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Sample records for inhibits beta-catenin binding

  1. Prenylated Rab acceptor 1 (PRA1) inhibits TCF/{beta}-catenin signaling by binding to {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong-Tae; Cho, Mi-Young; Choi, Seung-Chul; Kim, Jung Woo; Chae, Suhn-Kee; Yoon, Do-Young; Kim, Jae Wha . E-mail: wjkim@kribb.re.kr; Lim, Jong-Seok . E-mail: jslim@sookmyung.ac.kr

    2006-10-13

    The prenylated Rab acceptor 1 (PRA1) is a ubiquitously expressed 21 kDa protein containing two transmembrane domains that possibly induce its localization to the Golgi complex. It binds to prenylated Rab GTPases and VAMP2. In this study, we report that PRA1-overexpressing cells exhibited a significantly retarded growth rate as compared to that of the mock-transfected cells, and the transcriptional activity of TCF, as evaluated by TOPflash luciferase reporter assay, was profoundly reduced in the PRA1-overexpressed cells. These intracellular functions of PRA1 were verified by introducing deletion mutant or site-directed mutants, or small interfering RNA of PRA1. In addition, the translocation of {beta}-catenin from the cytosol to the nucleus was blocked to a significant degree in the PRA1-cells, and the interaction of PRA1 and {beta}-catenin was identified by confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation analysis. Finally, we observed that the inhibition of TCF/{beta}-catenin signaling by PRA1 is associated with ERK1/2 dephosphorylation. Therefore, our data suggest that the in vivo modulation of PRA1 may be involved in TCF/{beta}-catenin signaling, as well as cellular proliferation and tumorigenesis.

  2. ICAT Inhibits beta-Catenin Binding to Tcf/Lef-Family Transcription Factors and in the General Coactivator p300 Using Independent Structural Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    In the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, {beta}-catenin activates target genes through its interactions with Tcf/Lef-family transcription factors and additional transcriptional coactivators. The crystal structure of ICAT, an inhibitor of {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription, bound to the armadillo repeat domain of {beta}-catenin, has been determined. ICAT contains an N-terminal helilical domain that binds to repeats 11 and 12 of {beta}-catenin, and an extended C-terminal region that binds to repeats 5-10 in a manner similar that of Tcfs and other {beta}-catenin ligands. Full-length ICAT dissociates complexes of {beta}-catenin, Lef-1, and the transcriptional coactivator p300, whereas the helical domain alone selectively blocks binding to p300. The C-terminal armadillo repeats of {beta}-catenin may be an attractive target for compounds designed to disrupt aberrant {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription associated with various cancers.

  3. Inhibition of {beta}-catenin-mediated transactivation by flavanone in AGS gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chi Hoon; Hahm, Eun Ryeong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Kyung Chae; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-06-17

    Recently, data which prove that Wnt pathway activation may be an early event in multistep carcinogenesis in the stomach have been accumulating. We examined the effect of flavanone against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in AGS gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that flavanone inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by flavanone in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that there is no change of {beta}-catenin distribution and of nuclear {beta}-catenin levels through flavanone. In addition, the binding of Tcf complexes to DNA is not influenced by flavanone. The {beta}-catenin/Tcf transcriptional target gene cyclinD1 was downregulated by flavanone. These data suggest that flavanone inhibits the transcription of {beta}-catenin/Tcf responsive genes, by modulating Tcf activity without disrupting {beta}-catenin/Tcf complex formation.

  4. Inhibition of Drosophila Wg signaling involves competition between Mad and Armadillo/beta-catenin for dTcf binding.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi Arial; Rahnama, Maryam; Wang, Simon; Lee, Wendy; Verheyen, Esther M

    2008-01-01

    Precisely regulated signal transduction pathways are crucial for the regulation of developmental events and prevention of tumorigenesis. Both the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFbeta)/Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Wnt/Wingless (Wg) pathways play essential roles in organismal patterning and growth, and their deregulation can lead to cancers. We describe a mechanism of interaction between Drosophila Wg and BMP signaling in which Wg target gene expression is antagonized by BMP signaling. In vivo, high levels of both an activated BMP receptor and the BMP effector Mad can inhibit the expression of Wg target genes. Conversely, loss of mad can induce Wg target gene expression. In addition, we find that ectopic expression in vivo of the Wg transcription factor dTcf is able to suppress the inhibitory effect caused by ectopic Mad. In vitro binding studies revealed competition for dTcf binding between Mad and the Wnt effector beta-catenin/Armadillo (Arm). Our in vivo genetic analyses and target gene studies support a mechanism consistent with the in vitro binding and competition studies, namely that BMP pathway components can repress Wg target gene expression by influencing the binding of Arm and dTcf. PMID:19065265

  5. Lignans inhibit cell growth via regulation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hee Ju; Kang, Kyungsu; Jho, Eun Hye; Kim, Chul Young; Baturen, Dulamjav; Tunsag, Jigjidsuren; Nho, Chu Won

    2010-01-01

    As aberrant activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is one of the major mechanisms of carcinogenesis in colon cancer, identification of inhibitors of this pathway may aid in colon cancer prevention. We investigated the ability of the lignans arctiin, matairesinol and arctigenin from Saussurea salicifolia to inhibit Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in SW480 human colon cancer cells. The lignans inhibited SW480 cell growth. In addition, the transcriptional activity of a reporter construct containing the TCF binding element (TBE) was decreased after the treatment with all three lignans. Although arctiin, matairesinol and arctigenin have similar structures, arctigenin affected Wnt/beta-catenin signaling most significantly. Further, arctigenin reduced the level of beta-catenin by inducing its phosphorylation and thus its degradation. Arctigenin also decreased expression of the beta-catenin/TCF downstream genes CCND1, survivin and CTNNB1, and induced apoptosis. These results suggest that arctigenin, an aglycone with a methoxyl group, potently inhibits the growth of human colon cancer cells via the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:20510325

  6. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans, gomisins J and N inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Chul Young; Nho, Chu Won

    2012-11-16

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the possible molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway and the induction of G0/G1-phase arrest by gomisins J and N, derived from the fruits of S. chinensis, in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N disrupted the binding of {beta}-catenin to specific DNA sequences, TBE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the HCT116 cell proliferation through G0/G1 phase arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the expression of Cyc D1, a Wnt/{beta}-catenin target gene. -- Abstract: Here, we report that gomisin J and gomisin N, dibenzocyclooctadiene type lignans isolated from Schisandra chinensis, inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in HCT116 cells. Gomisins J and N appear to inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction between {beta}-catenin and its specific target DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) rather than by altering the expression of the {beta}-catenin protein. Gomisins J and N inhibit HCT116 cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase arrest induced by gomisins J and N appears to be caused by a decrease in the expression of Cyclin D1, a representative target gene of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway, as well as Cdk2, Cdk4, and E2F-1. Therefore, gomisins J and N, the novel Wnt/{beta}-catenin inhibitors discovered in this study, may serve as potential agents for the prevention and treatment of human colorectal cancers.

  7. MiR-214 inhibits cell growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Chen, Ji; Li, Feng; Lin, Yanting; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei; Jiang, Jiaji

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 is frequently downregulated in human HCC cell lines and tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 overexpression inhibits HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 directly targets {beta}-catenin 3 Prime -UTR in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 regulates {beta}-catenin downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: Mounting evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in carcinogenesis and can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Recent profile studies of miRNA expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-214) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its potential functions and underlying mechanisms in hepatocarcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we confirmed that miR-214 is significantly downregulated in HCC cells and specimens. Ectopic overexpression of miR-214 inhibited proliferation of HCC cells in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Further studies revealed that miR-214 could directly target the 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) of {beta}-catenin mRNA and suppress its protein expression. Similar to the restoring miR-214 expression, {beta}-catenin downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas restoring the {beta}-catenin expression abolished the function of miR-214. Moreover, miR-214-mediated reduction of {beta}-catenin resulted in suppression of several downstream genes including c-Myc, cyclinD1, TCF-1, and LEF-1. These findings indicate that miR-214 serves as tumor suppressor and plays substantial roles in inhibiting the tumorigenesis of HCC through suppression of {beta}-catenin. Given these, miR-214 may serve as a useful prognostic or therapeutic target for treatment of HCC.

  8. Cardamonin suppresses melanogenesis by inhibition of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Munju; Ryu, Minjung; Jeong, Yongsu; Chung, Young-Hwa; Kim, Dong-Eun; Cho, Ho-Song; Kang, Sangjin; Han, Jong-Sub; Chang, Min-Youl; Lee, Cheon-Koo; Jin, Muhyun; Kim, Ho-Jeoung; Oh, Sangtaek

    2009-12-18

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling plays important roles in many developmental processes, including neural crest-derived melanocyte development. Here we show that cardamonin, a calchone from Aplinia katsumadai Hayata, inhibited pigmentation in melanocytes through suppression of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. Cardamonin significantly suppressed the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase, which are melanocyte differentiation-associated markers, in human normal melanocytes, thereby decreasing intracellular melanin production. In addition, cardamonin promoted the degradation of intracellular beta-catenin that was accumulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium (Wnt3a CM) or bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO), a glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) inhibitor, in HEK293 reporter cells and human normal melanocytes. Our findings indicate that cardamonin may be a potential whitening agent for use in cosmetics and in the medical treatment of hyperpigmentation disorders. PMID:19800318

  9. The APC tumor suppressor binds to C-terminal binding protein to divert nuclear beta-catenin from TCF.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Fumihiko; Bienz, Mariann

    2004-11-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an important tumor suppressor in the colon. APC antagonizes the transcriptional activity of the Wnt effector beta-catenin by promoting its nuclear export and its proteasomal destruction in the cytoplasm. Here, we show that a third function of APC in antagonizing beta-catenin involves C-terminal binding protein (CtBP). APC is associated with CtBP in vivo and binds to CtBP in vitro through its conserved 15 amino acid repeats. Failure of this association results in elevated levels of beta-catenin/TCF complexes and of TCF-mediated transcription. Notably, CtBP is neither associated with TCF in vivo nor does mutation of the CtBP binding motifs in TCF-4 alter its transcriptional activity. This questions the idea that CtBP is a direct corepressor of TCF. Our evidence indicates that APC is an adaptor between beta-catenin and CtBP and that CtBP lowers the availability of free nuclear beta-catenin for binding to TCF by sequestering APC/beta-catenin complexes. PMID:15525529

  10. {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effect of baicalin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Haeyong; Bae, Sungmin; Kim, Kijeong; Kim, Wonyong; Chung, Sang-In; Yoon, Yoosik

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} Baicalin maintains the levels of {beta}-Catenin during adipogenesis. {yields} {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effect of baicalin. {yields} Baicalin maintains the WNT/{beta}-Catenin pathway during adipogenesis. -- Abstract: {beta}-Catenin reportedly inhibits adipogenesis through the down-regulations of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){gamma} and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP){alpha}. We report that baicalin, a natural flavonoid compound, inhibits adipogenesis by modulating {beta}-Catenin. During 3T3-L1 cell adipogenesis, {beta}-Catenin was down-regulated, but baicalin treatment maintained {beta}-Catenin expression. Anti-adipogenic effects of baicalin were significantly attenuated by {beta}-Catenin siRNA transfection. {beta}-Catenin siRNA rescued the reduced expressions of PPAR{gamma}, C/EBP{alpha}, fatty acid binding protein 4 and lipoprotein lipase by baicalin. Furthermore, baicalin modulated members of the WNT/{beta}-Catenin pathway by maintaining the expressions of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6, disheveled (DVL)2 and DVL3. These findings suggest that {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effects of baicalin.

  11. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, nabumetone, differentially inhibits beta-catenin signaling in the MIN mouse and azoxymethane-treated rat models of colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Hemant K; Karolski, William J; Wali, Ramesh K; Ratashak, Anne; Hart, John; Smyrk, Thomas C

    2005-01-20

    The mechanisms through which beta-catenin signaling is inhibited during colorectal cancer chemoprevention by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents is incompletely understood. We report that nabumetone decreased uninvolved intestinal mucosal beta-catenin levels in the MIN mouse with a concomitant increase in glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta levels, an enzyme that targets beta-catenin for destruction. However, in the azoxymethane-treated rat, where beta-catenin is frequently rendered GSK-3beta-insensitive, nabumetone failed to alter beta-catenin levels but did decrease beta-catenin nuclear localization and transcriptional activity as gauged by cyclin D1. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the differential mechanisms for beta-catenin suppression may be determined, at least partly, by GSK-3beta. PMID:15617833

  12. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax dysregulates beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Mariko; Kikuchi, Akira; Akiyama, Tetsu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Mori, Naoki

    2006-11-01

    Dysregulation of beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in the malignant transformation of cells. However, the role of beta-catenin in the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced transformation of T cells is unknown. Here we found that beta-catenin protein was overexpressed in the nucleus and that beta-catenin-dependent transcription was significantly enhanced in Tax-positive HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines compared to that in Tax-negative HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. Transfection with beta-catenin-specific small interfering RNA inhibited the growth of the Tax-positive HTLV-1-infected T-cell line HUT-102. Transient transfection of Tax appeared to enhance beta-catenin-dependent transcription by stabilizing the beta-catenin protein via activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element-binding protein. HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines overexpressing beta-catenin also showed increased Akt activity via Tax activation of the cAMP response element-binding protein, resulting in the phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, which phosphorylates beta-catenin for ubiquitination. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 reduced beta-catenin expression in Tax-positive T-cell lines, and inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta by lithium chloride restored beta-catenin expression in Tax-negative T-cell lines. Finally, we showed that dominant-negative Akt inhibited Tax-induced beta-catenin-dependent transcription. These results indicate that Tax activates beta-catenin through the Akt signaling pathway. Our findings suggest that activation of beta-catenin by Tax may be important in the transformation of T cells by HTLV-1 infection. PMID:16920823

  13. Inhibition of the Tcf/beta-catenin complex increases apoptosis and impairs adrenocortical tumor cell proliferation and adrenal steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Letícia F.; Bueno, Ana Carolina; Gomes, Débora C.; Abduch, Rafael; de Castro, Margaret; Antonini, Sonir R.

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, there is no effective therapy for patients with advanced/metastatic adrenocortical cancer (ACC). The activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is frequent in ACC and this pathway is a promising therapeutic target. Aim To investigate the effects of the inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin in ACC cells. Methods Adrenal (NCI-H295 and Y1) and non-adrenal (HeLa) cell lines were treated with PNU-74654 (5–200 μM) for 24–96 h to assess cell viability (MTS-based assay), apoptosis (Annexin V), expression/localization of beta-catenin (qPCR, immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and western blot), expression of beta-catenin target genes (qPCR and western blot), and adrenal steroidogenesis (radioimmunoassay, qPCR and western blot). Results In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 significantly decreased cell proliferation 96 h after treatment, increased early and late apoptosis, decreased nuclear beta-catenin accumulation, impaired CTNNB1/beta-catenin expression and increased beta-catenin target genes 48 h after treatment. No effects were observed on HeLa cells. In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased cortisol, testosterone and androstenedione secretion 24 and 48 h after treatment. Additionally, in NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased SF1 and CYP21A2 mRNA expression as well as the protein levels of STAR and aldosterone synthase 48 h after treatment. In Y1 cells, PNU-74654 impaired corticosterone secretion 24 h after treatment but did not decrease cell viability. Conclusions Blocking the Tcf/beta-catenin complex inhibits the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in adrenocortical tumor cells triggering increased apoptosis, decreased cell viability and impairment of adrenal steroidogenesis. These promising findings pave the way for further experiments inhibiting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in pre-clinical models of ACC. The inhibition of this pathway may become a promising adjuvant therapy for patients with ACC. PMID:26515592

  14. SIRT1 inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, by suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Il-Rae; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Moon, Jeong; Choi, Young-Whan; Horio, Yoshiyuki; Oh, Sangtaek; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inhibits protein levels of {beta}-catenin and its transcriptional activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for the decrease of {beta}-catenin expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is not required for GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 but for proteosome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing PAUF. -- Abstract: Because we found in a recent study that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, induces a rapid proliferation of pancreatic cells by up-regulation of {beta}-catenin, we postulated that {beta}-catenin might be a target molecule for pancreatic cancer treatment. We thus speculated whether SIRT1, known to target {beta}-catenin in a colon cancer model, suppresses {beta}-catenin in those pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF (Panc-PAUF). We further evaluated whether such suppression would lead to inhibition of the proliferation of these cells. The ectopic expression of either SIRT1 or resveratrol (an activator of SIRT1) suppressed levels of {beta}-catenin protein and its transcriptional activity in Panc-PAUF cells. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 expression by siRNA enhanced {beta}-catenin expression and transcriptional activity. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for reduction of {beta}-catenin. Treatment with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, restored {beta}-catenin protein levels, suggesting that SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin requires proteasomal activity. It was reported that inhibition of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 stabilizes {beta}-catenin in colon cancer cells, but suppression of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 using siRNA in the presence of resveratrol instead diminished {beta}-catenin protein levels in Panc-PAUF cells. This suggests that GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 are not involved in SIRT1

  15. The catenin p120{sup ctn} inhibits Kaiso-mediated transcriptional repression of the {beta}-catenin/TCF target gene matrilysin

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, Christopher M.; Kelly, Kevin F.; O'Kelly, Ita; Graham, Monica; Crawford, Howard C.; Daniel, Juliet M. . E-mail: danielj@mcmaster.ca

    2005-05-01

    The POZ-zinc finger transcription factor Kaiso was first identified as a specific binding partner for the Armadillo catenin and cell adhesion cofactor, p120{sup ctn}. Kaiso is a unique POZ protein with bi-modal DNA-binding properties; it associates with a sequence-specific DNA consensus Kaiso binding site (KBS) or methylated CpG dinucleotides, and regulates transcription of artificial promoters containing either site. Interestingly, the promoter of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin/TCF target gene matrilysin possesses two conserved copies of the KBS, which suggested that Kaiso might regulate matrilysin expression. In this study, we demonstrate using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis that Kaiso associates with the matrilysin promoter in vivo. Minimal promoter assays further confirmed that Kaiso specifically repressed transcription of the matrilysin promoter; mutation of the KBS element or RNAi-mediated depletion of Kaiso abrogated this effect. More importantly, Kaiso blocked {beta}-catenin-mediated activation of the matrilysin promoter. Consistent with our previous findings, both Kaiso-DNA binding and Kaiso-mediated transcriptional repression of the matrilysin promoter were inhibited by overexpression of wild-type p120{sup ctn}, but not by a p120{sup ctn} mutant exhibiting impaired nuclear import. Collectively, our data establish Kaiso as a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor of the matrilysin promoter, and suggest that p120{sup ctn} and {beta}-catenin act in a synergistic manner, via distinct mechanisms, to activate matrilysin expression.

  16. Negative regulation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in AGS gastric cancer cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ju Hyung; Park, Chi Hoon; Jung, Kyung Chae; Rhee, Ho Sung; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-09-30

    Functional activation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling plays an important role in early events in carcinogenesis. We examined the effect of naringenin against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that naringenin inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that the {beta}-catenin distribution and the levels of nuclear {beta}-catenin and Tcf-4 proteins were unchanged after naringenin treatment. Moreover, the binding activities of Tcf complexes to consensus DNA were not affected by naringenin. Taken together, these data suggest that naringenin inhibits {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer with unknown mechanisms.

  17. Effects of short-hairpin RNA-inhibited {beta}-catenin expression on the growth of human multiple myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Wenqing; Yang, Chengwei; Qian, Yu; Fu, Qiang

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CTNNB1 shRNA could inhibit the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significantly profound apoptotic cell death in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo, CTNNB1 silence led to a growth inhibition of myeloma growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc and {beta}-catenin in the expression cells of cleaved caspase-3 were increased. -- Abstract: Multiple myeloma (MM) is thrombogenic as a consequence of multiple hemostatic effects. Overexpression of {beta}-catenin has been observed in several types of malignant tumors, including MM. However, the relationship between {beta}-catenin expression and MM remains unclear. In the present study, RNA interference was used to inhibit {beta}-catenin expression in RPMI8226 cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses showed that {beta}-catenin mRNA and protein expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Western blotting showed that the protein levels of cyclin D1 and glutamine synthetase were downregulated and supported the transcriptional regulatory function of {beta}-catenin. The MTT assay showed that CTNNB1 shRNA could have significant inhibitory effects on the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. The TOPflash reporter assay demonstrated significant downregulation after CTNNB1 shRNA transfection in RPMI8226 cells. Flow cytometric analyses also showed significantly profound apoptosis in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. We found CTNNB1 silence led to growth inhibition of MM growth in vivo. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that c-myc and {beta}-catenin were reduced in CTNNB1 shRNA tumor tissues, but that expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased. These results show that {beta}-catenin could be a new therapeutic agent that targets the biology of MM cells.

  18. Nuclear hormone receptor LXRα inhibits adipocyte differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells with Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kenichi; Morello, Fulvio; Zhang, Zhiping; Masuda, Tomoko; Iwanaga, Shiro; Steffensen, Knut R; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Pratt, Richard E; Dzau, Victor J

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear hormone receptor liver X receptor-alpha (LXRα) has a vital role in cholesterol homeostasis and is reported to have a role in adipose function and obesity although this is controversial. Conversely, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are suggested to be a major source of adipocyte generation. Accordingly, we examined the role of LXRα in adipogenesis of MSCs. Adult murine MSCs (mMSCs) were isolated from wild-type (WT) and LXR-null mice. Using WT mMSCs, we further generated cell lines stably overexpressing GFP-LXRα (mMSC/LXRα/GFP) or GFP alone (mMSC/GFP) by retroviral infection. Confluent mMSCs were differentiated into adipocytes by the established protocol. Compared with MSCs isolated from WT mice, MSCs from LXR-null mice showed significantly increased adipogenesis, as determined by lipid droplet accumulation and adipogenesis-related gene expression. Moreover, mMSCs stably overexpressing GFP-LXRα (mMSC/LXRα/GFP) exhibited significantly decreased adipogenesis compared with mMSCs overexpressing GFP alone (mMSC/GFP). Since Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is reported to inhibit adipogenesis, we further examined it. The LXR-null group showed significantly decreased Wnt expression accompanied by a decrease of cellular beta-catenin (vs WT). The mMSC/LXRα/GFP group exhibited significantly increased Wnt expression accompanied by an increase of cellular beta-catenin (vs mMSC/GFP). These data demonstrate that LXRα has an inhibitory effect on adipogenic differentiation in mMSCs with Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. These results provide important insights into the pathophysiology of obesity and obesity-related consequences such as metabolic syndrome and may identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26595172

  19. Nuclear Hormone Receptor LXRα Inhibits Adipocyte Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Wnt/beta-catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Kenichi; Morello, Fulvio; Zhang, Zhiping; Masuda, Tomoko; Iwanaga, Shiro; Steffensen, Knut R.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Pratt, Richard E.; Dzau, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptor liver X receptor-alpha (LXRα) plays a vital role in cholesterol homeostasis and is reported to play a role in adipose function and obesity although this is controversial. Conversely, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are suggested to be a major source of adipocyte generation. Accordingly, we examined the role of LXRα in adipogenesis of MSCs. Adult murine MSCs (mMSCs) were isolated from wild type (WT) and LXR-null mice. Using WT mMSCs, we further generated cell lines stably overexpressing GFP-LXRα (mMSC/LXRα/GFP) or GFP alone (mMSC/GFP) by retroviral infection. Confluent mMSCs were differentiated into adipocytes by the established protocol. Compared with MSCs isolated from WT mice, MSCs from LXR-null mice showed significantly increased adipogenesis, as determined by lipid droplet accumulation and adipogenesis-related gene expression. Moreover, mMSCs stably overexpressing GFP-LXRα (mMSC/LXRα/GFP) exhibited significantly decreased adipogenesis compared with mMSCs overexpressing GFP alone (mMSC/GFP). Since Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is reported to inhibit adipogenesis, we further examined it. The LXR-null group showed significantly decreased Wnt expression accompanied by a decrease of cellular beta-catenin (vs. WT). The mMSC/LXRα/GFP group exhibited significantly increased Wnt expression accompanied by an increase of cellular beta-catenin (vs. mMSC/GFP). These data demonstrate that LXRα has an inhibitory effect on adipogenic differentiation in murine mesenchymal stem cells with Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. These results provide important insights into the pathophysiology of obesity and obesity related consequences such as metabolic syndrome and may identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26595172

  20. Polymeric black tea polyphenols inhibit 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colorectal carcinogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish B.

    2008-02-15

    Tea polyphenols like epigallocatechin gallate and theaflavins are established chemopreventive agents for colorectal carcinogenesis. However, studies on evaluating similar chemopreventive properties of thearubigins or polymeric black tea polyphenols (PBPs), the most abundant polyphenols in black tea, are limited. Hence, in the present study we aim to investigate chemopreventive effects along with probable mechanisms of action of PBP extract employing 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats as experimental model. The present study suggests that PBPs, like other tea polyphenols, also inhibit DMH-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by decreasing tumor volume and multiplicity. This study also shows that although the pretreatment with PBP extract could induce detoxifying enzymes in hepatic and colorectal tissue, it did not show any additional chemopreventive effects when compared to treatments with PBP extract after initiation with DMH. Mechanistically, PBP extract may inhibit colorectal carcinogenesis by decreasing DMH-induced cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Treatments with PBP extract showed decreased levels of COX-2, c-MYC and cyclin D1 proteins which aid cell proliferation probably by regulating {beta}-catenin by maintaining expression of APC and decreasing inactivation of GSK3{beta}. DMH-induced activation of MAP kinases such as ERK and JNK was also found to be inhibited by treatments with PBP extract. In conclusion, the protective effects of PBP extract could be attributed to inhibition of DMH-induced cellular proliferation probably through {beta}-catenin regulation.

  1. Bisindoylmaleimide I suppresses adipocyte differentiation through stabilization of intracellular {beta}-catenin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Munju; Park, Seoyoung; Gwak, Jungsug; Kim, Dong-Eun; Yea, Sung Su; Shin, Jae-Gook; Oh, Sangtaek

    2008-02-29

    The Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway plays important roles in cell differentiation. Activation of this pathway, likely by Wnt-10b, has been shown to inhibit adipogenesis in cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and mice. Here we revealed that bisindoylmaleimide I (BIM), which is widely used as a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), inhibits adipocyte differentiation through activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. BIM increased {beta}-catenin responsive transcription (CRT) and up-regulated intracellular {beta}-catenin levels in HEK293 cells and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. BIM significantly decreased intracellular lipid accumulation and reduced expression of important adipocyte marker genes including peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and CAATT enhancer-binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Taken together, our findings indicate that BIM inhibits adipogenesis by increasing the stability of {beta}-catenin protein in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells.

  2. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Sekiya, Manami; Hirata, Michiko; Ye, Mingjuan; Yamagishi, Azumi; Lee, Sang-Mi; Kang, Man-Jong; Hosoda, Akemi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Kim, Dong-Ho; Saeki, Shigeru

    2010-02-19

    Wnt signaling pathways play fundamental roles in the differentiation, proliferation and functions of many cells as well as developmental, growth, and homeostatic processes in animals. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 5 and LRP6 serve as coreceptors of Wnt proteins together with Frizzled receptors, triggering activation of canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Here, we found that LRP10, a new member of the LDLR gene family, inhibits the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. The {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells was activated by transfection with Wnt3a or LRP6, which was then inhibited by co-transfection with LRP10. Deletion of the extracellular domain of LRP10 negated its inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of LRP10 was consistently conserved in HEK293 cells even when GSK3{beta} phosphorylation was inhibited by incubation with lithium chloride and co-transfection with constitutively active S33Y-mutated {beta}-catenin. Nuclear {beta}-catenin accumulation was unaffected by LRP10. The present studies suggest that LRP10 may interfere with the formation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF complex and/or its binding to target DNA in the nucleus, and that the extracellular domain of LRP10 is critical for inhibition of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  3. Gamma-secretase-dependent and -independent effects of presenilin1 on beta-catenin.Tcf-4 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Raurell, Imma; Codina, Montserrat; Casagolda, David; Del Valle, Beatriz; Baulida, Josep; de Herreros, Antonio García; Duñach, Mireia

    2008-01-01

    Presenilin1 (PS1) is a component of the gamma-secretase complex mutated in cases of Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). PS1 is synthesized as a 50 kDa peptide subsequently processed to two 29 and 20 kDa subunits that remain associated. Processing of PS1 is inhibited by several mutations detected in FAD patients. PS1 acts as negative modulator of beta-catenin.Tcf-4 transcriptional activity. In this article we show that in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) the mechanisms of action of the processed and non-processed forms of PS1 on beta-catenin.Tcf-4 transcription are different. Whereas non-processed PS1 inhibits beta-catenin.Tcf-4 activity through a mechanism independent of gamma-secretase and associated with the interaction of this protein with plakoglobin and Tcf-4, the effect of processed PS1 is prevented by gamma-secretase inhibitors, and requires its interaction with E- or N-cadherin and the generation of cytosolic terminal fragments of these two cadherins, which in turn destabilize the beta-catenin transcriptional cofactor CBP. Accordingly, the two forms of PS1 interact differently with E-cadherin or beta-catenin and plakoglobin: whereas processed PS1 binds E-cadherin with high affinity and beta-catenin or plakoglobin weakly, the non-processed form behaves inversely. Moreover, contrarily to processed PS1, that decreases the levels of c-fos RNA, non-processed PS1 inhibits the expression c-myc, a known target of beta-catenin.Tcf-4, and does not block the activity of other transcriptional factors requiring CBP. These results indicate that prevention of PS1 processing in FAD affects the mechanism of repression of the transcriptional activity dependent on beta-catenin. PMID:19114997

  4. Rhesus lymphocryptovirus latent membrane protein 2A activates {beta}-catenin signaling and inhibits differentiation in epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Catherine A.; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    Rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is a {gamma}-herpesvirus closely related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The rhesus latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is highly homologous to EBV LMP2A. EBV LMP2A activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and {beta}-catenin signaling pathways in epithelial cells and affects differentiation. In the present study, the biochemical and biological properties of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells were investigated. The expression of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells induced Akt activation, GSK3{beta} inactivation and accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The nuclear translocation, but not accumulation of {beta}-catenin was dependent on Akt activation. Rhesus LMP2A also impaired epithelial cell differentiation; however, this process was not dependent upon Akt activation. A mutant rhesus LMP2A lacking six transmembrane domains functioned similarly to wild-type rhesus LMP2A indicating that the full number of transmembrane domains is not required for effects on {beta}-catenin or cell differentiation. These results underscore the similarity of LCV to EBV and the suitability of the macaque as an animal model for studying EBV pathogenesis.

  5. Roles of the ITAM and PY motifs of Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2A in the inhibition of epithelial cell differentiation and activation of {beta}-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jennifer A; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2005-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is important for maintenance of latency in infected B lymphocytes. Through its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) and PY motifs, LMP2A is able to block B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, bind BCR-associated kinases, and manipulate the turnover of itself and these kinases via a PY-mediated interaction with the Nedd4 family of ubiquitin ligases. In epithelial cells, LMP2A has been shown to activate the phosphatidylinositol 3'-OH kinase/Akt and beta-catenin signaling pathways. In the present study, the biological consequences of LMP2A expression in the normal human foreskin keratinocyte (HFK) cell line were investigated and the importance of the ITAM and PY motifs for LMP2A signaling effects in HFK cells was ascertained. The ITAM was essential for the activation of Akt by LMP2A in HFK cells, while both the ITAM and PY motifs contributed to LMP2A-mediated accumulation and nuclear translocation of the oncoprotein beta-catenin. LMP2A inhibited induction of differentiation in an assay conducted with semisolid methylcellulose medium, and the PY motifs were critical for this inhibition. LMP2A is expressed in the EBV-associated epithelial malignancies nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric carcinoma, and these data indicate that LMP2A affects cellular processes that likely contribute to carcinogenesis. PMID:15681438

  6. The role of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in renal carcinogenesis: lessons from cadmium toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Thévenod, F; Chakraborty, P K

    2010-06-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling plays a crucial role during embryogenesis. However, this signaling pathway also plays a role in normal adult tissues and in carcinogenesis, including cadmium (Cd2+) induced nephrocarcinogenesis, which is the topic of this review. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is tightly regulated in mature epithelia to balance cell proliferation, differentiation and death. This is accomplished by modulating phosphorylation of the multifunctional protein beta-catenin which in turn determines its preference for a particular fate, i.e. cell-cell adhesion by binding to E-cadherin, proteasomal degradation, or co-activation of the transcription factor Tcf/Lef. The pivotal role of beta-catenin is not limited to Wnt signaling, but can be challenged by other transcription factors under stress conditions (e.g. FOXO, HIF-1alpha, NF-kappaB, c-jun), where beta-catenin acts as a molecular switch in response to the cellular redox status. Aberrant Wnt/beta-catenin signaling can contribute to carcinogenesis of intestinal, lung or kidney epithelia, either by mutations of its signaling components and/or disruption of linked signaling networks. The nephrotoxic metal Cd2+ causes renal cancer in humans. Because it is not genotoxic Cd2+ is thought to induce mutations and carcinomas indirectly: Possible mechanisms include oxidative stress, inhibition of DNA repair, aberrant gene expression, deregulation of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, and/or disruption of cell adhesion. Wnt signaling may contribute to Cd2+ carcinogenesis because Cd2+ disrupts the junctional E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex, resulting in excessive nuclear translocation of beta-catenin and activation of Tcf4. Up-regulation of target genes of the beta-catenin/Tcf4 complex, such as c-myc, cyclin D1 and the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (MDR1/ABCB1), leads to increased proliferation, evasion of apoptosis, adaptation to Cd2+ toxicity and thereby promotes the selection of mutated and pre

  7. Inhibition of beta-catenin signaling by Pb leads to incomplete fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Eric E; Buckley, Taylor; Yukata, Kiminori; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; O’Keefe, Regis; Zuscik, Michael J; Puzas, J Edward

    2015-01-01

    There is strong evidence in the clinical literature to suggest that elevated lead (Pb) exposure impairs fracture healing. Since Pb has been demonstrated to inhibit bone formation, and Wnt signaling is an important anabolic pathway in chondrocyte maturation and endochondral ossification, we investigated the impact of Wnt therapy on Pb-exposed mice undergoing bone repair in a mouse tibial fracture model. We established that tibial fracture calluses from Pb-treated mice were smaller and contained less mineralized tissue than vehicle controls. This resulted in the persistence of immature cartilage in the callus and decreased β-catenin levels. Reduction of β-catenin protein was concurrent with systemic elevation of LRP5/6 antagonists DKK1 and sclerostin in Pb-exposed mice throughout fracture healing. β-catenin stimulation by the GSK3 inhibitor BIO reversed these molecular changes and restored the amount of mineralized callus. Overall, Pb is identified as a potent inhibitor of endochondral ossification in vivo with correlated effects on bone healing with noted deficits in β-catenin signaling, suggesting the Wnt/β-catenin as a pivotal pathway in the influence of Pb on fracture repair. PMID:25044211

  8. In situ phosphorylation of immobilized receptors on biosensor surfaces: application to E-cadherin/beta-catenin interactions.

    PubMed

    Catimel, Bruno; Layton, Meredith; Church, Nicole; Ross, Janine; Condron, Melanie; Faux, Maree; Simpson, Richard J; Burgess, Antony W; Nice, Edouard C

    2006-10-15

    Phosphorylation is a key posttranslational modification for modulating biological interactions. Biosensor technology is ideally suited for examining in real time the role of phosphorylation on protein-protein interactions in signaling pathways. We have developed processes for on-chip phosphorylation of immobilized receptors on biosensor surfaces. These processes have been used to analyze E-cadherin/beta-catenin interactions. Phosphorylation of the intracellular domain (ICD) of E-cadherin modulates its affinity to beta-catenin and consequently the strength of cell-cell adhesion. We have phosphorylated immobilized E-cadherin ICD in situ using casein kinase 1 (CK1), casein kinase 2 (CK2), and src. On-chip phosphorylation of E-cadherin was confirmed using anti-phosphoserine and anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. The binding of beta-catenin to E-cadherin was analyzed quantitatively. CK1 phosphorylation of E-cadherin increased the binding affinity to beta-catenin from approximately 230 to 4 nM. A similar increase in affinity, from 260 to 4 nM, was obtained with CK2 phosphorylation of E-cadherin. However, phosphorylation by src kinase decreased the affinity constant from approximately 260 nM to 4 microM. Interestingly, phosphorylation of E-cadherin by CK1 or CK2 prevented the inhibition of beta-catenin binding by src phosphorylation. PMID:16945320

  9. Interactions of Plakoglobin and [beta]-Catenin with Desmosomal Cadherins BASIS OF SELECTIVE EXCLUSION OF [alpha]- AND [beta]-CATENIN FROM DESMOSOMES

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hee-Jung; Gross, Julia C.; Pokutta, Sabine; Weis, William I.; Stanford-MED

    2009-11-18

    Plakoglobin and {beta}-catenin are homologous armadillo repeat proteins found in adherens junctions, where they interact with the cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins and with {alpha}-catenin. Plakoglobin, but normally not {beta}-catenin, is also a structural constituent of desmosomes, where it binds to the cytoplasmic domains of the desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins and desmocollins. Here, we report structural, biophysical, and biochemical studies aimed at understanding the molecular basis of selective exclusion of {beta}-catenin and {alpha}-catenin from desmosomes. The crystal structure of the plakoglobin armadillo domain bound to phosphorylated E-cadherin shows virtually identical interactions to those observed between {beta}-catenin and E-cadherin. Trypsin sensitivity experiments indicate that the plakoglobin arm domain by itself is more flexible than that of {beta}-catenin. Binding of plakoglobin and {beta}-catenin to the intracellular regions of E-cadherin, desmoglein1, and desmocollin1 was measured by isothermal titration calorimetry. Plakoglobin and {beta}-catenin bind strongly and with similar thermodynamic parameters to E-cadherin. In contrast, {beta}-catenin binds to desmoglein-1 more weakly than does plakoglobin. {beta}-Catenin and plakoglobin bind with similar weak affinities to desmocollin-1. Full affinity binding of desmoglein-1 requires sequences C-terminal to the region homologous to the catenin-binding domain of classical cadherins. Although pulldown assays suggest that the presence of N- and C-terminal {beta}-catenin 'tails' that flank the armadillo repeat region reduces the affinity for desmosomal cadherins, calorimetric measurements show no significant effects of the tails on binding to the cadherins. Using purified proteins, we show that desmosomal cadherins and {alpha}-catenin compete directly for binding to plakoglobin, consistent with the absence of {alpha}-catenin in desmosomes.

