assess vascular permeability. Lanthanum chloride was presented by perfusion to various vascular beds of mice lacking NO. Open IEJs were seen only in capillary and venular endothelial segments of mice lacking NO, and there was a concomitant increase in vascular permeability to the tracer. Together, these data demonstrate that constitutive eNOS-derived NO is a crucial determinant of IEJ integrity and thus serves to maintain the low basal permeability of continuous endothelia. PMID:16093363

  3. Hyperhomocysteinaemia in rats is associated with erectile dysfunction by impairing endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weijun; Xiong, Lei; Bin Yang; Li, Weiwei; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Wu, Qiuyue; Li, Tianfu; Zhang, Cui; Zhang, Mingchao; Xia, Xinyi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHCy) on penile erectile function in a rat model, a methionine-rich diet was used in which erectile function, the reproductive system, and nitric oxide synthase were characterized. The intracavernous pressure, apomorphine experiments, measurement of oxidative stress, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and measurement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity were utilized. Our results showed that erections in the middle-dose, high-dose, and interference (INF) groups were significantly lower than the control (P < 0.05). INF group, being fed with vitamins B and folic acid, demonstrated markedly improved penile erections compared with the middle-dose group (P < 0.05). HHCy-induced eNOS and phospho-eNOS protein expression was reduced and the antioxidant effect was markedly impaired. The data of the present data provide evidence that HHCy is a vascular risk factor for erectile dysfunction by impairing cavernosa endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. Intake of vitamins B can alleviate this abnormality. PMID:27221552

  4. Hyperhomocysteinaemia in rats is associated with erectile dysfunction by impairing endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weijun; Xiong, Lei; Bin Yang; Li, Weiwei; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Wu, Qiuyue; Li, Tianfu; Zhang, Cui; Zhang, Mingchao; Xia, Xinyi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHCy) on penile erectile function in a rat model, a methionine-rich diet was used in which erectile function, the reproductive system, and nitric oxide synthase were characterized. The intracavernous pressure, apomorphine experiments, measurement of oxidative stress, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and measurement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity were utilized. Our results showed that erections in the middle-dose, high-dose, and interference (INF) groups were significantly lower than the control (P < 0.05). INF group, being fed with vitamins B and folic acid, demonstrated markedly improved penile erections compared with the middle-dose group (P < 0.05). HHCy-induced eNOS and phospho-eNOS protein expression was reduced and the antioxidant effect was markedly impaired. The data of the present data provide evidence that HHCy is a vascular risk factor for erectile dysfunction by impairing cavernosa endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. Intake of vitamins B can alleviate this abnormality. PMID:27221552

  5. Endothelial cell-derived nitric oxide enhances aerobic glycolysis in astrocytes via HIF-1α-mediated target gene activation.

    PubMed

    Brix, Britta; Mesters, Jeroen R; Pellerin, Luc; Jöhren, Olaf

    2012-07-11

    Astrocytes exhibit a prominent glycolytic activity, but whether such a metabolic profile is influenced by intercellular communication is unknown. Treatment of primary cultures of mouse cortical astrocytes with the nitric oxide (NO) donor DetaNONOate induced a time-dependent enhancement in the expression of genes encoding various glycolytic enzymes as well as transporters for glucose and lactate. Such an effect was shown to be dependent on the hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1α, which is stabilized and translocated to the nucleus to exert its transcriptional regulation. NO action was dependent on both the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MEK signaling pathways and required the activation of COX, but was independent of the soluble guanylate cyclase pathway. Furthermore, as a consequence of NO treatment, an enhanced lactate production and release by astrocytes was evidenced, which was prevented by downregulating HIF-1α. Several brain cell types represent possible sources of NO. It was found that endothelial cells, which express the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) isoform, constitutively produced the largest amount of NO in culture. When astrocytes were cocultured with primary cultures of brain vascular endothelial cells, stabilization of HIF-1α and an enhancement in glucose transporter-1, hexokinase-2, and monocarboxylate transporter-4 expression as well as increased lactate production was found in astrocytes. This effect was inhibited by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME and was not seen when astrocytes were cocultured with primary cultures of cortical neurons. Our findings suggest that endothelial cell-derived NO participates to the maintenance of a high glycolytic activity in astrocytes mediated by astrocytic HIF-1α activation. PMID:22787058

  6. Immune Complex-Induced, Nitric Oxide-Mediated Vascular Endothelial Cell Death by Phagocytes Is Prevented with Decoy FcγReceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mula, Ramanjaneya V. R.; Machiah, Deepa; Holland, Lauren; Wang, Xinyu; Parihar, Harish; Sharma, Avadhesh C.; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune vasculitis is an endothelial inflammatory disease that results from the deposition of immune-complexes (ICs) in blood vessels. The interaction between Fcgamma receptors (FcγRs) expressed on inflammatory cells with ICs is known to cause blood vessel damage. Hence, blocking the interaction of ICs and inflammatory cells is essential to prevent the IC-mediated blood vessel damage. Thus we tested if uncoupling the interaction of FcγRs and ICs prevents endothelium damage. Herein, we demonstrate that dimeric FcγR-Igs prevented nitric oxide (NO) mediated apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in an in vitro vasculitis model. Dimeric FcγR-Igs significantly inhibited the IC-induced upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) release by murine monocytic cell line. However, FcγR-Igs did not affect the exogenously added NO-induced upregulation of pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax (15 fold), Bak (35 fold), cytochrome-C (11 fold) and caspase-3 (30 fold) in HUVECs. In conclusion, these data suggest that IC-induced NO could be one of the major inflammatory mediator promoting blood vessel inflammation and endothelial cell death during IC-mediated vasculitis which can be effectively blocked by dimeric decoy FcγRs. PMID:27101012

  7. Flow-dependent regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: role of protein kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are directly and continuously exposed to fluid shear stress generated by blood flow. Shear stress regulates endothelial structure and function by controlling expression of mechanosensitive genes and production of vasoactive factors such as nitric oxide (NO). Though it is well known that shear stress stimulates NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Shear-induced production of NO involves Ca2+/calmodulin-independent mechanisms, including phosphorylation of eNOS at several sites and its interaction with other proteins, including caveolin and heat shock protein-90. There have been conflicting results as to which protein kinases-protein kinase A, protein kinase B (Akt), other Ser/Thr protein kinases, or tyrosine kinases-are responsible for shear-dependent eNOS regulation. The functional significance of each phosphorylation site is still unclear. We have attempted to summarize the current status of understanding in shear-dependent eNOS regulation.

  8. Inhibition of gamma-irradiation induced adhesion molecules and NO production by alginate in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Son, E W; Cho, C K; Rhee, D K; Pyo, S

    2001-10-01

    Inflammation is a frequent radiation-induced reaction following therapeutic irradiation. Treatment of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) with gamma-irradiation (gammaIR) induces the expression of adhesion proteins such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and E-selectin. Since the upregulation of these proteins on endothelial cell surface has been known to be associated with inflammation, interfering with the expression of adhesion molecules is an important therapeutic target. In the present study, we demonstrate that high mannuronic acid-containing alginate (HMA) inhibits gammaIR induced expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin on HUVEC in a dose dependent manner. HMA also inhibited gammaIR induced production of Nitric oxide (NO). These data suggest that HMA has therapeutic potential for the treatment of various inflammatory disorder associated with an increase of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecules. PMID:11693551

  9. Ulinastatin attenuates pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx damage and inhibits endothelial heparanase activity in LPS-induced ARDS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lipeng; Huang, Xiao; Kong, Guiqing; Xu, Haixiao; Li, Jiankui; Hao, Dong; Wang, Tao; Han, Shasha; Han, Chunlei; Sun, Yeying; Liu, Xiangyong; Wang, Xiaozhi

    2016-09-16

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome of acute respiratory failure characterized by major pathologic mechanisms of increased microvascular permeability and inflammation. The glycocalyx lines on the endothelial surface, which determines the vascular permeability, and heparanase play pivotal roles in the degradation of heparan sulfate (HS). HS is the major component of the glycocalyx. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of Ulinastatin (UTI) on vascular permeability and pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In our study, C57BL/6 mice and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with LPS to induce injury models. After 6 h of LPS stimulation, pulmonary pathological changes, pulmonary edema, and vascular permeability were notably attenuated by UTI. UTI inhibited LPS-induced endothelial glycocalyx destruction and significantly decreased the production of HS as determined by ELISA and immunofluorescence. UTI also reduced the active form of heparanase (50 kDa) expression and heparanase activity. Moreover, lysosome pH was investigated because heparanase (65 kDa) can be reduced easily in its active form at 50 kDa in a low pH environment within lysosome. Results showed that UTI could inhibit LPS-induced pH elevation in lysosome. In conclusion, UTI protects pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx integrity and inhibits heparanase activity during LPS-induced ARDS. PMID:27498004

  10. Cyclooxygenase-inhibiting nitric oxide donators for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, John L; Viappiani, Serena; Bolla, Manlio

    2009-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain the most commonly used medications for the treatment of the symptoms of many chronic inflammatory diseases, including osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, the toxicity of NSAIDs substantially limits their long-term use. Some newer NSAIDs, namely selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, exhibit greater gastrointestinal safety, and concomitant use of anti-secretory drugs can also reduce NSAID-induced gastropathy. However, NSAIDs also adversely affect the cardiovascular system. A new class of anti-inflammatory drugs, COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donators (CINODs), has been designed to exert similar anti-inflammatory effects as NSAIDs, but with an improved safety profile. CINODs release nitric oxide, providing protective effects in the gastrointestinal tract and attenuating the detrimental effects on blood pressure normally associated with NSAIDs. We provide an outline of the rationale for CINODs and their activity, in addition to an overview of the pre-clinical and clinical profile of the most advanced CINOD, naproxcinod. PMID:19230986

  11. Slow and sustained nitric oxide releasing compounds inhibit multipotent vascular stem cell proliferation and differentiation without causing cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Brandon M.; Leix, Kyle Alexander; Ji, Yajing; Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot; Ash, David E.; Mohanty, Dillip K.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) proliferate and differentiate. • Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of MVSCs. • Nitric oxide inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs). • Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) neither de-differentiate nor proliferate. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cerebral and myocardial infarction. It is believed that neointimal growth common in the later stages of atherosclerosis is a result of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) de-differentiation in response to endothelial injury. However, the claims of the SMC de-differentiation theory have not been substantiated by monitoring the fate of mature SMCs in response to such injuries. A recent study suggests that atherosclerosis is a consequence of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) differentiation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known mediator against atherosclerosis, in part because of its inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation. Using three different NO-donors, we have investigated the effects of NO on MVSC proliferation. Results indicate that NO inhibits MVSC proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. A slow and sustained delivery of NO proved to inhibit proliferation without causing cell death. On the other hand, larger, single-burst NO concentrations, inhibits proliferation, with concurrent significant cell death. Furthermore, our results indicate that endogenously produced NO inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) and subsequently to SMC as well.

  12. Targeting endothelial connexin40 inhibits tumor growth by reducing angiogenesis and improving vessel perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Florian; Domingos-Pereira, Sonia; Le Gal, Loïc; Derré, Laurent; Meda, Paolo; Jichlinski, Patrice; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial connexin40 (Cx40) contributes to regulate the structure and function of vessels. We have examined whether the protein also modulates the altered growth of vessels in tumor models established in control mice (WT), mice lacking Cx40 (Cx40−/−), and mice expressing the protein solely in endothelial cells (Tie2-Cx40). Tumoral angiogenesis and growth were reduced, whereas vessel perfusion, smooth muscle cell (SMC) coverage and animal survival were increased in Cx40−/− but not Tie2-Cx40 mice, revealing a critical involvement of endothelial Cx40 in transformed tissues independently of the hypertensive status of Cx40−/− mice. As a result, Cx40−/− mice bearing tumors survived significantly longer than corresponding controls, including after a cytotoxic administration. Comparable observations were made in WT mice injected with a peptide targeting Cx40, supporting the Cx40 involvement. This involvement was further confirmed in the absence of Cx40 or by peptide-inhibition of this connexin in aorta-sprouting, matrigel plug and SMC migration assays, and associated with a decreased expression of the phosphorylated form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. The data identify Cx40 as a potential novel target in cancer treatment. PMID:26883111

  13. Targeting endothelial connexin40 inhibits tumor growth by reducing angiogenesis and improving vessel perfusion.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Florian; Domingos-Pereira, Sonia; Le Gal, Loïc; Derré, Laurent; Meda, Paolo; Jichlinski, Patrice; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine

    2016-03-22

    Endothelial connexin40 (Cx40) contributes to regulate the structure and function of vessels. We have examined whether the protein also modulates the altered growth of vessels in tumor models established in control mice (WT), mice lacking Cx40 (Cx40-/-), and mice expressing the protein solely in endothelial cells (Tie2-Cx40). Tumoral angiogenesis and growth were reduced, whereas vessel perfusion, smooth muscle cell (SMC) coverage and animal survival were increased in Cx40-/- but not Tie2-Cx40 mice, revealing a critical involvement of endothelial Cx40 in transformed tissues independently of the hypertensive status of Cx40-/- mice. As a result, Cx40-/- mice bearing tumors survived significantly longer than corresponding controls, including after a cytotoxic administration. Comparable observations were made in WT mice injected with a peptide targeting Cx40, supporting the Cx40 involvement. This involvement was further confirmed in the absence of Cx40 or by peptide-inhibition of this connexin in aorta-sprouting, matrigel plug and SMC migration assays, and associated with a decreased expression of the phosphorylated form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. The data identify Cx40 as a potential novel target in cancer treatment. PMID:26883111

  14. Post-translational regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Fulton, David

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a short-lived gaseous signaling molecule. In blood vessels, it is synthesized in a dynamic fashion by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and influences vascular function via two distinct mechanisms, the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent signaling and the S-nitrosylation of proteins with reactive thiols (S-nitrosylation). The regulation of eNOS activity and NO bioavailability is critical to maintain blood vessel function. The activity of eNOS and ability to generate NO is regulated at the transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels. Post-translational modifications acutely impact eNOS activity and dysregulation of these mechanisms compromise eNOS activity and foster the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). This review will intergrate past and current literature on the post-translational modifications of eNOS in both health and disease. PMID:24379783

  15. Spironolactone Prevents Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling and Vascular Dysfunction Induced by β-Adrenergic Overstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Victorio, Jamaira A.; Clerici, Stefano P.; Palacios, Roberto; Alonso, María J.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Rossoni, Luciana V.

    2016-01-01

    Sustained stimulation of β-adrenoceptors (β-ARs) and activation of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system are common features of cardiovascular diseases with rising sympathetic activation, including essential hypertension, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. In this study, we investigated the role of AT1 receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the vascular alterations caused by β-AR overstimulation. β-AR overstimulation with associated cardiac hypertrophy and increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in aorta were modeled in rats by 7-day isoproterenol treatment. The increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in this model was blunted by the MR antagonist spironolactone, but not by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan, despite the blunting of cardiac hypertrophy with both drugs. Spironolactone, but not losartan, restored NO bioavailability in association with lower endothelial nitric oxide synthase–derived superoxide production, increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase dimerization, and aortic HSP90 upregulation. MR genomic and nongenomic functions were activated in aortas from isoproterenol-treated rats. Isoproterenol did not modify plasma levels of MR ligands aldosterone and corticosterone but rather increased perivascular adipose tissue–derived corticosterone in association with increased expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1. The anticontractile effect of aortic perivascular adipose tissue was impaired by β-AR overstimulation and restored by MR blockade. These results suggest that activation of vascular MR signaling contributes to the vascular dysfunction induced by β-AR overstimulation associated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling. These findings reveal an additional explanation for the protective effects of MR antagonists in cardiovascular disorders with sympathetic activation. PMID:27432866

  16. GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zilin; Cheng, Liang; Liang, Hongliang; Duan, Weixun; Hu, Jing; Zhi, Weiwei; Yang, Jinbao; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhao, Minggao; Liu, Jincheng

    2016-02-01

    The effect of estrogen receptors on diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction is critical, but ambiguous. Individuals with diabetic vascular disease may require estrogen receptor-specific targeted therapy in the future. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) has beneficial effects on vascular function. However, its fundamental mechanisms are unclear. The RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway contributes to diabetic vascular complications, whereas estrogen can suppress Rho-kinase function. Thus, we assumed that GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular dysfunction. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in this process. Vascular endothelial cells and ex vivo cultured ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6 mouse aortae were treated with high glucose (HG) alone or in combination with GPER agonist (G1). G1 treatment was also administered to OVX db/db mice for 8 weeks. An ex-vivo isovolumic myograph was used to analyze the endothelium-dependent vasodilation and endothelium-independent contraction of mouse aortae. Apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation were attenuated in G1-pretreated vascular endothelial cells. G1 significantly decreased the phosphorylation of inhibitory endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase residue threonine 495 (eNOS Thr495), inhibited RhoA expression, and increased NO production. Additionally, G1 rescued the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and inhibited RhoA activation in the thoracic aorta of OVX db/db mice and ex-vivo cultured OVX C57BL/6 mouse aortae treated with HG. Estrogens acting via GPER could protect vascular endothelium, and GPER activation might elicit ERα-independent effect to inhibit RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway. Additionally, GPER activation might reduce vascular smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting RhoA activation. Thus, the results of the present study suggest a new therapeutic paradigm for end-stage vascular dysfunction by inhibiting RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway via GPER activation. PMID:26785611

  17. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  18. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Prevents Heparanase Induction and the Development of Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Garsen, Marjolein; Rops, Angelique L.; Li, Jinhua; van Beneden, Katrien; van den Branden, Christiane; Berden, Jo HM; Rabelink, Ton J.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) deficiency exacerbates proteinuria and renal injury in several glomerular diseases, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. We recently showed that heparanase is essential for the development of experimental diabetic nephropathy and glomerulonephritis, and hypothesize that heparanase expression is regulated by eNOS. Here, we demonstrate that induction of adriamycin nephropathy (AN) in C57BL/6 eNOS-deficient mice leads to an increased glomerular heparanase expression accompanied with overt proteinuria, which was not observed in the AN-resistant wild type counterpart. In vitro, the eNOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) induced heparanase expression in cultured mouse glomerular endothelial cells. Moreover, ADMA enhanced transendothelial albumin passage in a heparanase-dependent manner. We conclude that eNOS prevents heparanase induction and the development of proteinuria. PMID:27505185

  19. Endothelial-like nitric oxide synthase immunolocalization by using gold nanoparticles and dyes

    PubMed Central

    Gary, Ramla; Amelio, Daniela; Garofalo, Filippo; Petriashvili, Gia; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Ip, Yuen Kwong; Barberi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Immunofluorescence is a biological technique that allows displaying the localization of the target molecule through a fluorescent microscope. We used a combination of gold nanoparticles and the fluorescein isothiocianate, FITC, as optical contrast agents for laser scanning confocal microscopy imaging to localize the endothelial-like nitric oxide synthase in skeletal muscle cells in a three-dimensional tissue phantom at the depth of 4µm. The FITC detected fluorescence intensity from gold-nanoparticles-labelled cells was brighter than the emission intensity from unlabelled cells. PMID:26713190

  20. Sestrin 2 and AMPK Connect Hyperglycemia to Nox4-Dependent Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling and Matrix Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Assaad A.; Lee, Doug-Yoon; Roman, Linda J.; Khazim, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Mesangial matrix accumulation is an early feature of glomerular pathology in diabetes. Oxidative stress plays a critical role in hyperglycemia-induced glomerular injury. Here, we demonstrate that, in glomerular mesangial cells (MCs), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is uncoupled upon exposure to high glucose (HG), with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased production of nitric oxide. Peroxynitrite mediates the effects of HG on eNOS dysfunction. HG upregulates Nox4 protein, and inhibition of Nox4 abrogates the increase in ROS and peroxynitrite generation, as well as the eNOS uncoupling triggered by HG, demonstrating that Nox4 functions upstream from eNOS. Importantly, this pathway contributes to HG-induced MC fibronectin accumulation. Nox4-mediated eNOS dysfunction was confirmed in glomeruli of a rat model of type 1 diabetes. Sestrin 2-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation attenuates HG-induced MC fibronectin synthesis through blockade of Nox4-dependent ROS and peroxynitrite generation, with subsequent eNOS uncoupling. We also find that HG negatively regulates sestrin 2 and AMPK, thereby promoting Nox4-mediated eNOS dysfunction and increased fibronectin. These data identify a protective function for sestrin 2/AMPK and potential targets for intervention to prevent fibrotic injury in diabetes. PMID:23816887

  1. Houttuynia cordata Extract Improves Physical Endurance Performance by Regulating Endothelial Production of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ui-Jeong; Maeng, Hyojin; Park, Tae-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2015-09-01

    Vascular function is mediated by various regulatory molecules, including endothelial nitric oxide (NO), which regulates the vasodilation of smooth muscle cells. We investigated whether standardized Houttuynia cordata extract (SHCE) could improve physical endurance performance by regulating the endothelial production of NO. For the standardization of Houttuynia cordata (HC) extract, its bioactive components were identified and quantified using ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioaccessibility and biological activity were measured by the in vitro digestion model system and free radical scavenging capacity, respectively. The vascular function in the endothelium was assessed by the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). A preliminary clinical trial was carried out to assess the physical endurance performance. HC extract was standardized to bioactive components, including chlorogenic acid, rutin, and quercitrin, with the concentration of 5.53, 6.09, and 16.15 mg from 1 g of dry weight, respectively. Bioaccessibility was 33.17%, 31.67%, and 11.18% for chlorogenic acid, rutin, and quercitrin, respectively. Antioxidant activities of SHCE were expressed as vitamin C equivalent antioxidant capacity in 55.81 and 17.23 mg/g of HC extract using ABTS and DPPH scavenging assay, respectively. In human aortic endothelial cells, insulin-mediated phosphorylation of eNOS was increased by SHCE in the presence of palmitate. However, the expression of blood pressure-regulating genes was not altered. The level of blood lactate concentration and the heart rate of subjects who drank SHCE were lower than those of subjects who drank plain water. Oxygen uptake from subjects drinking SHCE was slightly higher than that from those who drank plain water. This study demonstrated that SHCE decreased heart rate and blood lactate, increased oxygen uptake, and improved physical performance, presumably due to the increased NO production. PMID:25923355

  2. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  3. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  4. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: involvement of protein kinase G 1 beta, serine 116 phosphorylation and lipid structures.

    PubMed

    John, Theresa A; Ibe, Basil O; Raj, J Usha

    2008-02-01

    1. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) is important for vascular homeostasis. The role of protein kinase G (PKG) in regulation of NOS3 activity was studied in primary cultures of newborn lamb lung microvascular endothelial cells (LMVEC). 2. We determined the presence of PKG in fetal and neonatal LMVEC as well as subcellular localization of PKG isoforms in the neonatal cells by fluorescence immunohistochemistry. We used diaminofluorescein (DAF) fluorophore to measure nitric oxide (NO) production from neonatal LMVEC. We confirmed that NO measured was from constitutive NOS3 by inhibiting it with NOS inhibitors. 3. To identify a role for PKG in basal NO production, we measured NO release from LMVEC cells using 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM; 0.5-0.8 micromol/L) with and without prior stimulation with the PKG activator 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP; 0.3 and 3 micromol/L) or prior PKG inhibition with beta-phenyl-1,N2-etheno-8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothionate (BPC; 0.3 and 3 micromol/L). With the same drugs, we determined the role of PKG on cellular expression of NOS3 and serine 116 phosphorylated NOS (pSer116-NOS) by qualitative and quantitative immunofluorescence assays, as well as western blotting. 4. Because PKG 1 beta was distributed throughout the cytosol in a punctate expression, we used 2 mmol/L cyclodextrin, a cholesterol extractor, to determine a role for lipid vesicles in PKG regulation of NO production. 5. Protein kinase G 1 beta gave a punctate appearance, indicating its presence in intracellular vesicles. Nitric oxide production decreased by approximately 20% with 300 nmol/L and 3 micromol/L 8-Br cGMP (P < 0.05) and increased by 20.8 +/- 3.7% with 3 micromol/L BPC (P < 0.001), indicating that both stimulated and basal PKG activity has inhibitory effects on basal NOS3 function. Nitric oxide synthase immunofluorescence and immunoblot expression were decreased and pSer116-NOS immunofluorescence was increased by 800 nmol

  5. Overexpression of uncoupling protein 2 inhibits the high glucose-induced apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    HE, YING; LUAN, ZHOU; FU, XUNAN; XU, XUN

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic apoptosis of vascular cells plays a critical role in the early stage development of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is a mitochondrial modulator which protects against endothelial dysfunction. However, the role which UCP2 plays in endothelial apoptosis and its association with DR was unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether UCP2 functioned as an inhibitor of DR in endothelial cells. Firstly, we noted that in UCP2-knockout mice retinal cell death and damage in vivo was similar to that of db/db diabetic mice. Additionally, UCP2 knockdown induced caspase-3 activation and exaggerated high glucose (HG)-induced apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Conversely, adenovirus-mediated UCP2 overexpression inhibited the apoptosis of HUVECs and HG-induced caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, HG treatment resulted in the opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP) and liberation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytosol in HUVECs. Notably, UCP2 overexpression inhibited these processes. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated UCP2 overexpression led to a significant increase in intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels and a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HUVECs. Collectively, these data suggest that UCP2 plays an anti-apoptotic role in endothelial cells. Thus, we suggest that approaches which augment UCP2 expression in vascular endothelial cells aid in preventing the early stage development and progression of DR. PMID:26846204

  6. Correction of Hypertension by Normalization of Endothelial Levels of Fibroblast Growth Factor and Nitric Oxide Synthase in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, Pedro; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Carceller, Fernando; Reimers, Diana; Zazo, Mercedes; Cuevas, Begona; Munoz-Willery, Isabel; Martinez-Coso, Victoria; Lamas, Santiago; Gimenez-Gallego, Guillermo

    1996-10-01

    Acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) share a wide range of diverse biological activities. To date, low levels of FGF have not been correlated with a pathophysiologic state. We report that blood vessels of spontaneously hypertensive rats are shown to be associated with a marked decrement in endothelial basic FGF content. This decrement correlates both with hypertension and with a decrease in the endothelial content of nitric oxide synthase. restoration of FGF to physiological levels in the vascular wall, either by systemic administration or by in vivo gene transfer, significantly augmented the number of endothelial cells with positive immunostaining for nitric oxide synthase, corrected hypertension, and ameliorated endothelial-dependent responses to vasoconstrictors. These results suggest an important role for FGFs in blood pressure homeostasis and open new avenues for the understanding of the etiology and treatment of hypertension.

  7. Nitric oxide inhibits falcipain, the Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Venturini, G; Colasanti, M; Salvati, L; Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pluripotent regulatory molecule possessing, among others, an antiparasitic activity. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of NO on the catalytic activity of falcipain, the papain-like cysteine protease involved in Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite hemoglobin degradation, is reported. In particular, NO donors S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), (+/-)-(E)-p6ethyl-2-[(E)-hydroxyimino]-5-nitro-3-hexenami de (NOR-3), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) inhibit dose-dependently the falcipain activity present in the P. falciparum trophozoite extract, this effect likely attributable to S-nitrosylation of the Cys25 catalytic residue. The results represent a new insight into the modulation mechanism of falcipain activity, thereby being relevant in developing new strategies for inhibition of the P. falciparum life cycle. PMID:10623597

  8. Vasostatin Inhibits VEGF-Induced Endothelial Cell Proliferation, Tube Formation and Induces Cell Apoptosis under Oxygen Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Qun; Li, Wenjiao; Li, Haichuan; Sun, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Anti-angiogenesis treatment has been a promising new form of cancer therapy. Endothelial cells are critical for vascular homeostasis and play important roles in angiogenesis, vascular and tissue remodeling. Vasostatin, the 180 amino acid N-terminal fragment of the calreticulin protein, is reported to be a potent endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis, suppressing tumor growth. However, the mechanism of these effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study was performed to investigate the possible mechanism of vasostatin effects on primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). We found that vasostatin could inhibit the cell viability of HUVEC and induce cell apoptosis through mitochondrial pathways via activation of caspase-3 under oxygen deprivation conditions. Meanwhile, vasostatin also inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor-induced proliferation and tube formation of HUVEC. The possible mechanism of vasostatin-inhibited proliferation of HUVEC could be through down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that vasostatin could regulate endothelial cell function and might be used in anti-angiogenesis treatment. PMID:24722573

  9. Serine 1179 Phosphorylation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Increases Superoxide Generation and Alters Cofactor Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Harbeck, Mark C.; He, Donghong; Xie, Lishi; Chen, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for maintaining systemic blood pressure, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. In addition to producing NO, eNOS can also generate superoxide (O2-.) in the absence of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Previous studies have shown that bovine eNOS serine 1179 (Serine 1177/human) phosphorylation critically modulates NO synthesis. However, the effect of serine 1179 phosphorylation on eNOS superoxide generation is unknown. Here, we used the phosphomimetic form of eNOS (S1179D) to determine the effect of S1179 phosphorylation on superoxide generating activity, and its sensitivity to regulation by BH4, Ca2+, and calmodulin (CAM). S1179D eNOS exhibited significantly increased superoxide generating activity and NADPH consumption compared to wild-type eNOS (WT eNOS). The superoxide generating activities of S1179D eNOS and WT eNOS did not differ significantly in their sensitivity to regulation by either Ca2+ or CaM. The sensitivity of the superoxide generating activity of S1179D eNOS to inhibition by BH4 was significantly reduced compared to WT eNOS. In eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells, BH4 depletion with 10mM DAHP for 48 hours followed by 50ng/ml VEGF for 30 min to phosphorylate eNOS S1179 increased ROS accumulation compared to DAHP-only treated cells. Meanwhile, MTT assay indicated that overexpression of eNOS in HEK293 cells decreased cellular viability compared to control cells at BH4 depletion condition (P<0.01). VEGF-mediated Serine 1179 phosphorylation further decreased the cellular viability in eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells (P<0.01). Our data demonstrate that eNOS serine 1179 phosphorylation, in addition to enhancing NO production, also profoundly affects superoxide generation: S1179 phosphorylation increases superoxide production while decreasing sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of BH4 on this activity. PMID:26560496

  10. Vitamin D is a regulator of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and arterial stiffness in mice.

    PubMed

    Andrukhova, Olena; Slavic, Svetlana; Zeitz, Ute; Riesen, Sabine C; Heppelmann, Monika S; Ambrisko, Tamas D; Markovic, Mato; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Erben, Reinhold G

    2014-01-01

    The vitamin D hormone 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] is essential for the preservation of serum calcium and phosphate levels but may also be important for the regulation of cardiovascular function. Epidemiological data in humans have shown that vitamin D insufficiency is associated with hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, increased arterial stiffness, and endothelial dysfunction in normal subjects and in patients with chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these associations remain largely unexplained. In this study, we aimed to decipher the mechanisms by which 1,25(OH)2D3 may regulate systemic vascular tone and cardiac function, using mice carrying a mutant, functionally inactive vitamin D receptor (VDR). To normalize calcium homeostasis in VDR mutant mice, we fed the mice lifelong with the so-called rescue diet enriched with calcium, phosphate, and lactose. Here, we report that VDR mutant mice are characterized by lower bioavailability of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) due to reduced expression of the key NO synthesizing enzyme, endothelial NO synthase, leading to endothelial dysfunction, increased arterial stiffness, increased aortic impedance, structural remodeling of the aorta, and impaired systolic and diastolic heart function at later ages, independent of changes in the renin-angiotensin system. We further demonstrate that 1,25(OH)2D3 is a direct transcriptional regulator of endothelial NO synthase. Our data demonstrate the importance of intact VDR signaling in the preservation of vascular function and may provide a mechanistic explanation for epidemiological data in humans showing that vitamin D insufficiency is associated with hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:24284821

  11. Bidirectional cross-regulation between the endothelial nitric oxide synthase and β-catenin signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Warboys, Christina M.; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Qiuping; Shaifta, Yasin; Vanderslott, Genevieve; Passacquale, Gabriella; Hu, Yanhua; Xu, Qingbo; Ward, Jeremy P.T.; Ferro, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Aims β-catenin has been shown to be regulated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in endothelial cells. We investigated here whether β-catenin interacts with and regulates endothelial NOS (eNOS) and whether eNOS activation promotes β-catenin signalling. Methods and results We identified β-catenin as a novel eNOS binding protein in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by mass spectroscopy and western blot analyses of β-catenin and eNOS immunoprecipitates. This was confirmed by in situ proximity ligation assay. eNOS activity, assessed by cGMP production and eNOS phosphorylation (Ser1177), was enhanced in β-catenin−/− mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (MPECs) relative to wild-type MPECs. eNOS activation (using adenosine, salbutamol, thrombin, or histamine), or application of an NO donor (spermine NONOate) or cGMP-analogue (8-bromo-cGMP) caused nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HUVEC as shown by western blotting of nuclear extracts. Exposure to spermine NONOate, 8-bromo-cGMP, or sildenafil (a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor) also increased the expression of β-catenin-dependent transcripts, IL-8, and cyclin D1. Stimulation of wild-type MPECs with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), spermine NONOate, 8-bromo-cGMP, or sildenafil increased tube length relative to controls in an angiogenesis assay. These responses were abrogated in β-catenin−/− MPECs, with the exception of that to bFGF which is NO-independent. In C57BL/6 mice, subcutaneous VEGF-supplemented Matrigel plugs containing β-catenin−/− MPECs exhibited reduced angiogenesis compared with plugs containing wild-type MPECs. Angiogenesis was not altered in bFGF-supplemented Matrigel. Conclusion These data reveal bidirectional cross-talk and regulation between the NO-cGMP and β-catenin signalling pathways. PMID:25062958

  12. Effects of chronic noradrenaline on the nitric oxide pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bachetti, T; Comini, L; Agnoletti, L; Pedersini, P; Gaia, G; Cargnoni, A; Bellet, M; Curello, S; Ferrari, R

    1998-08-01

    Altered endothelium-dependent vasodilation has been observed in congestive heart failure (CHF), a disease characterized by a sustained adrenergic activation. The purpose of our study was to test the hypothesis that chronically elevated catecholamines influence the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the human endothelium. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were exposed for 7 days to a concentration of noradrenaline (NA, 1 ng/mL) similar to that found in the blood of patients with CHF. Kinetics of endothelial constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) activity, measured by [3H]L-arginine to [3H]L-citrulline conversion, and protein expression of ecNOS and iNOS, assessed by Western blot analysis, were unaffected by chronic NA treatment. Furthermore, no changes in subcellular fraction-associated ecNOS were found; this indirectly shows that chronic NA did not cause phosphorylation of the enzyme. Moreover, [3H]L-arginine transport through the plasma membrane was conserved in chronically NA-treated cells. The data demonstrate that prolonged in vitro exposure to pathologic CHF-like NA does not affect the L-arginine: NO pathway in human endothelial cells. PMID:9782366

  13. Mechanical perturbations trigger endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shunmugan; Raj, Rajendran Kadarkarai; Saravanakumar, Venkatesan; Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Rajendran, Vinoth Kumar; Shathya, Yogarajan; Ali, B Mohammed Jaffar; Sumantran, Venil; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a vascular signaling molecule, is primarily produced by endothelial NO synthase. Recently, a functional endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was described in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC-eNOS contributes to the intravascular NO pool and regulates physiological functions. However the regulatory mechanisms and clinical implications of RBC-eNOS are unknown. The present study investigated regulation and functions of RBC-eNOS under mechanical stimulation. This study shows that mechanical stimuli perturb RBC membrane, which triggers a signaling cascade to activate the eNOS. Extracellular NO level, estimated by the 4-Amino-5-Methylamino-2', 7'-Difluorofluorescein Diacetate probe, was significantly increased under mechanical stimuli. Immunostaining and western blot studies confirmed that the mechanical stimuli phosphorylate the serine 1177 moiety of RBC-eNOS, and activates the enzyme. The NO produced by activation of RBC-eNOS in vortexed RBCs promoted important endothelial functions such as migration and vascular sprouting. We also show that mechanical perturbation facilitates nitrosylation of RBC proteins via eNOS activation. The results of the study confirm that mechanical perturbations sensitize RBC-eNOS to produce NO, which ultimately defines physiological boundaries of RBC structure and functions. Therefore, we propose that mild physical perturbations before, after, or during storage can improve viability of RBCs in blood banks. PMID:27345770

  14. Mechanical perturbations trigger endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Shunmugan; Raj, Rajendran Kadarkarai; Saravanakumar, Venkatesan; Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Rajendran, Vinoth Kumar; Shathya, Yogarajan; Ali, B. Mohammed Jaffar; Sumantran, Venil; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a vascular signaling molecule, is primarily produced by endothelial NO synthase. Recently, a functional endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was described in red blood cells (RBC). The RBC-eNOS contributes to the intravascular NO pool and regulates physiological functions. However the regulatory mechanisms and clinical implications of RBC-eNOS are unknown. The present study investigated regulation and functions of RBC-eNOS under mechanical stimulation. This study shows that mechanical stimuli perturb RBC membrane, which triggers a signaling cascade to activate the eNOS. Extracellular NO level, estimated by the 4-Amino-5-Methylamino-2′, 7′-Difluorofluorescein Diacetate probe, was significantly increased under mechanical stimuli. Immunostaining and western blot studies confirmed that the mechanical stimuli phosphorylate the serine 1177 moiety of RBC-eNOS, and activates the enzyme. The NO produced by activation of RBC-eNOS in vortexed RBCs promoted important endothelial functions such as migration and vascular sprouting. We also show that mechanical perturbation facilitates nitrosylation of RBC proteins via eNOS activation. The results of the study confirm that mechanical perturbations sensitize RBC-eNOS to produce NO, which ultimately defines physiological boundaries of RBC structure and functions. Therefore, we propose that mild physical perturbations before, after, or during storage can improve viability of RBCs in blood banks. PMID:27345770

  15. Simplified 2-Aminoquinoline-Based Scaffold for Potent and Selective Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Since high levels of nitric oxide (NO) are implicated in neurodegenerative disorders, inhibition of the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and reduction of NO levels are therapeutically desirable. Nonetheless, many nNOS inhibitors mimic l-arginine and are poorly bioavailable. 2-Aminoquinoline-based scaffolds were designed with the hope that they could (a) mimic aminopyridines as potent, isoform-selective arginine isosteres and (b) possess chemical properties more conducive to oral bioavailability and CNS penetration. A series of these compounds was synthesized and assayed against purified nNOS enzymes, endothelial NOS (eNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS). Several compounds built on a 7-substituted 2-aminoquinoline core are potent and isoform-selective; X-ray crystallography indicates that aminoquinolines exert inhibitory effects by mimicking substrate interactions with the conserved active site glutamate residue. The most potent and selective compounds, 7 and 15, were tested in a Caco-2 assay and showed good permeability and low efflux, suggesting high potential for oral bioavailability. PMID:24472039

  16. Oscillatory shear stress upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase requires intracellular hydrogen peroxide and CaMKII.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hua; McNally, Joseph S; Weber, Martina; Harrison, David G

    2004-07-01

    We have previously shown that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) upregulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression via a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated mechanism whereas it also acutely activates eNOS enzyme. We hypothesized that oscillatory shear stress (OSS), which stimulates endogenous H(2)O(2), would have effects on eNOS expression and function similar to that of exogenous H(2)O(2). Exposure of bovine aortic endothelial cells to OSS (+/-15 dynes/cm(2)) increased eNOS mRNA expression by 3-fold. Pretreatment with either polyethylene glycol-catalase (PEG-CAT, a scavenger of H(2)O(2)) or KN93, an inhibitor of CaMKII, abolished this response. OSS activated CaMKII in an H(2)O(2)-dependent fashion whereas unidirectional laminar shear stress (LSS) inhibited CaMKII phosphorylation. Inhibition of c-Src (essential for LSS upregulation of eNOS) had no effect on OSS upregulation of eNOS. Additionally, OSS stimulated NO* production acutely. Scavenging of H(2)O(2) by PEG-CAT attenuated OSS stimulation of NO* by 50% whereas it had no effect on LSS regulation of NO* production. These data suggest that intracellular H(2)O(2) and CaMKII mediate OSS upregulation of eNOS. The acute activation of eNOS by OSS also partially requires H(2)O(2). As OSS has been shown previously to stimulate sustained production of superoxide (O(2)*-) which would inactivate NO*, these responses may represent attempted compensation to restore NO* bioavailability in areas exposed to OSS. Simultaneous stimulation of O(2)*- and NO* by this mechanism, however, could facilitate peroxynitrite formation and protein nitration, which may enhance atherosclerotic lesion formation. Both OSS and LSS upregulate eNOS expression but via different signaling mechanisms. PMID:15242742

  17. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction after ionized radiation: selective impairment of the nitric oxide component of endothelium-dependent vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Soloviev, Anatoly I; Tishkin, Sergey M; Parshikov, Alexander V; Ivanova, Irina V; Goncharov, Eugene V; Gurney, Alison M

    2003-01-01

    Gamma radiation impairs vascular function, leading to the depression of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Loss of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway has been implicated, but little is known about radiation effects on other endothelial mediators. This study investigated the mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in rabbits subjected to whole-body irradiation from a cobalt60 source. The endothelium-dependent relaxation of rabbit aorta evoked by acetylcholine (ACh) or A23187 was impaired in a dose-dependent manner by irradiation at 2 Gy or above. Inhibition was evident 9 days post-irradiation and persisted over the 30 day experimental period. Endothelium-independent responses to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) were suppressed over a similar dose range at 7–9 days post-irradiation, but recovered fully by 30 days post-irradiation. In healthy vessels, ACh-induced relaxation was inhibited by L-Nω-nitroarginine (L-NA; 3×10−4 M) and charybdotoxin (10−8 M) plus apamin (10−6 M) but resistant to indomethacin, indicating the involvement of NO and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Supporting this, ACh caused smooth muscle hyperpolarization that was reduced by L-NA and charybdotoxin plus apamin. In irradiated vessels, responses to ACh were insensitive to L-NA but abolished by charybdotoxin plus apamin, indicating selective loss of NO-mediated relaxation. In animals treated shortly after irradiation with the antioxidant, α-tocopherol acetate, the NO-dependent relaxation was restored without effect on the EDHF-dependent component. The results imply that radiation selectively impairs the NO pathway as a consequence of oxidative stress, while EDHF is able to maintain endothelium-dependent relaxation at a reduced level. PMID:12642385

  18. Sepiapterin improves angiogenesis of pulmonary artery endothelial cells with in utero pulmonary hypertension by recoupling endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianhai; Xu, Hao; Bakhutashvili, Ivane; Eis, Annie; Shi, Yang; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Konduri, Girija G.

    2011-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is associated with decreased blood vessel density that contributes to increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Previous studies showed that uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) activity and increased NADPH oxidase activity resulted in marked decreases in NO bioavailability and impaired angiogenesis in PPHN. In the present study, we hypothesize that loss of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a critical cofactor for eNOS, induces uncoupled eNOS activity and impairs angiogenesis in PPHN. Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC) isolated from fetal lambs with PPHN (HTFL-PAEC) or control lambs (NFL-PAEC) were used to investigate the cellular mechanisms impairing angiogenesis in PPHN. Cellular mechanisms were examined with respect to BH4 levels, GTP-cyclohydrolase-1 (GCH-1) expression, eNOS dimer formation, and eNOS-heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) interactions under basal conditions and after sepiapterin (Sep) supplementation. Cellular levels of BH4, GCH-1 expression, and eNOS dimer formation were decreased in HTFL-PAEC compared with NFL-PAEC. Sep supplementation decreased apoptosis and increased in vitro angiogenesis in HTFL-PAEC and ex vivo pulmonary artery sprouting angiogenesis. Sep also increased cellular BH4 content, NO production, eNOS dimer formation, and eNOS-hsp90 association and decreased the superoxide formation in HTFL-PAEC. These data demonstrate that Sep improves NO production and angiogenic potential of HTFL-PAEC by recoupling eNOS activity. Increasing BH4 levels via Sep supplementation may be an important therapy for improving eNOS function and restoring angiogenesis in PPHN. PMID:21622842

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of a Chinese herbal medicine in atherosclerosis via estrogen receptor β mediating nitric oxide production and NF-κB suppression in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Qiu, X-M; Hao, Q; Li, D-J

    2013-01-01

    Bu-Shen-Ning-Xin Decoction (BSNXD) administration has alleviated the early pathologic damage of atherosclerosis by inhibiting the adhesion molecule expression and upregulating the estrogen receptor (ER) β expression in endothelial cells, and increasing the serum nitric oxide (NO) level without any effect on serum lipid status, endometrium and fat deposition in liver in ovariectomized rabbits. The BSNXD-derived serum increases ER β expression in the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and decreases malondialdehyde (MDA) production, and upregulates eNOS expression then increases NO synthesis through ERβ-dependent pathway. NO not only suppresses the LPS-induced NF-κB transcription in HUVECs, but also decreases apoptosis of endothelial cells. The BSNXD-derived serum decreases monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production, and suppresses cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin) expression in HUVECs injured by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL), and these effects can be abolished by ERβ antagonist (R,RTHC) and NO synthase inhibitor (L-NAME). The BSNXD-derived serum-treated HUVECs supernatant reduces CCR2, LFA-1 and VLA-4 expression in monocytes cell line U937 cells, which in turn inhibits adherence of U937 to injured endothelial cells. NO synthesis increases, and MDA production decreases through ERβ-mediated pathway that suppresses apoptosis and NF-κB activity in endothelial cells that downregulates adhesion molecules expression on endothelial cells via ERβ/NO/NF-κB pathway, and in turn leukocyte adhesion, which suggests BSNXD potential value in prophylaxis atherosclerosis. PMID:23519120

  20. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition Attenuates Cardiac Response to Hemodilution with Viscogenic Plasma Expander

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Increased vascular wall shear stress by elevated plasma viscosity significantly enhances the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity during an acute isovolemic hemodilution. Also the modulation of plasma viscosity has effects on the cardiac function that were revealed if a left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume (PV) measurement was used. The aim of this study was to assess cardiac function responses to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors with the presence of an elevated plasma viscosity but a low hematocrit level. Furthermore, systemic parameters were monitored in a murine model. Materials and Methods As test group five anesthetized hamsters were administered with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), NOS inhibitor, whereas five other hamsters were used as control group without L-NAME infusion. The dosage of L-NAME was 10 mg/kg. An isovolemic hemodilution was performed by 40% of estimated blood volume with 6% w/v dextran 2000 kDa, high viscosity plasma expanders (PEs) with viscosity 6.34 cP. LV function was measured and assessed using a 1.4 Fr PV conductance catheter. Results The study results demonstrated that NOS inhibition prevented the normal cardiac adaptive response after hemodilution. The endsystolic pressure increased 14% after L-NAME infusion and maintained higher than at the baseline after hemodilution, whereas it gradually decreased in the animals without L-NAME infusion. The admission of L-NAME significantly decreased the maximum rate of ventricular pressure rise (+dP/dtmax), stroke volume and cardiac output after hemodilution if compared to the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion This finding supports the presumption that nitric oxide induced by an increased plasma viscosity with the use of a high viscosity PE plays a major role in the cardiac function during an acute isovolemic hemodilution. PMID:24653740

  1. Cloricromene inhibits the induction of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Zingarelli, B; Carnuccio, R; Di Rosa, M

    1993-10-19

    The effect of cloricromene, a coumarin derivative, was investigated on the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) synthase induction in intact aortas from endotoxin shocked rats and in the murine macrophage cell line J774. Rings of thoracic aortas from lipopolysaccharide (4 mg/kg, i.v.)-shocked rats, contracted with phenylephrine, showed a progressive decrease in tone, that was of a greater magnitude than that of aortas from naive rats. Moreover, a decreased response to the constrictor effect of phenylephrine was observed in aortas from shocked rats. In vivo treatment with cloricromene (2 mg/kg, i.v.) 30 min before lipopolysaccharide administration partially prevented the loss in tone of aortic rings and improved their reactivity to phenylephrine. Murine J774 macrophages activated with lipopolysaccharide (100 ng/ml) produced significant amounts of nitrites (NO2-; 28.2 +/- 3.5 nmol/10(6) cells per 24 h). Cloricromene (2, 20 or 200 microM) added to the cells concomitantly with lipopolysaccharide inhibited NO2- production in a concentration-dependent manner. Maximum inhibition (84.0 +/- 8.0%) was observed when cloricromene (200 microM) was added to the cells 6 h before lipopolysaccharide, whereas it was ineffective when given 6 h after endotoxin. These results demonstrate that cloricromene inhibits the expression but not the activity of the inducible NO synthase. PMID:7506214

  2. Anandamide inhibits endothelin-1 production by human cultured endothelial cells: a new vascular action of this endocannabinoid.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Ana María; Llanos, Miguel; Tamayo, Daniela; Hirsch, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonist anandamide (AEA) exerts vascular effects such as vasodilatation and hypotension. In this study, we determined the effect of AEA on endothelin-1 production by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Anandamide (>or=5 micromol/l) significantly decreased endothelin-1 production in a dose-dependent manner, a response not affected by the specific CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist SR-141716A. Adenosine, via activation of adenosine receptors (also targets for SR-141716A), was not involved in these effects. Conversely, AEA increased nitric oxide (NO) production, an effect inhibited by SR-141716A, indicating the involvement of CB1 receptors. Therefore, we hypothesize that AEA effects on endothelial cells may lead to vasodilatation through independent concerted mechanisms, involving a non-CB1 receptor-dependent inhibition of endothelin-1 production and a CB1-mediated increase of NO. PMID:17114903

  3. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by agmatine after transient global cerebral ischemia in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mun, Chin Hee; Lee, Won Taek; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Jong Eun

    2010-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a protective role in cerebral ischemia by maintaining vascular permeability, whereas NO derived from neuronal and inducible NOS is neurotoxic and can participate in neuronal damage occurring in ischemia. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are up-regulated by ischemic injury and degrade the basement membrane if brain vessels to promote cell death and tissue injury. We previously reported that agmatine, synthesized from L-arginine by arginine decarboxylase (ADC) which is expressed in endothelial cells, has shown a direct increased eNOS expression and decreased MMPs expression in bEnd3 cells. But, there are few reports about the regulation of eNOS by agmatine in ischemic animal model. In the present study, we examined the expression of eNOS and MMPs by agmatine treatment after transient global ischemia in vivo. Global ischemia was induced with four vessel occlusion (4-VO) and agmatine (100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at the onset of reperfusion. The animals were euthanized at 6 and 24 hours after global ischemia and prepared for other analysis. Global ischemia led severe neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex, but agmatine treatment protected neurons from ischemic injury. Moreover, the level and expression of eNOS was increased by agmatine treatment, whereas inducible NOS (iNOS) and MMP-9 protein expressions were decreased in the brain. These results suggest that agmatine protects microvessels in the brain by activation eNOS as well as reduces extracellular matrix degradation during the early phase of ischemic insult. PMID:21212863

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Increases Nitric Oxide Production and Subsequent S-Nitrosylation in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping-Ho; Fu, Yaw-Syan; Wang, Yun-Ming; Yang, Kun-Han; Wang, Danny Ling; Huang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO), two endogenous gaseous molecules in endothelial cells, got increased attention with respect to their protective roles in the cardiovascular system. However, the details of the signaling pathways between H2S and NO in endothelia cells remain unclear. In this study, a treatment with NaHS profoundly increased the expression and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Elevated gaseous NO levels were observed by a novel and specific fluorescent probe, 5-amino-2-(6-hydroxy-3-oxo-3H-xanthen-9-yl)benzoic acid methyl ester (FA-OMe), and quantified by flow cytometry. Further study indicated an increase of upstream regulator for eNOS activation, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and protein kinase B (Akt). By using a biotin switch, the level of NO-mediated protein S-nitrosylation was also enhanced. However, with the addition of the NO donor, NOC-18, the expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase, cystathionine-β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase were not changed. The level of H2S was also monitored by a new designed fluorescent probe, 4-nitro-7-thiocyanatobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-SCN) with high specificity. Therefore, NO did not reciprocally increase the expression of H2S-generating enzymes and the H2S level. The present study provides an integrated insight of cellular responses to H2S and NO from protein expression to gaseous molecule generation, which indicates the upstream role of H2S in modulating NO production and protein S-nitrosylation. PMID:24971375

  5. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism is associated with sickle cell disease patients in India.

