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Sample records for inhibitor everolimus rad001

  1. FINAL RESULTS OF A PROSPECTIVE MULTI-INSTITUTIONAL PHASE II STUDY OF EVEROLIMUS (RAD001), AN MTOR INHIBITOR, IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT OR PROGRESSIVE LOW-GRADE GLIOMA. A POETIC CONSORTIUM TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Kieran, Mark W.; Yao, X.; Macy, M.; Leary, S.; Cohen, K.; MacDonald, T.; Allen, J.; Boklan, J.; Smith, A.; Nazemi, K.; Gore, L.; Trippett, T.; DiRenzo, J.; Narendran, A.; Perentesis, J.; Prabhu, S.; Pinches, N.; Robison, N.; Manley, P.; Chi, S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Purpose: The ras/raf signaling pathway is crucial in the development of pediatric low-grade gliomas (LGGs). Aberrant ras/raf signaling is involved in tumorigenesis through promotion of cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in sporadic LGG. Everolimus (RAD001) is a potent and selective inhibitor of mTOR, a downstream element of the ras/raf pathway. The activity, safety and pharmacokinetics of everolimus in pediatric patients with radiographic recurrent/progressive LGG are presented. METHODS: Pediatric patients with radiographic progressive or recurrent LGGs without neurofibromatosis type I were treated with oral everolimus 5mg/m2/dose once daily. Therapy was provided for 28 days (one cycle) and could be repeated for a total of 12 cycles. Response, as determined by standard 2-D MRI criteria, was assessed for all patients. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenetics, pharmacodynamic parameters including inhibition of p70s6 kinase activity, 4E-BP1 phosphorylation inhibition and suppression of cMyc expression, as well as the toxicity profile of everolimus were evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients with a median age of 9 years (range, 3–17 years) were enrolled, all of whom had received prior chemotherapy (average # regimens = 2.7) including progression after a carboplatin-containing regimen. Median number of cycles of therapy was 10 (range, 1-12). Responses were determined by blinded central review and included 4 patients with PR (>50% decrease) and 13 with stable disease. Six patients had progressive disease by one year. Overall therapy was well tolerated; two patients discontinued therapy due to mouth sores (n = 1) and withdrawal of consent (n = 1). Everolimus PK parameters were similar to those previously reported in both adult and pediatric patients and drug trough levels were maintained above 5ng/ml. Pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated inhibition of downstream targets of mTOR including phospho-S6 kinase, 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and c

  2. PTEN Loss Does Not Predict for Response to RAD001 (Everolimus) in a Glioblastoma Orthotopic Xenograft Test Panel

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Clarke, Michelle J.; Carlson, Brett L.; Mladek, Ann C.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Decker, Paul; Wu, Wenting; Kitange, Gaspar J.; Grogan, Patrick T.; Goble, Jennie M.; Uhm, Joon; Galanis, Evanthia; Giannini, Caterina; Lane, Heidi A.; James, C. David; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling through disruption of PTEN function is common in glioblastoma multiforme, and these genetic changes are predicted to enhance sensitivity to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors such as RAD001 (everolimus). Experimental Design To test whether PTEN loss could be used as a predictive marker for mTOR inhibitor sensitivity, the response of 17 serially transplantable glioblastoma multiforme xenografts was evaluated in an orthotopic therapy evaluation model. Of these 17 xenograft lines, 7 have either genomic deletion or mutation of PTEN. Results Consistent with activation of Akt signaling, there was a good correlation between loss of PTEN function and elevated levels of Akt phosphorylation. However, of the 7 lines with disrupted PTEN function, only 1 tumor line (GBM10) was significantly sensitive to RAD001 therapy (25% prolongation in median survival), whereas1 of 10 xenograft lines with wild-type PTEN was significantly sensitive to RAD001 (GS22; 34% prolongation in survival). Relative to placebo, 5 days of RAD001 treatment was associated with a marked 66% reduction in the MIB1 proliferation index in the sensitive GBM10 line (deleted PTEN) compared with a 25% and 7% reduction in MIB1 labeling index in the insensitive GBM14 (mutant PTEN) and GBM15 (wild-type PTEN) lines, respectively. Consistent with a cytostatic antitumor effect, bioluminescent imaging of luciferase-transduced intracranial GBM10 xenografts showed slowed tumor growth without significant tumor regression during RAD001 therapy. Conclusion These data suggest that loss of PTEN function is insufficient to adequately predict responsiveness to mTOR inhibitors in glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:18559622

  3. Phase II Study of Temozolomide (TMZ) and Everolimus (RAD001) Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dronca, Roxana S.; Allred, Jacob B.; Perez, Domingo G.; Nevala, Wendy K.; Lieser, Elizabeth A.T.; Thompson, Michael; Maples, William J.; Creagan, Edward T.; Pockaj, Barbara A.; Kaur, Judith S.; Moore, Timothy D.; Marchello, Benjamin T.; Markovic, Svetomir N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is activated in malignant melanoma and in situ lesions as opposed to benign nevi. Inhibition of PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling is implicated in sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agents [temozolomide (TMZ)] and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Methods We conducted a single-arm phase II multi-institution cooperative group study to assess the antitumor activity and safety profile of the combination of TMZ and the rapamycin derivative everolimus in patients with metastatic unresectable malignant melanoma. Patients received 10 mg/d of RAD001 for 5 of 7 days (ie, 50 mg/ wk) and 200 mg/m2/d of TMZ for 5 days each cycle. Results Of the first 39 eligible patients, 17 were PFS-9 successes, for a predetermined threshold of 18/39 patients for a positive trial. Overall, 21 of 48 patients were progression free at 9 weeks, for an event-free survival rate of 44% (95% confidence interval, 29%–59%). The median progression-free survival was 2.4 months and the median overall survival was 8.6 months. Four patients achieved a partial response; the median duration of response was 15.1 months. No complete remissions were observed. Treatment was in general well tolerated with only 1 patient discontinuing therapy due to toxicity (hyperlipidemia). Conclusions The combination of TMZ and RAD001 was well tolerated but failed to meet/exceed our study threshold for promising clinical activity in patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:23357973

  4. RAD001 (everolimus) attenuates experimental autoimmune neuritis by inhibiting the mTOR pathway, elevating Akt activity and polarizing M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Han, Ranran; Gao, Juan; Zhai, Hui; Xiao, Jinting; Ding, Ya'nan; Hao, Junwei

    2016-06-01

    Guillain-Barre' syndrome (GBS) is an acute, postinfectious, immune-mediated, demyelinating disease of peripheral nerves and nerve roots. As a classical animal model of GBS, experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) has become well-accepted. Additionally, the potent immune modulation exerted by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors has been used to treat cancers and showed beneficial effects. Here we demonstrate that the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 (everolimus) protected rats from the symptoms of EAN, as shown by decreased paralysis, diminished inflammatory cell infiltration, reductions in demyelination of peripheral nerves and improved nerve conduction. Furthermore, RAD001 shifted macrophage polarization toward the protective M2 phenotype and modified the inflammatory milieu by downregulating the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IFN-γ and IL-17as well as upregulating the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 and TGF-β. Amounts of the mTOR downstream targets p-P70S6K and p-4E-BP1 in sciatic nerves decreased, whereas the level of its upstream protein p-Akt was elevated. This demonstrated that RAD001 inhibited the mTOR pathway and encouraged the expression of p-Akt, which led to M2 macrophage polarization, thus improved the outcome of EAN in rats. Consequently, RAD001 exhibits strong potential as a therapeutic strategy for ameliorating peripheral poly-neuropathy. PMID:27063582

  5. RTOG 0913: A Phase 1 Study of Daily Everolimus (RAD001) in Combination With Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Won, Minhee; Wen, Patrick Y.; Wendland, Merideth; Dipetrillo, Thomas A.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus (RAD001) administered daily with concurrent radiation and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients. Methods and Materials: Everolimus was administered daily with concurrent radiation (60 Gy in 30 fractions) and temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2} per day). Everolimus was escalated from 2.5 mg/d (dose level 1) to 5 mg/d (dose level 2) to 10 mg/d (dose level 3). Adjuvant temozolomide was delivered at 150 to 200 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1 to 5, every 28 days, for up to 12 cycles, with concurrent everolimus at the previously established daily dose of 10 mg/d. Dose escalation continued if a dose level produced dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) in fewer than 3 of the first 6 evaluable patients. Results: Between October 28, 2010, and July 2, 2012, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0913 protocol initially registered a total of 35 patients, with 25 patients successfully meeting enrollment criteria receiving the drug and evaluable for toxicity. Everolimus was successfully escalated to the predetermined maximum tolerated dose of 10 mg/d. Two of the first 6 eligible patients had a DLT at each dose level. DLTs included gait disturbance, febrile neutropenia, rash, fatigue, thrombocytopenia, hypoxia, ear pain, headache, and mucositis. Other common toxicities were grade 1 or 2 hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia. At the time of analysis, there was 1 death reported, which was attributed to tumor progression. Conclusions: Daily oral everolimus (10 mg) combined with both concurrent radiation and temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide is well tolerated, with an acceptable toxicity profile. A randomized phase 2 clinical trial with mandatory correlative biomarker analysis is currently under way, designed to both determine the efficacy of this regimen and identify molecular determinants of response.

  6. Activity of everolimus (RAD001) in relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma: a phase I study

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Andreas; Baumann, Philipp; Burger, Renate; Kellner, Christian; Klapper, Wolfram; Schmidmaier, Ralf; Gramatzki, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin plays an important role in multiple myeloma. The allosteric mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus has long been approved for immunosuppression and has shown activity in certain cancers. This investigator-initiated phase I trial explored the use of everolimus in relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma patients who had received two or more lines of prior treatment. Following a dose-escalation design, it called for a fixed dose of oral everolimus. Blood drug levels were monitored and the biological activity of everolimus was evaluated in bone marrow. Seventeen patients were enrolled (age range, 52 to 76 years). All had been previously treated with stem cell transplantation and proteasome inhibitors and almost all with immunomodulatory drugs. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed and the intended final daily dose of 10 mg was reached. Only one severe adverse event was assessed as possibly related to the study drug, namely atypical pneumonia. Remarkably few infections were observed. Although the trial was mainly designed to evaluate feasibility, anti-myeloma activity, defined as clinical benefit, was documented in ten of 15 evaluable patients at every dose level including eight patients with stable disease, one patient with minor remission and one with partial remission. However, the median time to progression was 90 days (range, 13 to 278 days). The biomarker study documented on-target activity of everolimus in malignant plasma cells as well as the microenvironment. The observed responses are promising and allow further studies to be considered, including those testing combination strategies addressing escape pathways. This trial is registered with EudraCT number 2006-002675-41. PMID:25682600

  7. Treatment of relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma with everolimus (RAD001) and alemtuzumab: a Phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Zent, Clive S; Bowen, Deborah A; Conte, Michael J; LaPlant, Betsy R; Call, Timothy G

    2016-07-01

    Patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL), and especially those with purine analogue refractory disease or TP53 deletion/mutation, had a poor prognosis prior to the introduction of therapy targeting B cell receptor signaling. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has biological activity in CLL and can mobilize CLL cells from the lymphoid tissues into the circulation. In this clinical trial we determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of everolimus together with eight weeks of standard dose subcutaneous alemtuzumab (Phase I) and then evaluated the tolerability and efficacy of therapy of relapsed/refractory CLL with the combination of everolimus and alemtuzumab (Phase II). The maximum tolerated dose of oral everolimus was 2.5 mg three times/week. Therapy with everolimus and alemtuzumab was tolerable, but not sufficiently efficacious (33% partial responses, no complete responses) to recommend further development of the regimen. PMID:26699397

  8. North Central Cancer Treatment Group Phase I Trial N057K of Everolimus (RAD001) and Temozolomide in Combination With Radiation Therapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkaria, Jann N.; Galanis, Evanthia; Wu Wenting; Peller, Patrick J.; Giannini, Caterina; Brown, Paul D.; Uhm, Joon H.; McGraw, Steven; Jaeckle, Kurt A.; Buckner, Jan C.

    2011-10-01

    Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) functions within the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway as a critical modulator of cell survival. On the basis of promising preclinical data, the safety and tolerability of therapy with the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 in combination with radiation (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) was evaluated in this Phase I study. Methods and Materials: All patients received weekly oral RAD001 in combination with standard chemoradiotherapy, followed by RAD001 in combination with standard adjuvant temozolomide. RAD001 was dose escalated in cohorts of 6 patients. Dose-limiting toxicities were defined during RAD001 combination therapy with TMZ/RT. Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled, with a median follow-up of 8.4 months. Combined therapy was well tolerated at all dose levels, with 1 patient on each dose level experiencing a dose-limiting toxicity: Grade 3 fatigue, Grade 4 hematologic toxicity, and Grade 4 liver dysfunction. Throughout therapy, there were no Grade 5 events, 3 patients experienced Grade 4 toxicities, and 6 patients had Grade 3 toxicities attributable to treatment. On the basis of these results, the recommended Phase II dosage currently being tested is RAD001 70 mg/week in combination with standard chemoradiotherapy. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography scans also were obtained at baseline and after the second RAD001 dose before the initiation of TMZ/RT; the change in FDG uptake between scans was calculated for each patient. Fourteen patients had stable metabolic disease, and 4 patients had a partial metabolic response. Conclusions: RAD001 in combination with RT/TMZ and adjuvant TMZ was reasonably well tolerated. Changes in tumor metabolism can be detected by FDG positron emission tomography in a subset of patients within days of initiating RAD001 therapy.

  9. Everolimus

    MedlinePlus

    Everolimus comes as a tablet to take by mouth and as a tablet to suspend in water and take by mouth. When everolimus is taken ... more often than prescribed by your doctor.Everolimus tablets come in individual blister packs that can be ...

  10. Molecular analysis of a male breast cancer patient with prolonged stable disease under mTOR/PI3K inhibitors BEZ235/everolimus

    PubMed Central

    Brannon, A. Rose; Frizziero, Melissa; Chen, David; Hummel, Jennifer; Gallo, Jorge; Riester, Markus; Patel, Parul; Cheung, Wing; Morrissey, Michael; Carbone, Carmine; Cottini, Silvia; Tortora, Giampaolo; Melisi, Davide

    2016-01-01

    The mTORC1 inhibitor everolimus (Afinitor/RAD001) has been approved for multiple cancer indications, including ER+/HER2− metastatic breast cancer. However, the combination of everolimus with the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 was shown to be more efficacious than either everolimus or BEZ235 alone in preclinical models. Herein, we describe a male breast cancer (MBC) patient who was diagnosed with hormone receptor-positive (HR+)/HER2− stage IIIA invasive ductal carcinoma and sequentially treated with chemoradiotherapy and hormonal therapy. Upon the development of metastases, the patient began a 200 mg twice-daily BEZ235 and 2.5 mg weekly everolimus combination regimen. The patient sustained a prolonged stable disease of 18 mo while undergoing the therapy, before his tumor progressed again. Therefore, we sought to both better understand MBC and investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of the patient's sensitivity and subsequent resistance to the BEZ235/everolimus combination therapy. Genomic and immunohistochemical analyses were performed on samples collected from the initial invasive ductal carcinoma pretreatment and a metastasis postprogression on the BEZ235/everolimus combination treatment. Both tumors were relatively quiet genomically with no overlap to recurrent MBC alterations in the literature. Markers of PI3K/mTOR pathway hyperactivation were not identified in the pretreatment sample, which complements previous reports of HR+ female breast cancers being responsive to mTOR inhibition without this activation. The postprogression sample, however, demonstrated greater than fivefold increased estrogen receptor and pathogenesis-related protein expression, which could have constrained the PI3K/mTOR pathway inhibition by BEZ235/everolimus. Overall, these analyses have augmented the limited episteme on MBC genetics and treatment. PMID:27148582

  11. Everolimus

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are taking everolimus.do not have any vaccinations without talking to your doctor. During your treatment ... been vaccinated.talk to your child's doctor about vaccinations that your child may need to receive before ...

  12. Everolimus in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y

    2010-08-01

    Everolimus (also known as RAD-001; Afinitor®) is an orally active inhibitor of the intracellular protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency recently approved everolimus for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) on the basis of the results of a randomized phase III clinical trial. In the trial, 10 mg daily everolimus was effective and well tolerated by patients with advanced RCC, whose disease had progressed while under the treatment with sunitinib and/or sorafenib. Everolimus treatment led to 36% of 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate and 31% of 3-month PFS rate. Most of the adverse events were mild to moderate (grade 1-2) in severity. The most frequent grade 3-4 adverse events were stomatitis, fatigue, pneumonitis and infections. Clinical trials on everolimus in combination with sunitinib, sorafenib, imatinib and vatalanib for the treatment of RCC are ongoing. PMID:20830316

  13. Autophagy inhibition enhances RAD001-induced cytotoxicity in human bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ji-Fan; Lin, Yi-Chia; Yang, Shan-Che; Tsai, Te-Fu; Chen, Hung-En; Chou, Kuang-Yu; Hwang, Thomas I-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), involved in PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, is known to play a central role in regulating the growth of cancer cells. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway enhances tumor survival and proliferation through suppressing autophagy, which sustains energy homeostasis by collecting and recycling cellular components under stress conditions. Conversely, inhibitors of the mTOR pathway such as RAD001 induce autophagy, leading to promotion of tumor survival and limited antitumor efficacy. We thus hypothesized that the use of autophagy inhibitor in combination with mTOR inhibition improves the cytotoxicity of mTOR inhibitors in bladder cancer. Materials and methods The cytotoxicity of RT4, 5637, HT1376, and T24 human bladder cancer cells treated with RAD001 alone or combined with autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine (3-MA), bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1), chloroquine, or hydroxychloroquine) was assessed using the WST-8 cell viability kit. The autophagy status in cells was analyzed by the detection of microtubule-associated light chain 3 form II (LC3-II), using immunofluorescent staining and Western blot. Acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation in treated cells was determined by acridine orange vital staining. Inhibition of mTOR pathway by RAD001 was monitored by using a homemade quantitative polymerase chain reaction gene array, while phospho-mTOR was detected using Western blot. Induced apoptosis was determined by measurement of caspase 3/7 activity and DNA fragmentation in cells after treatment. Results Advanced bladder cancer cells (5637, HT1376, and T24) were more resistant to RAD001 than RT4. Autophagy flux detected by the expression of LC3-II showed RAD001-induced autophagy. AVO formation was detected in cells treated with RAD001 and was inhibited by the addition of 3-MA or Baf A1. Cotreatment of RAD001 with autophagy inhibitors further reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in bladder cancer cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that

  14. Loss of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2) Is Frequent in Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Predicts Response to mTORC1 Inhibitor Everolimus.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Hung; Hao, Huai-Xiang; Chan, Stephen L; Chen, David; Ong, Richard; Soo, Khee Chee; Pochanard, Panisa; Yang, David; Ruddy, David; Liu, Manway; Derti, Adnan; Balak, Marissa N; Palmer, Michael R; Wang, Yan; Lee, Benjamin H; Sellami, Dalila; Zhu, Andrew X; Schlegel, Robert; Huang, Alan

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and hyperactivation of mTOR signaling plays a pivotal role in HCC tumorigenesis. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a heterodimer of TSC1 and TSC2, functions as a negative regulator of mTOR signaling. In the current study, we discovered that TSC2 loss-of-function is common in HCC. TSC2 loss was found in 4 of 8 HCC cell lines and 8 of 28 (28.6%) patient-derived HCC xenografts. TSC2 mutations and deletions are likely to be the underlying cause of TSC2 loss in HCC cell lines, xenografts, and primary tumors for most cases. We further demonstrated that TSC2-null HCC cell lines and xenografts had elevated mTOR signaling and, more importantly, were significantly more sensitive to RAD001/everolimus, an mTORC1 inhibitor. These preclinical findings led to the analysis of TSC2 status in HCC samples collected in the EVOLVE-1 clinical trial of everolimus using an optimized immunohistochemistry assay and identified 15 of 139 (10.8%) samples with low to undetectable levels of TSC2. Although the sample size is too small for formal statistical analysis, TSC2-null/low tumor patients who received everolimus tended to have longer overall survival than those who received placebo. Finally, we performed an epidemiology survey of more than 239 Asian HCC tumors and found the frequency of TSC2 loss to be approximately 20% in Asian HBV(+) HCC. Taken together, our data strongly argue that TSC2 loss is a predictive biomarker for the response to everolimus in HCC patients. PMID:25724664

  15. Everolimus in combination with cyclosporin a as pre- and posttransplantation immunosuppressive therapy in nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Junghanss, Christian; Rathsack, Susanne; Wacke, Rainer; Weirich, Volker; Vogel, Heike; Drewelow, Bernd; Mueller, Sabrina; Altmann, Simone; Freund, Mathias; Lange, Sandra

    2012-07-01

    Everolimus (RAD001) is an mTOR inhibitor that has been successfully used as an immunosuppressant in solid-organ transplantation. Data in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is limited. This study aimed to investigate pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of RAD001 in a canine allogeneic HSCT model. First, pharmacokinetics of RAD001 were performed in healthy dogs in order to determine the appropriate dosing. Doses of 0.25 mg RAD001 twice daily in combination with 15 mg/kg cyclosporin A (CsA) twice daily were identified as appropriate starting doses to achieve the targeted range of RAD001 (3-8 μg/L) when orally administered. Subsequently, 10 dogs were transplanted using 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) for conditioning and 0.25 mg RAD001 twice daily plus 15 mg/kg CsA twice daily for pre- and posttransplantation immunosuppression. Seven of the 10 transplanted dogs were maintained at the starting RAD001 dose throughout the study. For the remaining 3 dogs, dose adjustments were necessary. RAD001 accumulation over time did not occur. All dogs initially engrafted. Five dogs eventually rejected the graft (weeks 10, 10, 13, 27, and 56). Two dogs died of pneumonia (weeks 8 and 72) but were chimeric until then. Total cholesterol rose from median 4.1 mmol/L (3.5-5.7 mmol/L) before HSCT to 6.0 mmol/l (5.0-8.5 mmol/l) at day 21 after HSCT, but remained always within normal range. Changes in creatinine and triglyceride values were not observed. Long-term engraftment rates were inferior to sirolimus/CsA and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)/CsA regimen, respectively. RAD001/CsA caused a more pronounced reduction of platelet counts to median 2 × 10(9)/L (range: 0-21 × 10(9)/L) and longer time to platelet recovery of 21 days (range: 14-24 days) compared with MMF/CsA. CsA c(2h) levels were significantly enhanced in the RAD001/CsA regimen, but c(0h) and area under the curve from 0 to 12 hours (AUC(0-12h)) values did not differ compared with an MMF

  16. Everolimus exhibits efficacy as a radiosensitizer in a model of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mauceri, Helena J; Sutton, Harold G; Darga, Thomas E; Kocherginsky, Masha; Kochanski, Joel; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Vokes, Everett E

    2012-05-01

    Signaling pathways that activate mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) are altered in many human cancers and these alterations are associated with prognosis and treatment response. mTOR inhibition can restore sensitivity to DNA damaging agents such as cisplatin. The rapamycin derivative everolimus exhibits antitumor activity and is approved for patients with renal cell cancer. Clinically, everolimus has also been evaluated in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that were refractory to chemotherapy and epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We tested the effects of combined treatment with everolimus (RAD001) and fractionated radiation using a xenograft model of human NSCLC (A549 cells). In growth studies, mean tumor volume was reduced in the everolimus plus 30 Gy cohort with significant tumor growth suppression compared to 30 Gy alone (p=0015), or everolimus alone (p<0.001, ANOVA). everolimus (20 nM) significantly reduced protein levels of the mTOR downstream effector p70-S6K compared with radiation and vehicle (p=0.05, ANOVA) and significantly suppressed phospho-p70-S6K levels compared with all other treatments (p<0.001, ANOVA). We also evaluated everolimus and radiation effects on gene expression in A549 cells. Everolimus ± 5 Gy suppressed endothelin 1 and lactate dehydrogenase expression and increased VEGFA, p21, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and SLC2A1 (facilitated glucose transporter 1). mTOR mRNA levels were unaffected while TNF-α levels were increased with everolimus + 5 Gy compared to either treatment alone. These findings suggest that everolimus increases the antitumor activity of radiation. Clinical trials combining everolimus with fractionated radiation in patients with NSCLC are warranted. PMID:22294050

  17. Differentiating the mTOR inhibitors everolimus and sirolimus in the treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    MacKeigan, Jeffrey P; Krueger, Darcy A

    2015-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic autosomal dominant disorder characterized by benign tumor-like lesions, called hamartomas, in multiple organ systems, including the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and lung. These hamartomas cause a diverse set of clinical problems based on their location and often result in epilepsy, learning difficulties, and behavioral problems. TSC is caused by mutations within the TSC1 or TSC2 genes that inactivate the genes' tumor-suppressive function and drive hamartomatous cell growth. In normal cells, TSC1 and TSC2 integrate growth signals and nutrient inputs to downregulate signaling to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionarily conserved serine-threonine kinase that controls cell growth and cell survival. The molecular connection between TSC and mTOR led to the clinical use of allosteric mTOR inhibitors (sirolimus and everolimus) for the treatment of TSC. Everolimus is approved for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas in patients with TSC. Sirolimus, though not approved for TSC, has undergone considerable investigation to treat various aspects of the disease. Everolimus and sirolimus selectively inhibit mTOR signaling with similar molecular mechanisms, but with distinct clinical profiles. This review differentiates mTOR inhibitors in TSC while describing the molecular mechanisms, pathogenic mutations, and clinical trial outcomes for managing TSC. PMID:26289591

  18. Involvement of autophagy in the pharmacological effects of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Nishihara, Kumiko; Inui, Ken-ichi; Masuda, Satohiro

    2012-12-01

    Inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have immunosuppressive and anti-cancer effects, but their effects on the progression of kidney disease are not fully understood. Using cells from normal kidney epithelial cell lines, we found that the antiproliferative effects of mTOR inhibitor everolimus accompanied the accumulation of a marker for cellular autophagic activity, the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3-II) in cells. We also showed that the primary autophagy factor UNC-51-like kinase 1 was involved in the antiproliferative effects of everolimus. Levels of LC3-II decreased in the kidneys of rats treated with ischemia-reperfusion or cisplatin; however, renal LC3-II levels increased after administration of everolimus to rats subjected to ischemia-reperfusion or cisplatin treatment. Simultaneously, increased signals for kidney injury molecule-1 and single-stranded DNA and decreased signals for Ki-67 in the proximal tubules were observed after treatment with everolimus, indicating that everolimus diminished renal function after acute tubular injury. We also found leakage of LC3 protein into rat urine after treatment with everolimus, and urinary LC3 protein was successfully measured between 0.1 and 500ng/mL by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Urinary LC3 levels were increased after administration of everolimus to rats subjected to ischemia-reperfusion or cisplatin treatment, suggesting that renal LC3-II and urinary LC3 protein are new biomarkers for autophagy in acute kidney injury. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the induction of autophagy by everolimus aggravates tubular dysfunction during recovery from kidney injury. PMID:23022334

  19. Cellular and molecular effects of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus.

    PubMed

    Saran, Uttara; Foti, Michelangelo; Dufour, Jean-François

    2015-11-01

    mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) functions as the central regulator for cell proliferation, growth and survival. Up-regulation of proteins regulating mTOR, as well as its downstream targets, has been reported in various cancers. This has promoted the development of anti-cancer therapies targeting mTOR, namely fungal macrolide rapamycin, a naturally occurring mTOR inhibitor, and its analogues (rapalogues). One such rapalogue, everolimus, has been approved in the clinical treatment of renal and breast cancers. Although results have demonstrated that these mTOR inhibitors are effective in attenuating cell growth of cancer cells under in vitro and in vivo conditions, subsequent sporadic response to rapalogues therapy in clinical trials has promoted researchers to look further into the complex understanding of the dynamics of mTOR regulation in the tumour environment. Limitations of these rapalogues include the sensitivity of tumour subsets to mTOR inhibition. Additionally, it is well known that rapamycin and its rapalogues mediate their effects by inhibiting mTORC (mTOR complex) 1, with limited or no effect on mTORC2 activity. The present review summarizes the pre-clinical, clinical and recent discoveries, with emphasis on the cellular and molecular effects of everolimus in cancer therapy. PMID:26330617

  20. Everolimus and early calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal: 3-year results from a randomized trial in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sterneck, M; Kaiser, G M; Heyne, N; Richter, N; Rauchfuss, F; Pascher, A; Schemmer, P; Fischer, L; Klein, C G; Nadalin, S; Lehner, F; Settmacher, U; Neuhaus, P; Gotthardt, D; Loss, M; Ladenburger, S; Paulus, E M; Mertens, M; Schlitt, H J

    2014-03-01

    The feasibility of de novo everolimus without calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) therapy following liver transplantation was assessed in a multicenter, prospective, open-label trial. Liver transplant patients were randomized at 4 weeks to start everolimus and discontinue CNI, or continue their current CNI-based regimen. The primary endpoint was adjusted estimated GFR (eGFR; Cockcroft-Gault) at month 11 post randomization. A 24-month extension phase followed 81/114 (71.1%) of eligible patients to month 35 post randomization. The adjusted mean eGFR benefit from randomization to month 35 was 10.1 mL/min (95% confidence interval [CI] -1.3, 21.5 mL/min, p = 0.082) in favor of CNI-free versus CNI using Cockcroft-Gault, 9.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (95% CI -0.4, 18.9, p = 0.053) with Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (four-variable) and 9.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (95% CI -1.1, 17.9, p = 0.028) using Nankivell. The difference in favor of the CNI-free regimen increased gradually over time due to a small progressive decline in eGFR in the CNI cohort despite a reduction in CNI exposure. Biopsy-proven acute rejection, graft loss and death were similar between groups. Adverse events led to study drug discontinuation in five CNI-free patients and five CNI patients (12.2% vs. 12.5%, p = 1.000) during the extension phase. Everolimus-based CNI-free immunosuppression is feasible following liver transplantation and patients benefit from sustained preservation of renal function versus patients on CNI for at least 3 years. PMID:24502384

  1. Antiinflammatory Activity of a Novel Folic Acid Targeted Conjugate of the mTOR Inhibitor Everolimus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingjuan; Parker, Nikki; Kleindl, Paul J; Cross, Vicky A; Wollak, Kristin; Westrick, Elaine; Stinnette, Torian W; Gehrke, Mark A; Wang, Kevin; Santhapuram, Hari Krishna R; You, Fei; Hahn, Spencer J; Vaughn, Jeremy F; Klein, Patrick J; Vlahov, Iontcho R; Low, Philip S; Leamon, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Folate receptor (FR)-β has been identified as a promising target for antimacrophage and antiinflammatory therapies. In the present study, we investigated EC0565, a folic acid-derivative of everolimus, as a FR-specific inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because of its amphiphilic nature, EC0565 was first evaluated for water solubility, critical micelle formation, stability in culture and FR-binding specificity. Using FR-expressing macrophages, the effect of EC0565 on mTOR signaling and cellular proliferation was studied. The pharmacokinetics, metabolism and bioavailability of EC0565 were studied in normal rats. The in vivo activity of EC0565 was assessed in rats with adjuvant arthritis, a "macrophage-rich" model with close resemblance to rheumatoid arthritis. EC0565 forms micellar aggregates in physiological buffers and demonstrates good water solubility as well as strong multivalent FR-binding capacity. EC0565 inhibited mTOR signaling in rat macrophages at nanomolar concentrations and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in serum-starved RAW264.7 cells. Subcutaneously administered EC0565 in rats displayed good bioavailability and a relatively long half-life (~12 h). When given at 250 nmol/kg, EC0565 selectively inhibited proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in thioglycollate-stimulated rat peritoneal cells. With limited dosing regimens, the antiarthritic activity of EC0565 was found superior to that of etanercept, everolimus and a nontargeted everolimus analog. The in vivo activity of EC0565 was also comparable to that of a folate-targeted aminopterin. Folate-targeted mTOR inhibition may be an effective way of suppressing activated macrophages in sites of inflammation, especially in nutrient-deprived conditions, such as in the arthritic joints. Further investigation and improvement upon the physical and biochemical properties of EC0565 are warranted. PMID:26181632

  2. Everolimus in combination with mycophenolate mofetil as pre- and post-transplantation immunosuppression after nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in canine littermates.

    PubMed

    Machka, Christoph; Lange, Sandra; Werner, Juliane; Wacke, Rainer; Killian, Doreen; Knueppel, Anne; Knuebel, Gudrun; Vogel, Heike; Lindner, Iris; Roolf, Catrin; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Junghanss, Christian

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus (RAD001) is a successfully used immunosuppressant in solid-organ transplantation. Several studies have already used RAD001 in combination with calcineurin inhibitors after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We investigated calcineurin inhibitor-free pre- and post-transplantation immunosuppression of RAD001 combined with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in a nonmyeloablative HSCT setting. After nonmyeloablative conditioning with 2 Gy total body irradiation, 8 dogs received HSCT from dog leukocyte antigen-identical siblings. Immunosuppressives were given at doses of 1.5 mg RAD001 twice daily from day -1 to +49, then tapered until day +56, and 20 mg/kg MMF from day 0 to +28, then tapered until day +42. An historical cyclosporin A (CsA)/MMF regimen was used in the control group. All dogs engrafted. Median platelet nadir amounted in all dogs to 0 × 10(9)/L (median, day +10; duration <50 × 10(9)/L, 22 days) and median leukocyte nadir was 1.0 × 10(9)/L (range, .1 to 2.5 × 10(9)/L; median, day +13). Eventually, 5 of 8 (63%) animals rejected their grafts. Two dogs died of infections on day +19 and +25. Pharmacokinetics of RAD001 and MMF showed median trough levels of 19.1 (range, 10.5 to 43.2) μg/L and .3 (.1 to 1.3) mg/L, respectively. The median area under the curve was 325 (range, 178 to 593) μg/L × hour for RAD001 and 29.6 (range, 7.9 to 40.5) ng/L × hour for MMF. All dogs developed clinically mucosal viral infections during the clinical course. Compared with the control group, the level of toxicities for RAD001/MMF increased in all qualities. Combined immunosuppression of RAD001 and MMF after nonmyeloablative HSCT is associated with significant toxicities, including a prolonged platelet recovery time as well as increased infections compared to the CsA/MMF regimen. PMID:24923538

  3. Everolimus and Early Calcineurin Inhibitor Withdrawal: 3-Year Results From a Randomized Trial in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sterneck, M; Kaiser, G M; Heyne, N; Richter, N; Rauchfuss, F; Pascher, A; Schemmer, P; Fischer, L; Klein, C G; Nadalin, S; Lehner, F; Settmacher, U; Neuhaus, P; Gotthardt, D; Loss, M; Ladenburger, S; Paulus, E M; Mertens, M; Schlitt, H J

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of de novo everolimus without calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) therapy following liver transplantation was assessed in a multicenter, prospective, open-label trial. Liver transplant patients were randomized at 4 weeks to start everolimus and discontinue CNI, or continue their current CNI-based regimen. The primary endpoint was adjusted estimated GFR (eGFR; Cockcroft-Gault) at month 11 postrandomization. A 24-month extension phase followed 81/114 (71.1%) of eligible patients to month 35 postrandomization. The adjusted mean eGFR benefit from randomization to month 35 was 10.1 mL/min (95% confidence interval [CI] −1.3, 21.5 mL/min, p = 0.082) in favor of CNI-free versus CNI using Cockcroft-Gault, 9.4 mL/min/1.73 m2 (95% CI −0.4, 18.9, p = 0.053) with Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (four-variable) and 9.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 (95% CI −1.1, 17.9, p = 0.028) using Nankivell. The difference in favor of the CNI-free regimen increased gradually over time due to a small progressive decline in eGFR in the CNI cohort despite a reduction in CNI exposure. Biopsy-proven acute rejection, graft loss and death were similar between groups. Adverse events led to study drug discontinuation in five CNI-free patients and five CNI patients (12.2% vs. 12.5%, p = 1.000) during the extension phase. Everolimus-based CNI-free immunosuppression is feasible following liver transplantation and patients benefit from sustained preservation of renal function versus patients on CNI for at least 3 years. The beneficial effect on renal function achieved by early CNI withdrawal and treatment with everolimus after liver transplantation is still evident after three years. PMID:24502384

  4. Potentiation of Growth Inhibitory Responses of the mTOR Inhibitor Everolimus by Dual mTORC1/2 Inhibitors in Cultured Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Euphemia Y.; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan; Finlay, Graeme J.; Rewcastle, Gordon W.; Baguley, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a vital component of signaling pathways involving PI3K/AKT, is an attractive therapeutic target in breast cancer. Everolimus, an allosteric mTOR inhibitor that inhibits the mTOR functional complex mTORC1, is approved for treatment of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. Other mTOR inhibitors show interesting differences in target specificities: BEZ235 and GSK2126458 are ATP competitive mTOR inhibitors targeting both PI3K and mTORC1/2; AZD8055, AZD2014 and KU-0063794 are ATP competitive mTOR inhibitors targeting both mTORC1 and mTORC2; and GDC-0941 is a pan-PI3K inhibitor. We have addressed the question of whether mTOR inhibitors may be more effective in combination than singly in inhibiting the proliferation of breast cancer cells. We selected a panel of 30 human breast cancer cell lines that included ER and PR positive, HER2 over-expressing, and “triple negative” variants, and determined whether signaling pathway utilization was related to drug-induced inhibition of proliferation. A significant correlation (p = 0.005) was found between everolimus IC50 values and p70S6K phosphorylation, but not with AKT or ERK phosphorylation, consistent with the mTOR pathway being a principal target. We then carried out combination studies with four everolimus resistant triple-negative breast cancer cell lines, and found an unexpectedly high degree of synergy between everolimus and the other inhibitors tested. The level of potentiation of everolimus inhibitory activity (measured by IC50 values) was found to be cell line-specific for all the kinase inhibitors tested. The results suggest that judicious combination of mTOR inhibitors with different modes of action could have beneficial effects in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26148118

  5. Sotrastaurin in calcineurin inhibitor-free regimen using everolimus in de novo kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Tedesco-Silva, H; Kho, M M L; Hartmann, A; Vitko, S; Russ, G; Rostaing, L; Budde, K; Campistol, J M; Eris, J; Krishnan, I; Gopalakrishnan, U; Klupp, J

    2013-07-01

    Sotrastaurin, a novel selective protein-kinase-C inhibitor, inhibits early T cell activation via a calcineurin-independent pathway. Efficacy and safety of sotrastaurin in a calcineurin inhibitor-free regimen were evaluated in this two-stage Phase II study of de novo kidney transplant recipients. Stage 1 randomized 131 patients (2:1) to sotrastaurin 300 mg or cyclosporine A (CsA). Stage 2 randomized 180 patients (1:1:1) to sotrastaurin 300 or 200 mg or CsA. All patients received basiliximab, everolimus (EVR) and prednisone. Primary endpoint was composite efficacy failure rate of treated biopsy-proven acute rejection, graft loss, death or lost to follow-up. Main safety assessment was estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) by MDRD-4 at Month 12. Composite efficacy failure rates at 12 months were higher in sotrastaurin arms (Stage 1: 16.5% and 10.9% for sotrastaurin 300 mg and CsA; Stage 2: 27.2%, 34.5% and 19.4% for sotrastaurin 200 mg, 300 mg and CsA). eGFR was significantly better in sotrastaurin groups versus CsA at most time points, except at 12 months. Gastrointestinal and cardiac adverse events were more frequent with sotrastaurin. Higher treatment discontinuation, deaths and graft losses occurred with sotrastaurin 300 mg. Sotrastaurin combined with EVR showed higher efficacy failure rates and some improvement in renal allograft function compared to a CsA-based therapy. PMID:23659755

  6. A comprehensive review of everolimus clinical reports: a new mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gurk-Turner, Cheryle; Manitpisitkul, Wana; Cooper, Matthew

    2012-10-15

    As new immunosuppressive agents are introduced to the market, clinicians are faced with the daunting task of sifting through the published literature to decide the value that the agent will add to their own practice. We often must extrapolate information provided through study in other solid-organ transplantation populations than our specific area of interest as we interpret the results and outcomes. With these challenges in mind, this compilation of published work for the newest mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus (Certican; Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Hanover, NJ) (Zortress; Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Basel, Switzerland) is intended to provide a concise but thorough presentation of available literature so that the reader who may be unfamiliar with the agent can make their own judgment. Both Ovid and PubMed search engines were queried with a particular focus on high-impact articles noted in the Web of Science or Citation Index. Work described solely in abstract or case report form was excluded, as well as meta-analyses or those that were editorial or commentary in nature. Included were publications presented using the English language that described adult human subjects who received a heart, lung, kidney, or liver allograft. The goal of this strategy was to allow for the inclusion of pertinent literature in an unbiased fashion. Tables are provided that outline trial specific information, leaving a discussion of major outcomes to the text of the review. PMID:22986894

  7. Everolimus in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: latest findings and interpretations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Eric; Marincola, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with various clinical presentations. More than half of patients present with so-called nonfunctioning tumors with no hormone-related symptoms, whereas other tumors produce symptoms like gastric problems, ulcers, hypoglycemia, skin rash and diarrhea related to hormone production. The traditional treatment for pNETs over the last three decades has been cytotoxic agents, mainly streptozotocin plus 5-fluorouracil or doxorubicin. Most recently two new compounds have been registered worldwide for the treatment of pNETs, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. This paper concentrates on the use of mTOR inhibitors and the mechanisms of action. The mTOR pathway is altered in a number of pNETs. Everolimus (RAD001) is an orally active rapamycin analog and mTOR inhibitor. It blocks activity of the mTOR pathway by binding with high affinity to the cytoplasmic protein FKBP-12. The efficacy of everolimus in pNETs has been demonstrated in two multicenter studies (RADIANT 1 and 3). The RADIANT 3 study was a randomized controlled study in pNETs of everolimus 10 mg/day versus placebo, showing an increased progression-free survival (11.7 months versus 4.6 months) and hazard ratio of 0.35 (p < 0.001). Current studies indicate that there is strong evidence to support the antitumor effect of rapalogs in pNETs. However, significant tumor reduction is very rarely obtained, usually in less than 10% of treated patients. Therefore, these drugs may be more effective in combination with other anticancer agents, including chemotherapy, targeted therapies as well as peptide receptor radiotherapy. PMID:24003341