  10. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) targets {beta}-catenin for phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Ji Eon; Sung, Ki Sa; Choi, Dong Wook; Lee, Byeong Jae; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2010-04-16

    The regulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin levels is central in the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling cascade and the activation of the Wnt target genes. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) acts as a negative regulator of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Knock-down of endogenous HIPK2 increases the stability of {beta}-catenin and results in the accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus, consequently enhancing the expression of Wnt target genes and cell proliferation both in vivo and in cultured cells. HIPK2 inhibits TCF/LEF-mediated target gene activation via degradation of {beta}-catenin. HIPK2 phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at its Ser33 and Ser37 residues without the aid of a priming kinase. Substitutions of Ser33 and Ser37 for alanines abolished the degradation of {beta}-catenin associated with HIPK2. In ex vivo mouse model, HIPK2 knock-down resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin, thereby potentiated {beta}-catenin-mediated cell proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, the axis duplication induced by the ectopic expression of {beta}-catenin was blocked by co-injection of HIPK2 mRNAs into Xenopus embryos. Taken together, HIPK2 appears to function as a novel negative regulator of {beta}-catenin through its phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation.

  11. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) targets beta-catenin for phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Ji Eon; Sung, Ki Sa; Choi, Dong Wook; Lee, Byeong Jae; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2010-04-16

    The regulation of intracellular beta-catenin levels is central in the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling cascade and the activation of the Wnt target genes. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) acts as a negative regulator of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Knock-down of endogenous HIPK2 increases the stability of beta-catenin and results in the accumulation of beta-catenin in the nucleus, consequently enhancing the expression of Wnt target genes and cell proliferation both in vivo and in cultured cells. HIPK2 inhibits TCF/LEF-mediated target gene activation via degradation of beta-catenin. HIPK2 phosphorylates beta-catenin at its Ser33 and Ser37 residues without the aid of a priming kinase. Substitutions of Ser33 and Ser37 for alanines abolished the degradation of beta-catenin associated with HIPK2. In ex vivo mouse model, HIPK2 knock-down resulted in accumulation of beta-catenin, thereby potentiated beta-catenin-mediated cell proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, the axis duplication induced by the ectopic expression of beta-catenin was blocked by co-injection of HIPK2 mRNAs into Xenopus embryos. Taken together, HIPK2 appears to function as a novel negative regulator of beta-catenin through its phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. PMID:20307497

  12. The ins and outs of APC and beta-catenin nuclear transport.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Beric R; Fagotto, Francois

    2002-09-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and beta-catenin, two key interacting proteins implicated in development and cancer, were recently found to traffic into and out of the nucleus in response to internal and external signals. The two proteins can enter and exit the nucleus independently, a discovery that has prompted debate about the previously proposed role of APC as a beta-catenin chaperone. Here, we review the regulation of APC and beta-catenin subcellular localization, in particular in cancer cells. We speculate that, in non-stimulated cells, APC actively exports beta-catenin from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where its levels are regulated by degradation; and, conversely, that, in cancer cells or those stimulated by Wnt signaling, beta-catenin degradation is inhibited and the accruing protein is capable of moving between the nucleus and cytoplasm independently of APC. Models that link APC and beta-catenin transport to function are discussed. PMID:12223464

  13. NF-{kappa}B p65 represses {beta}-catenin-activated transcription of cyclin D1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Injoo; Choi, Yong Seok; Jeon, Mi-Ya; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclin D1 transcription is directly activated by {beta}-catenin; however, {beta}-catenin-induced cyclin D1 transcription is reduced by NF-{kappa}B p65. {yields} Protein-protein interaction between NF-{kappa}B p65 and {beta}-catenin might be responsible for p65-mediated repression of cyclin D1. {yields} One of five putative binding sites, located further upstream of other sites, is the major {beta}-catenin binding site in the cyclin D1 promoter. {yields} NF-{kappa}B binding site in cyclin D1 is occupied not only by p65 but also by {beta}-catenin, which is dynamically regulated by the signal. -- Abstract: Signaling crosstalk between the {beta}-catenin and NF-{kappa}B pathways represents a functional network. To test whether the crosstalk also occurs on their common target genes, the cyclin D1 promoter was used as a model because it contains binding sites for both proteins. {beta}-catenin activated transcription from the cyclin D1 promoter, while co-expression of NF-{kappa}B p65 reduced {beta}-catenin-induced transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed lithium chloride-induced binding of {beta}-catenin on one of the T-cell activating factor binding sites. More interestingly, {beta}-catenin binding was greatly reduced by NF-{kappa}B p65, possibly by the protein-protein interaction between the two proteins. Such a dynamic and complex binding of {beta}-catenin and NF-{kappa}B on promoters might contribute to the regulated expression of their target genes.

  14. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) acts via a novel Galpha13-dishevelled axis to stabilize beta-catenin levels.

    PubMed

    Turm, Hagit; Maoz, Myriam; Katz, Vered; Yin, Yong-Jun; Offermanns, Steffan; Bar-Shavit, Rachel

    2010-05-14

    We have previously shown a novel link between hPar-1 (human protease-activated receptor-1) and beta-catenin stabilization. Although it is well recognized that Wnt signaling leads to beta-catenin accumulation, the role of PAR1 in the process is unknown. We provide here evidence that PAR1 induces beta-catenin stabilization independent of Wnt, Fz (Frizzled), and the co-receptor LRP5/6 (low density lipoprotein-related protein 5/6) and identify selective mediators of the PAR1-beta-catenin axis. Immunohistological analyses of hPar1-transgenic (TG) mouse mammary tissues show the expression of both Galpha(12) and Galpha(13) compared with age-matched control counterparts. However, only Galpha(13) was found to be actively involved in PAR1-induced beta-catenin stabilization. Indeed, a dominant negative form of Galpha(13) inhibited both PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion and Lef/Tcf (lymphoid enhancer factor/T cell factor) transcription activity. PAR1-Galpha(13) association is followed by the recruitment of DVL (Dishevelled), an upstream Wnt signaling protein via the DIX domain. Small interfering RNA-Dvl silencing leads to a reduction in PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion, inhibition of Lef/Tcf transcription activity, and decreased beta-catenin accumulation. It is of note that PAR1 also promotes the binding of beta-arrestin-2 to DVL, suggesting a role for beta-arrestin-2 in PAR1-induced DVL phosphorylation dynamics. Although infection of small interfering RNA-LRP5/6 or the use of the Wnt antagonists, SFRP2 (soluble Frizzled-related protein 2) or SFRP5 potently reduced Wnt3A-mediated beta-catenin accumulation, no effect was observed on PAR1-induced beta-catenin stabilization. Collectively, our data show that PAR1 mediates beta-catenin stabilization independent of Wnt. We propose here a novel cascade of PAR1-induced Galpha(13)-DVL axis in cancer and beta-catenin stabilization. PMID:20223821

  15. beta-catenin-mediated signaling: a molecular target for early chemopreventive intervention.

    PubMed

    Clapper, Margie L; Coudry, Jacques; Chang, Wen-Chi L

    2004-11-01

    Dysregulation of Wnt signaling appears to be a critical event in the formation of intestinal tumors and some other cancers. Accumulating data from preclinical studies strongly suggest that targeted disruption of beta-catenin-mediated TCF signaling is a promising strategy for early chemopreventive intervention, particularly with respect to intestinal tumorigenesis. While the search for potent inhibitors is just getting underway, the ability of several synthetic and naturally occurring agents to decrease the transcriptional activity of a luciferase reporter plasmid under the control of TCF-4 regulatory elements (pTOPFLASH) has been demonstrated already. Additional enthusiasm for this approach is provided by data from several groups, which indicate that sulindac, sulindac sulfone and indomethacin can modulate the subcellular localization of beta-catenin in vivo, resulting in either decreased nuclear compartmentalization or enhanced localization of beta-catenin to the plasma membrane. Although the mechanism by which agents disrupt beta-catenin-mediated TCF signaling remains to be elucidated, possibilities include: (1) physical inhibition of the beta-catenin/TCF complex formation, (2) upregulation of the ubiquitin-mediated proteosomal degradation of beta-catenin, (3) accelerated nuclear export of beta-catenin and (4) enhanced sequestration of beta-catenin by E-cadherin. The common role of beta-catenin in both Wnt signaling and cell adhesion provides a unique opportunity to develop chemopreventive therapies that both prevent the development of cancer and delay tumor progression. PMID:15476853

  16. beta-catenin signaling can initiate feather bud development.

    PubMed

    Noramly, S; Freeman, A; Morgan, B A

    1999-08-01

    Intercellular signaling by a subset of Wnts is mediated by stabilization of cytoplasmic beta-catenin and its translocation to the nucleus. Immunolocalization of beta-catenin in developing chick skin reveals that this signaling pathway is active in a dynamic pattern from the earliest stages of feather bud development. Forced activation of this pathway by expression of a stabilized beta-catenin in the ectoderm results in the ectopic formation of feather buds. This construct is sufficient to induce bud formation since it does so both within presumptive feather tracts and in normally featherless regions where tract-specific signals are absent. It is also insensitive to the lateral inhibition that mediates the normal spacing of buds and can induce ectopic buds in interfollicular skin. However, additional patterning signals cooperate with this pathway to regulate gene expression within domains of stabilized beta-catenin expression. Localized activation of this pathway within the bud as it develops is required for normal morphogenesis and ectopic activation of the pathway leads to abnormally oriented buds and growths on the feather filaments. These results suggest that activation of the beta-catenin pathway initiates follicle development in embryonic skin and plays important roles in the subsequent morphogenesis of the bud. PMID:10409498

  17. Beta-catenin expression in human cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, T.; Shiozaki, H.; Shibamoto, S.; Oka, H.; Kimura, Y.; Tamura, S.; Inoue, M.; Monden, T.; Ito, F.; Monden, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion in tissue is mainly regulated by homotypic interaction of cadherin molecules, which are anchored to the cytoskeleton via cytoplasmic proteins, including alpha- and beta-catenin. Although we previously demonstrated that alpha-catenin is crucial for cadherin function in vivo, little is known about the role of beta-catenin. We examined the expression of beta-catenin in human carcinoma samples along with normal tissue (esophagus, stomach, and colon) by immunostaining using our antibody for beta-catenin. Normal epithelium strongly expressed beta-catenin. However, beta-catenin expression was frequently reduced in primary tumors of the esophagus (10 of 15, 67%), stomach (9 of 19, 47%), and colon (11 of 22, 50%). From an immunoprecipitation study, we found that beta-catenin forms a complex with E-cadherin not only in the normal epithelium but also in cancerous tissues. In coexpression patterns of E-cadherin and beta-catenin, 43 (77%) of the 56 tumors showed a similar expression of both molecules, whereas the other 13 tumors (23%) showed positive staining for E-cadherin and reduced expression of beta-catenin. These findings suggest that beta-catenin forms a complex with E-cadherin in vivo and down-regulation of beta-catenin expression is associated with malignant transformation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8546224

  18. Nr-CAM is a target gene of the beta-catenin/LEF-1 pathway in melanoma and colon cancer and its expression enhances motility and confers tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice E; Ben-Yedidia, Tamar; Shtutman, Michael; Feinstein, Elena; Einat, Paz; Ben-Ze'ev, Avri

    2002-08-15

    beta-catenin and plakoglobin (gamma-catenin) are homologous molecules involved in cell adhesion, linking cadherin receptors to the cytoskeleton. beta-catenin is also a key component of the Wnt pathway by being a coactivator of LEF/TCF transcription factors. To identify novel target genes induced by beta-catenin and/or plakoglobin, DNA microarray analysis was carried out with RNA from cells overexpressing either protein. This analysis revealed that Nr-CAM is the gene most extensively induced by both catenins. Overexpression of either beta-catenin or plakoglobin induced Nr-CAM in a variety of cell types and the LEF/TCF binding sites in the Nr-CAM promoter were required for its activation by catenins. Retroviral transduction of Nr-CAM into NIH3T3 cells stimulated cell growth, enhanced motility, induced transformation, and produced rapidly growing tumors in nude mice. Nr-CAM and LEF-1 expression was elevated in human colon cancer tissue and cell lines and in human malignant melanoma cell lines but not in melanocytes or normal colon tissue. Dominant negative LEF-1 decreased Nr-CAM expression and antibodies to Nr-CAM inhibited the motility of B16 melanoma cells. The results indicate that induction of Nr-CAM transcription by beta-catenin or plakoglobin plays a role in melanoma and colon cancer tumorigenesis, probably by promoting cell growth and motility. PMID:12183361

  19. Drosophila E-cadherin and its binding partner Armadillo/ beta-catenin are required for axonal pathway choices in the developing larval brain.

    PubMed

    Fung, Siaumin; Wang, Fay; Spindler, Shana R; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-08-15

    The fly brain is formed by approximately hundred paired lineages of neurons, each lineage derived from one neuroblast. Embryonic neuroblasts undergo a small number of divisions and produce the primary neurons that form the functioning larval brain. In the larva, neuroblasts produce the secondary lineages that make up the bulk of the adult brain. Axons of a given secondary lineage fasciculate with each other and form a discrete bundle, the secondary axon tract (SAT). Secondary axon tracts prefigure the long axon connections of the adult brain, and therefore pathway choices of SATs made in the larva determine adult brain circuitry. Drosophila Shotgun/E-cadherin (DE-cad) and its binding partner Armadillo/beta-catenin (beta-cat) are expressed in newly born secondary neurons and their axons. The fact that the highly diverse, yet invariant pattern of secondary lineages and SATs has been recently mapped in the wild-type brain enabled us to investigate the role of DE-cad and beta-cat with the help of MARCM clones. Clones were validated by their absence of DE-cad immuno-reactivity. The most significant phenotype consists in the defasciculation and an increased amount of branching of SATs at the neuropile-cortex boundary, as well as subtle changes in the trajectory of SATs within the neuropile. In general, only a fraction of mutant clones in a given lineage showed structural abnormalities. Furthermore, although they all globally express DE-cad and beta-cat, lineages differ in their requirement for DE-cad function. Some lineages never showed morphological abnormalities in MARCM clones, whereas others reacted with abnormal branching and changes in SAT trajectory at a high frequency. We conclude that DE-cad/beta-cat form part of the mechanism that control branching and trajectory of axon tracts in the larval brain. PMID:19520071

  20. Beta-catenin signaling mediates CD4 expression on mature CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, Jason M; Zloza, Andrew; Li, Wei; Narasipura, Srinivas D; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2010-08-15

    Upon activation, a subset of mature human CD8(+) T cells re-expresses CD4 dimly. This CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cell population is genuine and enriched in antiviral CD8(+) T cell responses. The signaling pathway that leads to CD4 re-expression on mature CD8(+) T cells is not clear. Given that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling plays a critical role in the transition of CD4(-)CD8(-) to CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes, we determined whether beta-catenin mediates CD4 expression on mature CD8(+) T cells. We demonstrate that active beta-catenin expression is 20-fold higher on CD4(dim)CD8(bright) than CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells. Activation of beta-catenin signaling, through LiCl or transfection with a constitutively active construct of beta-catenin, induced CD4 on CD8(+) T cells by approximately 10-fold. Conversely, inhibition of beta-catenin signaling through transfection with a dominant-negative construct for T cell factor-4, a downstream effector of beta-catenin signaling, diminished CD4 expression on CD8(+) T cells by 50% in response to T cell activation. Beta-catenin-mediated induction of CD4 on CD8(+) T cells is transcriptionally regulated, as it induced CD4 mRNA, and T cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor sites were identified within the human CD4 promoter. Further, beta-catenin expression induced the antiapoptotic factor BcL-xL, suggesting that beta-catenin may mediate protection against activation-induced cell death. Collectively, these data demonstrate that beta-catenin is critical in inducing CD4 expression on mature CD8(+) T cells, suggesting that it is a common pathway for CD4 upregulation among thymocytes and mature CD8(+) T cells. PMID:20631314

  1. {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 activated enamelin expression in ameloblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hua; Lv, Ping; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Xuejun

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 complex could activate enamelin gene transcription. {yields} {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 can directly bind to enamelin 5' regulatory region. {yields} Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling can upregulate enamelin expression in ameloblast-like cells. -- Abstract: Enamelin is an ameloblast-specific matrix protein believed to play essential roles in enamel formation. However, mechanisms of enamelin transcription regulation are not clear. {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 is a key transcriptional complex involved in tooth development. In this study, the role of {beta}-catenin/LEF1 in enamelin expression was investigated. The 5'-flanking region of the mouse enamelin gene was analyzed and cloned. Co-transfection analysis and mutation assays revealed that two conserved LEF1 responsive elements located at -1002 and -597 bp upstream of the enamelin translation initiation site could augment transcriptional activity of the enamelin. The interaction between the enamelin elements and {beta}-catenin/LEF1 was further confirmed by electrophoresis mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. In addition, LiCl treatment induced nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin and elevated endogenous enamelin expression in mouse ameloblast-like cells. The results suggested that Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling could function in enamelin gene expression by direct interaction through two conserved LEF1 responsive elements on the enamelin gene in ameloblast-like cells.

  2. Sulindac suppresses beta-catenin expression in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Anjia; Song, Zibo; Tong, Chang; Hu, Dong; Bi, Xiuli; Augenlicht, Leonard H; Yang, Wancai

    2008-03-31

    Sulindac has been reported to be effective in suppressing tumor growth through the induction of p21WAF1/cip1 in human, animal models of colon cancer and colon cancer cells. In this study, we treated human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and lung cancer cell line A549 as well as colon cancer cell line SW620 with sulindac to observe the effects of sulindac in other tissue sites. In all cell lines, proliferation was significantly inhibited by sulindac after 24 and 72 h of treatment. Apoptosis was induced by sulindac in both lung cancer cells and colon cancer cells but was not induced in breast cancer cells. Western blots showed that p21 protein level were induced by sulindac in lung cancer cells and colon cancer cells, but not in breast cancer cells. However, the suppression of beta-catenin, a key mediator of Wnt signaling pathway, was seen in all three cell lines with sulindac administration. Further studies revealed that transcriptional activities of beta-catenin were significantly inhibited by sulindac and that the inhibition was sulindac dosage-dependent. The transcriptional targets of beta-catenin, c-myc, cyclin D1 and cdk 4 were also dramatically downregulated. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that the efficacy of sulindac in the inhibition of cell proliferation (rather than the induction of apoptosis) might be through the suppression of beta-catenin pathway in human cancer cells. PMID:18291362

  3. Klotho inhibits angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through suppression of the AT1R/beta catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liangzhu; Meng, Wei; Ding, Jieqiong; Cheng, Menglin

    2016-04-29

    Myocardial hypertrophy is an independent risk factor for cardiac morbidity and mortality. The antiaging protein klotho reportedly possesses a protective role in cardiac diseases. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effects of klotho remain unknown. This study was aimed to determine the effects of klotho on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertrophy in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and the possible mechanism of actions. We found that klotho significantly inhibited Ang II-induced hypertrophic growth of neonatal cardiomyocytes, as evidenced by decreased [(3)H]-Leucine incorporation, cardiomyocyte surface area and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) mRNA expression. Meanwhile, klotho inhibited Ang II-stimulated activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cardiomyocytes, as evidenced by decreased protein expression of active β-catenin, downregulated protein and mRNA expression of the β-catenin target genes c-myc and cyclin D1, and increased β-catenin phosphorylation. Inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by the specific inhibitor XAV939 markedly attenuated Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The further study revealed that klotho treatment significantly downregulated protein expression of Ang II receptor type I (AT1R) but not type II (AT2R). The AT1R antagonist losartan inhibited Ang II-stimulated activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Our findings suggest that klotho inhibits Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through suppression of the AT1R/β-catenin signaling pathway, which may provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the protective effects of klotho in heart diseases, and raise the possibility that klotho may act as an endogenous antihypertrophic factor by inhibiting the Ang II signaling pathway. PMID:26970306

  4. Roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in epithelial differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yajing; Sun, Zhaorui; Qiu, Xuefeng; Li, Yan; Qin, Jizheng; Han, Xiaodong

    2009-12-25

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to be able to differentiate into epithelial lineage, but the precise mechanisms controlling this process are unclear. Our aim is to explore the roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin in the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Using indirect co-culture of rat MSCs with rat airway epithelial cells (RTE), MSCs expressed several airway epithelial markers (cytokeratin 18, tight junction protein occudin, cystic fibrosis transmembrance regulator). The protein levels of some important members in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling were determined, suggested down-regulation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin with epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Furthermore, Wnt3{alpha} can inhibit the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. A loss of {beta}-catenin induced by Dickkopf-1 can enhance MSCs differentiation into epithelial cells. Lithium chloride transiently activated {beta}-catenin expression and subsequently decreased {beta}-catenin level and at last inhibited MSCs to differentiate into airway epithelium. Taken together, our study indicated that RTE cells can trigger epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Blocking Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling may promote MSCs to differentiate towards airway epithelial cells.

  5. Casein kinase iepsilon in the wnt pathway: regulation of beta-catenin function.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, C; Leong, P; Xu, L; Harrison, S D; Williams, L T

    1999-10-26

    Wnt and its intracellular effector beta-catenin regulate developmental and oncogenic processes. Using expression cloning to identify novel components of the Wnt pathway, we isolated casein kinase Iepsilon (CKIepsilon). CKIepsilon mimicked Wnt in inducing a secondary axis in Xenopus, stabilizing beta-catenin, and stimulating gene transcription in cells. Inhibition of endogenous CKIepsilon by kinase-defective CKIepsilon or CKIepsilon antisense-oligonucleotides attenuated Wnt signaling. CKIepsilon was in a complex with axin and other downstream components of the Wnt pathway, including Dishevelled. CKIepsilon appears to be a positive regulator of the pathway and a link between upstream signals and the complexes that regulate beta-catenin. PMID:10535959

  6. Murrayafoline A attenuates the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway by promoting the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyuk; Gwak, Jungsug; Cho, Munju; Ryu, Min-Jung; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Gye Won; Yun, Mi-Young; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Shin, Jae-Gook; Song, Gyu-Yong; Oh, Sangtaek

    2010-01-01

    Molecular lesions in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling and subsequent up-regulation of {beta}-catenin response transcription (CRT) occur frequently during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that suppress CRT, we screened natural compounds in a cell-based assay for detection of TOPFalsh reporter activity. Murrayafoline A, a carbazole alkaloid isolated from Glycosmis stenocarpa, antagonized CRT that was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium (Wnt3a-CM) or LiCl, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}), and promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin without altering its N-terminal phosphorylation at the Ser33/37 residues, marking it for proteasomal degradation, or the expression of Siah-1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Murrayafoline A repressed the expression of cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is known {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes and thus inhibited the proliferation of various colon cancer cells. These findings indicate that murrayafoline A may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for use in the treatment of colon cancer.

  7. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cross-talks with canonical Wnt signaling via phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junxing; Yue, Wanfu; Zhu, Mei J.; Sreejayan, Nair; Du, Min

    2010-04-23

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy metabolism; its activity is regulated by a plethora of physiological conditions, exercises and many anti-diabetic drugs. Recent studies show that AMPK involves in cell differentiation but the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Wingless Int-1 (Wnt)/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway regulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through enhancing {beta}-catenin/T-cell transcription factor 1 (TCF) mediated transcription. The objective of this study was to determine whether AMPK cross-talks with Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling through phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin. C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells were used. Chemical inhibition of AMPK and the expression of a dominant negative AMPK decreased phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552. The {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription was correlated with AMPK activity. In vitro, pure AMPK phosphorylated {beta}-catenin at Ser 552 and the mutation of Ser 552 to Ala prevented such phosphorylation, which was further confirmed using [{gamma}-{sup 32}P]ATP autoradiography. In conclusion, AMPK phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at Ser 552, which stabilizes {beta}-catenin, enhances {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription, expanding AMPK from regulation of energy metabolism to cell differentiation and development via cross-talking with the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  8. PECAM-1 affects GSK-3beta-mediated beta-catenin phosphorylation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Purba; Canosa, Sandra; Schoenfeld, David; Schoenfeld, Jonathan; Li, Puyau; Cheas, Lydia C; Zhang, Jin; Cordova, Alfredo; Sumpio, Bauer; Madri, Joseph A

    2006-07-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) regulates a variety of endothelial and immune cell biological responses. PECAM-1-null mice exhibit prolonged and increased permeability after inflammatory insults. We observed that in PECAM-1-null endothelial cells (ECs), beta-catenin remained tyrosine phosphorylated, coinciding with a sustained increase in permeability. Src homology 2 domain containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) association with beta-catenin was diminished in PECAM-1-null ECs, suggesting that lack of PECAM-1 inhibits the ability of this adherens junction component to become dephosphorylated, promoting a sustained increase in permeability. beta-Catenin/Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3beta) association and beta-catenin serine phosphorylation levels were increased and beta-catenin expression levels were reduced in PECAM-1-null ECs. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3beta) serine phosphorylation (inactivation) was blunted in PECAM-1-null ECs after histamine treatment or shear stress. Our data suggest that PECAM-1 serves as a critical dynamic regulator of endothelial barrier permeability. On stimulation by a vasoactive substance or shear stress, PECAM-1 became tyrosine phosphorylated, enabling recruitment of SHP-2 and tyrosine-phosphorylated beta-catenin to its cytoplasmic domain, facilitating dephosphorylation of beta-catenin, and allowing reconstitution of adherens junctions. In addition, PECAM-1 modulated the levels of beta-catenin by regulating the activity of GSK-3beta, which in turn affected the serine phosphorylation of beta-catenin and its proteosomal degradation, affecting the ability of the cell to reform adherens junctions in a timely fashion. PMID:16816383

  9. Osteopontin induces {beta}-catenin signaling through activation of Akt in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brian W.; Chellaiah, Meenakshi A.

    2010-01-01

    Secretion of osteopontin (OPN) by cancer cells is a known mediator of tumorigenesis and cancer progression in both experimental and clinical studies. Our work demonstrates that OPN can activate Akt, an important step in cancer progression. Both ILK and PI3K are integral proteins in the OPN/Akt pathway, as inhibition of either kinase leads to a loss of OPN-mediated Akt activation. Subsequent to OPN-induced Akt activation, we observe inactivation of GSK-3{beta}, a regulator of {beta}-catenin. Osteopontin stimulation leads to an overall increase in {beta}-catenin protein levels with a resultant transfer of {beta}-catenin to the nucleus. Through the nuclear import of {beta}-catenin, OPN increases both the transcription and protein levels of MMP-7 and CD44, which are known TCF/LEF transcription targets. This work describes an important aspect of cancer progression induced by OPN.

  10. Bioinformatics Knowledge Map for Analysis of Beta-Catenin Function in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arighi, Cecilia N.; Wu, Cathy H.

    2015-01-01

    Given the wealth of bioinformatics resources and the growing complexity of biological information, it is valuable to integrate data from disparate sources to gain insight into the role of genes/proteins in health and disease. We have developed a bioinformatics framework that combines literature mining with information from biomedical ontologies and curated databases to create knowledge “maps” of genes/proteins of interest. We applied this approach to the study of beta-catenin, a cell adhesion molecule and transcriptional regulator implicated in cancer. The knowledge map includes post-translational modifications (PTMs), protein-protein interactions, disease-associated mutations, and transcription factors co-activated by beta-catenin and their targets and captures the major processes in which beta-catenin is known to participate. Using the map, we generated testable hypotheses about beta-catenin biology in normal and cancer cells. By focusing on proteins participating in multiple relation types, we identified proteins that may participate in feedback loops regulating beta-catenin transcriptional activity. By combining multiple network relations with PTM proteoform-specific functional information, we proposed a mechanism to explain the observation that the cyclin dependent kinase CDK5 positively regulates beta-catenin co-activator activity. Finally, by overlaying cancer-associated mutation data with sequence features, we observed mutation patterns in several beta-catenin PTM sites and PTM enzyme binding sites that varied by tissue type, suggesting multiple mechanisms by which beta-catenin mutations can contribute to cancer. The approach described, which captures rich information for molecular species from genes and proteins to PTM proteoforms, is extensible to other proteins and their involvement in disease. PMID:26509276

  11. Stimulation of Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase activity and Na{sup +} coupled glucose transport by {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Wilmes, Jan; Dermaku-Sopjani, Miribane; Lam, Rebecca S.; Jakupi, Muharrem; Foeller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} The oncogenic transcription factor {beta}-catenin stimulates the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. {yields} {beta}-Catenin stimulates SGLT1 dependent Na{sup +}, glucose cotransport. {yields} The effects are independent of transcription. {yields} {beta}-Catenin sensitive transport may contribute to properties of proliferating cells. -- Abstract: {beta}-Catenin is a multifunctional protein stimulating as oncogenic transcription factor several genes important for cell proliferation. {beta}-Catenin-regulated genes include the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, which is known to stimulate a variety of transport systems. The present study explored the possibility that {beta}-catenin influences membrane transport. To this end, {beta}-catenin was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without SGLT1 and electrogenic transport determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. As a result, expression of {beta}-catenin significantly enhanced the ouabain-sensitive current of the endogeneous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. Inhibition of vesicle trafficking by brefeldin A revealed that the stimulatory effect of {beta}-catenin on the endogenous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase was not due to enhanced stability of the pump protein in the cell membrane. Expression of {beta}-catenin further enhanced glucose-induced current (Ig) in SGLT1-expressing oocytes. In the absence of SGLT1 Ig was negligible irrespective of {beta}-catenin expression. The stimulating effect of {beta}-catenin on both Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase and SGLT1 activity was observed even in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. The experiments disclose a completely novel function of {beta}-catenin, i.e. the regulation of transport.

  12. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling regulates cancer stem cells in lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Ying; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Yawei; Ma, Daoxin

    2010-02-12

    Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling plays an important role not only in cancer, but also in cancer stem cells. In this study, we found that {beta}-catenin and OCT-4 was highly expressed in cisplatin (DDP) selected A549 cells. Stimulating A549 cells with lithium chloride (LiCl) resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin and up-regulation of a typical Wnt target gene cyclin D1. This stimulation also significantly enhanced proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities in A549 cells. Moreover, the up-regulation of OCT-4, a stem cell marker, was observed through real-time PCR and Western blotting. In a reverse approach, we inhibited Wnt signaling by knocking down the expression of {beta}-catenin using RNA interference technology. This inhibition resulted in down-regulation of the Wnt target gene cyclin D1 as well as the proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities. Meanwhile, the expression of OCT-4 was reduced after the inhibition of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Taken together, our study provides strong evidence that canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in lung cancer stem cell properties, and it also regulates OCT-4, a lung cancer stem cell marker.

  13. Hit to lead studies on (hetero)arylpyrimidines--agonists of the canonical Wnt-beta-catenin cellular messaging system.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Adam M; Bursavich, Matthew G; Alon, Nippa; Bhat, Bheem M; Bex, Frederick J; Cain, Michael; Coleburn, Valerie; Gironda, Virginia; Green, Paula; Hauze, Diane B; Kharode, Yogendra; Krishnamurthy, Girija; Kirisits, Matthew; Lam, Ho-Sun; Liu, Yao-Bin; Lombardi, Sabrina; Matteo, Jeanne; Murrills, Richard; Robinson, John A; Selim, Sally; Sharp, Michael; Unwalla, Raymond; Varadarajan, Usha; Zhao, Weiguang; Yaworsky, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    A series of (hetero)arylpyrimidines agonists of the Wnt-beta-catenin cellular messaging system have been prepared. These compounds show activity in U2OS cells transfected with Wnt-3a, TCF-luciferase, Dkk-1 and tk-Renilla. Selected compounds show minimal GSK-3beta inhibition indicating that the Wnt-beta-catenin agonism activity most likely comes from interaction at Wnt-3a/Dkk-1. Two examples 1 and 25 show in vivo osteogenic activity in a mouse calvaria model. One example 1 is shown to activate non-phosphorylated beta-catenin formation in bone. PMID:19897365

  14. Krüppel-like factor 9 was down-regulated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and negatively regulated beta-catenin/TCF signaling.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Fan; Yao, Feng; Chen, Ling; Lu, Chengjun; Ni, Yiqian; Fang, Wentao; Jin, Hai

    2016-03-01

    Krüppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) has been found to play suppressive roles in several types of tumor. However, the expression pattern and biological functions of KLF9 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are still unknown. In this study, it was found that the expression of KLF9 was significantly down-regulated in ESCC compared to their adjacent normal esophageal tissues. Meanwhile, the expression of KLF9 was inversely correlated with the clinical features of ESCC patients. Moreover, in the biological function study, KLF9 was further validated to inhibit the growth, migration, and metastasis of ESCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, KLF9 bind with TCF4 and suppressed the beta-catenin/TCF signaling as well as the expression of its target gene Cyr61. Collectively, our study clarified the function of KLF9 in both ESCC progression and the regulation of beta-catenin/TCF signaling. PMID:25641762

  15. Effects of curcumin in pediatric epithelial liver tumors: inhibition of tumor growth and alpha-fetoprotein in vitro and in vivo involving the NFkappaB- and the beta-catenin pathways.