    PubMed

    Nishank, Sudhansu Sekhar; Singh, Mendi Prema Shyam Sunder; Yadav, Rajiv; Gupta, Rasik Bihari; Gadge, Vijay Sadashiv; Gwal, Anil

    2013-12-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) produce significantly low levels of plasma nitric oxide (NO) during acute vaso-occlusive crisis. In transgenic sickle cell mice, NO synthesized by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) enzyme of vascular endothelial cells has been found to protect the mice from vaso-occlusive events. Therefore, the present study aims to explore possible association of eNOS gene polymorphism as a potential genetic modifier in SCD patients. A case control study involving 150 SCD patients and age- and ethnicity-matched 150 healthy controls were genotyped by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques for three important eNOS gene polymorphisms-eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T and eNOS -786T>C. It was observed that SCD patients had significantly higher frequencies of mutant alleles besides heterozygous and homozygous mutant genotypes of these three eNOS gene polymorphisms and low levels of plasma nitrite (NO2) as compared with control groups. The SCD severe group had significantly lower levels of plasma NO2 and higher frequencies of mutant alleles of these three SNPs of eNOS gene in contrast to the SCD mild group of patients. Haplotype analysis revealed that frequencies of one mutant haplotype '4a-T-C' (alleles in order of eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T and eNOS -786T>C) were significantly high in the severe SCD patients (P<0.0001), whereas the frequency of a wild haplotype '4b-G-T' was found to be significantly high (P<0.0001) in the SCD mild patients, which indicates that eNOS gene polymorphisms are associated with SCD patients in India and may act as a genetic modifier of the phenotypic variation of SCD patients. PMID:24088668

  6. Inhibition of endothelial cell apoptosis by netrin-1 during angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castets, Marie; Coissieux, Marie-May; Delloye-Bourgeois, Céline; Bernard, Laure; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Bernet, Agnès; Laudet, Vincent; Mehlen, Patrick

    2009-04-01

    Netrin-1 was recently proposed to play an important role in embryonic and pathological angiogenesis. However, data reported led to the apparently contradictory conclusions that netrin-1 is either a pro- or an antiangiogenic factor. Here, we reconcile these opposing observations by demonstrating that netrin-1 acts as a survival factor for endothelial cells, blocking the proapoptotic effect of the dependence receptor UNC5B and its downstream death signaling effector, the serine/threonine kinase DAPK. The netrin-1 effect on blood vessel development is mimicked by caspase inhibitors in ex vivo assays, and the inhibition of caspase activity, the silencing of the UNC5B receptor, and the silencing of DAPK are each sufficient to rescue the vascular sprouting defects induced by netrin-1 silencing in zebrafish. Thus, the proapoptotic effect of unbound UNC5B and the survival effect of netrin-1 on endothelial cells finely tune the angiogenic process. PMID:19386270

  7. Inhibitory effects of NO on carotid body: contribution of neural and endothelial nitric oxide synthase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Viviana; Mosqueira, Matías; Rey, Sergio; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2003-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) produced within the carotid body is a tonic inhibitor of chemoreception and determined the contribution of neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) isoforms to the inhibitory NO effect. Accordingly, we studied the effect of NO generated from S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamide (SNAP) and compared the effects of the nonselective inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and the selective nNOS inhibitor 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-imidazole (TRIM) on chemosensory dose-response curves induced by nicotine and NaCN and responses to hypoxia (Po(2) approximately 30 Torr). CBs excised from pentobarbitone-anesthetized cats were perfused in vitro with Tyrode at 38 degrees C and pH 7.40, and chemosensory discharges were recorded from the carotid sinus nerve. SNAP (100 microM) reduced the responses to nicotine and NaCN. l-NAME (1 mM) enhanced the responses to nicotine and NaCN by increasing their duration, but TRIM (100 microM) only enhanced the responses to high doses of NaCN. The amplitude of the response to hypoxia was enhanced by l-NAME but not by TRIM. Our results suggest that both isoforms contribute to the NO action, but eNOS being the main source for NO in the cat CB and exerting a tonic effect upon chemoreceptor activity. PMID:12388352

  8. Relation between Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Genotypes and Oxidative Stress Markers in Larynx Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yanar, K.; Çakatay, U.; Aydın, S.; Verim, A.; Atukeren, P.; Özkan, N. E.; Karatoprak, K.; Cebe, T.; Turan, S.; Ozkök, E.; Korkmaz, G.; Cacına, C.; Küçükhüseyin, O.; Yaylım, İ.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) is responsible for the endothelial synthesis of nitric oxide (NO•). G894T polymorphism leads to the amino acid substitution from Glu298Asp that causes lower NOS3 activity and basal NO• production in NOS3 894T (298Asp) allele carriers compared with the GG homozygotes. NO• acts as an antioxidant protecting against Fenton's reaction which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Allelic variation of NOS3 may influence an individual's risk of laryngeal cancer (LC). In the current study we have examined the possible relationship between NOS3 G894T genotypes and various systemic oxidative damage markers such as protein carbonyl, advanced oxidation protein products, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, thiol group fractions, and lipid hydroperoxides in LC patients. Genotyping was carried out by PCR-RFLP. In LC patients with TT genotype, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase activities and nonprotein thiol levels were significantly higher than the controls. In patients with GT and GG genotype, high levels of lipid hydroperoxides showed statistical significance when compared to controls. Our results indicate a potential relationship among G894T polymorphism of NOS3, and impaired redox homeostasis. Further studies are required to determine the role of NOS3 gene polymorphism and impaired plasma redox homeostasis. PMID:26682008

  9. Extensive Ethnogenomic Diversity of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Bolaji N.; Thakur, Tanya J.; Yi, Li; Guindo, Aldiouma; Diallo, Dapa A.; Ott, Jurg

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is highly reactive, produced in endothelial cells by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and has been implicated in sickle cell pathophysiology. We evaluated the distribution of functionally significant eNOS variants (the T786C variant in the promoter region, the Glu298Asp variant in exon 7, and the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in intron 4) in Africans, African Americans and Caucasians. The C-786 variant was more common in Caucasians than in Africans and African Americans. Consistent with other findings, the Asp-298 variant had the highest frequency in Caucasians followed by African Americans, but was completely absent in Africans. The very rare intron 4 allele, eNOS 4c, was found in some Africans and African Americans, but not in Caucasians. eNOS 4d allele was present in 2 Africans. These findings suggest a consistent and widespread genomic diversity in the distribution of eNOS variants in Africans, comparative to African Americans and Caucasians. PMID:23400313

  10. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene transfer enhances dilation of newborn piglet pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Aschner, J L; Kovacs, N; Perciaccante, J V; Figueroa, J P; Thrikawala, N; Robins, G S; Busija, D W

    1999-07-01

    We determined the expression and functional correlate of in vitro transfection with a recombinant adenoviral vector encoding the gene for bovine endothelial nitric oxide synthase (AdCMVeNOS) or Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase (AdCMVLacZ) in pulmonary endothelial cells (EC), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), and pulmonary arteries (PA) from newborn piglets. AdCMVeNOS and AdCMVeLacZ vectors, grown in 293-cell monolayers, were purified by double-cesium gradient ultracentrifugation. Cell cultures and PA were incubated with increasing vector titers for 30 or 60 min, followed by incubation in fresh medium for 18 h at 37 degrees C. LacZ expression was assessed by histochemical staining; eNOS expression was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Functional eNOS expression was determined by measurement of cGMP and quantification of the relaxation response to bradykinin (BK). In PA, LacZ transgene expression was preferentially localized to the adventitia and endothelium. Increased eNOS protein expression was observed in EC and VSMC transfected with AdCMVeNOS. Functional studies revealed increased cGMP abundance in cultured cells and enhanced relaxation to BK in AdCMVeNOS-transfected PA. These studies demonstrate that gene transfer with AdCMVeNOS results in functional expression and altered vasoactive responses in the neonatal pulmonary vasculature. Gene transfer with replication-deficient adenovirus vectors is a useful tool for the study of targeted genes in vascular biology. PMID:10409217

  11. Translocation of Endothelial Nitric-Oxide Synthase Involves a Ternary Complex with Caveolin-1 and NOSTRIN

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Kirstin; Opitz, Nils; Wiesenthal, Anja; Oess, Stefanie; Tikkanen, Ritva; Icking, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we characterized a novel endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS)-interacting protein, NOSTRIN (for eNOS-trafficking inducer), which decreases eNOS activity upon overexpression and induces translocation of eNOS away from the plasma membrane. Here, we show that NOSTRIN directly binds to caveolin-1, a well-established inhibitor of eNOS. Because this interaction occurs between the N terminus of caveolin (positions 1–61) and the central domain of NOSTRIN (positions 323–434), it allows for independent binding of each of the two proteins to eNOS. Consistently, we were able to demonstrate the existence of a ternary complex of NOSTRIN, eNOS, and caveolin-1 in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-eNOS cells. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), the ternary complex assembles at the plasma membrane upon confluence or thrombin stimulation. In CHO-eNOS cells, NOSTRIN-mediated translocation of eNOS involves caveolin in a process most likely representing caveolar trafficking. Accordingly, trafficking of NOSTRIN/eNOS/caveolin is affected by altering the state of actin filaments or cholesterol levels in the plasma membrane. During caveolar trafficking, NOSTRIN functions as an adaptor to recruit mediators such as dynamin-2 essential for membrane fission. We propose that a ternary complex between NOSTRIN, caveolin-1, and eNOS mediates translocation of eNOS, with important implications for the activity and availability of eNOS in the cell. PMID:16807357

  12. Extensive ethnogenomic diversity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Bolaji N; Thakur, Tanya J; Yi, Li; Guindo, Aldiouma; Diallo, Dapa A; Ott, Jurg

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is highly reactive, produced in endothelial cells by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and has been implicated in sickle cell pathophysiology. We evaluated the distribution of functionally significant eNOS variants (the T786C variant in the promoter region, the Glu298Asp variant in exon 7, and the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in intron 4) in Africans, African Americans and Caucasians. The C-786 variant was more common in Caucasians than in Africans and African Americans. Consistent with other findings, the Asp-298 variant had the highest frequency in Caucasians followed by African Americans, but was completely absent in Africans. The very rare intron 4 allele, eNOS 4c, was found in some Africans and African Americans, but not in Caucasians. eNOS 4d allele was present in 2 Africans. These findings suggest a consistent and widespread genomic diversity in the distribution of eNOS variants in Africans, comparative to African Americans and Caucasians. PMID:23400313

  13. Functional interaction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase with a voltage-dependent anion channel

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianxin; Liao, James K.

    2002-01-01

    Endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of vascular function. NO is produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) whose function is modulated, in part, by specific protein interactions. By coimmunoprecipitation experiments followed by MS analyses, we identified a human voltage-dependent anion/cation channel or porin as a binding partner of eNOS. The interaction between porin and eNOS was demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation studies in nontransfected human endothelial cells and Cos-7 cells transiently transfected with eNOS and porin cDNAs. In vitro binding studies with glutathione S-transferase–porin indicated that porin binds directly to eNOS and that this interaction augmented eNOS activity. The calcium ionophore, A23187, and bradykinin, which are known to activate eNOS, markedly increased porin–eNOS interaction, suggesting a potential role of intracellular Ca2+ in mediating this interaction. Theses results indicate that the interaction between a voltage-dependent membrane channel and eNOS may be important for regulating eNOS activity. PMID:12228731

  14. Involvement of inducible nitric oxide synthase in radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Won; Kim, Young-Mee; Pyo, Hongryull; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Suwan; Lee, Sunyoung; Noh, Jae Myoung

    2013-11-01

    The use of radiation therapy has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To understand the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced vascular dysfunction, we employed two models. First, we examined the effect of X-ray irradiation on vasodilation in rabbit carotid arteries. Carotid arterial rings were irradiated with 8 or 16 Gy using in vivo and ex vivo methods. We measured the effect of acetylcholine-induced relaxation after phenylephrine-induced contraction on the rings. In irradiated carotid arteries, vasodilation was significantly attenuated by both irradiation methods. The relaxation response was completely blocked by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, a potent inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Residual relaxation persisted after treatment with L-N(ω)-nitroarginine (L-NA), a non-specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), but disappeared following the addition of aminoguanidine (AG), a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (iNOS). The relaxation response was also affected by tetraethylammonium, an inhibitor of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor activity. In the second model, we investigated the biochemical events of nitrosative stress in human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We measured iNOS and nitrotyrosine expression in HUVECs exposed to a dose of 4 Gy. The expression of iNOS and nitrotyrosine was greater in irradiated HUVECs than in untreated controls. Pretreatment with AG, L-N(6)-(1-iminoethyl) lysine hydrochloride (a selective inhibitor of iNOS), and L-NA attenuated nitrosative stress. While a selective target of radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage was not definitely determined, these results suggest that NO generated from iNOS could contribute to vasorelaxation. These studies highlight a potential role of iNOS inhibitors in ameliorating radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage. PMID:23704776

  15. The smoking-associated oxidant hypothiocyanous acid induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Kwan, Jair; Suryo Rahmanto, Aldwin; Witting, Paul K; Davies, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Considerable evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN(-), a preferred MPO substrate, with this resulting in HOSCN (hypothiocyanous acid) formation. We hypothesized that this thiol-specific oxidant may target the Zn(2+)-thiol cluster of eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), resulting in enzyme dysfunction and reduced formation of the critical signalling molecule NO•. Decreased NO• bioavailability is an early and critical event in atherogenesis, and HOSCN-mediated damage to eNOS may contribute to smoking-associated disease. In the present study it is shown that exposure of isolated eNOS to HOSCN or MPO/H2O2/SCN(-) decreased active dimeric eNOS levels, and increased inactive monomer and Zn(2+) release, compared with controls, HOCl (hypochlorous acid)- or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-treated samples. eNOS activity was increasingly compromised by MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-) concentrations. Exposure of HCAEC (human coronary artery endothelial cell) lysates to pre-formed HOSCN, or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-), increased eNOS monomerization and Zn(2+) release, and decreased activity. Intact HCAECs exposed to HOCl and HOSCN had decreased eNOS activity and NO2(-)/NO3(-) formation (products of NO• decomposition), and increased free Zn(2+). Exposure of isolated rat aortic rings to HOSCN resulted in thiol loss, and decreased eNOS activity and cGMP levels. Overall these data indicate that high SCN(-) levels, as seen in smokers, can increase HOSCN formation and enhance eNOS dysfunction in human endothelial cells, with this potentially contributing to increased atherogenesis in smokers. PMID:24112082

  16. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase G894T Polymorphism Associates with Disease Severity in Puumala Hantavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Koskela, Sirpa; Laine, Outi; Mäkelä, Satu; Pessi, Tanja; Tuomisto, Sari; Huhtala, Heini; Karhunen, Pekka J.; Pörsti, Ilkka; Mustonen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hantavirus infections are characterized by both activation and dysfunction of the endothelial cells. The underlying mechanisms of the disease pathogenesis are not fully understood. Here we tested the hypothesis whether the polymorphisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, eNOS G894T, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS G2087A, are associated with the severity of acute Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) infection. Patients and Methods Hospitalized patients (n = 172) with serologically verified PUUV infection were examined. Clinical and laboratory variables reflecting disease severity were determined. The polymorphisms of eNOS G894T (Glu298Asp, rs1799983) and iNOS G2087A (Ser608Leu, rs2297518) were genotyped. Results The rare eNOS G894T genotype was associated with the severity of acute kidney injury (AKI). The non-carriers of G-allele (TT-homozygotes) had higher maximum level of serum creatinine than the carriers of G-allele (GT-heterozygotes and GG-homozygotes; median 326, range 102–1041 vs. median 175, range 51–1499 μmol/l; p = 0.018, respectively). The length of hospital stay was longer in the non-carriers of G-allele than in G-allele carriers (median 8, range 3–14 vs. median 6, range 2–15 days; p = 0.032). The rare A-allele carriers (i.e. AA-homozygotes and GA-heterozygotes) of iNOS G2087A had lower minimum systolic and diastolic blood pressure than the non-carriers of A-allele (median 110, range 74–170 vs.116, range 86–162 mmHg, p = 0.019, and median 68, range 40–90 vs. 72, range 48–100 mmHg; p = 0.003, respectively). Conclusions Patients with the TT-homozygous genotype of eNOS G894T had more severe PUUV-induced AKI than the other genotypes. The eNOS G894T polymorphism may play role in the endothelial dysfunction observed during acute PUUV infection. PMID:26561052

  17. Transcriptional regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in uterine artery endothelial cells by c-Jun/AP-1

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiao-Xian; Mata-Greenwood, Eugenia; Liao, Wu Xiang; Zhang, Honghai; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Dong-bao

    2007-01-01

    Despite extensive studies have shown that increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) expression in the uterine artery endothelial cells (UAEC) plays a key role in uterine vasodilatation, the molecular mechanism controlling NOS3 expression in UAEC is unknown. According to the sheep NOS3 promoter sequence isolated in our laboratory, we hypothesize that the activator protein-1 (AP-1) site in the proximal sheep NOS3 promoter (TGAGTCA, -682 to -676) is important for NOS3 expression. We developed a c-Jun adenoviral expression system to overexpress c-Jun protein into UAEC to investigate the effects of c-Jun/AP-1 on NOS3 expression. Basal levels of c-Jun protein and mRNA were detected in UAEC. C-Jun protein was overexpressed in a concentration and time-dependent fashion in UAEC infected with sense c-Jun (S-c-Jun), but not sham and antisense c-Jun (A-c-Jun) adenoviruses. Infection with S-c-Jun adenovirus (25 MOI, multiplicity of infection) resulted in efficient c-Jun protein overexpression in UAEC up to 3 days. In S-c-Jun, but not sham and A-c-Jun adenovirus infected UAEC, NOS3 mRNA and protein levels were increased (P<0.05) compared to noninfected controls. Increased NOS3 expression was associated with increased total NOS activity. Transient transfections showed that c-Jun overexpression augmented the transactivation of the sheep NOS3 promoter-driven luciferase/reporter constructs with the AP-1 site but not of deletion constructs without the AP-1 site. When the AP-1 site was mutated, c-Jun failed to trans-activate the sheep NOS3 promoter. AP-1 DNA binding activity also increased in c-Jun overexpressed UAEC. Lastly, the pharmacological AP-1 activator phorbol myristate acetate increased AP-1 binding, trans-activated the wild-type but not the AP-1 mutant NOS3 promoter and dose-dependently stimulated UAEC NOS3 and c-Jun protein expression. Hence, our data show that c-Jun/AP-1 regulates NOS3 transcription involving the proximal AP-1 site in the 5′-regulatory region of

  18. Substituted oxines inhibit endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis†

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Shridhar; Shim, Joong Sup; Zhang, Feiran; Chong, Curtis Robert; Liu, Jun O.

    2013-01-01

    Two substituted oxines, nitroxoline (5) and 5-chloroquinolin-8-yl phenylcarbamate (22), were identified as hits in a high-throughput screen aimed at finding new anti-angiogenic agents. In a previous study, we have elucidated the molecular mechanism of antiproliferative activity of nitroxoline in endothelial cells, which comprises of a dual inhibition of type 2 human methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP2) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). Structure–activity relationship study (SAR) of nitroxoline offered many surprises where minor modifications yielded oxine derivatives with increased potency against human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), but with entirely different as yet unknown mechanisms. For example, 5-nitrosoquinolin-8-ol (33) inhibited HUVEC growth with sub-micromolar IC50, but did not affect MetAP2 or MetAP1, and it only showed weak inhibition against SIRT1. Other sub-micromolar inhibitors were derivatives of 5-aminoquinolin-8-ol (34) and 8-sulfonamidoquinoline (32). A sulfamate derivative of nitroxoline (48) was found to be more potent than nitroxoline with the retention of activities against MetAP2 and SIRT1. The bioactivity of the second hit, micromolar HUVEC and MetAP2 inhibitor carbamate 22 was improved further with an SAR study culminating in carbamate 24 which is a nanomolar inhibitor of HUVEC and MetAP2. PMID:22391578

  19. Rapid nontranscriptional activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates increased cerebral blood flow and stroke protection by corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Limbourg, Florian P.; Huang, Zhihong; Plumier, Jean-Christophe; Simoncini, Tommaso; Fujioka, Masayuki; Tuckermann, Jan; Schütz, Günther; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Liao, James K.

    2002-01-01

    Many cellular responses to corticosteroids involve the transcriptional modulation of target genes by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). A rapid, non-nuclear effect of GR was found to mediate neuroprotection. High-dose corticosteroids (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally), given within 2 hours of transient cerebral ischemia, acutely increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, augmented regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) by 40% to 50%, and reduced cerebral infarct size by 32%. These neuroprotective effects of corticosteroids were abolished by the GR antagonist RU486 and by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and were absent in eNOS–/– mice. To determine the mechanism by which GR activated eNOS, we measured the effect of corticosteroids on PI3K and the protein kinase Akt. In a ligand-dependent manner, GR activated PI3K and Akt in vitro and in vivo caused NO-dependent vasodilation, which was blocked by cotreatment with RU486 or the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 but not by transcriptional inhibitors. Indeed, a mutant GR, which cannot dimerize and bind to DNA, still activated PI3K and Akt in response to corticosteroids. These findings indicate that non-nuclear GR rapidly activates eNOS through the PI3K/Akt pathway and suggest that this mechanism mediates the acute neuroprotective effects of corticosteroids through augmentation of CBF. PMID:12464678

  20. Nitric oxide scavenging causes remodeling of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and mitochondria in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason E.; Yuan, Huijuan; Liang, Feng-Xia; Sehgal, Pravin B.

    2013-01-01

    The dependence of the structure and function of cytoplasmic organelles in endothelial cells on constitutively produced intracellular nitric oxide (NO) remains largely unexplored. We previously reported fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus in cells exposed to NO scavengers or after siRNA-mediated knockdown of eNOS. Others have reported increased mitochondrial fission in response to an NO donor. Functionally, we previously reported that bovine pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) exposed to the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5- tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) developed a prosecretory phenotype characterized by prolonged secretion of soluble proteins. In the present study, we investigated whether NO scavenging led to remodeling of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Live-cell DAF-2DA imaging confirmed the presence of intracellular NO in association with the BODIPY C5- ceramide-labelled Golgi apparatus. Untreated human PAECs displayed a pattern of peripheral tubulo-reticular ER with a juxtanuclear accumulation of ER sheets. Cells exposed to c-PTIO showed a dramatic increase in ER sheets as assayed using immunofluoresence for the ER structural protein reticulon-4b/Nogo-B and the ER-resident GTPase atlastin-3, live-cell fluorescence assays using RTN4-GFP and KDEL-mCherry, and electron microscopy methods. These ER changes were inhibited by the NO donor diethylamine NONOate, and also produced by L-NAME, but not D-NAME or 8-br-cGMP. This ER remodeling was accompanied by Golgi fragmentation and increased fibrillarity and function of mitochondria (uptake of tetramethyl- rhodamine, TMRE). Despite Golgi fragmentation the functional ER/Golgi trafficking unit was preserved as seen by the accumulation of Sec31A ER exit sites adjacent to the dispersed Golgi elements and a 1.8-fold increase in secretion of soluble cargo. Western blotting and immunopanning data showed that RTN4b was increasingly ubiquitinated following c-PTIO exposure, especially in the

  1. Follistatin-like 1, a secreted muscle protein, promotes endothelial cell function and revascularization in ischemic tissue through a nitric-oxide synthase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Noriyuki; Oshima, Yuichi; Ohashi, Koji; Higuchi, Akiko; Ikegami, Chiaki; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Walsh, Kenneth

    2008-11-21

    Myogenic Akt signaling coordinates blood vessel recruitment with normal tissue growth. Here, we investigated the role of Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) in the regulation of endothelial cell function and blood vessel growth in muscle. Transgenic Akt1 overexpression in skeletal muscle led to myofiber growth that was coupled to an increase in muscle capillary density. Myogenic Akt signaling or ischemic hind limb surgery led to the induction of Fstl1 in muscle and increased circulating levels of Fstl1. Intramuscular administration of an adenoviral vector expressing Fstl1 (Ad-Fstl1) accelerated flow recovery and increased capillary density in the ischemic hind limbs of wild-type mice, and this was associated with an increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation at residue Ser-1179. In cultured endothelial cells, Ad-Fstl1 stimulated migration and differentiation into network structures and inhibited apoptosis under conditions of serum deprivation. These cell responses were associated with the activating phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS. Conversely, transduction with dominant-negative Akt or LY294002 blocked Fstl1-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation and inhibited Fstl1-stimulated cellular responses. Treatment with the eNOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester also reduced endothelial cell migration and differentiation induced by Ad-Fstl1. The stimulatory effect of Ad-Fstl1 on ischemic limb reperfusion was abolished in mice lacking eNOS. These data indicate that Fstl1 is a secreted muscle protein or myokine that can function to promote endothelial cell function and stimulates revascularization in response to ischemic insult through its ability to activate Akt-eNOS signaling. PMID:18718903

  2. Role of PECAM-1 in the shear-stress-induced activation of Akt and the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Fisslthaler, Beate; Dixit, Madhulika; Busse, Rudi

    2005-09-15

    The application of fluid shear stress to endothelial cells elicits the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and phosphorylation of the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Shear stress also elicits the enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of endothelial proteins, especially of those situated in the vicinity of cell-cell contacts. Since a major constituent of these endothelial cell-cell contacts is the platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) we assessed the role of PECAM-1 in the activation of eNOS. In human endothelial cells, shear stress induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and enhanced the association of PECAM-1 with eNOS. Endothelial cell stimulation with shear stress elicited the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS as well as of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). While the shear-stress-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 as well as the serine phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were abolished by the pre-treatment of cells with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP1 the phosphorylation of AMPK was unaffected. Down-regulation of PECAM-1 using a siRNA approach attenuated the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS, as well as the shear-stress-induced accumulation of cyclic GMP levels while the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of AMPK remained intact. A comparable attenuation of Akt and eNOS (but not AMPK) phosphorylation and NO production was also observed in endothelial cells generated from PECAM-1-deficient mice. These data indicate that the shear-stress-induced activation of Akt and eNOS in endothelial cells is modulated by the tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 whereas the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of AMPK is controlled by an alternative signaling pathway. PMID:16118242

  3. Rapamycin inhibits re-endothelialization after percutaneous coronary intervention by impeding the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and inducing apoptosis of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Li, Fei; Wang, Wen-Yong; Li, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Yi-Meng; Wang, Rui-An; Guo, Wen-Yi; Wang, Hai-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial-cell function is important in the healing of damaged endothelium after percutaneous coronary artery damage. In 3 different animal models, we sought to determine whether rapamycin (sirolimus) affects the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells. First, after we implanted stents in dogs, we found that re-endothelialization was impeded more by drug-eluting stents than by bare-metal stents, 30 days after percutaneous coronary intervention. Second, in vitro in rats, we found that 1-100 ng/mL of rapamycin time- and dose-dependently inhibited proliferation over 72 hr (with effects evident as early as 24 hr) and also dose-dependently induced endothelial progenitor-cell apoptosis. Finally, in vivo in rats, we observed that vascular endothelial growth factor expression was decreased after 5 days of rapamycin treatment. We conclude that rapamycin impedes re-endothelialization after drug-eluting stent implantation by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of coronary endothelial cells, inducing endothelial progenitor-cell apoptosis, and decreasing vascular endothelial growth factor expression in the circulation. PMID:20401293

  4. Ethanol attenuates vasorelaxation via inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase in rat artery exposed to interleukin-1β.

    PubMed

    Yuui, K; Kudo, R; Kasuda, S; Hatake, K

    2016-09-01

    Nitric oxide produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) regulates sepsis-induced hypotension. During septic shock, interleukin (IL)-1β is synthesized in endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells by endotoxin. Ethanol (EtOH) suppresses endotoxin-induced hypotension. The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of EtOH on gradual relaxation and iNOS expression induced by IL-1β in isolated rat superior mesenteric arteries (SMAs). Exposure to IL-1β-induced contraction in SMA rings, followed by a gradual relaxation of phenylephrine precontracted tone. Contraction was abolished by indomethacin (IM), cycloheximide (Chx), and endothelium denudation. In contrast, the gradual relaxation was abolished by NOS inhibitors, Chx, endothelium denudation, and inhibited by EtOH (50 and 100 mM). However, IM had no effect on relaxation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that iNOS expression was induced by IL-1β and was inhibited by EtOH and endothelium denudation. Furthermore, messenger RNA expression of iNOS, but not endothelial NOS, was inhibited by EtOH. These data suggest that IL-1β-induced contraction is mediated by thromboxane A2, whereas IL-1β-induced relaxation occurs via NO derived from iNOS. The endothelium plays an important role in vasorelaxation. Taken together, EtOH inhibits IL-1β-mediated vasorelaxation by suppressing endothelium iNOS expression. This study provides the first evidence of EtOH -induced inhibition of IL-1β-mediated vasorelaxation. PMID:26500219

  5. Endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3' untranslated region of endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA: regulation by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, J; Sánchez de Miguel, L; Montón, M; Casado, S; López-Farré, A

    1997-01-01

    Changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression may be involved in the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation dysfunction associated with several vascular diseases. In the present work, we demonstrate that eNOS mRNA contains a previously undescribed cis element in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). A U+C-rich segment in the 3' UTR is critical in complex formation with bovine aortic endothelial cell cytosolic proteins. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), which destabilizes eNOS mRNA, increased the binding activity of the cytosolic proteins in a time-dependent manner. These data suggest that endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3' UTR of eNOS mRNA. These proteins may play a role in TNF-alpha-induced eNOS mRNA destabilization. PMID:9315630

  6. HSP27 Inhibits Homocysteine-Induced Endothelial Apoptosis by Modulation of ROS Production and Mitochondrial Caspase-Dependent Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xin; Zhao, Lei; Song, Xianjing; Yan, Youyou; Liu, Ning; Li, Tianyi; Yan, Bingdi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) could lead to endothelial dysfunction and is viewed as an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a small heat shock protein, is reported to exert protective effect against atherosclerosis. This study aims to investigate the protective effect of HSP27 against Hcy-induced endothelial cell apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and to determine the underlying mechanisms. Methods. Apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) of normal or HSP27-overexpressing HUVECs in the presence of Hcy were analyzed by flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein expression levels were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot. Results. We found that Hcy could induce cell apoptosis with corresponding decrease of nitric oxide (NO) level, increase of endothelin-1 (ET-1), intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels, elevation of ROS, and dissipation of MMP. In addition, HSP27 could protect the cell against Hcy-induced apoptosis and inhibit the effect of Hcy on HUVECs. Furthermore, HSP27 could increase the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax and inhibit caspase-3 activity. Conclusions. Therefore, we concluded that HSP27 played a protective role against Hcy-induced endothelial apoptosis through modulation of ROS production and the mitochondrial caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. PMID:27190988

  7. ACTIVATION OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE AND HEME OXYGENASE-1 EXPRESSION BY ELECTROPHILIC NITRO-FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Rudolph, Volker; Cole, Marsha P.; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Batthyany, Carlos; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species mediate a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and endothelial dysfunction, with secondary oxidized and nitrated byproducts of these reactions contributing to the pathogenesis of numerous vascular diseases. While oxidized lipids and lipoproteins exacerbate inflammatory reactions in the vasculature, in stark contrast the nitration of polyunsaturated fatty acids and complex lipids yield electrophilic products that exhibit pluripotent anti-inflammatory signaling capabilities acting via both cGMP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Herein we report that nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) treatment increases expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in the vasculature, thus transducing vascular protective effects associated with enhanced NO production. Administration of OA-NO2 via osmotic pump results in a significant increase in eNOS and HO-1 mRNA in mouse aortas. Moreover, HPLC-MS/MS analysis showed that NO2-FAs are rapidly metabolized in cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and treatment with NO2-FAs stimulated the phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179. These post-translational modifications of eNOS, in concert with elevated eNOS gene expression, contributed to an increase in endothelial NO production. In aggregate, OA-NO2-induced eNOS and HO-1 expression by vascular cells can induce beneficial effects on endothelial function and provide a new strategy for treating various vascular inflammatory and hypertensive disorders. PMID:19857569

  8. Resveratrol analog piceatannol restores the palmitic acid-induced impairment of insulin signaling and production of endothelial nitric oxide via activation of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative heme oxygenase-1 in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Oh; Son, Yong; Lee, Ju Hwan; Cheong, Yong-Kwan; Park, Seong Hoon; Chung, Hun-Taeg; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the elevation of free fatty acids, including palmitic acid (PA), are associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, which may be involved in endothelial dysfunction, characterized by the reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) synthesized from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is important in the preservation of NO bioavailability. Piceatannol (Pic), with similar chemical structure to resveratrol, is suggested to possess similar protective effects as resveratrol. In the present study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), stimulated with PA, were used to examine the endothelial protective effects of Pic. Pic increased the expression of HO-1 via nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 activation in the HUVECs, and decreased the PA-induced secretions of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, and the formation of reactive oxygen species ROS via inhibition of NF-κB activation. Notably, following inhibition of HO-1 activity by tin protoporphryin-IX, Pic did not prevent cytokine secretion, ROS formation, and NF-κB activation in the PA-stimulated HUVECs. PA attenuated insulin-mediated insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to decreased glucose uptake, and phosphorylation of eNOS, leading to a reduction in the production of NO. Pic effectively mitigated the inhibitory effects of PA on the insulin-mediated phosphorylation of IRS-1 and eNOS, which was not observed following inhibition of HO‑1 activity. The results of the present study suggested that Pic may have the potential to prevent PA-induced impairment of insulin signaling and eNOS function, by inducing the expression of the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, HO-1. PMID:25815690

  9. Modulation of PKCδ signaling alters the shear stress-mediated increases in endothelial nitric oxide synthase transcription: role of STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Kumar, Sanjiv; Wedgwood, Stephen; Black, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in endothelial cells isolated from fetal lamb under static conditions is positively regulated by PKCδ. In this study, we explore the role of PKCδ in regulating shear-induced upregulation of eNOS. We found that shear caused a decrease in PKCδ activation. Modulation of PKCδ before shear with a dominant negative mutant of PKCδ (DN PKCδ) or bryostatin (a known PKCδ activator) demonstrated that PKCδ inhibition potentiates the shear-mediated increases in eNOS expression and activity, while PKCδ activation inhibited these events. To gain insight into the mechanism by which PKCδ inhibits shear-induced eNOS expression, we examined activation of STAT3, a known target for PKCδ phosphorylation. We found that shear decreased the phosphorylation of STAT3. Further the transfection of cells with DN PKCδ reduced, while PKCδ activation enhanced, STAT3 phosphorylation in the presence of shear. Transfection of cells with a dominant negative mutant of STAT3 enhanced eNOS promoter activity and nitric oxide production in response to shear. Finally, we found that mutating the STAT3 binding site sequence within the eNOS promoter increased promoter activity in response to shear and that this was no longer inhibited by bryostatin. In conclusion, shear decreases PKCδ activity and, subsequently, reduces STAT3 binding to the eNOS promoter. This signaling pathway plays a previously unidentified role in the regulation of eNOS expression by shear stress. PMID:19118090

  10. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase G894T gene polymorphism and response to skin reactive hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam; Ghazali, Dzuzaini Mohd; Abdullah, Haswati; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Wong, Abd Rahim

    2009-09-01

    Post occlusive skin reactive hyperemia (PORH) is a tool used to assess microcirculation. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediates nitric oxide (NO) production; polymorphism of the eNOS gene may affect response to the PORH process. This study aims to determine whether eNOS G894T gene polymorphism affects response to skin PORH. 230 normotensive male and females between 18 and 40 years participated in this cross-sectional study. 170 subjects were of the homozygous GG genotype, whereas 60 were of the GT genotype. Skin PORH was performed by occlusion of the upper arm at 200 mm Hg for 3 min. Skin perfusion and temperature were monitored before, during and after occlusion release using the laser Doppler fluximetry. There were no significant differences between genotypes in their baseline blood pressure, serum cholesterol, BMI and age. Maximum change in perfusion after occlusion release (PORHmax) for the GG and GT genotypes were not significantly different at 50.15+/-1.29 vs. 47.92+/-2.17 AU; ANCOVA, p=0.351. Peak perfusion (PORHpeak) were also not significantly different between the two genotypes (61.23+/-1.36 vs. 57.72+/-2.32 AU; p=0.169). Minimum baseline perfusion were however higher in the GG compared to the GT genotype (10.83+/-0.29 vs. 9.61+/-0.50, p=0.029). We conclude that microvascular reactivity, assessed by change in perfusion after temporary ischemia was not significantly different between the GG and GT genotypes of the eNOS G894T gene. eNOS 894T allele carriers however, have lower baseline perfusion compared to the homozygous G894 allele carrier. PMID:19481100

  11. Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bhupesh Sharma, P.M.

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential in

  12. Calcimimetic R-568 and Its Enantiomer S-568 Increase Nitric Oxide Release in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, Caterina; Di Silvestre, Sara; Di Cesare, Moreno; Di Pietro, Natalia; Sirolli, Vittorio; Formoso, Gloria; Amoroso, Luigi; Mariggiò, Maria Addolorata; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2012-01-01

    Background Calcimimetics, such as R-568, are thought to activate G protein-linked Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) by allosterically increasing the affinity of the receptor for Ca2+ allowing for efficient control of uremic hyperparathyroidism. Several recent studies suggest they possess additional vascular actions. Although it has been postulated that calcimimetics may have a direct effect on CaSR in the blood vessels, further studies are needed to elucidate their vascular CaSR-dependent versus CaSR-independent effects. Methodology/Principal Findings Focusing on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we studied the CaSR expression and distribution by Immunofluorescence and Western Blot analysis. CaSR function was evaluated by measuring the potential effect of calcimimetic R-568 and its enantiomer S-568 upon the modulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels (using a single cell approach and FURA-2AM), in the presence or absence of Calhex-231, a negative modulator of CaSR. To address their potential vascular functions, we also evaluated R- and S-568-stimulated enzymatic release of Nitric Oxide (NO) by DAF-2DA, by Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) radiometric assay (both in HUVECs and in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells) and by measuring eNOS-ser1177 phosphorylation levels (Immunoblotting). We show that, although the CaSR protein was expressed in HUVECs, it was mainly distributed in cytoplasm while the functional CaSR dimers, usually localized on the plasma membrane, were absent. In addition, regardless of the presence or absence of Calhex-231, both R- and S-568 significantly increased intracellular Ca2+ levels by mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular stores, which in turn augmented NO release by a time- and Ca2+-dependent increase in eNOS-ser1177 phosphorylation levels. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these data indicate that in human endothelium there is no stereoselectivity in the responses to calcimimetics and that CaSR is probably not involved in the action of

  13. Widdrol, a sesquiterpene isolated from Juniperus chinensis, inhibits angiogenesis by targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Soojung; Yun, Hee Jung; Jeong, Hyun Young; Oh, You Na; Park, Hyun-Jin; Yun, Seung-Geun; Kim, Byung Woo; Kwon, Hyun Ju

    2015-09-01

    Widdrol is an odorous compound derived from Juniperus chinensis that is widely used in traditional medicine to treat fever, inflammation and cancer. It was previously reported that widdrol has antitumor activity by apoptosis induction in cancer cells in vitro. However, its anti-angiogenic activity remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated the anti‑angiogenic activity of widdrol and the molecular mechanisms involved. Widdrol inhibited cell proliferation via G1 phase arrest induction in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, it was associated with a decreased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and an increased expression of p21, a CDK inhibitor. Widdrol significantly inhibited the cell migration and tube formation of HUVECs using an in vitro angiogenesis assay. The results showed that widdrol suppressed phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and its downstream proteins, such as AKT, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Moreover, widdrol effectively reduced tumor growth and blood vessel formation in colon tumor xenograft mice. Collectively, these results suggested that widdrol may act as a potential anti-angiogenic agent by inhibiting vessel sprouting and growth, which may have implications for angioprevention. PMID:26133679

  14. Ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate isolated from kaempferia galanga inhibits inflammation by suppressing interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and angiogenesis by blocking endothelial functions

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Muhammad Ihtisham; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Sadikun, Amirin; Majid, Amin Malik Shah Abdul; Al-Suede, Fouad Saleih R.; Hassan, Loiy Elsir Ahmed; Altaf, Rabia; Ahamed, Mohamed B. Khadeer

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects of ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate isolated from Kaempferia galanga. METHODS: The anti-inflammatory effects of ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate were assessed using the cotton pellet granuloma assay in rats, whereby the levels of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α were measured in the animals' blood. In addition, the levels of interleukin, tumor necrosis factor, and nitric oxide were measured in vitro using the human macrophage cell line (U937). The analgesic effects of ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate were assessed by the tail flick assay in rats. The anti-angiogenic effects were evaluated first by the rat aortic ring assay and, subsequently, by assessing the inhibitory effects of ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate on vascular endothelial growth factor, proliferation, migration, and tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. RESULTS: Ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate strongly inhibited granuloma tissue formation in rats. It prolonged the tail flick time in rats by more than two-fold compared with the control animals. The inhibition of interleukin and tumor necrosis factor by ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate was significant in both in vivo and in vitro models; however, only a moderate inhibition of nitric oxide was observed in macrophages. Furthermore, ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate considerably inhibited microvessel sprouting from the rat aorta. These mechanistic studies showed that ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate strongly inhibited the differentiation and migration of endothelial cells, which was further confirmed by the reduced level of vascular endothelial growth factor. CONCLUSION: Ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate exhibits significant anti-inflammatory potential by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenesis, thus inhibiting the main functions of endothelial cells. Thus, ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate could be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammatory and

  15. Vanillic acid prevents the deregulation of lipid metabolism, endothelin 1 and up regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in nitric oxide deficient hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Subramanian; Prahalathan, Pichavaram; Saravanakumar, Murugesan; Raja, Boobalan

    2014-11-15

    Hypertension is one of the main factors causing cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of vanillic acid against nitric oxide deficient rats. Hypertension was induced in adult male albino rats of Wistar strain, weighing 180-220g, by oral administration of N(ω)-nitro-l arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) 40mg/kg in drinking water for 4 weeks. Vanillic acid was administered orally at a dose of 50mg/kg b.w. Nitric oxide deficient rats showed increased levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and decreased heart nitric oxide metabolites (NOx). A significant increase in the levels of plasma cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C), triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids (FFA), phospholipids (PL), 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in the plasma, liver and kidney and decreased level of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) are observed, whereas there is a decrease in the activities of plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) in nitric oxide deficient rats. l-NAME rats also showed an increase in TC, TG, FFA and PL levels in the liver and kidney tissues. Vanillic acid treatment brought the above parameters towards near normal level. Moreover the down regulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and up regulated expression of endothelin 1 (ET1) components was also attenuated by vanillic acid treatment. All the above outcomes were confirmed by the histopathological examination. These results suggest that vanillic acid has enough potential to attenuate hypertension, dyslipidemia and hepatic and renal damage in nitric oxide deficient rats. PMID:25239071

  16. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2}-induced down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in association with HSP70 induction

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jinah; Lee, Hyun-Il; Chang, Young-Sun; Lee, Soo Jae; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Sang Ick . E-mail: parksi@nih.go.kr

    2007-05-25

    A natural ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}), decreases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression by an unknown mechanism. Here we found that 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced eNOS reduction is inversely associated with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction in endothelial cells. Treatment of cells with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} decreased eNOS protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, but independently of PPAR{gamma} with no effect on mRNA levels. Although 15d-PGJ{sub 2} elicited endothelial apoptosis, inhibition of both pan-caspases and cathepsins failed to reverse reduction of eNOS protein. Interestingly, we observed that 15d-PGJ{sub 2} induced HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner. Immunoprecipitation and heat shock treatment demonstrated that eNOS reduction was strongly related to HSP70 induction. Cellular fractionation revealed that treatment with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} increased eNOS distribution 2.5-fold from soluble to insoluble fractions. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms whereby eNOS regulation by 15d-PGJ{sub 2} is related to HSP70 induction.

  17. Badiranji Buya Keli, a Traditional Uyghur Medicine, Induces Vasodilation in Rat Artery: Signaling Mediated by Nitric Oxide Production in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Miernisha, A; Bi, Cathy W C; Cheng, Lily K W; Xing, J G; Liu, J; Maiwulanjiang, M; Aisa, H A; Dong, Tina T X; Lin, Huangquan; Huang, Y; Tsim, Karl W K

    2016-01-01

    Badiranji Buya Keli (BBK) is a traditional Uyghur medicine derived from Dracocephalum Moldavica Herba (DMH, the aerial part of Dracocephalum moldavica L.). BBK has been widely used in treating cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Here, the quality control of BBK was established by using HPLC analysis of rosmarinic acid and tilianin. After chemical standardization, the biological effects of BBK was tested. First, BBK inhibited platelet aggregation of rabbit plasma. Second, BBK induced vasodilation in rat aortic ring, and this effect was partially mediated by nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Third, BBK induced NO production in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In HUVECs, the phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was markedly increased after application of BBK. Pre-treatment with the eNOS blocker N(ω) -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride could abolish BBK-induced NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that BBK could exert beneficial effects in cardiovascular system, which may provide parts of molecular explanation to account for its traditional usage in Uyghur medicine. PMID:26486882

  18. Selective Irreversible Inhibition of Neuronal and Inducible Nitric-oxide Synthase in the Combined Presence of Hydrogen Sulfide and Nitric Oxide*

    PubMed Central

    Heine, Christian L.; Schmidt, Renate; Geckl, Kerstin; Schrammel, Astrid; Gesslbauer, Bernd; Schmidt, Kurt; Mayer, Bernd; Gorren, Antonius C. F.

    2015-01-01

    Citrulline formation by both human neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) and mouse macrophage inducible NOS was inhibited by the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor Na2S with IC50 values of ∼2.4·10−5 and ∼7.9·10−5 m, respectively, whereas human endothelial NOS was hardly affected at all. Inhibition of nNOS was not affected by the concentrations of l-arginine (Arg), NADPH, FAD, FMN, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), and calmodulin, indicating that H2S does not interfere with substrate or cofactor binding. The IC50 decreased to ∼1.5·10−5 m at pH 6.0 and increased to ∼8.3·10−5 m at pH 8.0. Preincubation of concentrated nNOS with H2S under turnover conditions decreased activity after dilution by ∼70%, suggesting irreversible inhibition. However, when calmodulin was omitted during preincubation, activity was not affected, suggesting that irreversible inhibition requires both H2S and NO. Likewise, NADPH oxidation was inhibited with an IC50 of ∼1.9·10−5 m in the presence of Arg and BH4 but exhibited much higher IC50 values (∼1.0–6.1·10−4 m) when Arg and/or BH4 was omitted. Moreover, the relatively weak inhibition of nNOS by Na2S in the absence of Arg and/or BH4 was markedly potentiated by the NO donor 1-(hydroxy-NNO-azoxy)-l-proline, disodium salt (IC50 ∼ 1.3–2.0·10−5 m). These results suggest that nNOS and inducible NOS but not endothelial NOS are irreversibly inhibited by H2S/NO at modest concentrations of H2S in a reaction that may allow feedback inhibition of NO production under conditions of excessive NO/H2S formation. PMID:26296888

  19. Nitric oxide inhibits calpain-mediated proteolysis of talin in skeletal muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, T. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside prevented many of the effects of calcium ionophore on C(2)C(12) muscle cells, including preventing talin proteolysis and release into the cytosol and reducing loss of vinculin, cell detachment, and loss of cellular protein. These results indicate that nitric oxide inhibition of calpain protected the cells from ionophore-induced proteolysis. Calpain inhibitor I and a cell-permeable calpastatin peptide also protected the cells from proteolysis, confirming that ionophore-induced proteolysis was primarily calpain mediated. The activity of m-calpain in a casein zymogram was inhibited by sodium nitroprusside, and this inhibition was reversed by dithiothreitol. Previous incubation with the active site-targeted calpain inhibitor I prevented most of the sodium nitroprusside-induced inhibition of m-calpain activity. These data suggest that nitric oxide inhibited m-calpain activity via S-nitrosylation of the active site cysteine. The results of this study indicate that nitric oxide produced endogenously by skeletal muscle and other cell types has the potential to inhibit m-calpain activity and cytoskeletal proteolysis.

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in early gestation and in trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, I; Hochberg, A; Shochina, M

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To study the localisation of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the normal placenta, with special emphasis on the implantation site in the first trimester of pregnancy, and in the different subtypes of trophoblastic cells in gestational trophoblastic disease. METHODS: The immunoperoxidase technique with an antibody directed against eNOS was applied to paraffin sections from first and second trimester placentas, placenta accreta, partial and complete hydatidiform moles, and choriocarcinoma. Immunoperoxidase staining for human placental lactogen (hPL) was performed on parallel sections. RESULTS: Prominent immunoreactivity for eNOS was found to be present in the intermediate trophoblastic cells of the cell columns of the anchoring villi and in trophoblastic cells at the implantation site. Staining was also present in the syncytiotrophoblast, most conspicuous at the apical cell border. In trophoblastic disease, proliferating large mononuclear cells, which were strongly positive for hPL, were found to be immunoreactive for eNOS. CONCLUSIONS: eNOS immunoreactivity is strongly positive in the extravillous trophoblastic cells and to a lesser extent in the syncytiotrophoblast. In the former it may play a role in implantation and vascular invasion. Cells with differentiation to intermediate trophoblast in complete hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma also show high levels of eNOS, which may be associated with the haematogenous mode of spread of trophoblastic disease. Images PMID:9771440

  1. Method of measuring nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial cells grown in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, S.; Liu, A. C.; Barakat, A. I.; Choy, J. C.; Gray, B. L.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a simple and versatile method is presented which enables detection of nitric oxide (NO) released from vascular endothelial cells (ECs) cultured in microfluidic structures. The culturing system and NO measurement method allow cell shape to be controlled in a non-invasive manner using microfluidic structures while NO release is monitored for cell shape versus function studies. The culturing system consists of arrays of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fluidic channels 120 micrometers in depth and ranging from 100 micrometers to 3 mm in width. The number of channels in each array is varied to yield a constant cell culture surface area (75 mm2) independent of channel width. The channel surfaces are collagen-coated and ECs are cultured to confluence within the channels. A cell scraper is then used to scrape extraneous cells cultured between channels, and NO measurements are made 18 to 24 hours later. A chemiluminescence-based sensor system (NOA 280i, Sievers NO Analyzer) is utilized to measure sample NO. Initial results indicate that NO concentrations can be measured from different microfluidic channel-containing samples using this method. It is shown that there is no significant difference in NO concentration derived from channels of different widths even though the degree of cell elongation varies due to physical constraint by microfluidic channel walls. However, cells treated with TNFα release more NO than untreated cells in fluidic channels, which is comparable to the function of ECs cultured in conventional culturing systems such as culturing dishes.

  2. Decreased Endothelial Nitric Oxide Bioavailability, Impaired Microvascular Function, and Increased Tissue Oxygen Consumption in Children with Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Tsin W.; Lampah, Daniel A.; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Weinberg, J. Brice; Granger, Donald L.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P < .001) and all with severe malaria (P < .001). Children with malaria have decreased endothelial and microvascular function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24879801

  3. Nitric oxide therapies for local inhibition of platelets' activitation on blood-contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoako, Kagya Agyeman

    Blood-contacting devices interact with blood during their function much like the endothelium that modulates hemostasis. The surfaces of these devices however, lack endothelial-like properties, and consequently, upon blood contact, activate clotting factors to form clots. Systemic heparinization for inhibiting clot formation can cause bleeding and surface coatings show insignificant benefits. This research investigated nitric oxide (NO) production mimicry of the endothehum on artificial lungs (ALs) and pediatric catheters. Their surfaces were functionalized either by (1) entrapping NO donors inside their bulk, (2) incorporating catalysts to generate NO from NO-donors or (3) supplementing NO into sweep gas of artificial lungs. Pediatric catheters functionalized with NO-donor thin coats using method 1 is limited by short NO release duration. Method 2 has not been applied to large surface-area, low-flow devices like the AL. In this work NO-generating silicone membranes were synthesized and characterized to determine the relationship between surface properties, NO flux, and blood clotting time. These outcomes helped develop and optimize NO-generating gas-exchange silicone fibers that represent the majority of ALs surface area. The first NO-generating AL prototypes, using those fibers, were manufactured, incorporated into NO-generating circuits and tested for their non-thrombogenicity. To test for NO-release duration and non-thrombogenicity, catheters were fabricated to incorporate NO-donors inside their walls, characterized for NO flux and release duration by chemilumincscence, and tested for patency using a thrombogenicity model in rabbits. Methods 1-2 involve material modification using complicated and expensive chemical formulations and/or manufacturing. Method 3 however, functionalizes ALs by only adding NO into sweep gas. Decade-long anti-clotting testing using a wide range of NO concentrations has been conducted without knowledge of what concentration yields

  4. Endothelial dysfunction enhances vasoconstriction due to scavenging of nitric oxide by a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Binglan; Shahid, Mohd; Egorina, Elena M.; Sovershaev, Mikhail A.; Raher, Michael J.; Lei, Chong; Wu, Mei X.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Zapol, Warren M.

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, there is no safe and effective hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC) to substitute for red blood cell transfusion. It is uncertain whether a deficiency of endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability (endothelial dysfunction) prevents or augments the HBOC-induced vasoconstriction. Methods Hemodynamic effects of infusion of PolyHeme (1.08 g hemoglobin/kg, Northfield Laboratories, Evanston, IL) or murine tetrameric hemoglobin (0.48 g hemoglobin/kg) were determined in awake healthy lambs, awake mice and anesthetized mice. In vitro, a cumulative dose-tension response was obtained by sequential addition of PolyHeme or tetrameric hemoglobin to phenylephrine-precontracted murine aortic rings. Results Infusion of PolyHeme did not cause systemic hypertension in awake lambs, but produced acute systemic and pulmonary vasoconstriction. Infusion of PolyHeme did not cause systemic hypertension in healthy wild-type mice, but induced severe systemic vasoconstriction in mice with endothelial dysfunction (either db/db mice or high-fat fed wild-type mice for 4–6 weeks). The db/db mice were more sensitive to systemic vasoconstriction than wild-type mice after the infusion of either tetrameric hemoglobin or PolyHeme. Murine aortic ring studies confirmed that db/db mice have an impaired response to an endothelial-dependent vasodilator and an enhanced vasoconstrictor response to a HBOC. Conclusions Reduction of low molecular weight hemoglobin concentrations to less than 1% is insufficient to abrogate the vasoconstrictor effects of HBOC infusion in healthy awake sheep or in mice with reduced vascular nitric oxide levels associated with endothelial dysfunction. These findings suggest that testing HBOCs in animals with endothelial dysfunction can provide a more sensitive indication of their potential vasoconstrictor effects. PMID:20179495

  5. Arginase reciprocally regulates nitric oxide synthase activity and contributes to endothelial dysfunction in aging blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, Dan E.; White, Ron; Li, Dechun; Minhas, Khalid M.; Cernetich, Amy; Kim, Soonyul; Burke, Sean; Shoukas, Artin A.; Nyhan, Daniel; Champion, Hunter C.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although abnormal L-arginine NO signaling contributes to endothelial dysfunction in the aging cardiovascular system, the biochemical mechanisms remain controversial. L-arginine, the NO synthase (NOS) precursor, is also a substrate for arginase. We tested the hypotheses that arginase reciprocally regulates NOS by modulating L-arginine bioavailability and that arginase is upregulated in aging vasculature, contributing to depressed endothelial function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Inhibition of arginase with (S)-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine, HCl (BEC) produced vasodilation in aortic rings from young (Y) adult rats (maximum effect, 46.4+/-9.4% at 10(-5) mol/L, P<0.01). Similar vasorelaxation was elicited with the additional arginase inhibitors N-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) and difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). This effect required intact endothelium and was prevented by 1H-oxadiazole quinoxalin-1-one (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively), a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. DFMO-elicited vasodilation was greater in old (O) compared with Y rat aortic rings (60+/-6% versus 39+/-6%, P<0.05). In addition, BEC restored depressed L-arginine (10(-4) mol/L)-dependent vasorelaxant responses in O rings to those of Y. Arginase activity and expression were increased in O rings, whereas NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were decreased. BEC and DFMO suppressed arginase activity and restored NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels in O vessels to those of Y. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that arginase modulates NOS activity, likely by regulating intracellular L-arginine availability. Arginase upregulation contributes to endothelial dysfunction of aging and may therefore be a therapeutic target.

  6. Overexpression of Ref-1 Inhibits Lead-induced Endothelial Cell Death via the Upregulation of Catalase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwon Ho; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Hyo Shin; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Soo; Chang, Seok Jong; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong

    2009-01-01

    The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (Ref-1) on the lead (Pb)-induced cellular response was investigated in the cultured endothelial cells. Pb caused progressive cellular death in endothelial cells, which occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, Ref-1 overexpression with AdRef-1 significantly inhibited Pb-induced cell death in the endothelial cells. Also the overexpression of Ref-1 significantly suppressed Pb-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide elevation in the endothelial cells. Pb exposure induced the downregulation of catalase, it was inhibited by the Ref-1 overexpression in the endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggests that the overexpression of Ref-1 inhibited Pb-induced cell death via the upregulation of catalase in the cultured endothelial cells. PMID:20054488

  7. Nitric Oxide Suppresses β-Cell Apoptosis by Inhibiting the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Bryndon J; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Naatz, Aaron; Hogg, Neil; Tarakanova, Vera L; Corbett, John A

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide, produced in pancreatic β cells in response to proinflammatory cytokines, plays a dual role in the regulation of β-cell fate. While nitric oxide induces cellular damage and impairs β-cell function, it also promotes β-cell survival through activation of protective pathways that promote β-cell recovery. In this study, we identify a novel mechanism in which nitric oxide prevents β-cell apoptosis by attenuating the DNA damage response (DDR). Nitric oxide suppresses activation of the DDR (as measured by γH2AX formation and the phosphorylation of KAP1 and p53) in response to multiple genotoxic agents, including camptothecin, H2O2, and nitric oxide itself, despite the presence of DNA damage. While camptothecin and H2O2 both induce DDR activation, nitric oxide suppresses only camptothecin-induced apoptosis and not H2O2-induced necrosis. The ability of nitric oxide to suppress the DDR appears to be selective for pancreatic β cells, as nitric oxide fails to inhibit DDR signaling in macrophages, hepatocytes, and fibroblasts, three additional cell types examined. While originally described as the damaging agent responsible for cytokine-induced β-cell death, these studies identify a novel role for nitric oxide as a protective molecule that promotes β-cell survival by suppressing DDR signaling and attenuating DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:27185882

  8. Cyclic ADP ribose-mediated Ca2+ signaling in mediating endothelial nitric oxide production in bovine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo; Teggatz, Eric G; Zhang, Andrew Y; Koeberl, Matthew J; Yi, Fan; Chen, Li; Li, Pin-Lan

    2006-03-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) serves as a novel second messenger to mediate intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs) and thereby contributes to endothelium-dependent vasodilation. In isolated and perfused small bovine coronary arteries, bradykinin (BK)-induced concentration-dependent vasodilation was significantly attenuated by 8-bromo-cADPR (a cell-permeable cADPR antagonist), ryanodine (an antagonist of ryanodine receptors), or nicotinamide (an ADP-ribosyl cyclase inhibitor). By in situ simultaneously fluorescent monitoring, Ca2+ transient and nitric oxide (NO) levels in the intact coronary arterial endothelium preparation, 8-bromo-cADPR (30 microM), ryanodine (50 microM), and nicotinamide (6 mM) substantially attenuated BK (1 microM)-induced increase in intracellular [Ca2+] by 78%, 80%, and 74%, respectively, whereas these compounds significantly blocked BK-induced NO increase by about 80%, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor blockade with 2-aminethoxydiphenyl borate (50 microM) only blunted BK-induced Ca2+-NO signaling by about 30%. With the use of cADPR-cycling assay, it was found that inhibition of ADP-ribosyl cyclase by nicotinamide substantially blocked BK-induced intracellular cADPR production. Furthermore, HPLC analysis showed that the conversion rate of beta-nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide into cyclic GDP ribose dramatically increased by stimulation with BK, which was blockable by nicotinamide. However, U-73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, had no effect on this BK-induced increase in ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity for cADPR production. In conclusion, these results suggest that cADPR importantly contributes to BK- and A-23187-induced NO production and vasodilator response in coronary arteries through its Ca2+ signaling mechanism in CAECs. PMID:16243917

  9. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi; Zhang, Qunye; Li, Guorong

    2015-03-13

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation.