  8. Beneficial Effects of the mTOR Inhibitor Everolimus in Patients with Advanced Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: Subgroup Results of a Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, T. C.; de Wit, D.; Links, T. P.; van Erp, N. P.; van der Hoeven, J. J. M.; Gelderblom, H.; van Wezel, T.; van Eijk, R.; Morreau, H.; Guchelaar, H. J.; Kapiteijn, E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Until recently, advanced medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) had few treatment options except surgery. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has shown encouraging results in neuroendocrine tumors. As part of a prospective phase II study, we analyzed the safety and efficacy of everolimus in advanced MTC. Methods. Seven patients with per RECIST 1.1 documented advanced MTC were included and received everolimus 10 mg daily. The primary objective was determining treatment efficacy. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), toxicity, and pharmacokinetics (PK). Results. Median follow-up duration was 28 weeks (17–147). Five patients (71%) showed SD, of which 4 (57%) showed SD >24 weeks. Median PFS and OS were 33 (95%CI: 8–56) and 30 (95%CI: 15–45) weeks, respectively. Toxicity was predominantly grade 1/2 and included mucositis (43%), fatigue (43%), and hypertriglyceridemia (43%). Four MTCs harbored the somatic RET mutation c.2753T>C, p.Met918Thr. The best clinical response was seen in a MEN2A patient. PK characteristics were consistent with phase I data. One patient exhibited extensive toxicity accompanying elevated everolimus plasma concentrations. Conclusions. This study suggests that everolimus exerts clinically relevant antitumor activity in patients with advanced MTC. Given the high level of clinical benefit and the relatively low toxicity profile, further investigation of everolimus in these patients is warranted. PMID:26294908

  9. Interstitial Lung Disease Associated with mTOR Inhibitors in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: Results from a Large Phase III Clinical Trial Program of Everolimus and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Patricia; Kohler, Sven; Dimri, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) has been reported with the use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi). The clinical and safety databases of three Phase III trials of everolimus in de novo kidney (A2309), heart (A2310), and liver (H2304) transplant recipients (TxR) were searched using a standardized MedDRA query (SMQ) search for ILD followed by a case-by-case medical evaluation. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and EMBASE. Out of the 1,473 de novo TxR receiving everolimus in Phase III trials, everolimus-related ILD was confirmed in six cases (one kidney, four heart, and one liver TxR) representing an incidence of 0.4%. Everolimus was discontinued in three of the four heart TxR, resulting in ILD improvement or resolution. Outcome was fatal in the kidney TxR (in whom everolimus therapy was continued) and in the liver TxR despite everolimus discontinuation. The literature review identified 57 publications on ILD in solid organ TxR receiving everolimus or sirolimus. ILD presented months or years after mTORi initiation and symptoms were nonspecific and insidious. The event was more frequent in patients with a late switch to mTORi. In most cases, ILD was reversed after prompt mTORi discontinuation. ILD induced by mTORi is an uncommon and potentially fatal event warranting early recognition and drug discontinuation. PMID:25580277

  10. The combination of IκB kinase β inhibitor and everolimus modulates expression of interleukin-10 in human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1-infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Chie; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Yang, Jing; Udaka, Keiko; Yokoyama, Akihito

    2013-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma (ATLL) is an aggressive malignancy of CD4(+)  CD25(+) T lymphocytes, characterized by a severely compromised immunosystem, in which the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been recognized as the aetiological agent. This study found that an IκB kinase β (IKKβ) inhibitor Bay11-7082 inactivated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and transcription factor nuclear factor-κB in HTLV-1-infected T cells; this was significantly enhanced in the presence of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. In addition, Bay11-7082 decreased production of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), which was further down-regulated when Bay11-7082 was combined with evelolimus in HTLV-1-infected T and ATLL cells isolated from patients. Interleukin-10 is known to inhibit maturation and the antigen-presenting function of dendritic cells (DCs). The culture media of HTLV-1-infected MT-1 cells, which contained a large amout of IL-10, hampered tumour necrosis factor-α-induced maturation of DCs isolated from healthy volunteers. Culture supernatant of MT-1 cells treated with a combination of Bay11-7082 and everolimus augmented maturation of DCs in association with a decrease in production of IL-10 and enhanced the allostimulatory function of DCs. Similarly, when DCs isolated from patients with ATLL were treated with the combination of Bay11-7082 and everolimus, they were fully matured and their capability to stimulate proliferation of lymphocytes was augmented. Taken together, the combination of Bay11-7082 and everolimus might exhibit immunostimulatory properties in HTLV-1-infected T and ATLL cells isolated from patients, and this combination may be potentially therapeutic to regain the compromised immunosystem in ATLL patients. PMID:23278479

  11. The combination of NVP-BKM120 with trastuzumab or RAD001 synergistically inhibits the growth of breast cancer stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feng; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Yunhui; Zhou, Yang; Guo, Rong; Bai, Jingchao; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Huilai; Zhang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Deregulation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signalling pathway is common in breast cancer and is frequently associated with resistance to both traditional chemotherapy and targeted drugs. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that a small subpopulation of self-renewing cells, the so called cancer stem cells (CSC), are responsible for the growth of drug resistant secondary tumors. As many CSCs have upregulated the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, preclinical and clinical studies are addressing the inhibition of this axis to target drug resistance. We evaluated the susceptibility of breast CSCs to NVP-BKM120 (BKM120), a new generation of PI3K-specific inhibitor, when used individually or in combination with trastuzumab or RAD001 both in vitro and in vivo. For this, a stem-like cell population (SC) was enriched from breast cancer cell lines after mammosphere cultures. We demonstrated that BKM120 inhibits growth, generation of drug-resistant derivatives and SC formation in a panel of four breast cancer cell lines: MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, SK-BR-3 and CAL51. Importantly, BKM120 inhibits the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway in SCs from these cell lines. When BKM120 was used in combination with trastuzumab, a targeted therapy to treat HER2-positive breast cancer, we found synergistic cell growth inhibition, generation of drug resistant cells as well as SC formation from SK-BR-3 cells. Importantly, SK-BR-3 xenograft-derived tumors showed marginal growth when the drug combination was used. We also found a similar synergistic anticancer effect of BKM120 in combination with RAD001, an mTOR inhibitor, when treating triple-negative breast cancer cells in vitro and in both MDA-MB-231 and CAL51- mouse xenografts. Moreover, mouse data indicate that these drug combinations are well tolerated and provide the proof-of-concept and rationale to initiate clinical trials in both HER2-positive and triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:27175939

  12. Systemic and CNS activity of the RET inhibitor vandetanib combined with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in KIF5B-RET re-arranged non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Berry, Jenny; Roxas, Michael; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Subbiah, Ishwaria Mohan; Ali, Siraj M; McMahon, Caitlin; Miller, Vincent; Cascone, Tina; Pai, Shobha; Tang, Zhenya; Heymach, John V

    2015-07-01

    In-frame fusion KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene)-RET transcripts have been characterized in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancers and are known oncogenic drivers. The RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, suppresses fusion-induced, anchorage-independent growth activity. In vitro studies have shown that vandetanib is a high-affinity substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) but is not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), limiting its blood-brain barrier penetration. A co-administration strategy to enhance the brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-gp/Abcb1- and Bcrp1/Abcg2-mediated efflux with mTOR inhibitors, specifically everolimus, was shown to increase the blood-brain barrier penetration. We report the first bench-to-bedside evidence that RET inhibitor combined with an mTOR inhibitor is active against brain-metastatic RET-rearranged lung cancer and the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration. A 74-year-old female with progressive adenocarcinoma of the lung (wild-type EGFR and no ALK rearrangement) presented for therapy options. A deletion of 5'RET was revealed by FISH assay, indicating RET-gene rearrangement. Because of progressive disease in the brain, she was enrolled in a clinical trial with vandetanib and everolimus (NCT01582191). Comprehensive genomic profiling revealed fusion of KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene) and RET, in addition to AKT2 gene amplification. After two cycles of therapy a repeat MRI brain showed a decrease in the intracranial disease burden and PET/CT showed systemic response as well. Interestingly, AKT2 amplification seen is a critical component of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, alterations of which has been associated with both de novo and acquired resistance to targeted therapy. The addition of everolimus may have both overcome the AKT2 amplification to produce a response in addition to its direct effects on the RET gene. Our case report forms the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration by

  13. Systemic and CNS activity of the RET inhibitor vandetanib combined with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in KIF5B-RET re-arranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Vivek; Berry, Jenny; Roxas, Michael; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Subbiah, Ishwaria Mohan; Ali, Siraj M.; McMahon, Caitlin; Miller, Vincent; Cascone, Tina; Pai, Shobha; Tang, Zhenya; Heymach, John V.

    2016-01-01

    In-frame fusion KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene)-RET transcripts have been characterized in 1–2% of non-small cell lung cancers and are known oncogenic drivers. The RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, suppresses fusion-induced, anchorage-independent growth activity. In vitro studies have shown that vandetanib is a high-affinity substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) but is not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), limiting its blood-brain barrier penetration. A co-administration strategy to enhance the brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-gp/Abcb1- and Bcrp1/Abcg2-mediated efflux with mTOR inhibitors, specifically everolimus, was shown to increase the blood-brain barrier penetration. We report the first bench to bed-side evidence that RET inhibitor combined with an mTOR inhibitor is active against brain-metastatic RET-rearranged lung cancer and the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration. A 74 year old female with progressive adenocarcinoma of the lung (wild-type EGFR and no ALK rearrangement) presented for therapy options. A deletion of 5’RET was revealed by FISH assay, indicating RET-gene rearrangement. Because of progressive disease in the brain, she was enrolled in a clinical trial with vandetanib and everolimus (NCT01582191). Comprehensive genomic profiling revealed fusion of KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene) and RET, in addition to AKT2 gene amplification. After 2 cycles of therapy a repeat MRI brain showed a decrease in the intracranial disease burden and PET /CT showed systemic response as well. Interestingly, AKT2 amplification seen is a critical component of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, alterations of which has been associated with both de novo and acquired resistance to targeted therapy. The addition of everolimus may have both overcome the AKT2 amplification to produce a response in addition to its direct effects on the RET gene. Our case report forms the first evidence of blood

  14. Regression of Cardiac Rhabdomyomas in a Neonate after Everolimus Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bornaun, Helen; Öztarhan, Kazım; Erener-Ercan, Tugba; Dedeoğlu, Reyhan; Tugcu, Deniz; Aydoğmuş, Çiğdem; Cetinkaya, Merih; Kavuncuoglu, Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhabdomyoma often shows spontaneous regression and usually requires only close follow-up. However, patients with symptomatic inoperable rhabdomyomas may be candidates for everolimus treatment. Our patient had multiple inoperable cardiac rhabdomyomas causing serious left ventricle outflow-tract obstruction that showed a dramatic reduction in the size after everolimus therapy, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. After discontinuation of therapy, an increase in the diameter of masses occurred and everolimus was restarted. After 6 months of treatment, rhabdomyomas decreased in size and therapy was stopped. In conclusion, everolimus could be a possible novel therapy for neonates with clinically significant rhabdomyomas. PMID:27429821

  15. Decreased expression of B7-H3 reduces the glycolytic capacity and sensitizes breast cancer cells to AKT/mTOR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E.; Karlsen, Karine Flem; Tekle, Christina; Pedersen, Cathrine; Øyjord, Tove; Hongisto, Vesa; Nesland, Jahn M.; Tan, Ming; Sahlberg, Kristine Kleivi; Fodstad, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    B7 family proteins are important immune response regulators, and can mediate oncogenic signaling and cancer development. We have used human triple-negative breast cancer cell lines with different expression levels of B7-H3 to evaluate its effects on the sensitivity to 22 different anticancer compounds in a drug screen. API-2 (triciribidine) and everolimus (RAD-001), two inhibitors that target the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, showed enhanced inhibition of cell viability and proliferation in B7-H3 knockdown tumor cells compared to their B7-H3 expressing counterparts. Similar inhibition was seen in control cells treated with an anti-B7-H3 monoclonal antibody. In B7-H3 overexpressing cells, the effects of the two drugs were reduced, supported also by in vivo experiments in which B7-H3 overexpressing xenografts were less sensitive to everolimus than control tumors. In API-2 and everolimus-treated B7-H3 overexpressing cells, phospho-mTOR levels were decreased. However, phosphorylation of p70S6K was differentially regulated in B7-H3 cells treated with API-2 or everolimus, suggesting a different B7-H3-mediated mechanism downstream of mTOR. Both API-2 and everolimus decreased the glycolysis of the cells, whereas knockdown of B7-H3 decreased and B7-H3 overexpression increased the glycolytic capacity. In conclusion, we have unveiled a previously unknown relationship between B7-H3 expression and glycolytic capacity in tumor cells, and found that B7-H3 confers resistance to API-2 and everolimus. The results provide novel insights into the function of B7-H3 in cancer, and suggest that targeting of B7-H3 may be a novel alternative to improve current anticancer therapies. PMID:26771843

  16. Blood concentrations of everolimus are markedly increased by ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, J M; Beyer, D; Bizot, M N; Jiang, Q; Shenouda, M; Schmouder, R L

    2005-05-01

    The authors sought to quantify the influence of the CYP3A and P-glycoprotein inhibitor ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetics of everolimus in healthy subjects. This was a 2-period, single-sequence, crossover study in 12 healthy subjects. In period 1, subjects received the reference treatment of a single 2-mg dose of everolimus. In period 2, they received the test treatment of ketoconazole 200 mg twice daily for a total of 8 days and a single dose of everolimus coadministered on the fourth day of ketoconazole therapy. The test/reference ratio and 90% confidence interval were derived for everolimus maximum concentration and area under the curve. During ketoconazole coadministration, everolimus maximum concentration increased 3.9-fold (90% confidence interval, 3.4-4.6) from 15 +/- 4 ng/mL to 59 +/- 13 ng/mL. Everolimus area under the curve increased 15.0-fold (90% confidence interval, 13.6-16.6) from 90 +/- 23 ng*h/mL to 1324 +/- 232 ng*h/mL. Everolimus half-life was prolonged by 1.9-fold from 30 +/- 4 hours to 56 +/- 5 hours. Everolimus did not appear to alter ketoconazole predose concentrations. Given the magnitude of this drug interaction, use of ketoconazole should be avoided if possible in everolimus-treated patients. PMID:15831774

  17. Combined treatment by octreotide and everolimus: Octreotide enhances inhibitory effect of everolimus in aggressive meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Graillon, Thomas; Defilles, Céline; Mohamed, Amira; Lisbonis, Christophe; Germanetti, Anne-Laure; Chinot, Olivier; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Roche, Pierre-Hugues; Adetchessi, Tarek; Fuentes, Stéphane; Metellus, Philippe; Dufour, Henry; Enjalbert, Alain; Barlier, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Treatment for recurrent and aggressive meningiomas remains an unmet medical need in neuro-oncology, and chemotherapy exhibits limited clinical activity, if any. Merlin expression, encoded by the NF2 gene, is lost in a majority of meningiomas, and merlin is a negative regulator of mTORC1. The sst2 somatostatin receptor, targeted by octreotide, is highly expressed in meningiomas. To investigate new therapeutic strategies, we evaluated the activity of everolimus (mTOR inhibitor), BKM-120 and BEZ-235 (new Pi3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors), octreotide and a combined treatment (octreotide plus everolimus), on cell proliferation, signaling pathways, and cell cycle proteins, respectively. The in vitro study was conducted on human meningioma primary cells extracted from fresh tumors, allowing the assessment of somatostatin analogs at the concentration levels used in patients. The results were correlated to WHO grades. Further, everolimus decreased cell viability of human meningiomas, but concomitantly, induced Akt activation, reducing the antiproliferative effect of the drug. The new Pi3K inhibitors were not more active than everolimus alone, limiting their clinical relevance. In contrast, a clear cooperative inhibitory effect of octreotide and everolimus was observed on cell proliferation in all tested meningiomas, including WHO grades II-III. Octreotide not only reversed everolimus-induced Akt phosphorylation but also displayed additive and complementary effects with everolimus on downstream proteins involved in translation (4EB-P1), and controlling cell cycle (p27Kip1 and cyclin D1). We have demonstrated a co-operative action between everolimus and octreotide on cell proliferation in human meningiomas, including aggressive ones, establishing the basis for a clinical trial. PMID:26015296

  18. CGP57380 enhances efficacy of RAD001 in non-small cell lung cancer through abrogating mTOR inhibition-induced phosphorylation of eIF4E and activating mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qiuyuan; Wang, Weiyuan; Luo, Jiadi; Chu, Shuzhou; Chen, Lingjiao; Xu, Lina; Zang, Hongjing; Alnemah, Mohannad Ma; Ma, Jian; Fan, Songqing

    2016-05-10

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a potentially important therapeutic target in a broad range of cancer types. mTOR inhibitors such as rapamycin and its analogs (rapalogs) have been proven effective as anticancer agents in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), whereas they strongly enhance phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and activation of Akt, which cause resistance to mTOR-targeted therapy after an initial response. Rapamycin induces eIF4E phosphorylation by activating MAPK-interacting kinases (Mnks), and therefore targeting Mnk/eIF4E pathway represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NSCLC. Here, our results showed that over-expression of p-Mnk1 and p-eIF4E was significantly associated with poor overall survival of NSCLC patients and high expression of p-Mnk1 might act as an independent prognostic biomarker for these patients. Meanwhile, inhibiting Mnk1 expression by Mnk inhibitor (CGP57380) could abrogate rapalogs (RAD001)-induced eIF4E phosphorylation and Akt activation. Furthermore, combination of CGP57380 and RAD001 could induce NSCLC cells apoptosis via activating intrinsic mitochondrial pathway, and exert synergistic antitumor efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, combination of targeting both mTOR and Mnk/eIF4E signaling pathways to enhance effectiveness of mTOR-targeted cancer therapy might be significant innovation for the personalized treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27050281

  19. Response and Acquired Resistance to Everolimus in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagle, Nikhil; Grabiner, Brian C.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Rosenberg, Mara; Gray, Nathanael; Barletta, Justine A.; Guo, Yanan; Swanson, Scott J.; Ruan, Daniel T.; Hanna, Glenn J.; Haddad, Robert I.; Getz, Gad; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Carter, Scott L.; Sabatini, David M.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Garraway, Levi A.; Lorch, Jochen H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is effective in treating tumors harboring alterations in the mTOR pathway. Mechanisms of resistance to everolimus remain undefined. Resistance developed in a patient with metastatic anaplastic thyroid carcinoma after an extraordinary 18-month response. Whole-exome sequencing of pretreatment and drug-resistant tumors revealed a nonsense mutation in TSC2, a negative regulator of mTOR, suggesting a mechanism for exquisite sensitivity to everolimus. The resistant tumor also harbored a mutation in MTOR that confers resistance to allosteric mTOR inhibition. The mutation remains sensitive to mTOR kinase inhibitors. PMID:25295501

  20. The combination of IκB kinase β inhibitor and everolimus modulates expression of interleukin‐10 in human T‐cell lymphotropic virus type‐1‐infected T cells

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, Chie; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Yang, Jing; Udaka, Keiko; Yokoyama, Akihito

    2013-01-01

    Summary Adult T‐cell leukaemia‐lymphoma (ATLL) is an aggressive malignancy of CD4+ CD25+ T lymphocytes, characterized by a severely compromised immunosystem, in which the human T‐cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV‐1) has been recognized as the aetiological agent. This study found that an IκB kinase β (IKKβ) inhibitor Bay11‐7082 inactivated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and transcription factor nuclear factor‐κB in HTLV‐1‐infected T cells; this was significantly enhanced in the presence of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. In addition, Bay11‐7082 decreased production of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin‐10 (IL‐10), which was further down‐regulated when Bay11‐7082 was combined with evelolimus in HTLV‐1‐infected T and ATLL cells isolated from patients. Interleukin‐10 is known to inhibit maturation and the antigen‐presenting function of dendritic cells (DCs). The culture media of HTLV‐1‐infected MT‐1 cells, which contained a large amout of IL‐10, hampered tumour necrosis factor‐α‐induced maturation of DCs isolated from healthy volunteers. Culture supernatant of MT‐1 cells treated with a combination of Bay11‐7082 and everolimus augmented maturation of DCs in association with a decrease in production of IL‐10 and enhanced the allostimulatory function of DCs. Similarly, when DCs isolated from patients with ATLL were treated with the combination of Bay11‐7082 and everolimus, they were fully matured and their capability to stimulate proliferation of lymphocytes was augmented. Taken together, the combination of Bay11‐7082 and everolimus might exhibit immunostimulatory properties in HTLV‐1‐infected T and ATLL cells isolated from patients, and this combination may be potentially therapeutic to regain the compromised immunosystem in ATLL patients. PMID:23278479

  1. Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia: An uncommon adverse effect of everolimus

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shalabh; Akhil, Rajendra; Chacko, Raju Titus; George, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus is a novel agent used in endocrine therapy resistant hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer. Its use has been associated with clinically significant improvement in the otherwise dismal outcomes of this subset of patients. Rash is a common adverse effect associated with everolimus. However, Hand-foot syndrome is an uncommon toxicity with the use of this drug. We report a case of Grade 3 hand-foot syndrome following institution of everolimus therapy and describe its successful management. PMID:27168711

  2. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate in combination with RAD001 treatment: further investigations on tumor metastasis and response in the rat pancreatic CA20948 tumor model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previously, we reported on the unexpected development of distant metastases in the subcutaneous rat pancreas CA20948 tumor model after 4.5 weeks of treatment with RAD001-only or in combination with [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate (177Lu-DOTATATE) (Cancer Res. 73:12-8, 2013). Moreover, the combination therapy was less effective compared to 177Lu-DOTATATE-only. In the current study, we address the following questions: (1) Why was the combination therapy less effective? Is 177Lu-DOTATATE tumor uptake affected by pretreatment with RAD001? (2) Could sudden cessation of RAD001 therapy cause the development of distant metastases? (3) Is 177Lu-DOTATATE an effective treatment option for these metastases? Methods Lewis rats (HanHsd or SsNHsd substrain with a slight difference in immune response) bearing subcutaneous CA20948 tumors were treated with either 125 or 275 MBq 177Lu-DOTATATE, RAD001, or their combination. RAD001 was given twice a week for 4.5 or 12 weeks, whereas 177Lu-DOTATATE was given as a single injection. When combined, RAD001 was started either 3 days prior to or 3 days post administration of 177Lu-DOTATATE. SPECT/CT was performed to quantify 177Lu-DOTATATE tumor uptake. Where indicated, primary tumors were surgically removed when tumor size is >6,000 mm3 to enable monitoring for possible metastasis. If metastases were suspected, an 111In-DTPA-octreotide SPECT/CT scan was performed. Seven rats with metastases were treated with 400 MBq 177Lu-DOTATATE. Results Lu-DOTATATE tumor uptake was not significantly affected by RAD001 pretreatment. The occurrence of metastases after RAD001 treatment was not dose dependent in the dose range tested, nor was it related to the duration of RAD001 treatment. In the experiment in which the LEW/SsNsd substrain was used, only 12.5% of RAD001-treated rats showed complete response (CR), compared to 50% tumor regression in the control group. Re-treatment with a high dose of 177Lu-DOTATATE resulted in CR in only two

  3. Use of everolimus in liver transplantation: The French experience.

    PubMed

    Dumortier, Jérôme; Dharancy, Sebastien; Calmus, Yvon; Duvoux, Christophe; Durand, François; Salamé, Ephrem; Saliba, Faouzi

    2016-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus is approved for rejection prophylaxis after liver transplantation. The current article pools the experience of French liver transplant surgeons and physicians in use of everolimus and, particularly, practical guidance on dosing, appropriate concomitant immunosuppression and management of adverse events. In terms of indication, introduction of everolimus from week 4 after liver transplantation, with or without concomitant calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) therapy, offers a significant renal benefit without loss of immunosuppressive efficacy. De novo treatment with everolimus, either selectively or systematically, may play a role in the prevention and treatment of recurrence of hepatocellular cancer and de novo malignancies. For maintenance patients, the most frequent indications for introducing everolimus are in response to renal dysfunction, recurrent hepatocellular cancer, diabetes, hypertension, or neurotoxicity, or as a preventative approach to avoid malignancies. Of these, the strongest evidence exists for a renoprotective effect. However, the low rate of acute rejection following switch of maintenance patients from CNI-based to everolimus-based therapy means that this can be considered even where robust data are not yet available. Most adverse events associated with mTOR inhibitors can usually be managed successfully, often with concentration-controlled dose reductions. Dosing algorithms are provided, with suggestions for target ranges in specific settings, and treatment strategies for the most common side effects are proposed. Although further research is required, everolimus has become an established part of the immunosuppressive arsenal for liver transplant recipients over the last decade. Sharing experience from units which have embraced its use may help other centers develop their own protocols. PMID:27083870

  4. Cabozantinib versus everolimus in advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choueiri, Toni K.; Escudier, Bernard; Powles, Thomas; Mainwaring, Paul; Rini, Brian I.; Donskov, Frede; Hammers, Hans; Hutson, Thomas E.; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Peltola, Katriina; Roth, Bruce J.; Bjarnason, Georg A.; Géczi, Lajos; Keam, Bhumsuk; Moroto, Pablo; Heng, Daniel Y. C.; Schmidinger, Manuela; Kantoff, Philip W.; Borgman, Anne; Hessel, Colin; Scheffold, Christian; Schwab, Gisela M.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Motzer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cabozantinib is an oral small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) as well as MET and AXL; each has been implicated in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathobiology or development of resistance to antiangiogenic drugs. This randomized open-label phase 3 trial evaluated the efficacy of cabozantinib compared to everolimus in RCC patients who progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. Methods The trial randomized 658 patients to receive cabozantinib at a dose of 60 mg daily, or everolimus at a dose of 10 mg daily. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Secondary efficacy endpoints were overall survival and objective response rate. Results Median progression-free survival was 7.4 months with cabozantinib and 3.8 months with everolimus. The risk of progression or death was 42% lower with cabozantinib compared to everolimus (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45 to 0.75; P < 0.001). Objective response rates were 21% with cabozantinib and 5% with everolimus (P < 0.001). A planned interim analysis showed that overall survival was improved with cabozantinib (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.89; P = 0.005) but did not cross the significance boundary. Adverse events (grade 3 or 4, regardless of causality) were reported in 74% of cabozantinib patients and 65% of everolimus patients. Discontinuation of study treatment for adverse events occurred in 9.1% of cabozantinib patients and 10% of everolimus patients. Conclusions Cabozantinib improved progression-free survival compared to everolimus in RCC patients who progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. PMID:26406150

  5. Resistance to everolimus driven by epigenetic regulation of MYC in ER+ breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bihani, Teeru; Ezell, Scott A.; Ladd, Brendon; Grosskurth, Shaun E.; Mazzola, Anne Marie; Pietras, Mark; Reimer, Corinne; Zinda, Michael; Fawell, Stephen; D'Cruz, Celina M.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired resistance to PI3K/mTOR/Akt pathway inhibitors is often associated with compensatory feedback loops involving the activation of oncogenes. Here, we have generated everolimus resistance in ER+ breast cancer cells and in long-term estrogen deprived (LTED) models that mimic progression on anti-estrogens. This allowed us to uncover MYC as a driver of mTOR inhibitor resistance. We demonstrate that both everolimus resistance and acute treatment of everolimus can lead to the upregulation of MYC mRNA, protein expression and, consequently, the enrichment of MYC signatures as revealed by RNA sequencing data. Depletion of MYC resulted in resensitization to everolimus, confirming its functional importance in this setting. Furthermore, ChIP assays demonstrate that MYC upregulation in the everolimus resistant lines is mediated by increased association of the BRD4 transcription factor with the MYC gene. Finally, JQ1, a BRD4 inhibitor combined with everolimus exhibited increased tumor growth inhibition in 3D Matrigel models and an in vivo xenograft model. These data suggest that MYC plays an important role in mediating resistance to everolimus in ER+ and ER+/LTED models. Furthermore, given the regulation ofMYCby BRD4 in this setting, these data have implications for increased therapeutic potential of combining epigenetic agents with mTOR inhibitors to effectively downregulate otherwise difficult to target transcription factors such as MYC. PMID:25537515

  6. Everolimus prolonged survival in transgenic mice with EGFR-driven lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Yasugi, Masayuki; Takigawa, Nagio; Ochi, Nobuaki; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Harada, Daijiro; Ninomiya, Takashi; Murakami, Toshi; Honda, Yoshihiro; Ichihara, Eiki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2014-08-15

    Everolimus is an orally administered mTOR inhibitor. The effect, and mechanism of action, of everolimus on lung cancers with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation remain unclear. Four gefitinib-sensitive and -resistant cell lines were used in the present work. Growth inhibition was determined using the MTT assay. Transgenic mice carrying the EGFR L858R mutation were treated with everolimus (10 mg/kg/day), or vehicle alone, from 5 to 20 weeks of age, and were then sacrificed. To evaluate the efficacy of everolimus in prolonging survival, everolimus (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered from 5 weeks of age. The four cell lines were similarly sensitive to everolimus. Expression of phosphorylated (p) mTOR and pS6 were suppressed upon treatment with everolimus in vitro, whereas the pAKT level increased. The numbers of lung tumors with a long axis exceeding 1mm in the everolimus-treated and control groups were 1.9 ± 0.9 and 9.4 ± 3.2 (t-test, p<0.001), respectively. pS6 was suppressed during eve r olimus treatment. Although apoptosis and autophagy were not induced in everolimus-treated EGFR transgenic mice, angiogenesis was suppressed. The median survival time in the everolimus-treated group (58.0 weeks) was significantly longer than that in the control group (31.2 weeks) (logrank test, p<0.001). These findings suggest that everolimus had an indirect effect on tumor formation by inhibiting angiogenesis and might be effective to treat lung tumors induced by an activating EGFR gene mutation. PMID:24768699

  7. Impact of dual mTORC1/2 mTOR kinase inhibitor AZD8055 on acquired endocrine resistance in breast cancer in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Upregulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling in endocrine-resistant breast cancer (BC) has identified mTOR as an attractive target alongside anti-hormones to control resistance. RAD001 (everolimus/Afinitor®), an allosteric mTOR inhibitor, is proving valuable in this setting; however, some patients are inherently refractory or relapse during treatment requiring alternative strategies. Here we evaluate the potential for novel dual mTORC1/2 mTOR kinase inhibitors, exemplified by AZD8055, by comparison with RAD001 in ER + endocrine resistant BC cells. Methods In vitro models of tamoxifen (TamR) or oestrogen deprivation resistance (MCF7-X) were treated with RAD001 or AZD8055 alone or combined with anti-hormone fulvestrant. Endpoints included growth, cell proliferation (Ki67), viability and migration, with PI3K/AKT/mTOR signalling impact monitored by Western blotting. Potential ER cross-talk was investigated by immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR. Results RAD001 was a poor growth inhibitor of MCF7-derived TamR and MCF7-X cells (IC50 ≥1 μM), rapidly inhibiting mTORC1 but not mTORC2/AKT signalling. In contrast AZD8055, which rapidly inhibited both mTORC1 and mTORC2/AKT activity, was a highly effective (P <0.001) growth inhibitor of TamR (IC50 18 nM) and MCF7-X (IC50 24 nM), and of a further T47D-derived tamoxifen resistant model T47D-tamR (IC50 19 nM). AZD8055 significantly (P <0.05) inhibited resistant cell proliferation, increased cell death and reduced migration. Furthermore, dual treatment of TamR or MCF7-X cells with AZD8055 plus fulvestrant provided superior control of resistant growth versus either agent alone (P <0.05). Co-treating with AZD8055 alongside tamoxifen (P <0.01) or oestrogen deprivation (P <0.05) also effectively inhibited endocrine responsive MCF-7 cells. Although AZD8055 inhibited oestrogen receptor (ER) ser167 phosphorylation in TamR and MCF7-X, it had no effect on ER ser118 activity or expression of several ER-regulated genes

  8. A Phase I Study of Everolimus and Docetaxel in Patients With Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Kevin D.; Manola, Judith B.; Elfiky, Aymen A.; Ross, Robert; Oh, William K.; Yap, Jeffrey T.; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; Ryan, Christopher W.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Loda, Massimo; Priolo, Carmen; Kantoff, Philip; Taplin, Mary-Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling cascade, often through loss of the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) tumor suppressor, is frequent in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We assessed the safety and efficacy of combining the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus with docetaxel in a phase I clinical trial of men with metastatic CRPC, and evaluated the ability of fluorine–18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to predict response to treatment. The observed clinical activity of tolerable dose levels of everolimus with docetaxel was low. FDG-PET might serve as a biomarker for target inhibition by mTOR inhibitors in metastatic CRPC. Background The PTEN tumor suppressor is frequently lost in CRPC, with activation of Akt-mTOR signaling, driving growth. We conducted a phase I trial of the mTOR inhibitor, everolimus, and docetaxel in CRPC. Patients and Methods Eligible patients had progressive, metastatic, chemotherapy-naive CRPC. Patients received everolimus 10 mg daily for 2 weeks and underwent a restaging FDG-PET/computed tomography scan. Patient cohorts were subsequently treated at 3 dose levels of everolimus with docetaxel: 5 mg to 60 mg/m2, 10 mg to 60 mg/m2, and 10 mg to 70 mg/m2. The primary end point was the safety and tolerability of combination therapy. Results Accrual was 4 patients at level 1, 3 patients at level 2, and 8 patients at level 3. Common toxicities were hematologic and fatigue. Serum concentrations of everolimus when administered with docetaxel were 1.5 to 14.8 ng/mL in patients receiving 5 mg everolimus and 4.5 to 55.4 ng/mL in patients receiving 10 mg everolimus. Four patients had partial metabolic response (PMR) using FDG-PET, 12 had stable metabolic disease, and 2 had progressive metabolic disease after a 2-week treatment with everolimus alone. Five of 12 evaluable patients experienced a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) reduction ≥ 50

  9. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for everolimus and sorafenib in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pawaskar, Dipti K.; Straubinger, Robert M.; Fetterly, Gerald J.; Hylander, Bonnie H.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.; Ma, Wen W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor approved as an immunosuppressant and for second-line therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor used as first-line therapy in HCC and RCC. This study assessed the pharmacokinetics (PK) of everolimus and sorafenib alone and in combination in plasma and tissues, developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in mice, and assessed the possibility of PK drug interactions. Methods Single and multiple oral doses of everolimus and sorafenib were administered alone and in combination in immunocompetent male mice and to severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice bearing low-passage, patient-derived pancreatic adenocarcinoma in seven different studies. Plasma and tissue samples including tumor were collected over a 24-h period and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). Distribution of everolimus and sorafenib to the brain, muscle, adipose, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, spleen, liver, GI, and tumor was modeled as perfusion rate-limited, and all data from the diverse studies were fitted simultaneously using a population approach. Results PBPK models were developed for everolimus and sorafenib. PBPK analysis showed that the two drugs in combination had the same PK as each drug given alone. A twofold increase in sorafenib dose increased tumor exposure tenfold, thus suggesting involvement of transporters in tumor deposition of sorafenib. Conclusions The developed PBPK models suggested the absence of PK interaction between the two drugs in mice. These studies provide the basis for pharmacodynamic evaluation of these drugs in patient-derived primary pancreatic adenocarcinomas explants. PMID:23455451

  10. Everolimus exhibits anti-tumorigenic activity in obesity-induced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui; Zhong, Yan; Jackson, Amanda L.; Clark, Leslie H.; Kilgore, Josh; Zhang, Lu; Han, Jianjun; Sheng, Xiugui; Gilliam, Timothy P.; Gehrig, Paola A.; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Everolimus inhibits mTOR kinase activity and its downstream targets by acting on mTORC1 and has anti-tumorigenic activity in ovarian cancer. Clinical and epidemiologic data find that obesity is associated with worse outcomes in ovarian cancer. In addition, obesity leads to hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway in epithelial tissues, suggesting that mTOR inhibitors may be a logical choice for treatment in obesity-driven cancers. However, it remains unclear if obesity impacts the effect of everolimus on tumor growth in ovarian cancer. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of everolimus on cytotoxicity, cell metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle, cell stress and invasion in human ovarian cancer cells. A genetically engineered mouse model of serous ovarian cancer fed a high fat diet or low fat diet allowed further investigation into the inter-relationship between everolimus and obesity in vivo. Everolimus significantly inhibited cellular proliferation, induced cell cycle G1 arrest and apoptosis, reduced invasion and caused cellular stress via inhibition of mTOR pathways in vitro. Hypoglycemic conditions enhanced the sensitivity of cells to everolimus through the disruption of glycolysis. Moreover, everolimus was found to inhibit ovarian tumor growth in both obese and lean mice. This reduction coincided with a decrease in expression of Ki-67 and phosphorylated-S6, as well as an increase in cleaved caspase 3 and phosphorylated-AKT. Metabolite profiling revealed that everolimus was able to alter tumor metabolism through different metabolic pathways in the obese and lean mice. Our findings support that everolimus may be a promising therapeutic agent for obesity-driven ovarian cancers. PMID:26959121

  11. Early Response to Everolimus Therapy Detected on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in a Patient With Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Elgin; Soydal, Cigdem; Ucak Semirgin, Sibel; Yapici, Oktay; Atmaca, Aysegul; Demirag, Guzin

    2016-07-01

    Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor that has been recently approved for the treatment of patients with advanced progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. Here, we present a case in which an early therapy response to everolimus was effectively demonstrated by Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT. PMID:27163457

  12. Targeting the mTOR Complex by Everolimus in NRAS Mutant Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Michael K.; Curioni-Fontecedro, Alessandra; Samaras, Panagiotis; Lang, Silvia; Scharl, Michael; Aguzzi, Adriano; Oldrige, Derek A.; Maris, John M.; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains lethal in about 50% of patients despite multimodal treatment. Recent attempts to identify molecular targets for specific therapies have shown that Neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) is significantly mutated in a small number of patients. However, few inhibitors for the potential treatment for NRAS mutant neuroblastoma have been investigated so far. In this in-vitro study, we show that MEK inhibitors AZD6244, MEK162 and PD0325901 block cell growth in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma cell lines but not in NRAS wild-type cell lines. Several studies show that mutant NRAS leads to PI3K pathway activation and combined inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR effectively block cell growth. However, we observed the combination of MEK inhibitors with PI3K or AKT inhibitors did not show synergestic effects on cell growth. Thus, we tested single mTOR inhibitors Everolimus and AZD8055. Interestingly, Everolimus and AZD8055 alone were sufficient to block cell growth in NRAS mutant cell lines but not in wild-type cell lines. We found that Everolimus alone induced apoptosis in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma. Furthermore, the combination of mTOR and MEK inhibitors resulted in synergistic growth inhibition. Taken together, our results show that NRAS mutant neuroblastoma can be targeted by clinically available Everolimus alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors which could impact future clinical studies. PMID:26821351

  13. Everolimus Stabilizes Podocyte Microtubules via Enhancing TUBB2B and DCDC2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jeruschke, Stefanie; Jeruschke, Kay; DiStasio, Andrew; Karaterzi, Sinem; Büscher, Anja K.; Nalbant, Perihan; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Hoyer, Peter F.; Weiss, Jürgen; Stottmann, Rolf W.; Weber, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Glomerular podocytes are highly differentiated cells that are key components of the kidney filtration units. The podocyte cytoskeleton builds the basis for the dynamic podocyte cytoarchitecture and plays a central role for proper podocyte function. Recent studies implicate that immunosuppressive agents including the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus have a protective role directly on the stability of the podocyte actin cytoskeleton. In contrast, a potential stabilization of microtubules by everolimus has not been studied so far. Methods To elucidate mechanisms underlying mTOR-inhibitor mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements, we carried out microarray gene expression studies to identify target genes and corresponding pathways in response to everolimus. We analyzed the effect of everolimus in a puromycin aminonucleoside experimental in vitro model of podocyte injury. Results Upon treatment with puromycin aminonucleoside, microarray analysis revealed gene clusters involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell adhesion, migration and extracellular matrix composition to be affected. Everolimus was capable of protecting podocytes from injury, both on transcriptional and protein level. Rescued genes included tubulin beta 2B class IIb (TUBB2B) and doublecortin domain containing 2 (DCDC2), both involved in microtubule structure formation in neuronal cells but not identified in podocytes so far. Validating gene expression data, Western-blot analysis in cultured podocytes demonstrated an increase of TUBB2B and DCDC2 protein after everolimus treatment, and immunohistochemistry in healthy control kidneys confirmed a podocyte-specific expression. Interestingly, Tubb2bbrdp/brdp mice revealed a delay in glomerular podocyte development as showed by podocyte-specific markers Wilm’s tumour 1, Podocin, Nephrin and Synaptopodin. Conclusions Taken together, our study suggests that off-target, non-immune mediated effects of the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus on the podocyte cytoskeleton

  14. Dosing and Safety Implications for Oncologists When Administering Everolimus to Patients With Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway are common abnormalities in breast cancer and are associated with the development of resistance to endocrine- and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2-targeted therapies. Because of the significant improvement in progression-free survival for everolimus plus exemestane compared with exemestane plus placebo, everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, was approved in the United States for the treatment of patients with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), HER-negative, advanced breast cancer whose disease had progressed while receiving letrozole or anastrozole. To provide optimal prevention and management strategies, it is crucial that clinicians are aware of the adverse events (AEs) associated with mTOR inhibition. Understanding the appropriate dose modifications will help reduce toxicity and improve drug tolerance, thus achieving the optimal benefit from everolimus. Analyses of data from the Breast Cancer Trials of Oral Everolimus 2 trial have shown that, despite a greater frequency of AEs in the everolimus plus exemestane treatment arm, the AEs were effectively managed with temporary dose reductions or interruptions. In some cases, the full dose of everolimus could be resumed. Despite a lower mean dose and duration of exposure in patients aged ≥ 70 versus < 70 years, everolimus plus exemestane was similarly efficacious, suggesting that appropriate dose reductions for toxicity will not adversely impact efficacy. Appropriate modification of the everolimus dose and dose delay according to the severity of AEs, with resumption of the optimal dose of everolimus when toxicity has improved, will positively affect patient outcomes in HR+ advanced breast cancer. PMID:26507507

  15. Interaction of sirolimus and everolimus with hepatic and intestinal organic anion-transporting polypeptide transporters.