    PubMed

    Bortel, Nicola; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin; Schmid, Evi; Kirchner, Bettina; Frank, Jan; Kocher, Alexa; Schiborr, Christina; Warmann, Steven; Fuchs, Jörg; Ellerkamp, Verena

    2015-12-01

    In children with hepatocellular carcinoma (pHCC) the 5-year overall survival rate is poor. Effects of cytostatic therapies such as cisplatin and doxorubicin are limited due to chemoresistance and tumor relapse. In adult HCC, several antitumor properties are described for the use of curcumin. Curcumin is one of the best-investigated phytochemicals in complementary oncology without relevant side effects. Its use is limited by low bioavailability. Little is known about the influence of curcumin on pediatric epithelial hepatic malignancies. We investigated the effects of curcumin in combination with cisplatin on two pediatric epithelial liver tumor cell lines. As mechanisms of action inhibition of NFkappaB, beta-catenin, and decrease of cyclin D were identified. Using a mouse xenograft model we could show a significant decrease of alpha-fetoprotein after combination therapy of oral micellar curcumin and cisplatin. Significant concentrations of curcuminoids were found in blood samples, organ lysates, and tumor tissue after oral micellar curcumin administration. Micellar curcumin in combination with cisplatin can be a promising strategy for treatment of pediatric HCC. PMID:26515460

  16. Effects of curcumin in pediatric epithelial liver tumors: inhibition of tumor growth and alpha-fetoprotein in vitro and in vivo involving the NFkappaB- and the beta-catenin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bortel, Nicola; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin; Schmid, Evi; Kirchner, Bettina; Frank, Jan; Kocher, Alexa; Schiborr, Christina; Warmann, Steven; Fuchs, Jörg; Ellerkamp, Verena

    2015-01-01

    In children with hepatocellular carcinoma (pHCC) the 5-year overall survival rate is poor. Effects of cytostatic therapies such as cisplatin and doxorubicin are limited due to chemoresistance and tumor relapse. In adult HCC, several antitumor properties are described for the use of curcumin. Curcumin is one of the best-investigated phytochemicals in complementary oncology without relevant side effects. Its use is limited by low bioavailability. Little is known about the influence of curcumin on pediatric epithelial hepatic malignancies. We investigated the effects of curcumin in combination with cisplatin on two pediatric epithelial liver tumor cell lines. As mechanisms of action inhibition of NFkappaB, beta-catenin, and decrease of cyclin D were identified. Using a mouse xenograft model we could show a significant decrease of alpha-fetoprotein after combination therapy of oral micellar curcumin and cisplatin. Significant concentrations of curcuminoids were found in blood samples, organ lysates, and tumor tissue after oral micellar curcumin administration. Micellar curcumin in combination with cisplatin can be a promising strategy for treatment of pediatric HCC. PMID:26515460

  17. Requirement of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in pronephric kidney development.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Jon P; Miller, Rachel K; Zhou, Xiaolan; Weidinger, Gilbert; Deroo, Tom; Denayer, Tinneke; Park, Jae-Il; Ji, Hong; Hong, Ji Yeon; Li, Annette; Moon, Randall T; Jones, Elizabeth A; Vleminckx, Kris; Vize, Peter D; McCrea, Pierre D

    2009-01-01

    The pronephric kidney controls water and electrolyte balance during early fish and amphibian embryogenesis. Many Wnt signaling components have been implicated in kidney development. Specifically, in Xenopus pronephric development as well as the murine metanephroi, the secreted glycoprotein Wnt-4 has been shown to be essential for renal tubule formation. Despite the importance of Wnt signals in kidney organogenesis, little is known of the definitive downstream signaling pathway(s) that mediate their effects. Here we report that inhibition of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling within the pronephric field of Xenopus results in significant losses to kidney epithelial tubulogenesis with little or no effect on adjoining axis or somite development. We find that the requirement for Wnt/beta-catenin signaling extends throughout the pronephric primordium and is essential for the development of proximal and distal tubules of the pronephros as well as for the development of the duct and glomus. Although less pronounced than effects upon later pronephric tubule differentiation, inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway decreased expression of early pronephric mesenchymal markers indicating it is also needed in early pronephric patterning. We find that upstream inhibition of Wnt/beta-catenin signals in zebrafish likewise reduces pronephric epithelial tubulogenesis. We also find that exogenous activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling within the Xenopus pronephric field results in significant tubulogenic losses. Together, we propose Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is required for pronephric tubule, duct and glomus formation in Xenopus laevis, and this requirement is conserved in zebrafish pronephric tubule formation. PMID:19100832

  18. {beta}-Catenin can act as a nuclear import receptor for its partner transcription factor, lymphocyte enhancer factor-1 (lef-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Asally, Munehiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro . E-mail: yyoneda@anat3.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2005-08-15

    Nuclear accumulation of {beta}-catenin plays an important role in the Wnt signaling pathway. In the nucleus, {beta}-catenin acts as a transcriptional co-activator for TCF/LEF family of transcription factors. It has been shown that lef-1 contains a typical basic type nuclear localization signal (NLS) and is transported into the nucleus by the conventional import pathway. In this study, we found that a mutant lef-1 lacking the classical NLS accumulated in the nucleus of living cells, when {beta}-catenin was co-expressed. In addition, in a cell-free import assay, lef-1 migrated into the nucleus in the presence of {beta}-catenin alone without any other soluble factors. In contrast, another mutant lef-1 lacking the {beta}-catenin binding domain failed to migrate into the nucleus, even in the presence of {beta}-catenin. These findings indicate that {beta}-catenin alone can mediate the nuclear import of lef-1 through the direct binding. Collectively, we propose that there are two distinct pathways for the nuclear import of lef-1: importin {alpha}/{beta}-mediated and {beta}-catenin-mediated one, which provides a novel paradigm for Wnt signaling pathway.

  19. Isoreserpine promotes {beta}-catenin degradation via Siah-1 up-regulation in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Jungsug; Song, Taeyun; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Jeong, Yongsu; Shin, Jae-Gook; Oh, Sangtaek

    2009-09-25

    Aberrant accumulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells is a frequent early event during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that decrease the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, we performed cell-based chemical screening using genetically engineered HEK293 reporter cells to detect compounds that inhibit TOPFlash reporter activity, which was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium. We found that isoreserpine promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin by up-regulation of Siah-1 in HEK293 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Moreover, isoreserpine repressed the expression of {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, resulting in the suppression of HCT116 cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that isoreserpine can potentially be used as a chemotherapeutic agent against colon cancer.

  20. Repression of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in the anterior endoderm is essential for liver and pancreas development.

    PubMed

    McLin, Valérie A; Rankin, Scott A; Zorn, Aaron M

    2007-06-01

    The liver and pancreas are specified from the foregut endoderm through an interaction with the adjacent mesoderm. However, the earlier molecular mechanisms that establish the foregut precursors are largely unknown. In this study, we have identified a molecular pathway linking gastrula-stage endoderm patterning to organ specification. We show that in gastrula and early-somite stage Xenopus embryos, Wnt/beta-catenin activity must be repressed in the anterior endoderm to maintain foregut identity and to allow liver and pancreas development. By contrast, high beta-catenin activity in the posterior endoderm inhibits foregut fate while promoting intestinal development. Experimentally repressing beta-catenin activity in the posterior endoderm was sufficient to induce ectopic organ buds that express early liver and pancreas markers. beta-catenin acts in part by inhibiting expression of the homeobox gene hhex, which is one of the earliest foregut markers and is essential for liver and pancreas development. Promoter analysis indicates that beta-catenin represses hhex transcription indirectly via the homeodomain repressor Vent2. Later in development, beta-catenin activity has the opposite effect and enhances liver development. These results illustrate that turning Wnt signaling off and on in the correct temporal sequence is essential for organ formation, a finding that might directly impact efforts to differentiate liver and pancreas tissue from stem cells. PMID:17507400

  1. Anticancer activity of Panax notoginseng extract 20(S)-25-OCH3-PPD: Targetting beta-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiuli; Zhao, Yuqing; Fang, Wenfeng; Yang, Wancai

    2009-11-01

    1. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway plays a critical role in carcinogenesis and so agents that target Wnt/beta-catenin may have potential in cancer prevention and therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anticancer activity of the novel natural product dammarane-type triterpene sapogenin (20(S)-25-OCH3-PPD; PPD25) isolated from the leaves of Panax notoginseng. 2. The anticancer activity of PPD25 was evaluated in three colon cancer cell lines and in one lung cancer cell line. The effects of PPD25 to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis were evaluated. In addition, the potential mechanisms underlying the effects of PPD25 were investigated. 3. It was found that the addition of 5 or 25 micromol/L PPD25 to the culture medium significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in all four cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies revealed that PPD25 significantly reduced the expression of beta-catenin, a key mediator in the Wnt pathway, as well as transcriptional targets of beta-catenin, namely c-myc, cyclin D1, cdk4 and T cell factor (TCF)-4. In addition, beta-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity was significantly suppressed by PPD25. 4. The data demonstrate that the PPD25 exerts its anticancer effect by targetting beta-catenin signalling, suggesting that PPD25 may have potential as a chemotherapeutic and/or chemopreventive agent for colon and lung cancer. PMID:19413587

  2. Interactions between SOX factors and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Kormish, Jay D; Sinner, Débora; Zorn, Aaron M

    2010-01-01

    The SOX family of transcription factors have emerged as modulators of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in diverse development and disease contexts. There are over 20 SOX proteins encoded in the vertebrate genome and recent evidence suggests that many of these can physically interact with beta-catenin and modulate the transcription of Wnt-target genes. The precise mechanisms by which SOX proteins regulate beta-catenin/TCF activity are still being resolved and there is evidence to support a number of models including: protein-protein interactions, the binding of SOX factors to Wnt-target gene promoters, the recruitment of co-repressors or co-activators, modulation of protein stability, and nuclear translocation. In some contexts, Wnt signaling also regulates SOX expression resulting in feedback regulatory loops that fine-tune cellular responses to beta-catenin/TCF activity. In this review, we summarize the examples of Sox-Wnt interactions and examine the underlying mechanisms of this potentially widespread and underappreciated mode of Wnt-regulation. PMID:19655378

  3. Enhancing Beta-Catenin Activity via GSK3beta Inhibition Protects PC12 Cells against Rotenone Toxicity through Nurr1 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lei; Mo, Mingshu; Feng, Junmin; Sun, Congcong; Xiao, Yousheng; Luo, Qin; Li, Shaomin; Yang, Xinling; Xu, Pingyi

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Increasing evidence showed that Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 play crucial roles in the survival and functional maintenance of DA neurons in the midbrain and GSK-3β antagonists LiCl and SB216763 were used to activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway experimentally. However, the detail mechanism underlying the neuroprotection against apoptosis on DA neuron is still unclear and the interaction between Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 remains undisclosed. In this study, using cell biological assay we investigated the function of Wnt/β-catenin and its crosstalk with Nurr1 on the course of PC12 cell degeneration in vitro. Our data showed that PC12 cell viability was inhibited by rotenone, but attenuated by GSK-3β antagonists LiCl or SB216763. The activity of Wnt/β-catenin pathway was deregulated on exposure of rotenone in a concentration-dependent manner. After the interference of β-catenin with siRNA, LiCl or SB216763 failed to protect PC12 cells from apoptosis by the rotenone toxicity. Our data confirmed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling activated by LiCl or SB216763 enhanced Nurr1 expression to 2.75 ± 0.55 and 4.06 ± 0.41 folds respectively compared with control detected by real-time PCR and the interaction of β-catenin with Nurr1 was identified by co-immunoprecipitate analysis. In conclusion, the data suggested that Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 are crucial factors in the survival of DA neurons, and the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway exerts protective effects on DA neurons partly by mean of a co-active pattern with Nurr1. This finding may shed a light on the potential treatment of Parkinson disease. PMID:27045591

  4. Natural derivatives of curcumin attenuate the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway through down-regulation of the transcriptional coactivator p300

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Min-Jung; Cho, Munju; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Dong-Eun; Park, Byeoung-Soo; Oh, Sangtaek

    2008-12-26

    Curcumin, a component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been reported to suppress {beta}-catenin response transcription (CRT), which is aberrantly activated in colorectal cancer. However, the effects of its natural analogs (demethoxycurcumin [DMC] and bisdemethoxycurcumin [BDMC]) and metabolite (tetrahydrocurcumin [THC]) on the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway have not been investigated. Here, we show that DMC and BDMC suppressed CRT that was activated by Wnt3a conditioned-medium (Wnt3a-CM) without altering the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, and inhibited the growth of various colon cancer cells, with comparable potency to curcumin. Additionally, DMC and BDMC down-regulated p300, which is a positive regulator of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Notably, THC also inhibited CRT and cell proliferation, but to a much lesser degree than curcumin, DMC, or BDMC, indicating that the conjugated bonds in the central seven-carbon chain of curcuminoids are essential for the inhibition of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway and the anti-proliferative activity of curcuminoids. Thus, our findings suggest that curcumin derivatives inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway by decreasing the amount of the transcriptional coactivator p300.

  5. Crystal Structure of a Full-Length [beta]-Catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yi; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Liu, Jing; Berndt, Jason D.; Zheng, Jie J.; Moon, Randall T.; Xu, Wenqing

    2008-08-19

    {beta}-catenin plays essential roles in cell adhesion and Wnt signaling, while deregulation of {beta}-catenin is associated with multiple diseases including cancers. Here, we report the crystal structures of full-length zebrafish {beta}-catenin and a human {beta}-catenin fragment that contains both the armadillo repeat and the C-terminal domains. Our structures reveal that the N-terminal region of the C-terminal domain, a key component of the C-terminal transactivation domain, forms a long {alpha} helix that packs on the C-terminal end of the armadillo repeat domain, and thus forms part of the {beta}-catenin superhelical core. The existence of this helix redefines our view of interactions of {beta}-catenin with some of its critical partners, including ICAT and Chibby, which may form extensive interactions with this C-terminal domain {alpha} helix. Our crystallographic and NMR studies also suggest that the unstructured N-terminal and C-terminal tails interact with the ordered armadillo repeat domain in a dynamic and variable manner.

  6. Concurrent Transient Activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin Pathway Prevents Radiation Damage to Salivary Glands

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Bo; Yang Zhenhua; Shangguan Lei; Zhao Yanqiu; Boyer, Arthur; Liu, Fei

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Many head and neck cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy suffer from permanent impairment of their salivary gland function, for which few effective prevention or treatment options are available. This study explored the potential of transient activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in preventing radiation damage to salivary glands in a preclinical model. Methods and Materials: Wnt reporter transgenic mice were exposed to 15 Gy single-dose radiation in the head and neck area to evaluate the effects of radiation on Wnt activity in salivary glands. Transient Wnt1 overexpression in basal epithelia was induced in inducible Wnt1 transgenic mice before together with, after, or without local radiation, and then saliva flow rate, histology, apoptosis, proliferation, stem cell activity, and mRNA expression were evaluated. Results: Radiation damage did not significantly affect activity of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway as physical damage did. Transient expression of Wnt1 in basal epithelia significantly activated the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in submandibular glands of male mice but not in those of females. Concurrent transient activation of the Wnt pathway prevented chronic salivary gland dysfunction following radiation by suppressing apoptosis and preserving functional salivary stem/progenitor cells. In contrast, Wnt activation 3 days before or after irradiation did not show significant beneficial effects, mainly due to failure to inhibit acute apoptosis after radiation. Excessive Wnt activation before radiation failed to inhibit apoptosis, likely due to extensive induction of mitosis and up-regulation of proapoptosis gene PUMA while that after radiation might miss the critical treatment window. Conclusion: These results suggest that concurrent transient activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway could prevent radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction.

  7. Dissecting Wnt/beta-catenin signaling during gastrulation using RNA interference in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Lickert, Heiko; Cox, Brian; Wehrle, Christian; Taketo, Makoto M; Kemler, Rolf; Rossant, Janet

    2005-06-01

    Differential gene regulation integrated in time and space drives developmental programs during embryogenesis. To understand how the program of gastrulation is regulated by Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, we have used genome-wide expression profiling of conditional beta-catenin mutant embryos. Known Wnt/beta-catenin target genes, known components of other signaling pathways, as well as a number of uncharacterized genes were downregulated in these mutants. To further narrow down the set of differentially expressed genes, we used whole-mount in situ screening to associate gene expression with putative domains of Wnt activity. Several potential novel target genes were identified by this means and two, Grsf1 and Fragilis2, were functionally analyzed by RNA interference (RNAi) in completely embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived embryos. We show that the gene encoding the RNA-binding factor Grsf1 is important for axial elongation, mid/hindbrain development and axial mesoderm specification, and that Fragilis2, encoding a transmembrane protein, regulates epithelialization of the somites and paraxial mesoderm formation. Intriguingly, the knock-down phenotypes recapitulate several aspects of Wnt pathway mutants, suggesting that these genes are components of the downstream Wnt response. This functional genomic approach allows the rapid identification of functionally important components of embryonic development from large datasets of putative targets. PMID:15857914

  8. Apc bridges Wnt/{beta}-catenin and BMP signaling during osteoblast differentiation of KS483 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miclea, Razvan L.; Horst, Geertje van der; Robanus-Maandag, Els C.; Loewik, Clemens W.G.M.; Oostdijk, Wilma; Wit, Jan M.; Karperien, Marcel

    2011-06-10

    The canonical Wnt signaling pathway influences the differentiation of mesenchymal cell lineages in a quantitative and qualitative fashion depending on the dose of {beta}-catenin signaling. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) is the critical intracellular regulator of {beta}-catenin turnover. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of Apc in regulating the differentiation capacity of skeletal progenitor cells, we have knocked down Apc in the murine mesenchymal stem cell-like KS483 cells by stable expression of Apc-specific small interfering RNA. In routine culture, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells displayed a mesenchymal-like spindle shape morphology, exhibited markedly decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Apc knockdown resulted in upregulation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin and the BMP/Smad signaling pathways, but osteogenic differentiation was completely inhibited. This effect could be rescued by adding high concentrations of BMP-7 to the differentiation medium. Furthermore, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells showed no potential to differentiate into chondrocytes or adipocytes. These results demonstrate that Apc is essential for the proliferation, survival and differentiation of KS483 cells. Apc knockdown blocks the osteogenic differentiation of skeletal progenitor cells, a process that can be overruled by high BMP signaling.

  9. beta-Catenin initiates tooth neogenesis in adult rodent incisors.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Dangaria, S; Andl, T; Zhang, Y; Wright, A C; Damek-Poprawa, M; Piccolo, S; Nagy, A; Taketo, M M; Diekwisch, T G H; Akintoye, S O; Millar, S E

    2010-09-01

    beta-Catenin signaling is required for embryonic tooth morphogenesis and promotes continuous tooth development when activated in embryos. To determine whether activation of this pathway in the adult oral cavity could promote tooth development, we induced mutation of epithelial beta-catenin to a stabilized form in adult mice. This caused increased proliferation of the incisor tooth cervical loop, outpouching of incisor epithelium, abnormal morphology of the epithelial-mesenchymal junction, and enhanced expression of genes associated with embryonic tooth development. Ectopic dental-like structures were formed from the incisor region following implantation into immunodeficient mice. Thus, forced activation of beta-catenin signaling can initiate an embryonic-like program of tooth development in adult rodent incisor teeth. PMID:20530729

  10. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian-Yong; Huang, Yi; Li, Ji-Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei; Meng, Yan-Ling; Yan, Bo; Bian, Yong-Qian; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Wei-Zhong; and others

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  11. O-GlcNAc-glycosylation of {beta}-catenin regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayat, Ria; Leber, Brian; Grubac, Vanja; Wiltshire, Lesley; Persad, Sujata

    2008-09-10

    {beta}-catenin plays a role in intracellular adhesion and regulating gene expression. The latter role is associated with its oncogenic properties. Phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin controls its intracellular expression but mechanism/s that regulates the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin is unknown. We demonstrate that O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) of {beta}-catenin negatively regulates its levels in the nucleus. We show that normal prostate cells (PNT1A) have significantly higher amounts of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin compared to prostate cancer (CaP) cells. The total nuclear levels of {beta}-catenin are higher in the CaP cells than PNT1A but only a minimal fraction of the nuclear {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing the levels of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells with PUGNAc (O- (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-gluco-pyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate) treatment is associated with a progressive decrease in the levels of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus. TOPFlash reporter assay and mRNA expressions of {beta}-catenin's target genes indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of {beta}-catenin results in a decrease in its transcriptional activity. We define a novel modification of {beta}-catenin that regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional function.

  12. Chemoprevention of colon carcinogenesis by polyethylene glycol: suppression of epithelial proliferation via modulation of SNAIL/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Roy, Hemant K; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Koetsier, Jennifer L; Hart, John; Kim, Young L; Liu, Yang; Bissonnette, Marc; Goldberg, Michael; Backman, Vadim; Wali, Ramesh K

    2006-08-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is one of the most potent chemopreventive agents against colorectal cancer; however, the mechanisms remain largely unexplored. In this study, we assessed the ability of PEG to target cyclin D1-beta-catenin-mediated hyperproliferation in the azoxymethane-treated rat model and the human colorectal cancer cell line, HT-29. Azoxymethane-treated rats were randomized to AIN-76A diet alone or supplemented with 5% PEG-8000. After 30 weeks, animals were euthanized and biopsies of aberrant crypt foci and uninvolved crypts were subjected to immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses. PEG markedly suppressed both early and late markers of azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis (fractal dimension by 80%, aberrant crypt foci by 64%, and tumors by 74%). In both azoxymethane-treated rats and HT-29 cells treated with 5% PEG-3350 for 24 hours, PEG decreased proliferation (45% and 52%, respectively) and cyclin D1 (78% and 56%, respectively). Because beta-catenin is the major regulator of cyclin D1 in colorectal cancer, we used the T-cell factor (Tcf)-TOPFLASH reporter assay to show that PEG markedly inhibited beta-catenin transcriptional activity. PEG did not alter total beta-catenin expression but rather its nuclear localization, leading us to assess E-cadherin expression (a major determinant of beta-catenin subcellular localization), which was increased by 73% and 71% in the azoxymethane-rat and HT-29 cells, respectively. We therefore investigated the effect of PEG treatment on levels of the negative regulator of E-cadherin, SNAIL, and observed a 50% and 75% decrease, respectively. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, a molecular mechanism through which PEG imparts its antiproliferative and hence profound chemopreventive effect. PMID:16928827

  13. Constitutive activation of Beta-catenin in uterine stroma and smooth muscle leads to the development of mesenchymal tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Pradeep S; Lee, Ho-Joon; Zhang, LiHua; Zukerberg, Lawrence R; Taketo, Makoto M; Rueda, Bo R; Teixeira, Jose M

    2009-09-01

    Leiomyomas and other mesenchymally derived tumors are the most common neoplasms of the female reproductive tract. Presently, very little is known about the etiology and progression of these tumors, which are the primary indication for hysterectomies. Dysregulated WNT signaling through beta-catenin is a well-established mechanism for tumorigenesis. We have developed a mouse model that expresses constitutively activated beta-catenin in uterine mesenchyme driven by the expression of Cre recombinase knocked into the Müllerian-inhibiting substance type II receptor promoter locus to investigate its effects on uterine endometrial stroma and myometrium. These mice show myometrial hyperplasia and develop mesenchymal tumors with 100% penetrance that exhibit histological and molecular characteristics of human leiomyomas and endometrial stromal sarcomas. By immunohistochemistry, we also show that both transforming growth factor beta and the mammalian target of rapamycin are induced by constitutive activation of beta-catenin. The prevalence of the tumors was greater in multiparous mice, suggesting that their development may be a hormonally driven process or that changes in uterine morphology during pregnancy and after parturition induce injury and repair mechanisms that stimulate tumorigenesis from stem/progenitor cells, which normally do not express constitutively activated beta-catenin. Additionally, adenomyosis and endometrial gland hyperplasia were occasionally observed in some mice. These results show evidence suggesting that dysregulated, stromal, and myometrial WNT/beta-catenin signaling has pleiotropic effects on uterine function and tumorigenesis. PMID:19403928

  14. Constitutive Activation of Beta-Catenin in Uterine Stroma and Smooth Muscle Leads to the Development of Mesenchymal Tumors in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Tanwar, Pradeep S.; Lee, Ho-Joon; Zhang, LiHua; Zukerberg, Lawrence R.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Rueda, Bo R.; Teixeira, Jose M.

    2009-01-01

    Leiomyomas and other mesenchymally derived tumors are the most common neoplasms of the female reproductive tract. Presently, very little is known about the etiology and progression of these tumors, which are the primary indication for hysterectomies. Dysregulated WNT signaling through beta-catenin is a well-established mechanism for tumorigenesis. We have developed a mouse model that expresses constitutively activated beta-catenin in uterine mesenchyme driven by the expression of Cre recombinase knocked into the Müllerian-inhibiting substance type II receptor promoter locus to investigate its effects on uterine endometrial stroma and myometrium. These mice show myometrial hyperplasia and develop mesenchymal tumors with 100% penetrance that exhibit histological and molecular characteristics of human leiomyomas and endometrial stromal sarcomas. By immunohistochemistry, we also show that both transforming growth factor beta and the mammalian target of rapamycin are induced by constitutive activation of beta-catenin. The prevalence of the tumors was greater in multiparous mice, suggesting that their development may be a hormonally driven process or that changes in uterine morphology during pregnancy and after parturition induce injury and repair mechanisms that stimulate tumorigenesis from stem/progenitor cells, which normally do not express constitutively activated beta-catenin. Additionally, adenomyosis and endometrial gland hyperplasia were occasionally observed in some mice. These results show evidence suggesting that dysregulated, stromal, and myometrial WNT/beta-catenin signaling has pleiotropic effects on uterine function and tumorigenesis. PMID:19403928

  15. beta-Galactosidase enzyme fragment complementation for the measurement of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Verkaar, Folkert; Blankesteijn, W Matthijs; Smits, Jos F M; Zaman, Guido J R

    2010-04-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is an important regulator of cell polarity, proliferation, and stem cell maintenance during development and adulthood. Wnt proteins induce the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin, which regulates the expression of Wnt-responsive genes through association with TCF/LEF transcription factors. Aberrant Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in a plethora of pathologies and, most notably, underlies initiation and expansion of several cancers. Here, we apply enzyme fragment complementation to measure the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin. beta-Catenin was tagged with a peptide fragment of beta-galactosidase and transfected into cells expressing a corresponding deletion mutant of the enzyme exclusively in the nucleus. Stimulation of the cells with recombinant Wnt-3a restored beta-galactosidase activity in a dose-dependent manner with nanomolar potency. Using the assay, we confirmed that Wnt-5a represses beta-catenin-driven reporter gene activity downstream of nuclear entry of beta-catenin. In addition, we tested a library of >2000 synthetic chemical compounds for their ability to induce beta-catenin nuclear accumulation. The immunosuppressive protein kinase C inhibitor sotrastaurin (AEB-071) was identified as an activator of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling at micromolar concentrations. It was confirmed that the compound stabilizes endogenous beta-catenin protein and can induce TCF/LEF-dependent gene transcription. Subsequent biochemical profiling of >200 kinases revealed both isoforms of glycogen synthase kinase 3, as previously unappreciated targets of sotrastaurin. We show that the beta-catenin nuclear accumulation assay contributes to our knowledge of molecular interactions within the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and can be used to find new therapeutics targeting Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.-Verkaar, F., Blankesteijn, W. M., Smits, J. F. M., Zaman, G. J. R. beta-Galactosidase enzyme fragment complementation for the measurement of Wnt/beta-catenin

  16. Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok; Yao Hua; Li Wenqi; Budhraja, Amit; Li Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shi Xianglin

    2011-10-15

    Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

  17. Characterization of a beta-catenin nuclear localization defect in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Cara; Mills, Kate M; Lui, Christina; Semaan, Crystal; Molloy, Mark P; Sharma, Manisha; Forwood, Jade K; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-02-15

    Beta-catenin plays a key role in transducing Wnt signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Here we characterize an unusual subcellular distribution of beta-catenin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, wherein beta-catenin localizes to the cytoplasm and membrane but atypically did not relocate to the nucleus after Wnt treatment. The inability of Wnt or the Wnt agonist LiCl to induce nuclear localization of beta-catenin was not due to defective nuclear transport, as the transport machinery was intact and ectopic GFP-beta-catenin displayed rapid nuclear entry in living cells. The mislocalization is explained by a shift in the retention of beta-catenin from nucleus to cytoplasm. The reduced nuclear retention is caused by unusually low expression of lymphoid enhancer factor/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) transcription factors. The reconstitution of LEF-1 or TCF4 expression rescued nuclear localization of beta-catenin in Wnt treated cells. In the cytoplasm, beta-catenin accumulated in recycling endosomes, golgi and beta-COP-positive coatomer complexes. The peripheral association with endosomes diminished after Wnt treatment, potentially releasing β-catenin into the cytoplasm for nuclear entry. We propose that in MCF-7 and perhaps other breast cancer cells, beta-catenin may contribute to cytoplasmic functions such as ER-golgi transport, in addition to its transactivation role in the nucleus. PMID:26844628

  18. N-cadherin mediated distribution of beta-catenin alters MAP kinase and BMP-2 signaling on chondrogenesis-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Modarresi, Rozbeh; Lafond, Toulouse; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Danielson, Keith G; Tuan, Rocky S; Seghatoleslami, M Reza

    2005-05-01

    We have examined the effect of calcium-dependent adhesion, mediated by N-cadherin, on cell signaling during chondrogenesis of multipotential embryonic mouse C3H10T1/2 cells. The activity of chondrogenic genes, type II collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 were examined in monolayer (non-chondrogenic), and micromass (chondrogenic) cultures of parental C3H10T1/2 cells and altered C3H10T1/2 cell lines that express a dominant negative form of N-cadherin (delta390-T1/2) or overexpress normal N-cadherin (MNCD2-T1/2). Our findings show that missexpression or inhibition of N-cadherin in C3H10T1/2 cells results in temporal and spatial changes in expression of the chondrogenic genes Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II. We have also analyzed activity of the serum response factor (SRF), a nuclear target of MAP kinase signaling implicated in chondrogenesis. In semi-confluent monolayer cultures (minimum cell-cell contact) of C3H10T1/2, MNCD2-T1/2, or delta390-T1/2 cells, there was no significant change in the pattern of MAP kinase or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) regulation of SRF. However, in micromass cultures, the effect of MAP kinase and BMP-2 on SRF activity was proportional to the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a Wnt stabilized cytoplasmic factor that can associate with lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (LEF) to serve as a transcription factor. Our findings suggest that the extent of adherens junction formation mediated by N-cadherin can modulate the potential Wnt-induced nuclear activity of beta-catenin. PMID:15723280

  19. FHL2 mediates dexamethasone-induced mesenchymal cell differentiation into osteoblasts by activating Wnt/beta-catenin signaling-dependent Runx2 expression.

    PubMed

    Hamidouche, Zahia; Haÿ, Eric; Vaudin, Pascal; Charbord, Pierre; Schüle, Roland; Marie, Pierre J; Fromigué, Olivia

    2008-11-01

    The differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into osteoblasts is a crucial step in bone formation. However, the mechanisms involved in the early stages of osteogenic differentiation are not well understood. In this study, we identified FHL2, a member of the LIM-only subclass of the LIM protein superfamily, that is up-regulated during early osteoblast differentiation induced by dexamethasone in murine and human MSCs. Gain-of-function studies showed that FHL2 promotes the expression of the osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, as well as in vitro extracellular matrix mineralization in murine and human mesenchymal cells. Knocking down FHL2 using sh-RNA reduces basal and dexamethasone-induced osteoblast marker gene expression in MSCs. We demonstrate that FHL2 interacts with beta-catenin, a key player involved in bone formation induced by Wnt signaling. FHL2-beta-catenin interaction potentiates beta-catenin nuclear translocation and TCF/LEF transcription, resulting in increased Runx2 and alkaline phosphatase expression, which was inhibited by the Wnt inhibitor DKK1. Reduction of Runx2 transcriptional activity using a mutant Runx2 results in inhibition of FHL2-induced alkaline phosphatase expression in MSCs. These findings reveal that FHL2 acts as an endogenous activator of mesenchymal cell differentiation into osteoblasts and mediates osteogenic differentiation induced by dexamethasone in MSCs through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling- dependent Runx2 expression. PMID:18653765

  20. Caveolin-1-mediated suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 via a beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcriptional mechanism reduced prostaglandin E2 production and survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Diego A; Tapia, Julio C; Fernandez, Jaime G; Torres, Vicente A; Muñoz, Nicolas; Galleguillos, Daniela; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2009-04-01

    Augmented expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and enhanced production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) are associated with increased tumor cell survival and malignancy. Caveolin-1 is a scaffold protein that has been proposed to function as a tumor suppressor in human cancer cells, although mechanisms underlying this ability remain controversial. Intriguingly, the possibility that caveolin-1 regulates the expression of COX-2 has not been explored. Here we show that augmented caveolin-1 expression in cells with low basal levels of this protein, such as human colon cancer (HT29, DLD-1), breast cancer (ZR75), and embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells reduced COX-2 mRNA and protein levels and beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef and COX-2 gene reporter activity, as well as the production of PGE(2) and cell proliferation. Moreover, COX-2 overexpression or PGE(2) supplementation increased levels of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin by a transcriptional mechanism, as determined by PCR analysis, survivin gene reporter assays and Western blotting. Furthermore, addition of PGE(2) to the medium prevented effects attributed to caveolin-1-mediated inhibition of beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription. Finally, PGE(2) reduced the coimmunoprecipitation of caveolin-1 with beta-catenin and their colocalization at the plasma membrane. Thus, by reducing COX-2 expression, caveolin-1 interrupts a feedback amplification loop involving PGE(2)-induced signaling events linked to beta-catenin/Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription of tumor survival genes including cox-2 itself and survivin. PMID:19244345

  1. Genomic organization of the human {beta}-catenin gene (CTNNB1)

    SciTech Connect

    Nollet, F.; Berx, G.; Molemans, F.; Roy, F. van

    1996-03-05

    The cytoplasmic {beta}-catenin protein is implicated in signal transduction and associates with both the cell-cell adhesion protein E-cadherin and the tumor suppressor gene product APC. We determined the primary structure of the human {beta}-catenin gene (CTNNB1) by analysis cDNA and genomic clones. The size of the complete gene was determined to be 23.2 kb. Restriction mapping and partial sequence analysis revealed 16 exons. All splice donor and acceptor sites were conformable to the GT/AG rule. The exon size ranged from 61 to 790 bp. Half of the introns were smaller than 550 bp, with the smallest being 84 pb and the longest being 6700 bp. The intron-exon boundaries did not coincide either with conserved sites in the 12 armadillo repeat sequences of {beta}-catenin or with intron-exon boundaries in the armadillo gene of Drosophila. A major site for transcription initiation was identified as an A residue 214 nucleotides upstream of the ATG initiation codon. The resulting transcript is 3362 nucleotides long. Compared to the previously published mRNA sequence, additional residues were identified, 16 at the 5{prime} end and 766 at the 3{prime} end of the mRNA. An alternative splice acceptor site within exon 16 reduced the 3{prime} UTR sequence by 159 bp. Polymerase chain reaction on cDNA from 14 human cell lines demonstrated the general occurrence of both splice variants. The 5{prime}-flanking region is highly GC-rich and lacks a CCAAT box, but contains a TATA box and potential binding sites for several transcription factors, such as NFkB, SP1, AP2, and EGR1. Both a 437-bp fragment and a 6-kb fragment, containing about 4.7 kb of the 5{prime}-flanking region in addition to the noncoding exon 1 and 1 kb of intron 1, showed clear promoter activity when these fragments were linked to a secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter gene and transfected into a mouse epithelial cell line. 53 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack.

    PubMed

    Scherbakov, Alexander M; Stefanova, Lidia B; Sorokin, Danila V; Semina, Svetlana E; Berstein, Lev M; Krasil'nikov, Mikhail A

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors--from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O2 atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK - the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well the level of

  3. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    SciTech Connect

    Scherbakov, Alexander M.; Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E.; Berstein, Lev M.; Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A.

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  4. Beta-catenin is essential for ameloblast movement during enamel development.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaomu; Xu, Mingang; Millar, Sarah E; Bartlett, John D

    2016-06-01

    Beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein that plays key roles in cadherin-based cell adherens junctions and in the Wnt signaling pathway. The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway can regulate transcription factors that control cell movement/invasion. We investigated whether β-catenin regulates ameloblast movement through canonical Wnt signaling. The morphological and physical properties of enamel were assessed in enamel from control and β-catenin conditional knockout (cKO) mice. Ameloblast-lineage cells (ALC) were used to investigate the potential roles of β-catenin in cell migration and in E-cadherin expression. Compared with controls, incisors from β-catenin cKO mice were short, blunt, and where enamel was present, it was soft and malformed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dysplastic rod pattern within the enamel of incisors from β-catenin cKO mice, and Vickers microhardness measurements confirmed that mice with β-catenin ablated from their enamel organ had enamel that was significantly softer than normal. Amelogenesis was disrupted in the absence of β-catenin and the ameloblasts did not differentiate properly. We further demonstrated that migration of ALCs was inhibited in vitro and that E-cadherin expression was significantly up-regulated when ALCs were treated with the β-catenin inhibitor, ICG-001. Beta-catenin ablation causes enamel malformation in mice and this phenotype may occur, in part, by a lack of ameloblast differentiation and/or movement necessary to form the decussating enamel rod structure. PMID:26957367

  5. Excess beta-catenin promotes accumulation of transcriptionally active p53.

    PubMed Central

    Damalas, A; Ben-Ze'ev, A; Simcha, I; Shtutman, M; Leal, J F; Zhurinsky, J; Geiger, B; Oren, M

    1999-01-01

    beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein, acting both as a structural component of the cell adhesion machinery and as a transducer of extracellular signals. Deregulated beta-catenin protein expression, due to mutations in the beta-catenin gene itself or in its upstream regulator, the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, is prevalent in colorectal cancer and in several other tumor types, and attests to the potential oncogenic activity of this protein. Increased expression of beta-catenin is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis, and is usually followed by a later mutational inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. To examine whether these two key steps in carcinogenesis are interrelated, we studied the effect of excess beta-catenin on p53. We report here that overexpression of beta-catenin results in accumulation of p53, apparently through interference with its proteolytic degradation. This effect involves both Mdm2-dependent and -independent p53 degradation pathways, and is accompanied by augmented transcriptional activity of p53 in the affected cells. Increased p53 activity may provide a safeguard against oncogenic deregulation of beta-catenin, and thus impose a pressure for mutational inactivation of p53 during the later stages of tumor progression. PMID:10357817

  6. Heterocellular interaction enhances recruitment of {alpha} and {beta}-catenins and ZO-2 into functional gap-junction complexes and induces gap junction-dependant differentiation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Talhouk, Rabih S. Mroue, Rana; Mokalled, Mayssa; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Nehme, Ralda; Ismail, Ayman; Khalil, Antoine; Zaatari, Mira; El-Sabban, Marwan E.