  10. Packed Red Blood Cells Are an Abundant and Proximate Potential Source of Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zwemer, Charles F.; Davenport, Robertson D.; Gomez-Espina, Juan; Blanco-Gonzalez, Elisa; Whitesall, Steven E.; D'Alecy, Louis G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We determined, for packed red blood cells (PRBC) and fresh frozen plasma, the maximum content, and ability to release the endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and monomethylarginine (LNMMA). Background ADMA and LNMMA are near equipotent NOS inhibitors forming blood’s total NOS inhibitory content. The balance between removal from, and addition to plasma determines their free concentrations. Removal from plasma is by well-characterized specific hydrolases while formation is restricted to posttranslational protein methylation. When released into plasma they can readily enter endothelial cells and inhibit NOS. Fresh rat and human whole blood contain substantial protein incorporated ADMA however; the maximum content of ADMA and LNMMA in PRBC and fresh frozen plasma has not been determined. Methods We measured total (free and protein incorporated) ADMA and LNMMA content in PRBCs and fresh frozen plasma, as well as their incubation induced release, using HPLC with fluorescence detection. We tested the hypothesis that PRBC and fresh frozen plasma contain substantial inhibitory methylarginines that can be released chemically by complete in vitro acid hydrolysis or physiologically at 37°C by enzymatic blood proteolysis. Results In vitro strong-acid-hydrolysis revealed a large PRBC reservoir of ADMA (54.5 ± 9.7 µM) and LNMMA (58.9 ± 28.9 μM) that persisted over 42-d at 6° or -80°C. In vitro 5h incubation at 37°C nearly doubled free ADMA and LNMMNA concentration from PRBCs while no change was detected in fresh frozen plasma. Conclusion The compelling physiological ramifications are that regardless of storage age, 1) PRBCs can rapidly release pathologically relevant quantities of ADMA and LNMMA when incubated and 2) PRBCs have a protein-incorporated inhibitory methylarginines reservoir 100 times that of normal free inhibitory methylarginines in blood and thus could represent a clinically relevant and proximate

  11. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition and oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases: possible therapeutic targets?

    PubMed

    Rochette, Luc; Lorin, Julie; Zeller, Marianne; Guilland, Jean-Claude; Lorgis, Luc; Cottin, Yves; Vergely, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthetized enzymatically from l-arginine (l-Arg) by three NO synthase isoforms, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS. The synthesis of NO is selectively inhibited by guanidino-substituted analogs of l-Arg or methylarginines such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), which results from protein degradation in cells. Many disease states, including cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, are associated with increased plasma levels of ADMA. The N-terminal catalytic domain of these NOS isoforms binds the heme prosthetic group as well as the redox cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) associated with a regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM). The enzymatic activity of NOS depends on substrate and cofactor availability. The importance of BH(4) as a critical regulator of eNOS function suggests that BH(4) may be a rational therapeutic target in vascular disease states. BH(4) oxidation appears to be a major contributor to vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes and other cardiovascular diseases as it leads to the increased formation of oxygen-derived radicals due to NOS uncoupling rather than NO. Accordingly, abnormalities in vascular NO production and transport result in endothelial dysfunction leading to various cardiovascular disorders. However, some disorders including a wide range of functions in the neuronal, immune and cardiovascular system were associated with the over-production of NO. Inhibition of the enzyme should be a useful approach to treat these pathologies. Therefore, it appears that both a lack and excess of NO production in diseases can have various important pathological implications. In this context, NOS modulators (exogenous and endogenous) and their therapeutic effects are discussed. PMID:23859953

  12. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by PGD(2) in the developing choroid.

    PubMed

    Dumont, I; Hardy, P; Peri, K G; Hou, X; Molotchnikoff, S; Varma, D R; Chemtob, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated if prostaglandins might regulate the increased choroidal endothelial (e) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression in the perinate. Prostaglandins, eNOS mRNA, immunoreactive protein and activity, and nitrite [stable metabolite of nitric oxide (NO)] production were markedly higher in newborn (1 day old) than juvenile (6-8 wk old) pig choroid. Treatment of isolated newborn choroids with the prostaglandin synthase inhibitor ibuprofen for 24 h reduced eNOS mRNA and nitrite production to values in juveniles. This effect was equally observed with the PGD(2) receptor (DP) blocker BW A868C and was prevented by cotreatment with PGD(2) but not other prostaglandins; similar observations were made on NOS activity in vivo. PGD(2) also increased eNOS expression on choroids of juveniles, and this effect was blocked by BW A868C. The manifestation of this upregulation of eNOS by PGD(2) on the control of choroidal vasomotor response was tested by using NO-dependent vasorelaxants, ACh, bradykinin (Bk), and substance P (SP). ACh-, Bk-, and SP-elicited choroidal vasorelaxation was greater in saline-treated newborn than juvenile pigs. Ibuprofen (24 h) decreased ACh-, Bk-, and SP-evoked vasorelaxation in newborns, whereas PGD(2) increased that in juveniles and prevented the ibuprofen-induced attenuated relaxation in newborns; infusion of N(omega)-monomethyl-L-arginine in choroids of those animals treated with PGD(2) reversed the augmented vasorelaxation to ACh, Bk, and SP. Finally, PGD(2)-induced upregulation of NOS in the perinate was also reflected by curtailed choroidal blood flow autoregulatory response to increased perfusion pressure. In conclusion, PGD(2) exhibits a major role in upregulating eNOS expression and activity in the choroid, which in turn results in greater NO-mediated vasorelaxation; a new mechanism for eNOS regulation via DP is hereby disclosed. The relationship between PGD(2) and eNOS in the developing subject provides an explanation for the interactive

  13. Nitric oxide scavengers differentially inhibit ammonia oxidation in ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Laura A; Ross, Ashley A; Neufeld, Josh D

    2016-04-01

    Differential inhibitors are important for measuring the relative contributions of microbial groups, such as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), to biogeochemical processes in environmental samples. In particular, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) represents a nitric oxide scavenger used for the specific inhibition of AOA, implicating nitric oxide as an intermediate of thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation. This study investigated four alternative nitric oxide scavengers for their ability to differentially inhibit AOA and AOB in comparison to PTIO. Caffeic acid, curcumin, methylene blue hydrate and trolox were tested onNitrosopumilus maritimus, two unpublished AOA representatives (AOA-6f and AOA-G6) as well as the AOB representativeNitrosomonas europaea All four scavengers inhibited ammonia oxidation by AOA at lower concentrations than for AOB. In particular, differential inhibition of AOA and AOB by caffeic acid (100 μM) and methylene blue hydrate (3 μM) was comparable to carboxy-PTIO (100 μM) in pure and enrichment culture incubations. However, when added to aquarium sponge biofilm microcosms, both scavengers were unable to inhibit ammonia oxidation consistently, likely due to degradation of the inhibitors themselves. This study provides evidence that a variety of nitric oxide scavengers result in differential inhibition of ammonia oxidation in AOA and AOB, and provides support to the proposed role of nitric oxide as a key intermediate in the thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation pathway. PMID:26946536

  14. Cyclo(dehydrohistidyl-l-tryptophyl) inhibits nitric oxide production by preventing the dimerization of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Mi-Jin; Hur, Gang-Min; Byun, Hee-Sun; Kim, Won-Gon

    2008-02-15

    Dimerization of inducible NOS has been known to be a potential therapeutic target for iNOS-mediated pathologies. Cyclic dipeptides are among the simplest peptides commonly found as by-products of food processing or metabolites of microorganisms. In this study, we found that cyclo(dehydrohistidyl-l-tryptophyl) (CDHT), a cyclic dipeptide from an unidentified fungal strain Fb956, prevents iNOS dimerization in activated microglial BV-2 cells. CDHT inhibited NO production with an IC50 of 6.5 microM in LPS-treated BV-2 cells. Western blot analysis and iNOS activity measurement of fractions from size-exclusion chromatography of cell lysates indicated that CDHT inhibits dimerization of iNOS, while it has no effect on iNOS expression or enzyme activity. The CDHT inhibition of iNOS dimerization was confirmed by partially denaturing SDS-PAGE analysis. In contrast, CDHT did not affect cGMP production in endothelial HUVEC cells, which indicates no inhibition of endothelial NOS activity. These results reveal that CDHT, one of the simplest and cyclic dipeptides, selectively inhibits NO production by inhibiting iNOS dimerization, and could be a useful therapeutic agent for inflammation-mediated diseases. PMID:18061143

  15. The endothelial nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide system is involved in the defective quality of bovine oocytes from low mid-antral follicle count ovaries.

    PubMed

    Tessaro, I; Luciano, A M; Franciosi, F; Lodde, V; Corbani, D; Modina, S C

    2011-08-01

    In a previous survey concerning cows of reproductive age, we demonstrated that oocytes isolated from ovaries with <10 medium antral follicles of 2 to 6 mm in diameter (low ovaries; Lo) show less developmental competence than oocytes collected from ovaries with >10 medium antral follicles (high ovaries; Hi). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether a defective endothelial nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide (eNOS/NO) system and vasculature in healthy medium antral follicles is likely to reduce oocyte competence from Lo ovaries. Thus, experiments were conducted to 1) immunolocalize eNOS protein during folliculogenesis; 2) quantify eNOS protein/vasculature in the follicle wall; and 3) verify if NO donor, S-nitroso acetyl penicillamine (SNAP) administration during in vitro maturation affects developmental competence of oocytes isolated from Lo ovaries. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein was detected in granulosa and theca cells, as well as in blood vessels from primordial to antral follicles. Quantitative analysis indicated that in medium antral follicles from Lo ovaries, eNOS protein expression and vasculature were reduced (P < 0.05). The addition of SNAP improved blastocyst and hatching rates of oocytes from Lo ovaries, promoting a percentage similar to oocytes from Hi ovaries, and reduced the percentage of apoptotic nuclei in in vitro-produced blastocysts (P < 0.05). Results from our study suggest that in bovine ovaries with small mid antral follicle number, a defective eNOS/NO system is related to a reduced follicle vasculature and may affect oocyte quality, thus inducing a premature decline of fertility. PMID:21421835

  16. Neferine inhibits the upregulation of CCL5 and CCR5 in vascular endothelial cells during chronic high glucose treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Guilin; Zhu, Gaochun; Gao, Yun; Xiao, Wen; Xu, Hong; Liu, Shuangmei; Tu, Guihua; Peng, Haiying; Zheng, Chaoran; Liang, Shangdong; Li, Guodong

    2013-04-01

    We investigated whether the expressions of CCL5 and CCR5 participate in dysfunctional changes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) induced by chronic high glucose treatment and examined whether neferine exerts its therapeutic effects by blocking the development of dysfunctional vascular endothelium. HUVECs were cultured with control or high concentrations of glucose in the absence or presence of neferine for 5 days. Nitric acid reductase method was used to detect the concentration of nitric oxide (NO) released into culture media. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured by fluorescent DCFH-DA probe. The expressions of 84 genes related to endothelial cell biology were assessed by Human Endothelial Cell Biology RT(2) Profiler PCR Array. The expressions of the chemokine CCL5 and its receptor CCR5 were further determined by real-time RT-PCR and western blotting. PCR array indicated that CCL5 was the most significantly upregulated when HUVECs were exposed to chronic high glucose; the intracellular ROS level and the expressions of CCL5 and CCR5 at both mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased, whereas NO production was decreased simultaneously. The increased level of ROS and elevated expressions of CCL5 and CCR5 at high glucose were significantly inhibited by neferine; meanwhile the decreased NO production upon chronic high glucose treatment was relieved. An antioxidant (vitamin E) exerted similar beneficial effects. These data indicate that neferine can reduce the upregulation of CCL5 and CCR5 of vascular endothelium exposure to chronic high glucose and prevent or inhibit subsequent occurrence of inflammation in blood vessels possibly through antioxidation. PMID:23053727

  17. Significance of plasma nitric oxide/endothelial-1 ratio for prediction of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akira; Matsui, Takemi; Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Takase, Bonpei; Satomura, Kimio

    2005-01-01

    Vascular tone is regulated by vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is the predominant vasoconstrictor peptide that constricts vascular smooth muscle, whereas nitric oxide (NO) is the primary vasodilator peptide that relaxes vascular smooth muscle. In this study, the authors examined whether NO/ET-1 ratio is a useful marker for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD), by comparison with evaluation based on vascular endothelial (VE) function. They measured plasma NOX and ET-1 by using ENO-200 and radioimmunoassay, in 38 subjects with normal (NL) coronary arteries (NL group; mean age, 60 +/-12 years) and 25 subjects with CAD (CAD group; mean age, 69 +/- 6 years). VE function (randomized endothelium-dependent [D] and endothelium-independent [I] VE function) was assessed by measuring brachial artery (BA) diameter by using high-resolution ultrasound (7.5 MHz). Soon after these procedures, symptom-limited exercise testing was performed. There were no statistically significant differences in serum lipid concentrations or VED function between the groups. However, the CAD group had a significantly lower NO/ET-1 ratio (1.2 +/- 1.1 vs 2.7 +/- 2.2, p < 0.01) and BA diameter after sublingual nitroglycerin (VEID function: 6 +/- 7% vs 10 +/- 4%, p < 0.05). As expected, the ST segment and treadmill exercise duration were significantly lower in the CAD group. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting CAD by plasma NO/ET-1 ratio (> or =2 .0) were 90% and 85%, respectively; sensitivity and specificity for detecting CAD by ST depression (> or =1 mm) were 80% and 78%, respectively. The present results suggest that plasma NO/ET-1 ratio is a useful biological marker for predicting CAD. PMID:15889192

  18. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism is associated with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YULONG; LIAO, SHIJIE; LU, RONGBIN; DANG, HAO; ZHAO, JINMIN; DING, XIAOFEI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association of 27-bp variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in intron 4 and G894T polymorphism in exon 7 of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD), and to provide a scientific basis for further research into the pathogenic mechanism. A total of 80 patients with LCPD and 100 healthy subjects were recruited in this case-control study. The 27-bp VNTR and G894T polymorphisms of the eNOS gene were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, respectively, followed by agarose gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in the two groups and subjected to statistical analysis. For the 27-bp VNTR polymorphism, individuals with LCPD showed a higher frequency of the ab genotype [27.5 vs. 14%; odds ratio (OR), 2.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10–4.92; P=0.024]. For the G894T polymorphism, the LCPD case group showed a higher frequency of the heterozygous genotype GT than the healthy control group (35 vs. 17%; OR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.33–5.36; P=0.005). The results indicate that these eNOS gene polymorphisms may be a risk factor for LCPD. The 27-bp VNTR polymorphism in intron 4 and G894T polymorphism in exon 7 may be involved in the etiology of LCPD. PMID:27168827

  19. In vivo stimulatory effect of erythropoietin on endothelial nitric oxide synthase in cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R; Smith, Leslie A; Nath, Karl A; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-08-01

    The discovery of tissue protective effects of erythropoietin has stimulated significant interest in erythropoietin (Epo) as a novel therapeutic approach to vascular protection. The present study was designed to determine the cerebral vascular effects of recombinant Epo in vivo. Recombinant adenoviral vectors (10(9) plaque-forming units/animal) encoding genes for human erythropoietin (AdEpo) and beta-galactosidase (AdLacZ) were injected into the cisterna magna of rabbits. After 48 h, basilar arteries were harvested for analysis of vasomotor function, Western blotting, and measurement of cGMP levels. Gene transfer of AdEpo increased the expressions of recombinant Epo and its receptor in the basilar arteries. Arteries exposed to recombinant Epo demonstrated attenuation of contractile responses to histamine (10(-9) to 10(-5) mol/l) (P < 0.05, n = 5). Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (10(-9) to 10(-5) mol/l) were significantly augmented (P < 0.05, n = 5), whereas endothelium-independent relaxations to a nitric oxide (NO) donor 2-(N,N-diethylamino)diazenolate-2-oxide sodium salt remained unchanged in AdEpo-transduced basilar arteries. Transduction with AdEpo increased the protein expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated the S1177 form of the enzyme. Basal levels of cGMP were significantly elevated in arteries transduced with AdEpo consistent with increased NO production. Our studies suggest that in cerebral circulation, Epo enhances endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. This effect could play an important role in the vascular protective effect of Epo. PMID:16565320

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase tagSNPs influence the effects of enalapril in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Lacchini, Riccardo; Luizon, Marcelo R; Fontana, Vanessa; Silva, Pamela S; Biagi, Celso; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-05-01

    The antihypertensive effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) are associated with up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) activity. This mechanism may explain how polymorphisms in NOS3 gene affect the antihypertensive responses to ACEi. While clinically relevant NOS3 polymorphisms were previously shown to affect the antihypertensive responses to enalapril, no study has tested the hypothesis that NOS3 tagSNPs influence the antihypertensive effects of this drug. We examined whether the NOS3 tagSNPs rs3918226, rs3918188, and rs743506, and their haplotypes, affect the antihypertensive responses to enalapril in 101 patients with essential hypertension. Subjects were prospectively treated only with enalapril for 8 weeks. Genotypes were determined by Taqman(®) allele discrimination assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and haplotype frequencies were estimated. We compared the effects of NOS3 tagSNPs on changes in blood pressure after enalapril treatment. To confirm our findings, multiple linear regression analysis was performed adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, and alcohol consumption. We found that hypertensive patients carrying the AA genotype for the tagSNP rs3918188 showed lower decreases in blood pressure in response to enalapril. Moreover, the TCA haplotype was associated with improved decreases in blood pressure in response to enalapril compared with the CAG haplotype. Adjustment for covariates in multiple linear regression analysis did not change these effects. In addition, when patients were stratified according to the dose of enalapril used, we found that the carries of the T allele for the functional tagSNP rs3918226 showed more intense decreases in blood pressure in response to enalapril 20 mg/day. Our findings suggest that NOS3 tagSNPs influence the effects of enalapril in essential hypertension. PMID:27060232

  1. Gender differences in adiponectin modulation of cardiac remodeling in mice deficient in endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Durand, Jorge L; Nawrocki, Andrea R; Scherer, Philipp E; Jelicks, Linda A

    2012-10-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of death. Alterations in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), an enzyme involved in regulating vascular tone, and in adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived secretory factor, are associated with cardiac remodeling. Deficiency of eNOS is associated with hypertension and LVH. Adiponectin exhibits vaso-protective, anti-inflammatory, and anti-atherogenic properties. We hypothesized that increased levels of adiponectin would alleviate cardiac pathology resulting from eNOS deficiency, while decreased levels of adiponectin would exacerbate the pathology. Male and female mice, deficient in eNOS, and either lacking or over-expressing adiponectin, were fed high fat diet (HFD) or normal chow. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed to serially assess heart morphology and function up to 40 weeks of age. Thirty-two weeks of HFD feeding led to significantly greater LV mass in male mice deficient in eNOS and either lacking or over-expressing adiponectin. Heart function was significantly reduced when the mice were deficient in either eNOS, adiponectin or both eNOS and adiponectin; for female mice, heart function was only reduced when both eNOS and adiponectin were lacking. Thus, while over-expression of adiponectin in the eNOS deficient HFD fed male mice preserved function at the expense of significantly increased LV mass, female mice were protected from decreased function and increased LVH by over-expression of adiponectin. Our results demonstrate a sexual dimorphism in response of the heart to alterations in eNOS and adiponectin during high fat feeding and suggest that adiponectin might require eNOS for some of its metabolic effects. PMID:22644792

  2. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) deficiency affects energy metabolism pattern in murine oxidative skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Momken, Iman; Fortin, Dominique; Serrurier, Bernard; Bigard, Xavier; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Veksler, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    Oxidative capacity of muscles correlates with capillary density and with microcirculation, which in turn depend on various regulatory factors, including NO generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). To determine the role of eNOS in patterns of regulation of energy metabolism in various muscles, we studied mitochondrial respiration in situ in saponin-permeabilized fibres as well as the energy metabolism enzyme profile in the cardiac, soleus (oxidative) and gastrocnemius (glycolytic) muscles isolated from mice lacking eNOS (eNOS(-/-)). In soleus muscle, the absence of eNOS induced a marked decrease in both basal mitochondrial respiration without ADP (-32%; P <0.05) and maximal respiration in the presence of ADP (-29%; P <0.05). Furthermore, the eNOS(-/-) soleus muscle showed a decrease in total creatine kinase (-29%; P <0.05), citrate synthase (-31%; P <0.01), adenylate kinase (-27%; P <0.05), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (-43%; P <0.01) and pyruvate kinase (-26%; P <0.05) activities. The percentage of myosin heavy chains I (slow isoform) was significantly increased from 24.3+/-1.5% in control to 30.1+/-1.1% in eNOS(-/-) soleus muscle ( P <0.05) at the expense of a slight non-significant decrease in the three other (fast) isoforms. Besides, eNOS(-/-) soleus showed a 28% loss of weight. Interestingly, we did not find differences in any parameters in cardiac and gastrocnemius muscles compared with respective controls. These results show that eNOS knockout has an important effect on muscle oxidative capacity as well on the activities of energy metabolism enzymes in oxidative (soleus) muscle. The absence of such effects in cardiac and glycolytic (gastrocnemius) muscle suggests a specific role for eNOS-produced NO in oxidative skeletal muscle. PMID:12123418

  3. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Deficient Mice Are Protected from Lipopolysaccharide Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine M.; Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Ham III, P. Benson; Meadows, Mary Louise; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Kangath, Archana; Sridhar, Supriya; Lucas, Rudolf; Black, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria induces acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. This injury is associated with lung edema, inflammation, diffuse alveolar damage, and severe respiratory insufficiency. We have previously reported that LPS-mediated nitric oxide synthase (NOS) uncoupling, through increases in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), plays an important role in the development of ALI through the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Therefore, the focus of this study was to determine whether mice deficient in endothelial NOS (eNOS-/-) are protected against ALI. In both wild-type and eNOS-/- mice, ALI was induced by the intratracheal instillation of LPS (2 mg/kg). After 24 hours, we found that eNOS-/-mice were protected against the LPS mediated increase in inflammatory cell infiltration, inflammatory cytokine production, and lung injury. In addition, LPS exposed eNOS-/- mice had increased oxygen saturation and improved lung mechanics. The protection in eNOS-/- mice was associated with an attenuated production of NO, NOS derived superoxide, and peroxynitrite. Furthermore, we found that eNOS-/- mice had less RhoA activation that correlated with a reduction in RhoA nitration at Tyr34. Finally, we found that the reduction in NOS uncoupling in eNOS-/- mice was due to a preservation of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) activity that prevented the LPS-mediated increase in ADMA. Together our data suggest that eNOS derived reactive species play an important role in the development of LPS-mediated lung injury. PMID:25786132

  4. Nitric oxide inhibition sustains vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, M. J.; Carnochan, P.; Allen-Mersh, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    Hepatic parenchymal vasoconstriction increases cytotoxic drug uptake into hepatic metastases by increasing the tumour to liver blood flow ratio. Prolonged infusion of the vasoconstrictor vasopressin does not result in sustained vasoconstriction, and this may limit the benefit of vasopressin in infusional chemotherapy. We have assessed whether loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction is mediated by nitric oxide. Hepatic and tumour blood flow were continuously monitored, in an animal hepatic tumour model, by laser Doppler flowmetry. The response to regionally infused vasopressin and the nitric oxide inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were assessed over a 30 min infusion period. The vasopressin-induced vasoconstrictor effect diminished after 15 min despite continued infusion. Vasoconstriction was significantly prolonged when L-NAME was infused in addition to vasopressin. The increase in tumour to normal blood flow ratio was greater over the infusion period when L-NAME was co-administered with vasopressin. Our results suggest that the loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction seen in liver parenchyma after regional infusion is prevented by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-name and may be mediated by nitric oxide. PMID:7734317

  5. Radiofrequency Renal Denervation Protects the Ischemic Heart via Inhibition of GRK2 and Increased Nitric Oxide Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Polhemus, David J.; Gao, Juan; Scarborough, Amy L.; Trivedi, Rishi; McDonough, Kathleen H.; Goodchild, Traci T.; Smart, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) is currently under development for the treatment of resistant hypertension and is thought to reduce blood pressure via interruption of sympathetic pathways that modulate cardiovascular function. The sympathetic nervous system also plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of acute myocardial infarction and heart failure. Objective: We examined whether treatment with radiofrequency (RF)-RDN would protect the heart against subsequent myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury via direct effects on the myocardium. Methods and Results: Spontaneously hypertensive rats received either bilateral RF-RDN or sham-RDN. At 4 weeks after RF-RDN (n=14) or sham-RDN (n=14) treatment, spontaneously hypertensive rats were subjected to 30 minutes of transient coronary artery occlusion and 24 hours –7 days reperfusion. Four weeks after RF-RDN, myocardial oxidative stress was markedly attenuated, and transcription and translation of antioxidants, superoxide dismutase 1 and glutathione peroxidase-1, were significantly upregulated compared with sham-RDN spontaneously hypertensive rats. RF-RDN also inhibited myocardial G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 pathological signaling and enhanced myocardial endothelial nitric oxide synthase function and nitric oxide signaling. RF-RDN therapy resulted in a significant reduction in myocardial infarct size per area at risk compared with sham-RDN (26.8 versus 43.9%; P<0.01) at 24 hours postreperfusion and significantly improved left ventricular function at 7 days after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. Conclusions: RF-RDN reduced oxidative stress, inhibited G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 signaling, increased nitric oxide bioavailability, and ameliorated myocardial reperfusion injury in the setting of severe hypertension. These findings provide new insights into the remote cardioprotective effects of RF-RDN acting directly on cardiac myocytes to attenuate cell death and protect against ischemic

  6. Ovine caveolin-1: cDNA cloning, E. coli expression, and association with endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Zangl, A L; Zhao, Q; Markley, J L; Zheng, J; Bird, I M; Magness, R R

    2001-04-25

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), the principal coat protein of caveolae, plays an obligatory role in regulating the activity of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). We propose that Cav-1 may be critical to eNOS-NO mediated uterine vasodilatation during pregnancy and estrogen replacement therapy. To test this hypothesis in the sheep model, we isolated the full-length cDNA of ovine Cav-1 (oCav-1) from a Lambda ZAP cDNA library of ovine placental artery endothelial cells. Thirty-two positive oCav-1 clones were recognized by a partial oCav-1 cDNA from this library, of which eight were sequenced. Restriction digestion of these clones revealed that the cDNAs of oCav-1 ranged from approximately 2.1 to 2.7 kb. Northern analysis of Cav-1 mRNAs in ovine uterine artery endothelial cells (UAEC) showed two transcripts of approximately 2.1 and 2.7 kb, respectively. Immunoreactive Cav-1 protein, but not caveolin-2 or caveolin-3, was detected in UAEC. Sequence analysis revealed that in addition to a 537-bp open reading frame encoding a 178 amino acid oCav-1 protein, full-length oCav-1 cDNAs apparently possess a approximately 1.6-2.1 kb 3'-untranslated region. Database searches with oCav-1 cDNA revealed that the coding region of mammalian Cav-1 genes is highly conserved. We prepared a recombinant full-length oCav-1 protein in which six consecutive histidine residues were tagged at the end of its COOH-terminus and developed a [His]6-tagged oCav-1 'pull-down assay' for studying the association of eNOS with Cav-1. Incubation of exogenous [His]6-tagged oCav-1 with resting UAEC extracts led to the formation of a [His]6-tagged oCav-1-eNOS complex. In the presence of a synthetic caveolin-scaffolding domain (CSD, aa 82-101) peptide, but not a mutated CSD peptide, [His]6-tagged oCav-1 associated eNOS was dose (0-10 microM)-dependently inhibited. eNOS association with Cav-1 in UAEC was further confirmed by the facts that eNOS co-immunoprecipitated with Cav-1 and vice versa, and that eNOS co

  7. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase negatively regulates hydrogen peroxide-stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Benjamin Y; Sartoretto, Juliano L; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Michel, Thomas

    2009-10-13

    Hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species are intimately involved in endothelial cell signaling. In many cell types, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been implicated in the control of metabolic responses, but the role of endothelial cell redox signaling in the modulation of AMPK remains to be completely defined. We used RNA interference and pharmacological methods to establish that H(2)O(2) is a critical activator of AMPK in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). H(2)O(2) treatment of BAECs rapidly and significantly increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. The EC(50) for H(2)O(2)-promoted phosphorylation of AMPK is 65 + or - 15 microM, within the physiological range of cellular H(2)O(2) concentrations. The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKbeta) inhibitor STO-609 abolishes H(2)O(2)-dependent AMPK activation, whereas eNOS inhibitors enhance AMPK activation. Similarly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKKbeta abrogates AMPK activation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of eNOS leads to a striking increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Cellular imaging studies using the H(2)O(2) biosensor HyPer show that siRNA-mediated eNOS knockdown leads to a marked increase in intracellular H(2)O(2) generation, which is blocked by PEG-catalase. eNOS(-/-) mice show a marked increase in AMPK phosphorylation in liver and lung compared to wild-type mice. Lung endothelial cells from eNOS(-/-) mice also show a significant increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Taken together, these results establish that CaMKKbeta is critically involved in mediating the phosphorylation of AMPK promoted by H(2)O(2) in endothelial cells, and document that eNOS is an important negative regulator of AMPK phosphorylation and intracellular H(2)O(2) generation in endothelial cells. PMID:19805165

  8. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase negatively regulates hydrogen peroxide-stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Benjamin Y.; Sartoretto, Juliano L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Michel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species are intimately involved in endothelial cell signaling. In many cell types, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been implicated in the control of metabolic responses, but the role of endothelial cell redox signaling in the modulation of AMPK remains to be completely defined. We used RNA interference and pharmacological methods to establish that H2O2 is a critical activator of AMPK in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). H2O2 treatment of BAECs rapidly and significantly increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. The EC50 for H2O2-promoted phosphorylation of AMPK is 65 ± 15 μM, within the physiological range of cellular H2O2 concentrations. The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β (CaMKKβ) inhibitor STO-609 abolishes H2O2-dependent AMPK activation, whereas eNOS inhibitors enhance AMPK activation. Similarly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKKβ abrogates AMPK activation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of eNOS leads to a striking increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Cellular imaging studies using the H2O2 biosensor HyPer show that siRNA-mediated eNOS knockdown leads to a marked increase in intracellular H2O2 generation, which is blocked by PEG-catalase. eNOS−/− mice show a marked increase in AMPK phosphorylation in liver and lung compared to wild-type mice. Lung endothelial cells from eNOS−/− mice also show a significant increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Taken together, these results establish that CaMKKβ is critically involved in mediating the phosphorylation of AMPK promoted by H2O2 in endothelial cells, and document that eNOS is an important negative regulator of AMPK phosphorylation and intracellular H2O2 generation in endothelial cells. PMID:19805165

  9. Inhibition of endothelial lipase activity by sphingomyelin in the lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Belikova, Natalia A; Billheimer, Jeff; Rader, Daniel J; Hill, John S; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a major determinant of plasma HDL concentration, its activity being inversely proportional to HDL levels. Although it is known that it preferentially acts on HDL compared to LDL and VLDL, the basis for this specificity is not known. Here we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin, a major phospholipid in lipoproteins is a physiological inhibitor of EL, and that the preference of the enzyme for HDL may be due to low sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) ratio in HDL, compared to other lipoproteins. Using recombinant human EL, we showed that sphingomyelin inhibits the hydrolysis of PtdCho in the liposomes in a concentration-dependent manner. While the enzyme showed lower hydrolysis of LDL PtdCho, compared to HDL PtdCho, this difference disappeared after the degradation of lipoprotein sphingomyelin by bacterial sphingomyelinase. Analysis of molecular species of PtdCho hydrolyzed by EL in the lipoproteins showed that the enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed PtdCho containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as 22:6, 20:5, 20:4 at the sn-2 position, generating the corresponding PUFA-lyso PtdCho. This specificity for PUFA-PtdCho species was not observed after depletion of sphingomyelin by sphingomyelinase. These results show that sphingomyelin not only plays a role in regulating EL activity, but also influences its specificity towards PtdCho species. PMID:25167836

  10. Endothelial transcriptome in response to pharmacological methyltransferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Jun; Fernandez, Ana Z; Ziemann, Mark; Keating, Samuel T; Balcerczyk, Aneta; El-Osta, Assam

    2014-08-01

    The enzymatic activities of protein methyltransferases serve to write covalent modifications on histone and non-histone proteins in the control of gene transcription. Here, we describe gene expression changes in human endothelial cells caused by treatment with methyltransferase inhibitors 7,7'-carbonylbis (azanediyl) bis(4-hydroxynaphthalene-2 -sulfonic acid (AMI-1) and disodium-2-(2,4,5,7- tetrabromo-3-oxido-6-oxoxanthen-9-yl) benzoate trihydrate (AMI-5). Deep sequencing of mRNA indicated robust change on transcription following AMI-5 treatment compared with AMI-1. Functional annotation analysis revealed that both compounds suppress the expression of genes associated with translational regulation, suggesting arginine methylation by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) could be associated with regulation of this pathway. Interestingly, AMI-5 but not AMI-1 was found to decrease methylation of H3 histones at lysine 4 and down-regulate gene expression associated with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling pathways. These results imply that inhibition of protein methylation by AMI-1 and AMI-5 can differentially regulate specific pathways with potential to interrupt pathological signaling in the vascular endothelium. PMID:24850797

  11. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Phosphorylation and Interaction with GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Provide Novel Regulation of Endothelial Tetrahydrobiopterin and Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Rezvan, Amir; Salerno, John C.; Husain, Ahsan; Kwon, Kihwan; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G.; Chen, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Rationale GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH-1) is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor for nitric oxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. GTPCH-1 undergoes negative feedback regulation by its end-product BH4 via interaction with the GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). Such a negative feedback mechanism should maintain cellular BH4 levels within a very narrow range; however, we recently identified a phosphorylation site (S81) on human GTPCH-1 that markedly increases BH4 production in response to laminar shear. Objective To define how S81 phosphorylation alters GTPCH-1 enzyme activity and how this is modulated by GFRP. Methods and Results Using prokaryotically expressed proteins, we found that the GTPCH-1 phospho-mimetic mutant (S81D) has increased enzyme activity, reduced binding to GFRP and resistance to inhibition by GFRP compared to wild-type GTPCH-1. Using siRNA or overexpressing plasmids, GFRP was shown to modulate phosphorylation of GTPCH-1, BH4 levels and nitric oxide (NO) production in human endothelial cells. Laminar, but not oscillatory shear stress caused dissociation of GTPCH-1 and GFRP, promoting GTPCH-1 phosphorylation. We also found that both GTPCH-1 phosphorylation and GFRP down-regulation prevents eNOS uncoupling in response to oscillatory shear. Finally oscillatory shear was associated with impaired GTPCH-1 phosphorylation and reduced BH4 levels in vivo. Conclusion These studies provide a new mechanism for regulation of endothelial GTPCH-1 by its phosphorylation and interplay with GFRP. This mechanism allows for escape from GFRP negative feedback and permits large amounts of BH4 to be produced in response to laminar shear stress. PMID:19926872

  12. An Antagonistic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Variant Inhibits VEGF-Stimulated Receptor Autophosphorylation and Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemeister, Gerhard; Schirner, Michael; Reusch, Petra; Barleon, Bernhard; Marme, Dieter; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    1998-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen with a unique specificity for endothelial cells and a key mediator of aberrant endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability in a variety of human pathological situations, such as tumor angiogenesis, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis. VEGF is a symmetric homodimeric molecule with two receptor binding interfaces lying on each pole of the molecule. Herein we report on the construction and recombinant expression of an asymmetric heterodimeric VEGF variant with an intact receptor binding interface at one pole and a mutant receptor binding interface at the second pole of the dimer. This VEGF variant binds to VEGF receptors but fails to induce receptor activation. In competition experiments, the heterodimeric VEGF variant antagonizes VEGF-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and proliferation of endothelial cells. A 15-fold excess of the heterodimer was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation by 50%, and a 100-fold excess resulted in an almost complete inhibition. By using a rational approach that is based on the structure of VEGF, we have shown the feasibility to construct a VEGF variant that acts as an VEGF antagonist.

  13. Nitric oxide synthases activation and inhibition by metallacarborane cluster-based isoform-specific affectors

    PubMed Central

    Kaplánek, Robert; Martásek, Pavel; Grüner, Bohumír; Panda, Satya; Rak, Jakub; Masters, Bettie Sue Siler; Král, Vladimír; Roman, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    A small library of boron cluster and metallacarborane cluster-based ligands was designed, prepared and tested for isoform-selective activation or inhibition of the three nitric oxide synthase isoforms. Based on the concept of creating a hydrophobic analog of a natural substrate, a stable and non-toxic basic boron cluster system, previously used for boron neutron capture therapy, was modified by the addition of positively charged moieties to its periphery, providing hydrophobic and non-classical hydrogen bonding interactions with the protein. Several of these compounds show efficacy for inhibition of NO synthesis with differential effects on the various nitric oxide synthase isoforms. PMID:23075390

  14. Association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene T-786C promoter polymorphism with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaveni, Devulapalli; Amar Chand, Bhayal; Shravan Kumar, Porika; Uma Devi, Malladi; Ramanna, Macherla; Jyothy, Akka; Pratibha, Nallari; Balakrishna, N; Venkateshwari, Ananthapur

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase -786T > C promoter polymorphism in the etiology of gastric cancer (GC). METHODS: A total of 150 GC patients and 150 control subjects were included in the study. The information on demographic features was elicited with an informed consent from all the patients and control subjects using a structured questionnaire. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infectivity status was tested in antral biopsies from all the subjects by rapid urease test following the method of Vaira et al. Genomic DNA was isolated from whole blood samples following the salting out method of Lahiri et al. Genotype analysis of the rs2070744 polymorphism was carried out by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. The genotypes were determined based on the appearance of bands on an agarose gel stained with ethidium bromide under ultraviolet gel documentation with the help of 100 bp ladder. Odds ratios and corresponding 95%CIs were determined using java stat online software. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in the distribution of C allele (C vs T; P = 0.000, OR = 5.038) in patient group compared to the control subjects exhibiting a fivefold increased risk for GC. When the T/T and C/C genotypes were compared, there was an enhanced GC risk for individuals with C/C genotype (T/T vs C/C; P = 0.000). Among the demographic factors, smoking and alcoholism were the common risk factors in patients compared to the control subjects (P < 0.05). Patients with smoking and alcoholism developed cancer even in heterozygous T/C condition (smoking: P = 0.020 and alcoholism: P = 0.005). Individuals with H. pylori infection showed seven fold increased risk for cancer. All the patients with C/C genotype revealed a significant association between H. pylori infection and GC. Among the patients 2.4% of them revealed familial incidence of GC. No significant difference was noticed between cases and controls with regard to consanguinity (P = 0

  15. Functional effects of endothelial nitric oxide synthase genetic polymorphisms on haemorheological parameters in healthy human individuals.

    PubMed

    Babaoglu, Melih O; Dikmenoglu, Neslihan; Ileri-Gurel, Esin; Seringec, Nurten; Zoto, Teuta; Yasar, Umit; Kayaalp, S Oguz; Bozkurt, Atilla

    2011-03-01

    The constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a major role in circulatory homoeostasis and shows genetic polymorphism. eNOS is expressed and functional in blood cells, including erythrocytes. There is limited knowledge about the consequences of eNOS genetic variability in haemorheological parameters and erythrocyte functioning. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of three eNOS genetic polymorphisms, namely exonic G894T (Glu298Asp), intronic VNTR (27-bp repeat) and 5'-flanking T(-786)C polymorphisms on haemorheological variables, such as erythrocyte deformability and erythrocyte aggregation (rouleaux formation) in healthy non-smoking volunteers. Sixty subjects (19 women, 41 men) were examined for genotypes and haemorheological variables. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction analysis. Haemorheological variables were measured by means of a laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyser (LORCA). Erythrocyte aggregation was significantly decreased in individuals with 894TT genotype when compared to subjects with the (G) allele. Aggregation indices (AI) were 54.7±3.2% versus 61.0±0.9% (p=0.026), and the half-lives (t(1/2) ) for aggregation formation were 3.43±0.43 versus 2.55±0.12 sec. (p=0.024), respectively. Similarly, VNTR-bb genotype significantly altered erythrocyte aggregability. AI values were 58.7±1.1% in subjects with VNTR-a allele versus 63.7±1.2% in subjects with bb genotype (p=0.011); t(1/2) values were 2.86±0.16 versus 2.20±0.13 sec., respectively (p=0.016). T(-786)C polymorphism did not change any haemorheological parameters. These findings suggest that eNOS 894TT genotype is associated with decreased erythrocyte aggregation, while VNTR-bb genotype increases aggregability in healthy human individuals. eNOS genetic variants may contribute in the pathogenesis of microvascular disorders by altering erythrocyte functions in human beings. PMID:20977680

  16. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase intron 4a/b polymorphism in coronary artery disease in Thrace region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sivri, N.; Unlu, A.; Palabiyik, O.; Budak, M.; Kacmaz, Y.; Yalta, K.; Sipahi, T.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the frequent cardiovascular mortality causes in the world. Common risk factors explain only about half the risk of CAD. The healthy familial predisposition to CAD, combined with advances in genetic analysis, has led to a number of studies in recent years making an effort to identify the genetic factors that influence the risk. The approach taken by most studies was to examine the association of naturally occurring genetic polymorphisms in candidate genes with risk of or severity of CAD. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is important for vascular and tissue protection and is found in endothelial cells that encompass the entire vasculature, including the vessels in the heart. Nitric oxide (NO) is produced in a catabolic reaction in the endothelial cells, neurons, glia and macrophages by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoenzymes. eNOS is a subgroup of this family of enzymes that catalyses the production of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine and oxygen, which leads to vascular relaxation by activating the guanylate cyclase. This finally induces smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to investigate the allelic frequency and the genotypic distribution of the variable number of tandem repeat 27 (27 VNTR) gene polymorphism in intron 4 of the eNOS (eNOS 4a/b) gene in Thrace region, to compare CAD patients with appropriate healthy controls and to correlate the genetic findings with CAD subtypes. The study group included 281 (153 subjects with CAD and 128 controls) patients. The eNOS polymorphism was identified with a polymerase chain reaction. Genotypes were defined as aa, ab and bb according to the presence of a and b alleles. In this case–control study, we found that there was sensible correlation between eNOS gene intron 4a/b VNTR polymorphism and the risk of CAD in Thrace region of Turkey. However, there was no major difference for the genotype distribution and the allelic frequency among the CAD subtypes. Further

  17. Direct demonstration of insulin-like growth factor-I-induced nitric oxide production by endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, H; Gordienko, D V; Tonshoff, B; Gelato, M C; Goligorsky, M S

    1994-02-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a potent mediator of vasodilation. To elucidate the mechanism and site of action of IGF-I, we performed continuous monitoring of nitric oxide (NO) release from endothelial cells using a highly-sensitive amperometric NO-sensor. Two types of cultured cells were used: human umbilical vein endothelial cells and immortalized rat renal interlobar artery endothelial cells. In separate experiments, [Ca2+]i changes in response to IGF-I were measured spectrofluorometrically in fura-2-loaded cells. Stimulation with IGF-I resulted in a rapid, dose-dependent increase in [NO] as detected by the NO-probe positioned 1 mm above the monolayers, followed by a sustained elevation lasting for at least five minutes. The effect of IGF-I was significantly suppressed by pretreatment with anti-IGF-I antibody, suggesting that it was specific for IGF-I. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of NO synthesis, significantly blunted responses to IGF-I, but dexamethasone preincubation did not reduce the IGF-I-induced release of NO. These results indicate that the observed IGF-I-induced release of NO is a result of activation of the constitutive, rather than the inducible type of NO synthase in endothelial cells. Genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, resulted in a profound suppression of the IGF-I-induced release of NO. IGF-I did not affect [Ca2+]i in either type of cells. Therefore, IGF-I-induced NO production by both types of endothelial cells is mediated via a tyrosine kinase-dependent mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7513035

  18. Reduced nitric oxide-mediated relaxation and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the tail arteries of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Siti Safiah; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan Wai Sum; Suppian, Rapeah; Yusof, Mohd Imran; Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam

    2016-02-15

    Diabetes is associated with endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations. The present study aimed to examine the role of nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH), in the relaxation of ventral tail arteries of rats under diabetic conditions. Relaxations of tail arteries of control and diabetic rats were studied in wire myograph. Western blotting and immunostaining were used to determine the presence of proteins. Acetylcholine-induced relaxations were significantly smaller in arteries of diabetic compared to control rats (Rmax; 70.81 ± 2.48% versus 85.05 ± 3.15%). Incubation with the combination of non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin and potassium channel blockers, TRAM 34 and UCL 1684, demonstrated that NO-mediated relaxation was attenuated significantly in diabetic compared to control rats (Rmax; 48.47 ± 5.84% versus 68.39 ± 6.34%). EDH-type (in the presence of indomethacin and NO synthase inhibitor, LNAME) and prostacyclin-mediated (in the presence of LNAME plus TRAM 34 and UCL 1684) relaxations were not significantly reduced in arteries of diabetic compared to control rats [Rmax: (EDH; 17.81 ± 6.74% versus 34.16 ± 4.59%) (prostacyclin; 15.85 ± 3.27% versus 17.23 ± 3.75%)]. Endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside, salbutamol and prostacyclin were comparable in the two types of preparations. Western blotting and immunostaining indicated that diabetes diminished the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), while increasing those of COX-1 and COX-2. Thus, since acetylcholine-induced NO-mediated relaxation was impaired in diabetes because of reduced eNOS protein expression, pharmacological intervention improving NO bioavailability could be useful in the management of diabetic endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26825543

  19. Ozone inhibits endothelial cell cyclooxygenase activity through formation of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, M.C.; Eling, T.E.; Friedman, M.

    1987-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a 2H exposure of cultured pulmonary endothelial cells to ozone (0.0-1.0 ppm) in-vitro resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of endothelial prostacyclin production (90% decrease at the 1.0 ppm level). Ozone-exposed endothelial cells, incubated with 20 uM arachidonate, also demonstrated a significant inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis. To further examine the mechanisms of the inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis, bovine pulmonary endothelial cells were exposed to 1.0 ppm ozone for 2H. A significant decrease in prostacyclin synthesis was found within 5 min of exposure (77 +/- 36% of air-exposed control values, p less than 0.05). Endothelial prostacyclin synthesis returned to baseline levels by 12H after ozone exposure, a time point which was similar to the recovery time of unexposed endothelium treated with 0.5 uM acetylsalicylic acid. Incubation of endothelial cells, previously exposed to 1.0 ppm ozone for 2 hours, with 4 uM PGH2 resulted in restoration of essentially normal prostacyclin synthesis. When endothelial cells were co-incubated with catalase (5 U/ml) during ozone exposure, no inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis was observed. Co-incubation with either heat-inactivated catalase or superoxide dismutase (10 U/ml) did not affect the ozone-induced inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis. These data suggest that H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is a major toxic species produced in endothelial cells during ozone exposure and responsible for the inhibition of endothelial cyclooxygenase activity.

  20. Shear stress stimulates phosphorylation of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase at Ser1179 by Akt-independent mechanisms: role of protein kinase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Sorescu, George; Boyd, Nolan; Shiojima, Ichiro; Walsh, Kenneth; Du, Jie; Jo, Hanjoong

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that shear stress stimulates NO(*) production by the protein kinase B/Akt (Akt)-dependent mechanisms in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) (Go, Y. M., Boo, Y. C., Park, H., Maland, M. C., Patel, R., Pritchard, K. A., Jr., Fujio, Y., Walsh, K., Darley-Usmar, V., and Jo, H. (2001) J. Appl. Physiol. 91, 1574-1581). Akt has been believed to regulate shear-dependent production of NO(*) by directly phosphorylating endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) at the Ser(1179) residue (eNOS-S(1179)), but a critical evaluation using specific inhibitors or dominant negative mutants (Akt(AA) or Akt(AAA)) has not been reported. In addition, other kinases, including protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP kinase have also shown to phosphorylate eNOS-S(1179). Here, we show that shear-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS-S(1179) is mediated by an Akt-independent, but a PKA-dependent, mechanism. Expression of Akt(AA) or Akt(AAA) in BAEC by using recombinant adenoviral constructs inhibited phosphorylation of eNOS-S(1179) if cells were stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but not by shear stress. As shown before, expression of Akt(AA) inhibited shear-dependent NO(*) production, suggesting that Akt is still an important regulator in NO production. Further studies showed that a selective inhibitor of PKA, H89, inhibited shear-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS-S(1179) and NO(*) production. In contrast, H89 did not inhibit phosphorylation of eNOS-S(1179) induced by expressing a constitutively active Akt mutant (Akt(Myr)) in BAEC, showing that the inhibitor did not affect the Akt pathway. 8-Bromo-cAMP alone phosphorylated eNOS-S(1179) within 5 min without activating Akt, in an H89-sensitive manner. Collectively, these results demonstrate that shear stimulates phosphorylation of eNOS-S(1179) in a PKA-dependent, but Aktindependent manner, whereas the NO(*) production is regulated by the mechanisms dependent on both PKA and Akt. A coordinated interaction

  1. Dual microelectrodes for distance control and detection of nitric oxide from endothelial cells by means of scanning electrochemical microscope.

    PubMed

    Isik, Sonnur; Etienne, Mathieu; Oni, Joshua; Blöchl, Andrea; Reiter, Sabine; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2004-11-01

    Dual Pt disk microelectrodes consisting of a 10-microm distance sensor and a 50-microm nitric oxide sensor were prepared. The 50-microm electrode was modified with Ni(4-N-tetramethyl)pyridyl porphyrin enclosed in the polymer network of a negatively charged electrodeposition paint. This paint prevented the dissolution of the otherwise soluble porphyrin in the aqueous test medium due to charge interactions. It also denied negatively charged ions in the analyte solution access to the electrode surface by electrostatic repulsion, thereby preventing interference from anions such as nitrite, nitrate, and ascorbate. With the aid of a scanning electrochemical microscope, it was possible to use the distance sensor by recording the negative feedback effect on the reduction of molecular oxygen to "guide" the nitric oxide sensor to various known distances from a layer of adherently growing human umbilical vein endothelial cells for the detection of nitric oxide released from the cells upon stimulation with bradykinin. The use of the distance sensor made it possible to preserve the integrity of the adherently growing cells concomitantly with the modified electrode by preventing the deterioration of the modifying layer during the distance adjustment step. PMID:15516132

  2. AB239. Icariside II enhances endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression by suppressing miR-155 in diabetic-like human cavernous endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ruili; Lei, Hongen; Yang, Bicheng; Wang, Lin; Li, Huixi; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the role of Icariside II (ICA II) on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression regulated by miR-155, the human cavernous endothelial cells (HCECs) were exposed to a diabetic-like environment and treated with ICA II. Methods HCECs were treated with 200 µg/mL BSA as the Normal Control group (NC), with 200 µg/mL AGE-BSA plus 250 mg/dL glucose as the diabetes mellitus (DM) group, or with an addition of ICA II in DM group as the treatment group (DM+ICA II). Bioinformatics were first used to predict miRNAs targeting eNOS gene and then potential candidates including miR-155, miR-543, miR-31, miR-429, miR-200b were further verified by real-time PCR in a diabetic-like condition. Expressions levels of miRNAs, eNOS and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) were performed by Real-time PCR; Protein expression levels of eNOS and RAGE were analyzed by western blot; nitric oxide (NO) content was detected by DAF-FM DA probe and NaNO2 standard curve methods. Results The expression of miR-155 in DM group is significantly higher than that that in the normal control (NC) group, whereas this phenomenon was effectively reversed by ICA II treatment. Furthermore, the miR-155 targeting gene eNOS and its consequent NO product were significantly reduced in DM group, while these changes were also recovered after ICA II treatment. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that ICA II could promotes eNOS mRNA and protein levels by suppressing miR-155 in HCECs exposed to a diabetic-like environment.