    PubMed

    Picard, Nicolas; Levoir, Laure; Lamoureux, Fabien; Yee, Sook Wah; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Marquet, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the interaction of the mTOR inhibitors (ImTORs) sirolimus and everolimus with the human organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) expressed in hepatocytes and enterocytes by conducting uptake experiments using (i) transfected HEK293T cells, (ii) the hepatocyte-like HepaRG cell line and (iii) the enterocyte-like Caco-2 cell line. Sirolimus and everolimus inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the uptake of [³H]-estrone sulphate by OATP1A2 and OATP1B1 and that of mycophenolic acid 7-O-glucuronide (MPAG) by OATP1B3. ImTOR apparent 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC₅₀) for OATPs were 11.9 µM (OATP1A2), 9.8 µM (OATP1B1) and 1.3 µM (OATP1B3) for sirolimus and 4.2 µM (OATP1A2), 4.1 µM (OATP1B1) and 4.3 µM (OATP1B3) for everolimus. No transport of sirolimus or everolimus by OATP1A2, OATP1B1 or OATP1B3 was observed in HEK-transfected cells and the OAT/OATP/MRP chemical inhibitor probenecid did not significantly decrease the uptake of sirolimus and everolimus in HepaRG and Caco-2 cells, but tended to increase their intracellular accumulation presumably through efflux inhibition. In conclusion, our data suggest that the major OATP transporters expressed in the liver and the intestine do not contribute to the pharmacokinetics of sirolimus and everolimus. However, ImTORs are inhibitors of these transporters. PMID:21524191

  16. Everolimus in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buti, Sebastiano; Leonetti, Alessandro; Dallatomasina, Alice; Bersanelli, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, and its pathogenesis is strictly related to altered cellular response to hypoxia, in which mTOR signaling pathway is implicated. Everolimus, an mTOR serine/threonine kinase inhibitor, represents a therapeutic option for the treatment of advanced RCC. Aim The objective of this article is to review the evidence for the treatment of metastatic RCC with everolimus. Evidence review Everolimus was approved for second- and third-line therapy in patients with advanced RCC according to the results of a Phase III pivotal trial that demonstrated a benefit in median progression-free survival of ~2 months compared to placebo after failure of previous lines of therapy, of which at least one was an anti-VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). The role of this drug in first-line setting has been investigated in Phase II trials, with no significant clinical benefit, even in combination with bevacizumab. Everolimus activity in non-clear cell RCC is supported by two randomized Phase II trials that confirmed the benefit in second-line setting but not in first line. Recently, two randomized Phase III trials (METEOR and CheckMate 025) demonstrated the inferiority of everolimus in second-line setting compared to the TKI cabozantinib and to the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab, respectively. Moreover, a recent Phase II study demonstrated a significant benefit for the second-line combination treatment with everolimus plus lenvatinib (a novel TKI) in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival compared to the single-agent everolimus. Basing on preclinical data, the main downstream effectors of mTOR cascade, S6RP and its phosphorylated form, could be good predictive biomarkers of response to everolimus. The safety profile of the drug is favorable, with a good cost-effectiveness compared to second-line sorafenib or axitinib, and no significant impact on the quality of life of treated

  17. Profile of everolimus in the treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Capal, Jamie K; Franz, David Neal

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a relatively rare genetic disorder, affecting one in 6,000 births. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, such as everolimus, which have been previously used to prevent solid organ transplant rejection, augment anticancer treatment regimens, and prevent neovascularization of artificial cardiac stents, are now approved for treating TSC-related manifestations, such as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas. The use of everolimus in treating subependymal giant cell astrocytomas is supported by long-term Phase II and III clinical trials. Seizures are a common feature in TSC, occurring in up to 96% of patients. While mTOR inhibitors currently do not have regulatory approval in treating this manifestation, small clinical studies have demonstrated beneficial outcomes with everolimus. Further evidence from a forthcoming Phase III clinical study may provide additional support for the use of everolimus for this indication. Also, there are no approved treatments for TSC-associated neuropsychiatric disorders, which include intellectual disability, behavioral difficulties, and autism spectrum disorder, but preclinical data and small studies have suggested that some neuropsychiatric symptoms may be improved through mTOR inhibition therapy. More evidence is needed, particularly regarding safety in young infants. This review focuses on the current evidence supporting the use of everolimus in neurologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations of TSC, and the place of everolimus in therapy. PMID:27601910

  18. Profile of everolimus in the treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy.

    PubMed

    Capal, Jamie K; Franz, David Neal

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a relatively rare genetic disorder, affecting one in 6,000 births. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, such as everolimus, which have been previously used to prevent solid organ transplant rejection, augment anticancer treatment regimens, and prevent neovascularization of artificial cardiac stents, are now approved for treating TSC-related manifestations, such as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas. The use of everolimus in treating subependymal giant cell astrocytomas is supported by long-term Phase II and III clinical trials. Seizures are a common feature in TSC, occurring in up to 96% of patients. While mTOR inhibitors currently do not have regulatory approval in treating this manifestation, small clinical studies have demonstrated beneficial outcomes with everolimus. Further evidence from a forthcoming Phase III clinical study may provide additional support for the use of everolimus for this indication. Also, there are no approved treatments for TSC-associated neuropsychiatric disorders, which include intellectual disability, behavioral difficulties, and autism spectrum disorder, but preclinical data and small studies have suggested that some neuropsychiatric symptoms may be improved through mTOR inhibition therapy. More evidence is needed, particularly regarding safety in young infants. This review focuses on the current evidence supporting the use of everolimus in neurologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations of TSC, and the place of everolimus in therapy. PMID:27601910

  19. [Management of metabolic disorders induced by everolimus in patients with differentiated neuroendocrine tumors: expert proposals].

    PubMed

    Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Vergès, Bruno; Coriat, Romain; N'guyen, Thierry; François, Eric; Hammel, Pascal; Niccoli, Patricia; Hentic, Olivia

    2014-02-01

    Medical management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors has recently been improved by new molecules of which the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. If digestive neuroendocrine tumors are rare, the incidence is in constant increase and the prevalence in digestive cancers put them right behind colorectal cancers. Everolimus has demonstrated efficacy in unresectable and progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, by doubling the median progression free survival (11 versus 4.6 months), with a median time of exposure to everolimus of nine months. Everolimus is generally maintained until progression or intolerance and some patients are treated during several years. Potential metabolic disorders induced by everolimus (dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia) in patients with life expectancy of several years, justify monitoring of these parameters and accurate treatment management algorithm. These will avoid worsening patient's prognostic, but also prematurely discontinue potentially effective treatment or contraindicate other therapeutic weapons, in a pathology in which there are multiple therapeutic options in metastatic phase. We propose a standard practice in terms of initial assessment, monitoring, care threshold, and therapeutic objectives to manage metabolic disorders, fitted to our patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:24557872

  20. Combined Use of Metformin and Everolimus Is Synergistic in the Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunshan; Wei, Junmin; Li, Li; Fan, Cong; Sun, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Everolimus inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and leads to decreased protein synthesis and decreased cancer cell proliferation in many experimental systems. Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators such as metformin have similar actions in keeping with the TSC2/1 pathway linking activation of AMPK to inhibition of mTOR. Histopathological and biochemical studies of breast cancer show frequent dysregulation of the AMPK and the mTOR pathway. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and metformin in the treatment of breast cancer cells. This study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of everolimus alone or in combination with metformin on breast cancer cells. MTT assay was used to quantify the inhibitory effect of the drugs on breast cancer cells in vitro. SCID mice injected with HCC1428 cells followed by different treatments were used to assess the in vivo efficacy of different agents. Data showed that the combination of everolimus and metformin exerted synergistic inhibitory effects on the growth of breast cancer cells both in culture and in a mouse xenograft model. Further, this combination abrogated S6 and 4EBP1phosphorylation. Collectively, we suggest that the combination of everolimus and metformin may be an effective regimen for treatment of breast cancer, hence warranting further evaluation of the combination in the clinic. PMID:26351208

  1. Functional and histological improvement after everolimus rescue of chronic allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Kai Ming; Szeto, Cheuk Chun; Lai, Fernand Mac-Moune; Luk, Cathy Choi-Wan; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Leung, Chi Bon; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background We tested the strategy of mTOR inhibitors with calcineurin inhibitor minimization in renal transplant recipients with known chronic allograft dysfunction. Methods In this open-label, single-arm study, renal transplant patients were recruited after biopsy-confirmed chronic allograft dysfunction in the absence of acute rejection episode within 2 months, with proteinuria <0.8 g/day, and serum creatinine <220 μmol/L or estimated glomerular filtration rate >40 mL/min/1.73 m2. They were converted to everolimus (aiming for trough everolimus level 3–8 ng/mL) with cyclosporine minimization, to assess the effect on renal function, rate of glomerular filtration rate decline, and longitudinal transplant biopsy at 12 months. Results Seventeen Chinese patients (median transplant duration, 4.2 years) were recruited; no patients discontinued study medication. The mean slope of the glomerular filtration rate over time was −4.31±6.65 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in the year before everolimus, as compared with 1.29±5.84 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in the 12 months of everolimus therapy, a difference of 5.61 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40–10.8) favoring everolimus therapy (P=0.036). Serial renal biopsy histology showed significant decrease of tubular atrophy (15.7%±11.3% versus 7.1%±7.3%, P=0.005) and interstitial fibrosis (14.8%±11.5% versus 7.2%±8.2%, P=0.013). Intrarenal expression of TGF-β1 mRNA showed a nonsignificant decrease after everolimus treatment. Conclusion In renal transplant recipients with biopsy-confirmed chronic allograft dysfunction, we found a significant beneficial effect of everolimus rescue therapy and calcineurin inhibitor minimization strategy on the improvement of glomerular filtration rate decline rate. In secondary analysis, everolimus was shown to slow down the disease progression by reducing the tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis scoring. PMID:26056462

  2. Efficacy and Safety of an Everolimus- vs. a Mycophenolate Mofetil-Based Regimen in Pediatric Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Brunkhorst, Lena Caroline; Fichtner, Alexander; Höcker, Britta; Burmeister, Greta; Ahlenstiel-Grunow, Thurid; Krupka, Kai; Bald, Martin; Zapf, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Data on the efficacy and safety of everolimus in pediatric renal transplantation compared to other immunosuppressive regimens are scarce. Patients/Methods We therefore performed a multicenter, observational, matched cohort study over 4 years post-transplant in 35 patients on everolimus plus low-dose cyclosporine, who were matched (1:2) with a control group of 70 children receiving a standard-dose calcineurin-inhibitor- and mycophenolate mofetil-based regimen. Results Corticosteroids were withdrawn in 83% in the everolimus vs. 39% in the control group (p<0.001). Patient and graft survival were comparable. The rate of biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes Banff score ≥ IA during the first year post-transplant was 6% in the everolimus vs. 13% in the control group (p = 0.23). The rate of de novo donor-specific HLA antibodies (11% in everolimus, 18% in controls) was comparable (p = 0.55). At 4 years post-transplant, mean eGFR in the everolimus group was 56±33 ml/min per 1.73 m² vs. 63±22 ml/min per 1.73 m² in the control group (p = 0.14). Everolimus therapy was associated with less BK polyomavirus replication (3% vs. 17% in controls; p = 0.04), but with a higher percentage of arterial hypertension and more hyperlipidemia (p<0.001). Conclusion In pediatric renal transplantation, an everolimus-based regimen with low-dose cyclosporine yields comparable four year results as a standard regimen, but with a different side effect profile. PMID:26407177

  3. Adjuvant Everolimus for Resected Kidney Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with renal cell cancer who have undergone partial or complete nephrectomy will be randomly assigned to take everolimus tablets or matching placebo tablets daily for 54 weeks.

  4. Therapeutic potential and adverse events of everolimus for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma - systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Kenya; Petrulionis, Marius; Lin, Shibo; Gao, Chao; Galli, Uwe; Richter, Susanne; Winkler, Susanne; Houben, Philipp; Schultze, Daniel; Hatano, Etsuro; Schemmer, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Everolimus is an orally administrated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. Several large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated the survival benefits of everolimus at the dose of 10 mg/day for solid cancers. Furthermore, mTOR-inhibitor-based immunosuppression is associated with survival benefits for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have received liver transplantation. However, a low rate of tumor reduction and some adverse events have been pointed out. This review summarizes the antitumor effects and adverse events of everolimus and evaluates its possible application in advanced HCC. For the meta-analysis of adverse events, we used the RCTs for solid cancers. The odds ratios of adverse events were calculated using the Peto method. Manypreclinical studies demonstrated that everolimus had antitumor effects such as antiproliferation and antiangiogenesis. However, some differences in the effects were observed among in vivo animal studies for HCC treatment. Meanwhile, clinical studies demonstrated that the response rate of single-agent everolimus was low, though survival benefits could be expected. The meta-analysis revealed the odds ratios (95% confidence interval [CI]) of stomatitis: 5.42 [4.31-6.73], hyperglycemia: 3.22 [2.37-4.39], anemia: 3.34 [2.37-4.67], pneumonitis: 6.02 [3.95-9.16], aspartate aminotransferase levels: 2.22 [1.37-3.62], and serum alanine aminotransferase levels: 2.94 [1.72-5.02], respectively. Everolimus at the dose of 10 mg/day significantly increased the risk of the adverse events. In order to enable its application to the standard conventional therapies of HCC, further studies are required to enhance the antitumor effects and manage the adverse events of everolimus. PMID:24403259

  5. Combination of everolimus and tacrolimus: a potentially effective regimen for recalcitrant psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai-Che; Lai, Ping-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Severe forms of psoriasis that are refractory to conventional therapies are often difficult to manage. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors potentially have versatile effects toward putative psoriatic pathologic pathways. Therefore, mTOR inhibitors may offer a range of new therapeutic options for patients with psoriasis. We describe a 55-year-old male renal transplant patient with refractory psoriasis. We adjusted his antirejection regimen and put him on everolimus (Certican(®); Novartis, Basel, Switzerland; a semisynthetic macrolide, belonging to the mTOR inhibitors family) with low-dose tacrolimus. This combination regimen maintained his graft function and successfully controlled his psoriasis. His skin lesions never recurred in the next 18 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the combination of everolimus and tacrolimus could be used to treat recalcitrant psoriasis. The relative benefit-risk profiles of such therapies worth further investigation. PMID:25285355

  6. A randomized, controlled trial of everolimus-based dual immunosuppression versus standard of care in de novo kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chadban, Steven J; Eris, Josette Marie; Kanellis, John; Pilmore, Helen; Lee, Po Chang; Lim, Soo Kun; Woodcock, Chad; Kurstjens, Nicol; Russ, Graeme

    2014-03-01

    Kidney transplant recipients receiving calcineurin inhibitor-based immunosuppression incur increased long-term risks of cancer and kidney fibrosis. Switch to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors may reduce these risks. Steroid or Cyclosporin Removal After Transplant using Everolimus (SOCRATES), a 36-month, prospective, multinational, open-label, randomized controlled trial for de novo kidney transplant recipients, assessed whether everolimus switch could enable elimination of mycophenolate plus either steroids or CNI without compromising efficacy. Patients received cyclosporin, mycophenolate and steroids for the first 14 days then everolimus with mycophenolate and CNIwithdrawal (CNI-WD); everolimus with mycophenolate and steroid withdrawal (steroid-WD); or cyclosporin, mycophenolate and steroids (control). 126 patients were randomized. The steroid WD arm was terminated prematurely because of excess discontinuations. Mean eGFR at month 12 for CNI-WD versus control was 65.1 ml/min/1.73 m2 vs. 67.1 ml/min/1.73 m2 by ITT, which met predefined noninferiority criteria (P=0.026). The CNI-WD group experienced a higher rate of BPAR(31% vs. control 13%, P=0.048) and showed a trend towards higher composite treatment failure (BPAR, graft loss, death, loss to follow-up). The 12 month results from SOCRATES show noninferiority in eGFR, but a significant excess of acute rejection when everolimus was commenced at week 2 to enable a progressive withdrawal of mycophenolate and cyclosporin in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:24279685

  7. Meta-analysis of stomatitis in clinical studies of everolimus: incidence and relationship with efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Rugo, H. S.; Hortobagyi, G. N.; Yao, J.; Pavel, M.; Ravaud, A.; Franz, D.; Ringeisen, F.; Gallo, J.; Rouyrre, N.; Anak, O.; Motzer, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Everolimus, an oral mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, is used to treat solid tumors and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Stomatitis, an inflammation of the mucous membranes of the mouth, is a common adverse event associated with mTOR inhibitors, including everolimus. We conducted a meta-analysis of data from seven randomized, double-blind phase 3 clinical trials of everolimus to determine the clinical impact of stomatitis on efficacy and safety. Patients and methods Data were pooled from the safety sets of solid tumor [breast cancer (BOLERO-2 and BOLERO-3), renal cell carcinoma (RECORD-1), carcinoid tumors (RADIANT-2), and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (RADIANT-3)] and TSC studies (EXIST-1 and EXIST-2). Data from solid tumor trials and TSC trials were analyzed separately. Results The rate of stomatitis was 67% in the solid tumor trials (973/1455 patients) and 70% in the TSC trials (110/157 patients). Most stomatitis events were grade 1/2, with grade 3/4 events reported in only 9% (solid tumor trials) and 8% (TSC trials) of patients. Low TSC patient numbers prevented an in-depth evaluation of stomatitis and response. In the solid tumor trials, most first stomatitis episodes (89%; n = 870) were observed within 8 weeks of starting everolimus. Patients with stomatitis occurring within 8 weeks of everolimus initiation had longer progression-free survival (PFS) than everolimus-treated patients without stomatitis in BOLERO-2 {8.5 versus 6.9 months, respectively; hazard ratio (HR), 0.78 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62–1.00]} and RADIANT-3 [13.9 versus 8.3 months, respectively; HR, 0.70 (95% CI, 0.48–1.04)]. A similar trend was observed in RECORD-1 [HR, 0.90 (95% CI, 0.66–1.22)] and RADIANT-2 [HR, 0.87 (95% CI, 0.61–1.22)] but not in BOLERO-3 [HR, 1.01 (95% CI, 0.75–1.36)]. Conclusions Stomatitis did not adversely affect PFS, supporting the administration of everolimus in accordance with standard management guidelines. PMID

  8. Comparative effectiveness of everolimus and axitinib as second targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the US: a retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Pal, Sumanta K; Signorovitch, James E; Reichmann, William M; Li, Nanxin; Yang, Chelsey; Liu, Zhimei; Perez, Jose Ricardo; Jonasch, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background Second targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) include mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORis) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This observational study compares overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of patients treated with everolimus (an mTORi) and axitinib (a TKI) following first TKI, and assesses the impact of type and duration of first TKI on the relative effectiveness of these second targeted therapies. Methods Retrospective reviews of medical records were conducted by medical oncologists or hematologists/oncologists recruited from a nationwide panel. Included patients with mRCC were required to have discontinued a first TKI (sunitinib, sorafenib, or pazopanib) for medical reasons, and to have initiated everolimus or axitinib as second targeted therapy between February 2012 and January 2013. OS and PFS were compared between patients treated with everolimus vs. axitinib using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models. Comparative results were also stratified by type and duration of first TKI. Results Included patients (n = 325 for everolimus and n = 127 for axitinib) had a mean age of 61 years and 31% were female. Sunitinib was the most commonly used first TKI (73%). After adjusting for patient characteristics, no statistically significant differences were observed in OS or PFS between everolimus and axitinib. When stratifying by type and duration of first TKI, there was no statistically significant difference in OS between everolimus and axitinib in all subgroups except for patients with <6 months on sunitinib or sorafenib as first TKI. No significant difference in PFS was observed in any subgroup. Limitations Important limitations include potential missing or inaccurate data in medical charts, and confounding due to unobserved factors. Conclusions In this retrospective chart review, no significant differences were detected in OS or PFS between axitinib and

  9. Everolimus for the second-line treatment of advanced and/or metastatic renal cell cancer: a critique of the submission from Novartis.

    PubMed

    Pitt, M; Crathorne, L; Moxham, T; Bond, M; Hyde, C

    2010-10-01

    This paper represents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of everolimus plus best supportive care (BSC) for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) which has progressed following or on vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy (sunitinib, sorafenib, bevacizumab), compared to BSC alone. The submitting manufacturer's case for clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness was mainly based on a well-conducted randomised controlled trial (RCT), Renal Cell Cancer Treatment with Oral RAD001 Given Daily-1 (RECORD-1), comparing BSC plus everolimus with BSC plus placebo and a de novo economic model. The RCT indicated a marked statistically significant effect on progression-free survival. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) estimate was 52,000 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year (this included a reduction in drug cost associated with an approved patient access scheme). The ERG undertook a critical appraisal of the submission. The ERG was generally in agreement with the submitting manufacturer concerning its estimates of effectiveness; however, there was greater concern surrounding the estimates of cost-effectiveness. The ERG judged that if potential errors in the model were corrected, the ICERs offered by the submitting manufacturer would overstate the cost-effectiveness of everolimus for the second-line treatment of metastatic RCC (that this ICER would be a higher value). Concerning the estimates of cost-effectiveness in RCC, the observations in the ERG report provide strong further support for research collecting rigorous estimates of utilities associated with the main health states likely to be experienced by patients with renal cell cancer. At the time of writing, NICE was yet to issue the Appraisal Consultation Document for this appraisal. PMID:21047490

  10. mTOR inhibition by everolimus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia induces caspase-independent cell death.

    PubMed

    Baraz, Rana; Cisterne, Adam; Saunders, Philip O; Hewson, John; Thien, Marilyn; Weiss, Jocelyn; Basnett, Jordan; Bradstock, Kenneth F; Bendall, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, anti-cancer medications are being reported to induce cell death mechanisms other than apoptosis. Activating alternate death mechanisms introduces the potential to kill cells that have defects in their apoptotic machinery, as is commonly observed in cancer cells, including in hematological malignancies. We, and others, have previously reported that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus has pre-clinical efficacy and induces caspase-independent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, everolimus is currently in clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we characterize the death mechanism activated by everolimus in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We find that cell death is caspase-independent and lacks the morphology associated with apoptosis. Although mitochondrial depolarization is an early event, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane only occurs after cell death has occurred. While morphological and biochemical evidence shows that autophagy is clearly present it is not responsible for the observed cell death. There are a number of features consistent with paraptosis including morphology, caspase-independence, and the requirement for new protein synthesis. However in contrast to some reports of paraptosis, the activation of JNK signaling was not required for everolimus-induced cell death. Overall in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells everolimus induces a cell death that resembles paraptosis. PMID:25014496

  11. mTOR Inhibition by Everolimus in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Induces Caspase-Independent Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Baraz, Rana; Cisterne, Adam; Saunders, Philip O.; Hewson, John; Thien, Marilyn; Weiss, Jocelyn; Basnett, Jordan; Bradstock, Kenneth F.; Bendall, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, anti-cancer medications are being reported to induce cell death mechanisms other than apoptosis. Activating alternate death mechanisms introduces the potential to kill cells that have defects in their apoptotic machinery, as is commonly observed in cancer cells, including in hematological malignancies. We, and others, have previously reported that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus has pre-clinical efficacy and induces caspase-independent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, everolimus is currently in clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we characterize the death mechanism activated by everolimus in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We find that cell death is caspase-independent and lacks the morphology associated with apoptosis. Although mitochondrial depolarization is an early event, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane only occurs after cell death has occurred. While morphological and biochemical evidence shows that autophagy is clearly present it is not responsible for the observed cell death. There are a number of features consistent with paraptosis including morphology, caspase-independence, and the requirement for new protein synthesis. However in contrast to some reports of paraptosis, the activation of JNK signaling was not required for everolimus-induced cell death. Overall in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells everolimus induces a cell death that resembles paraptosis. PMID:25014496

  12. Targeting of tumor endothelial cells combining 2 Gy/day of X-ray with Everolimus is the effective modality for overcoming clinically relevant radioresistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Mori, Miyuki; Kitahara, Shuji; Fukumoto, Motoi; Ezaki, Taichi; Mori, Shiro; Echigo, Seishi; Ohkubo, Yasuhito; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2014-04-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used to treat cancer because it has the advantage of physically and functionally conserving the affected organ. To improve radiotherapy and investigate the molecular mechanisms of cellular radioresistance, we established a clinically relevant radioresistant (CRR) cell line, SAS-R, from SAS cells. SAS-R cells continue to proliferate when exposed to fractionated radiation (FR) of 2 Gy/day for more than 30 days in vitro. A xenograft tumor model of SAS-R was also resistant to 2 Gy/day of X-rays for 30 days. The density of blood vessels in SAS-R tumors was higher than in SAS tumors. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, sensitized microvascular endothelial cells to radiation, but failed to radiosensitize SAS and SAS-R cells in vitro. Everolimus with FR markedly reduced SAS and SAS-R tumor volumes. Additionally, the apoptosis of endothelial cells (ECs) increased in SAS-R tumor tissues when both Everolimus and radiation were administered. Both CD34-positive and tomato lectin-positive blood vessel densities in SAS-R tumor tissues decreased remarkably after the Everolimus and radiation treatment. Everolimus-induced apoptosis of vascular ECs in response to radiation was also followed by thrombus formation that leads to tumor necrosis. We conclude that FR combined with Everolimus may be an effective modality to overcome radioresistant tumors via targeting tumor ECs. PMID:24464839

  13. Long-Term Use of Everolimus in Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Final Results from the EXIST-1 Study

    PubMed Central

    Franz, David N.; Belousova, Elena; Sparagana, Steven; Bebin, E. Martina; Frost, Michael D.; Kuperman, Rachel; Witt, Olaf; Kohrman, Michael H.; Flamini, J. Robert; Wu, Joyce Y.; Curatolo, Paolo; de Vries, Petrus J.; Berkowitz, Noah; Niolat, Julie; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz

    2016-01-01

    Background Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, has demonstrated efficacy in treating subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) and other manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). However, long-term use of mTOR inhibitors might be necessary. This analysis explored long-term efficacy and safety of everolimus from the conclusion of the EXIST-1 study (NCT00789828). Methods and Findings EXIST-1 was an international, prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial examining everolimus in patients with new or growing TSC-related SEGA. After a double-blind core phase, all remaining patients could receive everolimus in a long-term, open-label extension. Everolimus was initiated at a dose (4.5 mg/m2/day) titrated to a target blood trough of 5–15 ng/mL. SEGA response rate (primary end point) was defined as the proportion of patients achieving confirmed ≥50% reduction in the sum volume of target SEGA lesions from baseline in the absence of worsening nontarget SEGA lesions, new target SEGA lesions, and new or worsening hydrocephalus. Of 111 patients (median age, 9.5 years) who received ≥1 dose of everolimus (median duration, 47.1 months), 57.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 47.9–67.0) achieved SEGA response. Of 41 patients with target renal angiomyolipomas at baseline, 30 (73.2%) achieved renal angiomyolipoma response. In 105 patients with ≥1 skin lesion at baseline, skin lesion response rate was 58.1%. Incidence of adverse events (AEs) was comparable with that of previous reports, and occurrence of emergent AEs generally decreased over time. The most common AEs (≥30% incidence) suspected to be treatment-related were stomatitis (43.2%) and mouth ulceration (32.4%). Conclusions Everolimus use led to sustained reduction in tumor volume, and new responses were observed for SEGA and renal angiomyolipoma from the blinded core phase of the study. These findings support the hypothesis that everolimus can safely reverse

  14. Everolimus Plus Exemestane for the Treatment of Advanced Breast Cancer: A Review of Subanalyses from BOLERO-21

    PubMed Central

    Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.

    2015-01-01

    Hormone receptor–positive breast cancer is typically managed with endocrine therapies. However, resistance to endocrine therapy results in disease progression in a large proportion of breast cancers. Through the understanding of the mechanisms of endocrine resistance, identification of implicated pathways and targets has led to the development of novel agents targeting these pathways. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway aberrations are common in breast cancer, with increased PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling associated with resistance to endocrine and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–targeted therapies. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus, in combination with exemestane, has been approved for patients with advanced hormone receptor–positive/HER2-negative breast cancer who progress on prior nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor therapy based on results reported in the Breast Cancer Trials of Oral Everolimus-2 (BOLERO-2) study. This review will summarize the overall findings from BOLERO-2 and will consider available subanalyses by age, Asian origin, visceral or bone metastases, and prior therapy, with the aim of identifying populations most likely to benefit from everolimus therapy. The review will also summarize safety findings and their management and the effects of everolimus on quality of life. PMID:25810012

  15. Next-generation sequencing reveals somatic mutations that confer exceptional response to everolimus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Sora; Ali, Siraj M.; Greenbowe, Joel R.; Yang, In Seok; Kwon, Nak-Jung; Lee, Jae Lyun; Ryu, Min-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Hyo Song; Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Hye Ryun; Moon, Yong Wha; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Joo-Hang; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background Given the modest responses to everolimus, a mTOR inhibitor, in multiple tumor types, there is a pressing need to identify predictive biomarkers for this drug. Using targeted ultra-deep sequencing, we aimed to explore genomic alterations that confer extreme sensitivity to everolimus. Results We collected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor/normal pairs from 39 patients (22 with exceptional clinical benefit, 17 with no clinical benefit) who were treated with everolimus across various tumor types (13 gastric cancers, 15 renal cell carcinomas, 2 thyroid cancers, 2 head and neck cancer, and 7 sarcomas). Ion AmpliSeqTM Comprehensive Cancer Panel was used to identify alterations across all exons of 409 target genes. Tumors were sequenced to a median coverage of 552x. Cancer genomes are characterized by 219 somatic single-nucleotide variants (181 missense, 9 nonsense, 7 splice-site) and 22 frameshift insertions/deletions, with a median of 2.1 mutations per Mb (0 to 12.4 mutations per Mb). Overall, genomic alterations with activating effect on mTOR signaling were identified in 10 of 22 (45%) patients with clinical benefit and these include MTOR, TSC1, TSC2, NF1, PIK3CA and PIK3CG mutations. Recurrently mutated genes in chromatin remodeling genes (BAP1; n = 2, 12%) and receptor tyrosine kinase signaling (FGFR4; n = 2, 12%) were noted only in patients without clinical benefit. Conclusions Regardless of different cancer types, mTOR-pathway-activating mutations confer sensitivity to everolimus. Targeted sequencing of mTOR pathway genes facilitates identification of potential candidates for mTOR inhibitors. PMID:26859683

  16. A single arm phase 1b study of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC)

    PubMed Central

    Kanesvaran, R.; Watt, K.; Turnbull, J. D.; Armstrong, A. J.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, M.; George, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Everolimus ,an oral inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and sunitinib, an oral inhibitor of VEGF/PDGF receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, have both been shown to provide clinical benefit in patients with advanced RCC. We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with these agents in patients with advanced RCC. Methods We conducted a phase Ib dose escalation trial of sunitinib and everolimus in patients with advanced metastatic RCC. Prior nephrectomy was required, and prior radiation or chemotherapy other than VEGF/mTOR-based therapies was permitted. The primary endpoint was to determine the MTD/recommended phase 2 dose. Results A total of 4 out of a planned 30 subjects were enrolled in this study (M:F= 2:2; mean age 52 years, 50% with KPS <80). The first three patients were enrolled on a 4+2 dosing schedule of daily sunitinib 50 mg and weekly everolimus 30 mg. Mean time on drug was 99 days. One partial response was seen. Toxicities included mucositis, thrombocytopenia, anemia, fatigue, dehydration and hypoglycemia. Due to multiple grade 3–4 toxicities, the protocol was amended to 2+1 dosing of sunitinib 37.5 mg and daily everolimus 5mg. The first patient on this schedule died from multi-organ failure with septic shock after 1 cycle of treatment. Subsequently, the study was closed. Pharmacokinetics results inconclusively suggest that toxicities could be attributed to the drug exposure. Conclusions Combined use of everolimus and sunitinib in the treatment of mRCC was not well tolerated in this small cohort. PMID:26174223

  17. Clinical experience and critical evaluation of the role of everolimus in advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Maxine; Abdollah, Firas; Schmitges, Jan; Jeldres, Claudio; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Perrotte, Paul; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of sequential everolimus, an orally administered inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), was proven in a placebo-controlled phase III study, where median progression-free survival was 4.9 vs 1.9 months for placebo (hazard ratio: 0.33, P < 0.001). Placebo crossovers (80%) contaminated overall survival data. Adverse event discontinuation rate was of only 10% and health-adjusted quality-of-life was sustained. These data represent the first placebo-controlled evidence of efficacy for a sequentially used targeted agent. Everolimus resulted in the strongest hazard ratio ever recorded for progression-free survival, despite it being tested in a population with the most aggressive natural history ever recorded in all available phase III metastatic renal cell carcinoma trials. Everolimus use after exclusively one prior antivascular endothelial growth factor failure resulted in an even longer progression-free survival time (5.4 months) than in the entire population (4.9 months). These benefits should also be considered in the light of sustained and unimpaired health-related quality of life. Use in first line other than second or subsequent lines remains to be validated. PMID:24198635

  18. Effects of sotrastaurin, mycophenolic acid and everolimus on human B-lymphocyte function and activation.

    PubMed

    Matz, Mareen; Lehnert, Martin; Lorkowski, Christine; Fabritius, Katharina; Unterwalder, Nadine; Doueiri, Salim; Weber, Ulrike A; Mashreghi, Mir-Farzin; Neumayer, Hans-H; Budde, Klemens

    2012-10-01

    Humoral rejection processes may lead to allograft injury and subsequent dysfunction. Today, only one B-cell-specific agent is in clinical use and the effects of standard and new immunosuppressant substances on B-cell activation and function are not fully clarified. The impact of sotrastaurin, mycophenolic acid and everolimus on human B-lymphocyte function was assessed by analysing proliferation, apoptosis, CD80/CD86 expression and immunoglobulin and IL-10 production in primary stimulated B cells. In addition, B-cell co-cultures with pre-activated T cells were performed to evaluate the effect of the different immunosuppressive agents on T-cell-dependent immunoglobulin production. Sotrastaurin did not inhibit B-cell proliferation, CD80/CD86 expression, and IgG production and had only minor effects on IgM levels at the highest concentration administered. In contrast, mycophenolic acid and everolimus had strong effects on all B-cell functions in a dose-dependent manner. All immunosuppressive agents caused decreased immunoglobulin levels in T-cell-dependent B-cell cultures. The data provided here suggest that mycophenolic acid and everolimus, but not sotrastaurin, are potent inhibitors of human B-lymphocyte function and activation. PMID:22816666

  19. Delayed mTOR Inhibition with Low Dose of Everolimus Reduces TGFβ Expression, Attenuates Proteinuria and Renal Damage in the Renal Mass Reduction Model

    PubMed Central

    Kurdián, Melania; Herrero-Fresneda, Inmaculada; Lloberas, Nuria; Gimenez-Bonafe, Pepita; Coria, Virginia; Grande, María T.; Boggia, José; Malacrida, Leonel; Torras, Joan; Arévalo, Miguel A.; González-Martínez, Francisco; López-Novoa, José M.; Grinyó, Josep; Noboa, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Background The immunosuppressive mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are widely used in solid organ transplantation, but their effect on kidney disease progression is controversial. mTOR has emerged as one of the main pathways regulating cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of delayed inhibition of mTOR pathway with low dose of everolimus on progression of renal disease and TGFβ expression in the 5/6 nephrectomy model in Wistar rats. Methods This study evaluated the effects of everolimus (0.3 mg/k/day) introduced 15 days after surgical procedure on renal function, proteinuria, renal histology and mechanisms of fibrosis and proliferation. Results Everolimus treated group (EveG) showed significantly less proteinuria and albuminuria, less glomerular and tubulointerstitial damage and fibrosis, fibroblast activation cell proliferation, when compared with control group (CG), even though the EveG remained with high blood pressure. Treatment with everolimus also diminished glomerular hypertrophy. Everolimus effectively inhibited the increase of mTOR developed in 5/6 nephrectomy animals, without changes in AKT mRNA or protein abundance, but with an increase in the pAKT/AKT ratio. Associated with this inhibition, everolimus blunted the increased expression of TGFβ observed in the remnant kidney model. Conclusion Delayed mTOR inhibition with low dose of everolimus significantly prevented progressive renal damage and protected the remnant kidney. mTOR and TGFβ mRNA reduction can partially explain this anti fibrotic effect. mTOR can be a new target to attenuate the progression of chronic kidney disease even in those nephropathies of non-immunologic origin. PMID:22427849

  20. A translational, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic phase IB clinical study of everolimus in resectable non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Miller, Daniel L.; Force, Seth D.; Sica, Gabriel L.; Mendel, Jennifer; Chen, Zhengjia; Rogatko, Andre; Tighiouart, Mourad; Harvey, R. Donald; Kim, Sungjin; Saba, Nabil F.; Pickens, Allan; Behera, Madhusmita; Fu, Robert W.; Rossi, Michael R.; Auffermann, William F.; Torres, William E.; Bechara, Rabih; Deng, Xingming; Sun, Shi-Yong; Fu, Haian; Gal, Anthony A.; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Altered PI3K/mTOR pathway is implicated in lung cancer but mTOR inhibitors have failed to demonstrate efficacy in advanced lung cancer. We studied the pharmacodynamic effects of everolimus in resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to inform further development of these agents in lung cancer. Experimental Design We enrolled 33 patients and obtained baseline tumor biopsy and FDG-PET/CT imaging followed by everolimus treatment (5 or 10 mg daily, up to 28 days), or without intervening treatment for controls. Target modulation by everolimus was quantified in vivo and ex vivo by comparing metabolic activity on paired PET scans and expression of active phosphorylated forms of mTOR, Akt, S6, eIF4e, p70S6K, 4EBP1 and total Bim protein between pretreatment and post treatment tissue samples. Results There were 23 patients on the treatment arm and 10 controls; median age 64 years; 22 (67%) were adenocarcinomas. There was a dose-dependent reduction in metabolic activity (SUVmax: 29.0%, −21%, −24%; p=0.014), tumor size (10.1%, 5.8%, −11.6%; p=0.047), and modulation of S6 (−36.1, −13.7, −77.0; p=0.071) and pS6 (−41.25, −61.57, −47.21; p=0.063) in patients treated in the control, 5mg and 10mg cohorts respectively. Targeted DNA sequencing in all patients along with exome and whole transcriptome RNA-seq in an index patient with hypersensitive tumor was employed to further elucidate the mechanism of everolimus activity. Conclusion This “window-of-opportunity” study demonstrated measurable, dose-dependent, biologic, metabolic and antitumor activity of everolimus in early stage NSCLC. PMID:25673697

  1. Additive Anti-Tumor Effects of Lovastatin and Everolimus In Vitro through Simultaneous Inhibition of Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nölting, Svenja; Maurer, Julian; Spöttl, Gerald; Aristizabal Prada, Elke Tatjana; Reuther, Clemens; Young, Karen; Korbonits, Márta; Göke, Burkhard; Grossman, Ashley; Auernhammer, Christoph J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mTORC1-inhibitor everolimus shows limited efficacy in treating patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic or pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and poor outcome in patients with malignant pheochromocytoma or hepatic carcinoma. We speculated that any effect may be enhanced by antogonising other signaling pathways. Methods Therefore, we tested the effect of lovastatin—known to inhibit both ERK and AKT signaling—and everolimus, separately and in combination, on cell viability and signaling pathways in human midgut (GOT), pancreatic (BON1), and pulmonary (H727) NET, hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2, Huh7), and mouse pheochromocytoma (MPC, MTT) cell lines. Results Lovastatin and everolimus separately significantly reduced cell viability in H727, HepG2, Huh7, MPC and MTT cells at clinically relevant doses (P ≤ 0.05). However, high doses of lovastatin were necessary to affect GOT or BON1 cell viability. Clinically relevant doses of both drugs showed additive anti-tumor effects in H727, HepG2, Huh7, MPC and MTT cells (P ≤ 0.05), but not in BON1 or GOT cells. In all cell lines investigated, lovastatin inhibited EGFR and AKT signaling. Subsequently, combination treatment more strongly inhibited EGFR and AKT signaling than everolimus alone, or at least attenuated everolimus-induced EGFR or AKT activation. Vice versa, everolimus constantly decreased pp70S6K and combination treatment more strongly decreased pp70S6K than lovastatin alone, or attenuated lovastatin-induced p70S6K activation: in BON1 cells lovastatin-induced EGFR inhibition was least pronounced, possibly explaining the low efficacy and consequent absent additive effect. Conclusion In summary, clinically relevant doses of lovastatin and everolimus were effective separately and showed additive effects in 5 out of 7 cell lines. Our findings emphasize the importance of targeting several interacting signaling pathways simultaneously when attempting to attenuate tumor growth. However, the variable

  2. FDG-PET as a predictive biomarker for therapy with everolimus in metastatic renal cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, James L; Appelbaum, Daniel E; Kocherginsky, Masha; Cowey, Charles L; Kimryn Rathmell, Wendy; McDermott, David F; Stadler, Walter M