    2008-11-01

    Gap junctions (GJ) are required for mammary epithelial differentiation. Using epithelial (SCp2) and myoepithelial-like (SCg6) mouse-derived mammary cells, the role of heterocellular interaction in assembly of GJ complexes and functional differentiation ({beta}-casein expression) was evaluated. Heterocellular interaction is critical for {beta}-casein expression, independent of exogenous basement membrane or cell anchoring substrata. Functional differentiation of SCp2, co-cultured with SCg6, is more sensitive to GJ inhibition relative to homocellular SCp2 cultures differentiated by exogenous basement membrane. Connexin (Cx)32 and Cx43 levels were not regulated across culture conditions; however, GJ functionality was enhanced under differentiation-permissive conditions. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated association of junctional complex components ({alpha}-catenin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-2) with Cx32 and Cx43, in differentiation conditions, and additionally with Cx30 in heterocellular cultures. Although {beta}-catenin did not shuttle between cadherin and GJ complexes, increased association between connexins and {beta}-catenin in heterocellular cultures was observed. This was concomitant with reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin, suggesting that differentiation in heterocellular cultures involves sequestration of {beta}-catenin in GJ complexes.

  7. [Dual-role regulations of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Chen-guang; Zhou, Chun-yan

    2010-04-18

    In recent years, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been identified as a key player in embryogenesis and human diseases. Canonical Wnt signaling pathway is controlled by a variety of classic molecules like Wnt, beta-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK-3beta and CK1, which interact and coordinate to regulate the expressions of cell signaling molecules. The latest evidences suggest that some components of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, like APC, GSK-3beta, CK1, Dkk2 and WISE, play dual roles different from what they have been thought previously. Here we reviewed some recent discoveries on the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway to provide some new ideas and principles for signaling transduction studies. PMID:20396373

  8. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates {beta}-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of {beta}-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of {beta}-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and {beta}-catenin-induced cell death.

  9. Tyrosine residues 654 and 670 in {beta}-cat enin are crucial in regulation of Met-{beta}-catenin interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Gang; Apte, Udayan; Micsenyi, Amanda; Bell, Aaron; Monga, Satdarshan P.S. . E-mail: smonga@pitt.edu

    2006-11-01

    {beta}-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt pathway, is also regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation that regulates its association to E-cadherin. Previously, we reported its association with the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor Met at the membrane. HGF induced Met-{beta}-catenin dissociation and nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin, which was tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent. Here, we further investigate the Met-{beta}-catenin interaction by selectively mutating several tyrosine residues, alone or in combination, in {beta}-catenin. The mutants were subcloned into FLAG-CMV vector and stably transfected into rat hepatoma cells, which were treated with HGF. All single or double-mutant-transfected cells continued to show HGF-induced nuclear translocation of FLAG-{beta}-catenin except the mutations affecting 654 and 670 simultaneously (Y654/670F), which coincided with the lack of formation of {beta}-catenin-TCF complex and DNA synthesis, in response to the HGF treatment. In addition, the Y654/670F-transfected cells also showed no phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin or dissociation from Met in response to HGF. Thus, intact 654 and 670 tyrosine residues in {beta}-catenin are crucial in HGF-mediated {beta}-catenin translocation, activation and mitogenesis.

  10. Role of CDK8 and beta-catenin in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jong-Og; Han, Song Iy; Lim, Sung-Chul

    2010-07-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway plays an important role in colon cancers. However, relatively little is known about the regulatory mechanism of beta-catenin in colon cancers. CDK8 is a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) member of the mediator complex that couples transcriptional regulators to the basal transcriptional machinery, and is implicated in the transcriptional regulation of key pathways involved in colon cancers. To determine the relationship between CDK8 and beta-catenin expressions, a population-based study was conducted for immunohistochemical staining analysis of tumor tissues, and Western blot analysis and CDK8 interference studies of colon cancer cell lines. The hypothesis that colorectal cancers with CDK8 expression have distinct clinical, prognostic and molecular attributes was tested. Among 127 colorectal cancers, CDK8 expression was detected in 96 (76%) tumors by immunohistochemistry. CDK8 and beta-catenin expression had significant positive correlation with carcinogenesis, tumor progression and patient survival. Immunohistochemically, CDK8 expression in colorectal cancer was independently associated with beta-catenin activation (P=0.0002). However, beta-catenin expression was not completely suppressed by CDK8 interference in the colon cancer cell lines HCT-116, HT-29 and SNU-C5. These data support a potential link between CDK8 and beta-catenin, and suggest that CDK8 may identify a subset of colon cancer patients with a poor prognosis. However, control of CDK8 is not an effective therapeutic strategy through beta-catenin regulation of general colon cancer. PMID:20514474

  11. TGF-{beta} modulates {beta}-Catenin stability and signaling in mesenchymal proliferations

    SciTech Connect

    Amini Nik, Saeid; Ebrahim, Rasoul Pour; Dam, Kim van; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Tejpar, Sabine . E-mail: sabine.tejpar@med.kuleuven.be

    2007-08-01

    Here for the first time we showed, despite the oncogenic mutations in {beta}-Catenin, that TGF-{beta} is a modulator of {beta}-Catenin levels in tumoral fibroblasts as well as non-tumoral fibroblasts. The results show that the TGF-{beta} pathway is active in desmoids cells and in in situ tumors. A dose dependent increase in {beta}-Catenin protein levels was observed after TGF-{beta} treatment in combination with an increased repression of GSK-3{beta} both in normal and tumoral fibroblasts. TGF-{beta} stimulation also led to an altered - up to 5 fold - transcriptional activity of {beta}-Catenin responsive promoters, such as IGFBP6 as well as increase of TOPflash activity. TGF-{beta} stimulation increased cell proliferation and BrdU incorporation 2.5 times. Taken together, we propose that TGF-{beta} is a modulator of {beta}-Catenin levels in tumoral fibroblasts and non-tumoral fibroblasts, despite the oncogenic mutations already present in this gene in tumoral fibroblasts of desmoid tumors. This modulation of {beta}-Catenin levels by TGF-{beta} may be involved in determining the tumoral phenotype of the cells.

  12. Nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of APC regulates beta-catenin subcellular localization and turnover.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B R

    2000-09-01

    Mutational inactivation of the APC gene is a key early event in the development of familial adenomatous polyposis and colon cancer. APC suppresses tumour progression by promoting degradation of the oncogenic transcriptional activator beta-catenin. APC gene mutations can lead to abnormally high levels of beta-catenin in the nucleus, and the consequent activation of transforming genes. Here, we show that APC is a nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling protein, and that it can function as a beta-catenin chaperone. APC contains two active nuclear export sequences (NES) at the amino terminus, and mutagenesis of these conserved motifs blocks nuclear export dependent on the CRM1 export receptor. Treatment of cells with the CRM1-specific export inhibitor leptomycin B shifts APC from cytoplasm to nucleus. beta-catenin localization is also regulated by CRM1, but in an APC-dependent manner. Transient expression of wild-type APC in SW480 (APCmut/mut) colon cancer cells enhances nuclear export and degradation of beta-catenin, and these effects can be blocked by mutagenesis of the APC NES. These findings suggest that wild-type APC controls the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin by a combination of nuclear export and cytoplasmic degradation. PMID:10980707

  13. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway regulates Gli-mediated Myf5 expression during somitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Borello, Ugo; Berarducci, Barbara; Murphy, Paula; Bajard, Lola; Buffa, Viviana; Piccolo, Stefano; Buckingham, Margaret; Cossu, Giulio

    2006-09-01

    Canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling regulates the activation of the myogenic determination gene Myf5 at the onset of myogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. Here, we report that the Wnt signal is transduced in muscle progenitor cells by at least two Frizzled (Fz) receptors (Fz1 and/or Fz6), through the canonical beta-catenin pathway, in the epaxial domain of newly formed somites. We show that Myf5 activation is dramatically reduced by blocking the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in somite progenitor cells, whereas expression of activated beta-catenin is sufficient to activate Myf5 in somites but not in the presomitic mesoderm. In addition, we identified Tcf/Lef sequences immediately 5' to the Myf5 early epaxial enhancer. These sites determine the correct spatiotemporal expression of Myf5 in the epaxial domain of the somite, mediating the synergistic action of the Wnt/beta-catenin and the Shh/Gli pathways. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Myf5 is a direct target of Wnt/beta-catenin, and that its full activation requires a cooperative interaction between the canonical Wnt and the Shh/Gli pathways in muscle progenitor cells. PMID:16936075

  14. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  15. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  16. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  17. Lack of Muc1-regulated beta-catenin stability results in aberrant expansion of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells from the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Tze Wei; Bradley, Judy M.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Gendler, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells that inhibit T cell activity and contribute to the immune suppression characteristic of most tumors. We discovered that bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells from the Muc1 knockout (KO) mice differentiated into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs in vitro under GM-CSF and IL-4 signaling. MUC1 is a tumor-associated mucin and its cytoplasmic tail (MUC1-CT) can regulate beta-catenin to promote oncogenesis. Given the importance of beta-catenin in hematopoiesis, we hypothesized that the MUC1 regulation of beta-catenin is important for MDSC development. Our current study shows that the aberrant development of BM progenitors into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs is dependent on the down regulation of beta-catenin levels that occurs in the absence of Muc1. In light of this, KO mice showed enhanced EL4 tumor growth and were able to better tolerate allogeneic BM185 tumor growth, with an accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ cells in the blood and tumor draining lymph nodes. WT mice were able to similarly tolerate allogeneic tumor growth when they were injected with CD11b+Gr1+ cells from tumor-bearing KO mice, suggesting that tolerance of allogeneic tumors is dependent on MDSC-mediated immune suppression. This further delineates the ability of Muc1 to control MDSC development which could directly impact tumorigenesis. Knowledge of the biology by which Muc1 regulates the development of myeloid progenitors into MDSCs would also be very useful in enhancing the efficacy of cancer vaccines in the face of tumor immune suppression. PMID:19351842

  18. Opposite Interplay between PPAR Gamma and Canonical Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Vallée, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The opposite interplay between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has led to the categorization of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) as either NDs in which PPAR gamma is downregulated while the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated [amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, Friedreich's ataxia] or NDs in which PPAR gamma is upregulated while the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is downregulated (bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease). ALS, a common adult-onset debilitating ND, is characterized by a chronic and progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons resulting in muscular atrophy, paralysis, and ultimately death. The intent of this review is to provide an analysis of the integration of these two opposed systems, i.e., canonical Wnt/beta-catenin and PPAR gamma, in ALS. Understanding this integration may aid in the development of novel ALS therapies. Although the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated in ALS, riluzole, an enhancer of the canonical Wnt signaling, is classically prescribed in this disease in humans. However, studies carried out on ALS transgenic mice have shown beneficial effects after treatment by PPAR gamma agonists partly due to their anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:27445967

  19. Beta-catenin and BMP-2 synergize to promote osteoblast differentiation and new bone formation.

    PubMed

    Mbalaviele, Gabriel; Sheikh, Sharmin; Stains, Joseph P; Salazar, Valerie S; Cheng, Su-Li; Chen, Di; Civitelli, Roberto

    2005-02-01

    Mutations of critical components of the Wnt pathway profoundly affect skeletal development and maintenance, probably via modulation of beta-catenin signaling. We tested the hypothesis that beta-catenin is involved in mesenchymal lineage allocation to osteogenic cells using a beta-catenin mutant with constitutive transcriptional activity (DeltaN151). Although this stable beta-catenin had no effects by itself on osteogenic differentiation of multipotent embryonic cell lines, it synergized with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) resulting in dramatic stimulation of alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin gene expression, and matrix mineralization. Likewise, DeltaN151 and BMP-2 synergistically stimulated new bone formation after subperiosteal injection in mouse calvaria in vivo. Conversely, DeltaN151 prevented adipogenic differentiation from pre-adipocytic or uncommitted mesenchymal cells in vitro. Intriguingly, the synergism with BMP-2 on gene transcription occurred without altering expression of Cbfa1/Runx2, suggesting actions independent or downstream of this osteoblast-specific transcription factor. Thus, beta-catenin directs osteogenic lineage allocation by enhancing mesenchymal cell responsiveness to osteogenic factors, such as BMP-2, in part via Tcf/Lef dependent mechanisms. In vivo, this synergism leads to increased new bone formation. PMID:15526274

  20. Opposite Interplay between PPAR Gamma and Canonical Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Vallée, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The opposite interplay between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has led to the categorization of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) as either NDs in which PPAR gamma is downregulated while the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated [amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Friedreich’s ataxia] or NDs in which PPAR gamma is upregulated while the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is downregulated (bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease). ALS, a common adult-onset debilitating ND, is characterized by a chronic and progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons resulting in muscular atrophy, paralysis, and ultimately death. The intent of this review is to provide an analysis of the integration of these two opposed systems, i.e., canonical Wnt/beta-catenin and PPAR gamma, in ALS. Understanding this integration may aid in the development of novel ALS therapies. Although the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated in ALS, riluzole, an enhancer of the canonical Wnt signaling, is classically prescribed in this disease in humans. However, studies carried out on ALS transgenic mice have shown beneficial effects after treatment by PPAR gamma agonists partly due to their anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:27445967

  1. Tissue-specific requirements of beta-catenin in external genitalia development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Congxing; Yin, Yan; Long, Fanxin; Ma, Liang

    2008-08-01

    External genitalia are body appendages specialized for internal fertilization. Their development can be divided into two phases, an early androgen-independent phase and a late androgen-dependent sexual differentiation phase. In the early phase, the embryonic anlage of external genitalia, the genital tubercle (GT), is morphologically identical in both sexes. Although congenital external genitalia malformations represent the second most common birth defect in humans, the genetic pathways governing early external genitalia development and urethra formation are poorly understood. Proper development of the GT requires coordinated outgrowth of the mesodermally derived mesenchyme and extension of the endodermal urethra within an ectodermal epithelial capsule. Here, we demonstrate that beta-catenin plays indispensable and distinct roles in each of the aforementioned three tissue layers in early androgen-independent GT development. WNT-beta-catenin signaling is required in the endodermal urethra to activate and maintain Fgf8 expression and direct GT outgrowth, as well as to maintain homeostasis of the urethra. Moreover, beta-catenin is required in the mesenchyme to promote cell proliferation. By contrast, beta-catenin is required in the ectoderm to maintain tissue integrity, possibly through cell-cell adhesion during GT outgrowth. The fact that both endodermal and ectodermal beta-catenin knockout animals develop severe hypospadias in both sexes raises the possibility that the deregulation of any of these functions can contribute to the etiology of congenital external genital defects in humans. PMID:18635608

  2. APP induces neuronal apoptosis through APP-BP1-mediated downregulation of beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y Z

    2004-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with progressive dementia. This mini-review focuses on how the amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in AD and Down syndrome as the regulator of the APP-BP1/hUba3 activated neddylation pathway. It is argued that the physiological function of APP is to downregulate the level of beta-catenin. However, this APP function is abnormally amplified in patients with familial AD (FAD) mutations in APP and presenilins, resulting in the hyperactivation of neddylation and the decrease of beta-catenin below a threshold level. Evidence in the literature is summarized to show that dysfunction of APP in downregulating beta-catenin may underlie the mechanism of neuronal death in AD and Down syndrome. PMID:15192323

  3. Activation of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhances monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Kun . E-mail: leedk@memorialhealthsource.com; Nathan Grantham, R.; Trachte, Aaron L.; Mannion, John D.; Wilson, Colleen L.

    2006-08-18

    Monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium has been reported to be one of the early processes in the development of atherosclerosis. In an attempt to develop strategies to prevent or delay atherosclerosis progression, we analyzed effects of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway on monocyte adhesion to various human endothelial cells. Adhesion of fluorescein-labeled monocytes to various human endothelial cells was analyzed under a fluorescent microscope. Unlike sodium chloride, lithium chloride enhanced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3{beta} or proteosome enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Results of semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway did not change expression levels of mRNA for adhesion molecules. In conclusion, the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion without changing expression levels of adhesion molecules.

  4. An ancient role for nuclear beta-catenin in the evolution of axial polarity and germ layer segregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikramanayake, Athula H.; Hong, Melanie; Lee, Patricia N.; Pang, Kevin; Byrum, Christine A.; Bince, Joanna M.; Xu, Ronghui; Martindale, Mark Q.

    2003-01-01

    The human oncogene beta-catenin is a bifunctional protein with critical roles in both cell adhesion and transcriptional regulation in the Wnt pathway. Wnt/beta-catenin signalling has been implicated in developmental processes as diverse as elaboration of embryonic polarity, formation of germ layers, neural patterning, spindle orientation and gap junction communication, but the ancestral function of beta-catenin remains unclear. In many animal embryos, activation of beta-catenin signalling occurs in blastomeres that mark the site of gastrulation and endomesoderm formation, raising the possibility that asymmetric activation of beta-catenin signalling specified embryonic polarity and segregated germ layers in the common ancestor of bilaterally symmetrical animals. To test whether nuclear translocation of beta-catenin is involved in axial identity and/or germ layer formation in 'pre-bilaterians', we examined the in vivo distribution, stability and function of beta-catenin protein in embryos of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis (Cnidaria, Anthozoa). Here we show that N. vectensis beta-catenin is differentially stabilized along the oral-aboral axis, translocated into nuclei in cells at the site of gastrulation and used to specify entoderm, indicating an evolutionarily ancient role for this protein in early pattern formation.

  5. DKK1, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, is a target of the beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

    PubMed

    Niida, Atsushi; Hiroko, Takatoshi; Kasai, Mana; Furukawa, Yoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2004-11-01

    Wnt signaling plays an important role in embryonic development and tumorigenesis. These biological effects are exerted by activation of the beta-catenin/TCF transcription complex and consequent regulation of a set of downstream genes. TCF-binding elements have been found in the promoter regions of many TCF target genes and characterized by a highly conserved consensus sequence. Utilizing this consensus sequence, we performed an in silico screening for new TCF target genes. Through computational screening and subsequent experimental analysis, we identified a novel TCF target gene, DKK1, which has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of Wnt signaling. Our finding suggests the existence of a novel feedback loop in Wnt signaling. PMID:15378020

  6. {beta}-Catenin up-regulates Nanog expression through interaction with Oct-3/4 in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Yukinari; Yokota, Takashi; Koide, Hiroshi . E-mail: hkoide@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2007-02-16

    It is well known that mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be maintained by the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Recent studies have revealed that Wnt also exhibits activity similar to LIF. The molecular mechanism behind the maintenance of ES cells by these factors, however, is not fully understood. In this study, we found that LIF enhances level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, a component of the Wnt signaling pathway. Expression of an activated mutant of {beta}-catenin led to the long-term proliferation of ES cells, even in the absence of LIF. Furthermore, it was found that {beta}-catenin up-regulates Nanog in an Oct-3/4-dependent manner and that {beta}-catenin physically associates with Oct-3/4. These results suggest that up-regulating Nanog through interaction with Oct-3/4 involves {beta}-catenin in the LIF- and Wnt-mediated maintenance of ES cell self-renewal.

  7. Protein 4.1R links E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex to the cytoskeleton through its direct interaction with beta-catenin and modulates adherens junction integrity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaomin; Guo, Xinhua; Debnath, Gargi; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2009-07-01

    Protein 4.1R (4.1R) is the prototypical member of the protein 4.1 superfamily comprising of the protein 4.1 family (4.1R, 4.1B, 4.1G and 4.1N) and ERM family (ezrin, radixin and meosin). These proteins in general serve as adaptors between the membrane and the cytoskeleton. Here we show that 4.1R expressed in the gastric epithelial cells associates with adherens junction protein beta-catenin. Biochemical examination of 4.1R-deficient stomach epithelia revealed a selective reduction of beta-catenin which is accompanied by a weaker linkage of E-cadherin to the cytoskeleton. In addition, organization of actin cytoskeleton was altered in 4.1R-deficient cells. Moreover, histological examination revealed that cell-cell contacts are impaired and gastric glands are disorganized in 4.1R null stomach epithelia. These results demonstrate an important and previously unidentified role of 4.1R in linking the cadherin/catenin complex to the cytoskeleton through its direct interaction with beta-catenin and in regulating the integrity of adherens junction. PMID:19376086

  8. Localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Hayley; Patel, Shyam; Wong, Janelle; Chu, Julia; Li, Adrian; Li, Song

    2008-08-08

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are pluripotent, and can be directed to differentiate into different cell types for therapeutic applications. To expand hESCs, it is desirable to maintain hESC growth without differentiation. As hESC colonies grow, differentiated cells are often found at the periphery of the colonies, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we utilized micropatterning techniques to pattern circular islands or strips of matrix proteins, and examined the spatial pattern of hESC renewal and differentiation. We found that micropatterned matrix restricted hESC differentiation at colony periphery but allowed hESC growth into multiple layers in the central region, which decreased hESC proliferation and induced hESC differentiation. In undifferentiated hESCs, {beta}-catenin primarily localized at cell-cell junctions but not in the nucleus. The amount of {beta}-catenin in differentiating hESCs at the periphery of colonies or in multiple layers decreased significantly at cell-cell junctions. Consistently, knocking down {beta}-catenin decreased Oct-4 expression in hESCs. These results indicate that localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the spatial pattern of differentiation in hESC colonies.

  9. LRP6 expression promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by altering beta-catenin subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghe; Lu, Wenyan; He, Xi; Schwartz, Alan L; Bu, Guojun

    2004-12-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays key roles in both embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6), a novel member of the expanding LDL receptor family, functions as an indispensable co-receptor for the Wnt signaling pathway. Although the role of LRP6 in embryonic development is now well established, its role in tumorigenesis is unclear. We report that LRP6 is readily expressed at the transcript level in several human cancer cell lines and human malignant tissues. Furthermore, using a retroviral gene transfer system, we find that stable expression of LRP6 in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells alters subcellular beta-catenin distribution such that the cytosolic beta-catenin level is significantly increased. This is accompanied by a significant increase in Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and cell proliferation. Finally, we demonstrate that LRP6 expression promotes tumorigenesis in vivo. These results thus indicate that LRP6 may function as a potential oncogenic protein by modulating Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. PMID:15516984

  10. Regulation of intracellular beta-catenin levels by the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor-suppressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Munemitsu, S; Albert, I; Souza, B; Rubinfeld, B; Polakis, P

    1995-01-01

    The APC tumor-suppressor protein associates with beta-catenin, a cell adhesion protein that is upregulated by the WNT1 oncogene. We examined the effects of exogenous APC expression on the distribution and amount of beta-catenin in a colorectal cancer cell containing only mutant APC. Expression of wild-type APC caused a pronounced reduction in total beta-catenin levels by eliminating an excessive supply of cytoplasmic beta-catenin indigenous to the SW480 colorectal cancer cell line. This reduction was due to an enhanced rate of beta-catenin protein degradation. Truncated mutant APC proteins, characteristic of those associated with cancer, lacked this activity. Mutational analysis revealed that the central region of the APC protein, which is typically deleted or severely truncated in tumors, was responsible for the down-regulation of beta-catenin. These results suggest that the tumor-suppressor activity of mutant APC may be compromised due to a defect in its ability to regulate beta-catenin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7708772

  11. Lymphoid enhancer factor-1 blocks adenomatous polyposis coli-mediated nuclear export and degradation of beta-catenin. Regulation by histone deacetylase 1.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Beric R; Galea, Melanie; Schuechner, Stefan; Leung, Louie

    2002-07-01

    The oncogenic protein beta-catenin is overexpressed in many cancers, frequently accumulating in nuclei where it forms active complexes with lymphoid enhancer factor-1 (LEF-1)/T-cell transcription factors, inducing genes such as c-myc and cyclin D1. In normal cells, nuclear beta-catenin levels are controlled by the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein through nuclear export and cytoplasmic degradation. Transient expression of LEF-1 is known to increase nuclear beta-catenin levels by an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that APC and LEF-1 compete for nuclear beta-catenin with opposing consequences. APC can export nuclear beta-catenin to the cytoplasm for degradation. In contrast, LEF-1 anchors beta-catenin in the nucleus by blocking APC-mediated nuclear export. LEF-1 also prevented the APC/CRM1-independent nuclear export of beta-catenin as revealed by in vitro assays. Importantly, LEF-1-bound beta-catenin was protected from degradation by APC and axin in SW480 colon cancer cells. The ability of LEF-1 to trap beta-catenin in the nucleus was down-regulated by histone deacetylase 1, and this correlated with a decrease in LEF1 transcription activity. Our findings identify LEF-1 as key regulator of beta-catenin nuclear localization and stability and suggest that overexpression of LEF-1 in colon cancer and melanoma cells may contribute to the accumulation of oncogenic beta-catenin in the nucleus. PMID:11986304

  12. {beta}-Catenin stabilization imparts crypt progenitor phenotype to hyperproliferating colonic epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, Joseph H.; Wang Yu; Singh, Pomila; Umar, Shahid

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing the Citrobacter rodentium (CR)-induced transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia (TMCH) model, we provide mechanistic basis of changes in {beta}-catenin/APC/CKI{epsilon} leading to progression and/or regression of hyperplasia in vivo. In response to CR-induced TMCH, crypt lengths increased significantly between days 6-27 post-infection, followed by a steep decline by day 34. {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/total {beta}-catenin were elevated on day 1 post-infection, preceding changes in crypt length, and persisted for 27 days before declining by day 34. Importantly, cellular CKI{epsilon} and {beta}-catenin co-immunoprecipitated and exhibited remarkable parallel changes in kinetics during hyperplasia/regression phases. {beta}-catenin, phosphorylated at Ser33,37 and Thr41 ({beta}-cat{sup 33,37/41}), was low till day 12, followed by gradual increase until day 27 before declining by day 34. GSK-3{beta} exhibited significant Ser{sup 9}-phosphorylation/inactivation at days 6-12 with partial recovery at days 27-34. Wild type (wt) APC (p312) levels increased at day 6 with transient proteolysis/truncation to p130 form between days 12 and 15; p312 reappeared by day 19 and returned to baseline by day 34. The kinetics of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin nuclear accumulation and acetylation (Ac-{beta}-Cat{sup Lys49}) from days 6 to 27, followed by loss of phosphorylation/acetylation by day 34 was almost identical; Tcf-4 co-immunoprecipitated with {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin and localized immunohistochemically to {beta}-Cat{sup 41/45}-positive regions leading to elevated cyclin D1 expression, during the hyperproliferative, but not regression phases of TMCH. CKI{epsilon} mediated phosphorylation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}, resulting in stabilization/nuclear translocation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45} may be critical for maintaining proliferation at days 6-27. Reversal of GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation and APC changes may be equally critical during the regression phase from days 27 to 34.

  13. [CELL CONTACT PROTEIN BETA-CATENIN IN EPENDYMAL AND EPITHELIAL CELLS OF THE CHOROID PLEXUS OF THE CEREBRAL LATERAL VENTRICLES].

    PubMed

    Kirik, O V; Sufieyva, D A; Nazarenkova, A V; Korzhevskiy, D E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution pattern of cellular contacts protein beta-catenin in the choroid plexus and ependyma of lateral ventricles of the brain. The study was conducted on frontal sections of the brain of Wistar rats (n = 10) using polyclonal antibodies against beta-catenin. The obtained preparations were analyzed by microscopy in transmitted light and using confocal laser microscopy. To study the distribution of beta-catenin in different projections, three-dimensional reconstruction was performed. The study demonstrated different distribution patterns of this protein in ependyma and choroid plexus. Unlike ependyma, in the cells of the choroid plexus beta-catenin was distributed in the same way as in simple epithelial tissues (on the basal and lateral borders of the cells). This may indicate different tissue attribution of the ependyma and the choroid plexus epithelium, despite their common origin. PMID:27487660

  14. Beta-catenin versus the other armadillo catenins: assessing our current view of canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel K; Hong, Ji Yeon; Muñoz, William A; McCrea, Pierre D

    2013-01-01

    The prevailing view of canonical Wnt signaling emphasizes the role of beta-catenin acting downstream of Wnt activation to regulate transcriptional activity. However, emerging evidence indicates that other armadillo catenins in vertebrates, such as members of the p120 subfamily, convey parallel signals to the nucleus downstream of canonical Wnt pathway activation. Their study is thus needed to appreciate the networked mechanisms of canonical Wnt pathway transduction, especially as they may assist in generating the diversity of Wnt effects observed in development and disease. In this chapter, we outline evidence of direct canonical Wnt effects on p120 subfamily members in vertebrates and speculate upon these catenins' roles in conjunction with or aside from beta-catenin. PMID:23481204

  15. Beta-catenin versus the other catenins: assessing our current view of canonical Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rachel K.; Hong, Ji Yeon; Muñoz, William A.; McCrea, Pierre D.

    2013-01-01

    The prevailing view of canonical Wnt signaling emphasizes the role of beta-catenin acting downstream of Wnt activation to regulate transcriptional activity. However, emerging evidence indicates that other catenins in vertebrates, such as members of the p120 subfamily, convey parallel signals to the nucleus downstream of canonical Wnt pathway activation. Their study is thus needed to appreciate the networked mechanisms of canonical Wnt pathway transduction, especially as they may assist in generating the diversity of Wnt effects observed in development and disease. In this chapter, we outline evidence of direct canonical Wnt effects on p120-subfamily members in vertebrates, and speculate upon these catenins’ roles in conjunction with or aside from beta-catenin. PMID:23481204

  16. Continuous tooth generation in mouse is induced by activated epithelial Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Elina; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Birchmeier, Walter; Taketo, Makoto M; Jernvall, Jukka; Thesleff, Irma

    2006-12-01

    The single replacement from milk teeth to permanent teeth makes mammalian teeth different from teeth of most nonmammalian vertebrates and other epithelial organs such as hair and feathers, whose continuous replacement has been linked to Wnt signaling. Here we show that mouse tooth buds expressing stabilized beta-catenin in epithelium give rise to dozens of teeth. The molar crowns, however, are typically simplified unicusped cones. We demonstrate that the supernumerary teeth develop by a renewal process where new signaling centers, the enamel knots, bud off from the existing dental epithelium. The basic aspects of the unlocked tooth renewal can be reproduced with a computer model on tooth development by increasing the intrinsic level of activator production, supporting the role of beta-catenin pathway as an upstream activator of enamel knot formation. These results may implicate Wnt signaling in tooth renewal, a capacity that was all but lost when mammals evolved progressively more complicated tooth shapes. PMID:17121988

  17. Recurrent Chromosome 22 Deletions in Osteoblastoma Affect Inhibitors of the Wnt/Beta-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Karolin H.; Nilsson, Jenny; Arbajian, Elsa; Vult von Steyern, Fredrik; Brosjö, Otte; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Szuhai, Karoly; Hogendoorn, Pancras C. W.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoblastoma is a bone forming tumor with histological features highly similar to osteoid osteoma; the discrimination between the tumor types is based on size and growth pattern. The vast majority of osteoblastomas are benign but there is a group of so-called aggressive osteoblastomas that can be diagnostically challenging at the histopathological level. The genetic aberrations required for osteoblastoma development are not known and no genetic difference between conventional and aggressive osteoblastoma has been reported. In order to identify recurrent genomic aberrations of importance for tumor development we applied cytogenetic and/or SNP array analyses on nine conventional and two aggressive osteoblastomas. The conventional osteoblastomas showed few or no acquired genetic aberrations while the aggressive tumors displayed heavily rearranged genomes. In one of the aggressive osteoblastomas, three neighboring regions in chromosome band 22q12 were homozygously deleted. Hemizygous deletions of these regions were found in two additional cases, one aggressive and one conventional. In total, 10 genes were recurrently and homozygously lost in osteoblastoma. Four of them are functionally involved in regulating osteogenesis and/or tumorigenesis. MN1 and NF2 have previously been implicated in the development of leukemia and solid tumors, and ZNRF3 and KREMEN1 are inhibitors of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. In line with deletions of the latter two genes, high beta-catenin protein expression has previously been reported in osteoblastoma and aberrations affecting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway have been found in other bone lesions, including osteoma and osteosarcoma. PMID:24236197

  18. [Adhesion molecules in Wilm's tumor: expression and significance of beta-catenin (part II)].

    PubMed

    Basta-Jovanović, Gordana; Radojević, Sanja; Djuricić, Slavisa; Savin, Marina; Skodrić, Stevo; Bunjevacki, Gordana; Hadzi-Djokić, Jovan; Nesić, Vida

    2003-01-01

    Beta-catenin is a glicoprotein which has an important role in cell-cell adhesion, as well as in cell signal transmission, in u regulation of gen expression and in interaction with axin and APC (adenomatous poliposis coli). Its oncogenic role in several types of carcinomas in human population is well known. It is very likely that beta-catenin as an protooncogen plays an important role in genesis of Wilms tumor. It is well known that in 15% Wilms tumors there are beta-catenin mutations, which indicates that there is a disorder in Wnt signal path that plays an important role in Wilms tumor genesis. The aim of our study was to investigate b-catenin expression in Wilms tumor, to compare it with the expression in normal renal tissue as well as to see if there is a positive correlation between b-catenin expression in Wilms tumor with tumor stage, histologic type and/or prognostic group. PMID:14608868

  19. Glioblastoma microvesicles promote endothelial cell proliferation through Akt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihai; Sun, Junfeng; Lan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma tumor cells release microvesicles, which contain mRNA, miRNA and angiogenic proteins. These tumor-derived microvesicles transfer genetic information and proteins to normal cells. Previous reports demonstrated that the increased microvesicles in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with glioblastoma up-regulate procoagulant activity. The concentration of microvesicles was closely related to thromboembolism incidence and clinical therapeutic effects of glioblastoma patients. However, it is still not clear how CSF microvesicles and what factors affect glioblastoma development. In this study, we collected the plasma and CSF from glioblastoma patients and healthy volunteers. Microvesicles acquired from serum or CSF were added to cultured endothelial cells. And the effects of these microvesicles on endothelial cells were examined. Our results showed that microvesicles from CSF of patients, but not from circulating blood, promoted endothelial cells migration and proliferation in vitro. In addition, the degree of endothelial cell proliferation triggered by microvesicles from CSF was reduced when treated with siRNA targeting Akt/beta-catenin, suggesting that the Akt/beta-catenin pathway is involved in the microvesicle-initiated endothelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, glioblastoma mainly affects microvesicles within CSF without showing significant impact on microvesicles in circulating blood. Microvesicles from the CSF of glioblastoma patients may initiate endothelial cell growth and thus promote cell invasion. This effect may be directly exerted by activated Akt/beta-catenin pathway. PMID:25197356

  20. CTNNB1 mutations and overexpression of Wnt/beta-catenin target genes in WT1-mutant Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Ming; Kim, Connie E; Margolin, Adam A; Guo, Meirong; Zhu, Jimmy; Mason, Jacqueline M; Hensle, Terrence W; Murty, Vundavalli V V S; Grundy, Paul E; Fearon, Eric R; D'Agati, Vivette; Licht, Jonathan D; Tycko, Benjamin

    2004-12-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in exon 3 of beta-catenin (CTNNB1) are specific for Wilms' tumors that have lost WT1, but 50% of WT1-mutant cases lack such "hot spot" mutations. To ask whether stabilization of beta-catenin might be essential after WT1 loss, and to identify downstream target genes, we compared expression profiles in WT1-mutant versus WT1 wild-type Wilms' tumors. Supervised and nonsupervised hierarchical clustering of the expression data separated these two classes of Wilms' tumor. The WT1-mutant tumors overexpressed genes encoding myogenic and other transcription factors (MOX2, LBX1, SIM2), signaling molecules (TGFB2, FST, BMP2A), extracellular Wnt inhibitors (WIF1, SFRP4), and known beta-catenin/TCF targets (FST, CSPG2, CMYC). Beta-Catenin/TCF target genes were overexpressed in the WT1-mutant tumors even in the absence of CTNNB1 exon 3 mutations, and complete sequencing revealed gain-of-function mutations elsewhere in the CTNNB1 gene in some of these tumors, increasing the overall mutation frequency to 75%. Lastly, we identified and validated a novel direct beta-catenin target gene, GAD1, among the WT1-mutant signature genes. These data highlight two molecular classes of Wilms' tumor, and indicate strong selection for stabilization of beta-catenin in the WT1-mutant class. Beta-Catenin stabilization can initiate tumorigenesis in other systems, and this mechanism is likely critical in tumor formation after loss of WT1. PMID:15579438

  1. The first armadillo repeat is involved in the recognition and regulation of beta-catenin phosphorylation by protein kinase CK1.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Victor H; Ferrarese, Anna; Venerando, Andrea; Marin, Oriano; Allende, Jorge E; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2006-12-26

    Multiple phosphorylation of beta-catenin by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) in the Wnt pathway is primed by CK1 through phosphorylation of Ser-45, which lacks a typical CK1 canonical sequence. Synthetic peptides encompassing amino acids 38-64 of beta-catenin are phosphorylated by CK1 on Ser-45 with low affinity (K(m) approximately 1 mM), whereas intact beta-catenin is phosphorylated at Ser-45 with very high affinity (K(m) approximately 200 nM). Peptides extended to include a putative CK1 docking motif (FXXXF) at 70-74 positions or a F74AA mutation in full-length beta-catenin had no significant effect on CK1 phosphorylation efficiency. beta-Catenin C-terminal deletion mutants up to residue 181 maintained their high affinity, whereas removal of the 131-181 fragment, corresponding to the first armadillo repeat, was deleterious, resulting in a 50-fold increase in K(m) value. Implication of the first armadillo repeat in beta-catenin targeting by CK1 is supported in that the Y142E mutation, which mimics phosphorylation of Tyr-142 by tyrosine kinases and promotes dissociation of beta-catenin from alpha-catenin, further improves CK1 phosphorylation efficiency, lowering the K(m) value to <50 nM, approximating the physiological concentration of beta-catenin. In contrast, alpha-catenin, which interacts with the N-terminal region of beta-catenin, prevents Ser-45 phosphorylation of CK1 in a dose-dependent manner. Our data show that the integrity of the N-terminal region and the first armadillo repeat are necessary and sufficient for high-affinity phosphorylation by CK1 of Ser-45. They also suggest that beta-catenin association with alpha-catenin and beta-catenin phosphorylation by CK1 at Ser-45 are mutually exclusive. PMID:17172446

  2. Localization of the human {beta}-catenin gene (CTNNB1) to 3p21: A region implicated in tumor development

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, C.; Liehr, T.; Ballhausen, G.