  3. Targeted overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in endothelial cells improves cerebrovascular reactivity in Ins2Akita-type-1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Saurav B; Mohan, Sumathy; Ford, Bridget M; Huang, Lei; Janardhanan, Preethi; Deo, Kaiwalya S; Cong, Linlin; Muir, Eric R; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-06-01

    Reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide due to impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity is a leading cause of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. Enhancing eNOS activity in diabetes is a potential therapeutic target. This study investigated basal cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity in wild-type mice, diabetic mice (Ins2(Akita+/-)), nondiabetic eNOS-overexpressing mice (TgeNOS), and the cross of two transgenic mice (TgeNOS-Ins2(Akita+/-)) at six months of age. The cross was aimed at improving eNOS expression in diabetic mice. The major findings were: (i) Body weights of Ins2(Akita+/-) and TgeNOS-Ins2(Akita+/-) were significantly different from wild-type and TgeNOS mice. Blood pressure of TgeNOS mice was lower than wild-type. (ii) Basal cerebral blood flow of the TgeNOS group was significantly higher than cerebral blood flow of the other three groups. (iii) The cerebrovascular reactivity in the Ins2(Akita+/-) mice was significantly lower compared with wild-type, whereas that in the TgeNOS-Ins2(Akita+/-) was significantly higher compared with the Ins2(Akita+/-) and TgeNOS groups. Overexpression of eNOS rescued cerebrovascular dysfunction in diabetic animals, resulting in improved cerebrovascular reactivity. These results underscore the possible role of eNOS in vascular dysfunction in the brain of diabetic mice and support the notion that enhancing eNOS activity in diabetes is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26661212

  4. Detrimental effects of Bartonella henselae are counteracted by L-arginine and nitric oxide in human endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Paola; Casamassimi, Amelia; Sommese, Linda; Fiorito, Carmela; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Rossiello, Raffaele; Avallone, Bice; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Costa, Valerio; Rienzo, Monica; Colicchio, Roberta; Williams-Ignarro, Sharon; Pagliarulo, Caterina; Prudente, Maria Evelina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Lamberti, Florentia; Baroni, Adone; Buommino, Elisabetta; Farzati, Bartolomeo; Tufano, Maria Antonietta; Ignarro, Louis Joseph; Napoli, Claudio

    2008-07-01

    The recruitment of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) might have a beneficial effect on the clinical course of several diseases. Endothelial damage and detachment of endothelial cells are known to occur in infection, tissue ischemia, and sepsis. These detrimental effects in EPCs are unknown. Here we elucidated whether human EPCs internalize Bartonella henselae constituting a circulating niche of the pathogen. B. henselae invades EPCs as shown by gentamicin protection assays and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Dil-Ac-LDL/lectin double immunostaining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis of EPCs revealed EPC bioactivity after infection with B. henselae. Nitric oxide (NO) and its precursor l-arginine (l-arg) exert a plethora of beneficial effects on vascular function and modulation of immune response. Therefore, we tested also the hypothesis that l-arg (1-30 mM) would affect the infection of B. henselae or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in EPCs. Our data provide evidence that l-arg counteracts detrimental effects induced by TNF or Bartonella infections via NO (confirmed by DETA-NO and L-NMMA experiments) and by modulation of p38 kinase phosphorylation. Microarray analysis indicated several genes involved in immune response were differentially expressed in Bartonella-infected EPCs, whereas these genes returned in steady state when cells were exposed to sustained doses of l-arg. This mechanism may have broad therapeutic applications in tissue ischemia, angiogenesis, immune response, and sepsis. PMID:18595894

  5. Detrimental effects of Bartonella henselae are counteracted by l-arginine and nitric oxide in human endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Paola; Casamassimi, Amelia; Sommese, Linda; Fiorito, Carmela; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Rossiello, Raffaele; Avallone, Bice; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Costa, Valerio; Rienzo, Monica; Colicchio, Roberta; Williams-Ignarro, Sharon; Pagliarulo, Caterina; Prudente, Maria Evelina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Lamberti, Florentia; Baroni, Adone; Buommino, Elisabetta; Farzati, Bartolomeo; Tufano, Maria Antonietta; Ignarro, Louis Joseph; Napoli, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    The recruitment of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) might have a beneficial effect on the clinical course of several diseases. Endothelial damage and detachment of endothelial cells are known to occur in infection, tissue ischemia, and sepsis. These detrimental effects in EPCs are unknown. Here we elucidated whether human EPCs internalize Bartonella henselae constituting a circulating niche of the pathogen. B. henselae invades EPCs as shown by gentamicin protection assays and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Dil-Ac-LDL/lectin double immunostaining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis of EPCs revealed EPC bioactivity after infection with B. henselae. Nitric oxide (NO) and its precursor l-arginine (l-arg) exert a plethora of beneficial effects on vascular function and modulation of immune response. Therefore, we tested also the hypothesis that l-arg (1–30 mM) would affect the infection of B. henselae or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in EPCs. Our data provide evidence that l-arg counteracts detrimental effects induced by TNF or Bartonella infections via NO (confirmed by DETA-NO and L-NMMA experiments) and by modulation of p38 kinase phosphorylation. Microarray analysis indicated several genes involved in immune response were differentially expressed in Bartonella-infected EPCs, whereas these genes returned in steady state when cells were exposed to sustained doses of l-arg. This mechanism may have broad therapeutic applications in tissue ischemia, angiogenesis, immune response, and sepsis. PMID:18595894

  6. Serine 1179 phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase caused by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene through PI3K/Akt signaling in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yang; Sumi, Daigo; Kumagai, Yoshito . E-mail: yk-em-tu@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2006-07-01

    Although 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) has been found to uncouple nitric oxide synthase (NOS), thereby leading to reactive oxygen species (ROS), cellular response against TNT still remains unclear. Exposure of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) to TNT (100 {mu}M) resulted in serine 1179 phosphorylation of endothelial NOS (eNOS). With specific inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002), we found that PI3K/Akt signaling participated in the eNOS phosphorylation caused by TNT, whereas the ERK pathway did not. ROS were generated following exposure of BAECs to TNT. However, TNT-mediated phosphorylation of either eNOS or Akt was drastically blocked by NAC and PEG-CAT. Interestingly, pretreatment with apocynin, a specific inhibitor for NADPH oxidase, diminished the phosphorylation of eNOS and Akt. These results suggest that TNT affects NADPH oxidase, thereby generating hydrogen peroxide, which is capable of activating PI3K/Akt signaling associated with eNOS Ser 1179 phosphorylation.

  7. Endothelial cell apoptosis induced by antibodies against dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 via production of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Lei, Huan-Yao; Shiau, Ai-Li; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Chen, Shun-Hua; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Chiu, Shu-Chen; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2002-07-15

    The onset of vascular leakage and hemorrhagic diathesis is one of the life-threatening complications occurring in dengue patients, yet the pathogenic mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrated that Abs against dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) generated in mice cross-reacted with human endothelial cells and mouse vessel endothelium. After binding, mouse anti-NS1 Abs induced endothelial cell apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner. Inducible NO synthase expression could be observed; it showed a time- and dose-dependent correlation with NO production. Endothelial cell apoptosis, characterized by exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface and nuclear DNA fragmentation, was blocked by treatment with the NO synthase inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Further studies demonstrated that the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L) decreased in both mRNA and protein levels, whereas p53 and Bax increased after anti-NS1 treatment. Cytochrome c release was also observed. All of these effects could be inhibited by N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Taken together, anti-NS1 Abs act as autoantibodies that cross-react with noninfected endothelial cells and trigger the intracellular signaling leading to the production of NO and to apoptosis. Endothelial cell damage may cause vascular leakage that contributes to the pathogenesis of dengue disease. PMID:12097367

  8. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy. PMID:27551496

  9. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy. PMID:27551496

  10. Expression of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Endothelin-1 in Skin Tissue from Amputated Limbs of Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Groeneweg, J. George; Antonissen, Claudia Heijmans; Huygen, Frank J. P. M.; Zijlstra, Freek J.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Impaired microcirculation during the chronic stage of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Endothelial dysfunction is suggested to be the main cause of diminished blood flow. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and endothelin-1(ET-1) relative to vascular density represented by the endothelial marker CD31-immunoreactivity in the skin tissue of patients with chronic CRPS. Methods. We performed immunohistochemical staining on sections of skin specimens obtained from the amputated limbs (one arm and one leg) of two patients with CRPS. Results. In comparison to proximal specimens we found an increased number of migrated endothelial cells as well as an increase of eNOS activity in distal dermis specimens. Conclusions. We found indications that endothelial dysfunction plays a role in chronic CRPS. PMID:18663383

  11. In Vitro Recapitulation of Functional Microvessels for the Study of Endothelial Shear Response, Nitric Oxide and [Ca2+]i

    PubMed Central

    He, Pingnian; Liu, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic technologies enable in vitro studies to closely simulate in vivo microvessel environment with complexity. Such method overcomes certain constrains of the statically cultured endothelial monolayers and enables the cells grow under physiological range of shear flow with geometry similar to microvessels in vivo. However, there are still existing knowledge gaps and lack of convincing evidence to demonstrate and quantify key biological features of the microfluidic microvessels. In this paper, using advanced micromanufacturing and microfluidic technologies, we presented an engineered microvessel model that mimicked the dimensions and network structures of in vivo microvessels with a long-term and continuous perfusion capability, as well as high-resolution and real-time imaging capability. Through direct comparisons with studies conducted in intact microvessels, our results demonstrated that the cultured microvessels formed under perfused conditions recapitulated certain key features of the microvessels in vivo. In particular, primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells were successfully cultured the entire inner surfaces of the microchannel network with well-developed junctions indicated by VE-cadherin staining. The morphological and proliferative responses of endothelial cells to shear stresses were quantified under different flow conditions which was simulated with three-dimensional shear dependent numerical flow model. Furthermore, we successfully measured agonist-induced changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and nitric oxide production at individual endothelial cell levels using fluorescence imaging. The results were comparable to those derived from individually perfused intact venules. With in vivo validation of its functionalities, our microfluidic model demonstrates a great potential for biological applications and bridges the gaps between in vitro and in vivo microvascular research. PMID:25965067

  12. Role of Polymorphisms of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in Idiopathic Environmental Intolerances

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Chiara; Gugliandolo, Agnese; Calabrò, Carlo; Currò, Monica; Ientile, Riccardo; Raskovic, Desanka; Korkina, Ludmila; Caccamo, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play a pathogenetic role in idiopathic environmental intolerances (IEI), namely, multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), fibromyalgia (FM), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Given the reported association of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene polymorphisms with inflammatory disorders, we aimed to investigate the distribution of NOS2A −2.5 kb (CCTTT)n as well as Ser608Leu and NOS3 −786T>C variants and their correlation with nitrite/nitrate levels, in a study cohort including 170 MCS, 108 suspected MCS (SMCS), 89 FM/CFS, and 196 healthy subjects. Patients and controls had similar distributions of NOS2A Ser608Leu and NOS3 −786T>C polymorphisms. Interestingly, the NOS3 −786TT genotype was associated with increased nitrite/nitrate levels only in IEI patients. We also found that the NOS2A −2.5 kb (CCTTT)11 allele represents a genetic determinant for FM/CFS, and the (CCTTT)16 allele discriminates MCS from SMCS patients. Instead, the (CCTTT)8 allele reduces by three-, six-, and tenfold, respectively, the risk for MCS, SMCS, and FM/CFS. Moreover, a short number of (CCTTT) repeats is associated with higher concentrations of nitrites/nitrates. Here, we first demonstrate that NOS3 −786T>C variant affects nitrite/nitrate levels in IEI patients and that screening for NOS2A −2.5 kb (CCTTT)n polymorphism may be useful for differential diagnosis of various IEI. PMID:25878398

  13. Nitric Oxide Loaded Echogenic Liposomes for Nitric Oxide Delivery and Inhibition of Intimal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shao-Ling; Kee, Patrick H.; Kim, Hyunggun; Moody, Melanie R.; Chrzanowski, Stephen M.; MacDonald, Robert C.; McPherson, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a new bioactive gas delivery method using echogenic liposomes (ELIP) as the gas carrier. Background Nitric oxide (NO) is a bioactive gas with potent therapeutic effects. Bioavailability of NO by systemic delivery is low with potential systemic effects. Methods Liposomes containing phospholipids and cholesterol were prepared using a new freezing under pressure method. The encapsulation and release profile of NO from NO containing-ELIP (NO-ELIP) or a mixture of NO/Argon (NO/Ar-ELIP was studied. Uptake of NO from NO-ELIP by cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) both in the absence and presence of hemoglobin was determined. The effect of NO-ELIP delivery to attenuate intimal hyperplasia in a balloon-injured artery was determined. Results Coencapsulation of NO with argon (Ar) enabled the adjustment the amount of encapsulated NO. A total of 10 µl of gas can be encapsulated into 1 mg liposomes. The release profile of NO from NO-ELIP demonstrated an initial rapid release followed by a slower release over 8 hours. Sixty-eight percent of cells remained viable when incubated with 80 µg/ml of NO/Ar-ELIP for 4 hours. NO delivery to VSMC using NO/Ar-ELIP was 7-fold higher than unencapsulated NO. NO/Ar-ELIP remained effective NO delivery to VSMC even in the presence of hemoglobin. Local NO-ELIP administration to balloon-injured carotid arteries attenuated the development of intimal hyperplasia and reduced arterial wall thickening by 41±9%. Conclusions Liposomes can protect and deliver a bioactive gas to target tissues with the potential for both visualization of gas delivery and controlled therapeutic gas release. PMID:19660697

  14. The Ape-1/Ref-1 redox antagonist E3330 inhibits the growth of tumor endothelium and endothelial progenitor cells: therapeutic implications in tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Gang-Ming; Karikari, Collins; Kabe, Yasuaki; Handa, Hiroshi; Anders, Robert A; Maitra, Anirban

    2009-04-01

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (Ape-1/Ref-1) is a multi-functional protein, involved in DNA repair and the activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors. The Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain acts as a cytoprotective element in normal endothelial cells, mitigating the deleterious effects of apoptotic stimuli through induction of survival signals. We explored the role of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain in the maintenance of tumor-associated endothelium, and of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which contribute to tumor angiogenesis. We demonstrate that E3330, a small molecule inhibitor of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain, blocks the in vitro growth of pancreatic cancer-associated endothelial cells (PCECs) and EPCs, which is recapitulated by stable expression of a dominant-negative redox domain mutant. Further, E3330 blocks the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into CD31(+) endothelial progeny. Exposure of PCECs to E3330 results in a reduction of H-ras expression and intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, as well as decreased DNA-binding activity of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, HIF-1alpha. E3330 also reduces secreted and intracellular vascular endothelial growth factor expression by pancreatic cancer cells, while concomitantly downregulating the cognate receptor Flk-1/KDR on PCECs. Inhibition of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain with E3330 or comparable angiogenesis inhibitors might be a potent therapeutic strategy in solid tumors. PMID:19097035

  15. Conditioned Media from Microvascular Endothelial Cells Cultured in Simulated Microgravity Inhibit Osteoblast Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Castiglioni, Sara; Maier, Jeanette A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims. Gravity contributes to the maintenance of bone integrity. Accordingly, weightlessness conditions during space flight accelerate bone loss and experimental models in real and simulated microgravity show decreased osteoblastic and increased osteoclastic activities. It is well known that the endothelium and bone cells cross-talk and this intercellular communication is vital to regulate bone homeostasis. Because microgravity promotes microvascular endothelial dysfunction, we anticipated that the molecular cross-talk between endothelial cells exposed to simulated microgravity and osteoblasts might be altered. Results. We cultured human microvascular endothelial cells in simulated microgravity using the rotating wall vessel device developed by NASA. Endothelial cells in microgravity show growth inhibition and release higher amounts of matrix metalloproteases type 2 and interleukin-6 than controls. Conditioned media collected from microvascular endothelial cells in simulated microgravity were used to culture human osteoblasts and were shown to retard osteoblast proliferation and inhibit their activity. Discussion. Microvascular endothelial cells in microgravity are growth retarded and release high amounts of matrix metalloproteases type 2 and interleukin-6, which might play a role in retarding the growth of osteoblasts and impairing their osteogenic activity. Conclusions. We demonstrate that since simulated microgravity modulates microvascular endothelial cell function, it indirectly impairs osteoblastic function. PMID:25210716

  16. Clinical pharmacokinetics of the cyclooxygenase inhibiting nitric oxide donator (CINOD) AZD3582.

    PubMed

    Fagerholm, Urban; Björnsson, Marcus A

    2005-12-01

    The clinical pharmacokinetics of the COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donator (CINOD) AZD3582 and its metabolites, including naproxen, nitric oxide and nitrate, are summarized. AZD3582 has low aqueous solubility, moderate and passive intestinal permeability and is degraded by intestinal esterases. Its oral bioavailability (F) appears to be maximally a few per cent, and increases by several-fold after food intake. Ninety-four per cent or more of an AZD3582 dose is absorbed, of which at least 9-20% appears to be taken up as intact substance. AZD3582 has a predicted plasma protein binding degree of approximately 0.1%, a half-life (t1/2) of 3 to 10 h and does not accumulate after repeated once- and twice-daily dosing. In patients AZD3582 does not provide a significantly better gastrointestinal (GI) side-effect profile than the highly permeable and locally irritating naproxen. Possible reasons for this include considerable GI uptake as naproxen, limited duration and extent of nitric oxide donation in the GI mucosa and the circulation, tolerance development (involving auto-inhibition of nitric oxide catalysing enzymes) and mucosal damage caused by nitric oxide. Blood pressure data suggest that nitric oxide is mainly donated within 3 h. The uptake of naproxen is slightly slower and lower (> or = 94% relative GI uptake and 80-85% relative F) after AZD3582 administration compared with naproxen dosing. The naproxen t1/2 and trough steady-state concentrations after AZD3582 and naproxen dosing are similar. The average systemic nitrate exposure is approximately doubled after dosing of 375 to 750 mg AZD3582 twice daily. PMID:16354398

  17. Analysis of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene as a modifier of the cerebral response to ischemia.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Ana Virginia; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Boyadjis, Melanie; Moussouttas, Michael; Reddy, P Leema; Grewal, Raji Paul

    2006-01-01

    We studied the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS or NOS-3) gene as a potential modifier of the cerebral response to ischemia by investigating the association of two common polymorphisms with ischemic stroke volume. We genotyped an intronic variable number tandem repeat and a single nucleotide polymorphism, G894T, in 132 patients with nonlacunar ischemic strokes in whom clinical data and stroke lesion volume were recorded. Our results show that all genotypes are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. After adjustment of covariates, neither of the NOS-3 polymorphisms showed significant differences comparing the genotypes and mean stroke volume (analysis of variance). Our results do not suggest a major gene effect of the NOS-3 gene as a modifier of the cerebral response to ischemia. PMID:17904064

  18. Selective inhibition of human inducible nitric oxide synthase by S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Park, J M; Higuchi, T; Kikuchi, K; Urano, Y; Hori, H; Nishino, T; Aoki, J; Inoue, K; Nagano, T

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides towards three partially purified recombinant human nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isozymes, as well as the effects of these compounds on cytokine-induced NO production by human DLD-1 cells. In an in vitro assay, S-methyl-L-isothiocitrulline (L-MIT) was slightly selective for human neuronal NOS (nNOS) over the inducible (iNOS) or endothelial (eNOS) isozyme, but the combination of a hydrophobic L-amino acid (L-Phe, L-Leu or L-Trp) with L-MIT dramatically altered the inhibition pattern to give selective iNOS inhibitors. Introduction of a hydroxy, nitro, amino or methoxy group at the para position of the aromatic ring of L-MIT-L-Phe (MILF) decreased the selectivity and inhibitory potency. A longer or larger S-alkyl group also decreased the selectivity and potency. Dixon analysis showed that all of the dipeptides were competitive inhibitors of the three isoforms of human NOS. The enzymatic time course curves indicated that MILF was a slow binding inhibitor of human iNOS. These results suggest that the human NOS isozymes have different-sized cavities in the binding site near the position to which the C-terminal of L-arginine binds, and the cavity of iNOS is hydrophobic. Interestingly, L-MIT-D-Phe (MIDF) showed little inhibitory activity or selectivity, suggesting that the cavity of human iNOS is located in a well-defined direction from the alpha carbon atom. NO production in cytokine-stimulated human DLD-1 cells was measured with a fluorescent indicator, DAF-FM. MILF, L-MIT-L-Trp(-CHO) (MILW) and L-MIT-L-Tyr (MILY) showed more potent activity than L-MIT in this whole-cell assay. Thus, S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides are selective inhibitors of human iNOS, and work efficiently in cell-based assay. PMID:11309260

  19. Selective inhibition of human inducible nitric oxide synthase by S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Min; Higuchi, Tsunehiko; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Urano, Yasuteru; Hori, Hiroyuki; Nishino, Takeshi; Aoki, Junken; Inoue, Keizo; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides towards three partially purified recombinant human nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isozymes, as well as the effects of these compounds on cytokine-induced NO production by human DLD-1 cells.In an in vitro assay, S-methyl-L-isothiocitrulline (L-MIT) was slightly selective for human neuronal NOS (nNOS) over the inducible (iNOS) or endothelial (eNOS) isozyme, but the combination of a hydrophobic L-amino acid (L-Phe, L-Leu or L-Trp) with L-MIT dramatically altered the inhibition pattern to give selective iNOS inhibitors. Introduction of a hydroxy, nitro, amino or methoxy group at the para position of the aromatic ring of L-MIT-L-Phe (MILF) decreased the selectivity and inhibitory potency. A longer or larger S-alkyl group also decreased the selectivity and potency. Dixon analysis showed that all of the dipeptides were competitive inhibitors of the three isoforms of human NOS. The enzymatic time course curves indicated that MILF was a slow binding inhibitor of human iNOS.These results suggest that the human NOS isozymes have different-sized cavities in the binding site near the position to which the C-terminal of L-arginine binds, and the cavity of iNOS is hydrophobic. Interestingly, L-MIT-D-Phe (MIDF) showed little inhibitory activity or selectivity, suggesting that the cavity of human iNOS is located in a well-defined direction from the α carbon atom.NO production in cytokine-stimulated human DLD-1 cells was measured with a fluorescent indicator, DAF-FM. MILF, L-MIT-L-Trp(-CHO) (MILW) and L-MIT-L-Tyr (MILY) showed more potent activity than L-MIT in this whole-cell assay.Thus, S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides are selective inhibitors of human iNOS, and work efficiently in cell-based assay. PMID:11309260

  20. Could thiamine pyrophosphate be a regulator of the nitric oxide synthesis in the endothelial cell of diabetic patients?

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Leyva, Susana; Alvarado-Vásquez, Noé

    2011-05-01

    Thiamine (Vitamin B1) is considered an essential micronutrient for humans; its deficient intake brings about the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (encephalopathy and psychosis) or beriberi (a neurological and cardiovascular disease). Once thiamine enters the cells it is phosphorylated by thiamine pyrophosphokinase (TPPK), and converted into the coenzyme thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), the active form of thiamine. TPP is a relevant cofactor for transketolase (TK), α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (αKDH), and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), all these enzymes are fundamental for glucose metabolism. Diabetes mellitus (DM), however, is considered both a deficient thiamine and deficient energy state, as a consequence of the limited TPP synthesis. Recent evidences have shown that the administration of thiamine or lipid-soluble derivatives, such as benfotiamine (developed to improve the bioavailability of thiamine), has positive effects in the diabetic patient (after thiamine is transformed into TPP). For this reason, administration of supplements with TPP in the diabetic patients is recommended to avoid complications, like neuropathy and nephropathy. It has been suggested that these beneficial effects are a consequence of the activation of TK (pentose pathway) or the PDH complex in mitochondria. Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized by the endothelial cell and is also an important element for the viability and functionality of this cell type. However, in the DM patient, a deficient synthesis of NO has been reported. It is relevant to mention that recent evidences have led to propose mitochondrial activity as an important regulator of nitric oxide synthesis (ON). We consider that the exogenous administration of TPP facilitates the utilization of this molecule, regulating some metabolic processes such as phosphorylation of thiamine by TPPK, energy consumption (ATP), as well as mitochondrial activity, inducing eventually NO synthesis. If this is confirmed, the administration of TPP to the

  1. Folic Acid Promotes Recycling of Tetrahydrobiopterin and Protects Against Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension by Recoupling Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chalupsky, Karel; Kračun, Damir; Kanchev, Ivan; Bertram, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nitric oxide (NO) derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) has been implicated in the adaptive response to hypoxia. An imbalance between 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (BH2) can result in eNOS uncoupling and the generation of superoxide instead of NO. Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) can recycle BH2 to BH4, leading to eNOS recoupling. However, the role of DHFR and eNOS recoupling in the response to hypoxia is not well understood. We hypothesized that increasing the capacity to recycle BH4 from BH2 would improve NO bioavailability as well as pulmonary vascular remodeling (PVR) and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) as indicators of pulmonary hypertension (PH) under hypoxic conditions. Results: In human pulmonary artery endothelial cells and murine pulmonary arteries exposed to hypoxia, eNOS was uncoupled as indicated by reduced superoxide production in the presence of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Concomitantly, NO levels, BH4 availability, and expression of DHFR were diminished under hypoxia. Application of folic acid (FA) restored DHFR levels, NO bioavailability, and BH4 levels under hypoxia. Importantly, FA prevented the development of hypoxia-induced PVR, right ventricular pressure increase, and RVH. Innovation: FA-induced upregulation of DHFR recouples eNOS under hypoxia by improving BH4 recycling, thus preventing hypoxia-induced PH. Conclusion: FA might serve as a novel therapeutic option combating PH. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1076–1091. PMID:26414244

  2. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M.; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  3. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  4. Kaempferia parviflora ethanolic extract promoted nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wattanapitayakul, Suvara K; Suwatronnakorn, Maneewan; Chularojmontri, Linda; Herunsalee, Angkana; Niumsakul, Somchit; Charuchongkolwongse, Suphan; Chansuvanich, Nuchattra

    2007-04-01

    The rhizomes of Kaempferia parviflora (KP) (Zingiberaceae) have been used in Thai traditional medicine for health promotion and for the treatment of digestive disorders and gastric ulcer. This study investigated effect of KP on endothelial function. Studies in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) showed that KP dose-dependently increased nitrite concentrations in culture media after 48 h incubation. eNOS mRNA and protein expression were also enhanced. The induction of eNOS mRNA was detected at 4 h and plateau at 48 h while iNOS expression was not observed. These data demonstrate that KP has a great potential for a supplemental use in vascular endothelial health promotion. PMID:17113256

  5. Endothelial Cell-Derived Nitric Oxide Mobilization is Attenuated in Copper-Deficient Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The attenuation of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation is a consistent finding in both conduit and resistance vessels during dietary Cu deficiency. While the effect is well established, evidence for the mechanism is still circumstantial. This study was designed to determine...

  6. Triterpenoic Acids from Apple Pomace Enhance the Activity of the Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS).

    PubMed

    Waldbauer, Katharina; Seiringer, Günter; Nguyen, Dieu Linh; Winkler, Johannes; Blaschke, Michael; McKinnon, Ruxandra; Urban, Ernst; Ladurner, Angela; Dirsch, Verena M; Zehl, Martin; Kopp, Brigitte

    2016-01-13

    Pomace is an easy-accessible raw material for the isolation of fruit-derived compounds. Fruit consumption is associated with health-promoting effects, such as the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Increased vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, for example, due to an enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, could be one molecular mechanism mediating this effect. To identify compounds from apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) pomace that have the potential to amplify NO bioavailability via eNOS activation, a bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol/water (70:30) extract has been performed using the (14)C-L-arginine to (14)C-L-citrulline conversion assay (ACCA) in the human endothelium-derived cell line EA.hy926. Phytochemical characterization of the active fractions was performed using the spectrophotometric assessment of the total phenolic content, as well as TLC, HPLC-DAD-ELSD, and HPLC-MS analyses. Eleven triterpenoic acids, of which one is a newly discovered compound, were identified as the main constituents in the most active fraction, accompanied by only minor contents of phenolic compounds. When tested individually, none of the tested compounds exhibited significant eNOS activation. Nevertheless, cell stimulation with the reconstituted compound mixture restored eNOS activation, validating the potential of apple pomace as a source of bioactive components. PMID:26682617

  7. Alteration of syncytiotrophoblast mitochondria function and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the placenta of rural residents.

    PubMed

    Rivero Osimani, Valeria L; Valdez, Susana R; Guiñazú, Natalia; Magnarelli, Gladis

    2016-06-01

    The impact of environmental organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure on respiratory complexes, enzymatic antioxidant defense activities, and oxidative damage markers in the syncytiotrophoblast and cytotrophoblast mitochondria was evaluated. Placental progesterone (PG) levels and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression were studied. Samples from women non-exposed (control group-CG) and women living in a rural area (rural group-RG) were collected during pesticide spraying season (RG-SS) and non-spraying season (RG-NSS). In RG-SS, the exposure biomarker placental carboxylesterase decreased and syncytiotrophoblast cytochrome c oxidase activity increased, while 4-hydroxynonenal levels decreased. PG levels decreased in RG-SS and in the RG. Nitric oxide synthase expression decreased in RG, RG-SS and RG-NSS. No significant changes in mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme activities were found. These results suggest that the alteration of syncytiotrophoblast mitochondrial complex IV activity and steroidogenic function may be associated to pesticide exposure. Reduction in placental PG and eNOS expression may account for low newborn weight in RG. PMID:26939719

  8. The volatile oil of Nardostachyos Radix et Rhizoma induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in HUVEC cells.

    PubMed

    Maiwulanjiang, Maitinuer; Bi, Cathy W C; Lee, Pinky S C; Xin, Guizhong; Miernisha, Abudureyimu; Lau, Kei M; Xiong, Aizhen; Li, Ning; Dong, Tina T X; Aisa, Haji A; Tsim, Karl W K

    2015-01-01

    Nardostahyos Radix et Rhizoma (NRR; the root and rhizome of Nardostachys jatamansi DC.) is a widely used medicinal herb. Historically, NRR is being used for the treatment of cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To search for active ingredients of NRR, we investigated the vascular benefit of NRR volatile oil in (i) the vasodilation in rat aorta ring, and (ii) the release of nitric oxide (NO) and the phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By measuring the fluorescence signal in cultures, application of NRR volatile oil resulted in a rapid activation of NO release as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS: both inductions were markedly reduced by L-NAME. In parallel, the phosphorylation level of Akt kinase was markedly increased by the oil treatment, which was partially attenuated by PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002. This inhibitor also blocked the NRR-induced NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. In HUVECs, application of NRR volatile oil elevated the intracellular Ca(2+) level, and BAPTA-AM, a Ca(2+) chelator, reduced the Ca(2+) surge: the blockage were also applied to NRR-induced eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. These findings suggested the volatile oil of NRR was the major ingredient in triggering the vascular dilatation, and which was mediated via the NO production. PMID:25643147

  9. Amorphous silica nanoparticles trigger nitric oxide/peroxynitrite imbalance in human endothelial cells: inflammatory and cytotoxic effects

    PubMed Central

    Corbalan, J Jose; Medina, Carlos; Jacoby, Adam; Malinski, Tadeusz; Radomski, Marek W

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of noxious effects of amorphous silica nanoparticles on human endothelial cells. Methods Nanoparticle uptake was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Electrochemical nanosensors were used to measure the nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO−) released by a single cell upon nanoparticle stimulation. The downstream inflammatory effects were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry, and cytotoxicity was measured by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Results We found that the silica nanoparticles penetrated the plasma membrane and rapidly stimulated release of cytoprotective NO and, to a greater extent, production of cytotoxic ONOO−. The low [NO]/[ONOO−] ratio indicated increased nitroxidative/oxidative stress and correlated closely with endothelial inflammation and necrosis. This imbalance was associated with nuclear factor κB activation, upregulation of key inflammatory factors, and cell death. These effects were observed in a nanoparticle size-dependent and concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion The [NO]/[ONOO−] imbalance induced by amorphous silica nanoparticles indicates a potentially deleterious effect of silica nanoparticles on vascular endothelium. PMID:22131828

  10. The Volatile Oil of Nardostachyos Radix et Rhizoma Induces Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Activity in HUVEC Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maiwulanjiang, Maitinuer; Bi, Cathy W. C.; Lee, Pinky S. C.; Xin, Guizhong; Miernisha, Abudureyimu; Lau, Kei M.; Xiong, Aizhen; Li, Ning; Dong, Tina T. X.; Aisa, Haji A.; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2015-01-01

    Nardostahyos Radix et Rhizoma (NRR; the root and rhizome of Nardostachys jatamansi DC.) is a widely used medicinal herb. Historically, NRR is being used for the treatment of cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To search for active ingredients of NRR, we investigated the vascular benefit of NRR volatile oil in (i) the vasodilation in rat aorta ring, and (ii) the release of nitric oxide (NO) and the phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By measuring the fluorescence signal in cultures, application of NRR volatile oil resulted in a rapid activation of NO release as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS: both inductions were markedly reduced by L-NAME. In parallel, the phosphorylation level of Akt kinase was markedly increased by the oil treatment, which was partially attenuated by PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002. This inhibitor also blocked the NRR-induced NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. In HUVECs, application of NRR volatile oil elevated the intracellular Ca2+ level, and BAPTA-AM, a Ca2+ chelator, reduced the Ca2+ surge: the blockage were also applied to NRR-induced eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. These findings suggested the volatile oil of NRR was the major ingredient in triggering the vascular dilatation, and which was mediated via the NO production. PMID:25643147

  11. Differential regulation of inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase by kinin B1 and B2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kuhr, F.; Lowry, J.; Zhang, Y.; Brovkovych, V.; Skidgel, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Kinins are vasoactive peptides that play important roles in cardiovascular homeostasis, pain and inflammation. After release from their precursor kininogens, kinins or their C-terminal des-Arg metabolites activate two distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), called B2 (B2R) or B1 (B1R). The B2R is expressed constitutively with a wide tissue distribution. In contrast, the B1R is not expressed under normal conditions but is upregulated by tissue insult or inflammatory mediators. The B2R is considered to mediate many of the acute effects of kinins while the B1R is more responsible for chronic responses in inflammation. Both receptors can couple to Gαi and Gαq families of G proteins to release mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), arachidonic acid, prostaglandins, leukotrienes and endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factor and can induce the release of other inflammatory agents. The focus of this review is on the different transduction events that take place upon B2R and B1R activation in human endothelial cells that leads to generation of NO via activation of different NOS isoforms. Importantly, B2R-mediated eNOS activation leads to a transient (~ 5 min) output of NO in control endothelial cells whereas in cytokine-treated endothelial cells, B1R activation leads to very high and prolonged (~90 min) NO production that is mediated by a novel signal transduction pathway leading to post-translational activation of iNOS. PMID:20045558

  12. Decreased endothelial nitric oxide, systemic oxidative stress, and increased sympathetic modulation contribute to hypertension in obese rats.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Natalia Veronez; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Panis, Carolina; Silva, Bruno Rodrigues; Pernomian, Laena; Grando, Marcella Daruge; Cecchini, Rubens; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso

    2014-05-15

    We investigated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on autonomic cardiovascular parameters, vascular reactivity, and endothelial cells isolated from aorta of monosodium glutamate (MSG) obese rats. Obesity was induced by administration of 4 mg/g body wt of MSG or equimolar saline [control (CTR)] to newborn rats. At the 60th day, the treatment was started with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 20 mg/kg) or 0.9% saline. At the 90th day, after artery catheterization, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were recorded. Plasma was collected to assess lipid peroxidation. Endothelial cells isolated from aorta were evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescence intensity (FI) emitted by NO-sensitive dye [4,5-diaminofluoresceindiacetate (DAF-2DA)] and by ROS-sensitive dye [dihydroethidium (DHE)]. Vascular reactivity was made by concentration-response curves of acetylcholine. MSG showed hypertension compared with CTR. Treatment with L-NAME increased MAP only in CTR. The MSG induced an increase in the low-frequency (LF) band and a decrease in the high-frequency band of pulse interval. L-NAME treatment increased the LF band of systolic arterial pressure only in CTR without changes in MSG. Lipid peroxidation levels were higher in MSG and were attenuated after L-NAME. In endothelial cells, basal FI to DAF was higher in CTR than in MSG. In both groups, acetylcholine increased FI for DAF from basal. The FI baseline to DHE was higher in MSG than in CTR. Acetylcholine increased FI to DHE in the CTR group, but decreased in MSG animals. We suggest that reduced NO production and increased production of ROS may contribute to hypertension in obese MSG animals. PMID:24633548

  13. Direct, Real-Time Measurement of Shear Stress-Induced Nitric Oxide Produced from Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Allison M.; Jaron, Dov; Buerk, Donald G.; Kirby, Patrick L.; Barbee, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by the endothelium is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. Decreased NO production or availability has been linked to endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Shear stress-induced NO release is a well-established phenomenon, yet the cellular mechanisms of this response are not completely understood. Experimental limitations have hindered direct, real-time measurements of NO under flow conditions. We have overcome these challenges with a new design for a parallel-plate flow chamber. The chamber consists of two compartments, separated by a Transwell® membrane, which isolates a NO recording electrode located in the upper compartment from flow effects. Endothelial cells are grown on the bottom of the membrane, which is inserted into the chamber flush with the upper plate. We demonstrate for the first time direct real-time NO measurements from endothelial cells with controlled variations in shear stress. Step changes in shear stress from 0.1 dyn/cm2 to 6, 10 or 20 dyn/cm2 elicited a transient decrease in NO followed by an increase to a new steady state. An analysis of NO transport suggests that the initial decrease is due to the increased removal rate by convection as flow increases. Furthermore, the rate at which the NO concentration approaches the new steady state is related to the time-dependent cellular response rather than transport limitations of the measurement configuration. Our design offers a method for studying the kinetics of the signaling mechanisms linking NO production with shear stress as well as pathological conditions involving changes in NO production or availability. PMID:20719252

  14. Enhancing the pharmacodynamic profile of a class of selective COX-2 inhibiting nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Biava, Mariangela; Battilocchio, Claudio; Poce, Giovanna; Alfonso, Salvatore; Consalvi, Sara; Di Capua, Angela; Calderone, Vincenzo; Martelli, Alma; Testai, Lara; Sautebin, Lidia; Rossi, Antonietta; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Giordani, Antonio; Persiani, Stefano; Colovic, Milena; Dovizio, Melania; Patrignani, Paola; Anzini, Maurizio

    2014-01-15

    We report herein the development, synthesis, physicochemical and pharmacological characterization of a novel class of pharmacodynamic hybrids that selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) isoform and present suitable nitric oxide releasing properties. The replacement of the ester moiety with the amide group gave access to in vivo more stable and active derivatives that highlighted outstanding pharmacological properties. In particular, the glycine derivative proved to be extremely active in suppressing hyperalgesia and edema. PMID:24373735

  15. Soy Isoflavone Protects Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Increasing Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Decreasing Oxidative Stress in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Li, Shuangyue; Zhang, Ping; Zhu, Jinbiao; Meng, Guoliang; Xie, Liping; Yu, Ying; Ji, Yong; Han, Yi

    2016-01-01

    There is a special role for estrogens in preventing and curing cardiovascular disease in women. Soy isoflavone (SI), a soy-derived phytoestrogen, has similar chemical structure to endogenous estrogen-estradiol. We investigate to elucidate the protective mechanism of SI on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Female SD rats underwent bilateral ovariectomy. One week later, rats were randomly divided into several groups, sham ovariectomy (control group), ovariectomy with MI/R, or ovariectomy with sham MI/R. Other ovariectomy rats were given different doses of SI or 17β-estradiol (E2). Four weeks later, they were exposed to 30 minutes of left coronary artery occlusion followed by 6 or 24 hours of reperfusion. SI administration significantly reduced myocardial infarct size and improved left ventricle function and restored endothelium-dependent relaxation function of thoracic aortas after MI/R in ovariectomized rats. SI also decreased serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activity, reduced plasma malonaldehyde, and attenuated oxidative stress in the myocardium. Meanwhile, SI increased phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signal pathway. SI failed to decrease infarct size of hearts with I/R in ovariectomized rats if PI3K was inhibited. Overall, these results indicated that SI protects myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in ovariectomized rats through increasing PI3K/Akt/eNOS signal pathway and decreasing oxidative stress. PMID:27057277

  16. Nitric oxide modulates chromatin folding in human endothelial cells via protein phosphatase 2A activation and class II histone deacetylases nuclear shuttling.

    PubMed

    Illi, Barbara; Dello Russo, Claudio; Colussi, Claudia; Rosati, Jessica; Pallaoro, Michele; Spallotta, Francesco; Rotili, Dante; Valente, Sergio; Ragone, Gianluca; Martelli, Fabio; Biglioli, Paolo; Steinkuhler, Christian; Gallinari, Paola; Mai, Antonello; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Gaetano, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) modulates important endothelial cell (EC) functions and gene expression by a molecular mechanism which is still poorly characterized. Here we show that in human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) NO inhibited serum-induced histone acetylation and enhanced histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. By immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses it was found that NO induced class II HDAC4 and 5 nuclear shuttling and that class II HDACs selective inhibitor MC1568 rescued serum-dependent histone acetylation above control level in NO-treated HUVECs. In contrast, class I HDACs inhibitor MS27-275 had no effect, indicating a specific role for class II HDACs in NO-dependent histone deacetylation. In addition, it was found that NO ability to induce HDAC4 and HDAC5 nuclear shuttling involved the activation of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). In fact, HDAC4 nuclear translocation was impaired in ECs expressing small-t antigen and exposed to NO. Finally, in cells engineered to express a HDAC4-Flag fusion protein, NO induced the formation of a macromolecular complex including HDAC4, HDAC3, HDAC5, and an active PP2A. The present results show that NO-dependent PP2A activation plays a key role in class II HDACs nuclear translocation. PMID:17975112

  17. Isolation and chromosomal localization of the human endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.J.; Michel, T.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C. )

    1994-01-15

    Endothelial NOS activity is a major determinant of vascular tone and blood pressure, and in several important (and sometimes hereditary) disease states, such as hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, the endothelial NO signaling system appears to be abnormal. To explore the relationship of the endothelial NOS activity, the authors isolated the human gene encoding the endothelial NOS. Genomic clones containing the 5[prime] end of this gene were identified in a human genomic library by applying a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach. Identification of the human gene for endothelial NOS (NOS3) was confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis of the first coding exon, which was found to be identical to its cognate cDNA. The NOS3 gene spans at least 20 kb and appears to contain multiple introns. The transcription start site and promoter region of the NOS3 gene were identified by primer extension and ribonuclease protection assays. Sequencing of the putative promoter revealed consensus sequences for the shear stress-response element, as well as cytokine-responsive cis regulatory sequences, both possible important to the roles played by NOS3 in the normal and the diseased cardiovascular system. The authors also mapped the chromosomal location of the NOS3 gene. First, a chromosomal panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids was screened using PCR with oligonucleotide primers derived from the NOS3 genomic clone. The specificity of the amplified PCR product was confirmed by human and hamster genomic DNA controls, as well as by Southern blot analysis, using the NOS3 cDNA as probe. Definitive chromosomal assignment of the NOS3 gene to human chromosome 7 was based upon 0% discordancy; fluorescence in situ hybridization sublocalized the NOS3 gene to 7q36. The identification and characterization of the NOS3 gene may lead to further insights into heritable disease states associated with this gene product. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Mitochondrial reserve capacity in endothelial cells: the impact of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Dranka, Brian P.; Hill, Bradford G.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    The endothelium is not considered to be a major energy requiring organ, but nevertheless endothelial cells have an extensive mitochondrial network. This suggests that mitochondrial function may be important in response to stress and signaling in these cells. In this study, we used extracellular flux analysis to measure mitochondrial function in adherent bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Under basal conditions, BAEC use only ~35% of their maximal respiratory capacity. We calculate that this represents an intermediate respiratory State between States 3 and 4 which we define as Stateapparent equal to 3.64. Interestingly, the apparent respiratory control ratio (maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption/non-ADP linked respiration) in these cells is on the order of 23 which is substantially higher than that which is frequently obtained with isolated mitochondria. These results suggest that mitochondria in endothelial cells are highly coupled and possess a considerable bioenergetic reserve. Since endothelial cells are exposed to both reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the course of vascular disease, we hypothesized that this reserve capacity is important in responding to oxidative stress. To test this, we exposed BAEC to NO or ROS alone or in combination. We found that exposure to non-toxic concentrations of NO or low levels of hydrogen peroxide generated from 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-napthoquinone (DMNQ) had little impact on basal mitochondrial function but both treatments reversibly decreased mitochondrial reserve capacity. However, combined NO and DMNQ treatment resulted in an irreversible loss of reserve capacity and was associated with cell death. These data are consistent with a critical role of mitochondrial reserve capacity in endothelial cells in responding to oxidative stress. PMID:20093177

  19. Purple sweet potato color inhibits endothelial premature senescence by blocking the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunhui; Fan, Shaohua; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zifeng; Wu, Dongmei; Shan, Qun; Zheng, Yuanlin

    2015-10-01

    Purple sweet potato color (PSPC), flavonoids isolated from purple sweet potato, has been well demonstrated for the pharmacological properties. In the present study, we attempt to explore whether the antisenescence was involved in PSPC-mediated protection against endothelium dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and, if involved, what are the possible mechanisms. The results showed that atherogenesis and endothelial senescence in the thoracic aorta were promoted in mice with prediabetes; meanwhile, PSPC attenuated the deterioration of vascular vessel and inhibited the endothelial senescence. Diabetes mellitus is a documented high-risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. Studies show that D-galactose (D-gal) promotes endothelial cell senescence in vitro. In our study, we have determined that PSPC could suppress the D-gal-induced premature senescence and the abnormal endothelial function, discovered in the early stages of atherosclerosis induced by T2DM. We have discovered that the PSPC down-regulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and the NLRP3 inflammasome functions. Furthermore, the premature senescence induced by D-gal was inhibited after attenuation of ROS and deactivation of NLRP3 inflammasomes. However, once the NLRP3 inflammasomes are overactivated, PSPC could not restrain cell senescence. These data imply that the beneficial effects of PSPC on diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction and senescence are mediated through ROS and NLRP3 signaling pathways, suggesting a potential target for the prevention of endothelial senescence-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26164602

  20. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  1. Inhibition of endothelial Cdk5 reduces tumor growth by promoting non-productive angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Merk, Henriette; Zhang, Siwei; Lehr, Thorsten; Müller, Christoph; Ulrich, Melanie; Bibb, James A.; Adams, Ralf H.; Bracher, Franz; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M.; Liebl, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic success of VEGF-based anti-angiogenic tumor therapy is limited due to resistance. Thus, new strategies for anti-angiogenic cancer therapy based on novel targets are urgently required. Our previous in vitro work suggested that small molecule Cdk5 inhibitors affect angiogenic processes such as endothelial migration and proliferation. Moreover, we recently uncovered a substantial role of Cdk5 in the development of lymphatic vessels. Here we pin down the in vivo impact of endothelial Cdk5 inhibition in angiogenesis and elucidate the underlying mechanism in order to judge the potential of Cdk5 as a novel anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer target. By the use of endothelial-specific Cdk5 knockout mouse models and various endothelial and tumor cell based assays including human tumor xenograft models, we show that endothelial-specific knockdown of Cdk5 results in excessive but non-productive angiogenesis during development but also in tumors, which subsequently leads to inhibition of tumor growth. As Cdk5 inhibition disrupted Notch function by reducing the generation of the active Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and Cdk5 modulates Notch-dependent endothelial cell proliferation and sprouting, we propose that the Dll4/Notch driven angiogenic signaling hub is an important and promising mechanistic target of Cdk5. In fact, Cdk5 inhibition can sensitize tumors to conventional anti-angiogenic treatment as shown in tumor xenograft models. In summary our data set the stage for Cdk5 as a drugable target to inhibit Notch-driven angiogenesis condensing the view that Cdk5 is a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:26755662

  2. Allicin inhibits lymphangiogenesis through suppressing activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weicang; Du, Zheyuan; Nimiya, Yoshiki; Sukamtoh, Elvira; Kim, Daeyoung; Zhang, Guodong

    2016-03-01

    Allicin, the most abundant organosulfur compound in freshly crushed garlic tissues, has been shown to have various health-promoting effects, including anticancer actions. A better understanding of the effects and mechanisms of allicin on tumorigenesis could facilitate development of allicin or garlic products for cancer prevention. Here we found that allicin inhibited lymphangiogenesis, which is a critical cellular process implicated in tumor metastasis. In primary human lymphatic endothelial cells, allicin at 10 μM inhibited capillary-like tube formation and cell migration, and it suppressed phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and focal adhesion kinase. Using a Matrigel plug assay in mice, addition of 10 μg allicin in Matrigel plug inhibited 40-50% of vascular endothelial growth factor-C-induced infiltration of lymphatic endothelial cells and leukocytes. S-Allylmercaptoglutathione, a major cellular metabolite of allicin, had no effect on lymphangiogenic responses in lymphatic endothelial cells. Together, these results demonstrate the antilymphangiogenic effect of allicin in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a novel mechanism for the health-promoting effects of garlic compounds. PMID:26895668

  3. RhoB controls endothelial barrier recovery by inhibiting Rac1 trafficking to the cell border.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; García-Weber, Diego; Barroso, Susana; Feito, Jorge; Ortega, María C; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Reglero-Real, Natalia; Fernández-Martín, Laura; Durán, Maria C; Alonso, Miguel A; Correas, Isabel; Cox, Susan; Ridley, Anne J; Millán, Jaime

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial barrier dysfunction underlies chronic inflammatory diseases. In searching for new proteins essential to the human endothelial inflammatory response, we have found that the endosomal GTPase RhoB is up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines and expressed in the endothelium of some chronically inflamed tissues. We show that although RhoB and the related RhoA and RhoC play additive and redundant roles in various aspects of endothelial barrier function, RhoB specifically inhibits barrier restoration after acute cell contraction by preventing plasma membrane extension. During barrier restoration, RhoB trafficking is induced between vesicles containing RhoB nanoclusters and plasma membrane protrusions. The Rho GTPase Rac1 controls membrane spreading and stabilizes endothelial barriers. We show that RhoB colocalizes with Rac1 in endosomes and inhibits Rac1 activity and trafficking to the cell border during barrier recovery. Inhibition of endosomal trafficking impairs barrier reformation, whereas induction of Rac1 translocation to the plasma membrane accelerates it. Therefore, RhoB-specific regulation of Rac1 trafficking controls endothelial barrier integrity during inflammation. PMID:27138256

  4. Role of neuronal nitric oxide in the inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle of healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Jendzjowsky, Nicholas G; DeLorey, Darren S

    2013-07-01

    Isoform-specific nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) contributions to NO-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle are incompletely understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of neuronal NOS (nNOS) in the inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle of healthy rats. We hypothesized that acute pharmacological inhibition of nNOS would augment sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle, demonstrating that nNOS is primarily responsible for NO-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 13) were anesthetized and instrumented with an indwelling brachial artery catheter, femoral artery flow probe, and lumbar sympathetic chain stimulating electrodes. Triceps surae muscles were stimulated to contract rhythmically at 60% of maximal contractile force. In series 1 (n = 9), the percent change in femoral vascular conductance (%FVC) in response to sympathetic stimulations delivered at 2 and 5 Hz was determined at rest and during muscle contraction before and after selective nNOS blockade with S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline (SMTC, 0.6 mg/kg iv) and subsequent nonselective NOS blockade with N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 5 mg/kg iv). In series 2 (n = 4), l-NAME was injected first, and then SMTC was injected to determine if the effect of l-NAME on constrictor responses was influenced by selective nNOS inhibition. Sympathetic stimulation decreased FVC at rest (-25 ± 7 and -44 ± 8%FVC at 2 and 5 Hz, respectively) and during contraction (-7 ± 3 and -19 ± 5%FVC at 2 and 5 Hz, respectively). The decrease in FVC in response to sympathetic stimulation was greater in the presence of SMTC at rest (-32 ± 6 and -49 ± 8%FVC at 2 and 5 Hz, respectively) and during contraction (-21 ± 4 and -28 ± 4%FVC at 2 and 5 Hz, respectively). l-NAME further increased (P < 0.05) the sympathetic vasoconstrictor

  5. Low Shear Stress Inhibited Endothelial Cell Autophagy Through TET2 Downregulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Li, Xiaohong; Li, Rongqing; Peng, Juan; Wang, Zuo; Jiang, Zhisheng; Tang, Xiaoqing; Peng, Zhao; Wang, Yu; Wei, Dangheng

    2016-07-01

    Low shear stress plays a crucial role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. However, the detailed mechanisms of these processes remain unclear. In this study, the effect of low shear stress on endothelial cell autophagy and its potential mechanism were investigated. Results showed autophagy dysfunction and ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) protein downregulation during atherosclerotic lesion progression. Autophagic markers BECLIN 1 and LC3II/LC3I under low shear stress (5 dyne/cm(2)) obviously decreased compared with those under physiological shear stress (15 dyne/cm(2)), whereas autophagic substrate p62 increased. TET2 expression was also downregulated under low shear stress. Endothelial cell autophagy was improved with TET2 overexpression but was impaired by TET2 siRNA treatment. Moreover, TET2 overexpression upregulated the expression of endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and downregulated the expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1). TET2 siRNA further attenuated eNOS expression and stimulated ET-1 expression. Overall, the results showed that low shear stress downregulated endothelial cell autophagy by impaired TET2 expression, which might contribute to the atherogenic process. PMID:26493943

  6. Activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by a vanadium compound ameliorates pressure overload-induced cardiac injury in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Md Shenuarin; Shioda, Norifumi; Shibuya, Masatoshi; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2009-01-01

    We here investigated the effect of bis(1-oxy-2-pyridinethiolato) oxovanadium (IV), [VO(OPT)], against myocardial hypertrophy and cardiac functional recovery in pressure overload-induced hypertrophy in ovariectomized female rats and defined mechanisms underlying its cardioprotective action. Wistar rats subjected to bilateral ovariectomy were further treated with abdominal aortic stenosis. VO(OPT) (containing 1.25 and 2.50 mg of vanadium per kg) was administered orally once a day for 14 days starting from 2 weeks after aortic banding. Treatment with VO(OPT) significantly inhibited pressure overload-induced increase both in the heart weight:body weight ratio and the lung weight:body weight ratio. VO(OPT) also attenuated hypertrophy-induced impaired left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, left ventricular developed pressure, and left ventricular contractility (+/-dp/dt(max)). VO(OPT) treatment significantly restored pressure overload-induced impaired endothelial NO synthase activity with concomitant increased phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase (Ser1179). Moreover, VO(OPT) treatment significantly restored pressure overload-induced reduced Akt activity, as indicated by increased phosphorylation at Ser473 and at Thr308. Treatment with VO(OPT) also secondarily inhibited calpastatin and dystrophin breakdown and decreased myosin light chain phosphorylation. Finally, VO(OPT) treatment significantly attenuated mortality after repeated isoproterenol administration in pressure overloaded-ovariectomized rats. Taken together, VO(OPT) attenuates cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo in pressure overload-induced hypertrophy in ovariectomized rats and prevents the process from hypertrophy to heart failure. These effects are mediated by inhibition of calpastatin and dystrophin breakdown in addition to increased Akt and endothelial NO synthase activities. PMID:19029487

  7. Catestatin Gly364Ser Variant Alters Systemic Blood Pressure and the Risk for Hypertension in Human Populations via Endothelial Nitric Oxide Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kiranmayi, Malapaka; Chirasani, Venkat R; Allu, Prasanna K R; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Martelli, Elizabeth E; Sahu, Bhavani S; Vishnuprabu, Durairajpandian; Kumaragurubaran, Rathnakumar; Sharma, Saurabh; Bodhini, Dhanasekaran; Dixit, Madhulika; Munirajan, Arasambattu K; Khullar, Madhu; Radha, Venkatesan; Mohan, Viswanathan; Mullasari, Ajit S; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Senapati, Sanjib; Mahapatra, Nitish R

    2016-08-01

    Catestatin (CST), an endogenous antihypertensive/antiadrenergic peptide, is a novel regulator of cardiovascular physiology. Here, we report case-control studies in 2 geographically/ethnically distinct Indian populations (n≈4000) that showed association of the naturally-occurring human CST-Gly364Ser variant with increased risk for hypertension (age-adjusted odds ratios: 1.483; P=0.009 and 2.951; P=0.005). Consistently, 364Ser allele carriers displayed elevated systolic (up to ≈8 mm Hg; P=0.004) and diastolic (up to ≈6 mm Hg; P=0.001) blood pressure. The variant allele was also found to be in linkage disequilibrium with other functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the CHGA promoter and nearby coding region. Functional characterization of the Gly364Ser variant was performed using cellular/molecular biological experiments (viz peptide-receptor binding assays, nitric oxide [NO], phosphorylated extracellular regulated kinase, and phosphorylated endothelial NO synthase estimations) and computational approaches (molecular dynamics simulations for structural analysis of wild-type [CST-WT] and variant [CST-364Ser] peptides and docking of peptide/ligand with β-adrenergic receptors [ADRB1/2]). CST-WT and CST-364Ser peptides differed profoundly in their secondary structures and showed differential interactions with ADRB2; although CST-WT displaced the ligand bound to ADRB2, CST-364Ser failed to do the same. Furthermore, CST-WT significantly inhibited ADRB2-stimulated extracellular regulated kinase activation, suggesting an antagonistic role towards ADRB2 unlike CST-364Ser. Consequently, CST-WT was more potent in NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells as compared with CST-364Ser. This NO-producing ability of CST-WT was abrogated by ADRB2 antagonist ICI 118551. In conclusion, CST-364Ser allele enhanced the risk for hypertension in human populations, possibly via diminished endothelial NO production because of altered interactions of CST-364Ser

  8. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gerritsen, M. E.; Carley, W. W.; Ranges, G. E.; Shen, C. P.; Phan, S. A.; Ligon, G. F.; Perry, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma induces the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell surface. Interfering with either leukocyte adhesion or adhesion protein upregulation is an important therapeutic target as evidenced by the potent anti-inflammatory actions of neutralizing antibodies to these ligands in various animal models and in patients. In the present study we report that cotreatment of human endothelial cells with certain hydroxyflavones and flavanols blocks cytokine-induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells. One of the most potent flavones, apigenin, exhibited a dose- and time-dependent, reversible effect on adhesion protein expression as well as inhibiting adhesion protein upregulation at the transcriptional level. Apigenin also inhibited IL-1 alpha-induced prostaglandin synthesis and TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production, suggesting that the hydroxyflavones may act as general inhibitors of cytokine-induced gene expression. Although apigenin did not inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B(p50(NFKB1)/p65(RelA)) we found this flavonoid did inhibit TNF-alpha induced beta-galactosidase activity in SW480 cells stably transfected with a beta-galactosidase reporter construct driven by four NF-kappa B elements, suggesting an action on NF-kappa B transcriptional activation. Adhesion of leukocytes to cytokine-treated endothelial cells was blocked in endothelial cells cotreated with apigenin. Finally, apigenin demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw edema and delayed type hypersensitivity in the mouse. We conclude that flavonoids offer important therapeutic potential for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory diseases involving an increase in leukocyte adhesion and trafficking. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 11 PMID:7543732

  9. The effects of catechin isolated from green tea GMB-4 on NADPH and nitric oxide levels in endothelial cells exposed to high glucose

    PubMed Central

    Peristiowati, Yuly; Indasah, Indasah; Ratnawati, Retty

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate whether a catechin isolated from GMB-4 green tea is able to increase the reducing equivalent system and nitric oxide (NO) level in endothelial cells exposed to high glucose (HG) level. Materials and Methods: Endothelial cells were obtained from human umbilical vascular tissues. At confluent, human endothelial cells were divided into five groups, which included control (untreated), endothelial cells exposed to HG (30 mM), endothelial cells exposed to HG in the presence of green tea catechin (HG + C) at the following three doses: 0.03; 0.3; and 3 mg/ml. Analysis of NADP+, NADPH, and NO levels were performed colorimetrically. Results: This decrease in NADPH was significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated by both the 0.3 and 3 mg/ml treatments of catechin. HG level significantly decreased NO compared with untreated cells. This increase in NO was significantly attenuated by the 0.3 mg/ml dose of the catechin. Conclusion: In conclusion, catechin isolated from GMB-4 green tea prohibits the decrease in NADPH and NO in endothelial cells induced by HG. Therefore this may provide a natural therapy for attenuating the endothelial dysfunction found in diabetes mellitus. PMID:26401396

  10. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 regulates microvascular endothelial growth induced by inflammatory cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Takasawa, Wataru; Ohnuma, Kei; Hatano, Ryo; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} induces EC proliferation with reduction of CD26 expression. {yields} CD26 siRNA or DPP-4 inhibition enhances TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}-induced EC proliferation. {yields} Loss of CD26/DPP-4 enhances aortic sprouting induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}. {yields} Capillary formation induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} is enahced in the CD26{sup -/-} mice. -- Abstract: CD26/DPP-4 is abundantly expressed on capillary of inflamed lesion as well as effector T cells. Recently, CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition has been used as a novel oral therapeutic approach for patients with type 2 diabetes. While accumulating data indicate that vascular inflammation is a key feature of both micro- and macro-vascular complications in diabetes, the direct role of CD26/DPP-4 in endothelial biology is to be elucidated. We herein showed that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor or interleukin-1 reduce expression of CD26 on microvascular endothelial cells, and that genetical or pharmacological inhibition of CD26/DPP-4 enhances endothelial growth both in vitro and in vivo. With DPP-4 inhibitors being used widely in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, our data strongly suggest that DPP-4 inhibition plays a pivotal role in endothelial growth and may have a potential role in the recovery of local circulation following diabetic vascular complications.