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor, everolimus, affects tumor growth by targeting cellular metabolic proliferation pathways and delays renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression. Preclinical evidence suggests that baseline elevated tumor glucose metabolism as quantified by FDG-PET ([18F] fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography) may predict antitumor activity. Metastatic RCC (mRCC) patients refractory to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway inhibition were treated with standard dose everolimus. FDG-PET scans were obtained at baseline and 2 weeks; serial computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained at baseline and every 8 weeks. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the most FDG avid lesion, average SUVmax of all measured lesions and their corresponding 2-week relative changes were examined for association with 8-week change in tumor size. A total of 63 patients were enrolled; 50 were evaluable for the primary endpoint of which 48 had both PET scans. Patient characteristics included the following: 36 (72%) clear cell histology and median age 59 (range: 37–80). Median pre- and 2-week treatment average SUVmax were 6.6 (1–17.9) and 4.2 (1–13.9), respectively. Response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST)-based measurements demonstrated an average change in tumor burden of 0.2% (−32.7% to 35.9%) at 8 weeks. Relative change in average SUVmax was the best predictor of change in tumor burden (all evaluable P = 0.01; clear cell subtype P = 0.02), with modest correlation. Baseline average SUVmax was correlated with overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS) (P = 0.023; 0.020), but not with change in tumor burden. Everolimus therapy decreased SUVs on follow-up PET scans in mRCC patients, but changes were only modestly correlated with changes in tumor size. Thus, clinical use of FDG-PET-based biomarkers is challenged by high variability. In this phase II trial, FDG-PET was explored as a

  3. Conversion to everolimus in liver transplant patients with renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pérez, T; Segovia, R; Castro, L; Roblero, J P; Estela, R

    2011-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) immunosuppressive therapy post-liver transplantation (OLT) is important to reduce graft rejection episodes. However, these drugs show important side effects, particularly renal dysfunction (RDF). Changing from CNI to a nonnephrotoxic drug, as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor may solve the problem. Our objective was to evaluate renal function (RF) among liver transplant patients initially receiving CNI, among whom the patients with RDF were converted completely or partially to an mTOR inhibitor like everolimus (EVE). We performed a prospective study in liver transplant patients from 2000 to 2009. Creatinine levels and creatinine clearances (Cockroft-Gault) expressed as mean values ± standard deviations were measured pre- and postswitch for comparisons using Wilcoxon nonparametric tests. Six patients were converted fully or partially to EVE. Their mean age at the moment of introducing the new therapy was 52.2 ± 13.6 years (range = 28-60). Immunosuppression time prior to switching from CNI to EVE was 23.8 ± 26.6 months (range = 6-70). Postconversion follow-up was 25.8 ± 16.5 months (range = 8-42). All patients showed improvement in RF. The creatinine level improvement was significant (P = .03) namely, from a mean of 2.26 ± 0.49 to 1.21 ± 0.57 mg/dL. Glomerular filtration rate improved from a mean of 40 ± 15.13 to 72.60 ± 17.3 mL/min/m(2) (P = .03). Conversion from CNI to EVE improved creatinine concentrations and creatinine clearances with long-term effects free of graft rejection. PMID:21839260

  4. Everolimus improves neuropsychiatric symptoms in a patient with tuberous sclerosis carrying a novel TSC2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Su-Kyeong; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Yang, Jung-Eun; Lim, Chae-Seok; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Yong-Seok; Lee, Kyungmin; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a neurocutaneous disorder characterized by multiple symptoms including neuropsychological deficits such as seizures, intellectual disability, and autism. TSC is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is caused by mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, which enhance activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Recent studies have suggested that mTOR inhibitors such as rapamycin can reverse TSC-associated deficits in rodent models of TSC. In addition, clinical trials are ongoing to test the efficacy of mTOR inhibitors toward the psychiatric symptoms associated with TSC. Here, we report a case study of a Korean patient with TSC, who exhibited multiple symptoms including frequent seizures, intellectual disability, language delays, and social problems. We performed whole exome sequencing and identified a novel small deletion mutation in TSC2. Expressing the novel deletion mutant in HEK293T cells significantly increased mTOR pathway activation. Furthermore, everolimus treatment showed not only reduction in SEGA size, but dramatically improved behavioral deficits including autism related behaviors in the patient. In summary, we identified a novel small deletion mutation in TSC2 associated with severe TSC in a Korean family that enhances the activation of mTOR signaling in vitro. Everolimus treatment improved behavioral deficits in the patient. PMID:27216612

  5. Everolimus and intensive behavioral therapy in an adolescent with tuberous sclerosis complex and severe behavior☆☆☆★

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Tanjala T.; Jennett, Heather; Wachtel, Lee; Gregory, Mary; Poretti, Andrea; Johnston, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-injury and aggression have been reported in individuals with TSC (tuberous sclerosis complex), yet few data exist about treatment. Everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, has been FDA-approved for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) and renal angiomyolipomas in TSC. However, clinical use of everolimus with direct, real-time observations of self-injury and aggression in an individual with TSC has not been reported. Methods During an inpatient admission to a neurobehavioral unit, real-time measurements of behaviors and seizures were recorded. An interdisciplinary team used these data to make treatment decisions and applied behavioral and pharmacological treatments, one at a time, in order to evaluate their effects. Results Aggression and self-injury improved with applied behavioral analysis (ABA), lithium, and asenapine. Improvements in SEGA size, facial angiofibromas, seizures, and the most stable low rates of self-injury were observed during the interval of treatment with everolimus. Conclusion Mechanism-based treatments in the setting of an evidence-based behavioral and psychopharmacological intervention program may be a model with utility for characterization and treatment of individuals with severe behavior and TSC. PMID:25667844

  6. Everolimus as second- or third-line treatment of advanced endometrial cancer: ENDORAD, a phase II trial of GINECO

    PubMed Central

    Ray-Coquard, I; Favier, L; Weber, B; Roemer-Becuwe, C; Bougnoux, P; Fabbro, M; Floquet, A; Joly, F; Plantade, A; Paraiso, D; Pujade-Lauraine, E

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patients with recurrent/metastatic endometrial cancer that progresses after chemotherapy have limited treatment options and poor outcomes. Preclinical data suggest the oral mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus may provide clinical benefit in these patients. Methods: In this multicenter, open-label, phase 2 study, patients with advanced or metastatic endometrial cancer refractory to one or two previous chemotherapy regimens received everolimus 10 mg per day until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Primary end point was the non-progressive disease rate at 3 months. Secondary end points included duration of response, progression-free, and overall survival (OS), and safety. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled (median age, 65 years); 66% received one previous chemotherapy regimen. The 3-month non-progressive disease rate was 36% (95% confidence interval 22–52%), including two patients (5%) with partial response (PR). At 6 months, two additional patients experienced PR. Median duration of response was 3.1 months. Median progression-free and OS were 2.8 months and 8.1 months, respectively. The most common adverse events were anaemia (100%), fatigue (93%), hypercholesterolaemia (81%), and lymphopenia (81%). Conclusion: Everolimus demonstrated efficacy and acceptable tolerability in patients with chemotherapy-refractory advanced or metastatic endometrial cancer. These results support the further development of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-targeted therapies in endometrial cancer. PMID:23612453

  7. Pre-treatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio may be associated with the outcome in patients treated with everolimus for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, M; De Giorgi, U; Iacovelli, R; Conti, A; Burattini, L; Rossi, L; Luca Burgio, S; Berardi, R; Muzzonigro, G; Cortesi, E; Amadori, D; Cascinu, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). We aimed to assess the association between pre-treatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and the outcome of patients treated with everolimus for mRCC. Methods: Ninety-seven patients with mRCC were treated with everolimus till April 2013 in our institutions. Patients were stratified in two groups with NLR >3 (Group A) vs <3 (Group B). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated using Kaplan–Meier method. Gender, age, Motzer prognostic group, PFS on first-line therapy, neutrophilia and NLR were included in the Cox analysis to investigate their prognostic relevance. Results: Median OS and PFS were 10.6 and 5.3 months, respectively. Median OS was 12.2 months in Group A and 24.4 months in Group B (P=0.001). Median PFS was 3.4 months in Group A and 9.9 months in Group B (P<0.001). At multivariate analysis, only Motzer prognostic group and NLR were independent prognostic factors for OS and PFS. Conclusion: Pre-treatment NLR is an independent prognostic factor for patients with mRCC treated with second- or third-line everolimus. This should be investigated and validated in prospective studies. PMID:24008663

  8. Immunoregulatory Effects of Everolimus on In Vitro Alloimmune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Levitsky, Josh; Miller, Joshua; Huang, Xuemei; Gallon, Lorenzo; Leventhal, Joseph R.; Mathew, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Everolimus (EVL) is a novel mTOR-inhibitor similar to sirolimus (SRL) that is used in organ transplant recipients, often in combination with tacrolimus (TAC) or mycophenolate (MPA). The current study aims to determine its effects on regulatory T cells. Increasing concentrations of EVL, MPA and TAC alone or in combination were added to MLRs of healthy volunteers. Lymphoproliferation by 3H-TdR incorporation and the percentage of newly generated CD4+CD127-CD25+FOXP3+ (total Treg) and CD4+CD127-CD25HighFOXP3+ (natural Treg) in CFSE labeled responder cells were assessed by flow cytometry. In comparison to medium controls, EVL and other agents dose-dependently inhibited 3H-TdR incorporation in HLA-2DR-matched and HLA-mismatched MLRs (n = 3–10). However, EVL significantly amplified newly generated total and natural Tregs in CFSE labeled responder cells (p<0.05) at all concentrations, while MPA and SRL did this only at sub-therapeutic concentrations and inhibited at therapeutic levels. In contrast, TAC inhibited newly generated Tregs at all concentrations. When tested in combination with TAC, EVL failed to reverse TAC inhibition of Treg generation. Combinations of EVL and low concentrations of MPA inhibited proliferation and amplified Treg generation in an additive manner when compared to medium controls or each drug tested alone (p<0.05). The relative tolerogenic effect from high to low was EVL > SRL> MPA > TAC. If the results from these in vitro studies are extrapolated to clinical transplantation, it would suggest EVL plus low concentrations of MPA may be the most tolerogenic combination. PMID:27275747

  9. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Everolimus: A Consensus Report.

    PubMed

    Shipkova, Maria; Hesselink, Dennis A; Holt, David W; Billaud, Eliane M; van Gelder, Teun; Kunicki, Paweł K; Brunet, Mercè; Budde, Klemens; Barten, Markus J; De Simone, Paolo; Wieland, Eberhard; López, Olga Millán; Masuda, Satohiro; Seger, Christoph; Picard, Nicolas; Oellerich, Michael; Langman, Loralie J; Wallemacq, Pierre; Morris, Raymond G; Thompson, Carol; Marquet, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    In 2014, the Immunosuppressive Drugs Scientific Committee of the International Association of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Clinical Toxicology called a meeting of international experts to provide recommendations to guide therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of everolimus (EVR) and its optimal use in clinical practice. EVR is a potent inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, approved for the prevention of organ transplant rejection and for the treatment of various types of cancer and tuberous sclerosis complex. EVR fulfills the prerequisites for TDM, having a narrow therapeutic range, high interindividual pharmacokinetic variability, and established drug exposure-response relationships. EVR trough concentrations (C0) demonstrate a good relationship with overall exposure, providing a simple and reliable index for TDM. Whole-blood samples should be used for measurement of EVR C0, and sampling times should be standardized to occur within 1 hour before the next dose, which should be taken at the same time everyday and preferably without food. In transplantation settings, EVR should be generally targeted to a C0 of 3-8 ng/mL when used in combination with other immunosuppressive drugs (calcineurin inhibitors and glucocorticoids); in calcineurin inhibitor-free regimens, the EVR target C0 range should be 6-10 ng/mL. Further studies are required to determine the clinical utility of TDM in nontransplantation settings. The choice of analytical method and differences between methods should be carefully considered when determining EVR concentrations, and when comparing and interpreting clinical trial outcomes. At present, a fully validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry assay is the preferred method for determination of EVR C0, with a lower limit of quantification close to 1 ng/mL. Use of certified commercially available whole-blood calibrators to avoid calibration bias and participation in external proficiency-testing programs to allow continuous cross

  10. A Case of Disease Improvement after Treatment with Everolimus plus Exemestane in a Patient with Hormone Receptor-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer with Bone Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J. Thaddeus; Mantooth, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers and a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Despite significant advances in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, tumor metastasis occurs frequently and is associated with poor long-term prognosis. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays a central role in cancer cell growth, proliferation, and resistance to endocrine therapies. Therefore, mTOR inhibitors such as everolimus in combination with nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors might reverse endocrine resistance and improve clinical outcomes in patients. Here, we report on a case of infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast with metastases to the bone. Histopathologic analysis showed that the patient was estrogen and progesterone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor-2 negative. This case represents the clinical spectrum of complications caused by metastasis: the patient experienced a considerable amount of skeletal-related complications, had previously received chemotherapy, and experienced disease progression while taking nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors. After treatment with oral everolimus 10 mg daily plus oral exemestane 25 mg daily, the patient's disease was ameliorated. Combination therapy was well tolerated, with minimal adverse effects that were manageable with concomitant medications. Although further analyses in larger populations are necessary, the addition of everolimus to exemestane might provide an effective new treatment option for patients with bone metastasis. PMID:25848360

  11. The Synergistic Effect of Everolimus and Chloroquine on Endothelial Cell Number Reduction Is Paralleled by Increased Apoptosis and Reduced Autophagy Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Anna; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa; D'Onofrio, Nunzia; Di Domenico, Gilda; Nocera, Cosimo; Lamberti, Monica; Tonini, Giuseppe; Zoccoli, Alice; Santini, Daniele; Caraglia, Michele; Pantano, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs), a minor subpopulation of the mononuclear cell fraction in peripheral blood, play a critical role in cancer development as they contribute to angiogenesis-mediated pathological neovascularization. In response to tumor cytokines, including VEGF, EPCs mobilize from the bone marrow into the peripheral circulation and move to the tumor bed where they incorporate into sprouting neovessels. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of everolimus (Afinitor, Novartis), a rapamycin analogue, alone or in combination with chloroquine, a 4-alkylamino substituted quinoline family member, one of the autophagy inhibitors, on EPCs biological functions. We found that either everolimus or chloroquine induce growth inhibition on EPCs in a dose-dependent manner after 72 h from the beginning of incubation. The combined administration of the two drugs to EPC was synergistic in inducing growth inhibition; in details, the maximal pharmacological synergism between everolimus and chloroquine in inducing growth inhibition on EPCs cells was recorded when chloroquine was administered 24 h before everolimus. Moreover, we have studied the mechanisms of cell death induced by the two agents alone or in combination on EPCs and we have found that the synergistic effect of combination on EPC growth inhibition was paralleled by increased apoptosis induction and reduced autophagy. These effects occurred together with biochemical features that are typical of reduced autophagic death such as increased co-immunoprecipitation between Beclin 1 and Bcl-2. Chloroquine antagonized the inhibition of the activity of Akt→4EBP1 axis mediated by everolimus and at the same time it blocked the feed-back activation of Erk-1/2 induced by RAD in EPCs. These data suggest a new strategy in order to block angiogenesis in tumours in which this process plays a key role in both the sustainment and spreading of cancer cells. PMID:24244540

  12. [Concurrent association of reirradiation therapy with everolimus for lymph node metastasis of gastroesophageal junction cancer: a case report].

    PubMed

    Pernin, V; Beuzeboc, P; Peurien, D; Louvet, C; Kirova, Y

    2014-11-01

    Advanced gastric cancer or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer after a failure of first line chemotherapy have poor outcome. Hereby, we present the first patient treated by radiotherapy with concurrent everolimus, a mTor inhibitor, for a reirradiation of metastasis invading left axillary, infraclavicular and supraclavicular lymph nodes in progression despite several lines of chemotherapy. After 6 months of follow-up, this association provided a satisfactory anti-tumor efficiency and tolerance. Nevertheless, clinical trials are needed in order to confirm this strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer metastasis. PMID:24981410

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of everolimus plus exemestane versus exemestane alone for treatment of hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Diaby, Vakaramoko; Adunlin, Georges; Zeichner, Simon B; Avancha, Kiran; Lopes, Gilberto; Gluck, Stefan; Montero, Alberto J

    2014-09-01

    Everolimus in combination with exemestane significantly improved progression-free survival compared to exemestane alone in patients previously treated with non-steroidal aromatase inhibitors in the BOLERO-2 trial. As a result, this combination has been approved by the food and drug administration to treat postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive and HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted to determine whether everolimus represents good value for money, utilizing data from BOLERO-2. A decision-analytic model was used to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio between treatment arms of the BOLERO-2 trial. Costs were obtained from the Center for Medicare Services drug payment table and physician fee schedule. Benefits were expressed as quality-adjusted progression-free survival weeks (QAPFW) and quality-adjusted progression-free years (QAPFY), with utilities/disutilities derived from the literature. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. A willingness to pay threshold of 1-3 times the per capita gross domestic product was adopted, as per the definition of the World Health Organization. The U.S. per capita gross domestic product in 2013 was $49,965; thus, a threshold varying between $49,965 and $149,895 was considered. Everolimus/exemestane had an incremental benefit of 11.88 QAPFW (0.22 QAPFY) compared to exemestane and an incremental cost of $60,574. This translated into an ICER of $265,498.5/QAPFY. Univariate sensitivity analyses showed important variations of the ICER, ranging between $189,836.4 and $530,947/QAPFY. A tornado analysis suggested that the key drivers of our model, by order of importance, included health utility value for stable disease, everolimus acquisition costs, and transition probabilities from the stable to the progression states. The Monte-Carlo simulation showed results that were similar to the base-case analysis. This cost-effectiveness analysis

  14. The effect of everolimus on renal angiomyolipoma in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex being treated for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: subgroup results from the randomized, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 trial EXIST-1

    PubMed Central

    Kingswood, J. Chris; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Belousova, Elena D.; Frost, Michael D.; Kuperman, Rachel A.; Bebin, E. Martina; Korf, Bruce R.; Flamini, J. Robert; Kohrman, Michael H.; Sparagana, Steven P.; Wu, Joyce Y.; Brechenmacher, Thomas; Stein, Karen; Berkowitz, Noah; Bissler, John J.; Franz, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is characterized by benign tumours in multiple organs, including the brain, kidneys, skin, lungs and heart. Our objective was to evaluate everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, in the treatment of angiomyolipoma in patients with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) associated with TSC. Methods EXamining everolimus In a Study of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex-1 (NCT00789828), a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 study, examined everolimus in treating SEGA associated with TSC. Patients with serial SEGA growth from pre-baseline to baseline scans were randomly assigned (2:1) to receive 4.5 mg/m2/day everolimus (target blood trough: 5–15 ng/mL; n = 78) or placebo (n = 39). Angiomyolipoma response rates were analysed in patients (n = 44) with target baseline angiomyolipoma lesions (≥1 angiomyolipoma; longest diameter ≥1.0 cm). An angiomyolipoma response rate, defined as the proportion of patients with confirmed angiomyolipoma response, was assessed by kidney CT or MRI screening at baseline, at 12, 24 and 48 weeks and annually. Results Angiomyolipoma response rates were 53.3% (16/30) and 0% (0/14) for everolimus- and placebo-treated patients, respectively. Angiomyolipoma reductions ≥50% in the sum of volumes of all target lesions were seen only in everolimus-treated patients (56.5, 78.3 and 80.0%) compared with placebo-treated patients (0% at each time point) at Weeks 12, 24 and 48, respectively. Greater percentages of everolimus-treated patients had angiomyolipoma reductions ≥30% at these same time points (82.6, 100 and 100% versus 8.3, 18.2 and 16.7% for everolimus versus placebo, respectively). Conclusions Everolimus showed efficacy in reducing angiomyolipoma lesion volume in patients with SEGA associated with TSC. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00789828; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00789828?term=EXIST-1&rank=1. PMID:24729041

  15. Early definite stent thrombosis with everolimus-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Ryo; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Okazaki, Shinya; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Stent thrombosis (ST) is a serious complication of percutaneous coronary intervention. Several factors are associated with ST, and combination of these factors increase the risk, even in everolimus-eluting stents, which have low risk of ST. We experienced a case of ST caused by limited coronary flow and resistance to antiplatelet agent. PMID:26509023

  16. Coronary vasomotion dysfunction after everolimus-eluting stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Pietro; Attisano, Tiziana; Di Maio, Marco; Bellino, Elisabetta M; Polito, Maria V; Baldi, Cesare; Vigorito, Francesco; Di Muro, Michele R; Tomasello, Salvatore D; Galassi, Alfredo R; Piscione, Federico

    2014-12-01

    First generation drug-eluting stent can cause a paradoxical "in-segment" coronary vasoconstriction. This phenomenon was seen with sirolimus, paclitaxel, and, more recently, also with zotarolimus-eluting stent. For the first time, we describe a case of coronary-induced vasoconstriction by everolimus-eluting stents (EES). PMID:25598992

  17. Inhibition of Chondrosarcoma Growth by mTOR Inhibitor in an In Vivo Syngeneic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jennifer; Decouvelaere, Anne Valérie; Pointecouteau, Thomas; Pissaloux, Daniel; Michot, Jean Philippe; Besse, Anthony; Blay, Jean Yves; Dutour, Aurélie

    2012-01-01

    Background Chondrosarcomas are the second most frequent primary malignant type of bone tumor. No effective systemic treatment has been identified in advanced or adjuvant phases for chondrosarcoma. The aim of the present study was to determine the antitumor effects of doxorubicin and everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor on chondrosarcoma progression. Methods and Findings Doxorubin and/or everolimus were tested in vivo as single agent or in combination in the rat orthotopic Schwarm chondrosarcoma model, in macroscopic phase, as well as with microscopic residual disease. Response to everolimus and/or doxorubicin was evaluated using chondrosarcoma volume evolution (MRI). Histological response was evaluated with % of tumor necrosis, tumor proliferation index, metabolism quantification analysis between the treated and control groups. Statistical analyses were performed using chi square, Fishers exact test. Doxorubicin single agent has no effect of tumor growth as compared to no treatment; conversely, everolimus single agent significantly inhibited tumor progression in macroscopic tumors with no synergistic additive effect with doxorubicin. Everolimus inhibited chondrosarcoma proliferation as evaluated by Ki67 expression did not induce the apoptosis of tumor cells; everolimus reduced Glut1 and 4EBP1 expression. Importantly when given in rats with microscopic residual diseases, in a pseudo neoadjuvant setting, following R1 resection of the implanted tumor, everolimus significantly delayed or prevented tumor recurrence. Conclusions MTOR inhibitor everolimus blocks cell proliferation, Glut1 expression and HIF1a expression, and prevents in vivo chondrosarcoma tumor progression in both macroscopic and in adjuvant phase post R1 resection. Taken together, our preclinical data indicate that mTOR inhibitor may be effective as a single agent in treating chondrosarcoma patients. A clinical trial evaluating mTOr inhibitor as neo-adjuvant and adjuvant therapy in chondrosarcoma patients is

  18. Phase I Study of the Anti-IGF-1R Monoclonal Antibody, Cixutumumab in Combination with Everolimus and Octreotide LAR in Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Arvind; Phan, Alexandria; Gupta, Sanjay; Rashid, Asif; Yeung, Sai-ChingJim; Hess, Kenneth; Chen, Helen; Tarco, Emily; Chen, Huiqin; Wei, Caimiao; Anh-Do, Kim; Halperin, Daniel; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Yao, James

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical data suggest multiple roles for the insulin like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF-1R) in neuroendocrine tumors (NET) including mediating resistance to mTOR inhibitors. Everolimus, an oral mTOR inhibitor and octreotide LAR are approved for subgroups of well differentiated NET. The primary objective was to establish the safety and recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of cixutumumab, a monoclonal antibody against IGF-1R with everolimus and octreotide LAR. Patients with well differentiated NET were treated with everolimus 10 mg po daily, octreotide LAR 20 mg IM every 21 days and escalating doses of cixutumumab. An expansion cohort was enrolled at RP2D. Correlative studies included evaluation of mTOR pathway inhibition in paired tumor biopsies and effects of this combination on metabolism per indirect calorimetry. 19 patients with progressive disease, including 9 to the expansion portion were enrolled. 2 patients had dose limiting toxicities of grade 3 mucositis at cixutumumab 15 mg/kg. Long term tolerance at RP2D was problematic, the most common ≥ grade 3 adverse event (AE) being fatigue. One patient with metastatic insulinoma had a confirmed partial response while seventeen had stable disease. Median progression free survival was 43.6 weeks and median overall survival was 25.5 months. Conclusions The RP2D of this combination per predefined study protocol cixutumumab iv 10 mg/kg, octreotide LAR 20 mg IM every 21 days plus everolimus 10 mg po daily is associated with non-DLT toxicities limiting long term tolerance. Although a signal of activity was noted in this study, this will need to be reconciled with limited tolerance of the combination and data from larger studies of anti-IGF-1R monoclonal antibodies in NET that have been disappointing. PMID:25900182

  19. Combined treatment with everolimus and fulvestrant reversed anti-HER2 resistance in a patient with refractory advanced breast cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing; Ding, Lijuan; Wu, Shikai; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Santai

    2016-01-01

    Background Everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, shows promising antitumor activity when combined with trastuzumab and chemotherapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer or when combined with endocrine agents for hormone receptor (HR)-positive tumors. However, data are limited regarding the effect of everolimus in combination with endocrine drugs in HER2-positive advanced breast cancer regardless of the HR status. Case presentation A 44-year-old female was diagnosed with recurrent HER2-positive breast cancer. The primary tumor was HR positive; however, the metastatic tumor was HR negative. The patient was resistant to classical chemotherapeutic agents and anti-HER2 treatment. Thus, the combination of everolimus and fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor downregulator, was chosen to reverse the resistance to anti-HER2 therapy. Indeed, the patient experienced long-term disease stabilization. Adverse events associated with the treatment were manageable by dose adjustments. We performed genetic testing of the metastatic tumor, which harbored a PIK3CA gene mutation but was positive for phosphatase and tensin homologue expression, which might result in resistance to the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor. Conclusion This case study indicates that combined treatment with everolimus and fulvestrant might be a viable option for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer patients who are HER2 positive and carry a PIK3CA gene mutation but are resistant to anti-HER2 therapy and classical chemotherapeutic agents. Further prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm this finding. PMID:27445490

  20. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

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  1. The Changes of Lipid Metabolism in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Everolimus: A New Pharmacodynamic Marker?

    PubMed Central

    Pantano, Francesco; Santoni, Matteo; Procopio, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Mimma; Iacovelli, Roberto; Porta, Camillo; Conti, Alessandro; Lugini, Antonio; Milella, Michele; Galli, Luca; Ortega, Cinzia; Guida, Francesco Maria; Silletta, Marianna; Schinzari, Giovanni; Verzoni, Elena; Modica, Daniela; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Rauco, Annamaria; Felici, Alessandra; Ballatore, Valentina; Cascinu, Stefano; Tonini, Giuseppe; Carteni, Giacomo; Russo, Antonio; Santini, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Background Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). We aimed to assess the association between the baseline values and treatmentrelated modifications of total serum cholesterol (C), triglycerides (T), body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose level (FBG) and blood pressure (BP) levels and the outcome of patients treated with everolimus for mRCC. Methods 177 patients were included in this retrospective analysis. Time to progression (TTP), clinical benefit (CB) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results Basal BMI was significantly higher in patients who experienced a CB (p=0,0145). C,T and C+T raises were significantly associated with baseline BMI (p=0.0412, 0.0283 and 0.0001). Median TTP was significantly longer in patients with T raise compared to patients without T (10 vs 6, p=0.030), C (8 vs 5, p=0.042) and C+T raise (10.9 vs 5.0, p=0.003). At the multivariate analysis, only C+T increase was associated with improved TTP (p=0.005). T raise (21.0 vs 14.0, p=0.002) and C+T increase (21.0 vs 14.0, p=0.006) were correlated with improved OS but were not significant at multivariate analysis. Conclusion C+T raise is an early predictor for everolimus efficacy for patients with mRCC. PMID:25885920

  2. Everolimus for Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia With Protein-Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Michio; Hori, Tomohiro; Kanda, Kaori; Kawamoto, Norio; Ibuka, Takashi; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL), also known as Waldmann's disease, is an exudative enteropathy resulting from morphologic abnormalities in the intestinal lymphatics. In this article, we describe a 12-year-old boy with PIL that led to protein-losing enteropathy characterized by diarrhea, hypoalbuminemia associated with edema (serum albumin level: 1.0 g/dL), and hypogammaglobulinemia (serum IgG level: 144 mg/dL). Severe hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte abnormalities, and tetany persisted despite a low-fat diet and propranolol. Everolimus (1.6 mg/m(2)/day) was added to his treatment as an antiangiogenic agent. With everolimus treatment, the patient's diarrhea resolved and replacement therapy for hypoproteinemia was less frequent. Hematologic and scintigraphy findings also improved (serum albumin level: 2.5 g/dL). There were no adverse reactions during the 12-month follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of everolimus use in a patient with PIL. PMID:26908672

  3. Protective function of pirfenidone and everolimus on the development of chronic allograft rejection after experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    von Suesskind-Schwendi, M; Heigel, E; Pfaehler, S; Haneya, A; Schmid, C; Hirt, S W; Lehle, K

    2016-07-01

    Long-term survival of lung allografts is limited by chronic rejection (CR). Oxidative stress (OxS) plays a central role in the development of CR. We investigated the influence of pirfenidone (alone or in combination with everolimus) on OxS and CR. A rat model of left lung allo-transplantation (F344-to-WKY) was used to evaluate the effects of pirfenidone alone [0,85% in chow from postoperative day (POD) -3 to 20/60] and in combination with everolimus [2,5 mg/kg bw daily from POD 7 to 20/60]. Allografts of non-treated animals, everolimus treated animals and right, non-transplanted lungs were used as references. Immunohistology of myeloperoxidase (MPO), haemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), iron and platelet-derived-growth-factor-receptor-alpha (PDGFR-a) were performed. On POD 20, all groups showed severe acute rejection (ISHLT A3-4/B1R-B2R). Groups treated with pirfenidone showed a lower interstitial inflammatory infiltration and a lower participation of highly fibrotic degenerated vessels (ISHLT-D2R). In the long term follow up (POD 60), pirfenidone alone significantly reduced chronic airway rejection (ISHLT-C; p≤0.05), interstitial fibrosis (IF; p≤0.05), content of collagen (p≤0.05), expression of PDGFR-a (p≤0.05) and the deposition of iron (p≤0.05). All groups treated with pirfenidone showed a high expression of the cytoprotective enzyme HO-1 (p≤0.05). The additional application of everolimus resulted in a significant decrease of chronic airway rejection (ISHLT-C; p≤0.05), vasculopathy (ISHLT; p≤0.05) and IF (p≤0.05). In conclusion, early application of pirfenidone inhibited the progression of CR by its anti-fibrotic and anti-oxidative properties. The additional application of an m-TOR-inhibitor increased the anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone which resulted in a reduction of CR after experimental LTx. PMID:26707547

  4. Effects of everolimus on a rat model of cerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Özkardeş, Alper Bilal; Bozkurt, Birkan; Dumlu, Ersin Gürkan; Tokaç, Mehmet; Yazgan, Aylin Kılıç; Ergin, Merve; Erel, Özcan; Kılıç, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the biochemical and histopathological effects of everolimus in an experimental rat model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of everolimus on blood biochemical parameters and tissue histopathology in an experimental rat model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Material and Methods: In 30 Wistar albino rats (male; 240–260 g), acute pancreatitis was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 μg/kg) administered twice in 2 h. They were equally divided into the following three groups: 0.9% isotonic solution (Group 1; control), everolimus once (Group 2), and everolimus twice (Group 3) by oral gavage after cerulein injection. Thirty hours after the induction of pancreatitis, blood samples were collected by direct intracardiac puncture, rats were sacrificed, and pancreatic tissue samples were obtained. Results: Biochemical analyses of the blood samples showed statistically significant difference in red blood cell count as well as hemoglobin, hematocrit, urea, and alanine transaminase levels among the study groups (p<0.05 in all). Everolimus proved to significantly increase red blood cell count in a dose-independent manner. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels significantly increased only after treatment with one dose of everolimus. Urea level was significantly different between the Groups 2 and 3; however, no change was observed in both groups when compared with the control. Alanine transaminase level significantly decreased only after treatment with two doses of everolimus. Histopathological analyses revealed that everolimus significantly decreased inflammation and perivascular infiltrate in a dose-dependent manner (35% in Group 2, 75% in Group 3; p=0.048). Conclusion: Treatment with two doses of everolimus improved some biochemical and histopathological parameters of experimental rat models of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and implied the specific inhibition of

  5. Comparative Metabolomic Profiling of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Treated with Sorafenib Monotherapy vs. Sorafenib-Everolimus Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jian-feng; Lu, Juan; Wang, Xiao-zhong; Guo, Wu-hua; Zhang, Ji-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Sorafenib-everolimus combination therapy may be more effective than sorafenib monotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To better understand this effect, we comparatively profiled the metabolite composition of HepG2 cells treated with sorafenib, everolimus, and sorafenib-everolimus combination therapy. Material/Methods A 2D HRMAS 1H-NMR metabolomic approach was applied to identify the key differential metabolites in 3 experimental groups: sorafenib (5 μM), everolimus (5 μM), and combination therapy (5 μM sorafenib +5 μM everolimus). MetaboAnalyst 3.0 was used to perform pathway analysis. Results All OPLS-DA models displayed good separation between experimental groups, high-quality goodness of fit (R2), and high-quality goodness of predication (Q2). Sorafenib and everolimus have differential effects with respect to amino acid, methane, pyruvate, pyrimidine, aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, and glycerophospholipid metabolism. The addition of everolimus to sorafenib resulted in differential effects with respect to pyruvate, amino acid, methane, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate, glycolysis or gluconeogenesis, glycerophospholipid, and purine metabolism. Conclusions Sorafenib and everolimus have differential effects on HepG2 cells. Sorafenib preferentially affects glycerophospholipid and purine metabolism, while the addition of everolimus preferentially affects pyruvate, amino acid, and glucose metabolism. This phenomenon may explain (in part) the synergistic effects of sorafenib-everolimus combination therapy observed in vivo. PMID:26092946

  6. Sirolimus and Everolimus Pathway: Reviewing Candidate Genes Influencing Their Intracellular Effects.

    PubMed

    Granata, Simona; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Carraro, Amedeo; Brunelli, Matteo; Stallone, Giovanni; Lupo, Antonio; Zaza, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Sirolimus (SRL) and everolimus (EVR) are mammalian targets of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR-I) largely employed in renal transplantation and oncology as immunosuppressive/antiproliferative agents. SRL was the first mTOR-I produced by the bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus and approved for several medical purposes. EVR, derived from SRL, contains a 2-hydroxy-ethyl chain in the 40th position that makes the drug more hydrophilic than SRL and increases oral bioavailability. Their main mechanism of action is the inhibition of the mTOR complex 1 and the regulation of factors involved in a several crucial cellular functions including: protein synthesis, regulation of angiogenesis, lipid biosynthesis, mitochondrial biogenesis and function, cell cycle, and autophagy. Most of the proteins/enzymes belonging to the aforementioned biological processes are encoded by numerous and tightly regulated genes. However, at the moment, the polygenic influence on SRL/EVR cellular effects is still not completely defined, and its comprehension represents a key challenge for researchers. Therefore, to obtain a complete picture of the cellular network connected to SRL/EVR, we decided to review major evidences available in the literature regarding the genetic influence on mTOR-I biology/pharmacology and to build, for the first time, a useful and specific "SRL/EVR genes-focused pathway", possibly employable as a starting point for future in-depth research projects. PMID:27187382

  7. Ganciclovir-Resistant Cytomegalovirus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated with Foscarnet and Everolimus.

    PubMed

    Menghi, Viola; Comai, Giorgia; Baraldi, Olga; Liviano D'Arcangelo, Giovanni; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; La Manna, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a major cause of morbidity, graft failure, and death in kidney transplant recipients. We describe a case of a 53-year-old CMV-seronegative man who underwent renal transplant from a CMV-positive donor and who developed ganciclovir- (GCV-) resistant CMV infection. Foscarnet was started while immunosuppressive therapy was modified with the introduction of everolimus minimizing tacrolimus dosage. Only two weeks after the start of this treatment regimen was the patient's viral load negative. At two-year follow-up the patient has no clinical or laboratory signs of CMV infection and a good and stable renal function or graft survival. In our case, administration of an mTOR inhibitor combined with foscarnet led to rapid and persistent viral clearance without compromising short- and medium-term graft function. This combination therapy supports the need for the kidney transplant community to individualize a target therapy for each type of GCV-resistant CMV infection. PMID:26942027

  8. Ganciclovir-Resistant Cytomegalovirus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated with Foscarnet and Everolimus

    PubMed Central

    Menghi, Viola; Comai, Giorgia; Baraldi, Olga; Liviano D'Arcangelo, Giovanni; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; La Manna, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a major cause of morbidity, graft failure, and death in kidney transplant recipients. We describe a case of a 53-year-old CMV-seronegative man who underwent renal transplant from a CMV-positive donor and who developed ganciclovir- (GCV-) resistant CMV infection. Foscarnet was started while immunosuppressive therapy was modified with the introduction of everolimus minimizing tacrolimus dosage. Only two weeks after the start of this treatment regimen was the patient's viral load negative. At two-year follow-up the patient has no clinical or laboratory signs of CMV infection and a good and stable renal function or graft survival. In our case, administration of an mTOR inhibitor combined with foscarnet led to rapid and persistent viral clearance without compromising short- and medium-term graft function. This combination therapy supports the need for the kidney transplant community to individualize a target therapy for each type of GCV-resistant CMV infection. PMID:26942027

  9. Sirolimus and Everolimus Pathway: Reviewing Candidate Genes Influencing Their Intracellular Effects

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Simona; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Carraro, Amedeo; Brunelli, Matteo; Stallone, Giovanni; Lupo, Antonio; Zaza, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Sirolimus (SRL) and everolimus (EVR) are mammalian targets of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR-I) largely employed in renal transplantation and oncology as immunosuppressive/antiproliferative agents. SRL was the first mTOR-I produced by the bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus and approved for several medical purposes. EVR, derived from SRL, contains a 2-hydroxy-ethyl chain in the 40th position that makes the drug more hydrophilic than SRL and increases oral bioavailability. Their main mechanism of action is the inhibition of the mTOR complex 1 and the regulation of factors involved in a several crucial cellular functions including: protein synthesis, regulation of angiogenesis, lipid biosynthesis, mitochondrial biogenesis and function, cell cycle, and autophagy. Most of the proteins/enzymes belonging to the aforementioned biological processes are encoded by numerous and tightly regulated genes. However, at the moment, the polygenic influence on SRL/EVR cellular effects is still not completely defined, and its comprehension represents a key challenge for researchers. Therefore, to obtain a complete picture of the cellular network connected to SRL/EVR, we decided to review major evidences available in the literature regarding the genetic influence on mTOR-I biology/pharmacology and to build, for the first time, a useful and specific “SRL/EVR genes-focused pathway”, possibly employable as a starting point for future in-depth research projects. PMID:27187382

  10. Everolimus Treatment for an Early Infantile Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Shinobu; Watanabe, Toshihide; Takayama, Rumiko; Minagawa, Kimio; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas are benign tumors often observed with tuberous sclerosis complex. These tumors are rarely diagnosed during fetal life or early infancy. Until recently, the only available treatment has been surgical resection. Current clinical research has demonstrated that everolimus can induce these tumors' regression. We report a 19-month-old boy with tuberous sclerosis complex. At 2 months of age, he presented with congenital subependymal giant cell astrocytoma that was complicated by refractory epilepsy and severe mental retardation. Treatment with everolimus was started when he was 10 months old. Three months after initiating everolimus, the tumor was significantly reduced in size, and the reduction was subsequently maintained. His seizures decreased and he showed cognitive and developmental improvement. No severe adverse events have been observed to date. Everolimus has promise as an effective alternative to surgery for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas during early infancy. PMID:25143481

  11. Everolimus-induced Pneumonitis after Drug-eluting Stent Implantation: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Susumu Kikuchi, Naoshi; Ichikawa, Atsuo; Sano, Go; Satoh, Keita; Sugino, Keishi; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Takai, Yujiro; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Homma, Sakae

    2013-08-01

    Despite the wide use of everolimus as an antineoplastic coating agent for coronary stents to reduce the rate of restenosis, little is known about the health hazards of everolimus-eluting stents (EES). We describe a case of pneumonitis that developed 2 months after EES implantation for angina. Lung pathology demonstrated an organizing pneumonia pattern that responded to corticosteroid therapy. Although the efficacy of EES for ischemic heart disease is well established, EES carries a risk of pneumonitis.