    1994-09-01

    The human {beta}-catenin locus (CTNNB1) was mapped by in situ fluorescence analysis to band p21 on the short arm of chromosome 3, a region frequently affected by somatic alterations in a variety of tumors. PCR primers for the genomic amplification of {beta}-catenin sequences were selected on the basis of homology to exon 4 of the Drosophila armadillo gene. Analysis of a panel of somatic cell hybrids confirmed the localization of {beta}-catenin on human chromosome 3. Furthermore, exclusion mapping of three hybrids carrying defined fragments of the short arm of human chromosome 3 allowed us to determine the position of the CTNNB1 locus close to the marker D3S2 in 3p21. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  3. CDK8 expression in 470 colorectal cancers in relation to beta-catenin activation, other molecular alterations and patient survival.

    PubMed

    Firestein, Ron; Shima, Kaori; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Irahara, Natsumi; Baba, Yoshifumi; Bojarski, Emeric; Giovannucci, Edward L; Hahn, William C; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji

    2010-06-15

    Alterations in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway define a key event in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. We have recently shown that CDK8, the gene encoding a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) component of the Mediator complex, acts as a colon cancer oncogene that is necessary for beta-catenin activity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that colorectal cancers with CDK8 expression have distinct clinical, prognostic and molecular attributes. Among 470 colorectal cancers identified in 2 prospective cohort studies, CDK8 expression was detected in 329 (70%) tumors by immunohistochemistry. Cox proportional hazards model and backward stepwise elimination were used to compute hazard ratio (HR) of deaths according to CDK8 status, initially adjusted for various patient and molecular features, including beta-catenin, p53, p21, p27 (CDK inhibitors), cyclin D1, fatty acid synthase (FASN), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsatellite instability (MSI), CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), LINE-1 methylation, and mutations in KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA. CDK8 expression in colorectal cancer was independently associated with beta-catenin activation (p = 0.0002), female gender (p < 0.0001) and FASN overexpression (p = 0.0003). Among colon cancer patients, CDK8 expression significantly increased colon cancer-specific mortality in both univariate analysis [HR 1.70; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-2.83; p = 0.039] and multivariate analysis (adjusted HR 2.05; 95% CI, 1.18-3.56; p = 0.011) that was adjusted for potential confounders including beta-catenin, COX-2, FASN, LINE-1 hypomethylation, CIMP and MSI. CDK8 expression was unrelated with clinical outcome among rectal cancer patients. These data support a potential link between CDK8 and beta-catenin, and suggest that CDK8 may identify a subset of colon cancer patients with a poor prognosis. PMID:19790197

  4. Deletion of angiotensin II type 2 receptor accelerates adipogenesis in murine mesenchymal stem cells via Wnt10b/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kenichi; Wu, Yaojiong; Pratt, Richard E; Dzau, Victor J

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has a vital role in adipocyte biology and the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. Obesity is the main culprit of metabolic syndrome; and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been forwarded as a major source of adipocyte generation. Previously, we reported that MSCs have a local RAS and that pharmacological blockade of angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) promotes adipogenesis in human MSCs. However, the definitive roles of AT2R and how AT2R functions in adipogenesis remains unknown. To this end, we employed AT2R-null murine MSCs to characterize how AT2R affects the differentiation of MSCs into adipocytes. Murine MSCs were isolated from AT2R-null mice and wild-type littermates, grown to confluency, and then differentiated into adipocytes. Adipogenesis was quantitated by assessing the lipid droplet accumulation. Using the lipophilic fluorescent dye, the AT2R-null cells showed significantly increased total fluorescence (261.6±49.6% vs littermate) on day 7. Oil red O staining followed by extraction of the absorbed dye and measurement of the absorbance on day 14 also exhibited significantly increased lipid droplet accumulation in the AT2R-null cells (202.7±14.1% vs littermate). We also examined the expression of adipogenic marker genes by quantitative RT-PCR. The AT2R-null group exhibited significantly increased expression of PPAR-gamma, fatty acid synthase, and adiponectin (vs littermate). We further examined the role of Wnt10b/beta-catenin signaling, which reportedly has an important inhibitory role in adipogenesis. The AT2R-null group exhibited significantly decreased Wnt10b expression accompanied by decreased beta-catenin (vs littermate). Our results thus revealed that the AT2R inhibits adipogenic differentiation in murine MSCs. Moreover, this inhibitory effect is associated with Wnt10b/beta-catenin signaling. These results provide important insights into the pathophysiology of obesity and obesity

  5. Associations of beta-catenin alterations and MSI screening status with expression of key cell cycle regulating proteins and survival from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite their pivotal roles in colorectal carcinogenesis, the interrelationship and prognostic significance of beta-catenin alterations and microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal cancer (CRC) needs to be further clarified. In this paper, we studied the associations between beta-catenin overexpression and MSI status with survival from CRC, and with expression of p21, p27, cyclin D1 and p53, in a large, prospective cohort study. Methods Immunohistochemical MSI-screening status and expression of p21, p27 and p53 was assessed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 557 cases of incident CRC in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Chi Square and Spearman’s correlation tests were used to explore the associations between beta-catenin expression, MSI status, clinicopathological characteristics and investigative parameters. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to assess the relationship between beta-catenin overexpression, MSI status and cancer specific survival (CSS). Results Positive MSI screening status was significantly associated with older age, female sex, proximal tumour location, non-metastatic disease, and poor differentiation, and inversely associated with beta-catenin overexpression. Beta-catenin overexpression was significantly associated with distal tumour location, low T-stage and well-differentiated tumours. Patients with MSI tumours had a significantly prolonged CSS in the whole cohort, and in stage III-IV disease, also in multivariable analysis, but not in stage I-II disease. Beta-catenin overexpression was associated with a favourable prognosis in the full cohort and in patients with stage III-IV disease. Neither MSI nor beta-catenin status were predictive for response to adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively treated stage III patients. P53 and p27 expression was positively associated with beta-catenin overexpression and inversely associated with MSI. Cyclin D1 expression was positively associated with MSI

  6. Expression of E-cadherin, beta-catenin and Ki-67 antigen and their reciprocal relationships in mammary adenocarcinomas in bitches.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Marcin; Madej, Janusz A; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    In progression of tumours, resulting from, i.e., release of cells from the parental tumour and development of metastases, expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAM) plays a significant role. CAM, including E-cadherin and the linked to it beta-catenin, determine the extent of adhesion between normal and neoplastically altered cells. Moreover, the unbound form of beta-catenin in a cell nucleus may affect the rate of cell proliferation This study aimed at demonstrating intensity and localisation of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression as related to expression of the proliferation-associated antigen, Ki-67 in mammary adenocarcinomas of bitches. The study was performed on 35 cases of the above mentioned tumours. On paraffin sections immunohistochemical reactions were performed using monoclonal antibodies directed against E-cadherin, beta-catenin and Ki-67 antigen. In the studies a membranous expression of E-cadherin, a cytoplasmic-nuclear expression of beta-catenin and nuclear expression of Ki-67 antigen were demonstrated. Statistical calculations using Spearman's test demonstrated a pronounced positive correlation between expression of beta-catenin and Ki-67 antigen and absence of correlation between expression of E-cadherin and Ki-67 antigen. No correlation could be detected between expression intensities of E-cadherin and beta-catenin. PMID:17951173

  7. Beta-catenin is elevated in human benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens compared to histologically normal prostate tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Tyler M; Vezina, Chad M; Huang, Wei; Marker, Paul C; Peterson, Richard E; Ricke, William A

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is linked to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as incomplete bladder emptying, urinary frequency and urgency. Mechanisms responsible for BPH are not fully known. Here, we tested whether beta-catenin (CTNNB1) immunostaining intensity and distribution differ in human glandular BPH tissue specimens compared to normal prostate tissue. Multiplex immunostaining of CTNNB1, its putative transcriptional target gene lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (LEF1), and the epithelial marker E-cadherin were examined in clinical human prostate specimens with or without histological BPH (pure epithelial or mixed stromal-epithelial nodules). BPH specimens were obtained from 24 men who experienced LUTS and underwent transurethral resection of the prostate surgery. Control specimens were tumor-adjacent histologically normal prostate tissue from 48 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy. The resulting multispectral images were unmixed and optical densities recorded to quantify staining abundance, cellular (membranous, cytoplasmic, and nuclear) and tissue localization (stromal versus epithelial), and determination of percentage of CTNNB1-positive cells. The following CTNNB1 indices were significantly higher in BPH compared to normal prostate tissue: overall staining intensity, staining intensity in prostate stromal cell membranes, cytoplasm and nuclei, and prostate epithelial cell nuclei. The following LEF1 indices were significantly lower in BPH compared to tumor-adjacent normal prostate tissue: stromal LEF1 staining intensity, percentage of LEF1-positive stromal cells, and intensity of LEF1 staining in stromal cell membranes, cytoplasm, and nuclei. The percentage of stromal cells with CTNNB1+/LEF1- nuclei was higher and percentage of stromal cells with CTNNB1-/LEF1+ nuclei was lower in BPH compared to tumor-adjacent normal prostate tissues. These results support the hypothesis that CTNNB1 expression increases in specific BPH tissue

  8. Wnt-11 signaling leads to down-regulation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin, JNK/AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B pathways and promotes viability in the CHO-K1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Railo, Antti; Nagy, Irina I.; Kilpelaeinen, Pekka Vainio, Seppo

    2008-08-01

    The Wnt family of glycoprotein growth factors controls a number of central cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and ageing. All the Wnt proteins analyzed so far either activate or inhibit the canonical {beta}-catenin signaling pathway that regulates transcription of the target genes. In addition, some of them activate noncanonical signaling pathways that involve components such as the JNK, heterotrimeric G proteins, protein kinase C, and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, although the precise signaling mechanisms are only just beginning to be revealed. We demonstrate here that Wnt-11 signaling is sufficient to inhibit not only the canonical {beta}-catenin mediated Wnt signaling but also JNK/AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B signaling in the CHO cells, thus serving as a noncanonical Wnt ligand in this system. Inhibition of the JNK/AP-1 pathway is mediated in part by the MAPK kinase MKK4 and Akt. Moreover, protein kinase C is involved in the regulation of JNK/AP-1 by Wnt-11, but not of the NF-{kappa}B pathway. Consistent with the central role of Akt, JNK and NF-{kappa}B in cell survival and stress responses, Wnt-11 signaling promotes cell viability. Hence Wnt-11 is involved in coordination of key signaling pathways.

  9. Loss of E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion due to mutation of the beta-catenin gene in a human cancer cell line, HSC-39.

    PubMed Central

    Kawanishi, J; Kato, J; Sasaki, K; Fujii, S; Watanabe, N; Niitsu, Y

    1995-01-01

    Detachment of cell-cell adhesion is indispensable for the first step of invasion and metastasis of cancer. This mechanism is frequently associated with the impairment of either E-cadherin expression or function. However, mechanisms of such abnormalities have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that the function of E-cadherin was completely abolished in the human gastric cancer cell line HSC-39, despite the high expression of E-cadherin, because of mutations in one of the E-cadherin-associated cytoplasmic proteins, beta-catenin. Although immunofluorescence staining of HSC-39 cells by using an anti-E-cadherin antibody (HECD-1) revealed the strong and uniform expression of E-cadherin on the cell surface, cell compaction and cell aggregation were not observed in this cell. Western blotting (immunoblotting) using HECD-1 exhibited a 120-kDa band which is equivalent to normal E-cadherin. Northern (RNA) blotting demonstrated a 4.7-kb band, the same as mature E-cadherin mRNA. Immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled proteins with HECD-1 revealed three bands corresponding to E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and gamma-catenin and a 79-kDa band which was apparently smaller than that of normal beta-catenin, indicating truncated beta-catenin. The 79-kDa band was immunologically identified as beta-catenin by using immunoblotting with anti-beta-catenin antibodies. Examination of beta-catenin mRNA by the reverse transcriptase-PCR method revealed a transcript which was shorter than that of normal beta-catenin. The sequencing of PCR product for beta-catenin confirmed deletion in 321 bases from nucleotides +82 to +402. Southern blotting of beta-catenin DNA disclosed mutation at the genomic level. Expression vectors of Beta-catenin were introduced into HSC-39 cells by transfection. In the obtained transfectants, E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesiveness was recovered, as revealed by cell compaction, cell aggregation, and immunoflourescence staining. From these

  10. Prenatal cadmium exposure dysregulates sonic hedgehog and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in the thymus resulting in altered thymocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Tou, Janet C.; Barnett, John B.

    2010-01-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is both an environmental pollutant and a component of cigarette smoke. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports in the literature of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt/beta-catenin pathways are required for thymocyte maturation. Several studies have demonstrated that Cd exposure affects these pathways in different organ systems. This study was designed to investigate the effect of prenatal Cd exposure on thymocyte development, and to determine if these effects were linked to dysregulation of Shh and Wnt/beta-catenin pathways. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose (10 ppm) of Cd throughout pregnancy and effects on the thymus were assessed on the day of birth. Thymocyte phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. A Gli:luciferase reporter cell line was used to measure Shh signaling. Transcription of target genes and translation of key components of both signaling pathways were assessed using real-time RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Prenatal Cd exposure increased the number of CD4{sup +} cells and a subpopulation of double-negative cells (DN; CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}), DN4 (CD44{sup -}CD25{sup -}). Shh and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling were both decreased in the thymus. Target genes of Shh (Patched1 and Gli1) and Wnt/beta-catenin (c-fos, and c-myc) were affected differentially among thymocyte subpopulations. These findings suggest that prenatal exposure to Cd dysregulates two signaling pathways in the thymus, resulting in altered thymocyte development.

  11. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling changes C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation by inducing Id3 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long; Shi, Songting; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Fangfang; Dijke, Peter ten

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Id3 but not Id1 is induced by Wnt3a stimulation in C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a induces Id3 expression via canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a-induced Id3 expression does not depend on BMP signaling activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Induction of Id3 expression is critical determinant in Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Canonical Wnt signaling plays important roles in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we report that inhibitor of differentiation (Id)3 is a Wnt-inducible gene in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Wnt3a induced Id3 expression in a {beta}-catenin-dependent manner. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) also potently induced Id3 expression. However, Wnt-induced Id3 expression occurred independent of the BMP/Smad pathway. Functional studies showed that Id3 depletion in C2C12 cells impaired Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity, an early marker of osteoblast cells. Id3 depletion elevated myogenin induction during myogenic differentiation and partially impaired Wnt3a suppressed myogenin expression in C2C12 cells. These results suggest that Id3 is an important Wnt/{beta}-catenin induced gene in myoblast cell fate determination.

  12. Smed-Evi/Wntless is required for beta-catenin-dependent and -independent processes during planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Adell, Teresa; Salò, Emili; Boutros, Michael; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2009-03-01

    Planarians can regenerate a whole animal from only a small piece of their body, and have become an important model for stem cell biology. To identify regenerative processes dependent on Wnt growth factors in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (Smed), we analyzed RNAi phenotypes of Evi, a transmembrane protein specifically required for the secretion of Wnt ligands. We show that, during regeneration, Smed-evi loss-of-function prevents posterior identity, leading to two-headed planarians that resemble Smed-beta-catenin1 RNAi animals. In addition, we observe regeneration defects of the nervous system that are not found after Smed-beta-catenin1 RNAi. By systematic knockdown of all putative Smed Wnts in regenerating planarians, we identify Smed-WntP-1 and Smed-Wnt11-2 as the putative posterior organizers, and demonstrate that Smed-Wnt5 is a regulator of neuronal organization and growth. Thus, our study provides evidence that planarian Wnts are major regulators of regeneration, and that they signal through beta-catenin-dependent and -independent pathways. PMID:19211673

  13. Pharmacological modulation of beta-catenin and its applications in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Ravi; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Beta-catenin (β-catenin) is a multifunction protein with a central role in physiological homeostasis. Its abnormal expression leads to various diseases including cancer. In normal physiology, β-catenin either maintains integrity of epithelial tissues or controls transcription of various genes on extracellular instigations. In epithelial tissues, β-catenin functions as a component of the cadherin protein complex and regulates epithelial cell growth and intracellular adhesion. In Wnt signalling, β-catenin is a major transcriptional modulator and plays a crucial role in embryogenesis, stem cell renewal and organ regeneration. Aberrant expression of β-catenin can induce malignant pathways in normal cells and its abnormal activity is also exploited by existing malignant programmes. It acts as an oncogene and modulates transcription of genes to drive cancer initiation, progression, survival and relapse. Abnormal expression and function of β-catenin in cancer makes it a putative drug target. In the past decade, various attempts have been made to identify and characterize various pharmacological inhibitors of β-catenin. Many of these inhibitors are currently being investigated for their anticancer activities in a variety of cancers. The first half of this review will focus on the role of β-catenin in cancer initiation, maintenance, progression and relapse whereas the second half will briefly summarize the recent progress in development of agents for the pharmacological modulation of β-catenin activity in cancer therapeutics. PMID:23490077

  14. Gonadal Identity in the Absence of Pro-Testis Factor SOX9 and Pro-Ovary Factor Beta-Catenin in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Barbara; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2015-08-01

    Sex-reversal cases in humans and genetic models in mice have revealed that the fate of the bipotential gonad hinges upon the balance between pro-testis SOX9 and pro-ovary beta-catenin pathways. Our central query was: if SOX9 and beta-catenin define the gonad's identity, then what do the gonads become when both factors are absent? To answer this question, we developed mouse models that lack either Sox9, beta-catenin, or both in the somatic cells of the fetal gonads and examined the morphological outcomes and transcriptome profiles. In the absence of Sox9 and beta-catenin, both XX and XY gonads progressively lean toward the testis fate, indicating that expression of certain pro-testis genes requires the repression of the beta-catenin pathway, rather than a direct activation by SOX9. We also observed that XY double knockout gonads were more masculinized than their XX counterpart. To identify the genes responsible for the initial events of masculinization and to determine how the genetic context (XX vs. XY) affects this process, we compared the transcriptomes of Sox9/beta-catenin mutant gonads and found that early molecular changes underlying the XY-specific masculinization involve the expression of Sry and 21 SRY direct target genes, such as Sox8 and Cyp26b1. These results imply that when both Sox9 and beta-catenin are absent, Sry is capable of activating other pro-testis genes and drive testis differentiation. Our findings not only provide insight into the mechanism of sex determination, but also identify candidate genes that are potentially involved in disorders of sex development. PMID:26108792

  15. Activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway is associated with glial proliferation in the adult spinal cord of ALS transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanchun; Guan, Yingjun; Liu, Huancai; Wu, Xin; Yu, Li; Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyan; Du, Hongmei; Wang, Xin

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 were upregulated in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus in the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin and Cyclin D1 co-localized for astrocytes were all increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. -- Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive and fatal loss of motor neurons. In ALS, there is a significant cell proliferation in response to neurodegeneration; however, the exact molecular mechanisms of cell proliferation and differentiation are unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative processes. Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 are three key signaling molecules of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. We determined the expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 in the adult spinal cord of SOD1{sup G93A} ALS transgenic mice at different stages by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling techniques. We found that the mRNA and protein of Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 in the spinal cord of the ALS mice were upregulated compared to those in wild-type mice. In addition, {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus and subsequently activated transcription of the target gene, Cyclin D1. BrdU and Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of these mice. Moreover, Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 were also expressed in both neurons and astrocytes. The expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin or Cyclin D1 in mature GFAP{sup +} astrocytes increased. Moreover, BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. Our findings suggest that

  16. Nodal signaling in Xenopus gastrulae is cell-autonomous and patterned by beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Partyka, Minako K; Yuge, Masahiro; Cho, Ken W Y

    2003-01-01

    The classical three-signal model of amphibian mesoderm induction and more recent modifications together propose that an activin-like signaling activity is uniformly distributed across the vegetal half of the Xenopus blastula and that this activity contributes to mesoderm induction. In support of this, we have previously shown that the activin-response element (DE) of the goosecoid promoter is uniformly activated across the vegetal half of midgastrula-stage embryos. Here, we further examine the nature of this activity by measuring DE activation by endogenous signals over time. We find that the spatiotemporal pattern of DE activation is much more dynamic than was previously appreciated and also conclude that DE(6X)Luc activity reflects endogenous nodal signaling in the embryo. Using both the DE(6X)Luc construct and endogenous Xbra and Xgsc expression as read-outs for nodal activity, and the cleavage-mutant version of Xnr2 (CmXnr2) to regionally suppress endogenous nodal activity, we demonstrate that nodal signals act cell-autonomously in Xenopus gastrulae. Nodal-expressing cells are unable to rescue either reporter gene activation or target gene expression in distant nodal-deficient cells, suggesting that nodals function at short range in this context. Finally, we show that DE activation by endogenous signals occurs in the absence of dorsal beta-catenin-mediated signaling, but that the timing of dorsal initiation is altered. We conclude that nodal signals in Xenopus gastrulae function cell autonomously at short ranges and that the spatiotemporal pattern of this signaling along the dorsoventral axis is regulated by maternal Wnt-like signaling. PMID:12490202

  17. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinases (Hipks) promote Wnt/Wg signaling through stabilization of beta-catenin/Arm and stimulation of target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wendy; Swarup, Sharan; Chen, Joanna; Ishitani, Tohru; Verheyen, Esther M

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt/Wingless (Wg) pathway represents a conserved signaling cascade involved in diverse biological processes. Misregulation of Wnt/Wg signal transduction has profound effects on development. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinases (Hipks) represent a novel family of serine/threonine kinases. Members of this group (in particular Hipk2) are implicated as important factors in transcriptional regulation to control cell growth, apoptosis and development. Here, we provide genetic and phenotypic evidence that the sole Drosophila member of this family, Hipk, functions as a positive regulator in the Wg pathway. Expression of hipk in the wing rescues loss of the Wg signal, whereas loss of hipk can enhance decreased wg signaling phenotypes. Furthermore, loss of hipk leads to diminished Arm protein levels, whereas overexpression of hipk promotes the Wg signal by stabilizing Arm, resulting in activation of Wg responsive targets. In Wg transcriptional assays, Hipk enhanced Tcf/Arm-mediated gene expression in a kinase-dependent manner. In addition, Hipk can bind to Arm and Drosophila Tcf, and phosphorylate Arm. Using both in vitro and in vivo assays, Hipk was found to promote the stabilization of Arm. We observe similar molecular interactions between Lef1/beta-catenin and vertebrate Hipk2, suggesting a direct and conserved role for Hipk proteins in promoting Wnt signaling. PMID:19088090

  18. URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by modulation of E-cadherin and {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Rui; Huang, Chen; Bi, Qian; Zhai, Ying; Xia, Lin; Liu, Jie; Sun, Shiren; Fan, Daiming

    2010-01-01

    Upregulated gene 11 (URG11), recently identified as a new HBx-upregulated gene that may activate {beta}-catenin and Wnt signaling, was found to be upregulated in a human tubule cell line under low oxygen. Here, we investigated the potential role of URG11 in hypoxia-induced renal tubular epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT). Overexpression of URG11 in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK2) promoted a mesenchymal phenotype accompanied by reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and {alpha}-SMA, while URG11 knockdown by siRNA effectively reversed hypoxia-induced EMT. URG11 promoted the expression of {beta}-catenin and increased its nuclear accumulation under normoxic conditions through transactivation of the {beta}-catenin promoter. This in turn upregulated {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) and its downstream effector genes, vimentin, and {alpha}-SMA. In vivo, strong expression of URG11 was observed in the tubular epithelia of 5/6-nephrectomized rats, and a Western blot analysis demonstrated a close correlation between HIF-1{alpha} and URG11 protein levels. Altogether, our results indicate that URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced EMT through the suppression of E-cadherin and the activation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF pathway.

  19. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and e-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Denise; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E.; Cotsarelis, George

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode ‘budding’ is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of adherens junction component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another adherens junction component, has been more difficult to study due to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent adherens junction dissolution. PMID:25010141

  20. Sfrp1, Sfrp2, and Sfrp5 regulate the Wnt/beta-catenin and the planar cell polarity pathways during early trunk formation in mouse.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Wataru; Matsuyama, Makoto; Takemura, Hiromasa; Aizawa, Shinichi; Shimono, Akihiko

    2008-02-01

    Sfrp is a secreted Wnt antagonist that directly interacts with Wnt ligand. We show here that inactivation of Sfrp1, Sfrp2, and Sfrp5 leads to fused somites formation in early-somite mouse embryos, simultaneously resulting in defective convergent extension (CE), which causes severe shortening of the anteroposterior axis. These observations indicate the redundant roles of Sfrp1, Sfrp2, and Sfrp5 in early trunk formation. The roles of the Sfrps were genetically distinguished in terms of the regulation of Wnt pathways. Genetic analysis combining Sfrps mutants and Loop-tail mice revealed the involvement of Sfrps in CE through the regulation of the planar cell polarity pathway. Furthermore, Dkk1-deficient embryos carrying Sfrp1 homozygous and Sfrp2 heterozygous mutations display irregular somites and indistinct intersomitic boundaries, which indicates that Sfrps-mediated inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is necessary for somitogenesis. Our results suggest that Sfrps regulation of the canonical and noncanonical pathways is essential for proper trunk formation. PMID:18257070

  1. Soy isoflavone genistein upregulates epithelial adhesion molecule e-cadherin expression and attenuates beta-catenin signaling in mammary epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced Wnt/beta -catenin signaling and loss of E-cadherin expression are considered hallmarks of mammary tumorigenesis. Mammary tumor protection by dietary intake of soy-rich foods and the soy isoflavone genistein (Gen) is widely regarded based on numerous epidemiological and animal studies; howev...

  2. Attenuated Response to Methamphetamine Sensitization and Deficits in Motor Learning and Memory after Selective Deletion of [beta]-Catenin in Dopamine Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Ruiz, Oscar; Zhang, YaJun; Shan, Lufei; Malik, Nasir; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Cadet, Jean Lud; Lupica, Carl R.; Tagliaferro, Adriana; Brusco, Alicia; Backman, Cristina M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed mice with a targeted deletion of [beta]-catenin in DA neurons (DA-[beta]cat KO mice) to address the functional significance of this molecule in the shaping of synaptic responses associated with motor learning and following exposure to drugs of abuse. Relative to controls, DA-[beta]cat KO mice showed significant…

  3. Pancreatic desmoid-type fibromatosis with beta-catenin gene mutation-Report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yoshitane; Imakita, Masami; Nishitani, Akiko; Ito, Toshikazu; Izukura, Masaaki; Hirota, Seiichi

    2016-05-01

    We experienced a rare case of pancreatic desmoid-type fibromatosis (DTF) in a 75-year-old Japanese woman. She was asymptomatic but routine examination including ultrasonography revealed a mass in the abdomen. For precise examination, she was referred to the regional hospital. Computed tomography showed that the mass was protruding anteriorly from the left-sided pancreas. Because of the enlargement of the mass lesion, distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed after about 3 months. Macroscopically, the mass was encapsulated and approximately 8cm in diameter. Histological examination revealed that spindle or blunt stellate cells were proliferating in parallel or storiform fashion with myxoid and fibrous background. The tumor cells did not show prominent atypia and mitoses were rarely seen, suggesting that the tumor was low grade or borderline. Immunohistochemistry showed obvious nuclear staining of beta-catenin. Furthermore, analysis of beta-catenin gene revealed that the tumor had a typical missense mutation of threonine to alanine at colon 41 (T41A) in exon 3. These findings confirmed the pathological diagnosis of DTF of the pancreas. To the best of our knowledge, 18 cases of pancreatic DTF have been reported in the English literature and beta-catenin gene mutation had been examined in only one case among them. Thus, our case is the 19th pancreatic DTF and the second case with confirmed beta-catenin gene mutation. PMID:26907785

  4. Circadian rhythms, Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPAR alpha/gamma profiles in diseases with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Duthoit, Guillaume; Hébert, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clock mechanisms are far-from-equilibrium dissipative structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR alpha, beta/delta, and gamma) play a key role in metabolic regulatory processes, particularly in heart muscle. Links between circadian rhythms (CRs) and PPARs have been established. Mammalian CRs involve at least two critical transcription factors, CLOCK and BMAL1 (Gekakis et al., 1998; Hogenesch et al., 1998). PPAR gamma plays a major role in both glucose and lipid metabolisms and presents circadian properties which coordinate the interplay between metabolism and CRs. PPAR gamma is a major component of the vascular clock. Vascular PPAR gamma is a peripheral regulator of cardiovascular rhythms controlling circadian variations in blood pressure and heart rate through BMAL1. We focused our review on diseases with abnormalities of CRs and with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction. Moreover, these diseases presented changes in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPARs, according to two opposed profiles. Profile 1 was defined as follows: inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with increased expression of PPAR gamma. Profile 2 was defined as follows: activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with decreased expression of PPAR gamma. A typical profile 1 disease is arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a genetic cardiac disease which presents mutations of the desmosomal proteins and is mainly characterized by fatty acid accumulation in adult cardiomyocytes mainly in the right ventricle. The link between PPAR gamma dysfunction and desmosomal genetic mutations occurs via inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway presenting oscillatory properties. A typical profile 2 disease is type 2 diabetes, with activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and decreased expression of PPAR gamma. CRs abnormalities are present in numerous pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases, sympathetic/parasympathetic dysfunction, hypertension, diabetes

  5. Differences in expression of junctional adhesion molecule-A and beta-catenin in multiple sclerosis brain tissue: increasing evidence for the role of tight junction pathology.

    PubMed

    Padden, Maureen; Leech, Susie; Craig, Beverly; Kirk, John; Brankin, Brenda; McQuaid, Stephen

    2007-02-01

    Previously we have employed antibodies to the tight junction (TJ)-associated proteins ZO-1 and occludin to describe endothelial tight junction abnormalities, in lesional and normal appearing white matter, in primary and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). This work is extended here by use of antibodies to the independent TJ-specific proteins and junctional adhesion molecule A & B (JAM-A, JAM-B). We have also assessed the expression in MS of beta-catenin, a protein specific to the TJ-associated adherens junction. Immunocytochemistry and semiquantitative confocal microscopy for JAM-A and beta-catenin was performed on snap-frozen sections from MS cases (n=11) and controls (n=6). Data on 1,443 blood vessels was acquired from active lesions (n=13), inactive lesions (n=13), NAWM (n=20) and control white matter (n=13). In MS abnormal JAM-A expression was found in active (46%) and inactive lesions (21%), comparable to previous data using ZO-1. However, a lower level of TJ abnormality was found in MS NAWM using JAM-A (3%) compared to ZO-1 (13%). JAM-B was strongly expressed on a small number of large blood vessels in control and MS tissues but at too low a level for quantitative analysis. By comparison with the high levels of abnormality observed with the TJ proteins, the adherens junction protein beta-catenin was normally expressed in all MS and control tissue categories. These results confirm, by use of the independent marker JAM-A, that TJ abnormalities are most frequent in active white matter lesions. Altered expression of JAM-A, in addition to affecting junctional tightness may also both reflect and affect leukocyte trafficking, with implications for immune status within the diseased CNS. Conversely, the adherens junction component of the TJ, as indicated by beta-catenin expression is normally expressed in all MS and control tissue categories. PMID:17024496

  6. Aberrant Wnt-1/beta-catenin signaling and WIF-1 deficiency are important events which promote tumor cell invasion and metastasis in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruinan; Geng, Ning; Zhou, Yuqiao; Zhang, Dunfang; Li, Longjiang; Li, Jing; Ji, Ning; Zhou, Min; Chen, Yu; Chen, Qianming

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates whether Wnt components play a role in carcinogenesis, or the invasion and metastasis of salivary glands, also referred to as adenoid cystic carcinoma (sAdCC). Several sAdCC cell lines with low invasive potential (ACC-2), high metastatic potential (ACC-M), and higher invasive potential (T-ACC-M) were examined to determine whether Wnt components correlate with tumors' invasive and metastatic behavior. Immunohistochemistry was performed in a sAdCC tissue array. ACC-M expressed higher levels of Wnt-1, beta-catenin and lower WIF-1 compared to ACC-2 (P<0.05). T-ACC-M exhibited increased mRNA of Wnt-1 and beta-catenin, and decreased WIF-1 compared to ACC-2 and ACC-M. Immuno-histochemistry showed up-regulation of Wnt-1 and down-regulation of WIF-1 in sAdCC compared with normal salivary glands. Beta-catenin was found in the cytoplasm and nuclei of sAdCC. Dislocation of E-cadherin in sAdCC was observed. These results suggest that sAdCC exhibits diverse expressions of Wnt components. It has an important relationship with the invasive phenotype of these cells. PMID:26405993

  7. Beta-catenin (CTNNB1) induces Bmp expression in urogenital sinus epithelium and participates in prostatic bud initiation and patterning

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vatsal; Schmitz, Christopher T.; Keil, Kimberly P.; Joshi, Pinak S.; Abler, Lisa L.; Lin, Tien-Min; Taketo, Makoto M.; Sun, Xin; Vezina, Chad M.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal prostate development is initiated by androgens and patterned by androgen dependent and independent signals. How these signals integrate to control epithelial cell differentiation and prostatic bud patterning is not fully understood. To test the role of beta-catenin (Ctnnb1) in this process, we used a genetic approach to conditionally delete or stabilize Ctnnb1 in urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium from which the prostate derives. Two opposing mechanisms of action were revealed. By deleting Ctnnb1, we found it is required for separation of UGS from cloaca, emergence or maintenance of differentiated UGS basal epithelium and formation of prostatic buds. By genetically inducing a patchy subset of UGS epithelial cells to express excess CTNNB1, we found its excess abundance increases Bmp expression and leads to a global impairment of prostatic bud formation. Addition of NOGGIN partially restores prostatic budding in UGS explants with excess Ctnnb1. These results indicate a requirement for Ctnnb1 in UGS basal epithelial cell differentiation, prostatic bud initiation and bud spacing and suggest some of these actions are mediated in part through activation of BMP signaling. PMID:23396188

  8. [Effect of phenylhexyl isothiocyanate on Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway in Jurkat cell line].

    PubMed

    Lin, Juan; Huang, Yi-Qun; Ma, Xu-Dong

    2013-04-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the effect of phenylhexyl isothiocyanate (PHI) on Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, histone acetylation, histone methylation and cell apoptosis in Jurkat cell line. The viability of Jurkat cells after treatment with PHI was tested by MTT. Apoptotic rate of Jurkat cells was measured by flow cytometry. The levels of Wnt/β-catenin related proteins including β-catenin, TCF, c-myc, and cyclinD1, histone acetylated H3 and H4, histone methylated H3K9 and H3K4 were detected by Western blot. The results showed that PHI inhibited the cell growth and induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells in time-and dose-dependent manners. Its IC50 at 48 h was about 20 µmol/L. Expression of histone acetylated H3, H4 and histone methylated H3k4 increased after exposure to PHI for 3 h, while histone methylated H3K9 decreased. Expression of β-catenin was not changed after exposure to PHI for 3 h, but expression of β-catenin, and its cell cycle-related genes such as TCF, c-myc and cyclinD1 decreased after exposure to PHI for 7 h. It is concluded that PHI regulates acetylation and methylation of histone, inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway, and is able to induce apoptosis and inhibits growth of Jurkat cells. PMID:23628033

  9. Next-generation sequencing is highly sensitive for the detection of beta-catenin mutations in desmoid-type fibromatoses.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Sarah J; Presneau, Nadège; Kalimuthu, Sangeetha; Dileo, Palma; Berisha, Fitim; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, M Fernanda; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2015-08-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatoses are locally aggressive and frequently recurrent tumours, and an accurate diagnosis is essential for patient management. The majority of sporadic lesions harbour beta-catenin (CTNNB1) mutations. We used next-generation sequencing to detect CTNNB1 mutations and to compare the sensitivity and specificity of next-generation sequencing with currently employed mutation detection techniques: mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion and polymerase chain reaction amplification. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded needle biopsy or resection tissue sections from 144 patients with sporadic desmoid-type fibromatoses, four patients with syndrome-related desmoid-type fibromatoses and 11 morphological mimics. Two primer pairs were designed for CTNNB1 mutation hotspots. Using ≥10 ng of DNA, libraries were generated by Fluidigm and sequenced on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Next-generation sequencing had a sensitivity of 92.36 % (133/144, 95 % CIs: 86.74 to 96.12 %) and a specificity of 100 % for the detection of CTNNB1 mutations in desmoid-type fibromatoses-like spindle cell lesions. All mutations detected by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion were identified by next-generation sequencing. Next-generation sequencing identified additional mutations in 11 tumours that were not detected by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion, two of which have not been previously described. Next-generation sequencing is highly sensitive for the detection of CTNNB1 mutations. This multiplex assay has the advantage of detecting additional mutations compared to those detected by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion (sensitivity 82.41 %). The technology requires minimal DNA and is time- and cost-efficient. PMID:25838078

  10. R-ETODOLAC DECREASES BETA-CATENIN LEVELS ALONG WITH SURVIVAL AND PROLIFERATION OF HEPATOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Behari, Jaideep; Zeng, Gang; Otruba, Wade; Thompson, Michael; Muller, Peggy; Micsenyi, Amanda; Sekhon, Sandeep S.; Leoni, Lorenzo; Monga, Satdarshan P. S.