  11. Evidence for antiviral effect of nitric oxide. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Croen, K D

    1993-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of infectious pathogens, but an antiviral effect has not been reported. The impact of NO, from endogenous and exogenous sources, on herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV 1) replication was studied in vitro. HSV 1 replication in RAW 264.7 macrophages was reduced 1,806-fold in monolayers induced to make NO by activation with gamma IFN and LPS. A competitive and a noncompetitive inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase substantially reduced the antiviral effect of activated RAW macrophages. S-nitroso-L-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP) is a donor of NO and was added to the media of infected monolayers to assess the antiviral properties of NO in the absence of gamma IFN and LPS. A single dose of S-nitroso-L-acetyl penicillamine 3 h after infection inhibited HSV 1 replication in Vero, HEp2, and RAW 264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Neither virucidal nor cytocidal effects of NO were observed under conditions that inhibited HSV 1 replication. Nitric oxide had inhibitory effects, comparable to that of gamma IFN/LPS, on protein and DNA synthesis as well as on cell replication. This report demonstrates that, among its diverse properties, NO has an antiviral effect. PMID:8390481

  12. Estrogen-Responsive nitroso-Proteome in Uterine Artery Endothelial Cells: Role of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Estrogen Receptor-β

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-hai; Feng, Lin; Wang, Wen; Magness, Ronald R.; Chen, Dong-bao

    2011-01-01

    Covalent adduction of a NO moiety to cysteines (S-nitrosylation or SNO) is a major route for NO to directly regulate protein functions. In uterine artery endothelial cells (UAEC), estradiol-17β (E2) rapidly stimulated protein SNO that maximized within 10-30 min post-E2 exposure. E2-bovine serum albumin stimulated protein SNO similarly. Stimulation of SNO by both was blocked by ICI 182, 780, implicating mechanisms linked to specific estrogen receptors (ERs) localized on the plasma membrane. E2-induced protein SNO was attenuated by selective ERβ, but not ERα, antagonists. A specific ERβ but not ERα agonist was able to induce protein SNO. Overexpression of ERβ, but not ERα, significantly enhanced E2-induced SNO. Overexpression of both ERs increased basal SNO, but did not further enhance E2-stimulated SNO. E2-induced SNO was inhibited by N-nitro-L-arginine-methylester and specific endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) siRNA. Thus, estrogen-induced SNO is mediated by endogenous NO via eNOS and mainly ERβ in UAEC. We further analyzed the nitroso-proteomes by CyDye switch technique combined with two dimensional (2D) fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis. Numerous nitrosoprotein (spots) were visible on the 2D gel. Sixty spots were chosen and subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Among the 54 identified, 9 were novel SNO-proteins, 32 were increased, 8 were decreased, and the rest were unchanged by E2. Tandom MS identified Cys139 as a specific site for SNO in GAPDH. Pathway analysis of basal and estrogen-responsive nitroso-proteomes suggested that SNO regulates diverse protein functions, directly implicating SNO as a novel mechanism for estrogen to regulate uterine endothelial function and thus uterine vasodilatation. PMID:21374595

  13. Beta2-adrenergic receptor stimulation inhibits nitric oxide generation by Mycobacterium avium infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, C S; Lafuse, W P; Zwilling, B S

    1999-11-01

    Catecholamine regulation of nitric oxide (NO) production by IFNgamma-primed macrophages infected with Mycobacterium avium was investigated. Epinephrine treatment of IFNgamma-primed macrophages at the time of M. avium infection inhibited the anti-mycobacterial activity of the cells. The anti-mycobacterial activity of macrophages correlated with NO production. Using specific adrenergic receptor agonists, the abrogation of mycobacterial killing and decreased NO production by catecholamines was shown to be mediated via the beta2-adrenergic receptor. Elevation of intracellular cAMP levels mimicked the catecholamine-mediated inhibition of NO in both M. avium infected and LPS stimulated macrophages. Specific inhibitors of both adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A prevented the beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of nitric oxide production. Beta2-adrenoreceptor stimulation at the time of M. avium infection of IFNgamma-primed macrophages also inhibited expression of iNOS mRNA. These observations show that catecholamine hormones can affect the outcome of macrophage-pathogen interactions and suggest that one result of sympathetic nervous system activation is the suppression of the capacity of macrophages to produce anti-microbial effector molecules. PMID:10580815

  14. NMI-1182, a gastro-protective cyclo-oxygenase-inhibiting nitric oxide donor.

    PubMed

    Ellis, James L; Augustyniak, Michael E; Cochran, Edward D; Earl, Richard A; Garvey, David S; Gordon, Laura J; Janero, David R; Khanapure, Subhash P; Letts, L Gordon; Melim, Terry L; Murty, Madhavi G; Schwalb, David J; Shumway, Matthew J; Selig, William M; Trocha, A Mark; Young, Delano V; Zemtseva, Irina S

    2005-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used to treat inflammation and to provide pain relief but suffer from a major liability concerning their propensity to cause gastric damage. As nitric oxide (NO) is known to be gastro-protective we have synthesized a NO-donating prodrug of naproxen named NMI-1182. We evaluated two cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-inhibiting nitric oxide donors (CINODs), NMI-1182 and AZD3582, for their ability to be gastro-protective compared to naproxen and for their anti-inflammatory activity. NMI-1182 and AZD3582 were found to produce similar inhibition of COX activity to that produced by naproxen. Both NMI-1182 and AZD3582 produced significantly less gastric lesions after oral administration than naproxen. All three compounds effectively inhibited paw swelling in the rat carrageenan paw edema model. In the carrageenan air pouch model all three compounds significantly reduced PGE2 levels in the pouch exudate but only NMI-1182 and naproxen inhibited leukocyte influx. These data demonstrate that NMI-1182 has comparable anti-inflammatory activity to naproxen but with a much reduced likelihood to cause gastric damage. PMID:16259719

  15. Inhibition of Cellular Methyltransferases Promotes Endothelial Cell Activation by Suppressing Glutathione Peroxidase 1 Protein Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Madalena; Florindo, Cristina; Kalwa, Hermann; Silva, Zélia; Turanov, Anton A.; Carlson, Bradley A.; de Almeida, Isabel Tavares; Blom, Henk J.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Michel, Thomas; Castro, Rita; Loscalzo, Joseph; Handy, Diane E.

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) is a negative regulator of most methyltransferases and the precursor for the cardiovascular risk factor homocysteine. We have previously identified a link between the homocysteine-induced suppression of the selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1) and endothelial dysfunction. Here we demonstrate a specific mechanism by which hypomethylation, promoted by the accumulation of the homocysteine precursor SAH, suppresses GPx-1 expression and leads to inflammatory activation of endothelial cells. The expression of GPx-1 and a subset of other selenoproteins is dependent on the methylation of the tRNASec to the Um34 form. The formation of methylated tRNASec facilitates translational incorporation of selenocysteine at a UGA codon. Our findings demonstrate that SAH accumulation in endothelial cells suppresses the expression of GPx-1 to promote oxidative stress. Hypomethylation stress, caused by SAH accumulation, inhibits the formation of the methylated isoform of the tRNASec and reduces GPx-1 expression. In contrast, under these conditions, the expression and activity of thioredoxin reductase 1, another selenoprotein, is increased. Furthermore, SAH-induced oxidative stress creates a proinflammatory activation of endothelial cells characterized by up-regulation of adhesion molecules and an augmented capacity to bind leukocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that SAH accumulation in endothelial cells can induce tRNASec hypomethylation, which alters the expression of selenoproteins such as GPx-1 to contribute to a proatherogenic endothelial phenotype. PMID:24719327

  16. Lonidamine Causes Inhibition of Angiogenesis-Related Endothelial Cell Functions1

    PubMed Central

    Del Bufalo, Donatella; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Scarsella, Marco; D'Amati, Giulia; Candiloro, Antonio; Iervolino, Angela; Leonetti, Carlo; Zupi, Gabriella

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess whether lonidamine (LND) interferes with some steps in angiogenesis progression. We report here, for the first time, that LND inhibited angiogenic-related endothelial cell functions in a dose-dependent manner (1–50 µg/ml). In particular, LND decreased proliferation, migration, invasion, and morphogenesis on matrigel of different endothelial cell lines. Zymographic and Western blot analysis assays showed that LND treatment produced a reduction in the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase- 2 and metalloproteinase-9 by endothelial cells. Vessel formation in a matrigel plug was also reduced by LND. The viability, migration, invasion, and matrix metalloproteinase production of different tumor cell lines were not affected by low doses of LND (1–10 µg/ml), whereas 50 µg/ml LND, which corresponds to the dose used in clinical management of tumors, triggered apoptosis both in endothelial and tumor cells. Together, these data demonstrate that LND is a compound that interferes with endothelial cell functions, both at low and high doses. Thus, the effect of LND on endothelial cell functions, previously undescribed, may be a significant contributor to the antitumor effect of LND observed for clinical management of solid tumors. PMID:15548359

  17. Angiotensin-(1-7) suppresses the number and function of the circulating fibrocytes by upregulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kan; Hu, Xiaosheng; Du, Changqing; Tu, Shike; Zhang, Furong; Xie, Xudong

    2012-06-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting that circulating fibrocytes (CFs) play a pivotal role in tissue repair and fibrosis. In contrast, in recent studies, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] has been shown to antagonize fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to examine the direct effect of Ang-(1-7) on CFs. Total mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from peripheral blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy, CFs were identified as adherent cells that stained positive for both CD34 and collagen-I. After 14 days of culture, CFs were stimulated with Ang-(1-7) at concentrations of 10 nM, 100 nM, 1 μM or 10 μM, in the absence and presence of pretreatment with A-779, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or both, for 24, 48 or 72 h. The number of cells, cellular proliferation, and level of apoptosis were determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8) assay and the annexin V/propidium iodide binding assay, respectively. The collagen content of CFs was measured by the concentration of hydroxyproline, which was detected using the enzymatic digestion method. The expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was assayed by western Blot analysis, while nitric oxide (NO) generation was detected using the Griess method. We found that Ang-(1-7) increases apoptosis and eNOS/NO production in CFs. In addition, Ang-(1-7) decreases the number, proliferative capacity and collagen-secretion of CFs in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. These data suggest that Ang-(1-7) suppresses the both the number and function of CFs possibly by increasing eNOS/NO production in the CFs. PMID:22456996

  18. Atorvastatin improves erectile dysfunction in patients initially irresponsive to Sildenafil by the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    El-Sisi, A A; Hegazy, S K; Salem, K A; AbdElkawy, K S

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at comparing the effects of atorvastatin and vitamin E on erectile dysfunction in patients initially irresponsive to sildenafil, with investigation into the underlying possible mechanisms. Sixty patients were randomly divided into three groups: the atorvastatin group received 80 mg daily, the vitamin E group received 400 IU daily and the control group received placebo capsules. Patients were examined both before and after 6 weeks of treatment for biochemical tests; Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPO), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide (NO) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and for erectile function tests; International index of erectile function (IIEF-5) scores and Rigiscan. Both atorvastatin and vitamin E showed a statistically significant GPO increase (P<0.05) and a statistically significant IL-6 decrease (P<0.05). Only atorvastatin showed a statistically significant increase in NO (15.19%, P<0.05), eNOS (20.58%, P<0.01), IIEF-5 score (53.1%, P<0.001) and Rigiscan rigidity parameters (P<0.01), in addition to a statistically significant decrease in CRP (57.9%, P<0.01). However, SOD showed a statistically significant increase only after vitamin E intake (23.1%, P<0.05). Both atorvatstain and vitamin E had antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Although activating eNOS by atorvastatin was the real difference, and expected to be the main mechanism for NO increase and for improving erectile dysfunction. Atorvastatin, but not vitamin E, is a promising drug for sildenafil nonresponders. PMID:23324897

  19. Caveolin 1 Is Required for the Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in Response to 17β-Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Wiseman, Dean A.; Black, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that estrogen mediates rapid endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation via estrogen receptor-a (ERα) within the plasma membrane of endothelial cells (EC). ERα is known to colocalize with caveolin 1, the major structural protein of caveolae, and caveolin 1 stimulates the translocation of ERα to the plasma membrane. However, the role played by caveolin 1 in regulating 17β-estradiol-mediated NO signaling in EC has not been adequately resolved. Thus, the purpose of this study was to explore how 17β-estradiol stimulates eNOS activity and the role of caveolin 1 in this process. Our data demonstrate that modulation of caveolin 1 expression using small interfering RNA or adenoviral gene delivery alters ERα localization to the plasma membrane in EC. Further, before estrogen stimulation ERα associates with caveolin 1, whereas stimulation promotes a pp60Src-mediated phosphorylation of caveolin 1 at tyrosine 14, increasing ERα-PI3 kinase interactions and disrupting caveolin 1-ERα interactions. Adenoviral mediated overexpression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of caveolin (Y14FCav) attenuated the ERα/PI3 kinase interaction and prevented Akt-mediated eNOS activation. Furthermore, Y14FCav overexpression reduced eNOS phosphorylation at serine1177 and decreased NO generation after estrogen exposure. Using a library of overlapping peptides we identified residues 62–73 of caveolin 1 as the ERα-binding site. Delivery of a synthetic peptide based on this sequence decreased ERα plasma membrane translocation and reduced estrogen-mediated activation of eNOS. In conclusion, caveolin 1 stimulates 17β-estradiol-induced NO production by promoting ERα to the plasma membrane, which facilitates the activation of the PI3 kinase pathway, leading to eNOS activation and NO generation. PMID:20610538

  20. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition by NG-Nitro-l-Arginine Methyl Ester Inhibits Tumor-Induced Angiogenesis in Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jadeski, Lorraine C.; Lala, Peeyush K.

    1999-01-01

    Using a murine breast cancer model, we earlier found a positive correlation between the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and tumor progression; treatment with inhibitors of NOS, NG-methyl-l-arginine (NMMA) and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), had antitumor and antimetastatic effects that were partly attributed to reduced tumor cell invasiveness. In the present study, we used a novel in vivo model of tumor angiogenesis using subcutaneous implants of tumor cells suspended in growth factor-reduced Matrigel to examine the angiogenic role of NO in a highly metastatic murine mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. This cell line, C3L5, expresses endothelial (e) NOS in vitro and in vivo, and inducible (i) NOS in vitro on stimulation with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ. Female C3H/HeJ mice received subcutaneous implants of growth factor-reduced Matrigel inclusive of C3L5 cells on one side, and on the contralateral side, Matrigel alone; L-NAME and D-NAME (inactive enantiomer) were subsequently administered for 14 days using osmotic minipumps. Immediately after sacrifice, implants were removed and processed for immunolocalization of eNOS and iNOS proteins, and measurement of angiogenesis. Neovascularization was quantified in sections stained with Masson’s trichrome or immunostained for the endothelial cell specific CD31 antigen. While most tumor cells and endothelial cells expressed immunoreactive eNOS protein, iNOS was localized in endothelial cells and some macrophages within the tumor-inclusive implants. Measurable angiogenesis occurred only in implants containing tumor cells. Irrespective of the method of quantification used, tumor-induced neovascularization was significantly reduced in L-NAME-treated mice relative to those treated with D-NAME. The quantity of stromal tissue was lower, but the quantity of necrotic tissue higher in L-NAME relative to D-NAME-treated animals. The total mass of viable tissue (ie, stroma and tumor cells) was lower in L

  1. Sinapic Acid Prevents Hypertension and Cardiovascular Remodeling in Pharmacological Model of Nitric Oxide Inhibited Rats

    PubMed Central

    Silambarasan, Thangarasu; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Krishna Priya, Mani; Suganya, Natarajan; Chatterjee, Suvro; Raja, Boobalan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hypertensive heart disease is a constellation of abnormalities that includes cardiac fibrosis in response to elevated blood pressure, systolic and diastolic dysfunction. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of sinapic acid on high blood pressure and cardiovascular remodeling. Methods An experimental hypertensive animal model was induced by L-NAME intake on rats. Sinapic acid (SA) was orally administered at a dose of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Blood pressure was measured by tail cuff plethysmography system. Cardiac and vascular function was evaluated by Langendorff isolated heart system and organ bath studies, respectively. Fibrotic remodeling of heart and aorta was assessed by histopathologic analyses. Oxidative stress was measured by biochemical assays. mRNA and protein expressions were assessed by RT-qPCR and western blot, respectively. In order to confirm the protective role of SA on endothelial cells through its antioxidant property, we have utilized the in vitro model of H2O2-induced oxidative stress in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. Results Rats with hypertension showed elevated blood pressure, declined myocardial performance associated with myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis, diminished vascular response, nitric oxide (NO) metabolites level, elevated markers of oxidative stress (TBARS, LOOH), ACE activity, depleted antioxidant system (SOD, CAT, GPx, reduced GSH), aberrant expression of TGF-β, β-MHC, eNOS mRNAs and eNOS protein. Remarkably, SA attenuated high blood pressure, myocardial, vascular dysfunction, cardiac fibrosis, oxidative stress and ACE activity. Level of NO metabolites, antioxidant system, and altered gene expression were also repaired by SA treatment. Results of in vitro study showed that, SA protects endothelial cells from oxidative stress and enhance the production of NO in a concentration dependent manner. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that SA may have beneficial role in the

  2. Inhibition of Monocyte Adhesion to Brain-Derived Endothelial Cells by Dual Functional RNA Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Xiao, Feng; Hao, Xin; Bai, Shuhua; Hao, Jiukuan

    2014-01-01

    Because adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells is the first step of vascular-neuronal inflammation, inhibition of adhesion and recruitment of leukocytes to vascular endothelial cells will have a beneficial effect on neuroinflammatory diseases. In this study, we used the pRNA of bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor to construct a novel RNA nanoparticle for specific targeting to transferrin receptor (TfR) on the murine brain-derived endothelial cells (bEND5) to deliver ICAM-1 siRNA. This RNA nanoparticle (FRS-NPs) contained a FB4 aptamer targeting to TfR and a siRNA moiety for silencing the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Our data indicated that this RNA nanoparticle was delivered into murine brain-derived endothelial cells. Furthermore, the siRNA was released from the FRS-NPs in the cells and knocked down ICAM-1 expression in the TNF-α–stimulated cells and in the cells under oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) condition. The functional end points of the study indicated that FRS-NPs significantly inhibited monocyte adhesion to the bEND5 cells induced by TNF-α and OGD/R. In conclusion, our approach using RNA nanotechnology for siRNA delivery could be potentially applied for inhibition of inflammation in ischemic stroke and other neuroinflammatory diseases, or diseases affecting endothelium of vasculature. PMID:25368913

  3. Nitric oxide inhibits the formation of zinc protoporphyrin IX and protoporphyrin IX.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Hayashi, Nobutaka; Nishimura, Takanori; Hattori, Akihito

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which curing agents, especially nitrite, inhibit the formation of zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZPP) in dry-cured hams such as Parma ham. The oxidation-reduction potential of model solutions was increased by the addition of nitrite, but it was not clear whether the formation of ZPP is inhibited by the oxidizing property of nitrite. The effect of nitric oxide (NO) produced from nitrite on the formation of ZPP was examined. The amount of ZPP formed was decreased by the addition of NO donors. The amount of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), which is the precursor of ZPP, was also decreased by the addition of NO donors. It is concluded that NO produced from nitrite inhibited the formation of PPIX and ZPP was therefore not formed in cured meat products with the addition of nitrite or nitrate. PMID:20374763

  4. Heat-shock protein 60 of Porphyromonas gingivalis may induce dysfunction of human umbilical endothelial cells via regulation of endothelial-nitric oxide synthase and vascular endothelial-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cunjin; Guo, Shijie; Niu, Yuanjie; Yang, Limin; Liu, Bainian; Jiang, Ning; Su, Ming; Wang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has established that periodontitis was an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CAD). Porphyromonus gingivalis (P. gingivalis), a major periodontal pathogen, has already been shown to have a significant role in the inflammatory response of CAD in vivo. The aim of the present study was to identify whether P. gingivalis heat-shock protein 60 (HSP60) induced the dysfunction of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. HUVECs were stimulated with a range of P. gingivalis HSP60 concentrations (1, 10 and 100 ng/l) at different time-points. The levels of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and cysteinyl aspartate-specific protease-3 (caspase-3) were measured using western blot analysis. The apoptotic rate of HUVECs was detected using flow cytometry. P. gingivalis HSP60 at a concentration of 10 ng/l significantly decreased the expression levels of VE-cadherin and eNOS protein at 24 h stimulation, whereas no difference in these proteins was identified following a low dose of P. gingivalis HSP60 (1 ng/l). P. gingivalis HSP60 at 100 ng/l significantly downregulated the expression levels of VE-cadherin and eNOS protein at 12 h in HUVECs. However, the cleavage of caspase-3 showed an opposing change at different concentrations. Consistently, P. gingivalis HSP60 induced apoptosis of HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. These results indicated that P. gingivalis HSP60 may induce dysfunction and apoptosis in HUVECs via downregulating the expression levels of VE-cadherin and eNOS, and promoting the cleavage of caspase-3. PMID:27446550

  5. Delphinidin Inhibits Tumor Growth by Acting on VEGF Signalling in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Anita; Justiniano, Hélène; Soleti, Raffaella; Alabed Alibrahim, Eid; Simard, Gilles; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Lugnier, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The vasculoprotective properties of delphinidin are driven mainly by its action on endothelial cells. Moreover, delphinidin displays anti-angiogenic properties in both in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis models and thereby might prevent the development of tumors associated with excessive vascularization. This study was aimed to test the effect of delphinidin on melanoma-induced tumor growth with emphasis on its molecular mechanism on endothelial cells. Delphinidin treatment significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth induced by B16-F10 melanoma cell xenograft in mice. In vitro, delphinidin was not able to inhibit VEGFR2-mediated B16-F10 melanoma cell proliferation but it specifically reduced basal and VEGFR2-mediated endothelial cell proliferation. The anti-proliferative effect of delphinidin was reversed either by the MEK1/2 MAP kinase inhibitor, U-0126, or the PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002. VEGF-induced proliferation was reduced either by U-0126 or LY-294002. Under these conditions, delphinidin failed to decrease further endothelial cell proliferation. Delphinidin prevented VEGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK and decreased the expression of the transcription factors, CREB and ATF1. Finally, delphinidin was more potent in inhibiting in vitro cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), PDE1 and PDE2, compared to PDE3-PDE5. Altogether delphinidin reduced tumor growth of melanoma cell in vivo by acting specifically on endothelial cell proliferation. The mechanism implies an association between inhibition of VEGF-induced proliferation via VEGFR2 signalling, MAPK, PI3K and at transcription level on CREB/ATF1 factors, and the inhibition of PDE2. In conjunction with our previous studies, we demonstrate that delphinidin is a promising compound to prevent pathologies associated with generation of vascular network in tumorigenesis. PMID:26694325

  6. TGF-{beta}2 inhibits AKT activation and FGF-2-induced corneal endothelial cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jiawei; Lu Zhenyu; Reinach, Peter

    2006-11-01

    The corneal endothelial cells form a boundary layer between anterior chamber and cornea. This single cell layer is important to maintain cornea transparency by eliciting net fluid transport into the anterior chamber. Injuries of the corneal endothelial layer in humans lead to corneal swelling and translucence. This hindrance is thought to be due to limited proliferative capacity of the endothelial layer. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) and transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF-{beta}2) are both found in aqueous humor, and these two cytokines promote and inhibit cell growth, respectively. The intracellular signaling mechanisms by which TGF-{beta}2 suppresses the mitogenic response to FGF-2, however, remain unclear. We have addressed this question by investigating potential crosstalk between FGF-2-induced and TGF-{beta}2-regulated intracellular signaling events in cultured bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) cells. We found that TGF-{beta}2 and FGF-2 oppositely affect BCE cell proliferation and TGF-{beta}2 can override the stimulating effects of FGF-2 by increasing COX-2 expression in these cells. Consistent with these findings, overexpression of COX-2 significantly reduced FGF-2-induced cell proliferation whereas a COX-2 specific inhibitor NS398 reversed the effect of TGF-{beta}2 on FGF-2-induced cell proliferation. The COX-2 product prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) blocks FGF-2-induced cell proliferation. Whereas FGF-2 stimulates cell proliferation by activating the AKT pathway, TGF-{beta}2 and PGE-2 both inhibit this pathway. In accordance with the effect of PGE-2, cAMP also inhibits FGF-2-induced AKT activation. These findings suggest that the mitogenic response to FGF-2 in vivo in the corneal endothelial layer may be inhibited by TGF-{beta}2-induced suppression of the PI3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway.

  7. Borna disease virus P protein inhibits nitric oxide synthase gene expression in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Guiqing; Zhang Fengmin; Zhang Qi; Wu Kailang; Zhu Fan; Wu Jianguo

    2007-09-30

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is one of the potential infectious agents involved in the development of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Neurons and astrocytes are the main targets of BDV infection, but little is known about the roles of BDV infection in the biological effects of astrocytes. Here we reported that BDV inhibits the activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in murine astrocytes induced by bacterial LPS and PMA. To determine which protein of BDV is responsible for the regulation of iNOS expression, we co-transfected murine astrocytes with reporter plasmid iNOS-luciferase and plasmid expressing individual BDV proteins. Results from analyses of reporter activities revealed that only the phosphoprotein (P) of BDV had an inhibitory effect on the activation of iNOS. In addition, P protein inhibits nitric oxide production through regulating iNOS expression. We also reported that the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) binding element, AP-1 recognition site, and interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) on the iNOS promoter were involved in the repression of iNOS gene expression regulated by the P protein. Functional analysis indicated that sequences from amino acids 134 to 174 of the P protein are necessary for the regulation of iNOS. These data suggested that BDV may suppress signal transduction pathways, which resulted in the inhibition of iNOS activation in astrocytes.

  8. Ultrafast dynamics of ligand and substrate interaction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase under Soret excitation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chih-Chang; Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Chen, Pei-Feng; Liang, Keng S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of endothelial NOS oxygenase domain (eNOS-oxy) was performed to study dynamics of ligand or substrate interaction under Soret band excitation. Photo-excitation dissociates imidazole ligand in <300fs, then followed by vibrational cooling and recombination within 2ps. Such impulsive bond breaking and late rebinding generate proteinquakes, which relaxes in several tens of picoseconds. The photo excited dynamics of eNOS-oxy with L-arginine substrate mainly occurs at the local site of heme, including ultrafast internal conversion within 400fs, vibrational cooling, charge transfer, and complete ground-state recovery within 1.4ps. The eNOS-oxy without additive is partially bound with water molecule, thus its photoexcited dynamics also shows ligand dissociation in <800fs. Then it followed by vibrational cooling coupled with charge transfer in 4.8ps, and recombination of ligand to distal side of heme in 12ps. PMID:27183248

  9. Role of endothelial nitric oxide in bone marrow-derived progenitor cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    de Resende, M Monterio; Huw, L-Y; Qian, H-S; Kauser, K

    2007-01-01

    Mobilization and recruitment of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells (BMDPCs) play an important role in postischemic tissue repair. Patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) or peripheral vascular disease (PVD) exhibit endothelial dysfunction, and as a result are likely to have a reduced number of progenitor cells mobilized in their peripheral circulation following ischemic injury. Identification of eNOS independent pathways for BMDPC mobilization may have important therapeutic value in this patient population. To identify such mechanisms we investigated the effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) and stem cell factor (SCF) in eNOS-KO mice with and without surgical hind-limb ischemia. Our results suggest that BMDPC mobilization can be achieved via activation of NO-independent pathways. PMID:17554503

  10. The relationship between inflammation and the anticoagulant pathway: the emerging role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS).

    PubMed

    Hooper, W Craig

    2004-01-01

    Inflammation represents the interaction of the immune and coagulation systems in an attempt to restore normal hemostasis following injury. The underlying basis of the interrelationship between these two physiological systems revolves around the following: a) the activation of coagulation by inflammation, b) the augmentation of the inflammatory response by coagulation, c) the significant attenuation of inflammation by the anticoagulant response and d) the separate influence of the vascular endothelium on coagulation and inflammation as well as its mediation or control of the cross-talk between these two physiological systems. In hemostasis, the protein C anticoagulant pathway is a major mechanism that functions to prevent the development of a pathological thrombus through the regulation of the procoagulant pathway. The endothelium is essential in maintaining a physiological balance between the anticoagulant and procoagulant pathways with proinflammatory cytokines functioning, in part, to regulate endothelial-cell- surface associated coagulation and anticoagulation proteins. In addition to its anticoagulant properties, activated protein C can also function as a regulator of proinflammatory cytokine production. Current evidence suggests that activated protein C may act to control inflammation through NF-kappaB and/or nitric oxide synthase. A better understanding of the relationship between APC and inflammation may provide new targets for drug design. PMID:15032695

  11. Investigation of the effect of tanshinone IIA on nitric oxide production in human vascular endothelial cells by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Wang, Hong; Xie, Wan-Zhen; Zhang, Hua-Shan

    2007-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proved to be a potent vasodilator that played an important role in regulating vascular tones. Tanshinone, one of the active components of Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza, was used widely in clinics in China for treating cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study was to sensitively and specifically investigate the effects of tanshinone IIA, one important pharmacological constituent of tanshinone, on the release of NO from human vascular endothelial cells (HVECs) by fluorescence imaging with an excellent fluorescent probe 1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-2,6-dicarbethoxy-8-(3',4'-diaminophenyl)-difluoroboradiaza- s-indacence (TMDCDABODIPY). After cells were incubated with tanshinone IIA, TMDCDABODIPY was employed to label NO. Following the tagging, real-time imaging of NO release from the cells was performed with inverted fluorescence microscope. The results of the experiments showed that tanshinone IIA could induce NO production significantly enhanced in HVECs. The activation of NO by tanshinone IIA may be employed therapeutically in modulating NO production in HVECs.

  12. Holoenzyme structures of endothelial nitric oxide synthase - an allosteric role for calmodulin in pivoting the FMN domain for electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Niels; Martásek, Pavel; Roman, Linda J; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Page, Christopher; Swift, Mark; Hanein, Dorit; Masters, Bettie Sue

    2014-10-01

    While the three-dimensional structures of heme- and flavin-binding domains of the NOS isoforms have been determined, the structures of the holoenzymes remained elusive. Application of electron cryo-microscopy and structural modeling of the bovine endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) holoenzyme produced detailed models of the intact holoenzyme in the presence and absence of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). These models accommodate the cross-electron transfer from the reductase in one monomer to the heme in the opposite monomer. The heme domain acts as the anchoring dimeric structure for the entire enzyme molecule, while the FMN domain is activated by CaM to move flexibly to bridge the distance between the reductase and oxygenase domains. Our results indicate that the key regulatory role of CaM involves the stabilization of structural intermediates and precise positioning of the pivot for the FMN domain tethered shuttling motion to accommodate efficient and rapid electron transfer in the homodimer of eNOS. PMID:25175399

  13. Signaling pathway of nitric oxide production induced by ginsenoside Rb1 in human aortic endothelial cells: a possible involvement of androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Eto, Masato; Akishita, Masahiro; Kaneko, Akiyo; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Okabe, Tetsuro

    2007-02-16

    Ginsenosides have been shown to stimulate nitric oxide (NO) production in aortic endothelial cells. However, the signaling pathways involved have not been well studied in human aortic endothelial cells. The present study was designed to examine whether purified ginsenoside Rb1, a major active component of ginseng could actually induce NO production and to clarify the signaling pathway in human aortic endothelial cells. NO production was rapidly increased by Rb1. The rapid increase in NO production was abrogated by treatment with nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor, L-NAME. Rb1 stimulated rapid phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473), ERK1/2 (Thr202/Thr204) and eNOS (Ser1177). Rapid phosphorylation of eNOS (Ser1177) was prevented by SH-5, an Akt inhibitor or wortmannin, PI3-kinase inhibitor and partially attenuated by PD98059, an upstream inhibitor for ERK1/2. Interestingly, NO production and eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 by Rb1 were abolished by androgen receptor antagonist, nilutamide. The results suggest that PI3kinase/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways and androgen receptor are involved in the regulation of acute eNOS activation by Rb1 in human aortic endothelial cells. PMID:17196933

  14. Age-dependent acceleration of ischemic injury in endothelial nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice: potential role of impaired VEGF receptor 2 expression.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hu Sheng; de Resende, Micheline Monterio; Beausejour, Christian; Huw, Ling-Yuh; Liu, Perry; Rubanyi, Gabor M; Kauser, Katalin

    2006-04-01

    Morbidity and mortality of peripheral arterial occlusive disease significantly increases with age, often exhibiting more severe disease pathology and decreased treatment effectiveness. Therapeutic angiogenesis with angiogenic growth factors may represent a valuable treatment option for the severely ill, older adult patient population. Aging is considered an independent cardiovascular risk factor, but pathomechanistically it is not well understood. Diminished endothelial nitric oxide (EDNO) production has been considered as a major contributor to the aging process. To investigate the effect of age on postischemic revascularization independent of changes in EDNO, we used endothelial nitric oxide synthase-deficient (ecNOS-KO) mice. We found an age-dependent acceleration in ischemic injury following unilateral femoral artery ligation in these animals compared to C57BL/J6 mice. Postischemic revascularization, quantified by measuring von Willebrand factor expression, was significantly impaired, suggesting that factors other than progressive EDNO deterioration are also involved in the age-dependent severe disease phenotype. Ischemia led to an increase in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, KDR, in younger ecNOS-KO; however, this increase in KDR expression was absent in the older animals. Lack of increased KDR expression may provide a mechanistic explanation for the severe ischemic injury and perhaps can be used as a clinical marker to identify severe, vascular endothelial growth factor refractory patient population. PMID:16680073

  15. High-Yield Method for Isolation and Culture of Endothelial Cells from Rat Coronary Blood Vessels Suitable for Analysis of Intracellular Calcium and Nitric Oxide Biosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nistri, Silvia; Mazzetti, Luca; Failli, Paola

    2002-01-01

    We describe here a method for isolating endothelial cells from rat heart blood vessels by means of coronary microperfusion with collagenase. This methods makes it possible to obtain high amounts of endothelial cells in culture which retain the functional properties of their in vivo counterparts, including the ability to uptake fluorescently-labeled acetylated low-density lipoproteins and to respond to vasoactive agents by modulating intracellular calcium and by upregulating intrinsic nitric oxide generation. The main advantages of our technique are: (i) good reproducibility, (ii) accurate sterility that can be maintained throughout the isolation procedure and (iii) high yield of pure endothelial cells, mainly due to microperfusion and temperature-controlled incubation with collagenase which allow an optimal distribution of this enzyme within the coronary vascular bed. PMID:12734571

  16. TRAF6 inhibits proangiogenic signals in endothelial cells and regulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Sarah; Datta, Dipak; Flaxenburg, Jesse A.; Pal, Soumitro; Briscoe, David M.

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-receptor associated factors (TRAFs) function in the angiogenesis response. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 regulates basal and inducible expression of VEGF in endothelial cells (EC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 is an endogenous inhibitor of EC proliferation and migration in EC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 inhibits VEGF expression in part via its ability to regulate Src signaling. -- Abstract: TNF-family molecules induce the expression Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in endothelial cells (EC) and elicit signaling responses that result in angiogenesis. However, the role of TNF-receptor associated factors (TRAFs) as upstream regulators of VEGF expression or as mediators of angiogenesis is not known. In this study, HUVEC were cotransfected with a full-length VEGF promoter-luciferase construct and siRNAs to TRAF 1, -2, -3, -5, -6, and promoter activity was measured. Paradoxically, rather than inhibiting VEGF expression, we found that knockdown of TRAF6 resulted in a 4-6-fold increase in basal VEGF promoter activity compared to control siRNA-transfected EC (P < 0.0001). In addition, knockdown of TRAF 1, -2, -3 or -5 resulted in a slight increase or no change in VEGF promoter activation. Using [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation assays as well as the in vitro wound healing assay, we also found that basal rates of EC proliferation and migration were increased following TRAF6 knockdown; and this response was inhibited by the addition of a blocking anti-VEGF antibody into cell cultures. Using a limited protein array to gain insight into TRAF6-dependent intermediary signaling responses, we observed that TRAF6 knockdown resulted in an increase in the activity of Src family kinases. In addition, we found that treatment with AZD-0530, a pharmacological Src inhibitor, reduced the regulatory effect of TRAF6 knockdown on VEGF promoter activity. Collectively, these findings define a novel pro-angiogenic signaling

  17. Three diketopiperazines from marine-derived bacteria inhibit LPS-induced endothelial inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyejin; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Choi, Hyukjae; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-04-15

    Diketopiperazine is a natural products found from bacteria, fungi, marine sponges, gorgonian and red algae. They are cyclic dipeptides possessing relatively simple and rigid structures with chiral nature and various side chains. Endothelial dysfunction is a key pathological feature of many inflammatory diseases, including sepsis. In the present study, three (1-3) of diketopiperazines were isolated from two strains of marine-derived bacteria. The compounds were investigated for their effects against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated endothelial inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. From 1μM, 1-3 inhibited LPS-induced hyperpermeability, adhesion, and migration of leukocytes across a human endothelial cell monolayer and in mice in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that 1-3 may serve as potential scaffolds for the development of therapeutic agents to treat vascular inflammatory disorders. PMID:26988307

  18. Linagliptin but not Sitagliptin inhibited transforming growth factor-β2-induced endothelial DPP-4 activity and the endothelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sen; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2016-02-26

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 plays an important role in endothelial cell biology. We have shown that the DPP-4 inhibitor Linagliptin can inhibit the endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) and ameliorate diabetic kidney fibrosis associated with the suppression of DPP-4 protein levels via the induction of miR-29. The current study demonstrated that such effects of Linagliptin on endothelial cell profibrotic programs were drug-specific but not class effects. In the cell-free system, both Linagliptin and Sitagliptin inhibited recombinant DPP-4 activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Linagliptin can inhibit all of the following: DPP-4 activity and protein level, integrin β1 protein levels, EndMT, and DPP-4 3'UTR activity; Sitagliptin, however, inhibited none of these in the current study. Additionally, TGF-β2 induced both the induction of VEGF-R1 and the suppression of VEGF-R2 levels in endothelial cells, and both were inhibited by Linagliptin but not by Sitagliptin. miR-29, the miR that negatively regulates the 3'UTR of DPP-4 mRNA, was suppressed by TGF-β2 and restored by Linagliptin but not by Sitagliptin. Following the overexpression of pCMV-DPP-4-GFP and pCMV6-Myc-DPP-4 in endothelial cells, the proximity of Myc-DPP-4 and DPP-4-GFP was suppressed by Linagliptin but not by Sitagliptin, suggesting that only Linagliptin inhibited the homo-dimer formation of DPP-4 in endothelial cells; this difference in activity between the two gliptins could explain their diverse effects on endothelial cell biology. In conclusion, each of the DPP-4 inhibitors may have unique drug-specific effects. PMID:26826382

  19. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition reduces muscle inflammation and necrosis in modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizza, F. X.; Hernandez, I. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of nitric oxide in muscle inflammation, fiber necrosis, and apoptosis of inflammatory cells in vivo. The effects of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition on the concentrations of neutrophils, ED1+ and ED2+ macrophages, apoptotic inflammatory cells, and necrotic muscle fibers in rats subjected to 10 days of hindlimb unloading and 2 days of reloading were determined. Administration of NOS inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) significantly reduced the concentrations of neutrophils, ED1+ and ED2+ macrophages, and necrotic fibers in soleus muscle relative to water-treated controls. The concentration of apoptotic inflammatory cells was also significantly lower for L-NAME-treated animals compared with water-treated controls. However, the proportion of the inflammatory cell population that was apoptotic did not differ between L-NAME-treated and control animals, suggesting that L-NAME treatment did not decrease inflammatory cell populations by increasing the frequency of apoptosis. Thus, nitric oxide or one of its intermediates promotes muscle inflammation and fiber necrosis during modified muscle use and plays no more than a minor role in the resolution of muscle inflammation by inducing apoptosis of inflammatory cells.

  20. Role of Nitric Oxide Isoforms in Vascular and Alveolar Development and Lung Injury in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Overexpressing Neonatal Mice Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Mansoor A.; Choo-Wing, Rayman; Homer, Robert J.; Bhandari, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced 3 different nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms in lung development and injury in the newborn (NB) lung are not known. We hypothesized that VEGF-induced specific NOS pathways are critical regulators of lung development and injury. Methodology We studied NB wild type (WT), lung epithelial cell-targeted VEGF165 doxycycline-inducible overexpressing transgenic (VEGFTG), VEGFTG treated with a NOS1 inhibitor (L-NIO), VEGFTG x NOS2-/- and VEGFTG x NOS3+/- mice in room air (RA) for 7 postnatal (PN) days. Lung morphometry (chord length), vascular markers (Ang1, Ang2, Notch2, vWF, CD31 and VE-cadherin), cell proliferation (Ki67), vascular permeability, injury and oxidative stress markers (hemosiderin, nitrotyrosine and 8-OHdG) were evaluated. Results VEGF overexpression in RA led to increased chord length and vascular markers at PN7, which were significantly decreased to control values in VEGFTG x NOS2−/− and VEGFTG x NOS3+/- lungs. However, we found no noticeable effect on chord length and vascular markers in the VEGFTG / NOS1 inhibited group. In the NB VEGFTG mouse model, we found VEGF-induced vascular permeability in the NB murine lung was partially dependent on NOS2 and NOS3-signaling pathways. In addition, the inhibition of NOS2 and NOS3 resulted in a significant decrease in VEGF-induced hemosiderin, nitrotyrosine- and 8-OHdG positive cells at PN7. NOS1 inhibition had no significant effect. Conclusion Our data showed that the complete absence of NOS2 and partial deficiency of NOS3 confers protection against VEGF-induced pathologic lung vascular and alveolar developmental changes, as well as injury markers. Inhibition of NOS1 does not have any modulating role on VEGF-induced changes in the NB lung. Overall, our data suggests that there is a significant differential regulation in the NOS-mediated effects of VEGF overexpression in the developing mouse lung. PMID:26799210

  1. Asymmetric dimethylarginine inhibits HSP90 activity in Pulmonary Arterial Endothelial Cells: Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Wells, Sandra M.; Wiseman, Dean A.; Wilham, Jason; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Increased ADMA levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of conditions affecting the cardiovascular system. However, the mechanism(s) by which ADMA exerts its effect has not been adequately elucidated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increased ADMA on nitric oxide (NO) signaling and to begin to elucidate the mechanism by which ADMA acts. Our initial data demonstrated that that ADMA increased NOS uncoupling both in recombinant human endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC). Further, we found that this eNOS uncoupling increased 3-nitrotyrosine levels preferentially in the mitochondria of PAEC due to a redistribution of eNOS from the plasma membrane to the mitochondria. This increase in nitration in the mitochondria was found to induce mitochondrial dysfunction as determined by increased mitochondrial derived reactive oxygen species and decreased generation of ATP. Finally, we found that the decrease in ATP resulted in a reduction in the chaperone activity of HSP90 resulting in a decrease in its interaction with eNOS. In conclusion increased levels of ADMA causes mitochondrial dysfunction and a loss of HSP90 chaperone activity secondary to an uncoupling of eNOS. Mitochondrial dysfunction may be an understudied component of the endothelial dysfunction associated with various cardiovascular disease states. PMID:18385287

  2. Extract from Ribes nigrum leaves in vitro activates nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and increases CD39 expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luzak, Boguslawa; Boncler, Magdalena; Rywaniak, Joanna; Dudzinska, Dominika; Rozalski, Marek; Krajewska, Urszula; Balcerczak, Ewa; Podsedek, Anna; Redzynia, Malgorzata; Watala, Cezary

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether blackcurrant leaf extract (BLE) modulates endothelium antithrombotic function, namely increases the expression/activity of ADPase (CD39) and augments the production of nitric oxide in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). It was found that BLE with proanthocyanidins (60 % of the total polyphenol content) increased the CD39-positive endothelial cell fraction (up to 10 % for 2.5 μg/ml, and up to 33 % for 15 μg/ml, p < 0.05 or less) in a concentration-dependent manner, and enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation (T495 phosphorylation decreased by 31 ± 6 % for 2.5 μg/ml and 48 ± 6 % for 15 μg/ml; S1177 phosphorylation increased by 13 ± 3 % for 2.5 μg/ml and 18 ± 7 % for 15 μg/ml, compared to untreated cells, p < 0.05 or less). Additionally, incubation for 24 or 48 h with BLE at a lower range of polyphenol concentrations, significantly increased cell viability with a maximal effect at 2.5 μg/ml (viability increased by 24.8 ± 1.0 % for 24 h and by 32.5 ± 2.7 % for 48-h time incubation, p < 0.0001). The increased CD39 expression and the increased eNOS activation in HUVEC can be regarded as the beneficial markers of the improvement of antiplatelet action of endothelial cells. Unexpectedly, these assumptions were not confirmed in the experimental model of platelet-endothelial cell interactions. These observations lead to the conclusion that BLE may improve endothelial cell viability at low physiological concentrations without affecting the antiplatelet action of endothelium. PMID:25407137

  3. Opposing effects of nitric oxide and prostaglandin inhibition on muscle mitochondrial Vo(2) during exercise.

    PubMed

    Boushel, Robert; Fuentes, Teresa; Hellsten, Ylva; Saltin, Bengt

    2012-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG) together play a role in regulating blood flow during exercise. NO also regulates mitochondrial oxygen consumption through competitive binding to cytochrome-c oxidase. Indomethacin uncouples and inhibits the electron transport chain in a concentration-dependent manner, and thus, inhibition of NO and PG synthesis may regulate both muscle oxygen delivery and utilization. The purpose of this study was to examine the independent and combined effects of NO and PG synthesis blockade (L-NMMA and indomethacin, respectively) on mitochondrial respiration in human muscle following knee extension exercise (KEE). Specifically, this study examined the physiological effect of NO, and the pharmacological effect of indomethacin, on muscle mitochondrial function. Consistent with their mechanism of action, we hypothesized that inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and PG synthesis would have opposite effects on muscle mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondrial respiration was measured ex vivo by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized fibers following 6 min KEE in control (CON; n = 8), arterial infusion of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; n = 4) and Indo (n = 4) followed by combined inhibition of NOS and PG synthesis (L-NMMA + Indo, n = 8). ADP-stimulated state 3 respiration (OXPHOS) with substrates for complex I (glutamate, malate) was reduced 50% by Indo. State 3 O(2) flux with complex I and II substrates was reduced less with both Indo (20%) and L-NMMA + Indo (15%) compared with CON. The results indicate that indomethacin reduces state 3 mitochondrial respiration primarily at complex I of the respiratory chain, while blockade of NOS by L-NMMA counteracts the inhibition by Indo. This effect on muscle mitochondria, in concert with a reduction of blood flow accounts for in vivo changes in muscle O(2) consumption during combined blockade of NOS and PG synthesis. PMID:22552792

  4. Tumor endothelial marker 5 expression in endothelial cells during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Vallon, Mario; Rohde, Franziska; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Essler, Markus

    2010-02-01

    Tumor endothelial marker (TEM) 5 is an adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor upregulated in endothelial cells during tumor and physiologic angiogenesis. So far, the mechanisms leading to upregulation of TEM5 and its function during angiogenesis have not been identified. Here, we report that TEM5 expression in endothelial cells is induced during capillary-like network formation on Matrigel, during capillary morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen I matrix, and upon confluence on a two-dimensional matrix. TEM5 expression was not induced by a variety of soluble angiogenic factors, including VEGF and bFGF, in subconfluent endothelial cells. TEM5 upregulation was blocked by toxin B from Clostridium difficile, an inhibitor of the small GTPases Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. The Rho inhibitor C3 transferase from Clostridium botulinum did not affect TEM5 expression, whereas the Rac inhibitor NSC23766 suppressed TEM5 upregulation. An excess of the soluble TEM5 extracellular domain or an inhibitory monoclonal TEM5 antibody blocked contact inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation resulting in multilayered islands within the endothelial monolayer and increased vessel density during capillary formation. Based on our results we conclude that TEM5 expression during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of proliferation in endothelial cells.