  12. Evaluation of the Impact of the Cancer Therapy Everolimus on the Central Nervous System in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Martine; Le Joncour, Vadim; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Anouar, Youssef; Proust, François; Morin, Fabrice; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Joly, Florence; Hilber, Pascal; Castel, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Cancer and treatments may induce cognitive impairments in cancer patients, and the causal link between chemotherapy and cognitive dysfunctions was recently validated in animal models. New cancer targeted therapies have become widely used, and their impact on brain functions and quality of life needs to be explored. We evaluated the impact of everolimus, an anticancer agent targeting the mTOR pathway, on cognitive functions, cerebral metabolism, and hippocampal cell proliferation/vascular density in mice. Adult mice received everolimus daily for 2 weeks, and behavioral tests were performed from 1 week after the last treatment. Everolimus-treated mice displayed a marked reduction in weight gain from the last day of the treatment period. Ex vivo analysis showed altered cytochrome oxidase activity in selective cerebral regions involved in energy balance, food intake, reward, learning and memory modulation, sleep/wake cycle regulation, and arousal. Like chemotherapy, everolimus did not alter emotional reactivity, learning and memory performances, but in contrast to chemotherapy, did not affect behavioral flexibility or reactivity to novelty. In vivo hippocampal neural cell proliferation and vascular density were also unchanged after everolimus treatments. In conclusion, two weeks daily everolimus treatment at the clinical dose did not evoke alteration of cognitive performances evaluated in hippocampal- and prefrontal cortex-dependent tasks that would persist at one to four weeks after the end of the treatment completion. However, acute everolimus treatment caused selective CO modifications without altering the mTOR effector P70S6 kinase in cerebral regions involved in feeding behavior and/or the sleep/wake cycle, at least in part under control of the solitary nucleus and the parasubthalamic region of the hypothalamus. Thus, this area may represent a key target for everolimus-mediating peripheral modifications, which has been previously associated with symptoms such as

  13. Activation of Autophagy by Everolimus Confers Hepatoprotection Against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, S C; Kim, K H; Kim, O H; Lee, S K; Kim, S J

    2016-07-01

    As the criteria for liver donation have been extended to include marginal donors, liver grafts are becoming particularly vulnerable to hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). However, no specific measures have been validated to ameliorate hepatic IRI. In this article, we explored whether everolimus has protective effects against hepatic IRI in relation with autophagy. The effects of everolimus were investigated in both in vitro and in vivo hepatic IRI models. Mouse hepatocyte AML12 cells and BALB/c mice were utilized for the establishment of each model. In the IRI-induced AML12 cells, everolimus treatment increased the expressions of autophagic markers (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and p62) and decreased pro-apoptotic proteins (cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved poly-ADP ribose polymerase). The blockage of autophagy, using either bafilomycin A1 or si-autophagy-related protein 5, abrogated these anti-apoptosis effects of everolimus. Subsequently, everolimus administration to the hepatic IRI-induced mice provided hepatoprotective effects in terms of (1) decreasing the expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins, (2) inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α), (3) reducing elevated liver enzymes (aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and ammonia), and (4) restoring liver histopathology. These findings suggest that everolimus protects the liver against hepatic IRI by way of activating autophagy, and thus could be a potential therapeutic agent for hepatic IRI. PMID:26814830

  14. Radiation Recall Pneumonitis During Systemic Treatment With Everolimus.

    PubMed

    Clark, Douglas; Gauchan, Dron; Ramaekers, Ryan; Norvell, Max; Copur, Mehmet Sitki

    2014-01-01

    Radiation recall syndrome is an acute inflammatory reaction developing at anatomical sites of previously irradiated tissue, weeks to months after the completion of radiation therapy. The distribution pattern of inflammation typically involves, and remains limited to, the boundaries of prior radiation treatment fields. Several classical chemotherapy drugs have been reported to have the potential for causing radiation recall syndrome. With the increasing availability and expanding use of novel biologic and targeted therapy anticancer drugs, isolated reports of radiation recall syndrome secondary to this class of agents are starting to appear in the literature. We describe a case of everolimus-induced radiation recall pneumonitis in a patient with metastatic renal cell cancer. PMID:26629944

  15. Multicenter phase II study of everolimus in patients with metastatic or recurrent bone and soft-tissue sarcomas after failure of anthracycline and ifosfamide.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Changhoon; Lee, Jeeyun; Rha, Sun Young; Park, Kyong Hwa; Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Hyo Jin; Lee, Kyung Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hee

    2013-12-01

    This multicenter, phase II trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, in patients with metastatic or recurrent bone and soft-tissue sarcoma after the failure of anthracycline- and ifosfamide-containing regimens. Everolimus was administered orally as 10 mg once daily. The primary endpoint was the progression-free rate (PFR) at 16 weeks, assessed by computed tomography scan according to RECIST v1.0. Between July 2010 and May 2011, 41 patients were enrolled in this study. Among them, 83% received two or more regimens of chemotherapy prior to study entry. In 38 patients who the primary endpoint was evaluable, 11 patients reached 16 weeks progression-free (one with partial response and 10 with stable disease), indicating a PFR at 16 weeks of 27% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16-42%). The PFR at 16 weeks was highest in patients with angiosarcoma (2 of 3, 67%). With a median follow-up of 10.9 months (range, 2.3-23.9 months) in living patients, the median progression-free survival was 1.9 months (95% CI, 1.3-2.4 months) and the median overall survival was 5.8 months (95% CI, 3.6-8.0 months). Most adverse events were generally mild and tolerable. Grade 3/4 toxicities included hyperglycemia (15%), stomatitis (7%), pain (5%), and asthenia (5%). Everolimus shows modest antitumor activity with manageable toxicities in heavily pretreated patients with bone and soft-tissue sarcoma. PMID:24037083

  16. Addition of Everolimus Post VEGFR Inhibition Treatment Failure in Advanced Sarcoma Patients Who Previously Benefited from VEGFR Inhibition: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Hays, John L.; Chen, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with metastatic sarcoma who progress on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitors (VEGFRi) have limited treatment options. Upregulation of the mTOR pathway has been demonstrated to be a means of resistance to targeted VEGFRi in metastatic sarcoma. Patients and methods Retrospective cohort study to evaluate the clinical benefit at four months of combining mTOR inhibition (mTORi) via everolimus with VEGFRi in patients who have derived benefit from single-agent VEGFRi but have progressed. Patients with recurrent, metastatic soft tissue or bone sarcomas who progressed after deriving clinical benefit to VEGFRi beyond 12 weeks were continued on VEGFRi with the addition of everolimus (5 mg daily). Progression free survival was measured from start of VEGFRi to disease progression on single agent VEGFRi as well as from the addition of everolimus therapy to disease progression or drug discontinuation due to toxicity. Clinical benefit was defined as stable disease or partial response at 4 months. Results Nine patients were evaluated. Two patients did not tolerate therapy due to GI toxicity and one elected to discontinue therapy. Of the remaining six patients, the clinical benefit rate at four months was 50%. Progression free survival (PFS) for these patients was 3.1 months ranging from 0.5 to 7.2 months with one patient remaining on combination therapy. Conclusion In this heavily pre-treated, advanced sarcoma population, the addition of mTOR inhibition to VEGFRi based therapy resulted in a clinical benefit for a subset of patients. Prospective studies will be needed to verify these results. PMID:27295141

  17. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitor Induced Complete Remission of a Recurrent Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma in a Patient Without Features of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Appalla, Deepika; Depalma, Andres; Calderwood, Stanley

    2016-07-01

    The majority of patients with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) have tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). In such patients, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has been shown to induce responses. Isolated SEGA have been reported in patients without clinical or genetic features of TSC. The treatment of these patients with everolimus has not previously been reported. We treated a patient with a recurrent isolated SEGA with an mTOR inhibitor. The patient tolerated therapy well and had a sustained complete remission. MTOR inhibitors may be useful for the treatment of isolated SEGA. Further study is warranted. PMID:26929034

  18. Potentiation of antileukemic therapies by the dual PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor, BAG956: effects on BCR-ABL– and mutant FLT3-expressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Banerji, Lolita; Wright, Renee D.; Barrett, Rosemary; Ray, Arghya; Moreno, Daisy; Catley, Laurence; Jiang, Jingrui; Hall-Meyers, Elizabeth; Sauveur-Michel, Maira; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Fox, Edward; Kung, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Mediators of PI3K/AKT signaling have been implicated in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Studies have shown that inhibitors of PI3K/AKT signaling, such as wortmannin and LY294002, are able to inhibit CML and AML cell proliferation and synergize with targeted tyrosine kinase inhi-bitors. We investigated the ability of BAG956, a dual PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor, to be used in combination with inhibitors of BCR-ABL and mutant FLT3, as well as with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, and the rapamycin derivative, RAD001. BAG956 was shown to block AKT phosphorylation induced by BCR-ABL–, and induce apoptosis of BCR-ABL–expressing cell lines and patient bone marrow cells at concentrations that also inhibit PI3K signaling. Enhancement of the inhibitory effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, imatinib and nilotinib, by BAG956 was demonstrated against BCR-ABL expressing cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have also shown that BAG956 is effective against mutant FLT3-expressing cell lines and AML patient bone marrow cells. Enhancement of the inhibitory effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PKC412, by BAG956 was demonstrated against mutant FLT3-expressing cells. Finally, BAG956 and rapamycin/RAD001 were shown to combine in a nonantagonistic fashion against BCR-ABL– and mutant FLT3-expressing cells both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18184863

  19. Impact of Everolimus and Low-Dose Cyclosporin on Cytomegalovirus Replication and Disease in Pediatric Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Höcker, B; Zencke, S; Pape, L; Krupka, K; Köster, L; Fichtner, A; Dello Strologo, L; Guzzo, I; Topaloglu, R; Kranz, B; König, J; Bald, M; Webb, N J A; Noyan, A; Dursun, H; Marks, S; Ozcakar, Z B; Thiel, F; Billing, H; Pohl, M; Fehrenbach, H; Schnitzler, P; Bruckner, T; Ahlenstiel-Grunow, T; Tönshoff, B

    2016-03-01

    In order to investigate the hypothesis that the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus (EVR) shows anticytomegalovirus (CMV) activity in pediatric patients, we analyzed the impact of EVR-based immunosuppressive therapy on CMV replication and disease in a large cohort (n = 301) of pediatric kidney allograft recipients. The EVR cohort (n = 59), who also received low-dose cyclosporin, was compared with a control cohort (n = 242), who was administered standard-dose cyclosporin or tacrolimus and an antimetabolite, mostly mycophenolate mofetil (91.7%). Multivariate analysis revealed an 83% lower risk of CMV replication in the EVR cohort than in the control cohort (p = 0.005). In CMV high-risk (donor+/recipient-) patients (n = 88), the EVR-based regimen was associated with a significantly lower rate of CMV disease (0% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.046) than the standard regimen. In patients who had received chemoprophylaxis with (val-)ganciclovir (n = 63), the CMV-free survival rates at 1 year and 3 years posttransplant (100%) were significantly (p = 0.015) higher in the EVR cohort (n = 15) than in the control cohort (n = 48; 1 year, 75.0%; 3 years, 63.3%). Our data suggest that in pediatric patients at high risk of CMV, an EVR-based immunosuppressive regimen is associated with a lower risk of CMV disease than a standard-dose calcineurin inhibitor-based regimen. PMID:26613840

  20. A sensitive high-throughput HPLC assay for simultaneous determination of everolimus and clobetasol propionate.

    PubMed

    Kamberi, Marika; Fu, Katherine; Lu, Jianmin; Chemaly, G Mike; Feder, Debra

    2008-01-01

    A novel sensitive high-throughput high-performance liquid chromatography assay is developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of everolimus and clobetasol propionate in pharmaceutical formulations. The chromatographic separation is achieved on a Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C18 reversed-phase column using a gradient elution, with solvent A: ammonium acetate (pH 6.8; 0.01 M) and solvent B: acetonitrile. The mean recovery ranges from 95.1% to 100.0% for clobetasol propionate and from 97.9% to 103.7% for everolimus. The limit of quantitation for each analyte is 0.02 microg/mL. The percent relative standard deviations are less than 3% for intra- and inter-day analyses. The proposed method can be used for the routine quality control of everolimus and clobetasol propionate in complex pharmaceutical formulations, especially the drug-delivery systems with a low total drug-load. PMID:18218184

  1. Real-World Study of Everolimus in Advanced Progressive Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Panzuto, Francesco; Rinzivillo, Maria; Fazio, Nicola; de Braud, Filippo; Luppi, Gabriele; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Lugli, Francesca; Tomassetti, Paola; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Nuzzo, Carmen; Brizzi, Maria Pia; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Zaniboni, Alberto; Nobili, Elisabetta; Pastorelli, Davide; Cascinu, Stefano; Merlano, Marco; Chiara, Silvana; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Funaioli, Chiara; Spada, Francesca; Pusceddu, Sara; Fontana, Annalisa; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Cassano, Alessandra; Campana, Davide; Cartenì, Giacomo; Appetecchia, Marialuisa; Berruti, Alfredo; Colao, Annamaria; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Everolimus is a valid therapeutic option for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs); however, data in a real-world setting outside regulatory trials are sparse. The aim of this study was to determine everolimus tolerability and efficacy, in relation to previous treatments, in a compassionate use program. A total of 169 patients with advanced progressive NETs treated with everolimus were enrolled, including 85 with pancreatic NETs (pNETs) and 84 with nonpancreatic NETs (non-pNETs). Previous treatments included somatostatin analogs (92.9%), peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT; 50.3%), chemotherapy (49.7%), and PRRT and chemotherapy (22.8%). Overall, 85.2% of patients experienced adverse events (AEs), which were severe (grade 3–4) in 46.1%. The most frequent severe AEs were pneumonitis (8.3%), thrombocytopenia (7.7%), anemia (5.3%), and renal failure (3.5%). In patients previously treated with PRRT and chemotherapy, a 12-fold increased risk for severe toxicity was observed, with grade 3–4 AEs reported in 86.8% (vs. 34.3% in other patients). In addition, 63.3% of patients required temporarily everolimus discontinuation due to toxicity. Overall, 27.8% of patients died during a median follow-up of 12 months. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 12 months and 32 months, respectively. Similar disease control rates, PFS, and OS were reported in pNETs and non-pNETs. In the real-world setting, everolimus is safe and effective for the treatment of NETs of different origins. Higher severe toxicity occurred in patients previously treated with systemic chemotherapy and PRRT. This finding prompts caution when using this drug in pretreated patients and raises the issue of planning for everolimus before PRRT and chemotherapy in the therapeutic algorithm for advanced NETs. PMID:25117065

  2. Real-world study of everolimus in advanced progressive neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Panzuto, Francesco; Rinzivillo, Maria; Fazio, Nicola; de Braud, Filippo; Luppi, Gabriele; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Lugli, Francesca; Tomassetti, Paola; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Nuzzo, Carmen; Brizzi, Maria Pia; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Zaniboni, Alberto; Nobili, Elisabetta; Pastorelli, Davide; Cascinu, Stefano; Merlano, Marco; Chiara, Silvana; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Funaioli, Chiara; Spada, Francesca; Pusceddu, Sara; Fontana, Annalisa; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Cassano, Alessandra; Campana, Davide; Cartenì, Giacomo; Appetecchia, Marialuisa; Berruti, Alfredo; Colao, Annamaria; Falconi, Massimo; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2014-09-01

    Everolimus is a valid therapeutic option for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs); however, data in a real-world setting outside regulatory trials are sparse. The aim of this study was to determine everolimus tolerability and efficacy, in relation to previous treatments, in a compassionate use program. A total of 169 patients with advanced progressive NETs treated with everolimus were enrolled, including 85 with pancreatic NETs (pNETs) and 84 with nonpancreatic NETs (non-pNETs). Previous treatments included somatostatin analogs (92.9%), peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT; 50.3%), chemotherapy (49.7%), and PRRT and chemotherapy (22.8%). Overall, 85.2% of patients experienced adverse events (AEs), which were severe (grade 3-4) in 46.1%. The most frequent severe AEs were pneumonitis (8.3%), thrombocytopenia (7.7%), anemia (5.3%), and renal failure (3.5%). In patients previously treated with PRRT and chemotherapy, a 12-fold increased risk for severe toxicity was observed, with grade 3-4 AEs reported in 86.8% (vs. 34.3% in other patients). In addition, 63.3% of patients required temporarily everolimus discontinuation due to toxicity. Overall, 27.8% of patients died during a median follow-up of 12 months. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 12 months and 32 months, respectively. Similar disease control rates, PFS, and OS were reported in pNETs and non-pNETs. In the real-world setting, everolimus is safe and effective for the treatment of NETs of different origins. Higher severe toxicity occurred in patients previously treated with systemic chemotherapy and PRRT. This finding prompts caution when using this drug in pretreated patients and raises the issue of planning for everolimus before PRRT and chemotherapy in the therapeutic algorithm for advanced NETs. PMID:25117065

  3. Growth hormone abolishes the negative effects of everolimus on intestinal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Küper, Markus Alexander; Trütschel, Sebastian; Weinreich, Jürgen; Königsrainer, Alfred; Beckert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the simultaneous treatment with human growth hormone (hGH) abolishes the negative effects of everolimus on anastomotic healing. METHODS: Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley-rats were randomized to three groups of 16 animals each (I: vehicle; II: everolimus 3 mg/kg po; III: everolimus 3 mg/kg po + hGH 2.5 mg/kg sc). Animals were pre-treated with hGH and/or everolimus daily for seven days. Then a standard anastomosis was created in the descending colon and treatment was continued for another seven days. The anastomosis was resected in toto and the bursting pressure was assessed as a mechanical parameter of intestinal healing. Moreover, biochemical (Hydroxyproline, PCNA, MPO, MMP-2 and MMP-9) and histological (cell density, angiogenesis, amount of granulation tissue) parameters of intestinal healing were assessed. RESULTS: Anastomotic bursting pressure was significantly reduced by everolimus and a simultaneous treatment with hGH resulted in considerably higher values (I: 134 ± 19 mmHg, II: 85 ± 25 mmHg, III: 114 ± 25 mmHg; P < 0.05, I vs II; P = 0.09, I vs III and II vs III) Hydroxyproline concentration was significantly increased by hGH compared to everolimus alone (I: 14.9 ± 2.5 μg/mg, II: 8.9 ± 3.6 μg/mg, III: 11.9 ± 2.8 μg/mg; P < 0.05, I vs II/III and II vs III). The number of MPO-positive cells was reduced significantly by hGH compared to everolimus alone (I: 10 ± 1 n/mm², II: 15 ± 3 n/mm², III: 9 ± 2 n/mm²; P < 0.05, I vs II and II vs III), while the number of PCNA-positive cells were increased by hGH (I: 28 ± 3 /mm², II: 12 ± 3 /mm², III: 26 ± 12 /mm²; P < 0.05, I vs II and II vs III). Corresponding to these biochemical findings, HE-histology revealed significantly increased amount of granulation tissue in hGH-treated animals. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of intestinal wound healing by everolimus is partially neutralized by simultaeous treatment with hGH. Both inflammation as well as collagen

  4. mTOR Inhibitors Alone and in Combination with JAK2 Inhibitors Effectively Inhibit Cells of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Serena; Tozzi, Lorenzo; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bosi, Alberto; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dysregulated signaling of the JAK/STAT pathway is a common feature of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), usually associated with JAK2V617F mutation. Recent clinical trials with JAK2 inhibitors showed significant improvements in splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms in patients with myelofibrosis but meaningful molecular responses were not documented. Accordingly, there remains a need for exploring new treatment strategies of MPN. A potential additional target for treatment is represented by the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway that has been found constitutively activated in MPN cells; proof-of-evidence of efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 has been obtained recently in a Phase I/II trial in patients with myelofibrosis. The aim of the study was to characterize the effects in vitro of mTOR inhibitors, used alone and in combination with JAK2 inhibitors, against MPN cells. Findings Mouse and human JAK2V617F mutated cell lines and primary hematopoietic progenitors from MPN patients were challenged with an allosteric (RAD001) and an ATP-competitive (PP242) mTOR inhibitor and two JAK2 inhibitors (AZD1480 and ruxolitinib). mTOR inhibitors effectively reduced proliferation and colony formation of cell lines through a slowed cell division mediated by changes in cell cycle transition to the S-phase. mTOR inhibitors also impaired the proliferation and prevented colony formation from MPN hematopoietic progenitors at doses significantly lower than healthy controls. JAK2 inhibitors produced similar antiproliferative effects in MPN cell lines and primary cells but were more potent inducers of apoptosis, as also supported by differential effects on cyclinD1, PIM1 and BcLxL expression levels. Co-treatment of mTOR inhibitor with JAK2 inhibitor resulted in synergistic activity against the proliferation of JAK2V617F mutated cell lines and significantly reduced erythropoietin-independent colony growth in patients with polycythemia vera

  5. Paclitaxel-Eluting versus Everolimus-Eluting Coronary Stents in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    2016-07-28

    Paclitaxel-Eluting versus Everolimus-Eluting Coronary Stents in Diabetes Original Article, N Engl J Med 2015;373:1709-1719. In the list of authors (page 1709), the surname Abhaychand should have been Abhaichand. The article is correct at NEJM.org. PMID:27464221

  6. Twelve-month efficacy and safety of the conversion to everolimus in maintenance heart transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Manito, Nicolás; Delgado, Juan F; Crespo-Leiro, María G; Arizón, José María; Segovia, Javier; González-Vílchez, Francisco; Mirabet, Sònia; Lage, Ernesto; Pascual-Figal, Domingo; Díaz, Beatriz; Palomo, Jesús; Rábago, Gregorio; Sanz, Marisa; Blasco, Teresa; Roig, Eulàlia

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinical reasons for conversion to everolimus (EVL) and long-term outcomes in heart transplant (HT) recipients. METHODS: A retrospective 12-mo study has been carried out in 14 Spanish centres to assess the efficacy and safety of conversion to EVL in maintenance HT recipients. RESULTS: Two hundred and twenty-two patients were included (mean age: 53 ± 10.5 years; mean time from HT: 8.1 ± 4.5 years). The most common reasons for conversion were nephrotoxicity (30%), chronic allograft vasculopathy (20%) and neoplasms (17%). The doses and mean levels of EVL at baseline (conversion to EVL) and after one year were 1.3 ± 0.3 and 1.2 ± 0.6 mg/d and 6.4 ± 3.4 and 5.6 ± 2.5 ng/mL, respectively. The percentage of patients receiving calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) at baseline and on the final visit was 95% and 65%, respectively. The doses and mean levels of CNIs decreased between baseline and month 12 from 142.2 ± 51.6 to 98.0 ± 39.4 mg/d (P < 0.001) and from 126.1 ± 50.9 to 89.2 ± 47.7 ng/mL (P < 0.001), respectively, for cyclosporine, and from 2.9 ± 1.8 to 2.6 ± 1.9 mg/d and from 8.3 ± 4.0 to 6.5 ± 2.7 ng/mL (P = 0.011) for tacrolimus. In the subgroup of patients converted because of nephrotoxicity, creatinine clearance increased from 34.9 ± 10.1 to 40.4 ± 14.4 mL/min (P < 0.001). There were 37 episodes of acute rejection in 24 patients (11%). The most frequent adverse events were oedemas (12%), infections (9%) and gastrointestinal problems (6%). EVL was suspended in 44 patients (20%). Since the database was closed at the end of the study, no further follow-up data is available. CONCLUSION: Conversion to EVL in maintenance HT recipients allowed minimisation or suspension of the CNIs, with improved kidney function in the patients with nephrotoxicity, after 12 mo. PMID:26722659

  7. Renal function improvement in liver transplant recipients after early everolimus conversion: A clinical practice cohort study in Spain.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Itxarone; Salcedo, Magdalena; Gómez, Miguel Angel; Jimenez, Carlos; Castroagudín, Javier; Fabregat, Joan; Almohalla, Carolina; Herrero, Ignacio; Cuervas-Mons, Valentín; Otero, Alejandra; Rubín, Angel; Miras, Manuel; Rodrigo, Juan; Serrano, Trinidad; Crespo, Gonzalo; De la Mata, Manuel; Bustamante, Javier; Gonzalez-Dieguez, M Luisa; Moreno, Antonia; Narvaez, Isidoro; Guilera, Magda

    2015-08-01

    A national, multicenter, retrospective study was conducted to assess the results obtained for liver transplant recipients with conversion to everolimus in daily practice. The study included 477 recipients (481 transplantations). Indications for conversion to everolimus were renal dysfunction (32.6% of cases), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; 30.2%; prophylactic treatment for 68.9%), and de novo malignancy (29.7%). The median time from transplantation to conversion to everolimus was 68.7 months for de novo malignancy, 23.8 months for renal dysfunction, and 7.1 months for HCC and other indications. During the first year of treatment, mean everolimus trough levels were 5.4 (standard deviation [SD], 2.7) ng/mL and doses remained stable (1.5 mg/day) from the first month after conversion. An everolimus monotherapy regimen was followed by 28.5% of patients at 12 months. Patients with renal dysfunction showed a glomerular filtration rate (4-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease) increase of 10.9 mL (baseline mean, 45.8 [SD, 25.3] versus 57.6 [SD, 27.6] mL/minute/1.73 m(2) ) at 3 months after everolimus initiation (P < 0.001), and 6.8 mL at 12 months. Improvement in renal function was higher in patients with early conversion (<1 year). Adverse events were the primary reason for discontinuation in 11.2% of cases. The probability of survival at 3 years after conversion to everolimus was 83.0%, 71.1%, and 59.5% for the renal dysfunction, de novo malignancy, and HCC groups, respectively. Everolimus is a viable option for the treatment of renal dysfunction, and earlier conversion is associated with better recovery of renal function. Prospective studies are needed to confirm advantages in patients with malignancy. PMID:25990257

  8. Biomarker signatures correlate with clinical outcome in refractory metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving bevacizumab and everolimus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingmiao; Starr, Mark D; Brady, John C; Rushing, Christel; Bulusu, Anuradha; Pang, Herbert; Honeycutt, Wanda; Amara, Anthony; Altomare, Ivy; Uronis, Hope E; Hurwitz, Herbert I; Nixon, Andrew B

    2015-04-01

    A novel combination of bevacizumab and everolimus was evaluated in refractory colorectal cancer patients in a phase II trial. In this retrospective analysis, plasma samples from 49 patients were tested for over 40 biomarkers at baseline and after one or two cycles of drug administration. Analyte levels at baseline and change on-treatment were correlated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) using univariate Cox proportional hazard modeling. Multivariable analyses were conducted using Cox modeling. Significant changes in multiple markers were observed following bevacizumab and everolimus treatment. Baseline levels of six markers significantly correlated with PFS and OS, including CRP, Gro-α, IGFBP-1, TF, ICAM-1, and TSP-2 (P < 0.05). At C2D1, changes of IGFBP-3, TGFβ-R3, and IGFBP-2 correlated with PFS and OS. Prognostic models were developed for OS and PFS (P = 0.0002 and 0.004, respectively). The baseline model for OS consisted of CRP, Gro-α, and TF, while the on-treatment model at C2D1 included IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3, and TGFβ-R3. These data demonstrated that multiple biomarkers were significantly modulated in response to bevacizumab and everolimus. Several markers correlated with both PFS and OS. Interestingly, these markers are known to be associated with inflammation and IGF signaling, key modulators of mTOR biology. PMID:25695956

  9. Everolimus inhibits anti-HLA I antibody-mediated endothelial cell signaling, migration and proliferation more potently than sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y-P; Valenzuela, N M; Ziegler, M E; Rozengurt, E; Reed, E F

    2014-04-01

    Antibody (Ab) crosslinking of HLA I molecules on the surface of endothelial cells triggers proliferative and pro-survival intracellular signaling, which is implicated in the process of chronic allograft rejection, also known as transplant vasculopathy (TV). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in HLA I Ab-induced signaling cascades. Everolimus provides a tool to establish how the mTOR signal network regulates HLA I-mediated migration, proliferation and survival. We found that everolimus inhibits mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) by disassociating Raptor from mTOR, thereby preventing class I-induced phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6K, S6RP and 4E-BP1, and resultant class I-stimulated cell migration and proliferation. Furthermore, we found that everolimus inhibits class I-mediated mTORC2 activation (1) by disassociating Rictor and Sin1 from mTOR; (2) by preventing class I-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and (3) by preventing class I-mediated ERK phosphorylation. These results suggest that everolimus is more effective than sirolimus at antagonizing both mTORC1 and mTORC2, the latter of which is critical in endothelial cell functional changes leading to TV in solid organ transplantation after HLA I crosslinking. Our findings point to a potential therapeutic effect of everolimus in prevention of chronic Ab-mediated rejection. PMID:24580843

  10. Everolimus improves memory and learning while worsening depressive- and anxiety-like behavior in an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Russo, Emilio; Leo, Antonio; Crupi, Rosalia; Aiello, Rossana; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Spiga, Rosangela; Chimirri, Serafina; Citraro, Rita; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Constanti, Andrew; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2016-07-01

    Everolimus (EVR) is an orally-administered rapamycin analog that selectively inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase (mainly mTORC1 and likely mTORC2) and the related signaling pathway. mTOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase regulating multiple important cellular functions; dysfunction of mTOR signaling has also been implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological, neurodegenerative, developmental and cognitive disorders. EVR is widely used as an anti-neoplastic therapy and more recently in children with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). However, no clear correlation exists between EVR use and development of central side effects e.g. depression, anxiety or cognitive impairment. We studied the effects of a 3 weeks administration of EVR in mice chronically treated with betamethasone 21-phosphate disodium (BTM) as a model of depression and cognitive decline. EVR treatment had detrimental effects on depressive- and anxiety-like behavior while improving cognitive performance in both control (untreated) and BTM-treated mice. Such effects were accompanied by an increased hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis. Our results therefore might support the proposed pathological role of mTOR dysregulation in depressive disorders and confirm some previous data on the positive effects of mTOR inhibition in cognitive decline. We also show that EVR, possibly through mTOR inhibition, may be linked to the development of anxiety. The increased hippocampal neurogenesis by EVR might explain its ability to improve cognitive function or protect from cognitive decline. Our findings suggest some caution in the use of EVR, particularly in the developing brain; patients should be carefully monitored for their psychiatric/neurological profiles in any clinical situation where an mTOR inhibitor and in particular EVR is used e.g. cancer treatment, TSC or immunosuppression. PMID:27019134

  11. Three-year efficacy and safety results from a study of everolimus versus mycophenolate mofetil in de novo renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Vítko, Stefan; Margreiter, Raimund; Weimar, Willem; Dantal, Jacques; Kuypers, Dirk; Winkler, Michael; Øyen, Ole; Viljoen, Hendrik G; Filiptsev, Pavel; Sadek, Sami; Li, Yulan; Cretin, Nathalie; Budde, Klemens

    2005-10-01

    Everolimus 1.5 or 3 mg/day was compared with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) 2 g/day in a randomized, multicenter 36-month trial in de novo renal allograft recipients (n = 588) receiving cyclosporine microemulsion (CsA) and corticosteroids. The study was double-blind until all patients had completed 12 months, then open-label. By 36 months, graft loss occurred in 7.2, 16.7 and 10.7% of patients in the everolimus 1.5, 3 mg/day, and MMF groups, respectively (p = 0.0048 for everolimus 1.5 mg/day vs. 3 mg/day); efficacy failure (biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR), graft loss, death or lost to follow-up) occurred in 33.0, 38.9 and 37.2% of patients (p = 0.455 overall), respectively. Mortality and incidence of BPAR were comparable in all groups. Creatinine values were higher in everolimus groups, requiring a protocol amendment that recommended lower CsA exposure. Diarrhea, lymphocele, peripheral edema and hyperlipidemia were more common among everolimus-treated patients, whereas viral infections, particularly cytomegalovirus infection, increased in the MMF group. Overall safety and tolerability were better with MMF and everolimus 1.5 mg/day than with everolimus 3 mg/day. In conclusion, at 36 months, an immunosuppressive regimen containing everolimus 1.5 mg/day had equivalent patient, and graft survival and rejection rates compared with MMF in de novo renal transplant recipients, whereas everolimus 3 mg/day had inferior graft survival. Renal dysfunction in everolimus cohorts necessitates close monitoring. PMID:16162203

  12. mTOR Inhibitors in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Paolo; Moavero, Romina

    2012-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic multiple organ system disorder that is characterized by the development of tumor-like lesions (hamartomas) and neurodevelopmental disorders. Mutations in the TSC1 and TSC2 tumor suppressor genes occur in the majority of patients with TSC, resulting in hyperactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and subsequent abnormalities in numerous cell processes. As a result, mTOR inhibitors such as sirolimus and everolimus have the potential to provide targeted therapy for patients with TSC. Everolimus is the first mTOR inhibitor approved as a treatment option in the USA and in Europe for patients with subependymal giant-cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) associated with TSC. The clinical evidence to date supports the use of mTOR inhibitors in a variety of TSC-associated disease manifestations, including SEGAs, renal angiomyolipoma, skin manifestations, and epilepsy. Furthermore, ongoing clinical trials evaluating mTOR inhibitors in TSC are underway, and the results of these studies are expected to provide further evidence that will firmly establish their role in this setting. This article will discuss the role of the mTOR pathway in TSC and review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy, and tolerability of mTOR inhibitors, along with their current place in clinical practice. PMID:23730262

  13. Circulating biomarkers and outcome from a randomised phase II trial of sunitinib vs everolimus for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Martin H; Chen, David; Marker, Mahtab; Hakimi, A Ari; Lee, Chung-Han; Hsieh, James J; Knox, Jennifer J; Voi, Maurizio; Motzer, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Background: RECORD-3 assessed non-inferiority of progression-free survival (PFS) with everolimus vs sunitinib in previously untreated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Baseline plasma sample collection and randomised design enabled correlation of circulating biomarkers with efficacy. Methods: Samples were analysed for 121 cancer-related biomarkers. Analyses of biomarkers categorised patients as high or low (vs median) to assess association with first-line PFS (PFS1L) for each treatment arm. A composite biomarker score (CBS) incorporated biomarkers potentially predictive of PFS1L with everolimus. Results: Plasma samples from 442 of the 471 randomised patients were analysed. Biomarkers were associated with PFS1L for everolimus alone (29), sunitinib alone (9) or both (12). Everolimus-specific biomarkers (CSF1, ICAM1, IL-18BP, KIM1, TNFRII) with hazard ratio ⩾1.8 were integrated into a CBS (range 0–5). For CBS low (0–3, n=291) vs high (4–5, n=151), PFS1L differed significantly for everolimus but not for sunitinib. There was no significant difference in PFS1L between everolimus and sunitinib in the high CBS patient cohort. Conclusions: Baseline levels of multiple soluble biomarkers correlated with benefit from everolimus and/or sunitinib, independent of clinical risk factors. A similar PFS1L was observed for both treatments among patients with high CBS score. PMID:26908330

  14. Use of mTOR inhibitors in the treatment of breast cancer: an evaluation of factors that influence patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jerusalem, Guy; Rorive, Andree; Collignon, Joelle

    2014-01-01

    Many systemic treatment options are available for advanced breast cancer, including endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) therapy, and other targeted agents. Recently, everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, combined with exemestane, an aromatase inhibitor, has been approved in Europe and the USA for patients suffering from estrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer previously treated by a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor, based on the results of BOLERO-2 (Breast cancer trials of OraL EveROlimus). This study showed a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in median progression-free survival. Results concerning the impact on overall survival are expected in the near future. This clinically oriented review focuses on the use of mTOR inhibitors in breast cancer. Results reported with first-generation mTOR inhibitors (ridaforolimus, temsirolimus, everolimus) are discussed. The current and potential role of mTOR inhibitors is reported according to breast cancer subtype (estrogen receptor-positive HER2-negative, triple-negative, and HER2-positive ER-positive/negative disease). Everolimus is currently being evaluated in the adjuvant setting in high-risk estrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative early breast cancer. Continuing mTOR inhibition or alternatively administering other drugs targeting the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B-mTOR pathway after progression on treatments including an mTOR inhibitor is under evaluation. Potential biomarkers to select patients showing a more pronounced benefit are reviewed, but we are not currently using these biomarkers in routine practice. Subgroup analysis of BOLERO 2 has shown that the benefit is consistent in all subgroups and that it is impossible to select patients not benefiting from addition of everolimus to exemestane. Side effects and impact on quality of life are other important issues discussed

  15. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and combined chemotherapy in breast cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Longwei; Liang, Yuting; Mira, Ranim R; Lu, Yaojuan; Gu, Junxia; Zheng, Qiping

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, in combination with other chemotherapeutic drugs, has been used for treatment of breast cancer that develops resistance to endocrine therapy. However, the efficacy and safety need further evaluation. Here, we report a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT) in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy using steroid (exemestane) or nonsteroid (letrozole) aromatase inhibitors with or without mTOR inhibitors (everolimus). The overall response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), clinical benefi;t rate with 95% confidence interval (CI), and the major toxicities/adverse effects were analyzed. Data were extracted from twelve studies that meet the selection criteria. Among these, six studies that enrolled 3693 women received treatment of everolimus plus exemestane, or placebo with exemestane. The results showed that everolimus plus exemestane significantly increased the ORR relative risk (relative risk = 9.18, 95% CI = 5.21-16.15), PFS hazard ratio (hazard ratio = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.41-0.48), and clinical benefi;t rate (relative risk = 1.92, 95% CI 1.69-2.17) compared to placebo control, while the risks of stomatitis, rash, hyperglycemia, diarrhea, fatigue, anorexia and pneumonitis also increased. Three studies that enrolled 715 women who received everolimus as neoadjuvant therapy were analyzed. Compared to chemotherapy with placebo, chemotherapy plus everolimus did not increase the ORR relative risk (relative risk = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.77-1.05). Meanwhile, two other studies that enrolled 2104 women examined the efficacy of temsirolimus (or placebo control) plus letrozole. The results indicated that emsirolimus plus letrozole did not increase the ORR relative risk and clinical benefi;t rate (p > 0.05). Together, these data suggest that the combined mTOR inhibitor (everolimus) plus endocrine therapy (exemestane) is superior to endocrine therapy alone. As a neoadjuvant, everolimus did not increase the

  16. Development and Validation of Stability-indicating High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Method for the Estimation of Everolimus in Tablets.

    PubMed

    Sharmila, D; Rao, A Lakshmana; Kalyani, L

    2015-01-01

    The present study depicts the development of a validated reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of the everolimus in presence of degradation products or pharmaceutical excipients. Stress study was performed on everolimus and it was found that it degrade sufficiently in oxidizing and acidic conditions but less degradation was found in alkaline, neutral, thermal and photolytic conditions. The separation was carried out on Hypersil BDS C18 column (100×4.6 mm, 5 μ) column having particle size 5 μ using acetate buffer:acetonitrile (50:50 v/v) with pH 6.5 adjusted with orthophosphoric acid as mobile phase at flow rate of 1 ml/min. The wavelength of the detection was 280 nm. A retention time (Rt) nearly 3.110 min was observed. The calibration curve for everolimus was linear (r(2)=0.999) from range of 25-150 μg/ml with limit of detection and limit of quantification of 0.036 μg/ml and 0.109 μg/ml, respectively. Analytical validation parameters such as selectivity, specificity, linearity, accuracy and precision were evaluated and relative standard deviation value for all the key parameters were less than 2.0%. The recovery of the drug after standard addition was found to be 100.55%. Thus, the developed RP-HPLC method was found to be suitable for the determination of everolimus in tablets containing various excipients. PMID:26798176

  17. Development and Validation of Stability-indicating High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Method for the Estimation of Everolimus in Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Sharmila, D.; Rao, A. Lakshmana; Kalyani, L.