    2007-01-01

    Background Inhibition of hepatoma cells by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 dependent and independent mechanisms has been shown previously. Here, we examine the effect of Celecoxib, a COX-2-inhibitor and R-Etodolac, an enantiomer of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug Etodolac, which lacks COX-inhibitory activity, on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and human hepatoma cells. Methods Hep3B and HepG2 cell lines were treated with Celecoxib or R-Etodolac, and examined for viability, DNA synthesis, Wnt/β-catenin pathway components, and downstream target gene expression. Results Celecoxib at high doses affected β-catenin protein by inducing its degradation via GSK3β and APC along with diminished tumor cell proliferation and survival. R-Etodolac at physiological doses caused decrease in total and activated β-catenin protein secondary to decrease in its gene expression and post-translationally through GSK3β activation. In addition, increased β-catenin-E-cadherin was also observed at the membrane. An associated inhibition of β-catenin-dependent Tcf reporter activity, decreased levels of downstream target gene products glutamine synthetase and cyclin-D1, and decreased proliferation and survival of hepatoma cells was evident. Conclusion The antitumor effects of Celecoxib (at high concentrations) and R-Etodolac (at physiological doses) on HCC cells were accompanied by the down-regulation of β-catenin demonstrating a useful therapeutic strategy in hepatocellular cancer. PMID:17275129

  11. Chondroitin Sulfate-E Is a Negative Regulator of a Pro-Tumorigenic Wnt/Beta-Catenin-Collagen 1 Axis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Catherine M.; Klüppel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate-E (CS-E) is misregulated in many human cancers, including breast cancer. Cell-surface associated CS-E has been shown to have pro-tumorigenic functions, and pharmacological treatment with exogenous CS-E has been proposed to interfere with tumor progression mediated by endogenous CS-E. However, the effects of exogenous CS-E on breast cancer cell behavior, and the molecular mechanisms deployed by CS-E are not well understood. We show here that treatment with CS-E, but not other chondroitin forms, could interfere with the invasive protrusion formation and migration of breast cancer cells in three-dimensional organotypic cultures. Microarray analysis identified transcriptional programs controlled by CS-E in these cells. Importantly, negative regulation of the pro-metastatic extracellular matrix gene Col1a1 was required for the anti-migratory effects of exogenous CS-E. Knock-down of Col1a1 gene expression mimics the effects of CS-E treatment, while exposing cells to a preformed collagen I matrix interfered with the anti-migratory effects of CS-E. In addition, CS-E specifically interfered with Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, a known pro-tumorigenic pathway. Lastly, we demonstrate that Col1a1 is a positively regulated target gene of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. Together, our data identify treatment with exogenous CS-E as negative regulatory mechanism of breast cancer cell motility through interference with a pro-tumorigenic Wnt/beta-catenin - Collagen I axis. PMID:25090092

  12. Interaction Between Beta-Catenin and EGFR Expression by Immunohistochemistry Identifies Prognostic Subgroups in Early High-risk Triple-negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lakis, Sotirios; Dimoudis, Stefanos; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Alexopoulou, Zoi; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Koletsa, Triantafyllia; Bobos, Mattheos; Timotheadou, Eleni; Papaspirou, Irene; Efstratiou, Ioannis; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Karavasilis, Vasilios; Zagouri, Flora; Gogas, Helen; Razis, Evangelia; Pentheroudakis, George; Christodoulou, Christos; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Fountzilas, George

    2016-05-01

    Wnt and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway abnormalities and de-stabilization of cell adhesion are all important aspects of the pathogenesis of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Herein we investigated how the expression of related protein markers may affect the outcome of patients bearing TNBC treated in the adjuvant setting. Immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin, Myc (Wnt pathway), E-cadherin, P-cadherin (cell-adhesion), EGFR and cytokeratin 5 (CK5) (identification of basal-like tumors) was carried out in 364 centrally confirmed TNBCs. Survival analysis was performed with Cox-regression models according to dichotomized continuous protein expression data and marker interactions. In 352 evaluable tumors, 81.5% were basal-like TNBC. E-cadherin and P-cadherin were positively associated, with co-expression being present in 68% of tumors. Individual markers did not affect patient outcome. However, a statistically significant interaction was shown such that low expression of beta-catenin in the cell membrane, defined as expression below the median of the H-score distribution, was associated with unfavourable disease-free survival among tumors that expressed EGFR, but not in the absence of EGFR expression (interaction p=0.0085). The interaction persisted after correcting for clinicopathological variables. A considerable number of TNBC co-expresses E-cadherin and P-cadherin, while membranous localization of beta-catenin may predict patient outcome in an EGFR-dependent manner. This novel interaction seems worthy for validating with regards to its biological and clinical relevance. PMID:27127145

  13. Novel Cancer Chemotherapy Hits by Molecular Topology: Dual Akt and Beta-Catenin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Morell, Cecilia; Rodríguez-Henche, Nieves; Recio-Iglesias, Maria Carmen; Garcia-Domenech, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Colorectal and prostate cancers are two of the most common types and cause of a high rate of deaths worldwide. Therefore, any strategy to stop or at least slacken the development and progression of malignant cells is an important therapeutic choice. The aim of the present work is the identification of novel cancer chemotherapy agents. Nowadays, many different drug discovery approaches are available, but this paper focuses on Molecular Topology, which has already demonstrated its extraordinary efficacy in this field, particularly in the identification of new hit and lead compounds against cancer. This methodology uses the graph theoretical formalism to numerically characterize molecular structures through the so called topological indices. Once obtained a specific framework, it allows the construction of complex mathematical models that can be used to predict physical, chemical or biological properties of compounds. In addition, Molecular Topology is highly efficient in selecting and designing new hit and lead drugs. According to the aforementioned, Molecular Topology has been applied here for the construction of specific Akt/mTOR and β-catenin inhibition mathematical models in order to identify and select novel antitumor agents. Experimental Approach Based on the results obtained by the selected mathematical models, six novel potential inhibitors of the Akt/mTOR and β-catenin pathways were identified. These compounds were then tested in vitro to confirm their biological activity. Conclusion and Implications Five of the selected compounds, CAS n° 256378-54-8 (Inhibitor n°1), 663203-38-1 (Inhibitor n°2), 247079-73-8 (Inhibitor n°3), 689769-86-6 (Inhibitor n°4) and 431925-096 (Inhibitor n°6) gave positive responses and resulted to be active for Akt/mTOR and/or β-catenin inhibition. This study confirms once again the Molecular Topology’s reliability and efficacy to find out novel drugs in the field of cancer. PMID:25910265

  14. RhoA GTPase interacts with beta-catenin signaling in clinorotated osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue under constant remodeling in response to various signals including mechanical loading. A lack of proper mechanical loading induces disuse osteoporosis that reduces bone mass and structural integrity. β-catenin signaling together with a network of GTPases is known to play a primary role in load-driven bone formation, but little is known about potential interactions of β-catenin signaling and GTPases in bone loss. In this study, we addressed a question: Does unloading suppress an activation level of RhoA GTPase and β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts? If yes, what is the role of RhoA GTPase and actin filaments in osteoblasts in regulating β-catenin signaling? Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique with a biosensor for RhoA together with a fluorescent T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) reporter, we examined the effects of clinostat-driven simulated unloading. The results revealed that both RhoA activity and TCF/LEF activity were downregulated by unloading. Reduction in RhoA activity was correlated to a decrease in cytoskeletal organization of actin filaments. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling blocked unloading-induced RhoA suppression, and dominant negative RhoA inhibited TCF/LEF suppression. On the other hand, a constitutively active RhoA enhanced unloading-induced reduction of TCF/LEF activity. The TCF/LEF suppression by unloading was enhanced by co-culture with osteocytes, but it was independent on organization of actin filaments, myosin II activity, or a myosin light chain kinase. Collectively, the results suggest that β-catenin signaling is required for unloading-driven regulation of RhoA, and RhoA, but not actin cytoskeleton or intracellular tension, mediates the responsiveness of β-catenin signaling to unloading. PMID:23529802

  15. (1-(4-(Naphthalen-2-yl)pyrimidin-2-yl)piperidin-4-yl)methanamine: a wingless beta-catenin agonist that increases bone formation rate.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jeffrey C; Lundquist, Joseph T; Gilbert, Adam M; Alon, Nipa; Bex, Frederick J; Bhat, Bheem M; Bursavich, Mattew G; Coleburn, Valerie E; Felix, Luciana A; Green, Daniel M; Green, Paula; Hauze, Diane B; Kharode, Yogendra P; Lam, Ho-Sun; Lockhead, Susan R; Magolda, Ronald L; Matteo, Jeanne J; Mehlmann, John F; Milligan, Colleen; Murrills, Richard J; Pirrello, Jennifer; Selim, Sally; Sharp, Michael C; Unwalla, Ray J; Vera, Matthew D; Wrobel, Jay E; Yaworsky, Paul; Bodine, Peter V N

    2009-11-26

    A high-throughput screening campaign to discover small molecule leads for the treatment of bone disorders concluded with the discovery of a compound with a 2-aminopyrimidine template that targeted the Wnt beta-catenin cellular messaging system. Hit-to-lead in vitro optimization for target activity and molecular properties led to the discovery of (1-(4-(naphthalen-2-yl)pyrimidin-2-yl)piperidin-4-yl)methanamine (5, WAY-262611). Compound 5 has excellent pharmacokinetic properties and showed a dose dependent increase in the trabecular bone formation rate in ovariectomized rats following oral administration. PMID:19856966

  16. INTRANODAL PALISADED MYOFIBROBLASTOMA: ANOTHER MESENCHYMAL NEOPLASM WITH CTNNB1 (BETA-CATENIN GENE) MUTATIONS. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC, IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL, AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY OF 18 CASES

    PubMed Central

    Laskin, William B.; Lasota, Jerzy; Fetsch, John F.; Felisiak-Golabek, Anna; Wang, Zeng-Feng; Miettinen, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Intranodal palisaded myofibroblastoma is a benign, lymph node-based myofibroblastic tumor of unknown pathogenesis. We report the clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and genetic molecular features of this rare entity. The study cohort consisted of 14 males and 4 females ranging in age from 31 to 65 (mean, 47; median 49) years with tumors arising in inguinal lymph nodes (n=15), a neck lymph node (n=1), and undesignated lymph nodes (n=2). Most individuals presented with a painless mass or lump. Possible trauma/injury to the inguinal region was documented in four cases. Tumors ranged in size from 1.0 to 4.2 (mean, 3.1; median; 3.0) cm. Microscopically, the process presented as a well-circumscribed, often times pseudoencapsulated nodule (n=17) or nodules (n=1). Tumors consisted of a cellular proliferation of cytologically bland, spindled cells arranged in short fascicles and whorls within a finely collagenous(n=11) or myxocollagenous(n=7) matrix. In 12 tumors, scattered fibromatosis-like fascicles of spindled cells were noted. Histological features characteristic of the process included nuclear palisades (n=16 cases), collagenous bodies (n=15), and perinuclear intracytoplasmic hyaline globules (n=10). Mitotic activity ranged from 0 to 8 (mean,2; median, 1) mitotic figures/50 high-powered fields with no atypical division figures identified. Immunohistochemically, all tumors tested expressed (vimentin (n=3), smooth-muscle actin and/or muscle-specific actin (n=5, each), and nuclear beta-catenin and cyclin D1 (n=8, each). The latter two results prompted a screening for mutations in the beta-catenin gene glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta phosphorylation mutational “hotspot” region in exon 3 using PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. Single nucleotide substitutions leading to missense mutations at the protein level were identified in 7 of 8 (88%) analyzed tumors and are responsible for the abnormal expression of beta-catenin and cyclin D1. These results

  17. Monitoring interactions and dynamics of endogenous beta-catenin with intracellular nanobodies in living cells.

    PubMed

    Traenkle, Bjoern; Emele, Felix; Anton, Roman; Poetz, Oliver; Haeussler, Ragna S; Maier, Julia; Kaiser, Philipp D; Scholz, Armin M; Nueske, Stefan; Buchfellner, Andrea; Romer, Tina; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    β-catenin is the key component of the canonical Wnt pathway and plays a crucial role in a multitude of developmental and homeostatic processes. The different tasks of β-catenin are orchestrated by its subcellular localization and participation in multiprotein complexes. To gain a better understanding of β-catenin's role in living cells we have generated a new set of single domain antibodies, referred to as nanobodies, derived from heavy chain antibodies of camelids. We selected nanobodies recognizing the N-terminal, core or C-terminal domain of β-catenin and applied these new high-affinity binders as capture molecules in sandwich immunoassays and co-immunoprecipitations of endogenous β-catenin complexes. In addition, we engineered intracellularly functional anti-β-catenin chromobodies by combining the binding moieties of the nanobodies with fluorescent proteins. For the first time, we were able to visualize the subcellular localization and nuclear translocation of endogenous β-catenin in living cells using these chromobodies. Moreover, the chromobody signal allowed us to trace the accumulation of diffusible, hypo-phosphorylated β-catenin in response to compound treatment in real time using High Content Imaging. The anti-β-catenin nanobodies and chromobodies characterized in this study are versatile tools that enable a novel and unique approach to monitor the dynamics of subcellular β-catenin in biochemical and cell biological assays. PMID:25595278

  18. Monitoring Interactions and Dynamics of Endogenous Beta-catenin With Intracellular Nanobodies in Living Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Traenkle, Bjoern; Emele, Felix; Anton, Roman; Poetz, Oliver; Haeussler, Ragna S.; Maier, Julia; Kaiser, Philipp D.; Scholz, Armin M.; Nueske, Stefan; Buchfellner, Andrea; Romer, Tina; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    β-catenin is the key component of the canonical Wnt pathway and plays a crucial role in a multitude of developmental and homeostatic processes. The different tasks of β-catenin are orchestrated by its subcellular localization and participation in multiprotein complexes. To gain a better understanding of β-catenin's role in living cells we have generated a new set of single domain antibodies, referred to as nanobodies, derived from heavy chain antibodies of camelids. We selected nanobodies recognizing the N-terminal, core or C-terminal domain of β-catenin and applied these new high-affinity binders as capture molecules in sandwich immunoassays and co-immunoprecipitations of endogenous β-catenin complexes. In addition, we engineered intracellularly functional anti-β-catenin chromobodies by combining the binding moieties of the nanobodies with fluorescent proteins. For the first time, we were able to visualize the subcellular localization and nuclear translocation of endogenous β-catenin in living cells using these chromobodies. Moreover, the chromobody signal allowed us to trace the accumulation of diffusible, hypo-phosphorylated β-catenin in response to compound treatment in real time using High Content Imaging. The anti-β-catenin nanobodies and chromobodies characterized in this study are versatile tools that enable a novel and unique approach to monitor the dynamics of subcellular β-catenin in biochemical and cell biological assays. PMID:25595278

  19. R-Spondin 1/Dickkopf-1/Beta-Catenin Machinery Is Involved in Testicular Embryonic Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Maria; Ferranti, Francesca; Corano Scheri, Katia; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Ciccarone, Fabio; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Testicular vasculogenesis is one of the key processes regulating male gonad morphogenesis. The knowledge of the molecular cues underlining this phenomenon is one of today’s most challenging issues and could represent a major contribution toward a better understanding of the onset of testicular morphogenetic disorders. R-spondin 1 has been clearly established as a candidate for mammalian ovary determination. Conversely, very little information is available on the expression and role of R-spondin 1 during testicular morphogenesis. This study aims to clarify the distribution pattern of R-spondin 1 and other partners of its machinery during the entire period of testicular morphogenesis and to indicate the role of this system in testicular development. Our whole mount immunofluorescence results clearly demonstrate that R-spondin 1 is always detectable in the testicular coelomic partition, where testicular vasculature is organized, while Dickkopf-1 is never detectable in this area. Moreover, organ culture experiments of embryonic male UGRs demonstrated that Dickkopf-1 acted as an inhibitor of testis vasculature formation. Consistent with this observation, real-time PCR analyses demonstrated that DKK1 is able to slightly but significantly decrease the expression level of the endothelial marker Pecam1. The latter experiments allowed us to observe that DKK1 administration also perturbs the expression level of the Pdgf-b chain, which is consistent with some authors’ observations relating this factor with prenatal testicular patterning and angiogenesis. Interestingly, the DKK1 induced inhibition of testicular angiogenesis was rescued by the co-administration of R-spondin 1. In addition, R-spondin 1 alone was sufficient to enhance, in culture, testicular angiogenesis. PMID:25910078

  20. Early embryonic expression of a LIM-homeobox gene Cs-lhx3 is downstream of beta-catenin and responsible for the endoderm differentiation in Ciona savignyi embryos.

    PubMed

    Satou, Y; Imai, K S; Satoh, N

    2001-09-01

    In early Ciona embryos, nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin is most probably the first step of endodermal cell specification. If beta-catenin is mis- and/or overexpressed, presumptive notochord cells and epidermal cells change their fates into endodermal cells, whereas if beta-catenin nuclear localization is downregulated by the overexpression of cadherin, the endoderm differentiation is suppressed, accompanied with the differentiation of extra epidermal cells ( Imai, K., Takada, N., Satoh, N. and Satou, Y. (2000) Development 127, 3009-3020). Subtractive hybridization screens of mRNAs between beta-catenin overexpressed embryos and cadherin overexpressed embryos were conducted to identify potential beta-catenin target genes that are responsible for endoderm differentiation in Ciona savignyi embryos. We found that a LIM-homeobox gene (Cs-lhx3), an otx homolog (Cs-otx) and an NK-2 class gene (Cs-ttf1) were among beta-catenin downstream genes. In situ hybridization signals for early zygotic expression of Cs-lhx3 were evident only in the presumptive endodermal cells as early as the 32-cell stage, those of Cs-otx in the mesoendodermal cells at the 32-cell stage and those of Cs-ttf1 in the endodermal cells at the 64-cell stage. Later, Cs-lhx3 was expressed again in a set of neuronal cells in the tailbud embryo, while Cs-otx was expressed in the anterior nervous system of the embryo. Expression of all three genes was upregulated in beta-catenin overexpressed embryos and downregulated in cadherin overexpressed embryos. Injection of morpholino oligonucleotides against Cs-otx did not affect the embryonic endoderm differentiation, although the formation of the central nervous system was suppressed. Injection of Cs-ttf1 morpholino oligonucleotides also failed to suppress the endoderm differentiation, although injection of its synthetic mRNAs resulted in ectopic development of endoderm differentiation marker alkaline phosphatase. By contrast, injection of Cs-lhx3 morpholino

  1. Inhibition of renal membrane binding and nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.D.; Hottendorf, G.H.; Bennett, D.B.

    1986-06-01

    The initial event in the renal tubular reabsorption of nephrotoxic aminoglycosides involves binding to brush border membranes. This primary event was measured in renal brush border membrane vesicles prepared from rat renal cortex utilizing (3H)gentamicin. In order to gain structure-activity information regarding this interaction the effect of substances having chemical similarities to aminoglycosides (sugars, polyamines and amino acids) on gentamicin binding to brush border membranes was determined. Polyamino acids were found to possess the greatest inhibitory potency. In addition to polymers of cationic amino acids (lysine, ornithine, arginine and histidine), polymers of neutral (asparagine) and acidic (aspartic and glutamic acid) amino acids also exhibited inhibition of the membrane binding of gentamicin. Inasmuch as inhibition of renal membrane binding has the potential to decrease aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity, several polyamino acids that inhibited membrane binding were tested in vivo for potential protective activity vs. gentamicin- and amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity. Polyasparagine90 and polyaspartic acid100 inhibited gentamicin and amikacin nephrotoxicity completely when coadministered to rats with the aminoglycosides. Polylysine20 provided complete and partial inhibition of gentamicin and amikacin nephrotoxicity, respectively. Whereas in vivo distribution studies revealed that cortical levels of (3H)amikacin were elevated slightly by the coadministration of polyaspartic acid, brush border and basolateral membranes contained significantly lower levels of the aminoglycoside (46 and 41% inhibition, respectively). These results question the role of charge per se in the binding of aminoglycosides to renal membranes and further confirm the importance of membrane binding in the pathogenesis of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity.

  2. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

    DOEpatents

    Konowalchuk, Thomas W

    2014-01-14

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods on inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  3. Inhibition of histone binding by supramolecular hosts

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Hillary F.; Daze, Kevin D.; Shimbo, Takashi; Lai, Anne; Musselman, Catherine A.; Sims, Jennifer K.; Wade, Paul A.; Hof†, Fraser; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2015-01-01

    The tandem PHD (plant homeodomain) fingers of the CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4) ATPase are epigenetic readers that bind either unmodified histone H3 tails or H3K9me3 (histone H3 trimethylated at Lys9). This dual function is necessary for the transcriptional and chromatin remodelling activities of the NuRD (nucleosome remodelling and deacetylase) complex. In the present paper, we show that calixarene-based supramolecular hosts disrupt binding of the CHD4 PHD2 finger to H3K9me3, but do not affect the interaction of this protein with the H3K9me0 (unmodified histone H3) tail. A similar inhibitory effect, observed for the association of chromodomain of HP1γ (heterochromatin protein 1γ) with H3K9me3, points to a general mechanism of methyl-lysine caging by calixarenes and suggests a high potential for these compounds in biochemical applications. Immunofluorescence analysis reveals that the supramolecular agents induce changes in chromatin organization that are consistent with their binding to and disruption of H3K9me3 sites in living cells. The results of the present study suggest that the aromatic macrocyclic hosts can be used as a powerful new tool for characterizing methylation-driven epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24576085

  4. Saccharin and Cyclamate Inhibit Binding of Epidermal Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L. S.

    1981-02-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to 18 cell lines, including HeLa (human carcinoma), MDCK (dog kidney cells), HTC (rat hepatoma), K22 (rat liver), HF (human foreskin), GM17 (human skin fibroblasts), XP (human xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts), and 3T3-L1 (mouse fibroblasts), was inhibited by saccharin and cyclamate. The human cells were more sensitive to inhibition by these sweeteners than mouse or rat cells. EGF at doses far above the physiological levels reversed the inhibition in rodent cells but not in HeLa cells. In HeLa cells, the doses of saccharin and cyclamate needed for 50% inhibition were 3.5 and 9.3 mg/ml, respectively. Glucose, 2-deoxyglucose, sucrose, and xylitol did not inhibit EGF binding. Previous studies have shown that phorbol esters, strongly potent tumor promoters, also inhibit EGF binding to tissue culture cells. To explain the EGF binding inhibition by such greatly dissimilar molecules as phorbol esters, saccharin, and cyclamate, it is suggested that they operate through the activation of a hormone response control unit.

  5. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Stec, David E; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W; Baum, Justin; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  6. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Stec, David E.; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J.; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W.; Baum, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  7. Binding sites associated with inhibition of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Shipman, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of experimental and theoretical evidence has been integrated into coherent molecular mechanisms for the action of photosystem II herbicides. Photosystem II herbicides act by inhibiting electron transfers between the first and second plastoquinones on the reducing side of photosystem II. Each herbicide molecule must have a flat polar component with hydrophobic substituents to be active. The hydrophobic substituents serve to partition the molecule into lipid regions of the cell and to fit the hydrophobic region of the herbicide binding site. The flat polar portion of the herbicide is used for electrostatic binding to the polar region of the herbicide binding site. Theoretical calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of herbicides to model proteinaceous binding sites.

  8. Inhibition of cell-cell binding by lipid assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Bargatze, Robert F.

    2001-05-22

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  9. Inhibition Of Call-Cell Binding By Kipid Assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O. , Bargatze, Robert F.

    2003-12-16

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  10. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Jay M.; Cura, Anthony J.; Lloyd, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites—the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis. PMID:25715702

  11. An L-RNA Aptamer that Binds and Inhibits RNase.

    PubMed

    Olea, Charles; Weidmann, Joachim; Dawson, Philip E; Joyce, Gerald F

    2015-11-19

    L-RNA aptamers were developed that bind to barnase RNase and thereby inhibit the function of the enzyme. These aptamers were obtained by first carrying out in vitro selection of D-RNAs that bind to the full-length synthetic D-enantiomer of barnase, then reversing the mirror and preparing L-RNAs of identical sequence that similarly bind to natural L-barnase. The resulting L-aptamers bind L-barnase with an affinity of ∼100 nM and function as competitive inhibitors of enzyme cleavage of D-RNA substrates. L-RNA aptamers are resistant to degradation by ribonucleases, thus enabling them to function in biological samples, most notably for applications in molecular diagnostics and therapeutics. In addition to the irony of using RNA to inhibit RNase, L-RNA aptamers such as those described here could be used to measure the concentration or inhibit the function of RNase in the laboratory or in biological systems. PMID:26590636

  12. A Method for Serial Tissue Processing and Parallel Analysis of Aberrant Crypt Morphology, Mucin Depletion, and Beta-Catenin Staining in an Experimental Model of Colon Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of architectural and morphological characteristics of cells for establishing prognostic indicators by which individual pathologies are assigned grade and stage is a well-accepted practice. Advances in automated micro- and macroscopic image acquisition and digital image analysis have created new opportunities in the field of prognostic assessment; but, one area in experimental pathology, animal models for colon cancer, has not taken advantage of these opportunities. This situation is primarily due to the methods available to evaluate the colon of the rodent for the presence of premalignant and malignant pathologies. We report a new method for the excision and processing of the entire colon of the rat and illustrate how this procedure permitted the quantitative assessment of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), a premalignant colon pathology, for characteristics consistent with progression to malignancy. ACF were detected by methylene blue staining and subjected to quantitative morphometric analysis. Colons were then restained with high iron diamine–alcian blue for assessment of mucin depletion using an image overlay to associate morphometric data with mucin depletion. The subsequent evaluation of ACF for beta-catenin staining is also demonstrated. The methods described are particularly relevant to the screening of compounds for cancer chemopreventive activity. PMID:21406072

  13. Inhibition of tobramycin diffusion by binding to alginate.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, W W; Dorrington, S M; Slack, M P; Walmsley, H L

    1988-01-01

    [3H]tobramycin bound to sodium alginate and to exopolysaccharide prepared from two mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Binding to sodium alginate was similar to binding to exopolysaccharide, both in the dependence on tobramycin concentration and in the maximum binding observed at saturation. Incorporation of sodium alginate into agar plates reduced the zone sizes of growth inhibition caused by tobramycin. The reductions in zone sizes were quantitatively accounted for by the binding of tobramycin to sodium alginate during diffusion of the antibiotic away from the well in which it had been placed at the start of the experiment. However, the binding of tobramycin to the exopolysaccharide of P. aeruginosa, and the resulting inhibition of diffusion of the antibiotic, did not significantly increase the penetration time of a spherical microcolony with a radius of 125 micron, such as might be found in the respiratory tract of a patient with cystic fibrosis (from a 90% penetration time of 12 s in the absence of exopolysaccharide to one of 35 s with an exopolysaccharide concentration of 1.0% [wt/vol]). PMID:3132093

  14. Calmodulin binds to and inhibits the activity of phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) functions as a cytoplasmic ATP-generating glycolytic enzyme, a nuclear mediator in DNA replication and repair, a stimulator of Sendai virus transcription and an extracellular disulfide reductase in angiogenesis. Probing of a developmental expression library from Dictyostelium discoideum with radiolabelled calmodulin led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative calmodulin-binding protein (DdPGK) with 68% sequence similarity to human PGK. Dictyostelium, rabbit and yeast PGKs bound to calmodulin-agarose in a calcium-dependent manner while DdPGK constructs lacking the calmodulin-binding domain (209KPFLAILGGAKVSDKIKLIE228) failed to bind. The calmodulin-binding domain shows 80% identity between diverse organisms and is situated beside the hinge and within the ATP binding domain adjacent to nine mutations associated with PGK deficiency. Calmodulin addition inhibits yeast PGK activity in vitro while the calmodulin antagonist W-7 abrogates this inhibition. Together, these data suggest that PGK activity may be negatively regulated by calcium and calmodulin signalling in eukaryotic cells. PMID:15363631

  15. Inhibition of tobramycin diffusion by binding to alginate

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, W.W.; Dorrington, S.M.; Slack, M.P.; Walmsley, H.L.

    1988-04-01

    (/sup 3/H)tobramycin bound to sodium alginate and to exopolysaccharide prepared from two mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Binding to sodium alginate was similar to binding to exopolysaccharide, both in the dependence on tobramycin concentration and in the maximum binding observed at saturation. Incorporation of sodium alginate into agar plates reduced the zone sizes of growth inhibition caused by tobramycin. The reductions in zone sizes were quantitatively accounted for by the binding of tobramycin to sodium alginate during diffusion of the antibiotic away from the well in which it had been placed at the start of the experiment. However, the binding of tobramycin to the exopolysaccharide of P. aeruginosa, and the resulting inhibition of diffusion of the antibiotic, did not significantly increase the penetration time of a spherical microcolony with a radius of 125 micron, such as might be found in the respiratory tract of a patient with cystic fibrosis (from a 90% penetration time of 12 s in the absence of exopolysaccharide to one of 35 s with an exopolysaccharide concentration of 1.0% (wt/vol)).

  16. Evaluation of Pregnancy Malaria Vaccine Candidates: The Binding Inhibition Assay.

    PubMed

    Saveria, Tracy; Duffy, Patrick E; Fried, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The parasite-binding inhibition assay is designed to evaluate the acquisition of naturally acquired functional antibodies that block Plasmodium falciparum binding to endothelial or placental receptors. The assay is also used to assess functional activity by antibodies induced by immunization, for example antibodies raised against pregnancy malaria vaccine candidates like VAR2CSA. Here we describe a plate-based assay to measure the levels of adhesion-blocking antibodies. This assay format can be adapted to any lab that is minimally equipped for short-term parasite culture. PMID:26450393

  17. Potent Glycosidase Inhibition with Heterovalent Fullerenes: Unveiling the Binding Modes Triggering Multivalent Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Abellán Flos, Marta; García Moreno, M Isabel; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, Jose Manuel; Nierengarten, Jean-Francois; Vincent, Stéphane P

    2016-08-01

    Glycosidases are key enzymes in metabolism, pathogenic/antipathogenic mechanisms and normal cellular functions. Recently, a novel approach for glycosidase inhibition that conveys multivalent glycomimetic conjugates has emerged. Many questions regarding the mechanism(s) of multivalent enzyme inhibition remain unanswered. Herein we report the synthesis of a collection of novel homo- and heterovalent glyco(mimetic)-fullerenes purposely conceived for probing the contribution of non-catalytic pockets in glysosidases to the multivalent inhibitory effect. Their affinities towards selected glycosidases were compared with data from homovalent fullerene conjugates. An original competitive glycosidase-lectin binding assay demonstrated that the multivalent derivatives and the substrate compete for low affinity non-glycone binding sites of the enzyme, leading to inhibition by a "recognition and blockage" mechanism. Most notably, this work provides evidence for enzyme inhibition by multivalent glycosystems, which will likely have a strong impact in the glycosciences given the utmost relevance of multivalency in Nature. PMID:27374430

  18. Flavopiridol inhibits glycogen phosphorylase by binding at the inhibitor site.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, N G; Schnier, J B; Zographos, S E; Skamnaki, V T; Tsitsanou, K E; Johnson, L N

    2000-11-01

    Flavopiridol (L86-8275) ((-)-cis-5, 7-dihydroxy-2-(2-chlorophenyl)-8-[4-(3-hydroxy-1-methyl)-piperidinyl] -4H-benzopyran-4-one), a potential antitumor drug, currently in phase II trials, has been shown to be an inhibitor of muscle glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and to cause glycogen accumulation in A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (Kaiser, A., Nishi, K., Gorin, F.A., Walsh, D.A., Bradbury, E. M., and Schnier, J. B., unpublished data). Kinetic experiments reported here show that flavopiridol inhibits GPb with an IC(50) = 15.5 microm. The inhibition is synergistic with glucose resulting in a reduction of IC(50) for flavopiridol to 2.3 microm and mimics the inhibition of caffeine. In order to elucidate the structural basis of inhibition, we determined the structures of GPb complexed with flavopiridol, GPb complexed with caffeine, and GPa complexed with both glucose and flavopiridol at 1.76-, 2.30-, and 2.23-A resolution, and refined to crystallographic R values of 0.216 (R(free) = 0.247), 0.189 (R(free) = 0.219), and 0.195 (R(free) = 0.252), respectively. The structures provide a rational for flavopiridol potency and synergism with glucose inhibitory action. Flavopiridol binds at the allosteric inhibitor site, situated at the entrance to the catalytic site, the site where caffeine binds. Flavopiridol intercalates between the two aromatic rings of Phe(285) and Tyr(613). Both flavopiridol and glucose promote the less active T-state through localization of the closed position of the 280s loop which blocks access to the catalytic site, thereby explaining their synergistic inhibition. The mode of interactions of flavopiridol with GP is different from that of des-chloro-flavopiridol with CDK2, illustrating how different functional parts of the inhibitor can be used to provide specific and potent binding to two different enzymes. PMID:10924512

  19. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity. PMID:26263125

  20. Menthol Binding and Inhibition of α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C.; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Al Kury, Lina; Shuba, Yaroslav; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Howarth, Frank C.; Sadek, Bassem; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca2+-free bathing solution containing Ba2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner. PMID:23935840

  1. Use of an Activated Beta-Catenin to Identify Wnt Pathway Target Genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, Including a Subset of Collagen Genes Expressed in Late Larval Development

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Belinda M.; Abete-Luzi, Patricia; Krause, Michael W.; Eisenmann, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays a fundamental role during metazoan development, where it regulates diverse processes, including cell fate specification, cell migration, and stem cell renewal. Activation of the beta-catenin−dependent/canonical Wnt pathway up-regulates expression of Wnt target genes to mediate a cellular response. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a canonical Wnt signaling pathway regulates several processes during larval development; however, few target genes of this pathway have been identified. To address this deficit, we used a novel approach of conditionally activated Wnt signaling during a defined stage of larval life by overexpressing an activated beta-catenin protein, then used microarray analysis to identify genes showing altered expression compared with control animals. We identified 166 differentially expressed genes, of which 104 were up-regulated. A subset of the up-regulated genes was shown to have altered expression in mutants with decreased or increased Wnt signaling; we consider these genes to be bona fide C. elegans Wnt pathway targets. Among these was a group of six genes, including the cuticular collagen genes, bli-1col-38, col-49, and col-71. These genes show a peak of expression in the mid L4 stage during normal development, suggesting a role in adult cuticle formation. Consistent with this finding, reduction of function for several of the genes causes phenotypes suggestive of defects in cuticle function or integrity. Therefore, this work has identified a large number of putative Wnt pathway target genes during larval life, including a small subset of Wnt-regulated collagen genes that may function in synthesis of the adult cuticle. PMID:24569038

  2. Aptamers Binding to c-Met Inhibiting Tumor Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Piater, Birgit; Doerner, Achim; Guenther, Ralf; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Bjoern

    2015-01-01

    The human receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays an important role in the control of critical cellular processes. Since c-Met is frequently over expressed or deregulated in human malignancies, blocking its activation is of special interest for therapy. In normal conditions, the c-Met receptor is activated by its bivalent ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Also bivalent antibodies can activate the receptor by cross linking, limiting therapeutic applications. We report the generation of the RNA aptamer CLN64 containing 2’-fluoro pyrimidine modifications by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). CLN64 and a previously described single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamer CLN3 exhibited high specificities and affinities to recombinant and cellular expressed c-Met. Both aptamers effectively inhibited HGF-dependent c-Met activation, signaling and cell migration. We showed that these aptamers did not induce c-Met activation, revealing an advantage over bivalent therapeutic molecules. Both aptamers were shown to bind overlapping epitopes but only CLN3 competed with HGF binding to cMet. In addition to their therapeutic and diagnostic potential, CLN3 and CLN64 aptamers exhibit valuable tools to further understand the structural and functional basis for c-Met activation or inhibition by synthetic ligands and their interplay with HGF binding. PMID:26658271