  5. Thrombospondin 2 Inhibits Microvascular Endothelial Cell Proliferation by a Caspase-independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Lucas C.; Björkblom, Benny; Hankenson, Kurt D.; Siadak, Anthony W.; Stiles, Charlotte E.; Bornstein, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The matricellular protein thrombospondin 2 (TSP2) regulates a variety of cell–matrix interactions. A prominent feature of TSP2-null mice is increased microvascular density, particularly in connective tissues synthesized after injury. We investigated the cellular basis for the regulation of angiogenesis by TSP2 in cultures of murine and human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Fibroblasts isolated from murine and human dermis synthesize TSP2 mRNA and secrete significant amounts of immunoreactive TSP2, whereas endothelial cells from mouse lung and human dermis did not synthesize TSP2 mRNA or protein. Recombinant mouse TSP2 inhibited growth of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) mediated by basic fibroblast growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, epidermal growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). HMVECs exposed to TSP2 in the presence of these growth factors had a decreased proportion of cells in S and G2/M phases. HMVECs cultured with a combination of basic fibroblast growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor displayed an increased proportion of nonviable cells in the presence of TSP2, but the addition of VEGF blocked this TSP2-mediated impairment of cell viability. TSP2-mediated inhibition of DNA synthesis by HMVECs in the presence of VEGF was not affected by the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. Similar findings were obtained with TSP1. Taken together, these observations indicate that either TSP2 or TSP1 can inhibit HMVEC proliferation by inhibition of cell cycle progression and induction of cell death, but the mechanisms responsible for TSP2-mediated inhibition of cell cycle progression are independent from those leading to cell death. PMID:12058057

  6. The nitric oxide donor pentaerythritol tetranitrate can preserve endothelial function in established atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Andreas; Müller, Senta; Meyer, Wilfried; Kojda, Georg

    2001-01-01

    Recent results suggested that long-term treatment with a low dose of the organic nitrate pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN, 6 mg kg−1 per day) for 16 weeks slightly decreases aortic superoxide production in normal rabbits. We sought to determine if PETN can preserve endothelium dependent relaxation (EDR) in atherosclerotic rabbits.Three groups of 9 – 10 New Zealand White rabbits received a cholesterol chow (0.75%) for 16 weeks. One group (CHOL16) served as control and two groups were fed for another 16 weeks a cholesterol-chow without (CHOL32) or with 6 mg PETN kg−1 per day (PETN32).Isolated aortic rings of CHOL16 showed a typical impairment of EDR with a maximal relaxation at 1 μM acetylcholine of 28±16%. In CHOL32-rings EDR was completely impaired. In striking contrast, EDR in PETN32 (24±15%) was similar to that of CHOL16 indicating a protective effect of PETN on endothelial function. Vascular superoxide production measured with the lucigenin method was not different between the groups.Aortic lesion formation in PETN32 was smaller than in CHOL32 (P<0.008). The onset of copper-induced LDL-oxidation (lag-time) after 16 weeks of cholesterol feeding (214±9 min) was reduced in CHOL32 (168±24 min, P=0.035) but not in PETN32 (220±21 min). This indicates prevention of increased LDL oxidation by PETN.The halfmaximal effective vasodilator concentrations of PETN (in −logM) were identical in CHOL16 (7.9±0.1), CHOL32 (7.6±0.2) and PETN32 (7.7±0.2). Similar results were obtained with S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine.These data suggest that PETN can reduce the progression of lesion formation, endothelial dysfunction and of LDL-oxidation in established atherosclerosis. PMID:11309242

  7. TSG attenuates LPC-induced endothelial cells inflammatory damage through notch signaling inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Song, Fan; Xu, Shouzhu; Nian, Lun; Zhou, Xuanxuan; Wang, Siwang

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) induces inflammation in endothelial cells (ECs) but the mechanism is not fully understood. The Notch signaling pathway is involved in chronic EC inflammation, but its functions in LPC-induced endothelial inflammatory damage and 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucoside's (TSG) protective effect during LPC-induced inflammatory damage in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) is largely unknown. We report that Notch signaling activation contributed to LPC-induced injury in HUVECs, and that TSG protected HUVECs from LPC-induced injury by antagonizing Notch signaling activation by LPC. γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT), a specific inhibitor of the Notch signaling pathway, and Notch1 siRNA were used to inhibit Notch activity. HUVECs were exposed to LPC in the presence or absence of TSG, DAPT, and Notch1 siRNA. LPC treatment of HUVECs resulted in reduced cell viability, and Notch1 and Hes1 upregulation. Either silencing of Notch1 by siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of Notch signaling by DAPT prevented the loss of cell viability, and induction of apoptosis, and enhanced expression Notch1, Hes1 and MCP-1 by LPC in HUVECs. Similarly, TSG reduced LPC stimulation of Notch1, Hes1, and MCP-1 expression, prevented the release of IL-6 and CRP and rescued HUVECs from LPC-induced cell damage. Our data indicate that the Notch signaling pathway is a crucial mediator of endothelial inflammatory damage and that TSG protects against endothelial inflammatory damage by inhibiting the Notch signaling pathway. Our findings suggest that targeting Notch signaling by natural products such as TSG is a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammation associated diseases, including atherosclerosis. © 2015 IUBMB Life, 68(1):37-50, 2016. PMID:26662286

  8. Inhibition of endothelial cell functions by novel potential cancer chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Bertl, Elisabeth; Becker, Hans; Eicher, Theophil; Herhaus, Christian; Kapadia, Govind; Bartsch, Helmut; Gerhäuser, Clarissa

    2004-12-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) play a major role in tumor-induced neovascularization and bridge the gap between a microtumor and growth factors such as nutrients and oxygen supply required for expansion. Immortalized human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were utilized to assess anti-endothelial effects of 10 novel potential cancer chemopreventive compounds from various sources that we have investigated previously in a human in vitro anti-angiogenic assay. These include the monoacylphloroglucinol isoaspidinol B, 1,2,5,7-tetrahydroxy-anthraquinone, peracetylated carnosic acid (PCA), isoxanthohumol, 2,2',4'-trimethoxychalcone, 3'-bromo-2,4-dimethoxychalcone as well as four synthetic derivatives of lunularic acid, a bibenzyl found in mosses [Int. J. Cancer Prev. 1 (2004) 47]. EC proliferation was inhibited with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations from 0.3 to 49.6muM, whereas EC migration was affected by most compounds at sub-micromolar concentrations. PCA and the bibenzyl derivative EC 1004 potently prevented differentiation of HMEC-1 into tubule-like structures. Overall, our data indicate that inhibition of endothelial cell function contributes to various extents to the chemopreventive or anti-angiogenic potential of these lead compounds. PMID:15522231

  9. Differential role of endothelial versus neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the regulation of coronary blood flow during pacing-induced increases in cardiac workload

    PubMed Central

    Shabeeh, Husain; Melikian, Narbeh; Dworakowski, Rafal; Casadei, Barbara; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was assumed to be the only source of nitric oxide (NO) involved in the regulation of human coronary blood flow (CBF). However, our recent first-in-human study using the neuronal NOS (nNOS)-selective inhibitor S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC) showed that nNOS-derived NO also plays a role. In this study, we investigated the relative contribution of nNOS and eNOS to the CBF response to a pacing-induced increase in cardiac workload. Incremental right atrial pacing was undertaken in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries during intracoronary infusion of saline vehicle and then either SMTC or NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA; which inhibits both eNOS and nNOS). Intracoronary SMTC (0.625 μmol/min) and l-NMMA (25 μmol/min) reduced basal CBF to a similar extent (−19.2 ± 3.2% and 25.0 ± 2.7%, respectively; n = 10 per group). Pacing-induced increases in CBF were significantly blunted by l-NMMA (maximum CBF: 83.5 ± 14.2 ml/min during saline vs. 61.6 ± 9.5 ml/min during l-NMMA; P < 0.01). By contrast, intracoronary SMTC had no effect on the maximum CBF during pacing (98.5 ± 12.9 ml/min during saline vs. 102.1 ± 16.6 ml/min during SMTC; P = not significant). l-NMMA also blunted the pacing-induced increase in coronary artery diameter (P < 0.001 vs. saline), whereas SMTC had no effect. Our results confirm a role of nNOS in the regulation of basal CBF in humans but show that coronary vasodilation in response to a pacing-induced increase in cardiac workload is exclusively mediated by eNOS-derived NO. PMID:23479261

  10. Nox4 NADPH Oxidase Mediates Peroxynitrite-dependent Uncoupling of Endothelial Nitric-oxide Synthase and Fibronectin Expression in Response to Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Doug-Yoon; Wauquier, Fabien; Eid, Assaad A.; Roman, Linda J.; Ghosh-Choudhury, Goutam; Khazim, Khaled; Block, Karen; Gorin, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Activation of glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) by angiotensin II (Ang II) leads to extracellular matrix accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that, in MCs, Ang II induces endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased production of NO. Ang II promotes a rapid increase in 3-nitrotyrosine formation, and uric acid attenuates Ang II-induced decrease in NO bioavailability, demonstrating that peroxynitrite mediates the effects of Ang II on eNOS dysfunction. Ang II rapidly up-regulates Nox4 protein. Inhibition of Nox4 abolishes the increase in ROS and peroxynitrite generation as well as eNOS uncoupling triggered by Ang II, indicating that Nox4 is upstream of eNOS. This pathway contributes to Ang II-mediated fibronectin accumulation in MCs. Ang II also elicits an increase in mitochondrial abundance of Nox4 protein, and the oxidase contributes to ROS production in mitochondria. Overexpression of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase prevents the stimulatory effects of Ang II on mitochondrial ROS production, loss of NO availability, and MC fibronectin accumulation, whereas manganese superoxide dismutase depletion increases mitochondrial ROS, NO deficiency, and fibronectin synthesis basally and in cells exposed to Ang II. This work provides the first evidence that uncoupled eNOS is responsible for Ang II-induced MC fibronectin accumulation and identifies Nox4 and mitochondrial ROS as mediators of eNOS dysfunction. These data shed light on molecular processes underlying the oxidative signaling cascade engaged by Ang II and identify potential targets for intervention to prevent renal fibrosis. PMID:23940049

  11. Nuclear p120 catenin unlocks mitotic block of contact-inhibited human corneal endothelial monolayers without disrupting adherent junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying-Ting; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chen, Szu-Yu; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2012-08-01

    Contact inhibition ubiquitously exists in non-transformed cells that are in contact with neighboring cells. This phenomenon explains the poor regenerative capacity of in vivo human corneal endothelial cells during aging, injury and surgery. This study demonstrated that the conventional approach of expanding human corneal endothelial cells by disrupting contact inhibition with EDTA followed by bFGF activated canonical Wnt signaling and lost the normal phenotype to endothelial-mesenchymal transition, especially if TGFβ1 was added. By contrast, siRNA against p120 catenin (CTNND1) also uniquely promoted proliferation of the endothelial cells by activating trafficking of p120 catenin to the nucleus, thus relieving repression by nuclear Kaiso. This nuclear p120-catenin-Kaiso signaling is associated with activation of RhoA-ROCK signaling, destabilization of microtubules and inhibition of Hippo signaling, but not with activation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling. Consequently, proliferating human corneal endothelial cells maintained a hexagonal shape, with junctional expression of N-cadherin, ZO-1 and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Further expansion of human corneal endothelial monolayers with a normal phenotype and a higher density was possible by prolonging treatment with p120 catenin siRNA followed by its withdrawal. This new strategy of perturbing contact inhibition by selective activation of p120-catenin-Kaiso signaling without disrupting adherent junction could be used to engineer surgical grafts containing normal human corneal endothelial cells to meet a global corneal shortage and for endothelial keratoplasties. PMID:22505615

  12. The effect of linarin on LPS-induced cytokine production and nitric oxide inhibition in murine macrophages cell line RAW264.7.

    PubMed

    Han, Shinha; Sung, Ki-Hyun; Yim, Dongsool; Lee, Sookyeon; Lee, Chong-Kil; Ha, Nam-ju; Kim, Kyungjae

    2002-04-01

    The herb, Chrysanthemum zawadskii var, latilobum commomly known as Gu-Jul-Cho in Korea, used in traditional medicine to treat pneumonia, bronchitis, cough, common cold, pharyngitis, bladder-related disorders, gastroenteric disorders, and hypertension. Linarin is the main active compound and the biological mechanisms of its activity are unclear. It is believed that effects of this herb may be exerted through the pluripotent effectors of linarin due to its ability to treat a variety of afflictions. In this study, the effects of linarin on the mouse macrophages cell line, RAW 264.7, were investigated. It was found that linarin could activate macrophages by producing cytokines. Monocytes and tissue macrophages produce at least two groups of protein mediators of inflammation, interleukin 1 (IL-1) and the tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Recent studies have shown that TNF and IL-1 modulate the inflammatory function of endothelial cells, leukocytes, and fibroblasts. TNF-alpha production by macrophages treated with linarin occured in a dose dependent manner. However, IL-1 production was largely unaffected by this natural product. This study demonstrated the ability of linarin to activate macrophages both directly and indirectly. Linarin also affect both cytokine production and nitric oxide inhibition, in addition to the expression of some surface molecules. Nitric oxide (NO), derived from L-argin-ine, is produced by two forms(constitutive and inducible) of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The NO produced in large amounts by inducible NOS is known to be responsible for the vasodilation and hypotension observed in septic shock. Linarin was found to inhibit NO production in the LPS-activated RAW 264.7 cells. Linarin may be a useful candidate as a new drug for treating endotoxemia and the inflammation accompanied by NO overproduction. The linarin-treated total lymphocytes exhibited cytotoxicity in a dose dependent manner between 20 microg/ml and 40 microg/ml. These results suggest

  13. Lycopene inhibits LPS-induced proinflammatory mediator inducible nitric oxide synthase in mouse macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Mohamed M; Yadav, Prem Narayan; Reyes, Marynell

    2007-01-01

    Lycopene is a fat-soluble red-orange carotenoid found primarily in tomatoes and tomato-derived products, including tomato sauce, tomato paste, and ketchup, and other dietary sources, including dried apricots, guava, watermelon, papaya, and pink grapefruit. In this study, we have demonstrated the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory properties of lycopene using a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7). Treatment with lycopene (10 microM) inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production (40% compared with the control). Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that lycopene treatment decreased LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein and mRNA expression in RAW 264.7 cells, respectively. These results suggest that lycopene has anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting iNOS proteins and mRNA expressions in mouse macrophage cell lines. Furthermore, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein and mRNA expression were not affected by treatment with lycopene. PMID:17995901

  14. Potentiation of osteoclast bone-resorption activity by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Kasten, T P; Collin-Osdoby, P; Patel, N; Osdoby, P; Krukowski, M; Misko, T P; Settle, S L; Currie, M G; Nickols, G A

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the effects of modulating nitric oxide (NO) levels on osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in vitro and the effects of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors on bone mineral density in vivo. Diaphorase-based histochemical staining for NOS activity of bone sections or highly enriched osteoclast cultures suggested that osteoclasts exhibit substantial NOS activity that may account for basal NO production. Chicken osteoclasts were cultured for 36 hr on bovine bone slices in the presence or absence of the NO-generating agent sodium nitroprusside or the NOS inhibitors N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and aminoguanidine. Nitroprusside markedly decreased the number of bone pits and the average pit area in comparison with control cultures. On the other hand, NOS inhibition by N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or aminoguanidine dramatically increased the number of bone pits and the average resorption area per pit. In a model of osteoporosis, aminoguanidine potentiated the loss of bone mineral density in ovariectomized rats. Aminoguanidine also caused a loss of bone mineral density in the sham-operated rats. Inhibition of NOS activity in vitro and in vivo resulted in an apparent potentiation of osteoclast activity. These findings suggest that endogenous NO production in osteoclast cultures may regulate resorption activity. The modulation of NOS and NO levels by cells within the bone microenvironment may be a sensitive mechanism for local control of osteoclast bone resorption. Images PMID:7513424

  15. Rap1 Spatially Controls ArhGAP29 To Inhibit Rho Signaling during Endothelial Barrier Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Post, A.; Pannekoek, W. J.; Ponsioen, B.; Vliem, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase Rap1 controls the actin cytoskeleton by regulating Rho GTPase signaling. We recently established that the Rap1 effectors Radil and Rasip1, together with the Rho GTPase activating protein ArhGAP29, mediate Rap1-induced inhibition of Rho signaling in the processes of epithelial cell spreading and endothelial barrier function. Here, we show that Rap1 induces the independent translocations of Rasip1 and a Radil-ArhGAP29 complex to the plasma membrane. This results in the formation of a multimeric protein complex required for Rap1-induced inhibition of Rho signaling and increased endothelial barrier function. Together with the previously reported spatiotemporal control of the Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factor Epac1, these findings elucidate a signaling pathway for spatiotemporal control of Rho signaling that operates by successive protein translocations to and complex formation at the plasma membrane. PMID:25963656

  16. The YSNSG cyclopeptide derived from tumstatin inhibits tumor angiogenesis by down-regulating endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Thevenard, Jessica; Ramont, Laurent; Devy, Jérome; Brassart, Bertrand; Dupont-Deshorgue, Aurélie; Floquet, Nicolas; Schneider, Laurence; Ouchani, Farid; Terryn, Christine; Maquart, François-Xavier; Monboisse, Jean-Claude; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie

    2010-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that the CNYYSNS peptide derived from tumstatin inhibited in vivo tumor progression. The YSNS motif formed a beta-turn crucial for biological activity. More recently, a YSNSG cyclopeptide with a constrained beta-turn on the YSNS residues was designed. Intraperitoneal administration of the YSNSG cyclopeptide inhibited in vivo melanoma progression more efficiently than the native linear peptide. In the present article, we showed that the YSNSG cyclopeptide also triggered an inhibition of in vivo tumor neovascularization and we further analyzed its in vitroantiangiogenic effect. The YSNSG cyclopeptide did not alter endothelial cell proliferation but inhibited cell migration by 83% in an in vitro wound healing model. The inhibition was mediated by a decrease in active MT1-MMP at the migration front as well as a decrease in u-PA and u-PAR expression. The cyclopeptide also altered beta1-integrin distribution in endothelial cell lamellipodia, induced a strong decrease in the phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p125(FAK)), disorganized F-actin stress fibers and decreased the number of lamellipodia, resulting in a non migratory phenotype. Our results confirm the YSNSG cyclopeptide as a potent antitumor agent, through both the inhibition of invasive properties of tumor cells and the antiangiogenic activity. PMID:19551865

  17. Overexpression of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase in rat vascular smooth muscle cells and in balloon-injured carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Daum, G; Forough, R; Clowes, M; Walter, U; Clowes, A W

    1998-05-01

    Endothelial cells in normal blood vessels might prevent the unscheduled proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) by the expression of cell migration and growth inhibitors. NO, a potent vasodilator, generated by endothelium-specific constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS) might be such an inhibitor. To test this hypothesis, we overexpressed human ecNOS in syngeneic rat arterial SMCs using retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. Compared with SMCs transduced with vector alone (LXSN SMCs), DNA synthesis and cell proliferation were inhibited in the ecNOS-expressing SMCs (LCNSN SMCs). Basal and stimulated (by the calcium ionophore A23187) secretion of NO and intracellular cGMP were increased in LCNSN SMCs. Nomega-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NA), an inhibitor of NO synthesis, enhanced the proliferation of LCNSN SMCs but had no effect on LXSN SMCs. LCNSN SMCs seeded onto the luminal surface of balloon-injured rat carotid arteries inhibited neointimal formation by 37% and induced marked dilatation (3-fold increase in vessel diameter) at 2 weeks compared with LXSN SMC-seeded arteries. Orally administered L-NA blocked these changes. Phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, which is regulated in part by NO, was elevated in LCNSN SMCs and in LCNSN SMC-seeded arteries. This study demonstrates that NO generation by ecNOS inhibits SMC proliferation in vitro and modulates vascular tone locally in vivo. PMID:9576106

  18. Pulmonary surfactant inhibits LPS-induced nitric oxide production by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Miles, P R; Bowman, L; Rao, K M; Baatz, J E; Huffman, L

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation were 1) to report that pulmonary surfactant inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (. NO) production by rat alveolar macrophages, 2) to study possible mechanisms for this effect, and 3) to determine which surfactant component(s) is responsible. NO produced by the cells in response to LPS is due to an inducible. NO synthase (iNOS). Surfactant inhibits LPS-induced. NO formation in a concentration-dependent manner;. NO production is inhibited by approximately 50 and approximately 75% at surfactant levels of 100 and 200 microg phospholipid/ml, respectively. The inhibition is not due to surfactant interference with the interaction of LPS with the cells or to disruption of the formation of iNOS mRNA. Also, surfactant does not seem to reduce. NO formation by directly affecting iNOS activity or by acting as an antioxidant or radical scavenger. However, in the presence of surfactant, there is an approximately 80% reduction in the amount of LPS-induced iNOS protein in the cells. LPS-induced. NO production is inhibited by Survanta, a surfactant preparation used in replacement therapy, as well as by natural surfactant. NO formation is not affected by the major lipid components of surfactant or by two surfactant-associated proteins, surfactant protein (SP) A or SP-C. However, the hydrophobic SP-B inhibits. NO formation in a concentration-dependent manner;. NO production is inhibited by approximately 50 and approximately 90% at SP-B levels of 1-2 and 10 microgram/ml, respectively. These results show that lung surfactant inhibits LPS-induced. NO production by alveolar macrophages, that the effect is due to a reduction in iNOS protein levels, and that the surfactant component responsible for the reduction is SP-B. PMID:9887071

  19. Isoflurane Postconditioning Protects Against Reperfusion Injury by Preventing Mitochondrial Permeability Transition via an Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase-dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zhi-Dong; Pravdic, Danijel; Bienengraeber, Martin; Pratt, Phillip F.; Auchampach, John A.; Gross, Garrett J.; Kersten, Judy R.; Warltier, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in isoflurane postconditioning (IsoPC)-elicited cardioprotection is poorly understood. We addressed this issue using eNOS-/- mice. Methods In vivo or Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts underwent 30 min of ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion in the presence and absence of postconditioning produced with isoflurane 5 min before ischemia and 3 min after reperfusion. Ca2+-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening was assessed in isolated mitochondria. Echocardiography was used to evaluate ventricular function. Results Postconditioning with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 minimum alveolar concentrations of isoflurane decreased infarct size from 56 ± 10% (n = 10) in control to 48 ± 10%, 41 ± 8% (n = 8, P < 0.05), and 38 ± 10% (n = 8, P < 0.05), respectively and improved cardiac function in wild-type mice. Improvement in cardiac function by IsoPC was blocked by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (a nonselective NOS inhibitor) administered either prior to ischemia or at the onset of reperfusion. Mitochondria isolated from postconditioned hearts required significantly higher in vitro Ca2+ loading than control (78 ± 29 vs. 40 ± 25 μM CaCl2 mg protein-1, n = 10, P < 0.05) to open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Hearts from eNOS-/- mice displayed no marked differences in infarct size, cardiac function, and sensitivity of mitochondrial permeability transition pore to Ca2+, compared to the wild-type hearts. However, IsoPC failed to alter infarct size, cardiac function or the amount of Ca2+ necessary to open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in mitochondria isolated from the eNOS-/- hearts compared to control hearts. Conclusions IsoPC protects mouse hearts from reperfusion injury by preventing MPT pore opening in an eNOS-dependent manner. Nitric oxide functions as both a trigger and a mediator of cardioprotection produced by IsoPC. PMID:19996950

  20. Rhus coriaria suppresses angiogenesis, metastasis and tumor growth of breast cancer through inhibition of STAT3, NFκB and nitric oxide pathways

    PubMed Central

    El Hasasna, Hussain; Saleh, Alaaeldin; Samri, Halima Al; Athamneh, Khawlah; Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; Benhalilou, Nehla; Alyan, Sofyan; Viallet, Jean; Dhaheri, Yusra Al; Eid, Ali; Iratni, Rabah

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported that Rhus coriaria exhibits anticancer activities by promoting cell cycle arrest and autophagic cell death of the metastatic triple negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Here, we investigated the effect of Rhus coriaria on the migration, invasion, metastasis and tumor growth of TNBC cells. Our current study revealed that non-cytotoxic concentrations of Rhus coriaria significantly inhibited migration and invasion, blocked adhesion to fibronectin and downregulated MMP-9 and prostaglandin E2 (PgE2). Not only did Rhus coriaria decrease their adhesion to HUVECs and to lung microvascular endothelial (HMVEC-L) cells, but it also inhibited the transendothelial migration of MDA-MB-231 cells through TNF-α-activated HUVECs. Furthermore, we found that Rhus coriaria inhibited angiogenesis, reduced VEGF production in both MDA-MB-231 and HUVECs and downregulated the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. The underlying mechanism for Rhus coriaria effects appears to be through inhibiting NFκB, STAT3 and nitric oxide (NO) pathways. Most importantly, by using chick embryo tumor growth assay, we showed that Rhus coriaria suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. The results described in the present study identify Rhus coriaria as a promising chemopreventive and therapeutic candidate that modulate triple negative breast cancer growth and metastasis. PMID:26888313

  1. Polyphenol fraction of extra virgin olive oil protects against endothelial dysfunction induced by high glucose and free fatty acids through modulation of nitric oxide and endothelin-1

    PubMed Central

    Storniolo, Carolina Emilia; Roselló-Catafau, Joan; Pintó, Xavier; Mitjavila, María Teresa; Moreno, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have reported that olive oil reduces the incidence of cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms involved in this beneficial effect have not been delineated. The endothelium plays an important role in blood pressure regulation through the release of potent vasodilator and vasoconstrictor agents such as nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), respectively, events that are disrupted in type 2 diabetes. Extra virgin olive oil contains polyphenols, compounds that exert a biological action on endothelial function. This study analyzes the effects of olive oil polyphenols on endothelial dysfunction using an in vitro model that simulates the conditions of type 2 diabetes. Our findings show that high glucose and linoleic and oleic acids decrease endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation, and consequently intracellular NO levels, and increase ET-1 synthesis by ECV304 cells. These effects may be related to the stimulation of reactive oxygen species production in these experimental conditions. Hydroxytyrosol and the polyphenol extract from extra virgin olive oil partially reversed the above events. Moreover, we observed that high glucose and free fatty acids reduced NO and increased ET-1 levels induced by acetylcholine through the modulation of intracellular calcium concentrations and endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation, events also reverted by hydroxytyrosol and polyphenol extract. Thus, our results suggest a protective effect of olive oil polyphenols on endothelial dysfunction induced by hyperglycemia and free fatty acids. PMID:25460732

  2. Two-chain high molecular weight kininogen induces endothelial cell apoptosis and inhibits angiogenesis: partial activity within domain 5.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J C; Claffey, K; Sakthivel, R; Darzynkiewicz, Z; Shaw, D E; Leal, J; Wang, Y C; Lu, F M; McCrae, K R

    2000-12-01

    We previously reported that the binding of two-chain high molecular weight kininogen (HKa) to endothelial cells may occur through interactions with endothelial urokinase receptors. Since the binding of urokinase to urokinase receptors activates signaling responses and may stimulate mitogenesis, we assessed the effect of HKa binding on endothelial cell proliferation. Unexpectedly, HKa inhibited proliferation in response to several growth factors, with 50% inhibition caused by approximately 10 nM HKa. This activity was Zn(2+) dependent and not shared by either single-chain high molecular weight kininogen (HK) or low molecular weight kininogen. HKa selectively inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein and dermal microvascular endothelial cells, but did not affect that of umbilical vein or human aortic smooth muscle cells, trophoblasts, fibroblasts, or carcinoma cells. Inhibition of endothelial proliferation by HKa was associated with endothelial cell apoptosis and unaffected by antibodies that block the binding of HK or HKa to any of their known endothelial receptors. Recombinant HK domain 5 displayed activity similar to that of HKa. In vivo, HKa inhibited neovascularization of subcutaneously implanted Matrigel plugs, as well as rat corneal angiogenesis. These results demonstrate that HKa is a novel inhibitor of angiogenesis, whose activity is dependent on the unique conformation of the two-chain molecule. PMID:11099478

  3. Mo polyoxometalate nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and vascular endothelial growth factor induced angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjing; Yang, Licong; Liu, Ying; Qin, Xiuying; Zhou, Yanhui; Zhou, Yunshan; Liu, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Tumor growth depends on angiogenesis, which can furnish the oxygen and nutrients that proliferate tumor cells. Thus, blocking angiogenesis can be an effective strategy to inhibit tumor growth. In this work, three typical nanoparticles based on polyoxometalates (POMs) have been prepared; we investigated their capability as antitumor and anti-angiogenesis agents. We found that Mo POM nanoparticles, especially complex 3, inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) through cellular reactive oxygen species levels’ elevation and mitochondrial membrane potential damage. Complex 3 also suppressed the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and chicken chorioallantoic membrane development ex vivo. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cell signaling molecules indicated that Mo POMs blocked the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways in endothelial cells. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated their cellular uptake and localization within the cytoplasm of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that, owing to the extraordinary physical and chemical properties, Mo POM nanoparticles can significantly inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis, which makes them potential drug candidates in anticancer and anti-angiogenesis therapies.

  4. Aldosterone Inactivates the Endothelin-B Receptor via a Cysteinyl Thiol Redox Switch to Decrease Pulmonary Endothelial Nitric Oxide Levels and Modulate Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; White, Kevin; Chan, Stephen Y.; Handy, Diane E.; Mahoney, Christopher E.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized, in part, by decreased endothelial nitric oxide (NO•) production and elevated levels of endothelin-1. Endothelin-1 is known to stimulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) via the endothelin-B receptor (ETB), suggesting that this signaling pathway is perturbed in PAH. Endothelin-1 also stimulates adrenal aldosterone synthesis; in systemic blood vessels, hyperaldosteronism induces vascular dysfunction by increasing endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and decreasing NO• levels. We hypothesized that aldosterone modulates PAH by disrupting ETB-eNOS signaling through a mechanism involving increased pulmonary endothelial oxidant stress. Methods and Results In rats with PAH, elevated endothelin-1 levels were associated with elevated aldosterone levels in plasma and lung tissue and decreased lung NO• metabolites in the absence of left heart failure. In human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs), endothelin-1 increased aldosterone levels via PGC-1α/steroidogenesis factor-1-dependent upregulation of aldosterone synthase. Aldosterone also increased ROS production, which oxidatively modified cysteinyl thiols in the eNOS-activating region of ETB to decrease endothelin-1-stimulated eNOS activity. Substitution of ETB-Cys405 with alanine improved ETB-dependent NO• synthesis under conditions of oxidant stress, confirming that Cys405 is a redox sensitive thiol that is necessary for ETB-eNOS signaling. In HPAECs, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism with spironolactone decreased aldosterone-mediated ROS generation and restored ETB-dependent NO• production. Spironolactone or eplerenone prevented or reversed pulmonary vascular remodeling and improved cardiopulmonary hemodynamics in two animal models of PAH in vivo. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that aldosterone modulates an ETB cysteinyl thiol redox switch to decrease pulmonary endothelium-derived NO• and promote PAH

  5. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition attenuates cutaneous vasodilation during the post-menopausal hot flash

    PubMed Central

    Hubing, Kimberly A.; Wingo, Jonathan E.; Brothers, R. Matthew; Coso, Juan Del; Low, David A.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that local inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin synthesis attenuates cutaneous vasodilator responses during post-menopausal hot flashes. Methods Four microdialysis membranes were inserted into forearm skin (dorsal surface) of 8 post-menopausal women (mean ± SD, 51±7 y). Ringers solution (control), 10mM Ketorolac (Keto) to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, 10mM NG-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase, and a combination of 10mM Keto + 10mM L-NAME were each infused at the separate sites. Skin blood flow at each site was indexed using laser-Doppler flowmetry. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial blood pressure and was expressed as a percentage of the maximal calculated CVC (CVCmax) obtained following infusion of 50mM sodium nitropruside at all sites at the end of the study. Data from 13 hot flashes were analyzed. Results At the control site, the mean ± SD peak increase in CVC was 15.5±6% CVCmax units. This value was not different relative to the peak increase in CVC at the Keto site (13.0±5 % CVCmax units, P = 0.09). However, the peak increase in CVC during the flash was attenuated at the L-NAME and L-NAME + Keto sites (7.4±4 % CVCmax units and 8.7±7 % CVCmax units, respectively) relative to both the control and the Keto sites (P<0.05 for both comparisons). There were no significant differences in the peak increases in sweat rate between any of the sites (P = 0.24). Conclusions These data demonstrate that cutaneous vasodilation during a hot flash has a nitric oxide component. Increases in CVC despite the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis suggest prostaglandins do not contribute to cutaneous vasodilation during a hot flash. PMID:20505548

  6. Febuxostat Inhibition of Endothelial-Bound XO: Implications for Targeting Vascular ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Umair Z.; Hundley, Nicholas J.; Romero, Guillermo; Radi, Rafael; Freeman, Bruce A.; Tarpey, Margaret M.; Kelley, Eric E.

    2011-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is a critical source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to vascular inflammation. Binding of XO to vascular endothelial cell glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) results in significant resistance to inhibition by traditional pyrazolopyrimidine-based inhibitors such as allopurinol. Therefore, we compared the extent of XO inhibition (free and GAG-bound) by allopurinol to febuxostat, a newly approved nonpurine XO-specific inhibitor. In solution, febuxostat was 1000 fold more potent than allopurinol inhibition of XO-dependent uric acid formation (IC50 = 1.8 nM vs. 2.9 μM). Association of XO with heparin-Sepharose 6B (HS6B-XO) had minimal effect on inhibition of uric acid formation by febuxostat (IC50 = 4.4 nM) while further limiting the effect of allopurinol (IC50 = 64 μM). Kinetic analysis of febuxostat inhibition revealed Ki values of 0.96 nM (free) and 0.92 nM (HS6B-XO), confirming equivalent inhibition for both free and GAG-immobilized enzyme. When XO was bound to endothelial cell GAGs, complete enzyme inhibition was observed with 25 nM febuxostat, while no more than 80% inhibition was seen with either allopurinol or oxypurinol, even at concentrations above those tolerated clinically. The superior potency for inhibition of endothelium-associated XO is predictive of a significant role for febuxostat in investigating pathological states where XO-derived ROS are contributive and traditional XO inhibitors are only slightly effective. PMID:21554948

  7. Therapeutic effect of enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and preventing eNOS uncoupling

    PubMed Central

    Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by the endothelium is an important protective molecule in the vasculature. It is generated by the enzyme endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Similar to all NOS isoforms, functional eNOS transfers electrons from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), via the flavins flavin adenine dinucleotide and flavin mononucleotide in the carboxy-terminal reductase domain, to the heme in the amino-terminal oxygenase domain. Here, the substrate L-arginine is oxidized to L-citrulline and NO. Cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia or cigarette smoking reduce bioactive NO. These risk factors lead to an enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the vessel wall. NADPH oxidases represent major sources of this ROS and have been found upregulated in the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. NADPH-oxidase-derived superoxide avidly reacts with eNOS-derived NO to form peroxynitrite (ONOO-). The essential NOS cofactor (6R-)5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is highly sensitive to oxidation by this ONOO-. In BH4 deficiency, oxygen reduction uncouples from NO synthesis, thereby converting NOS to a superoxide-producing enzyme. Among conventional drugs, compounds interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and statins can reduce vascular oxidative stress and increase bioactive NO. In recent years, we have identified a number of small molecules that have the potential to prevent eNOS uncoupling and, at the same time, enhance eNOS expression. These include the protein kinase C inhibitor midostaurin, the pentacyclic triterpenoids ursolic acid and betulinic acid, the eNOS enhancing compounds AVE9488 and AVE3085, and the polyphenolic phytoalexin trans-resveratrol. Such compounds enhance NO production from eNOS also under pathophysiological conditions and may thus have therapeutic potential. PMID:21198553

  8. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates N-Ras activation on the Golgi complex of antigen-stimulated T cells.

    PubMed

    Ibiza, Sales; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Ortega, Angel; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Barreiro, Olga; García-Domínguez, Carlota A; Víctor, Víctor M; Esplugues, Juan V; Rojas, José M; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M

    2008-07-29

    Ras/ERK signaling plays an important role in T cell activation and development. We recently reported that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO regulates T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent ERK activation by a cGMP-independent mechanism. Here, we explore the mechanisms through which eNOS exerts this regulation. We have found that eNOS-derived NO positively regulates Ras/ERK activation in T cells stimulated with antigen on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Intracellular activation of N-, H-, and K-Ras was monitored with fluorescent probes in T cells stably transfected with eNOS-GFP or its G2A point mutant, which is defective in activity and cellular localization. Using this system, we demonstrate that eNOS selectively activates N-Ras but not K-Ras on the Golgi complex of T cells engaged with APC, even though Ras isoforms are activated in response to NO from donors. We further show that activation of N-Ras involves eNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation on Cys(118), suggesting that upon TCR engagement, eNOS-derived NO directly activates N-Ras on the Golgi. Moreover, wild-type but not C118S N-Ras increased TCR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of Cys(118) contributes to activation-induced T cell death. Our data define a signaling mechanism for the regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway based on the eNOS-dependent differential activation of N-Ras and K-Ras at specific cell compartments. PMID:18641128

  9. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates N-Ras activation on the Golgi complex of antigen-stimulated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ibiza, Sales; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Ortega, Ángel; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Barreiro, Olga; García-Domínguez, Carlota A.; Víctor, Víctor M.; Esplugues, Juan V.; Rojas, José M.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Ras/ERK signaling plays an important role in T cell activation and development. We recently reported that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO regulates T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent ERK activation by a cGMP-independent mechanism. Here, we explore the mechanisms through which eNOS exerts this regulation. We have found that eNOS-derived NO positively regulates Ras/ERK activation in T cells stimulated with antigen on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Intracellular activation of N-, H-, and K-Ras was monitored with fluorescent probes in T cells stably transfected with eNOS-GFP or its G2A point mutant, which is defective in activity and cellular localization. Using this system, we demonstrate that eNOS selectively activates N-Ras but not K-Ras on the Golgi complex of T cells engaged with APC, even though Ras isoforms are activated in response to NO from donors. We further show that activation of N-Ras involves eNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation on Cys118, suggesting that upon TCR engagement, eNOS-derived NO directly activates N-Ras on the Golgi. Moreover, wild-type but not C118S N-Ras increased TCR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of Cys118 contributes to activation-induced T cell death. Our data define a signaling mechanism for the regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway based on the eNOS-dependent differential activation of N-Ras and K-Ras at specific cell compartments. PMID:18641128

  10. Association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphisms with coronary artery disease: an updated meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rai, Himanshu; Parveen, Farah; Kumar, Sudeep; Kapoor, Aditya; Sinha, Nakul

    2014-01-01

    Several association studies of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene polymorphisms with respect to coronary artery disease (CAD) have been published in the past two decades. However, their association with the disease, especially among different ethnic subgroups, still remains controversial. This prompted us to conduct a systematic review and an updated structured meta-analysis, which is the largest so far (89 articles, 132 separate studies, and a sample size of 69,235), examining association of three polymorphic forms of the NOS3 gene (i.e. Glu298Asp, T786-C and 27 bp VNTR b/a) with CAD. In a subgroup analysis, we tested their association separately among published studies originating predominantly from European, Middle Eastern, Asian, Asian-Indian and African ancestries. The pooled analysis confirmed the association of all the three selected SNP with CAD in three different genetic models transcending all ancestries worldwide. The Glu298Asp polymorphism showed strongest association (OR range = 1.28-1.52, and P<0.00001 for all comparisons), followed by T786-C (OR range = 1.34-1.42, and P<0.00001 for all comparisons) and 4b/a, (OR range = 1.19-1.41, and P ≤ 0.002 for all comparisons) in our pooled analysis. Subgroup analysis revealed that Glu298Asp (OR range = 1.54-1.87, and P<0.004 for all comparisons) and 4b/a (OR range = 1.71-3.02, and P<0.00001 for all comparisons) have highest degree of association amongst the Middle Easterners. On the other hand, T786-C and its minor allele seem to carry a highest risk for CAD among subjects of Asian ancestry (OR range = 1.61-1.90, and P ≤ 0.01 for all comparisons). PMID:25409023

  11. Exercise protects against chronic β-adrenergic remodeling of the heart by activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Jia, Zhe; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Mengmeng; Zhang, Jincai; Liu, Jie; Wu, Ping; Tian, Wencong; Li, Jing; Qi, Zhi; Tang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Extensive data have shown that exercise training can provide cardio-protection against pathological cardiac hypertrophy. However, how long the heart can retain cardio-protective phenotype after the cessation of exercise is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the time course of the loss of cardio-protection after cessation of exercise and the signaling molecules that are responsible for the possible sustained protection. Mice were made to run on a treadmill six times a week for 4 weeks and then rested for a period of 0, 1, 2 and 4 weeks followed by isoproterenol injection for 8 days. Morphological, echocardiographic and hemodynamic changes were measured, gene reactivation was determined by real-time PCR, and the expression and phosphorylation status of several cardio-protective signaling molecules were analyzed by Western-blot. HW/BW, HW/TL and LW/BW decreased significantly in exercise training (ER) mice. The less necrosis and lower fetal gene reactivation induced by isoproterenol injection were also found in ER mice. The echocardiographic and hemodynamic changes induced by β-adrenergic overload were also attenuated in ER mice. The protective effects can be sustained for at least 2 weeks after the cessation of the training. Western-blot analysis showed that the alterations in the phosphorylation status of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) (increase in serine 1177 and decrease in threonine 495) continued for 2 weeks after the cessation of the training whereas increases of the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR disappeared. Further study showed that L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treatment abolished the cardio-protective effects of ER. Our findings demonstrate that stimulation of eNOS in mice through exercise training provides acute and sustained cardioprotection against cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:24809512

  12. Low intensity exercise prevents disturbances in rat cardiac insulin signaling and endothelial nitric oxide synthase induced by high fructose diet.

    PubMed

    Stanišić, Jelena; Korićanac, Goran; Ćulafić, Tijana; Romić, Snježana; Stojiljković, Mojca; Kostić, Milan; Pantelić, Marija; Tepavčević, Snežana

    2016-01-15

    Increase in fructose consumption together with decrease in physical activity contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome and consequently cardiovascular diseases. The current study examined the preventive role of exercise on defects in cardiac insulin signaling and function of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in fructose fed rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control, sedentary fructose (received 10% fructose for 9 weeks) and exercise fructose (additionally exposed to low intensity exercise) groups. Concentration of triglycerides, glucose, insulin and visceral adipose tissue weight were determined to estimate metabolic syndrome development. Expression and/or phosphorylation of cardiac insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), Akt, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and eNOS were evaluated. Fructose overload increased visceral adipose tissue, insulin concentration and homeostasis model assessment index. Exercise managed to decrease visceral adiposity and insulin level and to increase insulin sensitivity. Fructose diet increased level of cardiac PTP1B and pIRS1 (Ser307), while levels of IR and ERK1/2, as well as pIRS1 (Tyr 632), pAkt (Ser473, Thr308) and pERK1/2 were decreased. These disturbances were accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177. Exercise managed to prevent most of the disturbances in insulin signaling caused by fructose diet (except phosphorylation of IRS1 at Tyr 632 and phosphorylation and protein expression of ERK1/2) and consequently restored function of eNOS. Low intensity exercise could be considered as efficient treatment of cardiac insulin resistance induced by fructose diet. PMID:26644274

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor and nitric oxide synthase expression in human lung cancer and the relation to p53.

    PubMed Central

    Ambs, S.; Bennett, W. P.; Merriam, W. G.; Ogunfusika, M. O.; Oser, S. M.; Khan, M. A.; Jones, R. T.; Harris, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and mutations of cancer-related genes increase with cancer progression. This correlation suggests the hypothesis that oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulate VEGF, and a significant correlation between p53 alteration and increased VEGF expression in human lung cancer was reported recently. To further examine this hypothesis, we analysed VEGF protein expression and mutations in p53 and K-ras in 27 non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC): 16 squamous cell, six adenocarcinomas, one large cell, two carcinoids and two undifferentiated tumours. VEGF was expressed in 50% of the squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and carcinoids but none of the others. p53 mutations occurred in 14 tumours (52%), and K-ras mutations were found in two adenocarcinomas and one SCC; there was no correlation between the mutations and VEGF expression. As nitric oxide also regulates angiogenesis, we examined NOS expression in NSCLC. The Ca2+-dependent NOS activity, which indicates NOS1 and NOS3 expression, was significantly reduced in lung carcinomas compared with adjacent non-tumour tissue (P < 0.004). Although the Ca2+-independent NOS activity, which indicates NOS2 expression, was low or undetectable in non-tumour tissues and most carcinomas, significant activity occurred in three SCC. In summary, our data do not show a direct regulation of VEGF by p53 in NSCLC. Finally, we did not find the up-regulation of NOS isoforms during NSCLC progression that has been suggested for gynaecological and breast cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9683299

  14. Nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, and vascular endothelial growth factor in the angiogenesis of non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marrogi, A J; Travis, W D; Welsh, J A; Khan, M A; Rahim, H; Tazelaar, H; Pairolero, P; Trastek, V; Jett, J; Caporaso, N E; Liotta, L A; Harris, C C

    2000-12-01

    We have investigated the hypothesis that nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein levels individually demonstrate a direct correlation with microvessel density (MVD) and clinical outcome in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Furthermore, we hypothesized that MVD may explain the propensity of certain histological lung cancer subtypes for early metastasis via a hematological route. Immunohistochemically, we studied the protein expression levels of NOS2, COX2, and VEGF and MVD by counting CD31-reactive blood vessels (BVs) in 106 surgically resected NSCLC specimens. NOS2, COX2, and VEGF immunoreactivity were observed in 48, 48, and 58%, respectively, of the study subjects, and their levels correlated with MVD at the tumor-stromal interphase (P < or = 0.001). More adenocarcindmas and large cell carcinomas displayed overexpression of NOS2 when compared with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; r = 0.44; P < 0.001). NOS2 and COX2 levels were found to correlate positively with VEGF status (r = 0.44; P < 0.001, 0.01, and 0.03, respectively). These results attest to the significant interaction of these factors in the angiogenesis of NSCLC. Although neither angiogenic factors nor MVD correlated with patient survival, the latter correlated with tumor clinical stage in both squamous (SCC; 73 BVs/mm2) and non-SCC (78 BVs/mm2) tumors. These results indicate that angiogenesis is a complex process that involves multiple factors including NOS2, COX2, and VEGF. Furthermore, the role of angiogenesis in the biology of various histological lung cancer types may be different. The complexity of angiogenesis may explain the modest results observed in antiangiogenesis therapy that target a single protein. PMID:11156228

  15. Laminar shear flow increases hydrogen sulfide and activates a nitric oxide producing signaling cascade in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Chen, Chang-Ting; Chen, Chi-Shia; Wang, Yun-Ming; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Wang, Danny Ling

    2015-09-01

    Laminar shear flow triggers a signaling cascade that maintains the integrity of endothelial cells (ECs). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a new gasotransmitter is regarded as an upstream regulator of nitric oxide (NO). Whether the H2S-generating enzymes are correlated to the enzymes involved in NO production under shear flow conditions remains unclear as yet. In the present study, the cultured ECs were subjected to a constant shear flow (12 dyn/cm(2)) in a parallel flow chamber system. We investigated the expression of three key enzymes for H2S biosynthesis, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), and 3-mercapto-sulfurtransferase (3-MST). Shear flow markedly increased the level of 3-MST. Shear flow enhanced the production of H2S was determined by NBD-SCN reagent that can bind to cysteine/homocystein. Exogenous treatment of NaHS that can release gaseous H2S, ECs showed an increase of phosphorylation in Akt(S473), ERK(T202/Y204) and eNOS(S1177). This indicated that H2S can trigger the NO-production signaling cascade. Silencing of CSE, CBS and 3-MST genes by siRNA separately attenuated the phosphorylation levels of Akt(S473) and eNOS(S1177) under shear flow conditions. The particular mode of shear flow increased H2S production. The interplay between H2S and NO-generating enzymes were discussed in the present study. PMID:26212441

  16. In vivo gene transfer of endothelial nitric oxide synthase decreases portal pressure in anaesthetised carbon tetrachloride cirrhotic rats

    PubMed Central

    Van de Casteele, M; Omasta, A; Janssens, S; Roskams, T; Desmet, V; Nevens, F; Fevery, J

    2002-01-01

    Background: Portal hypertension in cirrhosis results from enhanced intrahepatic resistance to an augmented inflow. The former is partly due to an imbalance between intrahepatic vasoconstriction and vasodilatation. Enhanced endothelin-1 and decreased activity of hepatic constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS 3) was reported in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) cirrhotic rat liver. Aims: To study whether an increase in hepatic NOS 3 could be obtained in the CCl4 cirrhotic rat liver by in vivo cDNA transfer and to investigate a possible effect on portal pressure. Methods: Hepatic NOS 3 immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to measure the amount of NOS 3 protein. Recombinant adenovirus, carrying cDNA encoding human NOS 3, was injected into the portal vein of CCl4 cirrhotic rats. Cirrhotic controls received carrier buffer, naked adenovirus, or adenovirus carrying the lac Z gene. Results: NOS 3 immunoreactivity and amount of protein (western blotting) were significantly decreased in CCl4 cirrhotic livers. Following cDNA transfer, NOS 3 expression and the amount of protein were partially restored. Portal pressure was 11.4 (1.6) mm Hg in untreated cirrhotic (n=9) and 11.8 (0.6) in lac Z transfected (n=4) cirrhotic rats but was reduced to 7.8 (1.0) mm Hg (n=9) five days after NOS 3 cDNA transfer. No changes were observed in systemic haemodynamics, in liver tests or urinary nitrates, or in NOS 3 expression in lung or kidney, indicating a highly selective transfer. Conclusions: NOS 3 cDNA transfer to cirrhotic rat liver is feasible and the increase in hepatic NOS 3 leads to a marked decrease in portal hypertension without systemic effects. These data indicate a major haemodynamic role of intrahepatic NOS 3 in the pathogenesis of portal hypertension in CCl4 cirrhosis. PMID:12171971

  17. Conversion of glyceryl trinitrate to nitric oxide in tolerant and non-tolerant smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, D.; Pistelli, A.; Vane, J.

    1993-01-01

    1. Exposure of smooth muscle cells (SMC) to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN, 75-600 microM) for 30 min led to a concentration-dependent increase in nitrite (NO2-), one of the breakdown products of nitric oxide (NO). This was not affected by 30 min pretreatment of the cells with 0.5 mM of sulphobromophthalein (SBP) an inhibitor of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), by metyrapone or SKF-525A inhibitors of cytochrome P450. These experiments were confirmed by organ bath studies using rabbit aortic strips denuded of endothelium and contracted with phenylephrine. Thus, a 30 min incubation of the strips with 0.5 mM SPB, metyrapone or SKF-525A did not affect the relaxations in response to GTN (10(-10)-10(-6) M). 2. Potentiation of the anti-platelet effect of GTN (44 microM) by endothelial cells (EC, 40 x 10(3) cells) was not affected by prior incubation of EC with SBP, metyrapone or SKF-525A (all at 0.5 mM). 3. Potentiation of the antiplatelet activity of GTN (11-352 microM) by small numbers of SMC (24 x 10(3) cells) or EC (40 x 10(3) cells) treated with indomethacin (10 microM) was attenuated when the SMC or EC were treated in culture with a high concentration of GTN (600 microM) for 18 h beforehand (referred to as 'tolerant' cells). In addition, tolerant SMC produced far less NO2- than non-tolerant SMC. 4. Exposure of non-tolerant SMC or EC (10(5) cells) to GTN (200 microM) for 3 min increased (3-4 fold) the levels of guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8381319

  18. Chlorogenic acid improves ex vivo vessel function and protects endothelial cells against HOCl-induced oxidative damage, via increased production of nitric oxide and induction of Hmox-1.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rujia; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Mas, Emilie; Croft, Kevin D; Ward, Natalie C

    2016-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols are potential contributors toward improved cardiovascular health. Coffee is one of the richest sources of dietary polyphenols in a coffee-drinking population, the most abundant form being chlorogenic acid (CGA). Endothelial dysfunction is an early and major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) is a key factor in regulation of endothelial function. Heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox-1), an inducible isoform of heme oxygenase that is produced in response to stressors such as oxidative stress, may also play a role in vascular protection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CGA on endothelial function with oxidant-induced damage in isolated aortic rings from C57BL mice. We further examine the mechanism by investigating cell viability, activation of eNOS and induction of Hmox-1 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). We found that pretreatment of isolated aortic rings with 10-μM CGA-protected vessels against HOCl-induced endothelial dysfunction (P<0.05). Pretreatment of cultured HAECs with 10-μM CGA increased endothelial cell viability following exposure to HOCl (P<0.05). Moreover, CGA increased NO production in HAECs in a dose-dependent manner, peaking at 6 h (P<0.05). CGA at 5 μM and 10 μM increased eNOS dimerization at 6 h and induced Hmox-1 protein expression at 6 h and 24 h in HAECs. These results are consistent with the cardiovascular protective effects of coffee polyphenols and demonstrate that CGA can protect vessels and cultured endothelial cells against oxidant-induced damage. The mechanism behind the beneficial effect of CGA appears to be in part via increased production of NO and induction of Hmox-1. PMID:26386740

  19. ADAMTS1 inhibits lymphangiogenesis by attenuating phosphorylation of the lymphatic endothelial cell-specific VEGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Junko; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Ogawa, Hiroko; Asano, Keiichi; Faruk Hatipoglu, Omer; Zeynel Cilek, Mehmet; Obika, Masanari; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Hofmann, Matthias; Kusachi, Shozo; Ninomiya, Yoshifumi; Hirohata, Satoshi

    2014-05-01

    Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis play roles in malignant tumor progression, dissemination, and metastasis. ADAMTS1, a member of the matrix metalloproteinase family, is known to inhibit angiogenesis. Recombinant ADAMTS1 was shown to strongly inhibit angiogenesis. We investigated whether ADAMTS1 inhibited lymphangiogenesis in the present study. We examined cell proliferation and cell migration in normal human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-dLy) transduced with or without adenoviral human ADAMTS1 gene therapy. We then examined the VEGFC/VEGFR3 signal transduction pathway in ADAMTS1-transduced HMVEC-dLy. Cell proliferation and tube formation in Matrigel were significantly lower with transduced ADAMTS1 than with control (non-transduced HMVEC-dLy). The phosphorylation of VEGFR3 was also attenuated by ADAMTS1 gene therapy in HMVEC-dLy. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ADAMTS1 formed a complex with VEGFC. Our results demonstrated that ADAMTS1 inhibited lymphangiogenesis in vitro. The data highlight the new function of ADAMTS1 in the regulation of lymphangiogenesis and the therapeutic potential of ADAMTS1 in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • ADAMTS1 significantly inhibited tube formation and cell proliferation in HMVEC-dLy. • Reduced lymph endothelial cell migration in ADAMTS1 transduced co-culture systems. • VEGFC-stimulated phosphorylation of VEGFR3 is attenuated by ADAMTS1. • Reduced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in ADAMTS1 treated HMVEC-dLy. • ADAMTS1 binds directly to VEGFC.

  20. T-kininogen inhibits kinin-mediated activation of ERK in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Perez, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Walter, Robin; Sierra, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    Serum levels of T-kininogen increase dramatically as rats approach the end of their lifespan. Stable expression of the protein in Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts leads to a dramatic inhibition of cell proliferation, as well as inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway. T-kininogen is a potent inhibitor of cysteine proteinases, and we have described that the inhibition of ERK activity occurs, at least in part, via stabilization of the MAP kinase phosphatase, MKP-1. Since fibroblasts are not a physiological target of T-kininogen, we have now purified the protein from rat serum, and used it to assess the effect of T-kininogen on endothelial cells. Adding purified T-kininogen to EAhy 926 hybridoma cells resulted in inhibition of basal ERK activity levels, as estimated using appropriate anti-phospho ERK antibodies. Furthermore, exogenously added T-kininogen inhibited the activation of the ERK pathway induced by either bradykinin or T-kinin. We conclude that the age-related increase in hepatic T-kininogen gene expression and serum levels of the protein could have dramatic consequences on endothelial cell physiology, both under steady state conditions, and after activation by cell-specific stimuli. Our results are consistent with T-kininogen being an important modulator of the senescent phenotype in vivo. PMID:12415746

  1. 5-HT1D receptor inhibits renal sympathetic neurotransmission by nitric oxide pathway in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    García-Pedraza, José-Ángel; García, Mónica; Martín, María-Luisa; Morán, Asunción

    2015-09-01

    Although serotonin has been shown to inhibit peripheral sympathetic outflow, serotonin regulation on renal sympathetic outflow has not yet been elucidated. This study investigated which 5-HT receptor subtypes are involved. Wistar rats were anesthetized (sodium pentobarbital; 60mg/kg, i.p.), and prepared for in situ autoperfused rat kidney, which allows continuous measurement of systemic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR) and renal perfusion pressure (PP). Electrical stimulation of renal sympathetic nerves resulted in frequency-dependent increases in PP (18.3±1.0, 43.7±2.7 and 66.7±4.0 for 2, 4 and 6Hz, respectively), without altering SBP or HR. 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-HT1/7 agonist) (0.00000125-0.1μg/kg each) or l-694,247 (5-HT1D agonist; 0.0125μg/kg) i.a. bolus inhibited vasopressor responses by renal nerve electrical stimulation, unlike i.a. bolus of agonists α-methyl-5-HT (5-HT2), 1-PBG (5-HT3), cisapride (5-HT4), AS-19 (5-HT7), CGS-12066B (5-HT1B) or 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT1A) (0.0125μg/kg each). The effect of l-694,247 did not affect the exogenous norepinephrine-induced vasoconstrictions, whereas was abolished by antagonist LY310762 (5-HT1D; 1mg/kg) or l-NAME (nitric oxide; 10mg/kg), but not by indomethacin (COX1/2; 2mg/kg) or glibenclamide (ATP-dependent K(+) channel; 20mg/kg). These results suggest that 5-HT mechanism-induced inhibition of rat vasopressor renal sympathetic outflow is mainly mediated by prejunctional 5-HT1D receptors via nitric oxide release. PMID:26003124

  2. Inhibition of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase by nitric oxide-mediated S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Kim, Bong-Jo; Song, Byoung J.

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is responsible for the metabolism of acetaldehyde and other toxic lipid aldehydes. Despite many reports about the inhibition of ALDH2 by toxic chemicals, it is unknown whether nitric oxide (NO) can alter the ALDH2 activity in intact cells or in vivo animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of NO on ALDH2 activity in H4IIE-C3 rat hepatoma cells. NO donors such as S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, and 3-morpholinosydnonimine significantly increased the nitrite concentration while they inhibited the ALDH2 activity. Addition of GSH-ethylester (GSH-EE) completely blocked the GSNO-mediated ALDH2 inhibition and increased nitrite concentration. To directly demonstrate the NO-mediated S-nitrosylation and inactivation, ALDH2 was immunopurified from control or GSNO-treated cells and subjected to immunoblot analysis. The anti-nitrosocysteine antibody recognized the immunopurified ALDH2 only from the GSNO-treated samples. All these results indicate that S-nitrosylation of ALDH2 in intact cells leads to reversible inhibition of ALDH2 activity. PMID:16242127

  3. Arginase inhibition in airways from normal and nitric oxide synthase 2-knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin

    SciTech Connect

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; O'Roark, Erin M.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Last, Jerold A.