    2015-01-01

    The present study depicts the development of a validated reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of the everolimus in presence of degradation products or pharmaceutical excipients. Stress study was performed on everolimus and it was found that it degrade sufficiently in oxidizing and acidic conditions but less degradation was found in alkaline, neutral, thermal and photolytic conditions. The separation was carried out on Hypersil BDS C18 column (100×4.6 mm, 5 μ) column having particle size 5 μ using acetate buffer:acetonitrile (50:50 v/v) with pH 6.5 adjusted with orthophosphoric acid as mobile phase at flow rate of 1 ml/min. The wavelength of the detection was 280 nm. A retention time (Rt) nearly 3.110 min was observed. The calibration curve for everolimus was linear (r2=0.999) from range of 25-150 μg/ml with limit of detection and limit of quantification of 0.036 μg/ml and 0.109 μg/ml, respectively. Analytical validation parameters such as selectivity, specificity, linearity, accuracy and precision were evaluated and relative standard deviation value for all the key parameters were less than 2.0%. The recovery of the drug after standard addition was found to be 100.55%. Thus, the developed RP-HPLC method was found to be suitable for the determination of everolimus in tablets containing various excipients. PMID:26798176

  18. A phase I/II trial of BNC105P with everolimus in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC)

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta; Azad, Arun; Bhatia, Shailender; Drabkin, Harry; Costello, Brian; Sarantopoulos, John; Kanesvaran, Ravindran; Lauer, Richard; Starodub, Alexander; Hauke, Ralph; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Hahn, Noah M.; Sonpavde, Guru; Richey, Stephen; Breen, Timothy; Kremmidiotis, Gabriel; Leske, Annabell; Doolin, Elizabeth; Bibby, David C.; Simpson, Jeremy; Iglesias, Jose; Hutson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose BNC105P inhibits tubulin polymerization, and preclinical studies suggest possible synergy with everolimus. In this phase I/II study, efficacy and safety of the combination were explored in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Experimental Design A phase I study in patients with clear cell mRCC and any prior number of therapies was conducted using a classical 3+3 design to evaluate standard doses of everolimus with increasing doses of BNC105P. At the recommended phase II dose (RP2D), patients with clear cell mRCC and 1-2 prior therapies (including ≥1 VEGF-TKI) were randomized to BNC105P with everolimus (Arm A) or everolimus alone (Arm B). The primary endpoint of the study was 6-month progression-free survival (6MPFS). Secondary endpoints included response rate, PFS, overall survival (OS) and exploratory biomarker analyses. Results In the phase I study (n=15), a dose of BNC105P at 16 mg/m2 with everolimus at 10 mg daily was identified as the RP2D. In the phase II study, 139 patients were randomized, with 69 and 67 evaluable patients in Arms A and B, respectively. 6MPFS was similar in the treatment arms (Arm A: 33.82% v Arm B: 30.30%, P=0.66) and no difference in median PFS was observed (Arm A: 4.7 mos v Arm B: 4.1 mos; P=0.49). Changes in matrix metalloproteinase-9, stem cell factor, sex hormone binding globulin and serum amyloid A protein were associated with clinical outcome with BNC105P. Conclusions Although the primary endpoint was not met in an unselected population, correlative studies suggest several biomarkers that warrant further prospective evaluation. PMID:25788492

  19. Hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopic imaging can be used to monitor Everolimus treatment in vivo in an orthotopic rodent model of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Ozawa, Tomoko; Park, IlWoo; Scott, Kristen; James, C. David; Nelson, Sarah J.; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary malignant brain tumor in humans. Because the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway is activated in more than 88% of GBM, new drugs which target this pathway, such as the mTOR inhibitor Everolimus, are currently in clinical trials. Early tumor response to molecularly targeted treatments remains challenging to assess non-invasively, because it is often associated with tumor stasis or slower tumor growth. Innovative neuroimaging methods are therefore critically needed to provide metabolic or functional information that is indicative of targeted therapeutic action at early time points during the course of treatment. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can be used on a clinical MR system to monitor early metabolic response of orthotopic GBM tumors to Everolimus treatment through measurement of the HP lactate-to-pyruvate ratios. The study was performed on a highly invasive non-enhancing orthotopic GBM tumor model in rats (GS-2 tumors), which replicates many fundamental features of human GBM tumors. Seven days after initiation of treatment there was a significant drop in the HP lactate-to-pyruvate ratio from the tumor tissue in treated animals relative to day 0 (67%±27% decrease). In the control group, no significant changes in the HP lactate-to-pyruvate ratios were observed. Importantly, at the 7 day time point, conventional MR imaging (MRI) was unable to detect a significant difference in tumor size between control and treated groups. Inhibition of tumor growth by conventional MRI was observed from day 15 of treatment. This implies that the decrease in the HP lactate-to-pyruvate ratio could be detected before any treatment-induced inhibition of tumor growth. Using immunohistochemical staining to further examine tumor response to treatment, we found that the decrease in the HP lactate-to-pyruvate ratio was

  20. Oral Everolimus for Treatment of a Giant Left Ventricular Rhabdomyoma in a Neonate-Rapid Tumor Regression Documented by Real Time 3D Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Riede, Frank Thomas; Seki, Hiroshi; Hornemann, Frauke; Syrbe, Steffen; Daehnert, Ingo; Weidenbach, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The presented case reports on successful treatment with everolimus in a neonate with left ventricular giant rhabdomyoma. The authors used a different dosage regime compared to literature and documented rapid tumor regression by 3D echocardiography. PMID:26199144

  1. Everolimus for the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma probably causing seizure aggravation in a child with tuberous sclerosis complex: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wiemer-Kruel, Adelheid; Woerle, H; Strobl, K; Bast, T

    2014-04-01

    We are reporting on a 13.5-year-old girl with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) who was treated with everolimus because of giant cell astrocytoma and bilateral angiomyolipoma. She suffered from pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy with clusters of tonic and tonic-clonic seizures. Treatment with carbamazepine and sulthiame had led to a stable situation for more than 2.5 years. The dosage of everolimus had to be increased and refractory status epilepticus followed after 12 days. In the absence of any other possible cause, we believe that the status epilepticus was provoked by everolimus. So far, only a few cases of possible seizure aggravation by everolimus have been reported. The clinical relevance of possible negative effects in epileptic patients remains unclear. Similar observations should be documented and reported. PMID:24293099

  2. Everolimus-eluting stent platforms in percutaneous coronary intervention: comparative effectiveness and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Panoulas, Vasileios F; Mastoris, Ioannis; Konstantinou, Klio; Tespili, Maurizio; Ielasi, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Despite the remarkable benefits obtained following the introduction of the first-generation drug-eluting stent (DES), concerns were raised over its long-term safety, particularly with regard to very late (beyond 1 year) stent thrombosis. Newer-generation DESs have been developed to overcome this limitation using novel stent platforms, new drugs, more biocompatible durable polymers, and bioabsorbable polymers or backbones. To date, new-generation DESs have virtually replaced the use of first-generation DESs worldwide. In this review article, we discuss in detail the design, pharmacology, and mechanism of action of the newer-generation permanent and bioresorbable everolimus-eluting platforms. Furthermore, we present and evaluate the current evidence on the performance and safety of these devices compared to those of other available stent platforms. PMID:26244031

  3. Everolimus-eluting stent platforms in percutaneous coronary intervention: comparative effectiveness and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Panoulas, Vasileios F; Mastoris, Ioannis; Konstantinou, Klio; Tespili, Maurizio; Ielasi, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Despite the remarkable benefits obtained following the introduction of the first-generation drug-eluting stent (DES), concerns were raised over its long-term safety, particularly with regard to very late (beyond 1 year) stent thrombosis. Newer-generation DESs have been developed to overcome this limitation using novel stent platforms, new drugs, more biocompatible durable polymers, and bioabsorbable polymers or backbones. To date, new-generation DESs have virtually replaced the use of first-generation DESs worldwide. In this review article, we discuss in detail the design, pharmacology, and mechanism of action of the newer-generation permanent and bioresorbable everolimus-eluting platforms. Furthermore, we present and evaluate the current evidence on the performance and safety of these devices compared to those of other available stent platforms. PMID:26244031

  4. Multiple Stent Fractures After Everolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation Causing Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun Young; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Tae-Seok; Kim, Chan Joon; Cho, Jung Sun; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stent fracture is an uncommon complication of drug-eluting stent implantation, but it has a clinical significance because of its potential association with adverse cardiac events such as in-stent restenosis, target lesion revascularization, and stent thrombosis. Multiple stent fractures account for a small proportion, but they may lead to more serious complications. Newer generation drug-eluting stents are designed for improved safety and efficacy compared with early generation drug-eluting stents. Multiple stent fractures after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation are a rare case. We report a case of 25-year-old male who presented with acute myocardial infarction caused by multiple stent fractures after everolimus-eluting stents implantation and was treated by balloon angioplasty. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of multiple stent fractures even after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation. PMID:26871806

  5. Second generation drug-eluting stents: a review of the everolimus-eluting platform.

    PubMed

    Whitbeck, Matthew G; Applegate, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Everolimus-eluting stents (EES) represent the next generation of drug-eluting stents (DES). Important design modifications include thin strut stent backbones, less inflammatory and more biocompatible polymers, and lower drug dosing. The cobalt chromium EES fluoropolymer XIENCE V stent has been the most extensively studied of such stents. In animal models, this stent demonstrated minimal vessel inflammation, a biologically active endothelium with strut coverage similar to a bare metal stent, and inhibition of intimal hyperplasia comparable to that seen with sirolimus-eluting stents. The SPIRIT family of clinical trials demonstrated low rates of late loss, and clinical restenosis, as well as low rates of very late stent thrombosis. These excellent clinical outcomes addressed limitations of the 1st generation DES, and substantiated widespread clinical use of the EES platform. PMID:23926441

  6. Novel agents and associated toxicities of inhibitors of the pi3k/Akt/mtor pathway for the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chia, S.; Gandhi, S.; Joy, A.A.; Edwards, S.; Gorr, M.; Hopkins, S.; Kondejewski, J.; Ayoub, J.P.; Califaretti, N.; Rayson, D.; Dent, S.F.

    2015-01-01

    The pi3k/Akt/mtor (phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/ Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling pathway is an established driver of oncogenic activity in human malignancies. Therapeutic targeting of this pathway holds significant promise as a treatment strategy. Everolimus, an mtor inhibitor, is the first of this class of agents approved for the treatment of hormone receptor–positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative advanced breast cancer. Everolimus has been associated with significant improvements in progression-free survival; however, it is also associated with increased toxicity related to its specific mechanism of action. Methods A comprehensive review of the literature conducted using a focused medline search was combined with a search of current trials at http://ClinicalTrials.gov/. Summary tables of the toxicities of the various classes of pi3k/Akt/mtor inhibitors were created. A broad group of Canadian health care professionals was assembled to review the data and to produce expert opinion and summary recommendations for possible best practices in managing the adverse events associated with these pathway inhibitors. Results Differing toxicities are associated with the various classes of pi3k/Akt/mtor pathway inhibitors. The most common unique adverse events observed in everolimus clinical trials in breast cancer include stomatitis (all grades: approximately 60%), noninfectious pneumonitis (15%), rash (40%), hyperglycemia (15%), and immunosuppression (40%). To minimize grades 3 and 4 toxicities and to attempt to attain optimal outcomes, effective management of those adverse events is critical. Management should be interdisciplinary and should use approaches that include education, early recognition, active intervention, and potentially prophylactic strategies. Discussion Everolimus likely represents the first of many complex oral targeted therapies for the treatment of breast cancer. Using this agent as a template, it is essential to

  7. The Role of mTOR Inhibitors in the Treatment of Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Evidence-based and Expert Opinions.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Paolo; Bjørnvold, Marit; Dill, Patricia E; Ferreira, José Carlos; Feucht, Martha; Hertzberg, Christoph; Jansen, Anna; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Kingswood, J Christopher; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Macaya, Alfons; Moavero, Romina; Nabbout, Rima; Zonnenberg, Bernard A

    2016-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disorder arising from mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. The resulting over-activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway leaves patients with TSC susceptible to the growth of non-malignant tumours in multiple organs. Previously, surgery was the main therapeutic option for TSC. However, pharmacological therapy with mTOR inhibitors such as everolimus and sirolimus is now emerging as an alternate approach. Everolimus and sirolimus have already been shown to be effective in treating subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) and renal angiomyolipoma (AML), and everolimus is currently being evaluated in treating TSC-related epilepsy. In November 2013 a group of European experts convened to discuss the current options and practical considerations for treating various manifestations of TSC. This article provides evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of SEGA, TSC-related epilepsy and renal AML, with a focus on where mTOR inhibitor therapy may be considered alongside other treatment options. Safety considerations regarding mTOR inhibitor therapy are also reviewed. With evidence of beneficial effects in neurological and non-neurological TSC manifestations, mTOR inhibitors may represent a systemic treatment for TSC. PMID:26927950

  8. Differential Antitumoral Properties and Renal-Associated Tissue Damage Induced by Tacrolimus and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors in Hepatocarcinoma: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sheila; Wang, Jize; Aliseda, Sara; Rodríguez-Hernández, María A.; González, Raúl; Marín-Gómez, Luís M.; Gómez-Bravo, Miguel A.; Padillo, Francisco J.; Álamo-Martínez, José M.; Muntané, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the recommended treatment for patients at early stages of hepatocarcinoma (HCC) with potential portal hypertension and/or bilirubinemia, but without vascular-associated diseases. The patients are receiving immunosuppressive therapy to reduce graft rejection, but differential side effects have been related to calcineurin and mTOR inhibitor administration regarding tumor recurrence and nephrotoxicity. The in vitro studies showed that Tacrolimus exerted a more potent pro-apoptotic effect than Everolimus (Huh 7>Hep 3B>HepG2), being sirolimus only active in Hep3B cell line. Tacrolimus and Everolimus exerted potent antiproliferative properties in Huh 7 and Hep3B in which cells Sirolimus was inactive. Interestingly, Tacrolimus- and Everolimus-dependent G0/G1 cell accumulation occurred as a consequence of drastic reduction in S, as well as in S and G2+M phases, respectively. The in vivo studies support data on the more effective antitumoral properties of Everolimus, eventual risk of pro-angiogenic tumoral properties and nephrotoxicity of Tacrolimus, and pro-proliferative properties of Sirolimus in tumors developed in nude mice. PMID:27518575

  9. A Phase 1 Study of Everolimus + Weekly Cisplatin + Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fury, Matthew G.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Sherman, Eric; Ho, Alan L.; Rao, Shyam; Heguy, Adriana; Shen, Ronglai; Korte, Susan; Lisa, Donna; Ganly, Ian; Patel, Snehal; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Haque, Sofia; Katabi, Nora; Pfister, David G.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Elevated expression of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in histologically cancer-free margins of resected head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and has been associated with increased risk of disease recurrence. Preclinically, inhibition of mTORC1 with everolimus sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin and radiation. Methods and Materials: This was single-institution phase 1 study to establish the maximum tolerated dose of daily everolimus given with fixed dose cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2} weekly × 6) and concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with locally and/or regionally advanced head-and-neck cancer. The study had a standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. Results: Tumor primary sites were oral cavity (4), salivary gland (4), oropharynx (2), nasopharynx (1), scalp (1), and neck node with occult primary (1). In 4 of 4 cases in which resected HNSCC surgical pathology specimens were available for immunohistochemistry, elevated expression of eIF4E was observed in the cancer-free margins. The most common grade ≥3 treatment-related adverse event was lymphopenia (92%), and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were mucositis (n=2) and failure to thrive (n=1). With a median follow up of 19.4 months, 2 patients have experienced recurrent disease. The maximum tolerated dose was everolimus 5 mg/day. Conclusions: Head-and-neck cancer patients tolerated everolimus at therapeutic doses (5 mg/day) given with weekly cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The regimen merits further evaluation, especially among patients who are status post resection of HNSCCs that harbor mTORC1-mediated activation of eIF4E in histologically negative surgical margins.

  10. Reduced BCL2 and CCND1 mRNA expression in human cervical cancer HeLa cells treated with a combination of everolimus and paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Ebru; Onen, H. Ilke; Menevse, Sevda

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Everolimus displays direct effects on growth and proliferation of cancer cells via inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein, which is known to be associated with drug resistance. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of everolimus, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel in terms of cell viability and mRNA expression levels of GRP78, CCND1, CASP2, and BCL2 genes. Material and methods HeLa cells were treated with different doses of everolimus, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel. Cell viability was assessed using MTT assay, and obtained dose response curves were used for the calculations of inhibitory concentration (IC) values. At the end of the treatment times with selected doses, RNA isolation and cDNA synthesis were performed. Finally, GRP78, CCND1, CASP2, and BCL2 genes mRNA expression levels were analysed using quantitative PCR. Results The IC50 value of everolimus was 0.9 µM for 24-hour treatment. Moreover, the IC50 value of gemcitabine and paclitaxel was found to be around 18.1 µM and 7.08 µM, respectively. Everolimus, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel treatments alone did not change the GRP78, CCND1, BCL2 and CASP2 mRNA expression levels significantly. However, combined treatment of everolimus and paclitaxel significantly reduced BCL2 and CCND1 mRNA expression (p < 0.05). In contrast, this combination did not change GRP78 and CASP2 mRNA expression levels (p > 0.05). Conclusions Down-regulation of CCND1 and BCL2 expression may be an important mechanism by which everolimus increases the therapeutic window of paclitaxel in cervical cancers. PMID:27095936

  11. Effects of BP-14, a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Allegri, Lorenzo; Baldan, Federica; Mio, Catia; Puppin, Cinzia; Russo, Diego; Kryštof, Vladimir; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is an extremely aggressive human malignancy characterized by a marked degree of invasiveness, absense of features of thyroid differentiation and resistance to current medical treatment. It is well known that ATCs are characterized by deregulation of genes related to cell cycle regulation, i.e., cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and endogenous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs). Therefore, in the present study, the effect of a novel exogenous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, BP-14, was investigated in three human ATC cell lines. The ATC-derived cell lines FRO, SW1736 and 8505C were treated with BP-14 alone or in combination with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. In all ATC cell lines, treatment with BP-14 decreased cell viability and, in two of them, BP-14 modified expression of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Thus, our data indicate that BP-14 is a potential new compound effective against ATC. Combined treatment with BP-14 and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus had a strong synergistic effect on cell viability in all three cell lines, suggesting that the combined used of CDK and mTOR inhibitors may be a useful strategy for ATC treatment. PMID:26884249

  12. Comparison of everolimus-eluting and biolimus-eluting coronary stents with everolimus-eluting bioresorbable scaffold: study protocol of the randomized controlled EVERBIO II trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Second-generation everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and third generation biolimus-eluting stents (BES) have been shown to be superior to first-generation paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) and second-generation sirolimus-eluting stents (SES). However, neointimal proliferation and very late stent thrombosis is still an unresolved issue of drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation overall. The Absorb™ (Abbott Vascular, Abbott Park, IL, USA) is the first CE approved DES with a bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) thought to reduce long-term complication rates. The EVERBIO II trial was set up to compare the BVS safety and efficacy with both EES and BES in all patients viable for inclusion. Methods/Design The EVERBIO II trial is a single-center, assessor-blinded, randomized trial. The study population consists of all patients aged ≥18 years old undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Exclusion criterion is where the lesion cannot be treated with BVS (reference vessel diameter >4.0 mm). A total of 240 patients will be enrolled and randomly assigned into 3 groups of 80 with either BVS, EES or BES implantation. All patients will undergo a follow-up angiography study at 9 months. Clinical follow-up for up to 5 years will be conducted by telephone. The primary endpoint is in-segment late lumen loss at 9 months measured by quantitative coronary angiography. Secondary endpoints are patient-oriented major adverse cardiac event (MACE) (death, myocardial infarction and target-vessel revascularization), device-oriented MACE (cardiac death, myocardial infarction and target-lesion revascularization), stent thrombosis according to ARC and binary restenosis at follow-up 12 months angiography. Discussion EVERBIO II is an independent, randomized study, aiming to compare the clinical efficacy, angiographic outcomes and safety of BVS, EES and BES in all comer patients. Trial registration The trial listed in clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01711931. PMID:24398143

  13. The pros and the cons of mTOR inhibitors in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ponticelli, Claudio

    2014-02-01

    Sirolimus and its derivate everolimus are two immunosuppressive drugs with similar chemical structure that inhibit the proliferation of T cells by interfering with a serine-threonine kinase, called mTOR. Apart from their immunosuppressive effects, these agents may also inhibit endothelial intimal proliferation, the replication of cytomegalovirus, and the development of certain cancers. The main dose-dependent adverse events of mTOR inhibitors are hyperlipidemia, thrombocytopenia, mucositis, edema, and proteinuria. The use of mTOR inhibitors in renal transplantation may allow to reduce the doses of calcineurin inhibitors. Withdrawal of calcineurin inhibitors is also possible and may improve renal function, but some patients do not tolerate this regimen because of side effects. Further studies are needed to assess the role of mTOR inhibitors in the long-term. PMID:24377908

  14. Incidence and time course of everolimus-related adverse events in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer: insights from BOLERO-2

    PubMed Central

    Rugo, H. S.; Pritchard, K. I.; Gnant, M.; Noguchi, S.; Piccart, M.; Hortobagyi, G.; Baselga, J.; Perez, A.; Geberth, M.; Csoszi, T.; Chouinard, E.; Srimuninnimit, V.; Puttawibul, P.; Eakle, J.; Feng, W.; Bauly, H.; El-Hashimy, M.; Taran, T.; Burris, H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In the BOLERO-2 trial, everolimus (EVE), an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin, demonstrated significant clinical benefit with an acceptable safety profile when administered with exemestane (EXE) in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer. We report on the incidence, time course, severity, and resolution of treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) as well as incidence of dose modifications during the extended follow-up of this study. Patients and methods Patients were randomized (2:1) to receive EVE 10 mg/day or placebo (PBO), with open-label EXE 25 mg/day (n = 724). The primary end point was progression-free survival. Secondary end points included overall survival, objective response rate, and safety. Safety evaluations included recording of AEs, laboratory values, dose interruptions/adjustments, and study drug discontinuations. Results The safety population comprised 720 patients (EVE + EXE, 482; PBO + EXE, 238). The median follow-up was 18 months. Class-effect toxicities, including stomatitis, pneumonitis, and hyperglycemia, were generally of mild or moderate severity and occurred relatively early after treatment initiation (except pneumonitis); incidence tapered off thereafter. EVE dose reduction and interruption (360 and 705 events, respectively) required for AE management were independent of patient age. The median duration of dose interruption was 7 days. Discontinuation of both study drugs because of AEs was higher with EVE + EXE (9%) versus PBO + EXE (3%). Conclusions Most EVE-associated AEs occur soon after initiation of therapy, are typically of mild or moderate severity, and are generally manageable with dose reduction and interruption. Discontinuation due to toxicity was uncommon. Understanding the time course of class-effect AEs will help inform preventive and monitoring strategies as well as patient education. Trial registration number NCT00863655. PMID:24615500

  15. The everolimus-eluting Xience stent in small vessel disease: bench, clinical, and pathology view

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Oscar D; Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Koppara, Tobias; Virmani, Renu; Joner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pathogenesis of CAD relates to the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries, which are most frequently treated today by percutaneous coronary intervention. Small vessel disease treatment represents one-third of all percutaneous coronary interventions with higher rates of restenosis and major adverse cardiac events. Initially, drug-eluting stents (DES) were developed to reduce in-stent restenosis, improving clinical outcomes and reducing the need for target vessel revascularization. However, late and very late stent thrombosis emerged as a new problem compromising DES’s long-term results. The cobalt–chromium everolimus-eluting stent (CoCr-EES) represents the results of an evolutionary process in DES technology aimed at improving the shortcomings of first-generation DES. Small vessel CAD has historically been an obstacle to long-term patency following implantation of DES. Antirestenotic efficacy has been shown to be of high relevance in small vessels. Therefore, stent selection may play an important role in determining outcomes in this subgroup of patients. This article will review the performance of CoCr-EES in the treatment of small vessel CAD from preclinical, clinical, and pathology perspectives, and it will highlight the most important findings in this regard. PMID:25565907

  16. Usefulness of Everolimus-Eluting Coronary Stent Implantation in Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Yuji; Kyono, Hiroyuki; Isshiki, Takaaki; Ishizuka, Shuichi; Nasu, Kenya; Sano, Koichi; Okada, Hisayuki; Sugano, Teruyasu; Uehara, Yoshiki

    2015-09-15

    The outcomes of second-generation drug-eluting stent (DES) are unknown in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) although HD has been reported as a strong predictor of adverse outcome after the first-generation DES implantation. The OUCH-PRO Study is a prospective multicenter single-arm registry design to study clinical and angiographic outcomes after everolimus-eluting stent (EES). Patients who underwent maintenance HD were prospectively enrolled at the time of elective coronary intervention using EES. Quantitative coronary angiography was performed in an independent core laboratory. The primary end point was the occurrence of target vessel failure (TVF) defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), and target vessel revascularization at 1 year. A total of 123 patients were enrolled and 161 EES were implanted. The TVF rate at 1 year was 18% (4% cardiac death, 0% MI, 17% target vessel revascularization). No stent thrombosis was documented. Other clinical events at 1 year were 3% noncardiac death, 3% stroke, and 9% non-target-vessel revascularization. Late lumen loss in stent was 0.37 ± 0.63 mm at 8 months. In conclusion, EES had a high TVF rate and great late lumen loss in patients on HD compared with previous huge EES data in non-HD patients. PMID:26219496

  17. A novel platinum chromium everolimus-eluting stent for the treatment of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Johan; Dubois, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The development of coronary stents represents a major step forward in the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention. The initial enthusiasm for bare metal stents was, however, tempered by a significant incidence of in-stent restenosis, the manifestation of excessive neointima hyperplasia within the stented vessel segment, ultimately leading to target vessel revascularization. Later, drug-eluting stents, with controlled local release of antiproliferative agents, consistently reduced this need for repeat revascularization. In turn, the long-term safety of first-generation drug-eluting stents was brought into question with the observation of an increased incidence of late stent thrombosis, often presenting as myocardial infarction or sudden death. Since then, new drugs, polymers, and platforms for drug elution have been developed to improve stent safety and preserve efficacy. Development of a novel platinum chromium alloy with high radial strength and high radiopacity has enabled the design of a new, thin-strut, flexible, and highly trackable stent platform, while simultaneously improving stent visibility. Significant advances in polymer coating, serving as a drug carrier on the stent surface, and in antiproliferative agent technology have further improved the safety and clinical performance of newer-generation drug-eluting stents. This review will provide an overview of the novel platinum chromium everolimus-eluting stents that are currently available. The clinical data from major clinical trials with these devices will be summarized and put into perspective. PMID:23818756

  18. Management of side effects of mTOR inhibitors in tuberous sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, Krzysztof; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz

    2016-06-01

    mTOR inhibitors represent a relatively new therapeutic option in the management of patients affected by tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Randomized clinical trials support the use of everolimus in the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGA) and renal angiomyolipomas (AML) related to TSC. Accumulating data suggest also systemic disease-modifying potential of mTOR inhibitors. Given that increasing number of patients with TSC receive mTOR inhibitors, the issue of adverse events associated with this therapy becomes practically important. In the present study we provide the overview of clinical manifestations and therapeutic options for the most common adverse events related to mTOR inhibitors in TSC patients. PMID:26891243

  19. Intensified antineoplastic effect by combining an HDAC-inhibitor, an mTOR-inhibitor and low dosed interferon alpha in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tsaur, Igor; Hudak, Lukasz; Makarević, Jasmina; Juengel, Eva; Mani, Jens; Borgmann, Hendrik; Gust, Kilian M; Schilling, David; Bartsch, Georg; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2015-08-01

    A significant proportion of men diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) eventually develop metastatic disease, which progresses to castration resistance, despite initial response to androgen deprivation. As anticancer therapy has become increasingly effective, acquired drug resistance has emerged, limiting efficacy. Combination treatment, utilizing different drug classes, exemplifies a possible strategy to foil resistance development. The effects of the triple application of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA), the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus and low dosed interferon alpha (IFNα) on PCa cell growth and dissemination capacity were investigated. For that purpose, the human PCa cell lines, PC-3, DU-145 and LNCaP were treated with the combined regimen or separate single agents. Cell growth was investigated by the MTT dye reduction assay. Flow cytometry served to analyse cell cycle progression. Adhesion to vascular endothelium or immobilized collagen, fibronectin and laminin was quantified. Migration and invasion characteristics were determined by the modified Boyden chamber assay. Integrin α and β subtypes were investigated by flow cytometry, western blotting and RT-PCR. Integrin related signalling, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFr), Akt, p70S6kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 activation were also assessed. The triple application of VPA, everolimus and low dosed IFNα blocked tumour cell growth and dissemination significantly better than any agent alone. Antitumour effects were associated with pronounced alteration in the cell cycle machinery, intracellular signalling and integrin expression profile. Combining VPA, everolimus and low dosed IFNα might be a promising option to counteract resistance development and improve outcome in PCa patients. PMID:25808196

  20. Response to everolimus is seen in TSC-associated SEGAs and angiomyolipomas independent of mutation type and site in TSC1 and TSC2

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, David J; Palmer, Michael R; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Bissler, John; Franz, David; Segal, Scott; Chen, David; Sampson, Julian R

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant disorder that occurs owing to inactivating mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2. Tuberous sclerosis complex-related tumors in the brain, such as subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, and in the kidney, such as angiomyolipoma, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Recently, randomized clinical trials (EXIST-1 and EXIST-2) of everolimus for each of these tuberous sclerosis complex-associated tumors demonstrated the benefit of this drug, which blocks activated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1. Here we report on the spectrum of mutations seen in patients treated during these trials and the association between mutation and response. TSC2 mutations were predominant among patients in both trials and were present in nearly all subjects with angiomyolipoma in whom a mutation was identified (97%), whereas TSC1 mutations were rare in those subjects (3%). The spectrum of mutations seen in each gene was similar to those previously reported. In both trials, there was no apparent association between mutation type or location within each gene and response to everolimus. Everolimus responses were also seen at a similar frequency for the 16–18% of patients in each trial in whom no mutation in either gene was identified. These observations confirm the strong association between TSC2 mutation and angiomyolipoma burden seen in previous studies, and they indicate that everolimus response occurs regardless of mutation type or location or when no mutation in TSC1 or TSC2 has been identified. PMID:25782670

  1. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Barasertib and Everolimus by ROS-independent Mechanism(s).

    PubMed

    Zhelev, Zhivko; Ivanova, Donika; Aoki, Ichio; Saga, Tsuneo; Bakalova, Rumiana

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate: (i) the possibility of sensitizing cancer cells to anticancer drugs using the redox modulator 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DDG); (ii) to find such combinations with synergistic cytotoxic effect; (iii) and to clarify the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for induction of apoptosis and cytotoxicity through these combinations. The study covers 15 anticancer drugs--both conventional and new-generation. Four parameters were analyzed simultaneously in Jurkat leukemia cells, treated by drugs or 2-DDG (separately or in combination): cell viability, induction of apoptosis, levels of ROS, and level of protein-carbonyl products. Very well-expressed synergistic cytotoxic effects were found after 48-h treatment of Jurkat cells with 2-DDG in combination with: palbociclib, everolimus, lonafarnib, bortezomib, and barasertib. The synergistic cytotoxic effect of everolimus with 2-DDG was accompanied by very strong induction of apoptosis in cells, but a very strong reduction of ROS level. Changes in the levels of protein-carbonyl products were not detected. The synergistic cytotoxic effect of barasertib with 2-DDG was accompanied by very strong induction of apoptosis in cells, without any increase of ROS levels, but with an enhancement of protein-carbonyl products. PMID:26637878

  2. Use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors after failure of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma undergoing hemodialysis: A single-center experience with four cases.

    PubMed

    Omae, Kenji; Kondo, Tsunenori; Takagi, Toshio; Iizuka, Junpei; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    We retrospectively identified patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis treated with the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors as a second- and/or third-line targeted therapy after treatment failure with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Patient medical records were reviewed to evaluate the response to therapies and treatment-related toxicities. Four patients were identified. All patients had undergone nephrectomy, and one had received immunotherapy before targeted therapy. Two patients had clear cell histology, and the other two had papillary histology. All patients were classified into the intermediate risk group according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center risk model. All patients were treated with everolimus as a second- or third-line therapy, and two patients were treated with temsirolimus as a second- or third-line therapy after treatment failure with sorafenib or sunitinib. The median duration of everolimus therapy was 6.7 months, whereas that of temsirolimus was 9.5 months. All patients had stable disease as the best response during each period of therapy. There were no severe adverse events. The use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in patients who previously failed to respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors appears to be feasible in patients with end-stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis. PMID:26833674

  3. Biodegradable-Polymer Biolimus-Eluting Stents versus Durable-Polymer Everolimus-Eluting Stents at One-Year Follow-Up: A Registry-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Ehsan; Saroukhani, Sepideh; Majlessi, Fereshteh; Poorhosseini, Hamidreza; Lofti-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Jalali, Arash; Salarifar, Mojtaba; Nematipour, Ebrahim; Alidoosti, Mohammad; Aghajani, Hassan; Amirzadegan, Alireza; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim

    2016-04-01

    We compared outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention patients who received biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stents with those who received durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stents. At Tehran Heart Center, we performed a retrospective analysis of the data from January 2007 through December 2011 on 3,270 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with the biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stent or the durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stent. We excluded patients with histories of coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous coronary intervention, acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, or the implantation of 2 different stent types. Patients were monitored for 12 months. The primary endpoint was a major adverse cardiac event, defined as a composite of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and target-vessel and target-lesion revascularization. Durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stents were implanted in 2,648 (81%) and biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stents in 622 (19%) of the study population. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups (2.7% vs 2.7%; P=0.984) in the incidence of major adverse cardiac events. The cumulative adjusted probability of major adverse cardiac events in the biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stent group did not differ from that of such events in the durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stent group (hazard ratio=0.768; 95% confidence interval, 0.421-1.44; P=0.388). We conclude that in our patients the biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stent was as effective and safe, during the 12-month follow-up period, as was the durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stent. PMID:27127426

  4. Biodegradable-Polymer Biolimus-Eluting Stents versus Durable-Polymer Everolimus-Eluting Stents at One-Year Follow-Up: A Registry-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Ehsan; Saroukhani, Sepideh; Majlessi, Fereshteh; Poorhosseini, Hamidreza; Lofti-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Jalali, Arash; Salarifar, Mojtaba; Nematipour, Ebrahim; Alidoosti, Mohammad; Aghajani, Hassan; Amirzadegan, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    We compared outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention patients who received biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stents with those who received durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stents. At Tehran Heart Center, we performed a retrospective analysis of the data from January 2007 through December 2011 on 3,270 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with the biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stent or the durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stent. We excluded patients with histories of coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous coronary intervention, acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, or the implantation of 2 different stent types. Patients were monitored for 12 months. The primary endpoint was a major adverse cardiac event, defined as a composite of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and target-vessel and target-lesion revascularization. Durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stents were implanted in 2,648 (81%) and biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stents in 622 (19%) of the study population. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups (2.7% vs 2.7%; P=0.984) in the incidence of major adverse cardiac events. The cumulative adjusted probability of major adverse cardiac events in the biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stent group did not differ from that of such events in the durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stent group (hazard ratio=0.768; 95% confidence interval, 0.421–1.44; P=0.388). We conclude that in our patients the biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stent was as effective and safe, during the 12-month follow-up period, as was the durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stent. PMID:27127426

  5. Evaluation of oral care to prevent oral mucositis in estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer patients treated with everolimus (Oral Care-BC): randomized controlled phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Naoki; Ota, Yoshihide; Hayashi, Naoki; Naito, Mariko; Kashiwabara, Kosuke; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Yamashita, Toshinari; Mukai, Hirofumi; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    This is a randomized, multi-center, open-label, phase III study to evaluate the efficacy of professional oral care in preventing oral mucositis induced by everolimus in postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer. Patients will be randomized into professional oral care and control groups (1:1 ratio). All patients will receive everolimus with exemestane and will continue everolimus until disease progression. In the professional oral care group, patients will receive teeth surface cleaning, scaling and tongue cleaning before starting everolimus, and will continue to receive professional oral care weekly from oral surgeons throughout the 8 week treatment. In the control group, patients will brush their own teeth and gargle with 0.9% sodium chloride solution or water. The primary endpoint is the incidence of all grades of oral mucositis. Target accrual is 200 patients with a two-sided type I error rate of 5% and 80% power to detect 25% risk reduction. PMID:27365521

  6. A phase 2 trial of everolimus and pasireotide long-acting release in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shoushtari, Alexander N; Ong, Leonard T; Schoder, Heiko; Singh-Kandah, Shahnaz; Abbate, Kelly T; Postow, Michael A; Callahan, Margaret K; Wolchok, Jedd; Chapman, Paul B; Panageas, Katherine S; Schwartz, Gary K; Carvajal, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor would be efficacious in metastatic uveal melanoma. This was a phase 2 trial of everolimus 10 mg daily plus pasireotide long-acting release 60 mg every 28 days enrolling patients with progressive, metastatic uveal melanoma to treatment until progression by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors 1.1 (RECIST 1.1) or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was clinical benefit rate, defined as any objective response or RECIST 1.1 stable disease at 16 weeks. A subset of patients underwent baseline indium-111-octreotide scans. A total of 14 patients were enrolled, of which 13 were evaluable for the primary endpoint, before the study was terminated due to poor accrual. Three of 13 (26%) patients obtained clinical benefit. Seven of 13 (54%) had stable disease lasting for a median of 8 weeks (range: 8-16 weeks). Grade 3 adverse events deemed at least possibly related to study drugs were hyperglycemia (n=7), oral mucositis (n=2), diarrhea (n=1), hypophosphatemia (n=1), and anemia (n=1). Seven of 14 (50%) patients required at least one dose reduction due to toxicity. Seven of eight (88%) patients with baseline indium-111-octreotide scans had at least one avid lesion, with significant intrapatient heterogeneity. There was a trend toward an association between octreotide avidity and cytostatic response to therapy (P=0.078). The combination of everolimus and pasireotide has limited clinical benefit in this small metastatic uveal melanoma cohort. Dose reductions for side effects were common. Further investigation into the relationship between somatostatin receptor expression and cytostatic activity of somatostatin analogues is warranted. PMID:26795274

  7. Co-administration strategy to enhance brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-glycoprotein (P-gp/Abcb1) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) mediated efflux with m-TOR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Mukul; Khurana, Varun; Qin, Bin; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-09-15

    The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize the interaction of vandetanib with P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1) in vitro and in vivo (ii) to study the modulation of P-gp and BCRP mediated efflux of vandetanib with specific transport inhibitors and m-TOR inhibitors, everolimus and temsirolimus. Cellular accumulation and bi-directional transport studies in MDCKII cell monolayers were conducted to delineate the role of efflux transporters on disposition of vandetanib. Brain distribution studies were conducted in male FVB wild-type mice with vandetanib administered intravenously either alone or in the presence of specific inhibitors and m-TOR inhibitors. In vitro studies suggested that vandetanib is a high affinity substrate of Bcrp1 but is not transported by P-gp. Interestingly, in vivo brain distribution studies in FVB wild type mice indicated that vandetanib penetration into the brain is restricted by both Bcrp1 and P-gp mediated active efflux at the blood brain barrier (BBB). Co-administration of elacridar, a dual P-gp/BCRP inhibitor increased the brain to plasma concentration ratio of vandetanib upto 5 fold. Of the two m-TOR pathway inhibitors examined; everolimus showed potent effect on modulating vandetanib brain penetration whereas no significant affect on vandetanib brain uptake was observed following temsirolimus co-administration. This finding could be clinically relevant as everolimus can provide synergistic pharmacological effect in addition to primary role of vandetanib efflux modulation at BBB for the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:22633931

  8. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  9. Role of mTOR Inhibitors in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Moto; Masuda, Satohiro

    2016-01-01

    The first compound that inhibited the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), sirolimus (rapamycin) was discovered in the 1970s as a soil bacterium metabolite collected on Easter Island (Rapa Nui). Because sirolimus showed antiproliferative activity, researchers investigated its molecular target and identified the TOR1 and TOR2. The mTOR consists of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2. Rapalogues including sirolimus, everolimus, and temsirolimus exert their effect mainly on mTORC1, whereas their inhibitory effect on mTORC2 is mild. To obtain compounds with more potent antiproliferative effects, ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR targeting both mTORC1 and mTORC2 have been developed and tested in clinical trials as anticancer drugs. Currently, mTOR inhibitors are used as anticancer drugs against several solid tumors, and immunosuppressive agents for transplantation of various organs. This review discusses the role of mTOR inhibitors in renal disease with a particular focus on renal cancer, diabetic nephropathy, and kidney transplantation. PMID:27338360

  10. Role of mTOR Inhibitors in Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kajiwara, Moto; Masuda, Satohiro

    2016-01-01

    The first compound that inhibited the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), sirolimus (rapamycin) was discovered in the 1970s as a soil bacterium metabolite collected on Easter Island (Rapa Nui). Because sirolimus showed antiproliferative activity, researchers investigated its molecular target and identified the TOR1 and TOR2. The mTOR consists of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2. Rapalogues including sirolimus, everolimus, and temsirolimus exert their effect mainly on mTORC1, whereas their inhibitory effect on mTORC2 is mild. To obtain compounds with more potent antiproliferative effects, ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR targeting both mTORC1 and mTORC2 have been developed and tested in clinical trials as anticancer drugs. Currently, mTOR inhibitors are used as anticancer drugs against several solid tumors, and immunosuppressive agents for transplantation of various organs. This review discusses the role of mTOR inhibitors in renal disease with a particular focus on renal cancer, diabetic nephropathy, and kidney transplantation. PMID:27338360

  11. Clinical Impact of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy Use in Patients Following Everolimus-eluting Stent Implantation: Insights from the SEEDS Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yao-Jun; Zhao, Ye-Lin; Xu, Bo; Han, Ya-Ling; Li, Bao; Liu, Qiang; Su, Xi; Pang, Si; Lu, Shu-Zheng; Guo, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Yue-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies have suggested that use of prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) following new generation drug-eluting stent implantation may increase costs and potential bleeding events. This study aimed to investigate the association of DAPT status with clinical safety in patients undergoing everolimus-eluting stent (EES) implantation in the SEEDS study (A Registry to Evaluate Safety and Effectiveness of Everolimus Drug-eluting Stent for Coronary Revascularization) at 2-year follow-up. Methods: The SEEDS study is a prospective, multicenter study, where patients (n = 1900) with small vessel, long lesion, or multi-vessel diseases underwent EES implantation. Detailed DAPT status was collected at baseline, 6-month, 1- and 2-year. DAPT interruption was defined as any interruption of aspirin and/or clopidogrel more than 14 days. The net adverse clinical events (NACE, a composite endpoint of all-cause death, all myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, definite/probable stent thrombosis (ST), and major bleeding (Bleeding Academic Research Consortium II-V)) were investigated according to the DAPT status at 2-year follow-up. Results: DAPT was used in 97.8% of patients at 6 months, 69.5% at 12 months and 35.4% at 2 years. It was observed that the incidence of NACE was low (8.1%) at 2 years follow-up, especially its components of all-cause death (0.9%), stroke (1.1%), and definite/probable ST (0.7%). DAPT was not an independent predictor of composite endpoint of all-cause death/MI/stroke (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.693, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.096–4.980, P = 0.715) and NACE (HR: 1.041, 95% CI: 0.145–7.454, P = 0.968). Of 73 patients who had DAPT interruption, no patient had ST at 12-month, and only 1 patient experienced ST between 1- and 2-year (1.4%). There was a high frequency of major bleeding events (53/65, 82.5%) occurred in patients receiving DAPT treatment. Conclusions: Prolonged DAPT use was not associated with improved clinical safety. The study

  12. Randomized comparison of acute stent malapposition between platinum-chromium versus cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jung-Sun; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2015-02-01

    No randomized data exist regarding optical coherence tomography (OCT) evaluation immediately post-procedure and at the 3-month follow-up for platinum-chromium everolimus-eluting stents (PtCr-EES) versus cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stents (CoCr-EES). A total of 100 patients were randomly assigned to undergo PtCr-EES (n = 51) or CoCr-EES (n = 49) implantation. OCT was serially evaluated after stent deployment with nominal pressure and immediately post-procedure, and 3-month follow-up. The primary endpoint was the percentage of malapposed strut after nominal pressure and immediately post-procedure. Compared to the CoCr-EES, the PtCr-EES showed a lower tendency of percent malapposed strut at nominal pressure [median value (interquartile range); 4.1 % (0.5-11.7) vs. 7.6 % (2.9-13.7), p = 0.082] and immediately post-procedure [1.2 % (0-3.4) vs. 2.5 % (0.7-5.3), p = 0.051]. The percentage of cross sections with any malapposed struts was significantly lower with PtCr-EES at nominal pressure [15.0 % (5.6-39.0) vs. 23.8 % (18.2-44.4), p = 0.036] and immediately post-procedure [6.5 % (0-15.3) vs. 10.5 % (7.1-20.0), p = 0.026]. At the 3-month follow-up, both PtCr-EES and CoCr-EES showed comparable percentages of malapposed struts (0 vs. 0 %, respectively, p = 0.332) and uncovered struts (5.3 vs. 4.7 %, respectively, p = 0.829). We found a significant correlation between the immediate post-procedural percentage of malapposed struts versus the percentage of uncovered struts (r = 0.430, p < 0.001) at the 3-month follow-up. Compared to the CoCr-EES, the PtCr-EES shows a lower tendency toward a lower percentage of malapposed struts but no significant difference in strut coverage at the 3-month follow-up. The percentage of malapposed struts immediately post-procedure was correlated with strut coverage at the 3-month follow-up. PMID:25345751