  3. Functional Comparison of Human Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) and APC-Like in Targeting Beta-Catenin for Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Schneikert, Jean; Vijaya Chandra, Shree Harsha; Ruppert, Jan Gustav; Ray, Suparna; Wenzel, Eva Maria; Behrens, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Truncating mutations affect the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in most cases of colon cancer, resulting in the stabilization of β-catenin and uncontrolled cell proliferation. We show here that colon cancer cell lines express also the paralog APC-like (APCL or APC2). RNA interference revealed that it controls the level and/or the activity of β-catenin, but it is less efficient and binds less well to β-catenin than APC, thereby providing one explanation as to why the gene is not mutated in colon cancer. A further comparison indicates that APCL down-regulates the β-catenin level despite the lack of the 15R region known to be important in APC. To understand this discrepancy, we performed immunoprecipitation experiments that revealed that phosphorylated β-catenin displays a preference for binding to the 15 amino acid repeats (15R) rather than the first 20 amino acid repeat of APC. This suggests that the 15R region constitutes a gate connecting the steps of β-catenin phosphorylation and subsequent ubiquitination/degradation. Using RNA interference and domain swapping experiments, we show that APCL benefits from the 15R of truncated APC to target β-catenin for degradation, in a process likely involving heterodimerization of the two partners. Our data suggest that the functional complementation of APCL by APC constitutes a substantial facet of tumour development, because the truncating mutations of APC in colorectal tumours from familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients are almost always selected for the retention of at least one 15R. PMID:23840886

  4. Evidence for the Nucleo-Apical Shuttling of a Beta-Catenin Like Plasmodium falciparum Armadillo Repeat Containing Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Pallabi; Gupta, Enna Dogra; Sahar, Tajali; Pandey, Alok K.; Dangi, Poonam; Reddy, K. Sony; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Gaur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic Armadillo (ARM) repeat proteins are multifaceted with prominent roles in cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal regulation and intracellular signaling among many others. One such ARM repeat containing protein, ARM Repeats Only (ARO), has recently been demonstrated in both Toxoplasma (TgARO) and Plasmodium (PfARO) parasites to be targeted to the rhoptries during the late asexual stages. TgARO has been implicated to play an important role in rhoptry positioning i.e. directing the rhoptry towards the apical end of the parasite. Here, we report for the first time that PfARO exhibits a DNA binding property and a dynamic sub-cellular localization between the nucleus (early schizont) and rhoptry (late schizont) during the different stages of the asexual blood-stage life cycle. PfARO possesses a putative nuclear export signal (NES) and the nucleo-apical shuttling was sensitive to Leptomycin B (LMB) suggesting that the nuclear export was mediated by CRM1. Importantly, PfARO specifically bound an A-T rich DNA sequence of the P. falciparum Gyrase A (PfgyrA) gene, suggesting that the DNA binding specificity of PfARO is likely due to the AT-richness of the probe. This is a novel functional characteristic that has not been reported previously for any P. falciparum ARM containing protein and suggests a putative role for PfARO in gene regulation. This study describes for the first time a conserved P. falciparum ARM repeat protein with a high degree of functional versatility. PMID:26828945

  5. Evidence for the Nucleo-Apical Shuttling of a Beta-Catenin Like Plasmodium falciparum Armadillo Repeat Containing Protein.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pallabi; Gupta, Enna Dogra; Sahar, Tajali; Pandey, Alok K; Dangi, Poonam; Reddy, K Sony; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Gaur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic Armadillo (ARM) repeat proteins are multifaceted with prominent roles in cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal regulation and intracellular signaling among many others. One such ARM repeat containing protein, ARM Repeats Only (ARO), has recently been demonstrated in both Toxoplasma (TgARO) and Plasmodium (PfARO) parasites to be targeted to the rhoptries during the late asexual stages. TgARO has been implicated to play an important role in rhoptry positioning i.e. directing the rhoptry towards the apical end of the parasite. Here, we report for the first time that PfARO exhibits a DNA binding property and a dynamic sub-cellular localization between the nucleus (early schizont) and rhoptry (late schizont) during the different stages of the asexual blood-stage life cycle. PfARO possesses a putative nuclear export signal (NES) and the nucleo-apical shuttling was sensitive to Leptomycin B (LMB) suggesting that the nuclear export was mediated by CRM1. Importantly, PfARO specifically bound an A-T rich DNA sequence of the P. falciparum Gyrase A (PfgyrA) gene, suggesting that the DNA binding specificity of PfARO is likely due to the AT-richness of the probe. This is a novel functional characteristic that has not been reported previously for any P. falciparum ARM containing protein and suggests a putative role for PfARO in gene regulation. This study describes for the first time a conserved P. falciparum ARM repeat protein with a high degree of functional versatility. PMID:26828945

  6. Aberrant expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in association with transforming growth factor-beta1 in urinary bladder lesions in humans after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Alina; Morimura, Keiichirou; Kinoshita, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Vozianov, Alexander; Fukushima, Shoji

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the molecular pathways of cell-cell communication in chronic inflammatory processes associated with long-term low-dose urinary bladder exposure to ionizing radiation in people without major disease living more than 19 years in radio-contaminated areas of Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident. Patterns of components of the E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex, and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were immunohistochemically evaluated in urinary bladder biopsies from 52 males with benign prostate hyperplasia and 8 females with chronic cystitis (group 1). For comparison, 25 males and 6 females living in non-contaminated areas of Ukraine were also investigated (group 2). Fourteen patients with primary urothelial carcinomas, which were operated on before the Chernobyl accident, were included as a carcinoma group. Chronic proliferative atypical cystitis ('Chernobyl cystitis') was observed in group 1 patients. Foci of dysplasia and carcinoma in situ were found in 51 (85%) and 34 (57%) of the 60 cases, respectively. Chronic cystitis with areas of dysplasia was detected in only 4 (13%) cases of 31 group 2 patients. Statistically significant differences in immunohistochemical scores for TGF-beta1 in the urothelium and lamina propria, iNOS in the urothelium and both beta-catenin and E-cadherin in the cytoplasm were observed between groups 1 and 2 with marked expression in group 1. Furthermore, TGF-beta1 overexpression and alteration in E-cadherin/beta-catenin complexes in bladder urothelium might play a crucial role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis in humans exposed to long-term low-dose ionizing radiation. PMID:16367920

  7. Inhibition of Midkine Augments Osteoporotic Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Haffner-Luntzer, Melanie; Kemmler, Julia; Heidler, Verena; Prystaz, Katja; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael; Kovtun, Anna; Rapp, Anna E.; Ignatius, Anita; Liedert, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    The heparin-binding growth and differentiation factor midkine (Mdk) is proposed to negatively regulate osteoblast activity and bone formation in the adult skeleton. As Mdk-deficient mice were protected from ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss, this factor may also play a role in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We have previously demonstrated that Mdk negatively influences bone regeneration during fracture healing. Here, we investigated whether the inhibition of Mdk using an Mdk-antibody (Mdk-Ab) improves compromised bone healing in osteoporotic OVX-mice. Using a standardized femur osteotomy model, we demonstrated that Mdk serum levels were significantly enhanced after fracture in both non-OVX and OVX-mice, however, the increase was considerably greater in osteoporotic mice. Systemic treatment with the Mdk-Ab significantly improved bone healing in osteoporotic mice by increasing bone formation in the fracture callus. On the molecular level, we demonstrated that the OVX-induced reduction of the osteoanabolic beta-catenin signaling in the bony callus was abolished by Mdk-Ab treatment. Furthermore, the injection of the Mdk-Ab increased trabecular bone mass in the skeleton of the osteoporotic mice. These results implicate that antagonizing Mdk may be useful for the therapy of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture-healing complications. PMID:27410432

  8. Dact2 Represses PITX2 Transcriptional Activation and Cell Proliferation through Wnt/beta-Catenin Signaling during Odontogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Florez, Sergio; Wang, Jianbo; Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    Dact proteins belong to the Dapper/Frodo protein family and function as cytoplasmic attenuators in Wnt and TGFβ signaling. Previous studies show that Dact1 is a potent Wnt signaling inhibitor by promoting degradation of β-catenin. We report a new mechanism for Dact2 function as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by interacting with PITX2. PITX2 is a downstream transcription factor in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and PITX2 synergizes with Lef-1 to activate downstream genes. Immunohistochemistry verified the expression of Dact2 in the tooth epithelium, which correlated with Pitx2 epithelial expression. Dact2 loss of function and PITX2 gain of function studies reveal a feedback mechanism for controlling Dact2 expression. Pitx2 endogenously activates Dact2 expression and Dact2 feeds back to repress Pitx2 transcriptional activity. A Topflash reporter system was employed showing PITX2 activation of Wnt signaling, which is attenuated by Dact2. Transient transfections demonstrate the inhibitory effect of Dact2 on critical dental epithelial differentiation factors during tooth development. Dact2 significantly inhibits PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 and amelogenin promoters. Multiple lines of evidence conclude the inhibition is achieved by the physical interaction between Dact2 and Pitx2 proteins. The loss of function of Dact2 also reveals increased cell proliferation due to up-regulated Wnt downstream genes, cyclinD1 and cyclinD2. In summary, we have identified a novel role for Dact2 as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway in embryonic tooth development through its regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:23349981

  9. MDM2 binds and inhibits vitamin D receptor

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Kristina; Heil, Tessa-Carina; Bette, Birgit; Reichrath, Jörg; Roemer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase and transcriptional repressor MDM2 is a potent inhibitor of the p53 family of transcription factors and tumor suppressors. Herein, we report that vitamin D receptor (VDR), another transcriptional regulator and probably, tumor suppressor, is also bound and inhibited by MDM2. This interaction was not affected by vitamin D ligand. VDR was ubiquitylated in the cell and its steady-state level was controlled by the proteasome. Strikingly, overproduced MDM2 reduced the level of VDR whereas knockdown of endogenous MDM2 increased the level of VDR. In addition to ubiquitin-marking proteins for degradation, MDM2, once recruited to promoters by DNA-binding interaction partners, can inhibit the transactivation of genes. Transient transfections with a VDR-responsive luciferase reporter revealed that low levels of MDM2 potently suppress VDR-mediated transactivation. Conversely, knockdown of MDM2 resulted in a significant increase of transcript from the CYP24A1 and p21 genes, noted cellular targets of transactivation by liganded VDR. Our findings suggest that MDM2 negatively regulates VDR in some analogy to p53. PMID:25969952

  10. Aprotinin inhibits the hormone binding of the estrogen receptor from calf uterus.

    PubMed

    Nigro, V; Medici, N; Abbondanza, C; Minucci, S; Molinari, A M; Puca, G A

    1989-11-15

    Micromolar concentrations of the proteinase inhibitor, aprotinin, produced a dose-dependent inhibition in the binding capacity of the estrogen receptor from calf uterus. Aprotinin inhibition was greater at 28 degrees C than at 4 degrees C and only occurred when conditions allowed the receptor transformation. When aprotinin was tested in the presence of transformation inhibitors, its effect was no longer seen. The binding capacity of the highly purified estrogen-binding subunit was similarly inhibited. PMID:2480113

  11. Beta-catenin in disease

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Sharada; Swaminathan, Uma; Nagamalini, BR; Krishnamurthy, Ashwini Balkuntla

    2016-01-01

    In continuation with the previous review on “β-catenin in health”, in this review we discuss the role of β-catenin in the pathogenesis of common oral lesions in the oral and maxillofacial region- oral potentially malignant disorders, their progression to oral squamous cell carcinoma, salivary gland tumors and odontogenic tumours. This review is based on a pubmed search of all the lesions included in the review. PMID:27601825

  12. Beta-catenin in disease.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sharada; Swaminathan, Uma; Nagamalini, B R; Krishnamurthy, Ashwini Balkuntla

    2016-01-01

    In continuation with the previous review on "β-catenin in health", in this review we discuss the role of β-catenin in the pathogenesis of common oral lesions in the oral and maxillofacial region- oral potentially malignant disorders, their progression to oral squamous cell carcinoma, salivary gland tumors and odontogenic tumours. This review is based on a pubmed search of all the lesions included in the review. PMID:27601825

  13. Inhibition by synthetic peptides from human IgG Fc of OKT4 binding and Fc receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Gaarde, W.A.; McClurg, M.R.; Hahn, G.S.; Plummer, J.M.

    1986-03-05

    Synthetic peptides from the Fc region of human IgG were tested for the ability to inhibit IgG rosette formation, /sup 125/I-IgG binding to Fc receptors on lymphocytes, and expression of the T4 cell determinant. The Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides inhibited IgG rosette formation and competitively inhibited both /sup 125/I-IgG binding to Fc receptors and OKT4 binding to the T4 cell determinant. Peptides containing D-amino acids did not inhibit IgG rosettes, OKT4 binding or /sup 125/I-IgG binding. OKT4 binding to T4 on MNC was inhibited by heat aggregated IgG but not by monomeric IgG. OKT3, OKT8 and OKT11 binding to their determinants was not altered by Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides, aggregated IgG or monomeric IgG. These results suggest that T4 antigen, Fc receptor for IgG and the Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptide binding site are in close proximity on the cell surface and when occupied by their respective ligands may sterically hinder binding to other sites. Alternatively, Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides may indirectly regulate cell surface expression of T4 and/or Fc receptors for IgG. These Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides inhibit the MLR, inhibit antigen induced T cell proliferation and reverse animal models of autoimmune disease. The immunoregulatory activities of these peptides may be related to their selective action on T4 helper/inducer lymphocytes expressing Fc receptors.

  14. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients. PMID:24253450

  15. A role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through inhibition of wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol intake induces bone loss remain unclear. In females, the skeletal response to ethanol varies depending on physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be a key event leading to skeletal toxicity. In the c...

  16. A crucial role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through Inhibition of Wnt / Beta-catenin Signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol intake induces bone loss remain largely unclear. Especially in females, skeletal response to ethanol may vary depending on the physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Nonetheless, ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be the key event le...

  17. A crucial role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through inhibition of wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Female skeletal responses to ethanol may vary depending on the physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Nonetheless, ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be the key event leading to skeletal toxicity. In the current study, we chronically infused EtOH-containing liquid diets ...

  18. Beta 1,4-oligoglucosides inhibit the binding of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kan, V L; Bennett, J E

    1991-05-01

    The binding of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to human monocytes is mediated by a barley beta-glucan-inhibitable receptor. The simplest linkages in this glucan are present in the disaccharides laminaribiose (beta 1,3) and cellobiose (beta 1,4). Although laminaribiose gave strong inhibition of conidial binding to monocytes, cellobiose and oligosaccharides with beta 1,4-linked glucose residues were more potent as specific inhibitors of this binding over similar concentrations. Increasing the number of beta 1,4-linked glucose residues led to greater inhibition of conidial binding by human monocytes. PMID:2019764

  19. Immunohistochemical expression of p53, Bcl-2, COX-2, C-erb-B2, EPO-R, beta-catenin, and E-cadherin in non tumoral gastric mucous membrane.

    PubMed

    Sereno, M; García-Cabezas, M A; De Castro, J; Cejas, P; Saenz, E Casado; Belda-Iniesta, C; Feijoo, J Barriuso; Larrauri, J; Nistal, M; Baron, M Gonzalez

    2006-01-01

    Different authors have investigated the immunohistochemical expression of some proteins in the adenocarcinoma of the stomach, including cell cycle regulators proteins like p53 and Bcl-2; growth factors (c-erb-B2 and EPO-R); angiogenesis-related markers such as COX-2 and cellular adhesion molecules (beta-catenin and E-cadherin). While these proteins have been studied in gastric adenocarcinoma, their immunophenotyping in non tumoral gastric mucous membrane remains unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the expression, function and behavior of these proteins in normal gastric mucous membrane to contribute to gain further knowledge on the significance of their loss or overexpression in malignant gastric tumors. PMID:17213037

  20. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  1. Norcantharidin inhibits Wnt signal pathway via promoter demethylation of WIF-1 in human non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junran; Zhang, Yaping; Hu, Xuming; Lv, Ran; Xiao, Dongju; Jiang, Li; Bao, Qi

    2015-05-01

    Wingless-type (Wnt) family of secreted glycoproteins is a group of signal molecules implicated in oncogenesis. Abnormal activation of Wnt signal pathway is associated with a variety of human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Wnt antagonists, such as the secreted frizzled-related protein (SFRP) family, Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) and cerberus, inhibit Wnt signal pathway by directly binding to Wnt molecules. Norcantharidin (NCTD) is known to possess anticancer activity but less nephrotoxicity than cantharidin. In this study, we found that NCTD inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, arrested cell cycle and suppressed cell invasion/migration in vitro. Additionally, Wnt signal pathway transcription was also suppressed. NCTD treatment blocked cytoplasmic translocation of beta-catenin into the nucleus. Alterations of apoptosis-related proteins, such as Bax, cleaved caspase-3 (pro-apoptotic) and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic), had been detected. Furthermore, the expression levels of WIF-1 and SFRP1 were significantly increased in NCTD-treated groups compared with negative control (NC) groups. Abnormal methylation was observed in NC groups, while NCTD treatment promoted WIF-1 demethylation. The present study revealed that NCTD activated WIF-1 via promoter demethylation, inhibiting the canonical Wnt signal pathway in NSCLC, which may present a new therapeutic target in vivo. PMID:25814287

  2. Sulfate inhibits ( sup 14 C)phosphonoformic acid binding to renal brush-border membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenhouse, H.S.; Lee, J. )

    1990-08-01

    To examine the specificity of the phosphonoformic acid (PFA) interaction with the Na(+)-dependent phosphate transporter of mouse renal brush-border membrane vesicles, we compared the effects of anions on Na(+)-dependent (14C)PFA binding and Na(+)-dependent phosphate transport. Inhibition of PFA binding was achieved by PFA (% control = 0 +/- 1), sulfate (15 +/- 2), arsenate (35 +/- 1), phosphate (59 +/- 2), and nitrate (68 +/- 4), whereas inhibition of phosphate transport was only apparent with phosphate (0 +/- 1), PFA (22 +/- 4), and arsenate (37 +/- 5). Succinate and gluconate had no effect on either Na(+)-dependent process. Under conditions where Na(+)-dependent PFA binding was maximally inhibited by phosphate (% control = 65 +/- 4), further inhibition could be achieved by sulfate (26 +/- 5%). Na(+)-dependent PFA binding was competitively inhibited by phosphate (apparent Ki = 8.9 +/- 1.2 mM) and noncompetitively inhibited by sulfate (apparent Ki = 2.6 +/- 0.5 mM). We found that PFA inhibited Na(+)-dependent sulfate transport (50% inhibition at 9 mM PFA) as well as Na(+)-dependent phosphate transport (50% inhibition at 0.5 mM PFA). We also examined the pH dependence of Na(+)-dependent PFA binding and Na(+)-dependent phosphate and sulfate transport. PFA binding was optimal at pH = 7.4, whereas phosphate transport increased with increasing pH, and sulfate transport increased with decreasing pH.

  3. Plasma binding proteins for platelet-derived growth factor that inhibit its binding to cell-surface receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Raines, E W; Bowen-Pope, D F; Ross, R

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the binding of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to plasma constituents inhibits the binding of PDGF to its cell-surface mitogen receptor. Approximately equivalent amounts of PDGF-binding activity were found in plasma from a number of different species known by radioreceptor assay to contain PDGF homologues in their clotted blood. Activation of the coagulation cascade did not significantly alter the PDGF-binding activity of the plasma components. Three molecular weight classes of plasma fractions that inhibit PDGF binding to its cell-surface receptor were defined by gel filtration: approximately equal to 40,000, 150,000, and greater than 500,000. Specific binding of 125I-labeled PDGF to the highest molecular weight plasma fraction could also be demonstrated by gel filtration. The binding of PDGF to these plasma components was reversible under conditions of low pH or with guanidine X HCl, and active PDGF could be recovered from the higher molecular weight fractions. Immunologic and functional evidence is presented that the highest molecular weight plasma fraction may be alpha 2-macroglobulin. A model is proposed in which the activity of PDGF released in vivo may be regulated by association with these plasma binding components and by high-affinity binding to cell-surface PDGF receptors. PMID:6203121

  4. Mithramycin inhibits SP1 binding and selectively inhibits transcriptional activity of the dihydrofolate reductase gene in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Blume, S W; Snyder, R C; Ray, R; Thomas, S; Koller, C A; Miller, D M

    1991-01-01

    The promoter of the human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene contains two consensus binding sites for the DNA binding protein Sp1. DNAse protection and gel mobility shift assays demonstrate binding of recombinant Sp1 to both decanucleotide Sp1 binding sequences which are located 49 and 14 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. The more distal of the two binding sites exhibits a somewhat higher affinity for Sp1. The G-C specific DNA binding drug, mithramycin, binds to both consensus sequences and prevents subsequent Sp1 binding. Promoter-dependent in vitro transcription of a DHFR template is selectively inhibited by mithramycin when compared to the human H2b histone gene. A similar effect is also noted in vivo. Mithramycin treatment of MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells containing an amplified DHFR gene induces selective inhibition of DHFR transcription initiation, resulting in a decline in DHFR mRNA level and enzyme activity. This selective inhibition of DHFR expression suggests that it is possible to modulate the overexpression of the DHFR gene in methotrexate resistant cells. Images PMID:1834700

  5. Fused protein domains inhibit DNA binding by LexA.

    PubMed Central

    Golemis, E A; Brent, R

    1992-01-01

    Many studies of transcription activation employ fusions of activation domains to DNA binding domains derived from the bacterial repressor LexA and the yeast activator GAL4. Such studies often implicitly assume that DNA binding by the chimeric proteins is equivalent to that of the protein donating the DNA binding moiety. To directly investigate this issue, we compared operator binding by a series of LexA-derivative proteins to operator binding by native LexA, by using both in vivo and in vitro assays. We show that operator binding by many proteins such as LexA-Myc, LexA-Fos, and LexA-Bicoid is severely impaired, while binding of other LexA-derivative proteins, such as those that carry bacterially encoded acidic sequences ("acid blobs"), is not. Our results also show that DNA binding by LexA derivatives that contain the LexA carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (amino acids 88 to 202) is considerably stronger than binding by fusions that lack it and that heterologous dimerization motifs cannot substitute for the LexA88-202 function. These results suggest the need to reevaluate some previous studies of activation that employed LexA derivatives and modifications to recent experimental approaches that use LexA and GAL4 derivatives to detect and study protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:1620111

  6. Sticky Plans: Inhibition and Binding during Serial-Task Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests substantial response-time costs associated with lag-2 repetitions of tasks within explicitly controlled task sequences [Koch, I., Philipp, A. M., Gade, M. (2006). Chunking in task sequences modulates task inhibition. "Psychological Science," 17, 346-350; Schneider, D. W. (2007). Task-set inhibition in chunked task…

  7. Water may inhibit oxygen binding in hemoprotein models

    PubMed Central

    Collman, James P.; Decréau, Richard A.; Dey, Abhishek; Yang, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Three distal imidazole pickets in a cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) model form a pocket hosting a cluster of water molecules. The cluster makes the ferrous heme low spin, and consequently the O2 binding slow. The nature of the rigid proximal imidazole tail favors a high spin/low spin cross-over. The O2 binding rate is enhanced either by removing the water, increasing the hydrophobicity of the gas binding pocket, or inserting a metal ion that coordinates to the 3 distal imidazole pickets. PMID:19246375

  8. Mechanism of P815 cell binding to endothelial cells and the inhibition of this binding by lymphokines

    SciTech Connect

    Antonia, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    A short term in vitro assay was developed for the study of tumor cell binding to endothelium. Monolayers of BPA endothelial cells were grown to confluence in 12-well tissue culture plates. /sup 51/Cr labeled P815 cells were then aliquoted onto the monolayers and incubated at 37/degree/C. Non adherent cells were washed off and the radioactivity bound to the monolayers was determined. The mechanisms of tumor cell binding to endothelial cells was studied. Specifically, evidence for cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) was sought. It was found that trypsin treatment of P815 mastocytoma cells resulted in a reduction in their ability to bind to monolayers of endothelial cells in vitro. The supernatant from trypsin treated P815 cells inhibited the binding of untreated P815 cells to endothelial cells. The binding was also found to be increased with the addition of divalent cations, with Mg/sup 2 +/ being more effective than Ca/sup 2 +/. Tunicamycin treatment of P815 cells resulted in a reduction of their ability to bind. The soluble monosaccharide N-acetylglucosamine, but not other monosaccharides commonly present in the carbohydrate regions of glycoproteins, inhibited the binding of P815 cells to endothelial cells. A sensitive assay for the detection of CAMs was developed.

  9. Competitive inhibition of (TH)dexamethasone binding to mammary glucocorticoid receptor by leupeptin

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, L.C.C.; Su, C.; Markland, F.S. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    The inhibitory effect of leupeptin on (TH)dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor from lactating goat mammary cytosol has been studied. Leupeptin (10 mM) caused a significant (about 35%) inhibition of (TH)dexamethasone binding to glucocorticoid receptor. Binding inhibition is further increased following filtration of unlabeled cytosolic receptor through a Bio-Gel A 0.5-m column. Binding inhibition was partially reversed by monothioglycerol at 10 mM concentration. A double reciprocal plot revealed that leupeptin appears to be a competitive inhibitor of (TH)dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor. Low salt sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed that the leupeptin-treated sample formed a slightly larger (approximately 9 S) receptor complex (leupeptin-free complex sediments at 8 S).

  10. KLF2 is downregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and inhibits the growth and migration of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dexiang; Dai, Yuedi; Cai, Yuankun; Suo, Tao; Liu, Han; Wang, Yueqi; Cheng, Zhijian; Liu, Houbao

    2016-03-01

    Members of the Kruppel-like factor (KLF) family have been considered as the tumor suppressors for their inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Dysregulation of KLF2, a member of KLF family, has been observed in various cancer types. However, its expression pattern and functions in the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are unknown. In this study, we examined the expression of KLF2 in PDAC clinical samples and evaluated the functions of KLF2 in the progression of PDAC. KLF2 is shown to be downregulated in PDAC clinical samples and overexpression of KLF2 inhibits the growth, migration, and metastasis of PDAC cancer cells. KLF2 interacts with beta-catenin and negatively regulates the beta-catenin/TCF signaling. Taken together, this study suggests the suppressive functions of KLF2 in PDAC. PMID:26449825

  11. Trichinella spiralis Paramyosin Binds Human Complement C1q and Inhibits Classical Complement Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ran; Zhao, Xi; Wang, Zixia; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Limei; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-Pmy) as a defense mechanism. Ts-Pmy is a functional protein with binding activity to human complement C8 and C9 and thus plays a role in evading the attack of the host’s immune system. In the present study, the binding activity of Ts-Pmy to human complement C1q and its ability to inhibit classical complement activation were investigated. Methods and Findings The binding of recombinant and natural Ts-Pmy to human C1q were determined by ELISA, Far Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Binding of recombinant Ts-Pmy (rTs-Pmy) to C1q inhibited C1q binding to IgM and consequently inhibited C3 deposition. The lysis of antibody-sensitized erythrocytes (EAs) elicited by the classical complement pathway was also inhibited in the presence of rTs-Pmy. In addition to inhibiting classical complement activation, rTs-Pmy also suppressed C1q binding to THP-1-derived macrophages, thereby reducing C1q-induced macrophages migration. Conclusion Our results suggest that T. spiralis paramyosin plays an important role in immune evasion by interfering with complement activation through binding to C1q in addition to C8 and C9. PMID:26720603

  12. Kinesin's light chains inhibit the head- and microtubule-binding activity of its tail.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yao Liang; Rice, Sarah E

    2010-06-29

    Kinesin-1 is a microtubule-based motor comprising two heavy chains (KHCs) and two light chains (KLCs). Motor activity is precisely regulated to avoid futile ATP consumption and to ensure proper intracellular localization of kinesin-1 and its cargoes. The KHC tail inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the enzymatic KHC heads, and the tail also binds microtubules. Here, we present a role for the KLCs in regulating both the head- and microtubule-binding activities of the kinesin-1 tail. We show that KLCs reduce the affinity of the head-tail interaction over tenfold and concomitantly repress the tail's regulatory activity. We also show that KLCs inhibit tail-microtubule binding by a separate mechanism. Inhibition of head-tail binding requires steric and electrostatic factors. Inhibition of tail-microtubule binding is largely electrostatic, pH dependent, and mediated partly by a highly negatively charged linker region between the KHC-interacting and cargo-binding domains of the KLCs. Our data support a model wherein KLCs promote activation of kinesin-1 for cargo transport by simultaneously suppressing tail-head and tail-microtubule interactions. KLC-mediated inhibition of tail-microtubule binding may also influence diffusional movement of kinesin-1 on microtubules, and kinesin-1's role in microtubule transport/sliding. PMID:20547877

  13. Kinesin’s light chains inhibit the head- and microtubule-binding activity of its tail

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yao Liang; Rice, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    Kinesin-1 is a microtubule-based motor comprising two heavy chains (KHCs) and two light chains (KLCs). Motor activity is precisely regulated to avoid futile ATP consumption and to ensure proper intracellular localization of kinesin-1 and its cargoes. The KHC tail inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the enzymatic KHC heads, and the tail also binds microtubules. Here, we present a role for the KLCs in regulating both the head- and microtubule-binding activities of the kinesin-1 tail. We show that KLCs reduce the affinity of the head-tail interaction over tenfold and concomitantly repress the tail’s regulatory activity. We also show that KLCs inhibit tail-microtubule binding by a separate mechanism. Inhibition of head-tail binding requires steric and electrostatic factors. Inhibition of tail-microtubule binding is largely electrostatic, pH dependent, and mediated partly by a highly negatively charged linker region between the KHC-interacting and cargo-binding domains of the KLCs. Our data support a model wherein KLCs promote activation of kinesin-1 for cargo transport by simultaneously suppressing tail-head and tail-microtubule interactions. KLC-mediated inhibition of tail-microtubule binding may also influence diffusional movement of kinesin-1 on microtubules, and kinesin-1’s role in microtubule transport/sliding. PMID:20547877

  14. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Chun, Hong Sung; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Do Kyung

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.

  15. Streptococcal IgA-binding proteins bind in the Calpha 2-Calpha 3 interdomain region and inhibit binding of IgA to human CD89.

    PubMed

    Pleass, R J; Areschoug, T; Lindahl, G; Woof, J M

    2001-03-16

    Certain pathogenic bacteria express surface proteins that bind to the Fc part of human IgA or IgG. These bacterial proteins are important as immunochemical tools and model systems, but their biological function is still unclear. Here, we describe studies of three streptococcal proteins that bind IgA: the Sir22 and Arp4 proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes and the unrelated beta protein of group B streptococcus. Analysis of IgA domain swap and point mutants indicated that two loops at the Calpha2/Calpha3 domain interface are critical for binding of the streptococcal proteins. This region is also used in binding the human IgA receptor CD89, an important mediator of IgA effector function. In agreement with this finding, the three IgA-binding proteins and a 50-residue IgA-binding peptide derived from Sir22 blocked the ability of IgA to bind CD89. Further, the Arp4 protein inhibited the ability of IgA to trigger a neutrophil respiratory burst via CD89. Thus, we have identified residues on IgA-Fc that play a key role in binding of different streptococcal IgA-binding proteins, and we have identified a mechanism by which a bacterial IgA-binding protein may interfere with IgA effector function. PMID:11096107

  16. Addition of lysophospholipids with large head groups to cells inhibits Shiga toxin binding.

    PubMed

    Ailte, Ieva; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Bergan, Jonas; Kvalvaag, Audun Sverre; Myrann, Anne-Grethe; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), an AB5 toxin, binds specifically to the neutral glycosphingolipid Gb3 at the cell surface before being transported into cells. We here demonstrate that addition of conical lysophospholipids (LPLs) with large head groups inhibit Stx binding to cells whereas LPLs with small head groups do not. Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI 18:0), the most efficient LPL with the largest head group, was selected for in-depth investigations to study how the binding of Stx is regulated. We show that the inhibition of Stx binding by LPI is reversible and possibly regulated by cholesterol since addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD) reversed the ability of LPI to inhibit binding. LPI-induced inhibition of Stx binding is independent of signalling and membrane turnover as it occurs in fixed cells as well as after depletion of cellular ATP. Furthermore, data obtained with fluorescent membrane dyes suggest that LPI treatment has a direct effect on plasma membrane lipid packing with shift towards a liquid disordered phase in the outer leaflet, while lysophosphoethanolamine (LPE), which has a small head group, does not. In conclusion, our data show that cellular treatment with conical LPLs with large head groups changes intrinsic properties of the plasma membrane and modulates Stx binding to Gb3. PMID:27458147

  17. IL-3 specifically inhibits GM-CSF binding to the higher affinity receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taketazu, F.; Chiba, S.; Shibuya, K.; Kuwaki, T.; Tsumura, H.; Miyazono, K.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F. )

    1991-02-01

    The inhibition of binding between human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and its receptor by human interleukin-3 (IL-3) was observed in myelogenous leukemia cell line KG-1 which bore the receptors both for GM-CSF and IL-3. In contrast, this phenomenon was not observed in histiocytic lymphoma cell line U-937 or in gastric carcinoma cell line KATO III, both of which have apparent GM-CSF receptor but an undetectable IL-3 receptor. In KG-1 cells, the cross-inhibition was preferentially observed when the binding of GM-CSF was performed under the high-affinity binding condition; i.e., a low concentration of 125I-GM-CSF was incubated. Scatchard analysis of 125I-GM-CSF binding to KG-1 cells in the absence and in the presence of unlabeled IL-3 demonstrated that IL-3 inhibited GM-CSF binding to the higher-affinity component of GM-CSF receptor on KG-1 cells. Moreover, a chemical cross-linking study has revealed that the cross-inhibition of the GM-CSF binding observed in KG-1 cells is specific for the beta-chain, Mr 135,000 binding protein which has been identified as a component forming the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor existing specifically on hemopoietic cells.