    2010-01-01

    Arginase1 and nitric oxide synthase2 (NOS2) utilize L-arginine as a substrate, with both enzymes expressed at high levels in the asthmatic lung. Inhibition of arginase in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice with the transition state inhibitor N{sup o}mega-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) significantly increased total L-arginine content in the airway compartment. We hypothesized that such an increase in L-arginine content would increase the amount of nitric oxide (NO) being produced in the airways and thereby decrease airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic influx. We further hypothesized that despite arginase inhibition, NOS2 knockout (NOS2-/-) mice would be unable to up-regulate NO production in response to allergen exposure and would demonstrate higher amounts of airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilia under conditions of arginase inhibition than C57BL/6 animals. We found that administration of nor-NOHA significantly decreased airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice, but these parameters were unchanged in ovalbumin-exposed NOS2-/- mice. Arginase1 protein content was increased in mice exposed to ovalbumin, an effect that was reversed upon nor-NOHA treatment in C57BL/6 mice. Arginase1 protein content in the airway compartment directly correlated with the degree of airway hyperreactivity in all treatment groups. NOS2-/- mice had significantly greater arginase1 and arginase2 concentrations compared to their respective C57BL/6 groups, indicating that inhibition of arginase may be dependent upon NOS2 expression. Arginase1 and 2 content were not affected by nor-NOHA administration in the NOS2-/- mice. We conclude that L-arginine metabolism plays an important role in the development of airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation. Inhibition of arginase early in the allergic inflammatory response decreases the severity of the chronic inflammatory phenotype. These effects appear to be attributable to NOS2

  4. Arginase Inhibition in Airways from Normal and Nitric Oxide Synthase 2-Knockout Mice Exposed to Ovalbumin

    PubMed Central

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; O’Roark, Erin M.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Last, Jerold A.

    2011-01-01

    Arginase1 and nitric oxide synthase2 (NOS2) utilize L-arginine as a substrate, with both enzymes expressed at high levels in the asthmatic lung. Inhibition of arginase in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice with the transition state inhibitor Nω-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) significantly increased total L-arginine content in the airway compartment. We hypothesized that such an increase in L-arginine content would increase the amount of nitric oxide (NO) being produced in the airways and thereby decrease airway hyper-reactivity and eosinophilic influx. We further hypothesized that despite arginase inhibition, NOS2 knockout (NOS2−/−) mice would be unable to up-regulate NO production in response to allergen exposure and would demonstrate higher amounts of airway hyper-reactivity and eosinophilia under conditions of arginase inhibition than C57BL/6 animals. We found that administration of nor-NOHA significantly decreased airway hyper-reactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice, but these parameters were unchanged in ovalbumin-exposed NOS2−/− mice. Arginase1 protein content was increased in mice exposed to ovalbumin, an effect that was reversed upon nor-NOHA treatment in C57BL/6 mice. Arginase1 protein content in the airway compartment directly correlated with the degree of airway hyper-reactivity in all treatment groups. NOS2−/− mice had a significantly greater arginase1 and arginase2 concentrations compared to their respective C57BL/6 groups, indicating that inhibition of arginase may be dependent upon NOS2 expression. Arginase1 and 2 content were not affected by nor-NOHA administration in the NOS2−/− mice. We conclude that L-arginine metabolism plays an important role in the development of airway hyper-reactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation. Inhibition of arginase early in the allergic inflammatory response decreases the severity of the chronic inflammatory phenotype. These effects appear to be

  5. Arginase inhibition in airways from normal and nitric oxide synthase 2-knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Bratt, Jennifer M; Franzi, Lisa M; Linderholm, Angela L; O'Roark, Erin M; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Last, Jerold A

    2010-01-01

    Arginase1 and nitric oxide synthase2 (NOS2) utilize l-arginine as a substrate, with both enzymes expressed at high levels in the asthmatic lung. Inhibition of arginase in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice with the transition state inhibitor N(omega)-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (nor-NOHA) significantly increased total l-arginine content in the airway compartment. We hypothesized that such an increase in l-arginine content would increase the amount of nitric oxide (NO) being produced in the airways and thereby decrease airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic influx. We further hypothesized that despite arginase inhibition, NOS2 knockout (NOS2-/-) mice would be unable to up-regulate NO production in response to allergen exposure and would demonstrate higher amounts of airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilia under conditions of arginase inhibition than C57BL/6 animals. We found that administration of nor-NOHA significantly decreased airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice, but these parameters were unchanged in ovalbumin-exposed NOS2-/- mice. Arginase1 protein content was increased in mice exposed to ovalbumin, an effect that was reversed upon nor-NOHA treatment in C57BL/6 mice. Arginase1 protein content in the airway compartment directly correlated with the degree of airway hyperreactivity in all treatment groups. NOS2-/- mice had significantly greater arginase1 and arginase2 concentrations compared to their respective C57BL/6 groups, indicating that inhibition of arginase may be dependent upon NOS2 expression. Arginase1 and 2 content were not affected by nor-NOHA administration in the NOS2-/- mice. We conclude that l-arginine metabolism plays an important role in the development of airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation. Inhibition of arginase early in the allergic inflammatory response decreases the severity of the chronic inflammatory phenotype. These effects appear to be attributable to NOS2, which

  6. Coniferyl Aldehyde Attenuates Radiation Enteropathy by Inhibiting Cell Death and Promoting Endothelial Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function. PMID:26029925

  7. You're Only as Old as Your Arteries: Translational Strategies for Preserving Vascular Endothelial Function with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A.; LaRocca, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction develops with age and increases the risk of age-associated vascular disorders. Nitric oxide insufficiency, oxidative stress, and chronic low-grade inflammation, induced by upregulation of adverse cellular signaling processes and imbalances in stress resistance pathways, mediate endothelial dysfunction with aging. Healthy lifestyle behaviors preserve endothelial function with aging by inhibiting these mechanisms, and novel nutraceutical compounds that favorably modulate these pathways hold promise as a complementary approach for preserving endothelial health. PMID:24985329

  8. Spironolactone Prevents Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling and Vascular Dysfunction Induced by β-Adrenergic Overstimulation: Role of Perivascular Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Victorio, Jamaira A; Clerici, Stefano P; Palacios, Roberto; Alonso, María J; Vassallo, Dalton V; Jaffe, Iris Z; Rossoni, Luciana V; Davel, Ana P

    2016-09-01

    Sustained stimulation of β-adrenoceptors (β-ARs) and activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system are common features of cardiovascular diseases with rising sympathetic activation, including essential hypertension, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. In this study, we investigated the role of AT1 receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the vascular alterations caused by β-AR overstimulation. β-AR overstimulation with associated cardiac hypertrophy and increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in aorta were modeled in rats by 7-day isoproterenol treatment. The increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in this model was blunted by the MR antagonist spironolactone, but not by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan, despite the blunting of cardiac hypertrophy with both drugs. Spironolactone, but not losartan, restored NO bioavailability in association with lower endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived superoxide production, increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase dimerization, and aortic HSP90 upregulation. MR genomic and nongenomic functions were activated in aortas from isoproterenol-treated rats. Isoproterenol did not modify plasma levels of MR ligands aldosterone and corticosterone but rather increased perivascular adipose tissue-derived corticosterone in association with increased expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1. The anticontractile effect of aortic perivascular adipose tissue was impaired by β-AR overstimulation and restored by MR blockade. These results suggest that activation of vascular MR signaling contributes to the vascular dysfunction induced by β-AR overstimulation associated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling. These findings reveal an additional explanation for the protective effects of MR antagonists in cardiovascular disorders with sympathetic activation. PMID:27432866

  9. Plasma nitrite rather than nitrate reflects regional endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity but lacks intrinsic vasodilator action.

    PubMed

    Lauer, T; Preik, M; Rassaf, T; Strauer, B E; Deussen, A; Feelisch, M; Kelm, M

    2001-10-23

    The plasma level of NO(x), i.e., the sum of NO(2)- and NO(3)-, is frequently used to assess NO bioavailability in vivo. However, little is known about the kinetics of NO conversion to these metabolites under physiological conditions. Moreover, plasma nitrite recently has been proposed to represent a delivery source for intravascular NO. We therefore sought to investigate in humans whether changes in NO(x) concentration are a reliable marker for endothelial NO production and whether physiological concentrations of nitrite are vasoactive. NO(2)- and NO(3)- concentrations were measured in blood sampled from the antecubital vein and brachial artery of 24 healthy volunteers. No significant arterial-venous gradient was observed for either NO(2)- or NO(3)-. Endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) stimulation with acetylcholine (1-10 microg/min) dose-dependently augmented venous NO(2)- levels by maximally 71%. This effect was paralleled by an almost 4-fold increase in forearm blood flow (FBF), whereas an equieffective dose of papaverine produced no change in venous NO(2)-. Intraarterial infusion of NO(2)- had no effect on FBF. NOS inhibition (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine; 4-12 micromol/min) dose-dependently reduced basal NO(2)- and FBF and blunted acetylcholine-induced vasodilation and NO release by more than 80% and 90%, respectively. In contrast, venous NO(3)- and total NO(x) remained unchanged as did systemic arterial NO(2)- and NO(3)- levels during all these interventions. FBF and NO release showed a positive association (r = 0.85; P < 0.001). These results contradict the current paradigm that plasma NO(3)- and/or total NO(x) are generally useful markers of endogenous NO production and demonstrate that only NO(2)- reflects acute changes in regional eNOS activity. Our results further demonstrate that physiological levels of nitrite are vasodilator-inactive. PMID:11606734

  10. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis after metabolism of menadione by cultured porcine endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Barchowsky, A; Tabrizi, K; Kent, R S; Whorton, A R

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the effects of menadione on porcine aortic endothelial cell prostaglandin synthesis. Addition of 1-20 microM menadione caused a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of stimulated prostaglandin synthesis with an IC50 of 5 microM at 15 min. Concentrations greater than 100 microM menadione were necessary to increase 51Cr release from prelabeled cells. Recovery of enzyme inactivated by menadione required a 6-h incubation in 1% serum. In a microsomal preparation, menadione was shown to have no direct effect on conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. In intact cells menadione caused only a 40% inhibition of the conversion of PGH2 to prostacyclin. Enzymes involved in the incorporation and the release of arachidonic acid were not affected by menadione (20 microM, 15 min). Menadione undergoes oxidation/reduction reactions in intact cells leading to partial reduction of oxygen-forming, reactive oxygen species. In our cells menadione was found to increase KCN-resistant oxygen consumption. Further, an increased accumulation of H2O2 was observed with a time course consistent with menadione-induced inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. We conclude that menadione at sublethal doses caused inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. The mechanism involves inactivation of PGH2 synthase by a reactive species resulting from metabolism of menadione by endothelial cells. PMID:2495300

  11. TIMP-1 inhibits microvascular endothelial cell migration by MMP-dependent and MMP-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Akahane, Takemi; Akahane, Manabu; Shah, Amy; Connor, Christine M; Thorgeirsson, Unnur P

    2004-12-10

    It was reported over a decade ago that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) suppresses angiogenesis in experimental models but the mechanism is still incompletely understood. This in vitro study focused on the molecular basis of TIMP-1-mediated inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) migration, a key step in the angiogenic process. Both recombinant human TIMP-1 and the synthetic MMP inhibitors, GM6001 and MMP-2-MMP-9 Inhibitor III, suppressed migration of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC) in a dose-dependent fashion. The MMP-dependent inhibition of migration was associated with increased expression of the junctional adhesion proteins, VE-cadherin and PECAM-1, and VE-cadherin accumulation at cell-cell junctions. TIMP-1 also caused MMP-independent dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (pY397) and paxillin, which was associated with reduced number of F-actin stress fibers and focal adhesions. Moreover, TIMP-1 stimulated expression of PTEN that has been shown to reduce phosphorylation of FAK and inhibit cell migration. Our data suggest that TIMP-1 inhibits HDMVEC migration through MMP-dependent stimulation of VE-cadherin and MMP-independent stimulation of PTEN with subsequent dephosphorylation of FAK and cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:15530852

  12. Time course of cardiac inflammation during nitric oxide synthase inhibition in SHR: impact of prior transient ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    Biwer, Lauren A; D'souza, Karen M; Abidali, Ali; Tu, Danni; Siniard, Ashley L; DeBoth, Matthew; Huentelman, Matthew; Hale, Taben M

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition with enalapril produces persistent effects that protect against future nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (L-arginine methyl ester, L-NAME)-induced cardiac dysfunction and outer wall collagen deposition in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In the present study, we dissect the cytokine/chemokine release profile during NOS inhibition, its correlation to pathological cardiac remodeling and the impact of transient ACE inhibition on these effects. Adult male SHR were treated with enalapril (E+L) or tap water (C+L) for 2 weeks followed by a 2-week washout period. Rats were then subjected to 0, 3, 7 or 10 days of L-NAME treatment. The temporal response to NOS inhibition was evaluated by measuring arterial pressure, cardiac remodeling and cytokine/chemokine levels. L-NAME equivalently increased blood pressure and myocardial and vascular injury in C+L and E+L rats. However, pulse pressure (PP) was only transiently altered in C+L rats. The levels of several inflammatory mediators were increased during L-NAME treatment. However, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were uniquely increased in C+L hearts; whereas IL-4 and fractalkine were only elevated in E+L hearts. By days 7 and 10 of L-NAME treatment, there was a significant increase in the cardiac density of macrophages and proliferating cells, respectively only in C+L rats. Although myocardial injury was similar in both treatment groups, PP was not changed and there was a distinct cardiac chemokine/cytokine signature in rats previously treated with enalapril that may be related to the lack of proliferative response and macrophage infiltration in these hearts. PMID:26490086

  13. Nitric oxide controls tuberculosis immunopathology by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent IL-1β processing

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Bibhuti B.; Rathinam, Vijay A. K.; Martens, Gregory W.; Martinot, Amanda J.; Kornfeld, Hardy; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Sassetti, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is an important mediator of innate immunity, but can also promote inflammatory tissue damage. During chronic infections, such as tuberculosis, the beneficial antimicrobial role of IL-1 must be balanced with the need to prevent immunopathology. By exogenously controlling the replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vivo, we obviated the requirement for antimicrobial immunity and discovered that both IL-1 production and infection-induced immunopathology were suppressed by lymphocyte-derived interferon-γ (IFN-γ). This effect was mediated by nitric oxide (NO), which we found to specifically inhibit the assembly of the NLRP3 inflammasome via thiol nitrosylation. These data suggest that the NO produced as a result of adaptive immunity is indispensable in modulating the destructive innate inflammatory responses that are elicited during persistent infections. PMID:23160153

  14. Competitive inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by p-aminobenzamidine, a serine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Venturini, G; Menegatti, E; Ascenzi, P

    1997-03-01

    p-Aminobenzamidine competitively inhibits bovine trypsin, human and bovine thrombin, and human plasmin, all of which act on substrates containing preferentially the L-arginyl side chain at their P1 position. Considering the structural and functional similarity between p-aminobenzamidine and the L-arginyl side chain in trypsin-like serine proteinases, we investigated the interaction of p-aminobenzamidine with mouse brain nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which uses L-arginine as the substrate for generating NO and L-citrulline. p-Aminobenzamidine is a competitive NOS inhibitor (Ki = 1.2 x 10(-4) M, at pH 7.5 and 37.0 degrees C), but not an NO precursor. Therefore, p-aminobenzamidine affects the NO production and the trypsin-like serine proteinase action. PMID:9125158

  15. Olive oil compounds inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Lamy, Sylvie Ouanouki, Amira; Béliveau, Richard; Desrosiers, Richard R.

    2014-03-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) triggers crucial signaling processes that regulate tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, represents an attractive target for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. Several epidemiological studies have confirmed that abundant consumption of foods from plant origin is associated with reduced risk of developing cancers. In the Mediterranean basin, the consumption of extra virgin olive oil is an important constituent of the diet. Compared to other vegetable oils, the presence of several phenolic antioxidants in olive oil is believed to prevent the occurrence of a variety of pathological processes, such as cancer. While the strong antioxidant potential of these molecules is well characterized, their antiangiogenic activities remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (HT), taxifolin (Tax), oleuropein (OL) and oleic acid (OA), five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil, can affect in vitro angiogenesis. We found that HT, Tax and OA were the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors through their inhibitory effect on specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2 (Tyr951, Tyr1059, Tyr1175 and Tyr1214) leading to the inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) signaling. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 by these olive oil compounds significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC proliferation and migration as well as their morphogenic differentiation into capillary-like tubular structures in Matrigel. Our study demonstrates that HT, Tax and OA are novel and potent inhibitors of the VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. These findings emphasize the chemopreventive properties of olive oil and highlight the importance of nutrition in cancer prevention. - Highlights: • We investigated five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil on angiogenesis. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid are the best angiogenesis inhibitors. • Olive oil compounds affect endothelial cell functions essential for

  16. G protein-coupled receptor 183 facilitates endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition via Notch1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Panpan; He, Qiuping; Chen, Dongbo; Liu, Weixiao; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Chunxia; Ma, Dongyuan; Li, Wei; Liu, Bing; Liu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, embryonic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are derived from a subset of endothelial cells, the hemogenic endothelium (HE), through the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). Notch signaling is essential for HSPC development during embryogenesis across vertebrates. However, whether and how it regulates EHT remains unclear. Here, we show that G protein-coupled receptor 183 (Gpr183) signaling serves as an indispensable switch for HSPC emergence by repressing Notch signaling before the onset of EHT. Inhibition of Gpr183 significantly upregulates Notch signaling and abolishes HSPC emergence. Upon activation by its ligand 7α-25-OHC, Gpr183 recruits β-arrestin1 and the E3 ligase Nedd4 to degrade Notch1 in specified HE cells and then facilitates the subsequent EHT. Importantly, 7α-25-OHC stimulation promotes HSPC emergence in vivo and in vitro, providing an attractive strategy for enhancing the in vitro generation of functional HSPCs. PMID:26358189

  17. Sunitinib inhibits lymphatic endothelial cell functions and lymph node metastasis in a breast cancer model through inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Metastasis is a common event and the main cause of death in cancer patients. Lymphangiogenesis refers to the formation of new lymphatic vessels and is thought to be involved in the development of metastasis. Sunitinib is a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocks receptor tyrosine kinase activity, including that of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs). Although sunitinib is a clinically available angiogenesis inhibitor, its effects on lymphangiogenesis and lymph node metastasis remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sunitinib on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3) and a related event, lymphangiogenesis. Methods The effects of sunitinib on the degree of phosphorylation of VEGFR-2/3 and other signaling molecules was examined in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) treated with the drug; VEGF-induced LEC growth, migration, and tube formation were also examined. For the in vivo study, luciferase-expressing breast cancer cells were transplanted into mammary fat pads of mice; the microvessel and lymphatic vessel density was then measured after treatment with sunitinib and anti-VEGFR-2 antibody. Results First, in human LECs, sunitinib blocked both VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 phosphorylation induced by VEGF-C or VEGF-D, and abrogated the activation of the downstream molecules extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt. Furthermore, sunitinib attenuated the cell-proliferation activity induced by VEGF-C/D and prevented VEGF-C-induced migration and tube formation of the LECs; however, anti-VEGFR2 treatment shows only a partial effect on the growth and functions of the LECs. We used a breast cancer cell line expressing luciferase as a metastatic cancer model. Sunitinib treatment (40 mg/kg/day) inhibited the growth of the primary tumor transplanted in the mammary fat pad of the mice and significantly reduced the number of blood and lymphatic vessels in the tumor. Furthermore, the development

  18. Wnt5a inhibits K(+) currents in hippocampal synapses through nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Jorge; Montecinos-Oliva, Carla; Varas, Rodrigo; Alfaro, Iván E; Serrano, Felipe G; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Muñoz, Francisco J; Cerpa, Waldo; Godoy, Juan A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-09-01

    Hippocampal synapses play a key role in memory and learning processes by inducing long-term potentiation and depression. Wnt signaling is essential in the development and maintenance of synapses via several mechanisms. We have previously found that Wnt5a induces the production of nitric oxide (NO), which modulates NMDA receptor expression in the postsynaptic regions of hippocampal neurons. Here, we report that Wnt5a selectively inhibits a voltage-gated K(+) current (Kv current) and increases synaptic activity in hippocampal slices. Further supporting a specific role for Wnt5a, the soluble Frizzled receptor protein (sFRP-2; a functional Wnt antagonist) fully inhibits the effects of Wnt5a. We additionally show that these responses to Wnt5a are mediated by activation of a ROR2 receptor and increased NO production because they are suppressed by the shRNA-mediated knockdown of ROR2 and by 7-nitroindazole, a specific inhibitor of neuronal NOS. Together, our results show that Wnt5a increases NO production by acting on ROR2 receptors, which in turn inhibit Kv currents. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which Wnt5a may regulate the excitability of hippocampal neurons. PMID:26311509

  19. Glucocorticoids enhance concanavalin A-induced mitogenic response through the inhibition of nitric oxide production.

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, F; Silva, A

    1997-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are known to inhibit mitogen-induced proliferation of T cells. In this study we show two experimental situations where the addition of GC increases lymphocyte proliferation. It has been reported by different authors that rat spleen (SPL) cells proliferate poorly after concanavalin A (Con A) activation. These poor responses have been related to the suppressor activity of macrophages. Similarly, it is known that T-cell proliferation is depressed in the presence of an excess of macrophages in the culture. Here we show that in both experimental situations, the inclusion of dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, in the culture medium enhances the Con A-stimulated proliferation. We provide evidence that this effect is a consequence of the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by the hormone. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that rat SPL cells are inefficient antigen-presenting cells (APC) because of their spontaneous high production of NO. Taken together our results suggest that the effects of GC on T-cell activation may be to promote or inhibit proliferation depending on the level of endogenous NO synthesis. The possible significance of these results is briefly discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9038714

  20. Nitric oxide inhibition of Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission is critical for myogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, C; Falcone, S; Pisoni, S; Cipolat, S; Panzeri, C; Pambianco, S; Pisconti, A; Allevi, R; Bassi, MT; Cossu, G; Pozzan, T; Moncada, S; Scorrano, L; Brunelli, S; Clementi, E

    2011-01-01

    During myogenic differentiation the short mitochondria of myoblasts change into the extensively elongated network observed in myotubes. The functional relevance and the molecular mechanisms driving the formation of this mitochondrial network are unknown. We now show that mitochondrial elongation is required for myogenesis to occur and that this event depends on the cellular generation of nitric oxide (NO). Inhibition of NO synthesis in myogenic precursor cells leads to inhibition of mitochondrial elongation and of myogenic differentiation. This is due to the enhanced activity, translocation and docking of the pro-fission GTPase dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1) to mitochondria, leading also to a latent mitochondrial dysfunction that increased sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. These effects of NO inhibition were not observed in myogenic precursor cells containing a dominant-negative form of Drp1. Both NO-dependent repression of Drp1 action and maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and function were mediated through the soluble guanylate cyclase. These data uncover a novel level of regulation of differentiation linking mitochondrial morphology and function to myogenic differentiation. PMID:20467441

  1. Cytotoxic and Nitric Oxide Inhibition Activities of Propolis Extract along with Microencapsulation by Complex Coacervation.

    PubMed

    Onbas, Rabia; Kazan, Aslihan; Nalbantsoy, Ayse; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2016-09-01

    In this study, cytotoxicity of ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) originating from Sivas, Turkey was screened against several cancer cell lines, namely PC-3, U87MG, A-549, mPANC96, CaCo-2, MCF-7, HeLa, MDA-MB-231 and a non-tumor cell line HEK293 by MTT assay. The inhibition levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were also determined by using RAW 264.7 macrophage cells following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. EEP exhibited significant cytotoxic nitric oxide inhibition activities with an IC50 value of 0.1 ± 0.1 μg/ml indicating a high potential as an anti-inflammatory agent. In spite of these promising results and the fact that propolis is a highly nutritive substance, its low solubility and bitter taste limit the applications as a natural supplement. Encapsulation might serve as a good strategy in order to overcome these problems. Complex coacervation was applied where the main focus was on surfactant type, polymer ratio (alginate:gelatin), stirring rate and concentration of core material. The mean particle size of unloaded microparticles were 22.62 μm obtained with gelatin:alginate ratio of 1:1 at a stirring rate of 1400 rpm with 2 ml of 1 % (w/v) sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (Na-CMC), whereas addition of EEP at a concentration of 100 mg/ml increased the mean particle size to 36.44 μm and yielded an encapsulation efficiency of 98.77 %. The cytotoxicities of EEP loaded microparticles were also assessed both on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 where similar results were achieved as free EEP which can enhance the possible use of propolis extract in the industry as a natural supplement. PMID:27380456

  2. Regional intestinal blood flow and nitric oxide synthase inhibition during sepsis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, K; Moody, F G

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Regional circulatory changes in intestinal mucosa were evaluated after the onset of septic shock and the effect of nitric oxide (NO) inhibition on mucosal blood flow was investigated at different locations along the intestine. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The response of intestinal blood flow to different physiologic and pharmacologic stimuli is known to vary along the intestine, but limited data are available on regional alterations in intestinal blood flow during septic shock. These regional variations in intestinal blood flow could become important because NO inhibition might restore the circulation of one segment of the gut or exacerbate ischemia that may be occurring concomitantly in another segment of the intestine. METHODS: Mucosal blood flow was studied with fluorescent microspheres in conscious unrestrained rats before and 2, 4, and 6 hours after lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) induced sepsis in the presence and absence of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-argininemethylester (L-NAME, 5 mg/kg subcutaneously). RESULTS: Control mucosal blood flow was significantly higher in the ileum than in the duodenum, jejunum, or colon. During LPS-induced sepsis, mucosal blood flow to the ileum decreased and perfusion to the remaining gut was preserved. This was accompanied by hypotension throughout the experiment. L-NAME administration during sepsis prevented hypotension and decreased mucosal blood flow to all segments of small intestine at 2 hours. In this group, mucosal blood flow to the proximal small intestine but not to the ileum returned to baseline levels at 4 and 6 hours. L-NAME alone decreased mucosal blood flow to the small intestine throughout the experiment. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that mucosal blood flow alterations during septic shock vary along the intestine, with a significant change only in the ileum, suggesting that perfusion in the small intestine is dependent on physiologic NO production. PMID

  3. Inhibition of rat platelet aggregation by the diazeniumdiolate nitric oxide donor MAHMA NONOate

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Kerry L; Wanstall, Janet C

    2002-01-01

    Inhibition of rat platelet aggregation by the nitric oxide (NO) donor MAHMA NONOate (Z-1-{N-methyl-N-[6-(N-methylammoniohexyl)amino]}diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate) was investigated. The aims were to compare its anti-aggregatory effect with vasorelaxation, to determine the effects of the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one), and to investigate the possible role of activation of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA), independent of soluble guanylate cyclase, using thapsigargin. MAHMA NONOate concentration-dependently inhibited sub-maximal aggregation responses to collagen (2–10 μg ml−1) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 2 μM) in platelet rich plasma. It was (i) more effective at inhibiting aggregation induced by collagen than by ADP, and (ii) less potent at inhibiting platelet aggregation than relaxing rat pulmonary artery. ODQ (10 μM) caused only a small shift (approximately half a log unit) in the concentration-response curve to MAHMA NONOate irrespective of the aggregating agent. The NO-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, YC-1 (3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole; 1–100 μM), did not inhibit aggregation. The cGMP analogue, 8-pCPT-cGMP (8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine 3′5′ cyclic monophosphate; 0.1–1 mM), caused minimal inhibition. On collagen-aggregated platelets responses to MAHMA NONOate (ODQ 10 μM present) were abolished by thapsigargin (200 nM). On ADP-aggregated platelets thapsigargin caused partial inhibition. Results with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) resembled those with MAHMA NONOate. Glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitroprusside were poor inhibitors of aggregation. Thus inhibition of rat platelet aggregation by MAHMA NONOate (like GSNO) is largely ODQ-resistant and, by implication, independent of soluble guanylate cyclase. A likely mechanism of inhibition is activation of SERCA. PMID:12429580

  4. Changes of soluble CD40 ligand in the progression of acute myocardial infarction associate to endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms and vascular endothelial growth factor but not to platelet CD62P expression.

    PubMed

    Napoleão, Patrícia; Monteiro, Maria do Céu; Cabral, Luís B P; Criado, Maria Begoña; Ramos, Catarina; Selas, Mafalda; Viegas-Crespo, Ana Maria; Saldanha, Carlota; Carmo, Miguel Mota; Ferreira, Rui Cruz; Pinheiro, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Reported in vitro data implicated soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) in endothelial dysfunction and angiogenesis. However, whether sCD40L could exert that influence in endothelial dysfunction and angiogenesis after injury in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the association of sCD40L with markers of platelet activation, endothelial, and vascular function during a recovery period early after AMI. To achieve this goal, the time changes of soluble, platelet-bound, and microparticle-bound CD40L levels over 1 month were assessed in AMI patients and correlated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) polymorphisms, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations, and platelet expression of P-selectin (CD62P). The association of soluble form, platelet-bound, and microparticle-bound CD40L with CD62P expression on platelets, a marker of platelet activation, was also assessed to evaluate the role of CD40L in the thrombosis, whereas the association with eNOS and VEGF was to evaluate the role of CD40L in vascular dysfunction. This work shows for the first time that time changes of sCD40L over 1 month after myocardial infarct onset were associated with G894T eNOS polymorphism and with the VEGF concentrations, but not to the platelet CD62P expression. These results indicate that, in terms of AMI pathophysiology, the sCD40L cannot be consider just as being involved in thrombosis and inflammation but also as having a relevant role in vascular and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26279254

  5. Identification of vascular endothelial genes differentially responsive to fluid mechanical stimuli: cyclooxygenase-2, manganese superoxide dismutase, and endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase are selectively up-regulated by steady laminar shear stress.

    PubMed Central

    Topper, J N; Cai, J; Falb, D; Gimbrone, M A

    1996-01-01

    Early atherosclerotic lesions develop in a topographical pattern that strongly suggests involvement of hemodynamic forces in their pathogenesis. We hypothesized that certain endothelial genes, which exhibit differential responsiveness to distinct fluid mechanical stimuli, may participate in the atherogenic process by modulating, on a local level within the arterial wall, the effects of systemic risk factors. A differential display strategy using cultured human endothelial cells has identified two genes, manganese superoxide dismutase and cyclooxygenase-2, that exhibit selective and sustained up-regulation by steady laminar shear stress (LSS). Turbulent shear stress, a nonlaminar fluid mechanical stimulus, does not induce these genes. The endothelial form of nitric oxide synthase also demonstrates a similar LSS-selective pattern of induction. Thus, three genes with potential atheroprotective (antioxidant, antithrombotic, and antiadhesive) activities manifest a differential response to distinct fluid mechanical stimuli, providing a possible mechanistic link between endothelial gene expression and early events in atherogenesis. The activities of these and other LSS-responsive genes may have important implications for the pathogenesis and prevention of atherosclerosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8816815

  6. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats.

    PubMed

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo Del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-09-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na(+), Ca(2+) and K(+). The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of N (ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca(2+)-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  7. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na+, Ca2+ and K+. The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca2+-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  8. PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC) negatively regulates endothelial adhesion of monocytes via inhibition of NF κB activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chengye, Zhan; Daixing, Zhou Qiang, Zhong; Shusheng, Li

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •First time to display that LPS downregulate the expression of PRC. •First time to show that PRC inhibits the induction of VCAM-1 and E-selectin. •First time to show that PRC inhibit monocytes attachment to endothelial cells. •First time to display that PRC inhibits transcriptional activity of NF-κB. •PRC protects the respiration rate and suppresses the glycolysis rate against LPS. -- Abstract: PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC) is a growth-regulated transcriptional cofactor known to activate many of the nuclear genes specifying mitochondrial respiratory function. Endothelial dysfunction is a prominent feature found in many inflammatory diseases. Adhesion molecules, such as VCAM-1, mediate the attachment of monocytes to endothelial cells, thereby playing an important role in endothelial inflammation. The effects of PRC in regards to endothelial inflammation remain unknown. In this study, our findings show that PRC can be inhibited by the inflammatory cytokine LPS in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In the presence of LPS, the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecular, such as VCAM1 and E-selectin, is found to be increased. These effects can be negated by overexpression of PRC. Importantly, monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells caused by LPS is significantly attenuated by PRC. In addition, overexpression of PRC protects mitochondrial metabolic function and suppresses the rate of glycolysis against LPS. It is also found that overexpression of PRC decreases the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. These findings suggest that PRC is a negative regulator of endothelial inflammation.

  9. R-Ras protein inhibits autophosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 in endothelial cells and suppresses receptor activation in tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Junko; Li, Fangfei; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2015-03-27

    Abnormal angiogenesis is associated with a broad range of medical conditions, including cancer. The formation of neovasculature with functionally defective blood vessels significantly impacts tumor progression, metastasis, and the efficacy of anticancer therapies. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) potently induces vascular permeability and vessel growth in the tumor microenvironment, and its inhibition normalizes tumor vasculature. In contrast, the signaling of the small GTPase R-Ras inhibits excessive angiogenic growth and promotes the maturation of regenerating blood vessels. R-Ras signaling counteracts VEGF-induced vessel sprouting, permeability, and invasive activities of endothelial cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of R-Ras on VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation by VEGF, the key mechanism for angiogenic stimulation. We show that tyrosine phosphorylation of VEGFR2 is significantly elevated in the tumor vasculature and dermal microvessels of VEGF-injected skin in R-Ras knockout mice. In cultured endothelial cells, R-Ras suppressed the internalization of VEGFR2, which is required for full activation of the receptor by VEGF. Consequently, R-Ras strongly suppressed autophosphorylation of the receptor at all five major tyrosine phosphorylation sites. Conversely, silencing of R-Ras resulted in increased VEGFR2 phosphorylation. This effect of R-Ras on VEGFR2 was, at least in part, dependent on vascular endothelial cadherin. These findings identify a novel function of R-Ras to control the response of endothelial cells to VEGF and suggest an underlying mechanism by which R-Ras regulates angiogenesis. PMID:25645912

  10. Nitroglycerin drives endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway.

    PubMed

    Mao, Mao; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Fernandes, Denise C; Tanaka, Leonardo Y; Fukai, Tohru; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Mason, Ronald P; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Minshall, Richard D; Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G

    2012-01-15

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) has been clinically used to treat angina pectoris and acute heart episodes for over 100 years. The effects of GTN have long been recognized and active research has contributed to the unraveling of numerous metabolic routes capable of converting GTN to the potent vasoactive messenger nitric oxide. Recently, the mechanism by which minute doses of GTN elicit robust pharmacological responses was revisited and eNOS activation was implicated as an important route mediating vasodilation induced by low GTN doses (1-50nM). Here, we demonstrate that at such concentrations the pharmacologic effects of nitroglycerin are largely dependent on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt/PKB, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) signal transduction axis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nitroglycerin-dependent accumulation of 3,4,5-InsP(3), probably because of inhibition of PTEN, is important for eNOS activation, conferring a mechanistic basis for GTN pharmacological action at pharmacologically relevant doses. PMID:22037515

  11. Nitroglycerin drives endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Fernandes, Denise C.; Tanaka, Leonardo Y.; Fukai, Tohru; Laurindo, Francisco R.M.; Mason, Ronald P.; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Minshall, Richard D.; Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G.

    2012-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) has been clinically used to treat angina pectoris and acute heart episodes for over 100 years. The effects of GTN have long been recognized and active research has contributed to the unraveling of numerous metabolic routes capable of converting GTN to the potent vasoactive messenger nitric oxide. Recently, the mechanism by which minute doses of GTN elicit robust pharmacological responses was revisited and eNOS activation was implicated as an important route mediating vasodilation induced by low GTN doses (1–50 nM). Here, we demonstrate that at such concentrations the pharmacologic effects of nitroglycerin are largely dependent on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt/PKB, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) signal transduction axis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nitroglycerin-dependent accumulation of 3,4,5-InsP3, probably because of inhibition of PTEN, is important for eNOS activation, conferring a mechanistic basis for GTN pharmacological action at pharmacologically relevant doses. PMID:22037515

  12. Central role of intracellular calcium stores in acute flow- and agonist-evoked endothelial nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, I R; Griffith, T M

    1997-09-01

    1. We have used a cascade bioassay system and isolated arterial ring preparations to investigate the contribution of Ca2+ release from endothelial intracellular stores to nitric oxide (NO) production evoked by increases in shear stress and by acetylcholine in rabbit aorta. 2. Experiments were performed before and following incubation with either the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, 10 microM) and thapsigargin (TSG, 1 microM) or ryanodine (30, 100 microM) which binds to a specific endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-release channel. 3. In cascade bioassay all three agents induced relaxations of the recipient ring (CPA, 24.4 +/- 3.8%; TSG, 51.5 +/- 10.6%; ryanodine, 17.4 +/- 1.6%) which were significantly attenuated by preincubation of the donor with 100 microM NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). However, in isolated rings, only CPA and TSG induced L-NAME-sensitive relaxations (CPA 52.7 +/- 6.5%; TSG 61.3 +/- 7%). 4. Addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) to the donor perfusate evoked relaxations of the recipient ring in cascade bioassay (13.3 +/- 1.4%, n = 22). Prior administration of SOD attenuated relaxations to TSG (23.2 +/- 3.8% n = 4) and ryanodine (1.7 +/- 0.8%, n = 4), and pre-incubation with TSG and ryanodine blunted SOD-induced responses (4 +/- 1.5%, n = 4 and 8.9 +/- 1.1%, n = 4, respectively). By contrast, no interaction was observed between the relaxations evoked by SOD and CPA. In isolated rings, SOD exerted no direct relaxant and did not modulate relaxations to CPA, TSG or ryanodine. 5. In cascade bioassay studies time-averaged shear stress was manipulated with dextran (1-4% w/v, 800000 MW) to increase perfusate viscosity. NO-dependent relaxation of the recipient ring induced by increased perfusate viscosity was significantly attenuated by CPA (P < 0.01; n = 6) and TSG (P < 0.05; n = 7), but not by ryanodine (n = 6). 6. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (0.1-30 microM) in cascade bioassay and in

  13. Association of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Polymorphisms with Coronary Artery Disease: An Updated Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Farah; Kapoor, Aditya; Sinha, Nakul

    2014-01-01

    Several association studies of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene polymorphisms with respect to coronary artery disease (CAD) have been published in the past two decades. However, their association with the disease, especially among different ethnic subgroups, still remains controversial. This prompted us to conduct a systematic review and an updated structured meta-analysis, which is the largest so far (89 articles, 132 separate studies, and a sample size of 69,235), examining association of three polymorphic forms of the NOS3 gene (i.e. Glu298Asp, T786-C and 27bp VNTR b/a) with CAD. In a subgroup analysis, we tested their association separately among published studies originating predominantly from European, Middle Eastern, Asian, Asian-Indian and African ancestries. The pooled analysis confirmed the association of all the three selected SNP with CAD in three different genetic models transcending all ancestries worldwide. The Glu298Asp polymorphism showed strongest association (OR range = 1.28–1.52, and P<0.00001 for all comparisons), followed by T786-C (OR range = 1.34–1.42, and P<0.00001 for all comparisons) and 4b/a, (OR range = 1.19–1.41, and P≤0.002 for all comparisons) in our pooled analysis. Subgroup analysis revealed that Glu298Asp (OR range = 1.54–1.87, and P<0.004 for all comparisons) and 4b/a (OR range = 1.71–3.02, and P<0.00001 for all comparisons) have highest degree of association amongst the Middle Easterners. On the other hand, T786-C and its minor allele seem to carry a highest risk for CAD among subjects of Asian ancestry (OR range = 1.61–1.90, and P≤0.01 for all comparisons). PMID:25409023

  14. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) 4a/b and G894T Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Zohreh; Aghaei, Amir; Rahimi, Ziba; Vaisi-Raygani, Asad

    2013-01-01

    Background Preeclampsia is a pregnancy complication with unknown etiology and its incidence is associated with genetic and environmental factors. There are inconsistent reports related to the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) 4a/b polymorphism on the risk of preeclampsia development. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible influence of eNOS 4a/b and its synergism with eNOS G894T polymorphism on the risk of preeclampsia. Methods The present case-control study consisted of 179 unrelated women with preeclampsia including 118 with mild and 61 with severe preeclampsia and 96 unrelated women with normal pregnancy as controls. All studied women were from Kermanshah Province of Iran. eNOS 4a/b and G894T genotypes were detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods, respectively. The categorical variables between groups were compared using χ2 test and the Odds ratios (OR) were obtained by SPSS logistic regression. Statistical significance was assumed at p<0.05 level. Results The frequency of eNOS a allele was slightly higher in both mild (16.5%) and severe (17.2%) preeclamptic women than controls (15.1%). Also, no significant difference was found between early- and late-onset preeclamptic women regarding the distribution of eNOS 4a/b genotypes. The presence of each allele of eNOS a or T was not associated with the risk of preeclampsia. However, the concomitant presence of both eNOS a and T alleles was associated with a non significant increased risk of severe preeclampsia by 1.77-fold (p=0.35). Conclusion The present study indicates the lack of association between eNOS a and T alleles with the risk of mild preeclampsia and a non significant increased risk of severe preeclampsia in the presence of both alleles which needs to be investigated in a study with larger samples. PMID:24551572

  15. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 effectively inhibits angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang; Shi, Minglei; Xi, Yongyi; Gao, Lihua; Zhang, Guanyi; Shao, Yong; Chen, Huipeng; Hu, Xianwen

    2015-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in both physiological and pathological angiogenesis. VEGF receptor‑1 (VEGFR‑1) acts as a decoy VEGF receptor that enables the regulation of VEGF on the vascular endothelium. In the present study, the recombinant human VEGFR1D1‑3/Fc (rhVEGFR‑1), which contains key domains for VEGF binding, was cloned and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The rhVEGFR‑1 protein was purified using protein‑A affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of rhVEGFR‑1 was found to be ~162 and 81 kD in non‑reducing and reducing SDS‑PAGE, respectively. The majority of the final protein products were in the dimeric conformation. Western blot analysis revealed that rhVEGFR‑1 was only capable of binding to the full glycan form of rhVEGF‑165 and rhVEGF‑121. The dissociation constant for the binding of rhVEGFR‑1 to VEGF‑165, detected using Biacore, was 285 pM. In addition, rhVEGFR‑1 inhibited the proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In vivo experiments also demonstrated that rhVEGFR‑1 inhibited chicken chorioallantoic membrane neovascularization and angiogenesis in nude mice. In conclusion, an anti‑angiogenic recombinant soluble VEGFR was expressed (up to 5 mg/l) in CHO cells and was shown to be capable of inhibiting neovascularization in vivo and in vitro. PMID:25607471

  16. Aspirin inhibits interleukin 1-induced prostaglandin H synthase expression in cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.K.; Sanduja, R.; Tsai, A.L.; Ferhanoglu, B.; Loose-Mitchell, D.S. )

    1991-03-15

    Prostaglandin H (PGH) synthase is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxane, and prostacyclin. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells, interleukin 1 (IL-1) is known to induce the synthesis of this enzyme, thereby raising the level of PGH synthase protein severalfold over the basal level. Pretreatment with aspirin at low concentrations inhibited more than 60% of the enzyme mass and also the cyclooxygenase activity in IL-1-induced cells with only minimal effects on the basal level of the synthase enzyme in cells without IL-1. Sodium salicylate exhibited a similar inhibitory action whereas indomethacin had no apparent effect. Similarly low levels of aspirin inhibited the increased L-({sup 35}S)methionine incorporation into PGH synthase that was induced by IL0-1 and also suppressed expression of the 2.7-kilobase PGH synthase mRNA. These results suggest that in cultured endothelial cells a potent inhibition of eicosanoid biosynthetic capacity can be effected by aspirin or salicylate at the level of PGH synthase gene expression. The aspirin effect may well be due to degradation of salicylate.

  17. Natural phenylpropanoids inhibit lipoprotein-induced endothelin-1 secretion by endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Martin-Nizard, Françoise; Sahpaz, Sevser; Kandoussi, Abdelmejid; Carpentier, Marie; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Duriez, Patrick; Bailleul, François

    2004-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidized low-density lipoproteins (Ox-LDL) might be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and it has been reported that polyphenols inhibit LDL peroxidation and atherosclerosis. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictor peptide isolated from endothelial cells and it induces smooth muscle cell proliferation. ET-1 secretion is increased in atheroma and induces deleterious effects such as vasospasm and atherosclerosis. The goal of this study was to test the effect of four natural phenolic compounds against copper-oxidized LDL (Cu-LDL)-induced ET-1 liberation by bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). The tested compounds were phenylpropanoid glycosides previously isolated from the aerial parts of Marrubium vulgare L. (acteoside 1, forsythoside B 2, arenarioside 3 and ballotetroside 4). ET-1 secretion increased when cells were incubated with Cu-LDL but the compounds 1-4 inhibited this increase. These results were confirmed by quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis. Since ET-1 plays an important role in atherosclerosis development, our work suggests that the tested phenylpropanoids could have a beneficial effect in inhibiting atherosclerosis development. PMID:15563769

  18. Propofol inhibits burn injury-induced hyperpermeability through an apoptotic signal pathway in microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, K Y; Liu, X J; Xu, J D; Deng, L J; Wang, G

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have revealed that an intrinsic apoptotic signaling cascade is involved in vascular hyperpermeability and endothelial barrier dysfunction. Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) has also been reported to inhibit apoptotic signaling by regulating mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening and caspase-3 activation. Here, we investigated whether propofol could alleviate burn serum-induced endothelial hyperpermeability through the inhibition of the intrinsic apoptotic signaling cascade. Rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMVECs) were pretreated with propofol at various concentrations, followed by stimulation with burn serum, obtained from burn-injury rats. Monolayer permeability was determined by transendothelial electrical resistance. Mitochondrial release of cytochrome C was measured by ELISA. Bax and Bcl-2 expression and mitochondrial release of second mitochondrial-derived activator of caspases (smac) were detected by Western blotting. Caspase-3 activity was assessed by fluorometric assay; mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) was determined with JC-1 (a potential-sensitive fluorescent dye). Intracellular ATP content was assayed using a commercial kit, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Burn serum significantly increased monolayer permeability (P<0.05), and this effect could be inhibited by propofol (P<0.05). Compared with a sham treatment group, intrinsic apoptotic signaling activation - indicated by Bax overexpression, Bcl-2 downregulation, Δψm reduction, decreased intracellular ATP level, increased cytosolic cytochrome C and smac, and caspase-3 activation - was observed in the vehicle group. Propofol not only attenuated these alterations (P<0.05 for all), but also significantly decreased burn-induced ROS production (P<0.05). Propofol attenuated burn-induced RLMVEC monolayer hyperpermeability by regulating the intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway. PMID:25760023

  19. A newly synthesized sinapic acid derivative inhibits endothelial activation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaoyun; Zheng, Jinhong; Fu, Chenglai; Su, Hang; Sun, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xuesi; Hou, Yingjian; Zhu, Yi

    2013-05-01

    Inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammation in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) may represent a new therapeutic strategy against endothelial activation. Sinapic acid (SA), a phenylpropanoid compound, is found in natural herbs and high-bran cereals and has moderate antioxidant activity. We aimed to develop new SA agents with the properties of antioxidation and blocking EC activation for possible therapy of cardiovascular disease. We designed and synthesized 10 SA derivatives according to their chemical structures. Preliminary screening of the compounds involved scavenging hydroxyl radicals and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(⋅)), croton oil-induced ear edema in mice, and analysis of the mRNA expression of adhesion molecules in ECs. 1-Acetyl-sinapic acyl-4-(3'-chlorine-)benzylpiperazine (SA9) had the strongest antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the effect of SA9 was further studied. SA9 inhibited tumor necrosis factor α-induced upregulation of adhesion molecules in ECs at both mRNA and protein levels, as well as the consequent monocyte adhesion to ECs. In vivo, result of face-to-face immunostaining showed that SA9 reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in mouse aortic intima. To study the molecular mechanism, results from luciferase assay, nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and Western blot indicated that the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effects of SA9 might be suppression of intracellular generation of ROS and inhibition of NF-κB activation in ECs. SA9 is a prototype of a novel class of antioxidant with anti-inflammatory effects in ECs. It may represent a new therapeutic approach for preventing endothelial activation in cardiovascular disorders. PMID:23470287

  20. Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide Inhibits Chemokine Production by Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Stohl, Lori L.; Zhou, Xi; Ding, Wanhong; Granstein, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether the sensory neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) inhibits release of chemokines by dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Dermal blood vessels are associated with nerves containing CGRP, suggesting that CGRP-containing nerves may regulate cutaneous inflammation through effects on vessels. We examined CGRP effects on stimulated chemokine production by a human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) and primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (pHDMECs). HMEC-1 cells and pHDMECs expressed mRNA for components of the CGRP and adrenomedullin receptors and CGRP inhibited LPS-induced production of the chemokines CXCL8, CCL2, and CXCL1 by both HMEC-1 cells and pHDMECs. The receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)1/calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL)-specific antagonists CGRP8-37 and BIBN4096BS, blocked this effect of CGRP in a dose-dependent manner. CGRP prevented LPS-induced IκBα degradation and NF-κB binding to the promoters of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CCL2 in HMEC-1 cells and Bay 11-7085, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation, suppressed LPS-induced production of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CCL2. Thus, the NF-κB pathway appears to be involved in CGRP-mediated suppression of chemokine production. Accordingly, CGRP treatment of LPS-stimulated HMEC-1 cells inhibited their ability to chemoattract human neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Elucidation of this pathway may suggest new avenues for therapeutic manipulation of cutaneous inflammation. PMID:21334428

  1. Dual mechanisms of NF-kappaB inhibition in carnosol-treated endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, K.-C.; Chuang, J.-J.; Hsieh, C.-W.; Wung, B.-S.; Huang, G.-D.; Jian, T.-Y.; Sun, Y.-W.

    2010-05-15

    The increased adhesion of monocytes to injured endothelial layers is a critical early event in atherogenesis. Under inflammatory conditions, there is increased expression of specific cell adhesion molecules on activated vascular endothelial cells, which increases monocyte adhesion. In our current study, we demonstrate a putative mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effects of carnosol, a diterpene derived from the herb rosemary. Our results show that both carnosol and rosemary essential oils inhibit the adhesion of TNFalpha-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppress the expression of ICAM-1 at the transcriptional level. Moreover, carnosol was found to exert its inhibitory effects by blocking the degradation of the inhibitory protein IkappaBalpha in short term pretreatments but not in 12 h pretreatments. Our data show that carnosol reduces IKK-beta phosphorylation in pretreatments of less than 3 h. In TNFalpha-treated ECs, NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity was abolished by up to 12 h of carnosol pretreatment and this was blocked by Nrf-2 siRNA. The long-term inhibitory effects of carnosol thus appear to be mediated through its induction of Nrf-2-related genes. The inhibition of ICAM-1 expression and p65 translocation is reversed by HO-1 siRNA. Carnosol also upregulates the Nrf-2-related glutathione synthase gene and thereby increases the GSH levels after 9 h of exposure. Treating ECs with a GSH synthesis inhibitor, BSO, blocks the inhibitory effects of carnosol. In addition, carnosol increases p65 glutathionylation. Hence, our present findings indicate that carnosol suppresses TNFalpha-induced singling pathways through the inhibition of IKK-beta activity or the upregulation of HO-1 expression. The resulting GSH levels are dependent, however, on the length of the carnosol pretreatment period.

  2. Human neutrophil-pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell interactions in vitro: differential effects of nitric oxide vs. peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Jennifer L; Wang, Lefeng; Cepinskas, Gediminas; Inculet, Richard; Mehta, Sanjay

    2008-08-01

    Sepsis-induced acute lung injury is characterized by activation and injury of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC), increased neutrophil-PMVEC adhesion and migration, and trans-PMVEC high-protein edema. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) inhibits septic murine neutrophil migration in vivo and in vitro. The effects of NO in human neutrophil-PMVEC interactions are not known. We isolated human PMVEC using magnetic bead-bound anti-PECAM antibody. Confluent PMVEC at passage 3-4 were co-cultured with human neutrophils for assessment of neutrophil-PMVEC adhesion, and trans-PMVEC neutrophil migration and Evans-Blue dye-labeled albumin leak. Two NO donors (spermine-NONOate, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine) attenuated both cytomix-enhanced neutrophil-PMVEC adhesion by 64+/-14% (p<0.01) and 32+/-3% (p<0.05), respectively, and cytomix-induced trans-PMVEC neutrophil migration by 85+/-16% (p<0.01) and 43+/-5% (p<0.01), respectively. Correspondingly, iNOS inhibition with 1400W enhanced cytomix-stimulated neutrophil migration by 52+/-3% (p<0.01), but had no effect on neutrophil-PMVEC adhesion. Conversely, a peroxynitrite donor (SIN-1) increased both neutrophil-PMVEC adhesion (38+/-2% vs. 14+/-1% control, p<0.01) and trans-PMVEC neutrophil migration; with both effects were completely inhibited by scavenging of NO, superoxide, or peroxynitrite (p<0.05 for each). Scavenging of peroxynitrite also eliminated cytomix-induced neutrophil adhesion and migration. Blocking CD18-dependent neutrophil adhesion prevented cytomix-stimulated trans-PMVEC EB-albumin leak (p<0.05), while inhibiting neutrophil migration paradoxically enhanced cytomix-stimulated EB-albumin leak (11+/-1% vs. 7+/-0.5%, p<0.01). FMLP-induced neutrophil migration had no effect on trans-PMVEC EB-albumin leak. In summary, we report differential effects, including the inhibitory action of NO and stimulatory effect of ONOO(-) on human neutrophil-PMVEC adhesion and trans-PMVEC migration under cytomix stimulation

  3. Proliferation of macrophages due to the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis by oxidized low-density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Monika; Gruber, Miriam; Schmid, Diethart; Baran, Halina; Moeslinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is assumed to be a major causal agent in hypercholesteraemia-induced atherosclerosis. Because the proliferation of lipid-loaden macrophages within atherosclerotic lesions has been described, we investigated the dependence of macrophage proliferation on the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by hypochlorite oxidized LDL. Ox-LDL induces a dose dependent inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis in lipopolysaccharide-interferon stimulated mouse macrophages (J774.A1) with concomitant macrophage proliferation as assayed by cell counting, tritiated-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cell protein. Native LDL did not influence macrophage proliferation and inducible nitric oxide synthesis. iNOS protein and mRNA was reduced by HOCl-oxidized LDL (0-40 µg/ml) as revealed by immunoblotting and competitive semiquantitative PCR. Macrophage proliferation was increased by the addition of the iNOS inhibitor L-NAME. The addition of ox-LDL to L-NAME containing incubations induced no further statistically significant increase in cell number. Nitric oxide donors decreased ox-LDL induced macrophage proliferation and nitric oxide scavengers restored macrophage proliferation to the initial values achieved by ox-LDL. The decrease of cytosolic DNA fragments in stimulated macrophages incubated with ox-LDL demonstrates that the proliferative actions of ox-LDL are associated with a decrease of NO-induced apoptosis. Our data show that inhibition of iNOS dependent nitric oxide production caused by hypochlorite oxidized LDL enhances macrophage proliferation. This might be a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:26600745

  4. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis in vascular smooth muscle by retinoids.