  13. Differential effects of inhibitors of the PI3K/mTOR pathway on the expansion and functionality of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Huijts, Charlotte M; Santegoets, Saskia J; Quiles Del Rey, Maria; de Haas, Richard R; Verheul, Henk M; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van der Vliet, Hans J

    2016-07-01

    The PI3K/mTOR pathway is commonly deregulated in cancer. mTOR inhibitors are registered for the treatment of several solid tumors and novel inhibitors are explored clinically. Notably, this pathway also plays an important role in immunoregulation. While mTOR inhibitors block cell cycle progression of conventional T cells (Tconv), they also result in the expansion of CD4(+)CD25(hi)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), and this likely limits their clinical antitumor efficacy. Here, we compared the effects of dual mTOR/PI3K inhibition (using BEZ235) to single PI3K (using BKM120) or mTOR inhibition (using rapamycin and everolimus) on Treg expansion and functionality. Whereas rapamycin, everolimus and BEZ235 effected a relative expansion benefit for Tregs and increased their overall suppressive activity, BKM120 allowed for similar expansion rates of Tregs and Tconv without altering their overall suppressive activity. Therefore, PI3K inhibition alone might offer antitumor efficacy without the detrimental selective expansion of Tregs associated with mTOR inhibition. PMID:27189717

  14. Feasibility of 320-row multi-detector computed tomography angiography to assess bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting vascular scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Asami, Masahiko; Aoki, Jiro; Serruys, Patrick W; Abizaid, Alexandre; Saito, Shigeru; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Kimura, Takeshi; Simonton, Charles A; Tanabe, Kengo

    2016-04-01

    Coronary computer tomographic angiography (CCTA) for screening intra-arterial vessel disease is gaining rapid clinical acceptance in recent years, but its use for such assessments in metal-stented vessel segments is very limited due to blooming artifacts introduced by the metal. However, vessel segments treated by the polymeric everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (Absorb) are readily monitored for intravascular disease over time with CCTA. The data on the accuracy of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in patients treated with Absorb is still sparse. Results on 5 Japanese case studies from ABSORB EXTEND are presented here. Five patients were treated with Absorb, and follow-up angiography was conducted at 8 to 14 months as per routine site standard of practice. 320-row MDCT scan was performed within 1 month before the angiography. By MDCT, all Absorb-treated lesions were clearly evaluated and restenosis were not observed. Minimal diameter and % diameter stenosis were similar between MDCT and quantitative angiography (2.07 ± 0.13 vs. 2.03 ± 0.06 mm, P = 0.86, and 22.5 ± 5.0 vs. 21.5 ± 4.5 %, P = 0.88, respectively). MDCT appears to be feasible and useful for evaluating lumen patency and vessel disease in segments implanted with Absorb at follow-up. PMID:26445951

  15. CFTR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Synder, David; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Anderson, Marc O.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel whose major function is to facilitate epithelial fluid secretion. Loss-of-function mutations in CFTR cause the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. CFTR is required for transepithelial fluid transport in certain secretory diarrheas, such as cholera, and for cyst expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. High-throughput screening has yielded CFTR inhibitors of the thiazolidinone, glycine hydrazide and quinoxalinedione chemical classes. The glycine hydrazides target the extracellular CFTR pore, whereas the thiazolidinones and quinoxalinediones act at the cytoplasmic surface. These inhibitors have been widely used in cystic fibrosis research to study CFTR function at the cell and organ levels. The most potent CFTR inhibitor has IC50 of approximately 4 nM. Studies in animal models support the development of CFTR inhibitors for antisecretory therapy of enterotoxin-mediated diarrheas and polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23331030

  16. mTOR Inhibitors Control the Growth of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer Even after Acquiring Resistance by HGF

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Shinji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Sano, Takako; Nakade, Junya; Nanjo, Shigeki; Yamada, Tadaaki; Ebi, Hiromichi; Zhao, Lu; Yasumoto, Kazuo; Nakamura, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Kunio; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Hirohisa; Yano, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), gefitinib and erlotinib, is a critical problem in the treatment of EGFR mutant lung cancer. Several mechanisms, including bypass signaling by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-triggered Met activation, are implicated as mediators of resistance. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is a downstream conduit of EGFR and MET signaling, and is thus considered a therapeutically attractive target in the treatment of various types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to examine whether 2 clinically approved mTOR inhibitors, temsirolimus and everolimus, overcome HGF-dependent resistance to EGFR-TKIs in EGFR mutant lung cancer cells. Both temsirolimus and everolimus inhibited the phosphorylation of p70S6K and 4E-BP1, which are downstream targets of the mTOR pathway, and reduced the viability of EGFR mutant lung cancer cells, PC-9, and HCC827, even in the presence of HGF in vitro. In a xenograft model, temsirolimus suppressed the growth of PC-9 cells overexpressing the HGF-gene; this was associated with suppression of the mTOR signaling pathway and tumor angiogenesis. In contrast, erlotinib did not suppress this signaling pathway or tumor growth. Multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor production by tumor cells and suppression of endothelial cell viability, contribute to the anti-angiogenic effect of temsirolimus. These findings indicate that mTOR inhibitors may be useful for controlling HGF-triggered EGFR-TKI resistance in EGFR mutant lung cancer, and they provide the rationale for clinical trials of mTOR inhibitors in patients stratified by EGFR mutation and HGF expression status. PMID:23690929

  17. Improved oral absorption and chemical stability of everolimus via preparation of solid dispersion using solvent wetting technique.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sun Woo; Kang, Myung Joo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the physicochemical properties and oral absorption of poorly water-soluble everolimus via preparation of a solid dispersion (SD) system using a solvent wetting (SW) technique. The physicochemical properties, drug release profile, and bioavailability of SD prepared by SW process were also compared to SD prepared by the conventional co-precipitation method. Solid state characterizations using scanning electron microscopy, particle size analysis and X-ray powder diffraction indicated that drug homogeneously dispersed and existed in an amorphous state within the intact polymeric carrier. Whereas, a film-like mass was obtained by a co-precipitation method and further pulverization step was needed for tabletization. The drug release from the SD tablet prepared by SW process at a ratio of drug to hydroxypropyl methylcellulose of 1:15 was markedly higher than the drug alone and equivalent to the marketed product (Afinitor(®), Novartis Pharmaceuticals), a SD tablet prepared by co-precipitation method, archiving over 75% the drug release after 30 min. At the accelerated (40°C/75% R.H.) and stress (80°C) stability tests, the novel formula was more stable than drug powder and provided comparable drug stability with the commercially available product, which contains a potentially risky antioxidant, butylated hydroxyl toluene. The pharmacokinetic parameters after single oral administration in beagles showed no significant difference (P>0.01) between the novel SD-based tablet and the marketed product. The results of this study, therefore, suggest that the novel SD system prepared by the solvent wetting process may be a promising approach for improving the physicochemical stability and oral absorption of the sirolimus derivatives. PMID:25003829

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Low-Dose Cyclosporine with Everolimus and Steroids in de novo Heart Transplant Patients: A Multicentre, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zuckermann, Andreas; Wang, Shoei-Shen; Ross, Heather; Frigerio, Maria; Eisen, Howard J.; Bara, Christoph; Hoefer, Daniel; Cotrufo, Maurizio; Dong, Gaohong; Junge, Guido; Keogh, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    A six-month, multicenter, randomized, open-label study was undertaken to determine whether renal function is improved using reduced-exposure cyclosporine (CsA) versus standard-exposure CsA in 199 de novo heart transplant patients receiving everolimus and steroids ± induction therapy. Mean C2 levels were at the low end of the target range in standard-exposure patients (n = 100) and exceeded target range in reduced-exposure patients (n = 99) throughout the study. Mean serum creatinine at Month 6 (the primary endpoint) was 141.0 ± 53.1 μmol/L in standard-exposure patients versus 130.1 ± 53.7 μmol/L in reduced-exposure patients (P = 0.093). The incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection ≥3A at Month 6 was 21.0% (21/100) in the standard-exposure group and 16.2% (16/99) in the reduced-exposure group (n.s.). Adverse events and infections were similar between treatment groups. Thus, everolimus with reduced-exposure CsA resulted in comparable efficacy compared to standard-exposure CsA. No renal function benefits were demonstrated; that is possibly related to poor adherence to reduced CsA exposure. PMID:22295178

  19. [An Elderly Patient with Metastatic Breast Cancer Who Developed Severe Adverse Events such as Stomatitis and Interstitial Pneumonia after Everolimus plus Exemestane Treatment].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Kana; Yoshida, Takashi; Goto, Yoshinari; Kimura, Morihiko

    2016-06-01

    An 80-year-old woman was diagnosed with right breast cancer with clinical Stage IIIA 6 years previously. She underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection. The pathological diagnosis was invasive micropapillary carcinoma with lymph node involvement. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, and negative for HER2. Postoperatively, the patient was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel, followed by endocrine therapy with letrozole. Four years after surgery, she experienced a recurrence of breast cancer in the thoracic wall, and was treated with exemestane, toremifene, and fulvestrant for 1 year and 5 months. However, she developed carcinomatous pleurisy and was treated with eribulin. This last treatment was ineffective. Subsequently, she received combination therapy with everolimus and exemestane. Although the pleural effusion reduced markedly after 5 weeks, stomatitis, diarrhea, melena, and interstitial pneumonia occurred as adverse events. The symptoms improved after drug discontinuation and steroid therapy. The combination therapy with everolimus and exemestane is a prospective therapy for hormone-resistant recurrent breast cancer, but the management of adverse events is very important. PMID:27306814

  20. Everolimus-eluting bioresorbable stent vs. durable polymer everolimus-eluting metallic stent in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: results of the randomized ABSORB ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction—TROFI II trial

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté, Manel; Windecker, Stephan; Iñiguez, Andres; Okkels-Jensen, Lisette; Cequier, Angel; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Hofma, Sjoerd H.; Räber, Lorenz; Christiansen, Evald Høi; Suttorp, Maarten; Pilgrim, Thomas; Anne van Es, Gerrit; Sotomi, Yohei; García-García, Hector M.; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) feature thrombus-rich lesions with large necrotic core, which are usually associated with delayed arterial healing and impaired stent-related outcomes. The use of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (Absorb) has the potential to overcome these limitations owing to restoration of native vessel lumen and physiology at long term. The purpose of this randomized trial was to compare the arterial healing response at short term, as a surrogate for safety and efficacy, between the Absorb and the metallic everolimus-eluting stent (EES) in patients with STEMI. Methods and results ABSORB-STEMI TROFI II was a multicentre, single-blind, non-inferiority, randomized controlled trial. Patients with STEMI who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention were randomly allocated 1:1 to treatment with the Absorb or EES. The primary endpoint was the 6-month optical frequency domain imaging healing score (HS) based on the presence of uncovered and/or malapposed stent struts and intraluminal filling defects. Main secondary endpoint included the device-oriented composite endpoint (DOCE) according to the Academic Research Consortium definition. Between 06 January 2014 and 21 September 2014, 191 patients (Absorb [n = 95] or EES [n = 96]; mean age 58.6 years old; 17.8% females) were enrolled at eight centres. At 6 months, HS was lower in the Absorb arm when compared with EES arm [1.74 (2.39) vs. 2.80 (4.44); difference (90% CI) −1.06 (−1.96, −0.16); Pnon-inferiority <0.001]. Device-oriented composite endpoint was also comparably low between groups (1.1% Absorb vs. 0% EES). One case of definite subacute stent thrombosis occurred in the Absorb arm (1.1% vs. 0% EES; P = ns). Conclusion Stenting of culprit lesions with Absorb in the setting of STEMI resulted in a nearly complete arterial healing which was comparable with that of metallic EES at 6 months. These findings provide the basis for further exploration in

  1. Immunosuppressive potency of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibitors in solid-organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Ramírez, Pablo; Pons, José A

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin, also known as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that belongs to the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, which is involved in several fundamental cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, and survival. This protein and its associated pathway have been implicated in cancer development and the regulation of immune responses, including the rejection response generated following allograft transplantation. Inhibitors of mTOR (mTORi) such as rapamycin and its derivative everolimus are potent immunosuppressive drugs that both maintain similar rates of efficacy and could optimize the renal function and diminish the side effects compared with calcineurin inhibitors. These drugs are used in solid-organ transplantationtoinduceimmunosuppression while also promoting the expansion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells that could favor a scenery of immunological tolerance. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which inhibitors of mTOR induce suppression by regulation of these pathways at different levels of the immune response. In addition, we particularly emphasize about the main methods that are used to assess the potency of immunosuppressive drugs, highlighting the studies carried out about immunosuppressive potency of inhibitors of mTOR. PMID:27011916

  2. Relationships between Signaling Pathway Usage and Sensitivity to a Pathway Inhibitor: Examination of Trametinib Responses in Cultured Breast Cancer Lines

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Euphemia Y.; Kim, Ji Eun; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan; Rewcastle, Gordon W.; Finlay, Graeme J.; Baguley, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular signaling pathways involving mTOR, PI3K and ERK have dominated recent studies of breast cancer biology, and inhibitors of these pathways have formed a focus of numerous clinical trials. We have chosen trametinib, a drug targeting MEK in the ERK pathway, to address two questions. Firstly, does inhibition of a signaling pathway, as measured by protein phosphorylation, predict the antiproliferative activity of trametinib? Secondly, do inhibitors of the mTOR and PI3K pathways synergize with trametinib in their effects on cell proliferation? A panel of 30 human breast cancer cell lines was chosen to include lines that could be classified according to whether they were ER and PR positive, HER2 over-expressing, and “triple negative”. Everolimus (targeting mTOR), NVP-BEZ235 and GSK2126458 (both targeting PI3K/mTOR) were chosen for combination experiments. Inhibition of cell proliferation was measured by IC50 values and pathway utilization was measured by phosphorylation of signaling kinases. Overall, no correlation was found between trametinib IC50 values and inhibition of ERK signaling. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed at trametinib concentrations not affecting proliferation, and sensitivity of cell proliferation to trametinib was found in cell lines with low ERK phosphorylation. Evidence was found for synergy between trametinib and either everolimus, NVP-BEZ235 or GSK2126458, but this was cell line specific. The results have implications for the clinical application of PI3K/mTOR and MEK inhibitors. PMID:25170609

  3. [Proteasome inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an essential role in degradation of eukaryotic intracellular protein, including cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and survival. Cancer cells generally have higher level of proteasome activity compared with normal cells, suggesting proteasome inhibition could be therapeutic target in oncology. Bortezomib, the first proteasome inhibitor introduced into the clinic, is approved for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Although it was approved as single agent in the relapsed setting, bortezomib is now predominantly used in combination with conventional and novel targeted agents because bortezomib has demonstrated additive and synergistic activity in preclinical studies. Recently, several second-generation proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib and MLN9708, have been developed and entered into clinical trials. These agents were investigated in frontline MM in combination with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone. These studies demonstrated positive efficacy and safety, and it is expected that they will be approved in near future. PMID:25016815

  4. Everolimus-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition in immortalized human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells: key role of heparanase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Everolimus (EVE) is a drug widely used in several renal transplant protocols. Although characterized by a relatively low nephrotoxicity, it may induce several adverse effects including severe fibro-interstitial pneumonitis. The exact molecular/biological mechanism associated to these pro-fibrotic effects is unknown, but epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) may have a central role. Additionally, heparanase, an enzyme recently associated with the progression of chronic allograft nephropathy, could contribute to activate this machinery in renal cells. Methods Several biomolecular strategies (RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, zymography and migration assay) have been used to assess the capability of EVE (10, 100, 200 and 500 nM) to induce an in vitro heparanase-mediated EMT in wild-type (WT) and Heparanase (HPSE)-silenced immortalized human renal epithelial proximal tubular cells (HK-2). Additionally, microarray technology was used to find additional biological elements involved in EVE-induced EMT. Results Biomolecular experiments demonstrated a significant up-regulation (more than 1.5 fold increase) of several genes encoding for well known EMT markers [(alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), Vimentin (VIM), Fibronectin (FN) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9)], enhancement of MMP9 protein level and increment of cells motility in WT HK2 cells treated with high concentrations of EVE (higher than 100 nM). Similarly, immunofluorescence analysis showed that 100 nM of EVE increased α-SMA, VIM and FN protein expression in WT HK2 cells. All these effects were absent in both HPSE- and AKT-silenced cell lines. AKT is a protein having a central role in EMT. Additionally, microarray analysis identified other 2 genes significantly up-regulated in 100 nM EVE-treated cells (p < 0.005 and FDR < 5%): transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGFβ2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Real-time PCR analysis validated microarray. Conclusions Our in vitro study

  5. Autophagy Inhibition to Augment mTOR Inhibition: A Phase I/II Trial of RAD001 and Hydroxychloroquine in Patients With Previously Treated Renal Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-07

    Histological Evidence of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; That Has Been Previously Treated With 1-3 Prior Regimens. Phase 1 Only, Any Number of Prior Regimens; With Evidence of Progressive Disease on or Within 6 Months; of Discontinuing Sunitinib, Sorafenib or Pazopanib. Previous; Therapy With Bevacizumab, IL2, or Interferon Are Permitted.

  6. Vascular disruption in combination with mTOR inhibition in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Leigh; Shah, Preeti; Hammers, Hans; Lehet, Kristin; Sotomayor, Paula; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Seshadri, Mukund; Pili, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an angiogenesis-dependent and hypoxia-driven malignancy. As a result, there has been an increased interest in the use of antiangiogenic agents for the management of RCC in patients. However, the activity of tumor-vascular disrupting agents (tumor-VDA) has not been extensively examined against RCC. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the tumor-VDA ASA404 (DMXAA, 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid, or vadimezan) in combination with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus (RAD001) against RCC. In vitro studies were carried out using human umbilical vein endothelial cells and in vivo studies using orthotopic RENCA tumors and immunohistochemical patient tumor-derived RCC xenografts. MRI was used to characterize the vascular response of orthotopic RENCA xenografts to combination treatment. Therapeutic efficacy was determined by tumor growth measurements and histopathologic evaluation. ASA404/everolimus combination resulted in enhanced inhibition of endothelial cell sprouting in the 3-dimensional spheroid assay. MRI of orthotopic RENCA xenografts revealed an early increase in permeability 4 hours posttreatment with ASA404, but not with everolimus. Twenty-four hours after treatment, a significant reduction in blood volume was observed with combination treatment. Correlative CD31/NG2 staining of tumor sections confirmed marked vascular damage following combination therapy. Histologic sections showed extensive necrosis and a reduction in the viable rim following combination treatment compared with VDA treatment alone. These results show the potential of combining tumor-VDAs with mTOR inhibitors in RCC. Further investigation into this novel combination strategy is warranted. PMID:22084164

  7. Vascular Disruption in Combination with mTOR Inhibition in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Leigh; Shah, Preeti; Hammers, Hans; Lehet, Kristin; Sotomayor, Paula; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Seshadri, Mukund; Pili, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an angiogenesis-dependent and hypoxia-driven malignancy. As a result, there has been an increased interest in the use of antiangiogenic agents for the management of RCC in patients. However, the activity of tumor-vascular disrupting agents (tumor-VDA) has not been extensively examined against RCC. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the tumor-VDA ASA404 (DMXAA, 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid, or vadimezan) in combination with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus (RAD001) against RCC. In vitro studies were carried out using human umbilical vein endothelial cells and in vivo studies using orthotopic RENCA tumors and immunohistochemical patient tumor-derived RCC xenografts. MRI was used to characterize the vascular response of orthotopic RENCA xenografts to combination treatment. Therapeutic efficacy was determined by tumor growth measurements and histopathologic evaluation. ASA404/everolimus combination resulted in enhanced inhibition of endothelial cell sprouting in the 3-dimensional spheroid assay. MRI of orthotopic RENCA xenografts revealed an early increase in permeability 4 hours posttreatment with ASA404, but not with everolimus. Twenty-four hours after treatment, a significant reduction in blood volume was observed with combination treatment. Correlative CD31/NG2 staining of tumor sections confirmed marked vascular damage following combination therapy. Histologic sections showed extensive necrosis and a reduction in the viable rim following combination treatment compared with VDA treatment alone. These results show the potential of combining tumor-VDAs with mTOR inhibitors in RCC. Further investigation into this novel combination strategy is warranted. PMID:22084164

  8. mTORC1 Inhibition Is Required for Sensitivity to PI3K p110α Inhibitors in PIK3CA-Mutant Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elkabets, Moshe; Vora, Sadhna; Juric, Dejan; Morse, Natasha; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Muranen, Taru; Tao, Jessica; Campos, Ana Bosch; Rodon, Jordi; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Serra, Violeta; Rodrik-Outmezguine, Vanessa; Hazra, Saswati; Singh, Sharat; Kim, Phillip; Quadt, Cornelia; Liu, Manway; Huang, Alan; Rosen, Neal; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of the PIK3CA gene occur frequently in breast cancer, and inhibitors that are specific for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p110α, such as BYL719, are being investigated in clinical trials. In a search for correlates of sensitivity to p110α inhibition among PIK3CA-mutant breast cancer cell lines, we observed that sensitivity to BYL719 (as assessed by cell proliferation) was associated with full inhibition of signaling through the TORC1 pathway. Conversely, cancer cells that were resistant to BYL719 had persistently active mTORC1 signaling, although Akt phosphorylation was inhibited. Similarly, in patients, pS6 (residues 240/4) expression (a marker of mTORC1 signaling) was associated with tumor response to BYL719, and mTORC1 was found to be reactivated in tumors from patients whose disease progressed after treatment. In PIK3CA-mutant cancer cell lines with persistent mTORC1 signaling despite PI3K p110α blockade (that is, resistance), the addition of the allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor RAD001 to the cells along with BYL719 resulted in reversal of resistance in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we found that growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 and neuregulin 1 can activate mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and mediate resistance to BYL719. Our findings suggest that simultaneous administration of mTORC1 inhibitors may enhance the clinical activity of p110α-targeted drugs and delay the appearance of resistance. PMID:23903756

  9. mTOR inhibitors counteract tamoxifen-induced activation of breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Karthik, Govindasamy-Muralidharan; Ma, Ran; Lövrot, John; Kis, Lorand Levente; Lindh, Claes; Blomquist, Lennart; Fredriksson, Irma; Bergh, Jonas; Hartman, Johan

    2015-10-10

    Breast cancer cells with stem cell characteristics (CSC) are a distinct cell population with phenotypic similarities to mammary stem cells. CSCs are important drivers of tumorigenesis and the metastatic process. Tamoxifen is the most widely used hormonal therapy for estrogen receptor (ER) positive cancers. In our study, tamoxifen was effective in reducing proliferation of ER + adherent cancer cells, but not their CSC population. We isolated, expanded and incubated CSC from seven breast cancers with or without tamoxifen. By genome-wide transcriptional analysis we identified tamoxifen-induced transcriptional pathways associated with ribosomal biogenesis and mRNA translation, both regulated by the mTOR-pathway. We observed induction of the key mTOR downstream targets S6K1, S6RP and 4E-BP1 in-patient derived CSCs by tamoxifen on protein level. Using the mTOR inhibitors rapamycin, everolimus and PF-04691502 (a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor) and in combination with tamoxifen, significant reduction in mammosphere formation was observed. Hence, we suggest that the CSC population play a significant role during endocrine resistance through activity of the mTOR pathway. In addition, tamoxifen further stimulates the mTOR-pathway but can be antagonized using mTOR-inhibitors. PMID:26208432

  10. Autophagy inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent mechanism of intracellular degradation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are highly complex and involve multiple proteins, including the kinases ULK1 and Vps34. The main function of autophagy is the maintenance of cell survival when modifications occur in the cellular environment. During the past decade, extensive studies have greatly improved our knowledge and autophagy has exploded as a research field. This process is now widely implicated in pathophysiological processes such as cancer, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders, making it an attractive target for drug discovery. In this review, we will summarize the different types of inhibitors that affect the autophagy machinery and provide some potential therapeutic perspectives. PMID:26658914

  11. Comparison of neointimal coverage and extra-stent lumen between sirolimus and everolimus-eluting stent using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Oda, Takamasa; Okamura, Takayuki; Yamada, Jutaro; Miyagi, Naoto; Uehara, Hiroki; Nao, Tomoko; Tateishi, Hiroki; Maeda, Takao; Nakamura, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Kohzoh; Nakashima, Tadamitsu; Nishimura, Shigehiko; Miura, Toshiro; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Yano, Masafumi

    2016-04-01

    The external lumen of a stent [defined as extra-stent lumen (ESL)] assessed by optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be related to the risk of thrombus formation after sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) implantation. An everolimus-eluting stent (EES) might provide relatively minimal inflammatory reaction and appropriate neointimal coverage. The purpose of this study was to compare the neointimal thickness and ESL between SES and EES. Patients who underwent OCT examination more than 7 months after either SES or EES implantation were enrolled. Stent area (SA), lumen area (LA), neointimal area (NIA) and neointimal thickness (NIT) of each strut were measured at 1-mm intervals between stented segments. The area, angle (summation per cross-section) and depth (maximum distance from adjacent vessel surface to the outline of stent) of ESL were analyzed. A total of 49 lesions were included (SES n = 20, EES n = 29). Mean follow-up period was 11 months. A total of 998 cross-sections and 9874 struts were analyzed. There were no differences in stent area, lumen area and neointimal area (SA: 6.01 ± 1.60 vs. 6.02 ± 1.40 mm(2), p = 0.572, LA: 5.37 ± 1.52 vs. 5.29 ± 1.34 mm(2), p = 0.692, NIA: 0.64 ± 0.49 vs. 0.72 ± 0.37 mm(2), p = 0.493). Mean NIT of SES and EES were 0.11 ± 0.05 and 0.10 ± 0.05 mm, respectively (p = 0.367). Conversely, area, angle and depth of ESL in SES group were significantly greater than those in EES group (0.20 ± 0.39 vs. 0.03 ± 0.09 mm(2), p < 0.001, 56.2 ± 59.1° vs. 20.1 ± 41.9°, p < 0.001, 0.10 ± 0.09 vs. 0.03 ± 0.03 mm, p < 0.001). OCT showed that the efficacy of neointimal growth suppression is similar between SES and EES, whereas the adverse vascular response after EES implantation is smaller than that after SES implantation. PMID:25614415

  12. Oral mucosal injury caused by mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors: emerging perspectives on pathobiology and impact on clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Douglas E; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Rugo, Hope S; Elad, Sharon; Schubert, Mark M; Viet, Chi T; Campbell-Baird, Cynthia; Hronek, Jan; Seery, Virginia; Divers, Josephine; Glaspy, John; Schmidt, Brian L; Meiller, Timothy F

    2016-08-01

    In recent years oral mucosal injury has been increasingly recognized as an important toxicity associated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, including in patients with breast cancer who are receiving everolimus. This review addresses the state-of-the-science regarding mTOR inhibitor-associated stomatitis (mIAS), and delineates its clinical characteristics and management. Given the clinically impactful pain associated with mIAS, this review also specifically highlights new research focusing on the study of the molecular basis of pain. The incidence of mIAS varies widely (2-78%). As reported across multiple mTOR inhibitor clinical trials, grade 3/4 toxicity occurs in up to 9% of patients. Managing mTOR-associated oral lesions with topical oral, intralesional, and/or systemic steroids can be beneficial, in contrast to the lack of evidence supporting steroid treatment of oral mucositis caused by high-dose chemotherapy or radiation. However, steroid management is not uniformly efficacious in all patients receiving mTOR inhibitors. Furthermore, technology does not presently exist to permit clinicians to predict a priori which of their patients will develop these lesions. There thus remains a strategic need to define the pathobiology of mIAS, the molecular basis of pain, and risk prediction relative to development of the clinical lesion. This knowledge could lead to novel future interventions designed to more effectively prevent mIAS and improve pain management if clinically significant mIAS lesions develop. PMID:27334013

  13. Combination treatment with hypoxia-activated prodrug evofosfamide (TH-302) and mTOR inhibitors results in enhanced antitumor efficacy in preclinical renal cell carcinoma models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jessica D; Ahluwalia, Dharmendra; Liu, Qian; Li, Wenwu; Wang, Yan; Meng, Fanying; Bhupathi, Deepthi; Matteucci, Mark D; Hart, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    Tumors often consist of hypoxic regions which are resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy. Evofosfamide (also known as TH-302), a 2-nitroimidazole triggered hypoxia-activated prodrug, preferentially releases the DNA cross-linker bromo-isophosphoramide mustard in hypoxic cells. The intracellular kinase mTOR plays a key role in multiple pathways which are important in cancer progression. Here we investigated the enhanced efficacy profile and possible mechanisms of evofosfamide in combination with mTOR inhibitor (mTORi) everolimus or temsirolimus in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) xenograft models. The antitumor activities of the mTORi everolimus or temsirolimus alone, evofosfamide alone, or the combination were investigated in the 786-O and Caki-1 RCC cells in vitro and in vivo xenograft models. Two schedules were tested in which evofosfamide was started on the same day as the mTORi or 1 week after. Combination mechanisms were investigated by measuring a panel of pharmacodynamic biomarkers by immunohistochemistry. Antitumor efficacy in both RCC xenograft models was enhanced by the combination of evofosfamide and mTORi. Evofosfamide reduced the increased hypoxia induced by mTORi. Combination treatment induced increased DNA damage, decreased cell proliferation, and decreased survivin. Addition of mTORi did not change evofosfamide-mediated cytotoxicity in 786-O or Caki-1 cells in vitro which might suggest cell non-autonomous effects, specifically increased tumor hypoxia, are important for the in vivo combination activity. Taken together, evofosfamide potentiates the antitumor efficacy of mTOR inhibitors and inhibits the increased tumor hypoxia caused by mTOR inhibition. These studies provide a translational rationale for combining evofosfamide with mTOR inhibitors in clinical studies. PMID:26328245

  14. Endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive her2-negative advanced breast cancer after progression or recurrence on nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor therapy: a Canadian consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, K I; Gelmon, K A; Rayson, D; Provencher, L; Webster, M; McLeod, D; Verma, S

    2013-02-01

    Approximately 22,700 Canadian women were expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012. Despite improvements in screening and adjuvant treatment options, a substantial number of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive (hr+) breast cancer will continue to develop metastatic disease during or after adjuvant endocrine therapy. Guidance on the selection of endocrine therapy for patients with hr+ disease that is negative for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (her2-) and that has relapsed or progressed on earlier nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor (nsai) therapy is of increasing clinical importance. Exemestane, fulvestrant, and tamoxifen are approved therapeutic options in this context. Four phase iii trials involving 2876 patients-efect, sofea, confirm, and bolero-2-have assessed the efficacy of various treatment options in this clinical setting. Data from those trials suggest that standard-dose fulvestrant (250 mg monthly) and exemestane are of comparable efficacy, that doubling the dose of fulvestrant from 250 mg to 500 mg monthly results in a 15% reduction in the risk of progression, and that adding everolimus to exemestane (compared with exemestane alone) results in a 57% reduction in the risk of progression, albeit with increased toxicity. Multiple treatment options are now available to women with hr+ her2- advanced breast cancer recurring or progressing on earlier nsai therapy, although current clinical trial data suggest more robust clinical efficacy with everolimus plus exemestane. Consideration should be given to the patient's age, functional status, and comorbidities during selection of an endocrine therapy, and use of a proactive everolimus safety management strategy is encouraged. PMID:23443928

  15. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors and Life-Threatening Conditions in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Moavero, Romina; Romagnoli, Gloria; Graziola, Federica; Curatolo, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multisystem disease associated with an overall reduction in life expectancy due to the possible occurrence of different life-threatening conditions. Subjects affected by TSC are, in fact, at risk of hydrocephalus secondary to the growth of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, or of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Other nonneurological life-threatening conditions include abdominal bleeding owing to renal angiomyolipomas rupture, renal insufficiency due to progressive parenchymal destruction by multiple cysts, pulmonary complications due to lymphangioleiomyomatosis, and cardiac failure or arrhythmias secondary to rhabdomyomas. In the last decades, there has been a great progress in understanding the pathophysiology of TSC-related manifestations, which are mainly linked to the hyperactivation of the so-called mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, as a consequence of the mutation in 1 of the 2 genes TSC1 or TSC2. This led to the development of new treatment strategies for this disease. In fact, it is now available as a biologically targeted therapy with everolimus, a selective mTOR inhibitor, which has been licensed in Europe and USA for the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and angiomyolipomas in subjects with TSC. This drug also proved to benefit other TSC-related manifestations, including pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis, cardiac rhabdomyomas, and presumably epileptic seizures. mTOR inhibitors are thus proving to be a systemic therapy able to simultaneously address different and potentially life-threatening complications, giving the hope of improving life expectation in individuals with TSC. PMID:26706015

  16. PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joycelyn JX; Loh, Kiley; Yap, Yoon-Sim

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is common in breast cancer. There is preclinical data to support inhibition of the pathway, and phase I to III trials involving inhibitors of the pathway have been or are being conducted in solid tumors and breast cancer. Everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, is currently approved for the treatment of hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. In this review, we summarise the efficacy and toxicity findings from the randomised clinical trials, with simplified guidelines on the management of potential adverse effects. Education of healthcare professionals and patients is critical for safety and compliance. While there is some clinical evidence of activity of mTOR inhibition in HR-positive and HER2-positive breast cancers, the benefits may be more pronounced in selected subsets rather than in the overall population. Further development of predictive biomarkers will be useful in the selection of patients who will benefit from inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR (PAM) pathway. PMID:26779371

  17. Coronary vasomotion one year after drug-eluting stent implantation: comparison of everolimus-eluting and paclitaxel-eluting coronary stents.

    PubMed

    Hamilos, Michalis; Ribichini, Flavio; Ostojic, Miodrag C; Ferrero, Valeria; Orlic, Dejan; Vassanelli, Corrado; Karanovic, Nevena; Sarno, Giovanna; Cuisset, Thomas; Vardas, Panos E; Wijns, William

    2014-06-01

    First-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have been associated with impaired localized coronary vasomotion and delayed endothelialization. We aimed to compare coronary vasomotion after implantation of a newer-generation everolimus-eluting stent (EES), with a first-generation paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES). Coronary vasomotion was studied in 19 patients with EES and 13 with PES. Vasomotor response was measured proximally and distally to the stent and in a remote vessel (reference segment). Quantitative coronary angiography was performed offline. Endothelium independent vasomotion did not differ significantly between the two groups. EES showed significant vasodilatation while PES showed vasoconstriction at both proximal (+4.5 ± 3.6 vs -4.2 ± 6.9, p < 0.001) and distal (+4.6 ± 7.9 vs -4.8 ± 9.3, p = 0.003) segments. The reference segment did not show any significant difference in vasodilatation between the two groups (+9.8 ± 6.4 vs +7.2 ± 5.2, p = 0.17). Endothelium-dependent vasomotion at adjacent stent segments is relatively preserved after EES implantation while vasoconstriction was observed after PES implantation. PMID:24794876

  18. The influence of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Skardelly, Marco; Glien, Anja; Groba, Claudia; Schlichting, Nadine; Kamprad, Manja; Meixensberger, Juergen; Milosevic, Javorina

    2013-12-10

    In allogenic and xenogenic transplantation, adequate immunosuppression plays a major role in graft survival, especially over the long term. The effect of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate has not been sufficiently explored. The focus of this study is to systematically investigate the effects of the following four different immunotherapeutic strategies on human neural progenitor cell survival/death, proliferation, metabolic activity, differentiation and migration in vitro: (1) cyclosporine A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor; (2) everolimus (RAD001), an mTOR-inhibitor; (3) mycophenolic acid (MPA, mycophenolate), an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and (4) prednisolone, a steroid. At the minimum effective concentration (MEC), we found a prominent decrease in hNPCs' proliferative capacity (BrdU incorporation), especially for CsA and MPA, and an alteration of the NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity. Cell death rate, neurogenesis, gliogenesis and cell migration remained mostly unaffected under these conditions for all four immunosuppressants, except for apoptotic cell death, which was significantly increased by MPA treatment. - Highlights: • Four immunosuppresants (ISs) were tested in human neural progenitor cells in vitro. • Cyclosporine A and mycophenolic acid showed a prominent anti-proliferative activity • Mycophenolic acid exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect. • NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity was occasionally induced by ISs. • Neuronal differentiation and migration potential remained unaffected by ISs treatment.

  19. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  20. Comparison on the efficacy of everolimus-eluting stent and zotarolimus-eluting stents in coronary heart disease between diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liming; Jin, Cheng; Wei, Xiaoming; Li, Huiying; Shi, Jihong; Wu, Shouling; Yang, Xiaojie; Qi, Xiangqian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to examine and compare the efficacy of everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and zotarolimus-eluting stents (ZES) in coronary heart disease in diabetic or non-diabetic patients. Methods: A total of 666 patients needed for percutaneous coronary intervention were randomly selected from June 2008 to June 2013 in our hospital and were divided into two groups: (i) coronary heart disease with diabetes group and (ii) non-diabetes group. Patients in each group were further assigned to receive treatment of either EES or ZES. Then we observed the major adverse cardiac events, including mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction and non-fatal cerebrovascular events over the period of 15 months after initial stent implantation. Results: Compared to the non-diabetic group, more patients in diabetic group had received anti-hypotensive treatment (72% vs. 49%, P < 0.0001) and hypolipemic treatment (80% vs. 67%, P < 0.0001) before the percutaneous coronary intervention. In both diabetic group and non-diabetic group, patients received ZES treatment had a much greater incidence rate of major adverse cardiac events compared to the patients received EES treatment (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, target lesion revascularization rate in the ZES group was also significantly higher than that in the EES group. The data showed big differences between ZES and EES groups with important statistical significance (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes have a higher risk of major adverse cardiac events after stent implantation. EES treatment is safer with higher efficacy in our study, being a more effective stent for the patients merged with diabetes. PMID:26885005

  1. A network meta-analysis of everolimus plus exemestane versus chemotherapy in the first- and second-line treatment of estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Generali, Daniele; Venturini, Sergio; Rognoni, Carla; Ciani, Oriana; Pusztai, Lajos; Loi, Sherene; Jerusalem, Guy; Bottini, Alberto; Tarricone, Rosanna

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapy to exemestane plus everolimus (EXE/EVE) through a network meta-analysis (NMA) of randomized controlled trials. NMA methods extend standard pairwise meta-analysis to allow simultaneous comparison of multiple treatments while maintaining randomization of individual studies. The method enables "direct" evidence (i.e., evidence from studies directly comparing two interventions) and "indirect" evidence (i.e., evidence from studies that do not compare the two interventions directly) to be pooled under the assumption of evidence consistency. We used NMA to evaluate progression-free survival (PFS) and time to progression (TTP) curves in 34 studies, and response rate (RR) and the hazard ratios (HRs) of the PFS/TTP in 36 studies. A number needed to treat (NNT) analysis was also performed as well as descriptive comparison of reported toxicities. The NMA for PFS/TTP curves and for HR shows EXE/EVE is more efficacious than capecitabine plus sunitinib, CMF, megestrol acetate and tamoxifen, with an average of related-PFS/TTP difference ranging from about 10 months for capecitabine plus sunitinib to more than 6 months for tamoxifen. The NMA for overall RR shows that EXE/EVE provides a better RR than bevacizumab plus capecitabine, capecitabine, capecitabine plus sorafenib, capecitabine plus sunitinib, CMF, gemcitabine plus epirubicin plus paclitaxel, EVE plus tamoxifen, EXE, FEC, megestrol acetate, mitoxantrone, and tamoxifen. Finally, the NMA for NNT shows that EXE/EVE is more beneficial as compared to BMF, capecitabine, capecitabine plus sunitinib, CMF, FEC, megestrol acetate, mitoxantrone, and tamoxifen. The combination of EXE/EVE as first- or second-line therapy for ER+ve/HER2-ve metastatic breast cancer is more efficacious than several chemotherapy regimens that were reported in the literature. Toxicities also favored EXE/EVE in most instances. PMID:26044370

  2. [Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken

    2008-04-01

    Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase decrease production of uric acid, thus they act as hypouricemic drugs. Allopurinol, a prototypical xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, has been widely prescribed for treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. However, severe side effects of allopurinol may occur in patients with renal insufficiency. Recently, novel nonpurine selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase have been developed as potential alternatives to allopurinol. They have different inhibition mechanisms, utilizing the enzyme structure and the reaction mechanism. Such variation of the inhibition mechanism affects/in vivo/hypouricemic effects of the inhibitors. PMID:18409526

  3. Review of US Comparative Economic Evidence for Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma after Failure of First-Line VEGF Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael K.; Wang, Xufang; Chulikavit, Maruit J.; Liu, Zhimei

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2006, the economic burden of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) was estimated to be up to $1.6 billion worldwide and has since grown annually. With the continuing increase of the economic burden of this disease in the United States, there is a growing need for economic analyses to guide treatment and policy decisions for this patient population. Objective To evaluate available comparative economic data on targeted therapies for patients with mRCC who have failed first-line targeted therapies. Method A broad and comprehensive literature review was conducted of US-based studies between January 1, 2005, and February 11, 2013, evaluating comparative economic evidence for targeted agents that are used as second-line therapy or beyond. Based on the specific search parameters that focused on cost-effectiveness and economic comparisons between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor (VEGFr) inhibitors and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, only 7 relevant, US-based economic evaluations were found appropriate for inclusion in the analysis. All authors, who are experts in the health economics and outcomes research field, reviewed the search results. Studies of interest were those with a targeted agent, VEGF/VEGFr or mTOR inhibitor, in at least 1 study arm. Discussion As a group, targeted therapies were found to be cost-effective options in treating patients with refractory mRCC in the United States. Oral therapies showed an economic advantage over intravenous agents, presumably because oral therapies have a lower impact on outpatient resources. Based on 3 studies, everolimus has been shown to have an economic advantage over temsirolimus and to be cost-effective compared with sorafenib. No economic comparison between everolimus and axitinib, the only 2 drugs with a National Comprehensive Cancer Network category 1 recommendation for use after the failure of VEGFr tyrosine kinase inhibitors, is available. Conclusion The limited

  4. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  5. Comparison of the Efficacy of Everolimus-Eluting Stents Versus Drug-Eluting Balloons in Patients With In-Stent Restenosis (from the RIBS IV and V Randomized Clinical Trials).