  18. Addition of lysophospholipids with large head groups to cells inhibits Shiga toxin binding

    PubMed Central

    Ailte, Ieva; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Bergan, Jonas; Kvalvaag, Audun Sverre; Myrann, Anne-Grethe; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), an AB5 toxin, binds specifically to the neutral glycosphingolipid Gb3 at the cell surface before being transported into cells. We here demonstrate that addition of conical lysophospholipids (LPLs) with large head groups inhibit Stx binding to cells whereas LPLs with small head groups do not. Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI 18:0), the most efficient LPL with the largest head group, was selected for in-depth investigations to study how the binding of Stx is regulated. We show that the inhibition of Stx binding by LPI is reversible and possibly regulated by cholesterol since addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD) reversed the ability of LPI to inhibit binding. LPI-induced inhibition of Stx binding is independent of signalling and membrane turnover as it occurs in fixed cells as well as after depletion of cellular ATP. Furthermore, data obtained with fluorescent membrane dyes suggest that LPI treatment has a direct effect on plasma membrane lipid packing with shift towards a liquid disordered phase in the outer leaflet, while lysophosphoethanolamine (LPE), which has a small head group, does not. In conclusion, our data show that cellular treatment with conical LPLs with large head groups changes intrinsic properties of the plasma membrane and modulates Stx binding to Gb3. PMID:27458147

  19. RNAs nonspecifically inhibit RNA polymerase II by preventing binding to the DNA template

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Dave A.; Kaplan, Craig D.; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Murakami, Kenji; Andrews, Philip C.; Engelke, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Many RNAs are known to act as regulators of transcription in eukaryotes, including certain small RNAs that directly inhibit RNA polymerases both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We have examined the potential for a variety of RNAs to directly inhibit transcription by yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and find that unstructured RNAs are potent inhibitors of purified yeast Pol II. Inhibition by RNA is achieved by blocking binding of the DNA template and requires binding of the RNA to Pol II prior to open complex formation. RNA is not able to displace a DNA template that is already stably bound to Pol II, nor can RNA inhibit elongating Pol II. Unstructured RNAs are more potent inhibitors than highly structured RNAs and can also block specific transcription initiation in the presence of basal transcription factors. Crosslinking studies with ultraviolet light show that unstructured RNA is most closely associated with the two large subunits of Pol II that comprise the template binding cleft, but the RNA has contacts in a basic residue channel behind the back wall of the active site. These results are distinct from previous observations of specific inhibition by small, structured RNAs in that they demonstrate a sensitivity of the holoenzyme to inhibition by unstructured RNA products that bind to a surface outside the DNA cleft. These results are discussed in terms of the need to prevent inhibition by RNAs, either though sequestration of nascent RNA or preemptive interaction of Pol II with the DNA template. PMID:24614752

  20. Inhibition of benzodiazepine binding in vitro by amentoflavone, a constituent of various species of Hypericum.

    PubMed

    Baureithel, K H; Büter, K B; Engesser, A; Burkard, W; Schaffner, W

    1997-06-01

    Flower extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Hypericum hirsutum, Hypericum patulum and Hypericum olympicum efficiently inhibited binding of [3H]flumazenil to rat brain benzodiazepine binding sites of the GABAA-receptor in vitro with IC50 values of 6.83, 6.97, 13.2 and 6.14 micrograms/ml, respectively. Single constituents of the extracts like hypericin, the flavones quercetin and luteolin, the glycosylated flavonoides rutin, hyperoside and quercitrin and the biflavone 13, II8-biapigenin did not inhibit binding up to concentrations of 1 microM. In contrast, amentoflavone revealed an IC50 = 14.9 +/- 1.9 nM on benzodiazepine binding in vitro. Comparative HPLC analyses of hypericin and amentoflavone in extracts of different Hypericum species revealed a possible correlation between the amentoflavone concentration and the inhibition of flumazenil binding. For hypericin no such correlation was observed. Our experimental data demonstrate that amentoflavone, in contrast to hypericin, presents a very active compound with regard to the inhibition of [3H]-flumazenil binding in vitro and thus might be involved in the antidepressant effects of Hypericum perforatum extracts. PMID:9204773

  1. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  2. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  3. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  4. A small molecule directly inhibits the p53 transactivation domain from binding to replication protein A

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Carnes, Katie A.; Soto, Patricia; Liu, Shengqin; Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Oakley, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), essential for DNA replication, repair and DNA damage signalling, possesses six ssDNA-binding domains (DBDs), including DBD-F on the N-terminus of the largest subunit, RPA70. This domain functions as a binding site for p53 and other DNA damage and repair proteins that contain amphipathic alpha helical domains. Here, we demonstrate direct binding of both ssDNA and the transactivation domain 2 of p53 (p53TAD2) to DBD-F, as well as DBD-F-directed dsDNA strand separation by RPA, all of which are inhibited by fumaropimaric acid (FPA). FPA binds directly to RPA, resulting in a conformational shift as determined through quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in full length RPA. Structural analogues of FPA provide insight on chemical properties that are required for inhibition. Finally, we confirm the inability of RPA possessing R41E and R43E mutations to bind to p53, destabilize dsDNA and quench tryptophan fluorescence by FPA, suggesting that protein binding, DNA modulation and inhibitor binding all occur within the same site on DBD-F. The disruption of p53–RPA interactions by FPA may disturb the regulatory functions of p53 and RPA, thereby inhibiting cellular pathways that control the cell cycle and maintain the integrity of the human genome. PMID:23267009

  5. A nucleolar localizing Rev binding element inhibits HIV replication

    PubMed Central

    Michienzi, Alessandro; De Angelis, Fernanda G; Bozzoni, Irene; Rossi, John J

    2006-01-01

    The Rev protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) facilitates the nuclear export of intron containing viral mRNAs allowing formation of infectious virions. Rev traffics through the nucleolus and shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Rev multimerization and interaction with the export protein CRM1 takes place in the nucleolus. To test the importance of Rev nucleolar trafficking in the HIV-1 replication cycle, we created a nucleolar localizing Rev Response Element (RRE) decoy and tested this for its anti-HIV activity. The RRE decoy provided marked inhibition of HIV-1 replication in both the CEM T-cell line and in primary CD34+ derived monocytes. These results demonstrate that titration of Rev in the nucleolus impairs HIV-1 replication and supports a functional role for Rev trafficking in this sub-cellular compartment. PMID:16712721

  6. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by a preS1-binding Peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ming; He, Yonggang; Wan, Yanmin; Bai, Weiya; Tao, Shuai; Ren, Yanqin; Zhang, Xinxin; Xu, Jianqing; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Junqi; Hu, Kanghong; Xie, Youhua

    2016-01-01

    Entry inhibitors are promising novel antivirals against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The existing potential entry inhibitors have targeted the cellular receptor(s). In this study, we aim to develop the first entry inhibitor that inhibits HBV infection via targeting viral particles. The preS1 segment of the large envelope glycoprotein of HBV is essential for virion attachment and infection. Previously, we obtained a preS1-binding short peptide B10 by screening a phage display peptide library using the N-terminal half of preS1 (residues 1 to 60, genotype C). We report here that by means of concatenation of B10, we identified a quadruple concatemer 4B10 that displayed a markedly increased preS1-binding activity. The main binding site of 4B10 in preS1 was mapped to the receptor binding enhancing region. 4B10 blocked HBV attachment to hepatic cells and inhibited HBV infection of primary human and tupaia hepatocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. The 4B10-mediated inhibition of HBV infection is specific as it did not inhibit the infection of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus or human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Moreover, 4B10 showed no binding activity to hepatic cells. In conclusion, we have identified 4B10 as a promising candidate for a novel class of HBV entry inhibitors. PMID:27384014

  7. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by a preS1-binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ming; He, Yonggang; Wan, Yanmin; Bai, Weiya; Tao, Shuai; Ren, Yanqin; Zhang, Xinxin; Xu, Jianqing; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Junqi; Hu, Kanghong; Xie, Youhua

    2016-01-01

    Entry inhibitors are promising novel antivirals against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The existing potential entry inhibitors have targeted the cellular receptor(s). In this study, we aim to develop the first entry inhibitor that inhibits HBV infection via targeting viral particles. The preS1 segment of the large envelope glycoprotein of HBV is essential for virion attachment and infection. Previously, we obtained a preS1-binding short peptide B10 by screening a phage display peptide library using the N-terminal half of preS1 (residues 1 to 60, genotype C). We report here that by means of concatenation of B10, we identified a quadruple concatemer 4B10 that displayed a markedly increased preS1-binding activity. The main binding site of 4B10 in preS1 was mapped to the receptor binding enhancing region. 4B10 blocked HBV attachment to hepatic cells and inhibited HBV infection of primary human and tupaia hepatocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. The 4B10-mediated inhibition of HBV infection is specific as it did not inhibit the infection of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus or human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Moreover, 4B10 showed no binding activity to hepatic cells. In conclusion, we have identified 4B10 as a promising candidate for a novel class of HBV entry inhibitors. PMID:27384014

  8. Lipoamide channel-binding sulfonamides selectively inhibit mycobacterial lipoamide dehydrogenase†,#

    PubMed Central

    Bryk, Ruslana; Arango, Nancy; Maksymiuk, Christina; Balakrishnan, Anand; Wu, Ying-Ta; Wong, Chi-Huey; Masquelin, Thierry; Hipskind, Philip; Lima, Christopher D.; Nathan, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health emergency that calls for treatment regimens directed at new targets. Here we explored lipoamide dehydrogenase, a metabolic and detoxifying enzyme in Mycobacterium tuberculosis whose deletion drastically impairs Mtb's ability to establish infection in the mouse. Upon screening over 1,600,000 compounds, we identified N-methylpyridine 3-sulfonamides as potent and species-selective inhibitors of Mtb Lpd, affording over 1,000-fold selectivity versus the human homolog. The sulfonamides demonstrated low nanomolar affinity and bound at the lipoamide channel in an Lpd-inhibitor co-crystal. Their selectivity could be attributed, at least partially, to hydrogen bonding of the sulfonamide amide oxygen with the species-variant Arg93 in the lipoamide channel. Although potent and selective, the sulfonamides did not enter mycobacteria, as determined by their inability to accumulate in Mtb to effective levels and produce changes in intracellular metabolites. This work demonstrates that high potency and selectivity can be achieved at the lipoamide binding site of Mtb Lpd, a site different from the NAD+/NADH pocket targeted by previously reported species-selective triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyl inhibitors. PMID:24251446

  9. Cyclosporine A and PSC833 inhibit ABCA1 function via direct binding.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kohjiro; Maeda, Minami; Mañucat, Noralyn B; Ueda, Kazumitsu

    2013-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1) plays a key role in generating high-density lipoprotein (HDL). However, the detailed mechanism of HDL formation remains unclear; in order to reveal it, chemicals that specifically block each step of HDL formation would be useful. Cyclosporine A inhibits ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, but it is not clear whether this is mediated via inhibition of calcineurin. We analyzed the effects of cyclosporine A and related compounds on ABCA1 function in BHK/ABCA1 cells. Cyclosporine A, FK506, and pimecrolimus inhibited ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux in a concentration-dependent manner, with IC(50) of 7.6, 13.6, and 7.0μM, respectively. An mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin also inhibited ABCA1, with IC(50) of 18.8μM. The primary targets for these drugs were inhibited at much lower concentrations in BHK/ABCA1 cells, suggesting that they were not involved. Binding of [(3)H] cyclosporine A to purified ABCA1 could be clearly detected. Furthermore, a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine, PSC833, inhibited ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux with IC(50) of 1.9μM, and efficiently competed with [(3)H] cyclosporine A binding to ABCA1. These results indicate that cyclosporine A and PSC833 inhibit ABCA1 via direct binding, and that the ABCA1 inhibitor PSC833 is an excellent candidate for further investigations of the detailed mechanisms underlying formation of HDL. PMID:23153588

  10. Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated PDE1 regulates the beta-catenin/TCF signaling through PP2A B56 gamma subunit in proliferating vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kye-Im; Jono, Hirofumi; Miller, Clint L.; Cai, Yujun; Lim, Soyeon; Liu, Xuan; Gao, Pingjin; Abe, Jun-Ichi; Li, Jian-Dong; Yan, Chen

    2010-01-01

    The phenotypic change of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), from a “contractile” phenotype to “synthetic” phenotype, is crucial for pathogenic vascular remodeling in vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Ca2+-calmodulin stimulated phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) isozymes, including PDE1A and PDE1C, play integral roles in regulating the proliferation of synthetic VSMCs. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain unknown. In this study, we explore the role and mechanism of PDE1 isoforms in regulating β-catenin/TCF signaling in VSMCs, a pathway important for vascular remodeling through promoting VSMC growth and survival. We found that inhibition of PDE1 activity markedly attenuated β-catenin/TCF signaling by down-regulating β-catenin protein. The effect of PDE1 inhibition on β-catenin protein reduction is exerted via promoting GSK3β activation, β-catenin phosphorylation, and subsequent β-catenin protein degradation. Moreover, PDE1 inhibition specifically upregulated phosphatase PP2A B56γ subunit gene expression, which is responsible for the effects of PDE1 inhibition on GSK3β and β-catenin/TCF signaling. Further more, the effect of PDE1 inhibition on β-catenin was specifically mediated by PDE1A but not PDE1C isozyme. Interestingly, in synthetic VSMCs PP2A B56γ, phospho-GSK3β, and phospho-β-catenin were all found in the nucleus, suggesting that PDE1A regulates nuclear β-catenin protein stability through the nuclear PP2A-GSK3β-β-catenin signaling axis. Taken together these findings provide direct evidence for the first time that PP2A B56γ is a critical mediator for PDE1A in the regulation of β-catenin signaling in proliferating VSMCs. PMID:21078118

  11. Inhibition of mu and delta opioid receptor ligand binding by the peptide aldehyde protease inhibitor, leupeptin.

    PubMed

    Christoffers, Keith H; Khokhar, Arshia; Chaturvedi, Kirti; Howells, Richard D

    2002-04-15

    We reported recently that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in agonist-induced down regulation of mu and delta opioid receptors [J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001) 12345]. While evaluating the effects of various protease inhibitors on agonist-induced opioid receptor down regulation, we observed that while the peptide aldehyde, leupeptin (acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Arginal), did not affect agonist-induced down regulation, leupeptin at submillimolar concentrations directly inhibited radioligand binding to opioid receptors. In this study, the inhibitory activity of leupeptin on radioligand binding was characterized utilizing human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell lines expressing transfected mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. The rank order of potency for leupeptin inhibition of [3H]bremazocine binding to opioid receptors was mu > delta > kappa. In contrast to the effect of leupeptin, the peptide aldehyde proteasome inhibitor, MG 132 (carbobenzoxy-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucinal), had significantly less effect on bremazocine binding to mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. We propose that leupeptin inhibits ligand binding by reacting reversibly with essential sulfhydryl groups that are necessary for high-affinity ligand/receptor interactions. PMID:11853866

  12. Competitive inhibition of LDL binding and uptake by HDL in aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.J.; Miguel, R.; Graham, D. )

    1990-09-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) may inhibit the binding and cellular uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as one means of regulating the delivery of exogenous cholesterol to nonhepatic tissues. This may play an important role in atherogenesis, by altering lipid metabolism in cells of the arterial wall. To verify and better characterize this effect, endothelial cells were harvested from bovine aorta and maintained in tissue culture. Following initial preincubation in lipid-deficient culture media, these cells were incubated for 2 hr at 4 degrees C in media containing 125I-LDL (10 micrograms protein/ml) and varying concentrations of either HDL (0-400 micrograms protein/ml) or comparable amounts of Apoprotein A (Apo A), the major protein component of HDL. Intracellular and trypsin-released counts were assayed separately, as a measurement of cellular uptake and membrane bound LDL, respectively. Results of this study indicated an inhibition of LDL binding and uptake by HDL (P less than 0.005, ANOVA). A similar inhibition was found with Apo A alone (P less than 0.005). When identical studies were performed using 125I-Apoprotein B, the protein component of LDL, and Apo A, the latter was found to inhibit the binding of Apo B to the same extent (P less than 0.0006). These results indicate that HDL does inhibit LDL binding and uptake by bovine aortic endothelial cells and that, because this effect is seen equally with only the protein component of these lipoprotein particles, it is most likely due to competitive binding at the receptor level rather than to stearic hindrance or an alteration of the cell membrane.

  13. Yeast mannans inhibit binding and phagocytosis of zymosan by mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, S S; Nelson, R S; Silverstein, S C

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the effects of various mannans, glycoproteins, oligosaccharides, monosaccharides, and sugar phosphates on the binding and phagocytosis of yeast cell walls (zymosan) by mouse peritoneal macrophages. A phosphonomannan (PO(4):mannose ratio = 1:8:6) from kloeckera brevis was the most potent inhibitor tested; it inhibited binding and phagocytosis by 50 percent at concentrations of approximately 3-5 mug/ml and 10 mug/ml, respectively. Removal of the phosphate from this mannan by mild acid and alkaline phosphatase treatment did not appreciably reduce its capacity to inhibit zymosan phagocytosis. The mannan from saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant LB301 inhibits phagocytosis by 50 percent at 0.3 mg/ml, and a neutral exocellular glucomannan from pichia pinus inhibited phagocytosis by 50 percent at 1 mg/ml. Cell wall mannans from wild type S. cervisiae X2180, its mnn2 mutant which contains mannan with predominantly 1(arrow)6- linked mannose residues, yeast exocellular mannans and O-phosphonomannans were less efficient inhibitors requiring concentrations of 1-5 mg/ml to achieve 50 percent reduction in phagocytosis. Horseradish peroxidase, which contains high-mannose type oligosaccharides, was also inhibitory. Mannan is a specific inhibitor of zymosan binding and phagocytosis. The binding and ingestion of zymosan but not of IgG- or complement-coated erythrocytes can be obliterated by plating macrophages on substrates coated with poly-L-lysin (PLL)-mannan. Zymosan uptake was completely abolished by trypsin treatment of the macrophages and reduced by 50-60 percent in the presence of 10 mM EGTA. Pretreatment of the macrophages with chloroquine inhibited zymosan binding and ingestion. These results support the proposal that the macrophage mannose/N-acetylglucosamine receptor (P. Stahl, J.S. Rodman, M.J. Miller, and P.H. Schlesinger, 1978, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75:1399-1403, mediates the phagocytosis of zymosan particles. PMID:6298248

  14. Inhibition of HIV derived lentiviral production by TAR RNA binding domain of TAT protein

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Michael Y; Zhang, Jiying; He, Yukai

    2005-01-01

    Background A critical step in the production of new HIV virions involves the TAT protein binding to the TAR element. The TAT protein contains in close proximity its TAR RNA binding domain and protein transduction domain (PTD). The PTD domain of TAT has been identified as being instrumental in the protein's ability to cross mammalian cell and nuclear membranes. All together, this information led us to form the hypothesis that a protein containing the TAR RNA binding domain could compete with the native full length TAT protein and effectively block the TAR RNA binding site in transduced HIV infected cells. Results We synthesized a short peptide named Tat-P, which contained the TAR RNA binding and PTD domains to examine whether the peptide has the potential of inhibiting TAT dependent HIV replication. We investigated the inhibiting effects of Tat-P in vitro using a HIV derived lentiviral vector model. We found that the TAT PTD domain not only efficiently transduced test cells, but also effectively inhibited the production of lentiviral particles in a TAT dependent manner. These results were also supported by data derived from the TAT activated LTR-luciferase expression model and RNA binding assays. Conclusion Tat-P may become part of a category of anti-HIV drugs that competes with full length TAT proteins to inhibit HIV replication. In addition, this study indicates that the HIV derived lentiviral vector system is a safe and reliable screening method for anti-HIV drugs, especially for those targeting the interaction of TAT and TAR RNAs. PMID:16293193

  15. Severe MgADP Inhibition of Bacillus subtilis F1-ATPase Is Not Due to the Absence of Nucleotide Binding to the Noncatalytic Nucleotide Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase from Bacillus subtilis (BF1) is severely suppressed by the MgADP inhibition. Here, we have tested if this is due to the loss of nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic site that is required for the activation. Measurements with a tryptophan mutant of BF1 indicated that the noncatalytic sites could bind ATP normally. Furthermore, the mutant BF1 that cannot bind ATP to the noncatalytic sites showed much lower ATPase activity. It was concluded that the cause of strong MgADP inhibition of BF1 is not the weak nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic sites but the other steps required for the activation. PMID:25244289

  16. A poxvirus protein that binds to and inactivates IL-18, and inhibits NK cell response.

    PubMed

    Born, T L; Morrison, L A; Esteban, D J; VandenBos, T; Thebeau, L G; Chen, N; Spriggs, M K; Sims, J E; Buller, R M

    2000-03-15

    IL-18 induces IFN-gamma and NK cell cytotoxicity, making it a logical target for viral antagonism of host defense. We demonstrate that the ectromelia poxvirus p13 protein, bearing homology to the mammalian IL-18 binding protein, binds IL-18, and inhibits its activity in vitro. Binding of IL-18 to the viral p13 protein was compared with binding to the cellular IL-18R. The dissociation constant of p13 for murine IL-18 is 5 nM, compared with 0.2 nM for the cellular receptor heterodimer. Mice infected with a p13 deletion mutant of ectromelia virus had elevated cytotoxicity for YAC-1 tumor cell targets compared with control animals. Additionally, the p13 deletion mutant virus exhibited decreased levels of infectivity. Our data suggest that inactivation of IL-18, and subsequent impairment of NK cell cytotoxicity, may be one mechanism by which ectromelia evades the host immune response. PMID:10706717

  17. Partial MHC class II constructs inhibit MIF/CD74 binding and downstream effects.

    PubMed

    Benedek, Gil; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Andrew, Shayne; Leng, Lin; Burrows, Gregory G; Bourdette, Dennis; Offner, Halina; Bucala, Richard; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2013-05-01

    MIF and its receptor, CD74, are pivotal regulators of the immune system. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that partial MHC class II constructs comprised of linked β1α1 domains with covalently attached antigenic peptides (also referred to as recombinant T-cell receptor ligands - RTLs) can inhibit MIF activity by not only blocking the binding of rhMIF to immunopurified CD74, but also downregulating CD74 cell-surface expression. This bifunctional inhibition of MIF/CD74 interactions blocked downstream MIF effects, including enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, anti-apoptotic activity, and inhibition of random migration that all contribute to the reversal of clinical and histological signs of EAE. Moreover, we demonstrate that enhanced CD74 cell-surface expression on monocytes in mice with EAE and subjects with multiple sclerosis can be downregulated by humanized RTLs, resulting in reduced MIF binding to the cells. Thus, binding of partial MHC complexes to CD74 blocks both the accessibility and availability of CD74 for MIF binding and downstream inflammatory activity. PMID:23576302

  18. Partial MHC class II constructs inhibit MIF/CD74 binding and downstream effects

    PubMed Central

    Benedek, Gil; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Andrew, Shayne; Leng, Lin; Burrows, Gregory G.; Bourdette, Dennis; Offner, Halina; Bucala, Richard; Vandenbark, Arthur A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and its receptor, CD74, are pivotal regulators of the immune system. Here we demonstrate for the first time that partial MHC class II constructs comprised of linked β1α1 domains with covalently attached antigenic peptides (also referred to as recombinant T-cell receptor ligands - RTLs) can inhibit MIF activity by not only blocking the binding of rhMIF to immunopurified CD74, but also down-regulating CD74 cell-surface expression. This bi-functional inhibition of MIF/CD74 interactions blocked downstream MIF effects, including enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, anti-apoptotic activity and inhibition of random migration that all contribute to the reversal of clinical and histological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Moreover, we demonstrate that enhanced CD74 cell surface expression on monocytes in mice with EAE and subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS) can be down-regulated by humanized RTLs, resulting in reduced MIF binding to the cells. Thus, binding of partial MHC complexes to CD74 blocks both the accessibility and availability of CD74 for MIF binding and downstream inflammatory activity. PMID:23576302

  19. Lucanthone and its derivative hycanthone inhibit apurinic endonuclease-1 (APE1) by direct protein binding

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, M.; Naidu, M.; Agarwal, R.; Pena, L.A.; Cunha, L.; Mezei, M.; Shen, M.; Wilson, D.M.; Liu, Y.; Sanchez, Z.; Chaudhary, P.; Wilson, S.H.; Waring, M.J.

    2011-09-15

    Lucanthone and hycanthone are thioxanthenone DNA intercalators used in the 1980s as antitumor agents. Lucanthone is in Phase I clinical trial, whereas hycanthone was pulled out of Phase II trials. Their potential mechanism of action includes DNA intercalation, inhibition of nucleic acid biosyntheses, and inhibition of enzymes like topoisomerases and the dual function base excision repair enzyme apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). Lucanthone inhibits the endonuclease activity of APE1, without affecting its redox activity. Our goal was to decipher the precise mechanism of APE1 inhibition as a prerequisite towards development of improved therapeutics that can counteract higher APE1 activity often seen in tumors. The IC{sub 50} values for inhibition of APE1 incision of depurinated plasmid DNA by lucanthone and hycanthone were 5 {mu}M and 80 nM, respectively. The K{sub D} values (affinity constants) for APE1, as determined by BIACORE binding studies, were 89 nM for lucanthone/10 nM for hycanthone. APE1 structures reveal a hydrophobic pocket where hydrophobic small molecules like thioxanthenones can bind, and our modeling studies confirmed such docking. Circular dichroism spectra uncovered change in the helical structure of APE1 in the presence of lucanthone/hycanthone, and notably, this effect was decreased (Phe266Ala or Phe266Cys or Trp280Leu) or abolished (Phe266Ala/Trp280Ala) when hydrophobic site mutants were employed. Reduced inhibition by lucanthone of the diminished endonuclease activity of hydrophobic mutant proteins (as compared to wild type APE1) supports that binding of lucanthone to the hydrophobic pocket dictates APE1 inhibition. The DNA binding capacity of APE1 was marginally inhibited by lucanthone, and not at all by hycanthone, supporting our hypothesis that thioxanthenones inhibit APE1, predominantly, by direct interaction. Finally, lucanthone-induced degradation was drastically reduced in the presence of short and long lived free radical scavengers, e

  20. E1A inhibits transforming growth factor-beta signaling through binding to Smad proteins.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, A; Hanai, J; Imamura, T; Miyazono, K; Kawabata, M

    1999-10-01

    Smads form a recently identified family of proteins that mediate intracellular signaling of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta superfamily. Smads bind to DNA and act as transcriptional regulators. Smads interact with a variety of transcription factors, and the interaction is likely to determine the target specificity of gene induction. Smads also associate with transcriptional coactivators such as p300 and CBP. E1A, an adenoviral oncoprotein, inhibits TGF-beta-induced transactivation, and the ability of E1A to bind p300/CBP is required for the inhibition. Here we determined the Smad interaction domain (SID) in p300 and found that two adjacent regions are required for the interaction. One of the regions is the C/H3 domain conserved between p300 and CBP, and the other is a nonconserved region. p300 mutants containing SID inhibit transactivation by TGF-beta in a dose-dependent manner. E1A inhibits the interaction of Smad3 with a p300 mutant that contains SID but lacks the E1A binding domain. We found that E1A interacts specifically with receptor-regulated Smads, suggesting a novel mechanism whereby E1A antagonizes TGF-beta signaling. PMID:10497242

  1. Rat and human colonic mucins bind to and inhibit adherence lectin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K; Petri, W A; Innes, D J; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Establishment of adherence by Entamoeba histolytica is mediated by a 170-kD Gal/GalNAc inhibitable lectin and is required for cytolysis and phagocytosis of mammalian target cells. We studied the biochemical mechanisms of the in vitro interaction between rat and human colonic mucins and axenic E. histolytica trophozoites. Crude mucus prevented amebic adherence to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by up to 70%. Purification of the colonic mucins by Sepharose 4B chromatography, nuclease digestion, and cesium chloride gradient centrifugation resulted in a 1,000-fold enrichment of the inhibitory mucins. Purified rat mucin inhibited amebic adherence to and cytolysis of homologous rat colonic epithelial cells. Oxidation and enzymatic cleavage of rat mucin Gal and GalNAc residues completely abrogated mucin inhibition of amebic adherence. The binding of rat 125I-mucin to amebae was galactose specific, saturable, reversible, and pH dependent. A monoclonal antibody specific for the 170-kD amebic Gal/GalNAc lectin completely inhibited the binding of rat 125I-mucin. Rat mucin bound to Affigel affinity purified the amebic lectin from conditioned medium. Colonic mucin glycoproteins act as an important host defense by binding to the parasite's adherence lectin, thus preventing amebic attachment to and cytolysis of host epithelial cells. Images PMID:2890655

  2. Ebselen Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Helicase Binding to Nucleic Acid and Prevents Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is both a protease, which cleaves viral and host proteins, and a helicase that separates nucleic acid strands, using ATP hydrolysis to fuel the reaction. Many antiviral drugs, and compounds in clinical trials, target the NS3 protease, but few helicase inhibitors that function as antivirals have been reported. This study focuses on the analysis of the mechanism by which ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3-one), a compound previously shown to be a HCV antiviral agent, inhibits the NS3 helicase. Ebselen inhibited the abilities of NS3 to unwind nucleic acids, to bind nucleic acids, and to hydrolyze ATP, and about 1 μM ebselen was sufficient to inhibit each of these activities by 50%. However, ebselen had no effect on the activity of the NS3 protease, even at 100 times higher ebselen concentrations. At concentrations below 10 μM, the ability of ebselen to inhibit HCV helicase was reversible, but prolonged incubation of HCV helicase with higher ebselen concentrations led to irreversible inhibition and the formation of covalent adducts between ebselen and all 14 cysteines present in HCV helicase. Ebselen analogues with sulfur replacing the selenium were just as potent HCV helicase inhibitors as ebselen, but the length of the linker between the phenyl and benzisoselenazol rings was critical. Modifications of the phenyl ring also affected compound potency over 30-fold, and ebselen was a far more potent helicase inhibitor than other, structurally unrelated, thiol-modifying agents. Ebselen analogues were also more effective antiviral agents, and they were less toxic to hepatocytes than ebselen. Although the above structure–activity relationship studies suggest that ebselen targets a specific site on NS3, we were unable to confirm binding to either the NS3 ATP binding site or nucleic acid binding cleft by examining the effects of ebselen on NS3 proteins lacking key cysteines. PMID:25126694

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate competitively inhibits phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, A.; Cauhan, V.P.S.; Deshmukh, D.S.; Brokerhoff, H. )

    1989-06-13

    Calcium phospholipid dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is activated by diacylglycerol (DG) and by phorbol esters and is recognized to be the phorbol ester receptor of cells; DG displaces phorbol ester competitively from PKC. A phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), can also activate PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and Ca{sup 2+} with a K{sub PIP{sub 2}} of 0.04 mol %. Preliminary experiments have suggested a common binding site for PIP{sub 2} and DG on PKC. Here, the authors investigate the effect of PIP{sub 2} on phorbol ester binding to PKC in a mixed micellar assay. In the presence of 20 mol % PS, PIP{sub 2} inhibited specific binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) in a dose-dependent fashion up to 85% at 1 mol %. Inhibition of binding was more pronounced with PIP{sub 2} than with DG. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding of PDBu in the presence of PIP{sub 2} is the result of an altered affinity for the phorbol ester rather than of a change in maximal binding. The plot of apparent dissociation constants (K{sub d{prime}}) against PIP{sub 2} concentration was linear over a range of 0.01-1 mol % with a K{sub i} of 0.043 mol % and confirmed the competitive nature of inhibition between PDBu and PIP{sub 2}. Competition between PIP{sub 2} and phorbol ester could be determined in a liposomal assay system also. These results indicate that PIP{sub 2}, DG, and phorbol ester all compete for the same activator-receiving region on the regulatory moiety of protein kinase C, and they lend support to the suggestion that PIP{sub 2} is a primary activator of the enzyme.

  4. Endogenous peptide(s) inhibiting [3H]cocaine binding in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Reith, M E; Sershen, H; Lajtha, A

    1980-12-01

    The supernatant fraction of centrifuged homogenate of brain tissue contains material that inhibits the saturable binding of [3H]cocaine to crude mouse brain membranes. This material was subjected to heat treatment to remove protein; further purification was achieved by filtering through an Amicon UM-10 membrane ultrafilter and gel filtration of the ultrafiltrate on Sephadex G-25. Sensitivity to acid hydrolysis and peptidase action indicates that the inhibitory activity resides in peptide material with low molecular weight. The partially purified inhibitor has similar effects to that of cocaine on the specific binding of various ligands to opiate and nonopiate receptors in mouse brain membranes. PMID:6261176

  5. Non-specific binding sites help to explain mixed inhibition in mushroom tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sorour; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Fazli, Mostafa

    2016-10-21

    Inhibition and activation studies of tyrosinase could prove beneficial to agricultural, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Although non-competitive and mixed-inhibition are frequent modes observed in kinetics studies on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activities, the phenomena are left unexplained. In this study, dual effects of phthalic acid (PA) and cinnamic acid (CA) on MT during mono-phenolase activity were demonstrated. PA activated and inhibited MT at concentrations lower and higher than 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, CA inhibited and activated MT at concentrations lower and higher than 5 μM. The mode of inhibition for both effectors was mixed-type. Complex kinetics of MT in the presence of a modulator could partly be ascribed to its mixed-cooperativity. However, to explain mixed-inhibition mode, it is necessary to demonstrate how the ternary complex of substrate/enzyme/effector is formed. Therefore, we looked for possible non-specific binding sites using MT tropolone-bound PDB (2Y9X) in the computational studies. When tropolone was in MTPa (active site), PA and CA occupied different pockets (named MTPb and MTPc, respectively). The close Moldock scores of PA binding posed in MTPb and MTPa suggested that MTPb could be a secondary binding site for PA. Similar results were obtained for CA. Ensuing results from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations for 2Y9X-effector complexes indicated that the structures were gradually stabilized during simulation. Tunnel analysis by using CAVER Analyst and CHEXVIS resulted in identifying two distinct channels that assumingly participate in exchanging the effectors when the direct channel to MTPa is not accessible. PMID:27344491

  6. ITRACONAZOLE INHIBITS ENTEROVIRUS REPLICATION BY TARGETING THE OXYSTEROL-BINDING PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Strating, Jeroen R.P.M.; van der Linden, Lonneke; Albulescu, Lucian; Bigay, Joëlle; Arita, Minetaro; Delang, Leen; Leyssen, Pieter; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Lanke, Kjerstin H.W.; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Ulferts, Rachel; Drin, Guillaume; Schlinck, Nina; Wubbolts, Richard W.; Sever, Navdar; Head, Sarah A.; Liu, Jun O.; Beachy, Philip A.; De Matteis, Maria A.; Shair, Matthew D.; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Itraconazole (ITZ) is a well-known antifungal agent that also has anti-cancer activity. In this study, we identified ITZ as a broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses (e.g. poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus-71, rhinovirus). We demonstrate that ITZ inhibits viral RNA replication by targeting oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and OSBP-related protein 4 (ORP4). Consistently, OSW-1, a specific OSBP/ORP4 antagonist, also inhibits enterovirus replication. Knockdown of OSBP inhibits virus replication whereas overexpression of OSBP or ORP4 counteracts the antiviral effects of ITZ and OSW-1. ITZ binds OSBP and inhibits its function, i.e. shuttling of cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate between membranes, thereby likely perturbing the virus-induced membrane alterations essential for viral replication organelle formation. ITZ also inhibits hepatitis C virus replication, which also relies on OSBP. Together, these data implicate OSBP/ORP4 as novel molecular targets of ITZ and point to an essential role of OSBP/ORP4-mediated lipid exchange in virus replication that can be targeted by antiviral drugs. PMID:25640182

  7. Calcium absorption and calcium-binding protein synthesis: solanum malacoxylon reverses strontium inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, R H

    1974-03-15

    The ingestion of diets containing high concentrations of stable strontium inhibits calcium absorption and intestinal calcium-binding protein synthesis and, as shown by others, does so by inhibiting the conversion of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, the active form of vitamin D. The addition of the South American plant Solanum malacoxylon to strontium-containing diets counteracts the inhibitory action of dietary strontium, thereby indicating that the plant contains a factor which can mimic the action of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol and representing the first such factor identified in a botanical source. PMID:4812040

  8. Phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin inhibits protein translocation across the ER membrane.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-05-10

    Secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across and inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via translocon channels. To investigate the effect of the negatively-charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine on the translocation of nascent polypeptide chains through the translocon, we used the phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin C2-domain. Lactadherin inhibited targeting of nascent chain to the translocon by signal sequence and the initiation of translocation. Moreover, lactadherin inhibited the movement of the translocating polypeptide chain regardless of the presence or absence of positively-charged residues. Phosphatidylserine might be critically involved in translocon function, but it is not a major determinant for translocation arrest of positively-charged residues. PMID:23583395

  9. Chronic chemotherapeutic stress promotes evolution of stemness and WNT/beta-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer cells: implications for clinical use of WNT-signaling inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Meriam; Bouygues, Anaïs; Ouaret, Djamila; Ferrand, Nathalie; Chouaib, Salem; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Muchardt, Christian; Sabbah, Michèle; Larsen, Annette K

    2015-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain a subfraction of cells with stem/progenitor cell features. Stem cells are naturally chemoresistant suggesting that chronic chemotherapeutic stress may select for cells with increased “stemness”. We carried out a comprehensive molecular and functional analysis of six independently selected colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with acquired resistance to three different chemotherapeutic agents derived from two distinct parental cell lines. Chronic drug exposure resulted in complex alterations of stem cell markers that could be classified into three categories: 1) one cell line, HT-29/5-FU, showed increased “stemness” and WNT-signaling, 2) three cell lines showed decreased expression of stem cell markers, decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, attenuated WNT-signaling and lost the capacity to form colonospheres and 3) two cell lines displayed prominent expression of ABC transporters with a heterogeneous response for stem cell markers. While WNT-signaling could be attenuated in the HT-29/5-FU cells by the WNT-signaling inhibitors ICG-001 and PKF-118, this was not accompanied by any selective growth inhibitory effect suggesting that the cytotoxic activity of these compounds is not directly linked to WNT-signaling inhibition. We conclude that classical WNT-signaling inhibitors have toxic off-target activities that need to be addressed for clinical development. PMID:26041882

  10. Chronic chemotherapeutic stress promotes evolution of stemness and WNT/beta-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer cells: implications for clinical use of WNT-signaling inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, Meriam; Bouygues, Anaïs; Ouaret, Djamila; Ferrand, Nathalie; Chouaib, Salem; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Muchardt, Christian; Sabbah, Michèle; Larsen, Annette K

    2015-07-30

    Most solid tumors contain a subfraction of cells with stem/progenitor cell features. Stem cells are naturally chemoresistant suggesting that chronic chemotherapeutic stress may select for cells with increased "stemness". We carried out a comprehensive molecular and functional analysis of six independently selected colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with acquired resistance to three different chemotherapeutic agents derived from two distinct parental cell lines. Chronic drug exposure resulted in complex alterations of stem cell markers that could be classified into three categories: 1) one cell line, HT-29/5-FU, showed increased "stemness" and WNT-signaling, 2) three cell lines showed decreased expression of stem cell markers, decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, attenuated WNT-signaling and lost the capacity to form colonospheres and 3) two cell lines displayed prominent expression of ABC transporters with a heterogeneous response for stem cell markers. While WNT-signaling could be attenuated in the HT-29/5-FU cells by the WNT-signaling inhibitors ICG-001 and PKF-118, this was not accompanied by any selective growth inhibitory effect suggesting that the cytotoxic activity of these compounds is not directly linked to WNT-signaling inhibition. We conclude that classical WNT-signaling inhibitors have toxic off-target activities that need to be addressed for clinical development. PMID:26041882