    PubMed Central

    Hirokawa, K; O'Shaughnessy, K M; Ramrakha, P; Wilkins, M R

    1994-01-01

    1. These studies examine the effect of retinoids on interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta)-induced nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells and isolated rat aortic rings. 2. All-trans-retinoic acid (all-trans-RA, 0.1-10 microM) and its active analogues produced concentration-dependent inhibition of IL-1 beta (0.1-10 ng ml-1)-induced nitrite production in cultured VSM cells. In contrast, the inactive retinoid, Ro 14-6113 (0.1-10 microM), had no effect on IL-1 beta-induced nitrite production. 3. Since some of the actions of retinoids are mediated by induction of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), its effect on inducible NOS activity in VSM cells was examined. TGF-beta produced concentration-dependent (0.1-10 ng ml-1) inhibition of IL-1 beta-induced nitrite production and the maximum effect (approximately 90% inhibition) was significantly greater than that seen with all-trans-RA (approximately 70% with 10 microM). However, an anti-TGF-beta antibody (50 micrograms ml-1) which blocked the effect of exogenous TGF-beta (5 ng ml-1) did not significantly reverse the inhibitory action of all-trans-RA (10 microM). 4. In addition to inhibiting IL-1 beta-induced nitrite production, all-trans-RA (10 microM) reduced substantially inducible NOS mRNA and protein levels in IL-1 beta-induced VSM cells (P < 0.01). 5. Incubation of isolated rat aortic rings with IL-1 beta (10 ng ml-1) caused a progressive resistance of the rings to the vasoconstrictor action of phenylephrine (10 nM to 10 microM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7534188

  5. Myocardial microcirculation stereological changes in rats subjected to nitric oxide synthesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Pereira, L M; Mandarim-De-Lacerda, C A

    1999-01-01

    This work aims to study stereological changes in intramyocardial blood vessels in rats submitted to nitric oxide (NO) synthesis inhibition within different periods. NO synthesis inhibition was achieved by administration of L-NAME (50 mg/kg/day); control and L-NAME rats were sacrificed 25 and 40 days after experimentation. Light microscopy and stereology [according to references 7, 13 and 14] were used for analyzing the myocardium. Arterial blood pressure and cardiac weight increased by 74.5% and 57.8% after 25 days and by 90.2% and 34.6% after 40 days, respectively. Comparing the L-NAME rats with corresponding controls revealed that the volume density of the vessels decreased by 31.3% after 40 days, and the length density by 53.5% after 25 days and by 25.7% after 40 days. The mean cross-sectional area of the vessels increased by 154.6% after 25 days. In this study on intramyocardial vessels, we observed an important decrease of the length density in L-NAME animals. Likewise, the volume density also decreased significantly in L-NAME animals. The mean cross sectional area of the vessels, which normally increases during cardiac growth between 25 and 40 days, was precociously increased in L-NAME animals at 25 days, suggesting that these animals suffer from a precocious increase of the heart (including blood vessels) due to pressure overload. Stereology of cardiac microvessels revealed remodeling of these vessels in rats under NO synthesis inhibition. Although these changes may be caused by NO inhibition and not by arterial hypertension, further comparative studies on different models of arterial hypertension are needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:10220798

  6. Therapeutic effect of the endogenous fatty acid amide, palmitoylethanolamide, in rat acute inflammation: inhibition of nitric oxide and cyclo-oxygenase systems

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Barbara; Conti, Silvia; Giagnoni, Gabriella; Colleoni, Mariapia

    2002-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of the endogenous fatty acid amide palmitoylethanolamide and its relationship to cyclo-oxygenase (COX) activity, nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen free radical production were investigated in the rat model of carrageenan-induced acute paw inflammation and compared with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin. Palmitoylethanolamide (1, 3, 5, 10 mg kg−1; p.o.) and indomethacin (5 mg kg−1; p.o.) were administered daily after the onset of inflammation for three days and the paw oedema was measured daily; 24 h after the last dose (fourth day) the rats were killed and the COX activity and the content of nitrite/nitrate (NO2−/NO3−), malondialdehyde (MDA), endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and iNOS) were evaluated in the paw tissues. Palmitoylethanolamide had a curative effect on inflammation, inhibiting the carrageenan-induced oedema in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was not reversed by the selective CB2 receptor antagonist (N-[(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2yl]-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrazole-3 carboxamide) (SR144528), 3 mg kg−1 p.o. On the fourth day after carrageenan injection, COX activity and the level of NO2−/NO3−, eNOS and MDA were increased in the inflamed paw, but iNOS was not present. Palmitoylethanolamide (10 mg kg−1) and indomethacin markedly reduced these increases. Our findings show, for the first time, that palmitoylethanolamide has a curative effect in a model of acute inflammation. The inhibition of COX activity and of NO and free radical production at the site of inflammation might account for this activity. PMID:12359622

  7. Downregulation of Fes inhibits VEGF-A-induced chemotaxis and capillary-like morphogenesis by cultured endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Shigeru; Kanetake, Hiroshi; Miyata, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether the downregulation of endogenous Fes by siRNA in cultured endothelial cells affects vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A)-induced chemotaxis and capillary-like morphogenesis, which are considered as angiogenic cellular responses in vitro. VEGF-A-treatment induced autophosphorylation of Fes in cultured endothelial cells.LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, significantly inhibited VEGF-A-induced chemotaxis and capillary-like morphogenesis.Downregulation of Fes attenuated these VEGF-A-induced cellular responses but LY294002 did not produce further inhibition of these responses. Downregulation of Fes neither affected VEGF-A-induced autophosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 nor mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, but markedly decreased Akt activation.Taken together, our novel results indicate the involvement of Fes in VEGF-A-induced cellular responses by cultured endothelial cells. PMID:17521372

  8. The coffee diterpene kahweol inhibits tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Kim, Ji Young; Hwang, Yong Pil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang . E-mail: hgjeong@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Endothelial cells produce adhesion molecules after being stimulated with various inflammatory cytokines. These adhesion molecules play an important role in the development of atherogenesis. Recent studies have highlighted the chemoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of kahweol, a coffee-specific diterpene. This study examined the effects of kahweol on the cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interaction, which is a crucial early event in atherogenesis. Kahweol inhibited the adhesion of TNF{alpha}-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF{alpha}-induced protein and mRNA expression of the cell adhesion molecules, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Furthermore, kahweol inhibited the TNF{alpha}-induced JAK2-PI3K/Akt-NF-{kappa}B activation pathway in these cells. Overall, kahweol has anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic activities, which occurs partly by down-regulating the pathway that affects the expression and interaction of the cell adhesion molecules on endothelial cells.

  9. Competitive inhibition of LDL binding and uptake by HDL in aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.J.; Miguel, R.; Graham, D. )

    1990-09-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) may inhibit the binding and cellular uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as one means of regulating the delivery of exogenous cholesterol to nonhepatic tissues. This may play an important role in atherogenesis, by altering lipid metabolism in cells of the arterial wall. To verify and better characterize this effect, endothelial cells were harvested from bovine aorta and maintained in tissue culture. Following initial preincubation in lipid-deficient culture media, these cells were incubated for 2 hr at 4 degrees C in media containing 125I-LDL (10 micrograms protein/ml) and varying concentrations of either HDL (0-400 micrograms protein/ml) or comparable amounts of Apoprotein A (Apo A), the major protein component of HDL. Intracellular and trypsin-released counts were assayed separately, as a measurement of cellular uptake and membrane bound LDL, respectively. Results of this study indicated an inhibition of LDL binding and uptake by HDL (P less than 0.005, ANOVA). A similar inhibition was found with Apo A alone (P less than 0.005). When identical studies were performed using 125I-Apoprotein B, the protein component of LDL, and Apo A, the latter was found to inhibit the binding of Apo B to the same extent (P less than 0.0006). These results indicate that HDL does inhibit LDL binding and uptake by bovine aortic endothelial cells and that, because this effect is seen equally with only the protein component of these lipoprotein particles, it is most likely due to competitive binding at the receptor level rather than to stearic hindrance or an alteration of the cell membrane.

  10. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis aggravates reperfusion injury after hepatic ischemia and endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Mathews, W R; Guido, D M; Farhood, A; Jaeschke, H

    1995-10-01

    The potential role of nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in the pathophysiology of liver injury after priming with 20 min hepatic ischemia-reperfusion and administration of .5 mg/kg Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin. Liver injury during the early reperfusion phase of 4 h was characterized by severe vascular oxidant stress, lipid peroxidation (LPO), neutrophil infiltration, and a 33% reduction of the microvascular blood flow in the liver. Inhibition of NO synthesis with N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) aggravated liver injury by 90%, reduced LPO, and did not affect liver neutrophils but further impaired microvascular blood flow. Treatment with the NO-donor spermine-NONOate or L-arginine did not affect these parameters in postischemic animals, however, treatment did restore all values of L-NAME-treated animals back to disease control levels. These data suggest that endogenous NO formation is sufficient to limit ischemic liver injury during reperfusion but inhibition of NO synthesis will result in additional ischemic damage. NO may also be involved in scavenging of superoxide in the vasculature and in inducing LPO. PMID:8564557

  11. Nitric oxide inhibits cruzipain, the major papain-like cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Venturini, G; Salvati, L; Muolo, M; Colasanti, M; Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2000-04-13

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pluripotent regulatory molecule showing, among others, an antiparasitic activity. Moreover, NO inhibits cysteine proteinase action by nitrosylating the Cys catalytic residue. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of the substrate N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine-(7-amino-4-methyl coumarin) and of NO on the catalytic activity of cruzipain, the major papain-like cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi (the hemoflagellate protozoan parasite which causes the American trypanosomiasis), is reported. In particular, NO-donors S-nitroso-glutathione (GSNO), (+/-)-(E)-4-ethyl-2-[(E)-hydroxyimino]-5-nitro-3-hexenamide (NOR-3), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), S-nitroso-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) dose-dependently inhibited cruzipain, this effect being likely attributable to the S-nitrosylation of the Cys25 catalytic residue. These results were analyzed in parallel with those concerning the inhibitory effect of the substrate and of NO on the catalytic activity of falcipain, the cruzipain-homologous cysteine proteinase from Plasmodium falciparum. The modulation of the cruzipain and falcipain activity by NO may be relevant in developing new strategies against T. cruzi and P. falciparum in human host. As a whole, the NO-mediated S-nitrosylation of pathogenic viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic cysteine proteinases may represent a general mechanism of antimicrobial and antiparasitic host defences. PMID:10753643

  12. Investigations of the inhibition of copper corrosion in nitric acid solutions by ketene dithioacetal derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, A.; Chibani, A.; Darchen, A.; Boulkamh, A.; Djebbar, K.

    2007-10-01

    Ketene dithioacetal derivatives, namely 3-[bis(methylthio)methylene] pentane-2,4-dione ( 1), 3-(1,3-dithian-2-ylidene) pentane-2,4-dione ( 2) and 3-(1,3-dithiolan-2-ylidene) pentane-2,4-dione ( 3) were synthesized and their respective capacity to inhibit copper corrosion in 3 M HNO 3 was investigated by means of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The obtained results indicate that the addition of these compounds significantly decreases the corrosion rate. Potentiodynamic polarization studies clearly showed that the inhibition efficiency increases with increasing concentration of the investigated compounds at a fixed temperature, but decreases with increasing temperature. These results on the whole showed that the studied substances are good cathodic inhibitors for copper corrosion in nitric acid medium. SEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) examination of the copper surface revealed that these compounds prevented copper from corrosion by adsorption on its surface to form a protective film, which acts as a barrier to aggressive agents. The presence of these organic compounds adsorbed on the electrode surface was confirmed by XRF investigations.

  13. Gender-related associations of genetic polymorphisms of α-adrenergic receptors, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and bradykinin B2 receptor with treadmill exercise test responses

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Rafael Amorim Belo; Barroso, Lúcia Pereira; Pereira, Alexandre da Costa; Krieger, José Eduardo; Mansur, Alfredo José

    2014-01-01

    Background Treadmill exercise test responses have been associated with cardiovascular prognosis in individuals without overt heart disease. Neurohumoral and nitric oxide responses may influence cardiovascular performance during exercise testing. Therefore, we evaluated associations between functional genetic polymorphisms of α-adrenergic receptors, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, bradykinin receptor B2 and treadmill exercise test responses in men and women without overt heart disease. Methods We enrolled 766 (417 women; 349 men) individuals without established heart disease from a check-up programme at the Heart Institute, University of São Paulo Medical School. Exercise capacity, chronotropic reserve, maximum heart-rate achieved, heart-rate recovery, exercise systolic blood pressure (SBP), exercise diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and SBP recovery were assessed during exercise testing. Genotypes for the α-adrenergic receptors ADRA1A Arg347Cys (rs1048101), ADRA2A 1780 C>T (rs553668), ADRA2B Del 301–303 (rs28365031), endothelial nitric synthase (eNOS) 786 T>C (rs2070744), eNOS Glu298Asp (rs1799983) and BK2R (rs5810761) polymorphisms were assessed by PCR and high-resolution melting analysis. Results Maximum SBP was associated with ADRA1A rs1048101 (p=0.008) and BK2R rs5810761 (p=0.008) polymorphisms in men and ADRA2A rs553668 (p=0.008) and ADRA2B rs28365031 (p=0.022) in women. Maximum DBP pressure was associated with ADRA2A rs553668 (p=0.002) and eNOS rs1799983 (p=0.015) polymorphisms in women. Exercise capacity was associated with eNOS rs2070744 polymorphisms in women (p=0.01) and with eNOS rs1799983 in men and women (p=0.038 and p=0.024). Conclusions The findings suggest that genetic variants of α-adrenergic receptors and bradykinin B2 receptor may be involved with blood pressure responses during exercise tests. Genetic variants of endothelial nitric oxide synthase may be involved with exercise capacity and blood pressure responses during exercise tests

  14. Coronary vasomotor responses to isometric handgrip exercise are primarily mediated by nitric oxide: a noninvasive MRI test of coronary endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Hays, Allison G; Iantorno, Micaela; Soleimanifard, Sahar; Steinberg, Angela; Schär, Michael; Gerstenblith, Gary; Stuber, Matthias; Weiss, Robert G

    2015-06-01

    Endothelial cell release of nitric oxide (NO) is a defining characteristic of nondiseased arteries, and abnormal endothelial NO release is both a marker of early atherosclerosis and a predictor of its progression and future events. Healthy coronaries respond to endothelial-dependent stressors with vasodilatation and increased coronary blood flow (CBF), but those with endothelial dysfunction respond with paradoxical vasoconstriction and reduced CBF. Recently, coronary MRI and isometric handgrip exercise (IHE) were reported to noninvasively quantify coronary endothelial function (CEF). However, it is not known whether the coronary response to IHE is actually mediated by NO and/or whether it is reproducible over weeks. To determine the contribution of NO, we studied the coronary response to IHE before and during infusion of N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA, 0.3 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), a NO-synthase inhibitor, in healthy volunteers. For reproducibility, we performed two MRI-IHE studies ~8 wk apart in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Changes from rest to IHE in coronary cross-sectional area (%CSA) and diastolic CBF (%CBF) were quantified. l-NMMA completely blocked normal coronary vasodilation during IHE [%CSA, 12.9 ± 2.5 (mean ± SE, placebo) vs. -0.3 ± 1.6% (l-NMMA); P < 0.001] and significantly blunted the increase in flow [%CBF, 47.7 ± 6.4 (placebo) vs. 10.6 ± 4.6% (l-NMMA); P < 0.001]. MRI-IHE measures obtained weeks apart strongly correlated for CSA (P < 0.0001) and CBF (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the normal human coronary vasoactive response to IHE is primarily mediated by NO. This noninvasive, reproducible MRI-IHE exam of NO-mediated CEF promises to be useful for studying CAD pathogenesis in low-risk populations and for evaluating translational strategies designed to alter CAD in patients. PMID:25820391

  15. p90 RSK-1 associates with and inhibits neuronal nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tao; Sugimoto, Katsuyoshi; Ihara, Hideshi; Mizutani, Akihiro; Hatano, Naoya; Kume, Kodai; Kambe, Toshie; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tokuda, Masaaki; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2006-01-01

    Evidence is presented that RSK1 (ribosomal S6 kinase 1), a downstream target of MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), directly phosphorylates nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) on Ser847 in response to mitogens. The phosphorylation thus increases greatly following EGF (epidermal growth factor) treatment of rat pituitary tumour GH3 cells and is reduced by exposure to the MEK (MAPK/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase kinase) inhibitor PD98059. Furthermore, it is significantly enhanced by expression of wild-type RSK1 and antagonized by kinase-inactive RSK1 or specific reduction of endogenous RSK1. EGF treatment of HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney) cells, expressing RSK1 and nNOS, led to inhibition of NOS enzyme activity, associated with an increase in phosphorylation of nNOS at Ser847, as is also the case in an in vitro assay. In addition, these phenomena were significantly blocked by treatment with the RSK inhibitor Ro31-8220. Cells expressing mutant nNOS (S847A) proved resistant to phosphorylation and decrease of NOS activity. Within minutes of adding EGF to transfected cells, RSK1 associated with nNOS and subsequently dissociated following more prolonged agonist stimulation. EGF-induced formation of the nNOS–RSK1 complex was significantly decreased by PD98059 treatment. Treatment with EGF further revealed phosphorylation of nNOS on Ser847 in rat hippocampal neurons and cerebellar granule cells. This EGF-induced phosphorylation was partially blocked by PD98059 and Ro31-8220. Together, these data provide substantial evidence that RSK1 associates with and phosphorylates nNOS on Ser847 following mitogen stimulation and suggest a novel role for RSK1 in the regulation of nitric oxide function in brain. PMID:16984226

  16. α2A-adrenoceptors, but not nitric oxide, mediate the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition of moxonidine.

    PubMed

    Cobos-Puc, Luis E; Aguayo-Morales, Hilda; Silva-Belmares, Yesenia; González-Zavala, Maria A; Centurión, David

    2016-07-01

    Moxonidine centrally inhibits the sympathetic activity through the I1-imidazoline receptor and nitric oxide. In addition, inhibits the peripheral cardiac sympathetic outflow by α2-adrenoceptors/I1-imidazoline receptors, although the role of α2-adrenoceptor subtypes or nitric oxide in the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine are unknown. Therefore, the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine (10μg/kgmin) was evaluated before and after of the treatment with the following antagonists/inhibitor: (1) BRL 44408, (300μg/kg, α2A), imiloxan, (3000μg/kg, α2B), and JP-1302, (300μg/kg, α2C), in animals pretreated with AGN 192403 (3000μg/kg, I1 antagonist); (2) N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 34, 100, and 340μg/kgmin); and (3) the combinations of the highest dose of l-NAME plus AGN 192403 or BRL 44408. Additionally, the expression of the neuronal (nNOS) and inducible (iNOS) nitric oxide synthase in the stellate ganglion was determined after treatment with moxonidine (i.p. 0.56mg/kg daily, during one week). The cardiac sympatho-inhibition of 10μg/kgmin moxonidine was: (1) unaffected by imiloxan and JP-1302, under pretreatment with AGN 192403, or l-NAME (34, 100 and 340μg/kgmin) given alone; (2) partially antagonized by the combination of 340 μg/kgmin l-NAME plus BRL 44408; and (3) abolished by BRL 44408 under treatment with AGN 192403. Furthermore, moxonidine did not modify the nNOS or iNOS protein expression in the stellate ganglion, the main source of postganglionic sympathetic neurons innervating the heart. In conclusion, our results suggest that the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine is mediated by α2A-adrenoceptor subtype but not by nitric oxide. PMID:27112661

  17. Geraniol improves endothelial function by inhibiting NOX-2 derived oxidative stress in high fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Shiqi; Su, Mengqi; Sun, Li; Zhang, Song; Wang, Dingyu; Liu, Zhaorui; Yuan, Yue; Liu, Yang; Li, Yue

    2016-05-20

    Endothelial dysfunction occurs in obese patients and high-fat diet (HFD) fed experimental animals. While geraniol has been reported to ameliorate inflammation and oxidative stress, inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and improve atherosclerosis, its direct effect on endothelial function remains uncharacterized. The present study therefore investigated the effect of geraniol on endothelial function in HFD mice and its underlying mechanisms. C57 BL/6 mice were fed an HFD (n = 40) or a normal diet (n = 20) for 8 weeks. HFD fed mice then were randomized to intraperitoneal treatment with geraniol (n = 20) or vehicle (n = 20) for another 6 weeks. Acetylcholine (Ach)-induced endothelial dependent vasorelaxation was measured on wire myography; reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed by fluorescence imaging, and NADPH oxidases (NOXs) and adhesive molecules VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 protein expression by western blotting. Geraniol improved endothelial function in HFD fed mice, as evidenced by its: 1. restoring endothelial dependent vasorelaxation induced by Ach, and reversing increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression; 2. attenuating HFD induced increased serum TBARS and aortic ROS generation; and 3. downregulating aortic NOX-2 expression in both HFD fed mice and in palmitic acid treated endothelial cells. Geraniol therefore protects against endothelial dysfunction induced by HFD through reducing NOX-2 associated ROS generation. PMID:27107694

  18. Antagonist of nitric oxide synthesis inhibits nerve-mediated relaxation of isolated strips of rumen and reticulum.

    PubMed

    Schneider, D A; Eades, S C

    1998-10-01

    The present study investigated the possibility that nitric oxide is a nonadrenergic, noncholinergic neurotransmitter of nerves that are intrinsic to the forestomach. Tunica muscularis, myenteric plexus preparations of bovine reticulum and rumen were maintained in vitro in a physiological solution of buffer that contained scopolamine. Trains of electric field stimulation transiently reduced (relaxed) the tone induced by BaCl2. NG-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide synthase competitive antagonist, inhibited relaxation of the rumen and reticulum preparations that had been induced by the electrical field. The actions of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester were partially reversed by L-arginine. These data suggest that nitric oxide, or a related substance, is an inhibitory neurotransmitter of nerves that are intrinsic to tunica muscularis, myenteric plexus preparations of the bovine forestomach. PMID:9812264

  19. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (-786T>C) and Endothelin-1 (5665G>T) Gene Polymorphisms as Vascular Dysfunction Risk Factors in Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, Wendell; Figueiredo, Camylla V B; Pitanga, Thassila N; Carvalho, Magda O S; Santiago, Rayra P; Santana, Sânzio S; Guarda, Caroline C; Zanette, Angela M D; Cerqueira, Bruno A V; Gonçalves, Marilda S

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients have vascular complications, and polymorphisms in endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) genes were associated with ET-1 and nitric oxide disturbance. We investigate the association of ET-1 5665G>T and eNOS -786T>C polymorphisms with soluble adhesion molecules (sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1), biochemical markers, and medical history. We studied 101 SCA patients; carriers of eNOS minor allele (C) had the highest levels of sVCAM-1, and carriers of ET-1 minor allele had more occurrence of acute chest syndrome (ACS). The multivariate analysis suggested the influence of the ET-1 gene on ACS outcome and an association of the eNOS gene with upper respiratory tract infection. We suggest that eNOS and ET-1 gene polymorphisms can influence SCA pathophysiology and that eNOS variant in SCA patients might be important to nitric oxide activity and vascular alteration. We found an association of the ET-1 minor allele in ACS, showing the importance of genetic screening in SCA. PMID:27486304

  20. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (−786T>C) and Endothelin-1 (5665G>T) Gene Polymorphisms as Vascular Dysfunction Risk Factors in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Wendell; Figueiredo, Camylla V. B.; Pitanga, Thassila N.; Carvalho, Magda O. S.; Santiago, Rayra P.; Santana, Sânzio S.; Guarda, Caroline C.; Zanette, Angela M. D.; Cerqueira, Bruno A. V.; Gonçalves, Marilda S.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients have vascular complications, and polymorphisms in endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) genes were associated with ET-1 and nitric oxide disturbance. We investigate the association of ET-1 5665G>T and eNOS −786T>C polymorphisms with soluble adhesion molecules (sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1), biochemical markers, and medical history. We studied 101 SCA patients; carriers of eNOS minor allele (C) had the highest levels of sVCAM-1, and carriers of ET-1 minor allele had more occurrence of acute chest syndrome (ACS). The multivariate analysis suggested the influence of the ET-1 gene on ACS outcome and an association of the eNOS gene with upper respiratory tract infection. We suggest that eNOS and ET-1 gene polymorphisms can influence SCA pathophysiology and that eNOS variant in SCA patients might be important to nitric oxide activity and vascular alteration. We found an association of the ET-1 minor allele in ACS, showing the importance of genetic screening in SCA. PMID:27486304

  1. Nitric oxide donors inhibit formation of the Apaf-1/caspase-9 apoptosome and activation of caspases.

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Birgit; Köhl, Roman; von Knethen, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Caspases are critical for the initiation and execution of apoptosis. Nitric oxide (NO) or derived species can prevent programmed cell death in several cell types, reportedly through S-nitrosation and inactivation of active caspases. Although we find that S-nitrosation of caspases can occur in vitro, our study questions whether this post-translational modification is solely responsible for NO-mediated inhibition of apoptosis. Indeed, using Jurkat cells as a model system, we demonstrate that NO donors block Fas- and etoposide-induced caspase activation and apoptosis (downstream of mitochondrial membrane depolarization) and cytochrome c release. However, caspase activity was not restored by the strong reducing agent dithiothreitol, as predicted for S-nitrosation reactions, thereby excluding active-site-thiol modification of caspases as the only anti-apoptotic mechanism of NO donors in cells. Rather, we observed that processing of procaspases-9, -3 and -8 was decreased due to ineffective formation of the Apaf-1/caspase-9 apoptosome. Gel-filtration and in vitro binding assays indicated that NO donors inhibit correct assembly of Apaf-1 into an active approx. 700 kDa apoptosome complex, and markedly attenuate caspase-recruitment domain (CARD)-CARD interactions between Apaf-1 and procaspase-9. Therefore we suggest that NO or a metabolite acts directly at the level of the apoptosome and inhibits the sequential activation of caspases-9, -3 and -8, which are required for both stress- and receptor-induced death in cells that use the mitochondrial subroute of cell demise. PMID:12605597

  2. A large blood pressure-raising effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibition in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, M.; Chavoshan, B.; Victor, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    In experimental animals, systemic administration of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors causes large increases in blood pressure that are in part sympathetically mediated. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which these conclusions can be extrapolated to humans. In healthy normotensive humans, we measured blood pressure in response to two NOS inhibitors, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), the latter of which recently became available for use in humans. The major new findings are 3-fold. First, L-NAME produced robust increases in blood pressure that were more than 2 times larger than those previously reported in humans with L-NMMA and approximated those seen in experimental animals. L-NAME (4 mg/kg) raised mean arterial pressure by 24+/-2 mm Hg (n=27, P<0.001), whereas in subjects who received both inhibitors, a 12-fold higher dose of L-NMMA (50 mg/kg) raised mean arterial pressure by 15+/-2 mm Hg (n=4, P<0.05 vs L-NAME). Second, the L-NAME-induced increases in blood pressure were caused specifically by NOS inhibition because they were reversed by L-arginine (200 mg/kg, n=12) but not D-arginine (200 mg/kg, n=6) and because NG-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester (4 mg/kg, n=5) had no effect on blood pressure. Third, in humans, there is an important sympathetic component to the blood pressure-raising effect of NOS inhibition. alpha-Adrenergic blockade with phentolamine (0.2 mg/kg, n=9) attenuated the L-NAME-induced increase in blood pressure by 40% (P<0.05). From these data, we conclude that pharmacological inhibition of NOS causes large increases in blood pressure that are in part sympathetically mediated in humans as well as experimental animals.

  3. Combined inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins reduces human skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Boushel, Robert; Langberg, Henning; Gemmer, Carsten; Olesen, Jens; Crameri, Regina; Scheede, Celena; Sander, Michael; Kjær, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is an important mediator of tissue vasodilatation, yet the role of the specific substances, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG), in mediating the large increases in muscle perfusion during exercise in humans is unclear. Quadriceps microvascular blood flow was quantified by near infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green in six healthy humans during dynamic knee extension exercise with and without combined pharmacological inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) and PG by l-NAME and indomethacin, respectively. Microdialysis was applied to determine interstitial release of PG. Compared to control, combined blockade resulted in a 5- to 10-fold lower muscle interstitial PG level. During control incremental knee extension exercise, mean blood flow in the quadriceps muscles rose from 10 ± 0.8 ml (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1 at rest to 124 ± 19, 245 ± 24, 329 ± 24 and 312 ± 25 ml (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1 at 15, 30, 45 and 60 W, respectively. During inhibition of NOS and PG, blood flow was reduced to 8 ± 0.5 ml (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1 at rest, and 100 ± 13, 163 ± 21, 217 ± 23 and 256 ± 28 ml (100 ml tissue)−1 min−1 at 15, 30, 45 and 60 W, respectively (P < 0.05 vs. control). In conclusion, combined inhibition of NOS and PG reduced muscle blood flow during dynamic exercise in humans. These findings demonstrate an important synergistic role of NO and PG for skeletal muscle vasodilatation and hyperaemia during muscular contraction. PMID:12205200

  4. Fulvene-5 potently inhibits NADPH oxidase 4 and blocks the growth of endothelial tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhandarkar, Sulochana S.; Jaconi, Marisa; Fried, Levi E.; Bonner, Michael Y.; Lefkove, Benjamin; Govindarajan, Baskaran; Perry, Betsy N.; Parhar, Ravi; Mackelfresh, Jamie; Sohn, Allie; Stouffs, Michael; Knaus, Ulla; Yancopoulos, George; Reiss, Yvonne; Benest, Andrew V.; Augustin, Hellmut G.; Arbiser, Jack L.

    2009-01-01

    Hemangiomas are the most common type of tumor in infants. As they are endothelial cell–derived neoplasias, their growth can be regulated by the autocrine-acting Tie2 ligand angiopoietin 2 (Ang2). Using an experimental model of human hemangiomas, in which polyoma middle T–transformed brain endothelial (bEnd) cells are grafted subcutaneously into nude mice, we compared hemangioma growth originating from bEnd cells derived from wild-type, Ang2+/–, and Ang2–/– mice. Surprisingly, Ang2-deficient bEnd cells formed endothelial tumors that grew rapidly and were devoid of the typical cavernous architecture of slow-growing Ang2-expressing hemangiomas, while Ang2+/– cells were greatly impaired in their in vivo growth. Gene array analysis identified a strong downregulation of NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) in Ang2+/– cells. Correspondingly, lentiviral silencing of Nox4 in an Ang2-sufficient bEnd cell line decreased Ang2 mRNA levels and greatly impaired hemangioma growth in vivo. Using a structure-based approach, we identified fulvenes as what we believe to be a novel class of Nox inhibitors. We therefore produced and began the initial characterization of fulvenes as potential Nox inhibitors, finding that fulvene-5 efficiently inhibited Nox activity in vitro and potently inhibited hemangioma growth in vivo. In conclusion, the present study establishes Nox4 as a critical regulator of hemangioma growth and identifies fulvenes as a potential class of candidate inhibitor to therapeutically interfere with Nox function. PMID:19620773

  5. 6,6'-bieckol isolated from Ecklonia cava protects oxidative stress through inhibiting expression of ROS and proinflammatory enzymes in high-glucose-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Hwa; Heo, Soo-Jin; Park, Pyo-Jam; Moon, Sang-Ho; Sung, Si-Heung; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Lee, Seung-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress accelerates endothelial cell dysfunctions, which cause various complications of diabetes. The protective effects of 6,6'-bieckol (BEK), one of phlorotannin compound purified from Ecklonia cava against high-glucose-induced oxidative stress was investigated using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), which is susceptible to oxidative stress. High glucose (30 mM) treatment induced HUVECs' cell death, but BEK, at concentration 10 or 50 μg/ml, significantly inhibited the high-glucose-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, treatment with BEK dose-dependently decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and nitric oxide level increased by high glucose. In addition, high glucose levels induced the overexpressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) proteins in HUVECs, but BEK treatment reduced the overexpressions of these proteins. These findings indicate that BEK is a potential therapeutic agent that will prevent diabetic endothelial dysfunction and related complications. PMID:25086922

  6. Cocaine inhibits store-operated Ca2+ entry in brain microvascular endothelial cells: critical role for sigma-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Console-Bram, Linda M; Soboloff, Jonathan; Abood, Mary E; Unterwald, Ellen M; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an intracellular chaperone protein with many ligands, located at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Binding of cocaine to Sig-1R has previously been found to modulate endothelial functions. In the present study, we show that cocaine dramatically inhibits store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a Ca(2+) influx mechanism promoted by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Using either Sig-1R shRNA or pharmacological inhibition with the unrelated Sig-1R antagonists BD-1063 and NE-100, we show that cocaine-induced SOCE inhibition is dependent on Sig-1R. In addition to revealing new insight into fundamental mechanisms of cocaine-induced changes in endothelial function, these studies indicate an unprecedented role for Sig-1R as a SOCE inhibitor. PMID:26467159

  7. Endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide synthases variably modulate the estrogen-mediated control of blood pressure and cardiovascular autonomic control

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We have previously shown that long-term estrogen (E2) replacement lowers blood pressure (BP) and improves the cardiovascular autonomic control in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. In this study, we investigated whether constitutive and/or inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) modulate these E2 effects.We evaluated changes in BP, myocardial contractility index (dP/dtmax), and power spectral indices of hemodynamic variability following selective inhibition of eNOS [N5-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine; L-NIO], nNOS (Nω-propyl-L-arginine; NPLA), or iNOS (1400W) in telemetered OVX rats treated for 16 weeks with (OVXE2) or without (control, OVXC) E2.OVXE2 rats exhibited: (i) reduced BP, and increased dP/dtmax, (ii) cardiac parasympathetic dominance as reflected by the reduced low-frequency (LF, 0.25–0.75 Hz)/high-frequency (HF, 0.75–3 Hz) ratio of interbeat intervals (IBILF/HF), and (iii) reduced LF oscillations of systolic BP, suggesting a reduced vasomotor sympathetic tone.eNOS inhibition (L-NIO, 20 mg/kg i.p.) elicited a shorter-lived pressor response in OVXE2, than in OVXC, rats along with reductions in dP/dtmax and increases in the spectral index of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (index α). NPLA (1 mg/kg i.p.) reduced BP and increased IBILF/HF ratio in OVXE2, but not OVXC rats. The iNOS inhibitor 1400W (5 mg/kg i.p.) caused no hemodynamic changes in OVXC or OVXE2 rats.Overall, constitutive NOS isoforms exert restraining tonic modulatory BP effects, which encompass eNOS-mediated reduction and nNOS-mediated elevation in BP in OVXE2 rats. Baroreflex facilitation, and dP/dtmax reductions might account for the shorter pressor action of L-NIO in E2-treated, compared with untreated, OVX rats. PMID:24471817

  8. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors Prevent the Growth-inhibiting Effects of Quinpirole

    PubMed Central

    Nickla, Debora L.; Lee, Laimeng; Totonelly, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Both dopamine and nitric oxide (NO) have been implicated in the signal cascade mediating ocular growth inhibition. If both are part of the same pathway, which precedes the other? We tested the hypothesis that dopamine acts upstream of NO, by using two NOS inhibitors in combination with the dopamine agonist quinpirole, and measuring the effects on ocular growth rate. Methods Chicks wore −10 D lenses or diffusers (FD) for 4d starting at age 13d. Experimental eyes received daily 20 μl injections of the following: Quinpirole: lens: n=12; FD: n=20; n-ω-propyl-L-arginine (n-PLA): lens: n=6; FD: n=4; quinpirole + n-PLA: lens: n=17; FD: n=19; quinpirole + L-NIO: lens: n=12; FD: n=12. Saline injections were done as controls. High frequency ultrasonography was done at the start, and on day 5, prior to injections and 3 hours later. Refractions were measured on day5. Results As expected, quinpirole prevented the development of axial myopia in both paradigms. When quinpirole was combined with either NOS inhibitor, however, eyes became myopic compared to quinpirole (FD: n-PLA: −5.9D vs −3.4D; L-NIO: −5.8D vs −3.4D; LENS: n-PLA: −3.5D vs −0.4D; p<0.05 for all; L-NIO was not significant). This was the result of a dis-inhibition of vitreous chamber growth vs quinpirole (FD: n-PLA: 401 vs 275 μm/4d; L-NIO: 440 vs 275 μm/4d; LENS: n-PLA: 407 vs 253/4d; L-NIO: 403 vs 253 μm/4d; p<0.05). Only n-PLA prevented the quinpirole-induced choroidal thickening in lens-wearing eyes (0 vs 31 μm/3hr; p<0.05). Choroidal thickening was not inhibited by either drug in FD eyes. Conclusions Dopamine acts upstream of NO and the choroidal response in the signal cascade mediating ocular growth inhibition in both form deprivation and negative lens wear. That neither NOS inhibitor inhibits choroidal thickening in FD eyes suggests that the choroidal mechanisms differ in the two paradigms. PMID:24061155

  9. Nitric oxide inhibits capacitative Ca2+ entry by suppression of mitochondrial Ca2+ handling

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Malli, Roland; Schmidt, Kurt; Graier, Wolfgang F; Groschner, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key modulator of cellular Ca2+ signalling and a determinant of mitochondrial function. Here, we demonstrate that NO governs capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) into HEK293 cells by impairment of mitochondrial Ca2+ handling. Authentic NO as well as the NO donors 1-[2-(carboxylato)pyrrolidin-1-yl]diazem-1-ium-1,2-diolate (ProliNO) and 2-(N,N-diethylamino)-diazenolate-2-oxide (DEANO) suppressed CCE activated by thapsigargin (TG)-induced store depletion. Threshold concentrations for inhibition of CCE by ProliNO and DEANO were 0.3 and 1 μM, respectively. NO-induced inhibition of CCE was not mimicked by peroxynitrite (100 μM), the peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1, 100 μM) or 8-bromoguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcGMP, 1 mM). In addition, the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazole[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 30 μM) failed to antagonize the inhibitory action of NO on CCE. DEANO (1–10 μM) suppressed mitochondrial respiration as evident from inhibition of cellular oxygen consumption. Experiments using fluorescent dyes to monitor mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial Ca2+ levels, respectively, indicated that DEANO (10 μM) depolarized mitochondria and suppressed mitochondrial Ca2+ sequestration. The inhibitory effect of DEANO on Ca2+ uptake into mitochondria was confirmed by recording mitochondrial Ca2+ during agonist stimulation in HEK293 cells expressing ratiometric-pericam in mitochondria. DEANO (10 μM) failed to inhibit Ba2+ entry into TG-stimulated cells when extracellular Ca2+ was buffered below 1 μM, while clear inhibition of Ba2+ entry into store depleted cells was observed when extracellular Ca2+ levels were above 10 μM. Moreover, buffering of intracellular Ca2+ by use of N,N′-[1,2-ethanediylbis(oxy-2,1-phenylene)] bis [N-[25-[(acetyloxy) methoxy]-2-oxoethyl

  10. How mental stress affects endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Nakanishi-Toda, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    Mental stress is an important factor contributing to recognized mechanisms underlying cardiovascular events. Among these, stress-related endothelial dysfunction is an early risk factor that predicts future development of severe cardiovascular disorders. Acute mental stress by a variety of tests impairs endothelial function in humans, although the opposite results have been reported by some investigators. Chronic stress always deteriorates endothelial function in humans and experimental animals. Stress hormones, such as glucocorticoids and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and endothelin-1 liberated in response to mental stress participate in endothelial dysfunction possibly via downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, eNOS inactivation, decreased nitric oxide (NO) actions, and increased NO degradation, together with vasoconstriction counteracting against NO-induced vasodilatation. Catecholamines do not directly affect endothelial function but impair its function when blood pressure elevation by the amines is sustained. Endogenous opioids favorably affect endothelial function, which counteract deteriorating effects of other stress hormones and mediators. Inhibition of cortisol and endothelin-1 production, prevention of pro-inflammatory mediator accumulation, hypnotics, mirthful laughter, humor orientation, and lifestyle modification would contribute to the prevention and treatment for stress-related endothelial dysfunction and future serious cardiovascular disease. PMID:21947555

  11. R-Ras inhibits VEGF-induced p38MAPK activation and HSP27 phosphorylation in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Junko; Li, Fangfei; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    R-Ras is a Ras family small GTPase highly expressed in mature functional blood vessels in normal tissues. It inhibits pathological angiogenesis and promotes vessel maturation and stabilization. Previous studies suggest that R-Ras affects cellular signaling in endothelial cells, pericytes, and smooth muscle cells to regulate vessel formation and remodeling in adult tissues. R-Ras suppresses VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and vessel sprouting while promoting normalization of pathologically developing vessels in mice. R-Ras attenuates VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) activation by inhibiting internalization of the receptor upon VEGF ligand binding, leading to significant reduction of VEGFR2 autophosphorylation. Here, we show that R-Ras strongly suppresses VEGF-dependent activation of stress-activated protein kinase-2/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (SAPK2/p38MAPK) and phosphorylation of downstream heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a regulator of actin cytoskeleton organization, in endothelial cells. The suppression of p38MAPK activation and HSP27 phosphorylation by R-Ras concurred with altered actin cytoskeleton architecture, reduced membrane protrusion, and inhibition of endothelial cell migration toward VEGF. Silencing of endogenous R-Ras by RNAi increased membrane protrusion and cell migration stimulated by VEGF, and these effects were offset by p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580. These results suggest that R-Ras regulates angiogenic activities of endothelial cells in part via inhibition of the p38MAPK-HSP27 axis of VEGF signaling. PMID:27029009

  12. R-Ras Inhibits VEGF-Induced p38MAPK Activation and HSP27 Phosphorylation in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Junko; Li, Fangfei; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    R-Ras is a Ras family small GTPase that is highly expressed in mature functional blood vessels in normal tissues. It inhibits pathological angiogenesis and promotes vessel maturation and stabilization. Previous studies suggest that R-Ras affects cellular signaling in endothelial cells, pericytes and smooth-muscle cells to regulate vessel formation and remodeling in adult tissues. R-Ras suppresses VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and vessel sprouting while promoting normalization of pathologically developing vessels in mice. It attenuates VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) activation by inhibiting internalization of the receptor upon VEGF ligand binding, leading to significant reduction of VEGFR2 autophosphorylation. Here, we show that R-Ras strongly suppresses the VEGF-dependent activation of stress-activated protein kinase-2/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (SAPK2/p38MAPK) and the phosphorylation of downstream heat-shock protein 27 (HSP27), a regulator of actin cytoskeleton organization, in endothelial cells. The suppression of p38MAPK activation and HSP27 phosphorylation by R-Ras concurred with altered actin cytoskeleton architecture, reduced membrane protrusion and inhibition of endothelial cell migration toward VEGF. Silencing of endogenous R-Ras by RNA interference increased membrane protrusion and cell migration stimulated by VEGF, and these effects were offset by p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580. These results suggest that R-Ras regulates angiogenic activities of endothelial cells in part via inhibition of the p38MAPK-HSP27 axis of VEGF signaling. PMID:27029009

  13. Infantile hemangioma-derived stem cells and endothelial cells are inhibited by class 3 semaphorins

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hironao; Huang, Lan; Kelly, Ryan P.; Oudenaarden, Clara R.L.; Dagher, Adelle; Hofmann, Nicole A.; Moses, Marsha A.; Bischoff, Joyce; Klagsbrun, Michael

    2015-08-14

    Class 3 semaphorins were discovered as a family of axon guidance molecules, but are now known to be involved in diverse biologic processes. In this study, we investigated the anti-angiogenic potential of SEMA3E and SEMA3F (SEMA3E&F) in infantile hemangioma (IH). IH is a common vascular tumor that involves both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Our lab has identified and isolated hemangioma stem cells (HemSC), glucose transporter 1 positive (GLUT1{sup +}) endothelial cells (designated as GLUT1{sup sel} cells) based on anti-GLUT1 magnetic beads selection and GLUT1-negative endothelial cells (named HemEC). We have shown that these types of cells play important roles in hemangiogenesis. We report here that SEMA3E inhibited HemEC migration and proliferation while SEMA3F was able to suppress the migration and proliferation in all three types of cells. Confocal microscopy showed that stress fibers in HemEC were reduced by SEMA3E&F and that stress fibers in HemSC were decreased by SEMA3F, which led to cytoskeletal collapse and loss of cell motility in both cell types. Additionally, SEMA3E&F were able to inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced sprouts in all three types of cells. Further, SEMA3E&F reduced the level of p-VEGFR2 and its downstream p-ERK in HemEC. These results demonstrate that SEMA3E&F inhibit IH cell proliferation and suppress the angiogenic activities of migration and sprout formation. SEMA3E&F may have therapeutic potential to treat or prevent growth of highly proliferative IH. - Highlights: • SEMA3E&F reduce actin stress fibers and induce cytoskeletal collapse in HemEC. • SEMA3E&F inhibit angiogenic activities of HemEC. • SEMA3E&F can interrupt the VEGF-A-VEGFR2-ERK signaling pathway in HemEC. • Plexin D1 and NRP2 are induced during HemSC/GLUT1{sup sel}-to-EC differentiation.

  14. Treatment of metastatic colorectal carcinomas by systemic inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Volker; Kornek, Miroslaw; Hilbert, Tobias; Dzienisowicz, Christian; Raskopf, Esther; Rabe, Christian; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Qian, Cheng; Caselmann, Wolfgang H

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Tumor angiogenesis has been shown to be promoted by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) via stimulating endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and survival. Blockade of VEGF signaling by different means has been demonstrated to result in reduced tumor growth and suppression of tumor angiogenesis in distinct tumor entities. Here, we tested a recombinant adenovirus, AdsFlt1-3, that encodes an antagonistically acting fragment of the VEGF receptor 1 (Flt-1), for systemic antitumor effects in pre-established subcutaneous CRC tumors in mice. METHODS: Murine colorectal carcinoma cells (CT26) were inoculated subcutaneously into Balb/c mice for in vivo studies. Tumor size and survival were determined. 293 cell line was used for propagation of the adenoviral vectors. Human lung cancer line A549 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were transfected for in vitro experiments. RESULTS: Infection of tumor cells with AdsFlt1-3 resulted in protein secretion into cell supernatant, demonstrating correct vector function. As expected, the secreted sFlt1-3 protein had no direct effect on CT26 tumor cell proliferation in vitro, but endothelial cell function was inhibited by about 46% as compared to the AdLacZ control in a tube formation assay. When AdsFlt1-3 (5×109 PFU/animal) was applied to tumor bearing mice, we found a tumor inhibition by 72% at d 12 after treatment initiation. In spite of these antitumoral effects, the survival time was not improved. According to reduced intratumoral microvessel density in AdsFlt1-3-treated mice, the antitumor mechanism can be attributed to angiostatic vector effects. We did not detect increased systemic VEGF levels after AdsFlt1-3 treatment and liver toxicity was low as judged by serum alanine aminotransferase determination. CONCLUSION: In this study we confirmed the value of a systemic administration of AdsFlt1-3 to block VEGF signaling as antitumor therapy in an experimental metastatic colorectal carcinoma model in mice. PMID

  15. Lithium prevents early cytosolic calcium increase and secondary injurious calcium overload in glycolytically inhibited endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bosche, Bert; Schäfer, Matthias; Graf, Rudolf; Härtel, Frauke V.; Schäfer, Ute; Noll, Thomas

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We investigate free calcium as a central signalling element in endothelial cells. •Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose reduces cellular ATP. •This manoeuvre leads to a biphasic increase and overload of free calcium. •Pre-treatment with lithium for 24 h abolishes both phases of the calcium increase. •This provides a new strategy to protect endothelial calcium homeostasis and barrier function. -- Abstract: Cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is a central signalling element for the maintenance of endothelial barrier function. Under physiological conditions, it is controlled within narrow limits. Metabolic inhibition during ischemia/reperfusion, however, induces [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload, which results in barrier failure. In a model of cultured porcine aortic endothelial monolayers (EC), we addressed the question of whether [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload can be prevented by lithium treatment. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and ATP were analysed using Fura-2 and HPLC, respectively. The combined inhibition of glycolytic and mitochondrial ATP synthesis by 2-desoxy-D-glucose (5 mM; 2-DG) plus sodium cyanide (5 mM; NaCN) caused a significant decrease in cellular ATP content (14 ± 1 nmol/mg protein vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg protein in the control, n = 6 culture dishes, P < 0.05), an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (278 ± 24 nM vs. 71 ± 2 nM in the control, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05), and the formation of gaps between adjacent EC. These observations indicate that there is impaired barrier function at an early state of metabolic inhibition. Glycolytic inhibition alone by 10 mM 2-DG led to a similar decrease in ATP content (14 ± 2 nmol/mg vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg in the control, P < 0.05) with a delay of 5 min. The [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} response of EC was biphasic with a peak after 1 min (183 ± 6 nM vs. 71 ± 1 nM, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05) followed by a sustained increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. A 24-h pre-treatment with 10 mM of lithium

  16. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase decreases elevated levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase and apoptotic cell death in ocular hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Aslan, Mutay; Basaranlar, Goksun; Unal, Mustafa; Ciftcioglu, Akif; Derin, Narin; Mutus, Bulent

    2014-11-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and excessive nitric oxide production via induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neuronal retinal cell death in ocular hypertension. Neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase)/ceramide pathway can regulate NOS2 expression, hence this study determined the role of selective neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase) inhibition on retinal NOS2 levels, ER stress, apoptosis and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in a rat model of elevated intraocular pressure (EIOP). NOS2 expression and retinal protein nitration were significantly greater in EIOP and significantly decreased with N-SMase inhibition. A significant increase was observed in retinal ER stress markers pPERK, CHOP and GRP78 in EIOP, which were not significantly altered by N-SMase inhibition. Retinal TUNEL staining showed increased apoptosis in all EIOP groups; however N-SMase inhibition significantly decreased the percent of apoptotic cells in EIOP. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities were significantly increased in EIOP and returned to baseline levels following N-SMase inhibition. Latencies of all VEP components were significantly prolonged in EIOP and shortened following N-SMase inhibition. Data confirm the role of nitrative injury in EIOP and highlight the protective effect of N-SMase inhibition in EIOP via down-regulation of NOS2 levels and nitrative stress. - Highlights: • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases NOS2 levels in ocular hypertension. • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases protein nitration in ocular hypertension. • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases caspase activation in ocular hypertension. • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases apoptosis in ocular hypertension.

  17. Inhibition of potassium-stimulated dopamine release by the nitric oxide generator isosorbide dinitrate.

    PubMed

    Sun, P; Kanthasamy, A; Yim, G K; Isom, G E

    1995-02-01

    In PC12 cells, isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) and S-nitrosol-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), both nitric oxide (NO) generators, attenuated K+ (56 mM)-stimulated release of dopamine. The attenuation was not observed with isosorbide, an ISDN analog lacking NO generating capacity. In this model, A23187 (Ca2+ ionophore), Bay K8644 (Ca2+ slow channel agonist) and veratridine (Na+ channel agonist) stimulated dopamine release. Treatment with ISDN enhanced Bay K8644 and veratridine-evoked dopamine release, while ISDN had no significant effect on the A23187 response. Incubation with 8-bromo-cGMP (membrane permeable cGMP analog) had no effect on basal or stimulated dopamine release in these cells, suggesting NO's response was not mediated by cGMP. In additional studies, K+ (56 mM), Bay K8644 and veratridine elevated cytosolic free calcium levels ([Ca2+]i). ISDN reduced K(+)-stimulated increase in [Ca2+]i, but enhanced the increases of [Ca2+]i induced by Bay K8644 or veratridine. These results suggest NO interacts with K(+)-induced membrane depolarization (possibly by inhibiting membrane conductance to K+) to attenuate Ca2+ influx and Ca(2+)-mediated dopamine secretion stimulated by K+. PMID:7542370

  18. LIF-JAK1-STAT3 signaling delays contact inhibition of human corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Tseng, Scheffer C G; Zhang, Ming-Chang; Chen, Szu-Yu; Tighe, Sean; Lu, Wen-Juan; Zhu, Ying-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) responsible for corneal transparency have limited proliferative capacity in vivo because of "contact-inhibition." This feature has hampered the ability to engineer HCECs for transplantation. Previously we have reported an in vitro model of HCECs in which contact inhibition was re-established at Day 21, even though cell junction and cell matrix interaction were not perturbed during isolation. Herein, we observe that such HCEC monolayers continue to expand and retain a normal phenotype for 2 more weeks if cultured in a leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-containing serum-free medium. Such expansion is accompanied initially by upregulation of Cyclin E2 colocalized with nuclear translocation of phosphorylated retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (p-Rb) at Day 21 followed by a delay in contact inhibition through activation of LIF-Janus kinase1 (JAK1)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling at Day 35. The LIF-JAK1-STAT3 signaling is coupled with upregulation of E2F2 colocalized with nuclear p-Rb and with concomitant downregulation of p16(INK4a), of which upregulation is linked to senescence. Hence, activation of LIF-JAK1-STAT3 signaling to delay contact inhibition can be used as another strategy to facilitate engineering of HCEC grafts to solve the unmet global shortage of corneal grafts. PMID:25695744

  19. Normalization of Supine Blood Pressure After Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition in Persons With Tetraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Wecht, Jill M; Weir, Joseph P; Krothe, AnnMarie H; Spungen, Ann M; Bauman, William A

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Orthostatic hypotension is a well-defined clinical consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), particularly in those with tetraplegia. The etiology of orthostatic hypotension is thought to be loss of sympathetic vasomotor control, although other factors may play a role. There is evidence of up-regulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity after hind-limb suspension in rats, a condition of antigravity that may have similar vascular effects as shown in persons with tetraplegia caused by paralysis. The study objective was to determine the effect of a NOS inhibitor (nitro-L-arginine methyl ester [L-NAME]) on supine mean arterial pressure in persons with chronic tetraplegia compared with non-SCI controls. Methods: Fourteen individuals participated (7 with tetraplegia and 7 controls). Subjects visited the laboratory twice for placebo on day 1 and L-NAME (1 mg/kg) on day 2; both were infused intravenously over 60 minutes. Blood pressure was monitored for 3 hours after infusion at the brachial artery using a standard manual cuff. Results: Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was lower at baseline (P < 0.05) and after placebo administration (P < 0.0001) in the tetraplegia group compared with the control group. L-NAME increased MAP in both groups; however, the relative increase was greater in the tetraplegia group compared with the control group, such that group differences for MAP were eliminated. Supine MAP was normalized with L-NAME, and there was an increased sensitivity to NOS inhibition in the group with tetraplegia. Conclusions: These findings indicate that blood pressure dysregulation in persons with tetraplegia may reflect increased vascular NO and suggest a novel treatment of hypotension using NOS inhibition in this population. PMID:17385265

  20. The Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Cediranib (Recentin; AZD2171) Inhibits Endothelial Cell Function and Growth of Human Renal Tumor Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, Dietmar W. Brazelle, W.D.; Juergensmeier, Juliane M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine the therapeutic potential of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling inhibitor cediranib in a human model of renal cell carcinoma (Caki-1). Methods and Materials: The effects of cediranib treatment on in vitro endothelial cell function (proliferation, migration, and tube formation), as well as in vivo angiogenesis and tumor growth, were determined. Results: In vitro, cediranib significantly impaired the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and their ability to form tubes, but had no effect on the proliferation of Caki-1 tumor cells. In vivo, cediranib significantly reduced Caki-1 tumor cell-induced angiogenesis, reduced tumor perfusion, and inhibited the growth of Caki-1 tumor xenografts. Conclusions: The present results are consistent with the notion that inhibition of VEGF signaling leads to an indirect (i.e., antiangiogenic) antitumor effect, rather than a direct effect on tumor cells. These results further suggest that inhibition of VEGF signaling with cediranib may impair the growth of renal cell carcinoma.

  1. Constitutive Store-Operated Ca(2+) Entry Leads to Enhanced Nitric Oxide Production and Proliferation in Infantile Hemangioma-Derived Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells.

    PubMed

    Zuccolo, Estella; Bottino, Cinzia; Diofano, Federica; Poletto, Valentina; Codazzi, Alessia Claudia; Mannarino, Savina; Campanelli, Rita; Fois, Gabriella; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Guerra, Germano; Montagna, Daniela; Laforenza, Umberto; Rosti, Vittorio; Massa, Margherita; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-02-15

    Clonal endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been implicated in the aberrant vascular growth that features infantile hemangioma (IH), the most common benign vascular tumor in childhood that may cause ulceration, bleeding, and/or permanent disfigurement. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), truly endothelial EPCs endowed with clonal ability and capable of forming patent vessels in vivo, remodel their Ca(2+) toolkit in tumor-derived patients to acquire an adaptive advantage. Particularly, they upregulate the proangiogenic store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) pathway due to the overexpression of its underlying components, that is, stromal interaction molecule 1 (Stim1), Orai1, and transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1). The present work was undertaken to assess whether and how the Ca(2+) signalosome is altered in IH-ECFCs by employing Ca(2+) and nitric oxide (NO) imaging, real-time pol