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Pérez-Vizcayno, María José; García Del Blanco, Bruno; García-Touchard, Arturo; Masotti, Mónica; López-Minguez, José R; Iñiguez, Andrés; Zueco, Javier; Velazquez, Maite; Cequier, Angel; Lázaro-García, Rosa; Martí, Vicens; Moris, César; Urbano-Carrillo, Cristobal; Bastante, Teresa; Rivero, Fernando; Cárdenas, Alberto; Gonzalo, Nieves; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Fernández, Cristina

    2016-02-15

    Treatment of patients with in-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a challenge. This study sought to compare the efficacy of everolimus-eluting stents (EESs) and drug-eluting balloons (DEBs) with paclitaxel in patients with ISR. A pooled analysis of the Restenosis Intra-Stent of Drug-Eluting Stents: Drug-Eluting Balloon vs Everolimus-Eluting Stent (RIBS IV) and Restenosis Intra-Stent of Bare-Metal Stents: Drug-Eluting Balloon vs Everolimus-Eluting Stent (RIBS V) randomized trials was performed using patient-level data. In both trials, EESs were compared with DEBs in patients with ISR (RIBS V included 189 patients with bare-metal ISR; RIBS IV included 309 patients with drug-eluting ISR). Inclusion and exclusion criteria were identical in both trials. A total of 249 patients were allocated to EES and 249 to DEB. Clinical follow-up at 1 year was obtained in all (100%) patients and late angiography (median 249 days) in 91% of eligible patients. Compared with patients treated with DEBs, patients treated with EESs obtained better short-term results (postprocedural minimal lumen diameter 2.28 ± 0.5 vs 2.12 ± 0.4 mm, p <0.0001). At follow-up, patients treated with EESs had larger in-segment minimal lumen diameter (primary end point 2.16 ± 0.7 vs 1.88 ± 0.6 mm, p <0.0001; absolute mean difference 0.28 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16 to 0.40) and net lumen gain (1.33 ± 0.6 vs 1.00 ± 0.7 mm, p <0.0001) and had lower %diameter stenosis (19 ± 21% vs 28 ± 22%, p <0.0001) and binary restenosis rate (8.7% vs 15.7%, p = 0.02). Consistent results were observed in the in-lesion analysis. No interactions were found between the underlying stent type and treatment effects. At 1-year clinical follow-up, the composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization was significantly reduced in the EES arm (8.8% vs 14.5%, p = 0.03; hazard ratio 0.59, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.94) mainly driven by a lower need for target vessel revascularization (6% vs 12.4%, p

  6. Screening of telomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kleideiter, Elke; Piotrowska, Kamilla; Klotz, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Shortening of telomeres prevents cells from uncontrolled proliferation. Progressive telomere shortening occurs at each cell division until a critical telomeric length is reached. Telomerase expression is switched off after embryonic differentiation in most normal cells, but it is expressed in a very high percentage of tumors of different origin. Thus, telomerase is regarded as the best tumor marker and a promising novel molecular target for cancer treatment. Therefore, different strategies to inhibit telomerase have been developed. However, systematic screening of telomerase inhibitors has not been performed to compare their therapeutic potential. We propose a suitable strategy for estimation of the therapeutic potential of telomerase inhibitors, which is based on a systematic screening of different inhibitors in the same cell system. From the long list of compounds discussed in the literature, we have selected four telomerase inhibitors of different structure and mode of action: BRACO19 (G-quadruplex-interactive compound), BIBR1532 (non-nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitor), 2'-O-methyl RNA, and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs; hTR antisense oligonucleotides). To determine minimal effective concentrations for telomerase inhibition, telomerase activity was measured using the cell-free telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. We also tested inhibitors in long-term cell-culture experiments by exposing A-549 cells to non-cytotoxic concentrations of inhibitors for a period of 99 days. Subsequently, telomerase activity of A-549 cells was investigated using the TRAP assay, and telomere length of samples was assessed by telomere restriction fragment (TRF) Southern blot analysis. PMID:18369824

  7. Synthetic inhibitors of elastase.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Bernstein, P R

    1994-03-01

    For more than two decades investigators around the world, in both academic and industrial institutions, have been developing inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. A number of very elegant and insightful strategies have been reported. In the case of reversible peptidic inhibitors, this has resulted in the identification of some extremely potent compounds with dissociation constants in the 10(-11) M range. This is quite an accomplishment considering that these low molecular-weight inhibitors are only tri- and tetrapeptides. In the case of the heterocyclic-based inhibitors, the challenge of balancing the heterocycle's inherent reactivity and aqueous stability with the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor adduct has been meet by either using a latent, reactive functionality which is only activated within the enzyme, or by incorporating features which selectively obstruct deacylation but have little effect on the enzyme acylation step. The underlying goal of this research has been the identification of agents to treat diseases associated with HNE. Several animal models have been developed for evaluating the in vivo activity of elastase inhibitors, and compounds have been shown to be effective in all of these models by the intravenous, intratrachael or oral routes of administration. However, only a very small percentage of compounds have possessed all the necessary properties, including lack of toxicity, for progression into the clinic. The peptidyl TFMK ICI 200,880 (25-12) has many of the desired characteristics of a drug to treat the diseases associated with HNE: chemical stability, in vitro and in vivo activity, a long duration of action, and adequate metabolic stability. Currently ICI 200,880 is the only low molecular-weight HNE inhibitor known to be undergoing clinical trials, and may be the compound which finally demonstrates the clinical utility of a synthetic HNE inhibitor. PMID:8189835

  8. Assessing Metabolic Changes in Response to mTOR Inhibition in a Mantle Cell Lymphoma Xenograft Model Using AcidoCEST MRI

    PubMed Central

    Akhenblit, Paul J.; Hanke, Neale T.; Gill, Alexander; Persky, Daniel O.; Howison, Christine M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Baker, Amanda F.

    2016-01-01

    AcidoCEST magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has previously been shown to measure tumor extracellular pH (pHe) with excellent accuracy and precision. This study investigated the ability of acidoCEST MRI to monitor changes in tumor pHe in response to therapy. To perform this study, we used the Granta 519 human mantle cell lymphoma cell line, which is an aggressive B-cell malignancy that demonstrates activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. We performed in vitro and in vivo studies using the Granta 519 cell line to investigate the efficacy and associated changes induced by the mTOR inhibitor, everolimus (RAD001). AcidoCEST MRI studies showed a statistically significant increase in tumor pHe of 0.10 pH unit within 1 day of initiating treatment, which foreshadowed a decrease in tumor growth of the Granta 519 xenograft model. AcidoCEST MRI then measured a decrease in tumor pHe 7 days after initiating treatment, which foreshadowed a return to normal tumor growth rate. Therefore, this study is a strong example that acidoCEST MRI can be used to measure tumor pHe that may serve as a marker for therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapies. PMID:27140422

  9. Assessing Metabolic Changes in Response to mTOR Inhibition in a Mantle Cell Lymphoma Xenograft Model Using AcidoCEST MRI.

    PubMed

    Akhenblit, Paul J; Hanke, Neale T; Gill, Alexander; Persky, Daniel O; Howison, Christine M; Pagel, Mark D; Baker, Amanda F

    2016-01-01

    AcidoCEST magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has previously been shown to measure tumor extracellular pH (pHe) with excellent accuracy and precision. This study investigated the ability of acidoCEST MRI to monitor changes in tumor pHe in response to therapy. To perform this study, we used the Granta 519 human mantle cell lymphoma cell line, which is an aggressive B-cell malignancy that demonstrates activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. We performed in vitro and in vivo studies using the Granta 519 cell line to investigate the efficacy and associated changes induced by the mTOR inhibitor, everolimus (RAD001). AcidoCEST MRI studies showed a statistically significant increase in tumor pHe of 0.10 pH unit within 1 day of initiating treatment, which foreshadowed a decrease in tumor growth of the Granta 519 xenograft model. AcidoCEST MRI then measured a decrease in tumor pHe 7 days after initiating treatment, which foreshadowed a return to normal tumor growth rate. Therefore, this study is a strong example that acidoCEST MRI can be used to measure tumor pHe that may serve as a marker for therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapies. PMID:27140422

  10. [STAT3 inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Clinical efficacies of various molecular-targeted drugs have been recently demonstrated. Most of these drugs are kinase inhibitors. A most successful drug Glivec is an inhibitor of Bcr-Abl fusion kinase, derived from a well-known causative chromosome translocation of chronic myeloid leukemia(CML). Although other kinase inhibitors have also proved to be useful in the therapy of malignant diseases including an ALK inhibitor for lung carcinomas, a general problem of kinase inhibitors is their lowspecificities. Therefore, the complication of these drugs must be overcome. Recently, trials to develop moleculartargeted therapy whose targets are molecules other than kinases have also been promising. Among molecular targets, STAT3 has attracted a great deal of researchers' attention because it is constitutively activated in most malignant tumors and plays important roles in carcinogenesis. This article summarizes the current situation and problems to be solved with STAT3 inhibitors as well as our recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of STAT3 activation. PMID:21368456

  11. Aromatase and its inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brodie, A; Lu, Q; Long, B

    1999-01-01

    Inhibitors of aromatase (estrogen synthetase) have been developed as treatment for postmenopausal breast cancer. Both steroidal substrate analogs, type I inhibitors, which inactivate the enzyme and non-steroidal competitive reversible, type II inhibitors, are now available. 4-hydroxyandrostenedione (4-OHA), the first selective aromatase inhibitor, has been shown to reduce serum estrogen concentrations and cause complete and partial responses in approximately 25% of patients with hormone responsive disease who have relapsed from previous endocrine treatment. Letrozole (CGS 20, 269) and anastrozole (ZN 1033) have been recently approved for treatment. Both suppress serum estrogen levels to the limit of assay detection. Letrozole has been shown to be significantly superior to megace in overall response rates and time to treatment failure, whereas anastrozole was found to improve survival in comparison to megace. Both were better tolerated than the latter. The potential of aromatase within the breast as a significant source of estrogen mediating tumor proliferation and which might determine the outcome of inhibitor treatment was explored. Using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization, aromatase and mRNAarom was detected mainly in the epithelial cells of the terminal ductal lobular units (TDLU) of the normal breast and also in breast tumor epithelial cells as well as some stromal cells. Increase in proliferation, measured by increased thymidine incorporation into DNA and by PCNA immunostaining in response to testosterone was observed in histocultures of breast cancer samples. This effect could be inhibited by 4-OHA and implies that intratumoral aromatase has functional significance. An intratumoral aromatase model in the ovariectomized nude mouse was developed which simulated the hormone responsive postmenopausal breast cancer patient. This model also allows evaluation of the efficacy of aromatase inhibitors and antiestrogens in tumors of estrogen receptor positive

  12. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  13. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. PMID:26362302

  14. Different in vitro proliferation and cytokine-production inhibition of memory T-cell subsets after calcineurin and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors treatment.

    PubMed

    Merino, David; San Segundo, David; Medina, Juan M; Rodrigo, Emilio; Asensio, Esther; Irure, Juan; Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema; Arias, Manuel A; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    2016-06-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) are the main immunosuppressants used for long-term maintenance therapy in transplant recipients to avoid acute rejection episodes. Both groups of immunosuppressants have wide effects and are focused against the T cells, although different impacts on specific T-cell subsets, such as regulatory T cells, have been demonstrated. A greater knowledge of the impact of immunosuppression on the cellular components involved in allograft rejection could facilitate decisions for individualized immunosuppression when an acute rejection event is suspected. Memory T cells have recently gained focus because they might induce a more potent response compared with naive cells. The impact of immunosuppressants on different memory T-cell subsets remains unclear. In the present study, we have studied the specific impact of CNI (tacrolimus) and mTORi (rapamycin and everolimus) over memory and naive CD4(+) T cells. To do so, we have analysed the proliferation, phenotypic changes and cytokine synthesis in vitro in the presence of these immunosuppressants. The present work shows a more potent effect of CNI on proliferation and cytokine production in naive and memory T cells. However, the mTORi permit the differentiation of naive T cells to the memory phenotype and allow the production of interleukin-2. Taken together, our data show evidence to support the combined use of CNI and mTORi in transplant immunosuppression. PMID:26931075

  15. Long-term mTOR inhibitors administration evokes altered calcium homeostasis and platelet dysfunction in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    López, Esther; Berna-Erro, Alejandro; Bermejo, Nuria; Brull, José María; Martinez, Rocío; Garcia Pino, Guadalupe; Alvarado, Raul; Salido, Ginés María; Rosado, Juan Antonio; Cubero, Juan José; Redondo, Pedro Cosme

    2013-05-01

    The use of the mammal target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors has been consolidated as the therapy of election for preventing graft rejection in kidney transplant patients, despite their immunosuppressive activity is less strong than anti-calcineurin agents like tacrolimus and cyclosporine A. Furthermore, as mTOR is widely expressed, rapamycin (a macrolide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus) is recommended in patients presenting neoplasia due to its antiproliferative actions. Hence, we have investigated whether rapamycin presents side effects in the physiology of other cell types different from leucocytes, such as platelets. Blood samples were drawn from healthy volunteers and kidney transplant patients long-term medicated with rapamycin: sirolimus and everolimus. Platelets were either loaded with fura-2 or directly stimulated, and immunoassayed or fixed with Laemmli's buffer to perform the subsequent analysis of platelet physiology. Our results indicate that rapamycin evokes a biphasic time-dependent alteration in calcium homeostasis and function in platelets from kidney transplant patients under rapamycin regime, as demonstrated by the reduction in granule secretion observed and subsequent impairment of platelet aggregation in these patients compared with healthy volunteers. Platelet count was also reduced in these patients, thus 41% of patients presented thrombocytopenia. All together our results show that long-term administration of rapamycin to kidney transplant patients evokes alteration in platelet function. PMID:23577651

  16. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  17. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  18. One-year outcome of a prospective trial stopping dual antiplatelet therapy at 3 months after everolimus-eluting cobalt-chromium stent implantation: ShortT and OPtimal duration of Dual AntiPlatelet Therapy after everolimus-eluting cobalt-chromium stent (STOPDAPT) trial.

    PubMed

    Natsuaki, Masahiro; Morimoto, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Erika; Shiomi, Hiroki; Furukawa, Yutaka; Abe, Mitsuru; Nakao, Koichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kawai, Kazuya; Yunoki, Kei; Shimizu, Shogo; Akao, Masaharu; Miki, Shinji; Yamamoto, Masashi; Okada, Hisayuki; Hoshino, Kozo; Kadota, Kazushige; Morino, Yoshihiro; Igarashi, Keiichi; Tanabe, Kengo; Kozuma, Ken; Kimura, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    There has been no previous prospective study evaluating dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) duration shorter than 6 months after cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stent (CoCr-EES) implantation. STOPDAPT trial is a prospective multi-center single-arm study evaluating 3-month DAPT duration after CoCr-EES implantation. The primary endpoint was a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, definite stent thrombosis (ST) and TIMI major/minor bleeding at 1 year. Between September 2012 and October 2013, a total of 1525 patients were enrolled from 58 Japanese centers, with complete 1-year follow-up in 1519 patients (99.6 %). Thienopyridine was discontinued within 4 months in 1444 patients (94.7 %). The event rates beyond 3 months were very low (cardiovascular death: 0.5 %, MI: 0.1 %, ST: 0 %, stroke: 0.7 %, and TIMI major/minor bleeding: 0.8 %). Cumulative 1-year incidence of the primary endpoint was 2.8 % [upper 97.5 % confidence interval (CI) 3.6 %], which was lower than the pre-defined performance goal of 6.6 % (P < 0.0001). Using the CoCr-EES group in the RESET trial as a historical comparison group, where nearly 90 % of patients had continued DAPT at 1 year, cumulative incidence of the primary endpoint tended to be lower in the STOPDAPT than in the RESET (2.8 versus 4.0 %, P = 0.06) and adjusted hazard ratio was 0.64 (95 % CI 0.42-0.95, P = 0.03). The cumulative incidence of definite/probable ST was lower in the STOPDAPT than in the RESET [0 patient (0 %) versus 5 patients (0.3 %), P = 0.03]. In conclusion, stopping DAPT at 3 months in selected patients after CoCr-EES implantation was at least as safe as the prolonged DAPT regimen adopted in the historical control group. PMID:26518420

  19. Protein protease inhibitors in insects and comparison with mammalian inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Studies on insect protein protease inhibitors are summarized. Biochemical, genetic and physiological investigations of the silkworm are performed. 2. In addition, the properties and characteristics of fungal protease inhibitors from the silkworm (Bombyx mori) are described and their importance as defensive functions is emphasized. 3. This review also concerns comparative and evolutionary studies of protease inhibitors from various sources. 4. The biological significance of inhibitors is discussed in view of the extensive experimental results. PMID:8365101

  20. Inhibitors of rhomboid proteases.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Eliane V; Verhelst, Steven H L

    2016-03-01

    Rhomboid proteases form one of the most widespread families of intramembrane proteases. They utilize a catalytic serine-histidine dyad located several Å below the surface of the membrane for substrate hydrolysis. Multiple studies have implicated rhomboid proteases in biologically and medically relevant processes. Several assays have been developed that are able to monitor rhomboid activity. With the aid of these assays, different types of inhibitors have been found, all based on electrophiles that covalently react with the active site machinery. Although the currently available inhibitors have limited selectivity and moderate potency, they can function as research tools and as starting point for the development of activity-based probes, which are reagents that can specifically detect active rhomboid species. Structural studies on complexes of inhibitors with the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG have provided insight into how substrate recognition may occur. Future synthetic efforts, aided by high-throughput screening or structure-based design, may lead to more potent and selective inhibitors for this interesting family of proteases. PMID:26166068

  1. Sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Korsinczky, Michael L J; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Craik, David J

    2004-10-01

    SFTI-1 is a bicyclic 14 amino acid peptide that was originally isolated from the seeds of the sunflower Helianthus annuus. It is a potent inhibitor of trypsin, with a sub-nanomolar K(i) value and is homologous to the active site region of the well-known family of serine protease inhibitors known as the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitors. It has a cyclic backbone that is cross-braced by a single disulfide bridge and a network of hydrogen bonds that result in a well-defined structure. SFTI-1 is amenable to chemical synthesis, allowing for the creation of synthetic variants. Alterations to the structure such as linearising the backbone or removing the disulfide bridge do not reduce the potency of SFTI-1 significantly, and minimising the peptide to as few as nine residues results in only a small decrease in reactivity. The creation of linear variants of SFTI-1 also provides a tool for investigating putative linear precursor peptides. The mechanism of biosynthesis of SFTI-1 is not yet known but it seems likely that it is a gene-coded product that has arisen from a precursor protein that may be evolutionarily related to classic Bowman-Birk inhibitors. PMID:15544530

  2. Recent advances for FLAP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Daniel; Davidsson, Öjvind; Whatling, Carl

    2015-07-01

    A number of FLAP inhibitors have been progressed to clinical trials for respiratory and other inflammatory indications but so far no drug has reached the market. With this Digest we assess the opportunity to develop FLAP inhibitors for indications beyond respiratory disease, and in particular for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We also show how recently disclosed FLAP inhibitors have structurally evolved from the first generation FLAP inhibitors paving the way for new compound classes. PMID:26004579

  3. One-Year Outcomes in "Real-World" Patients Treated With a Thin-Strut, Platinum-Chromium, Everolimus-Eluting Stent (from the PROMUS Element Plus US Post-Approval Study [PE-Plus PAS]).

    PubMed

    Kandzari, David E; Amjadi, Nima; Caputo, Christopher; Rowe, Steven K; Williams, Jerome; Tamboli, Hoshedar P; Christen, Thomas; Allocco, Dominic J; Dawkins, Keith D

    2016-02-15

    The PROMUS Element Plus US Post-Approval Study (PE-Plus PAS) was a prospective, open-label, multicenter, observational study designed to examine outcomes in everyday clinical practice in patients treated with everolimus-eluting, platinum-chromium PROMUS Element Plus stents at 52 centers in the United States. This is the first report of results from this large study. The primary end point of the PE-Plus PAS was 12-month cardiac death or myocardial infarction in the more restricted population of "PLATINUM-like" patients pooled from the PE-Plus PAS, PE-PROVE (PROMUS Element European post-approval study), and PLATINUM Workhorse/Small Vessel trials. Additional clinical end points were tested in the overall PE-Plus PAS patient population. Of the 2,683 patients enrolled in PE-Plus PAS, 70% were men, mean age was 64 years, 33% had diabetes, and 29% were "PLATINUM-like." Among the PLATINUM-like patients, 12-month cardiac death or myocardial infarction was 1.8% (33 of 1,855) with an upper 1-sided 95% confidence interval of 2.3%, which was significantly less than the prespecified performance goal of 3.2% (pnoninferiority <0.001). In the overall PE-Plus population, 12-month target vessel failure (defined as death, MI, or revascularization related to the target vessel) was 6.7% (170 of 2,554), cardiac death was 1.4% (37 of 2,554), MI was 1.1% (28 of 2,554), and ARC-definite/probable stent thrombosis was 0.7% (19 of 2,554). A prespecified secondary end point of 12-month target vessel failure in diabetic patients demonstrated a rate of 4.2% (14 of 332) with an upper 1-sided 95% confidence interval of 6.03%, which was significantly less than the performance goal of 12.6% (pnoninferiority <0.001). In conclusion, in this large registry of unselected patients, coronary artery revascularization with the PROMUS Element Plus everolimus-eluting stent demonstrates favorable results with low 1-year clinical event rates. PMID:26732420

  4. Benzoylurea Chitin Synthesis Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ranfeng; Liu, Chunjuan; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Qingmin

    2015-08-12

    Benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors are widely used in integrated pest management (IPM) and insecticide resistance management (IRM) programs due to their low toxicity to mammals and predatory insects. In the past decades, a large number of benzoylurea derivatives have been synthesized, and 15 benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors have been commercialized. This review focuses on the history of commercial benzolyphenylureas (BPUs), synthetic methods, structure-activity relationships (SAR), action mechanism research, environmental behaviors, and ecotoxicology. Furthermore, their disadvantages of high risk to aquatic invertebrates and crustaceans are pointed out. Finally, we propose that the para-substituents at anilide of benzoylphenylureas should be the functional groups, and bipartite model BPU analogues are discussed in an attempt to provide new insight for future development of BPUs. PMID:26168369

  5. Alpha glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2014-04-01

    Alpha glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) are a unique class of anti-diabetic drugs. Derived from bacteria, these oral drugs are enzyme inhibitors which do not have a pancreato -centred mechanism of action. Working to delay carbohydrate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract, they control postprandial hyperglycaemia and provide unquestioned cardiovascular benefit. Specially suited for a traditional Pakistani carbohydrate-rich diet, AGIs have been termed the 'untapped diamonds' of diabetology. The use of these oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) that target pathophysiology in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, notably to reduce postprandial hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia will inevitably increase with time. This review describes the history of their development, mechanism of action, basic and clinical pharmacology, and suggests practical, evidence-based guidance for their optimal use. PMID:24864650

  6. [JAK2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hernández Boluda, Juan Carlos; Gómez, Montse; Pérez, Ariadna

    2016-07-15

    Pharmacological inhibition of the kinase activity of JAK proteins can interfere with the signaling of immunomodulatory cytokines and block the constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway that characterizes certain malignancies, including chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. JAK inhibitors may, therefore, be useful to treat malignancies as well as inflammatory or immune disorders. Currently, the most significant advances have been made in the treatment of myelofibrosis, where these drugs may lead to a remarkable improvement in the control of hyperproliferative manifestations. However, available data suggest that this treatment is not curative of myelofibrosis. In general, JAK2 inhibition induces cytopaenias, with this being considered a class side-effect. By contrast, the extrahaematologic toxicity profile varies significantly among the different JAK inhibitors. At present, there are several clinical trials evaluating the combination of ruxolitinib with other drugs, in order to improve its therapeutic activity as well as reducing haematologic toxicity. PMID:27033437

  7. PARP inhibitors and more.

    PubMed

    Bose, Chinmoy K; Basu, Nirban

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) lends a panoramic view to the inner mystery of protection of integrity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a cell genome. They are a balancing part of an even more dynamic equilibrium of normalcy against daily assaults. PARP finds its companion candidates in other tumor suppressors, with the most prominent and glaring one being breast cancer (BRCA) 1 and 2. The strength of both is split by PARP inhibitors, inculcating the synthetic lethality of tumor cell, which is now in the market for ovarian cancer treatment. There are many reasons for the resistance of such inhibitors, which are now becoming clinically important. These are seen along with other damage repair approaches. PMID:26097394

  8. PARP inhibitors and more

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Chinmoy K.; Basu, Nirban

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) lends a panoramic view to the inner mystery of protection of integrity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a cell genome. They are a balancing part of an even more dynamic equilibrium of normalcy against daily assaults. PARP finds its companion candidates in other tumor suppressors, with the most prominent and glaring one being breast cancer (BRCA) 1 and 2. The strength of both is split by PARP inhibitors, inculcating the synthetic lethality of tumor cell, which is now in the market for ovarian cancer treatment. There are many reasons for the resistance of such inhibitors, which are now becoming clinically important. These are seen along with other damage repair approaches. PMID:26097394

  9. Mineralization by Inhibitor Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Price, Paul A.; Toroian, Damon; Lim, Joo Eun

    2009-01-01

    One of our goals is to understand the mechanisms that deposit mineral within collagen fibrils, and as a first step we recently determined the size exclusion characteristics of the fibril. This study revealed that apatite crystals up to 12 unit cells in size can access the water within the fibril, whereas molecules larger than a 40-kDa protein are excluded. Based on these observations, we proposed a novel mechanism for fibril mineralization: that macromolecular inhibitors of apatite growth favor fibril mineralization by selectively inhibiting crystal growth in the solution outside of the fibril. To test this mechanism, we developed a system in which crystal formation is driven by homogeneous nucleation at high calcium phosphate concentration and the only macromolecule in solution is fetuin, a 48-kDa inhibitor of apatite growth. Our experiments with this system demonstrated that fetuin determines the location of mineral growth; in the presence of fetuin mineral grows exclusively within the fibril, whereas in its absence mineral grows in solution outside the fibril. Additional experiments showed that fetuin is also able to localize calcification to the interior of synthetic matrices that have size exclusion characteristics similar to those of collagen and that it does so by selectively inhibiting mineral growth outside of these matrices. We termed this new calcification mechanism “mineralization by inhibitor exclusion,” the selective mineralization of a matrix using a macromolecular inhibitor of mineral growth that is excluded from that matrix. Future studies will be needed to evaluate the possible role of this mechanism in bone mineralization. PMID:19414589

  10. Development of scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.

    1996-12-01

    During the last fifty years, scale inhibition has gone from an art to a science. Scale inhibition has changed from simple pH adjustment to the use of optimized dose of designer polymers from multiple monomers. The water-treatment industry faces many challenges due to the need to conserve water, availability of only low quality water, increasing environmental regulations of the water discharge, and concern for human safety when using acid. Natural materials such as starch, lignin, tannin, etc., have been replaced with hydrolytically stable organic phosphates and synthetic polymers. Most progress in scale inhibition has come from the use of synergistic mixtures and copolymerizing different functionalities to achieve specific goals. Development of scale inhibitors requires an understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and its inhibition. This paper discusses the historic perspective of scale inhibition and the development of new inhibitors based on the understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and the use of powerful tools like molecular modeling to visualize crystal-inhibitor interactions.

  11. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  12. Thymidylate synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Danenberg, P V; Malli, H; Swenson, S

    1999-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a critical enzyme for DNA replication and cell growth because it is the only de novo source of thymine nucleotide precursors for DNA synthesis. TS is the primary target of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has been used for cancer treatment for more than 40 years. However, dissatisfaction with the overall activity of 5-FU against the major cancers, and the recognition that TS still remains an attractive target for anticancer drugs because of its central position in the pathway of DNA synthesis, led to a search for new inhibitors of TS structurally analogous to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, the second substrate of TS. TS inhibitory antifolates developed to date that are in various stages of clinical evaluation are ZD 1694 and ZD9331 (Astra-Zeneca, London, UK), (Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN), LY231514 (BW1843U89 (Glaxo-Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC), and AG337 and AG331 (Agouron, La Jolla, CA). Although each of these compounds has TS as its major intracellular site of action, they differ in propensity for polyglutamylation and for transport by the reduced folate carrier. LY231514 also has secondary target enzymes. As a result, each compound is likely to have a different spectrum of antitumor activity and toxicity. This review will summarize the development and properties of this new class of TS inhibitors. PMID:10606255

  13. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  14. [Kinase inhibitors and their resistance].

    PubMed

    Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-08-01

    Kinase cascades are involved in all stages of tumorigenesis through modulation of transformation and differentiation, cell-cycle progression, and motility. Advances in molecular targeted drug development allow the design and synthesis of inhibitors targeting cancer-associated signal transduction pathways. Potent selective inhibitors with low toxicity can benefit patients especially with several malignancies harboring an oncogenic driver addictive signal. This article evaluates information on solid tumor-related kinase signals and inhibitors, including receptor tyrosine kinase or serine/threonine kinase signals that lead to successful application in clinical settings. In addition, the resistant mechanisms to the inhibitors is summarized. PMID:26281685

  15. Effects of mTOR inhibitors and cytoskeletal-directed agents alone and in combination against normal and neoplastic hematopoietic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Trendowski, Matthew; Christen, Timothy D; Andonova, Antoaneta A; Narampanawe, Berlini; Thibaud, Ashlee; Kusang, Tenzin; Fondy, Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) controls cell growth and enlargement and has been found to be aberrant in a wide variety of malignancies. Although mTOR is already an attractive antineoplastic target, overexpression or aberrant expression of mTOR may also provide an opportunity to further increase the size differential between malignant and normal cells, providing an opportunity to amplify and exploit cell size differences between neoplastic cells and their normal counterparts using physiochemical treatment modalities. Therefore, this study sought to quantify the concentration response and time course effects of rapamycin on cell cycle entry, cell enlargement, and cell proliferation in U937 human monocytic leukemia and human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSCs). In addition, the effects of combination treatment with mTOR inhibitors (rapamycin, everolimus, and temsirolimus) and cytoskeletal-directed agents (cytochalasin B and vincristine) in leukemic cells (U937, THP1, K562, Molt-4, and L1210) were assessed for potential drug synergy. While both U937 cells and hHSCs exhibited a marked reduction in cell volume, U937 cells were able to proliferate in the presence of rapamycin ranging from 0.5 nM to 10 μM (10,000 nM), whereas hHSCs were able to proliferate only at lower concentrations, and were completely inhibited from proliferation by 8 nM rapamycin. These effects were observed with as little as 0.5 nM rapamycin, demonstrating the profound affinity the compound has for FK-binding protein 12 (FKBP12), which subsequently forms the FKBP12/rapamycin complex to inhibit mTOR. Rapamycin continued to exert effects on cell size and proliferation even at 10 μM, without producing marked cytotoxicity. Although cytochalasin B and vincristine were unable to substantially enlarge rapamycin-treated leukemia cells, it appears that rapamycin and its associated analogs everolimus and temsirolimus have notable synergistic potential with microfilament-disrupting cytochalasin B

  16. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  17. Repositioning of DHFR Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lele, Arundhati Chandrashekhar; Mishra, Deepak Amarnath; Kamil, Tengku Karmila; Bhakta, Sanjib; Degani, Mariam Sohel

    2016-01-01

    Development of new drugs is a time-consuming, hugely expensive and an uncertain endeavor. The pharmaceutical industry is looking for cost-effective alternatives with reduced risks of drug failure. Validated target machinery along with established inhibitors indicates usefulness in drug design, discovery and further development. Folate metabolism, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, represents an essential druggable target for chemotherapy. Numerous enzymes in the cell replication cycle use folate either as a cofactor or as a substrate. DHFR, an enzyme of the folate biosynthesis pathway is an established chemotherapeutic target, initially explored for anti-cancer drug discovery. Diaminopteridines e.g. methotrexate and aminopterin, primarily used as anti-cancer agents, are folic acid analogues, first reported in late 1940's, used to produce temporary remission of acute leukaemia in children. However, due to the toxicity of these drugs, they could not be used for other therapeutic implications such as in the treatment of infectious diseases. Development of newer diaminopteridine derivatives has helped in repositioning their therapeutic usefulness. These analogues have now been proven as anti-parasitic, immuno-suppressants, anti-bacterial agents, to enlist a few therapeutic applications. Likewise, diaminopyrimidine, diaminoquinazoline and diaminodihydrotriazines are being explored for structural modifications by which they can be repurposed from their originally developed medicinal applicability and exploited for various other infectious disease conditions. In this review, we encompass the study of DHFR inhibitors potentially to be repurposed for different infectious disease case scenario and also highlight the novel anti-infective drug discovery benefits therein. PMID:26881719

  18. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  19. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  20. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  1. Comparison of paclitaxel-eluting stents (Taxus) and everolimus-eluting stents (Xience) in left main coronary artery disease with 3 years follow-up (from the ESTROFA-LM registry).

    PubMed

    De la Torre Hernandez, Jose M; Alfonso, Fernando; Sanchez Recalde, Angel; Jimenez Navarro, Manuel F; Perez de Prado, Armando; Hernandez, Felipe; Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; Roura, Gerard; Garcia Camarero, Tamara; Elizaga, Jaime; Rivero, Fernando; Gimeno, Federico; Calviño, Ramon; Moreu, Jose; Bosa, Francisco; Rumoroso, Jose R; Bullones, Juan A; Gallardo, Arsenio; Fernandez Diaz, Jose A; Ruiz Arroyo, Jose R; Aragon, Victor; Masotti, Monica

    2013-03-01

    Evidence regarding therapy with drug-eluting stents in the left main coronary artery (LM) is based mostly on trials performed with first-generation drug-eluting stents. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term clinical outcomes after treatment for unprotected LM disease with paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) and everolimus-eluting stents (EES). The ESTROFA-LM is a multicenter retrospective registry including consecutive patients with unprotected LM disease treated with PES or EES. A total of 770 patients have been included at 21 centers, 415 with treated PES and 355 with EES. Treatment with 2 stents was more frequent with PES (17% vs 10.4%, p = 0.007), whereas intravascular ultrasound was more frequently used with EES (35.2% vs 26%, p = 0.006). The 3-year death and infarction survival rates were 86.1% for PES and 87.3% for EES (p = 0.50) and for death, infarction, and target lesion revascularization were 83.6% versus 82% (p = 0.60), respectively. Definite or probable thrombosis was 1.6% for PES and 1.4% for EES (p = 0.80). The use of 2 stents, age, diabetes, and acute coronary syndromes were independent predictors of mortality. In the subgroup of distal lesions, the use of intravascular ultrasound was an independent predictor of better outcome. Comparison of propensity score-matched groups did not yield differences between the 2 stents. In conclusion, the results of this multicenter registry show comparable safety and efficacy at 3 years for PES and EES in the treatment of LM disease. The use of bifurcation stenting techniques in distal lesions was a relevant independent predictor for events. The use of intravascular ultrasound appears to have a positive impact on patients treated for LM distal disease. PMID:23273715

  2. Vascular response to bioresorbable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent vs. permanent polymer everolimus-eluting stent at 9-month follow-up: an optical coherence tomography sub-study from the CENTURY II trial

    PubMed Central

    Kuramitsu, Shoichi; Kazuno, Yoshio; Sonoda, Shinjo; Domei, Takenori; Jinnouchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaji, Kyohei; Soga, Yoshimitsu; Shirai, Shinichi; Ando, Kenji; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Aims The Ultimaster bioresorbable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent (BP-SES) is a newly developed drug-eluting stent (DES) that consists of a thin-strut, cobalt chromium with bioresorbable polymer coated only albuminally. We sought to compare tissue coverage in coronary lesions treated with BP-SES with the XIENCE permanent polymer everolimus-eluting stent (PP-EES) using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods and results A total of 36 patients participated in the CENTURY II trial in our institution and were randomly assigned to BP-SES (n = 15) and PP-EES (n = 21). Of these, 27 patients (13 BP-SES and 14 PP-EES) underwent OCT at 9-month follow-up. Tissue coverage and apposition were assessed on each strut, and the results in both groups were compared using multilevel logistic or linear regression models with random effects at three levels: patient, lesion, and struts. A total of 6450 struts (BP-SES, n = 2951; PP-EES, n = 3499) were analysed. Thirty and 79 uncovered struts (1.02 and 2.26%, P = 0.35), and 3 and 4 malapposed struts (0.10 and 0.11%, P = 0.94) were found in BP-SES and PP-EES groups, respectively. Mean neointimal thickness did not significantly differ between both groups (110 ± 10 vs. 93 ± 10 µm, P = 0.22). No significant differences in per cent neointimal volume obstruction (13.2 ± 4.6 vs. 10.5 ± 4.9%, P = 0.14) or other areas-volumetric parameters were detected between both groups. Conclusion BP-SES shows an excellent vascular healing response at 9-month follow-up, which is similar to PP-EES. PMID:26333375

  3. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  4. Synthetic conversion of ACAT inhibitor to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Otoguro, K; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    2000-06-19

    Natural product acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor pyripyropene A was synthetically converted to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor via heterolitic cleavage of the 2-pyrone ring, followed by gamma-acylation/cyclization with several aroyl chlorides. The 4-pyridyl analogue selectively showed AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 7.9 microM) and no ACAT inhibitory activity IC50 = >1000 microM. PMID:10890154

  5. Drug-Related Pneumonitis During Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitor Therapy: Radiographic Pattern-Based Approach in Waldenström Macroglobulinemia as a Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Erica N.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Ghobrial, Irene M.; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study determined the frequency of drug-related pneumonitis during mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor therapy in Waldenström macroglobulinemia patients and investigated the imaging characteristics and radiographic patterns of pneumonitis. Materials and Methods. A total of 40 patients (23 men, 17 women; 43–84 years old) with Waldenström macroglobulinemia treated in 2 trials of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus were retrospectively studied. Chest computed tomography (CT) scans during therapy were reviewed for abnormalities suspicious for drug-related pneumonitis by the consensus of three radiologists, evaluating the extent, distributions, and specific findings. The radiographic patterns of pneumonitis were classified using the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification of interstitial pneumonia. Results. Drug-related pneumonitis was noted in 23 patients (58%). The median time from the initiation of therapy to the onset of pneumonitis was 5.7 months. Lower lungs were involved in all 23 patients, with a higher extent than in the other zones (p < .001). The distribution was peripheral and lower in 11 patients (48%) and mixed and multifocal in 10 (44%). The findings were bilateral in 20 patients (87%). Ground glass opacities (GGOs) and reticular opacities were present in all 23 patients, with consolidation in 12, traction bronchiectasis in 2, and centrilobular nodularity in 1. The pattern of pneumonitis was classified as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) in 16 (70%) and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) in 7 (30%), with overlapping features of COP and NSIP in 7 patients. Conclusion. Drug-related pneumonitis was noted on CT in 58% of Waldenström macroglobulinemia patients treated with mTOR inhibitor therapy. Most common findings were bilateral GGOs and reticular opacities, with or without consolidation, in peripheral and lower lungs, demonstrating COP and NSIP patterns. Implications for Practice: The

  6. Targeting cancer with kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Stefan; Rahal, Rami; Stransky, Nicolas; Lengauer, Christoph; Hoeflich, Klaus P.

    2015-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors have played an increasingly prominent role in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Currently, more than 25 oncology drugs that target kinases have been approved, and numerous additional therapeutics are in various stages of clinical evaluation. In this Review, we provide an in-depth analysis of activation mechanisms for kinases in cancer, highlight recent successes in drug discovery, and demonstrate the clinical impact of selective kinase inhibitors. We also describe the substantial progress that has been made in designing next-generation inhibitors to circumvent on-target resistance mechanisms, as well as ongoing strategies for combining kinase inhibitors in the clinic. Last, there are numerous prospects for the discovery of novel kinase targets, and we explore cancer immunotherapy as a new and promising research area for studying kinase biology. PMID:25932675

  7. Aromatase inhibitors for male infertility.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Peter N

    2012-12-01

    Some men with severely defective sperm production commonly have excess aromatase activity, reflected by low serum testosterone and relatively elevated estradiol levels. Aromatase inhibitors can increase endogenous testosterone production and serum testosterone levels. Treatment of infertile males with the aromatase inhibitors testolactone, anastrazole, and letrozole has been associated with increased sperm production and return of sperm to the ejaculate in men with non-obstructive azoospermia. Use of the aromatase inhibitors anastrazole (1 mg/day) and letrozole (2.5 mg/day) represent off-label use of these agents for impaired spermatogenesis in men with excess aromatase activity (abnormal testosterone/estradiol [T/E] ratios). Side effects have rarely been reported. Randomized controlled trials are needed to define the magnitude of benefit of aromatase inhibitor treatment for infertile men. PMID:23103016

  8. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  9. [Cancer therapy by PARP inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases(PARP) synthesize the ADP-ribose polymers onto proteins and play a role in DNA repair. PARP inhibitors block the repair of single-strand breaks, which in turn gives rise to double-strand breaks during DNA replication. Thus, PARP inhibitors elicit synthetic lethality in cancer with BRCA1/2 loss-of-function mutations that hamper homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks. Olaparib, the first-in-class PARP inhibitor, was approved for treatment of BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer in Europe and the United States in 2014. Other PARP inhibitors under clinical trials include rucaparib, niraparib, veliparib, and the "PARP-trapping" BMN-673. BRCA1/2 sequencing is an FDA-approved companion diagnostics, which predicts the cancer vulnerability to PARP inhibition. Together, synthetic lethal PARP inhibition is a novel promising strategy for cancer intervention even in cases without prominent driver oncogenes. PMID:26281686

  10. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853