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Sample records for inhibits carcinoid cell

  1. Clear cell carcinoid tumor of the distal common bile duct

    PubMed Central

    Todoroki, Takeshi; Sano, Takaaki; Yamada, Shuji; Hirahara, Nobutsune; Toda, Naotaka; Tsukada, Katsuhiko; Motojima, Ryuji; Motojima, Teiji

    2007-01-01

    Background Carcinoid tumors rarely arise in the extrahepatic bile duct and can be difficult to distinguish from carcinoma. There are no reports of clear cell carcinoid (CCC) tumors in the distal bile duct (DBD) to the best of our knowledge. Herein, we report a CCC tumor in the DBD and review the literature concerning extrahepatic bile duct carcinoid tumors. Case presentation A 73-old man presented with fever and occult obstructive jaundice. Ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) demonstrated a nodular tumor projection in the DBD without regional lymph node swelling. Under suspicion of carcinoma, we resected the head of the pancreas along with 2nd portion duodenectomy and a lymph node dissection. The surgical specimen showed a golden yellow polypoid tumor in the DBD (0.8 × 0.6 × 0.5 cm in size). The lesion was composed of clear polygonal cells arranged in nests and a trabecular pattern. The tumor invaded through the wall into the fibromuscular layer. Immunohistochemical stains showed that neoplastic cells were positive for neuron-specific enolase (NSE), chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and pancreatic polypeptide and negative for inhibin, keratin, CD56, serotonin, gastrin and somatostatin. The postoperative course was uneventful and he is living well without relapse 12 months after surgery. Conclusion Given the preoperative difficulty in differentiating carcinoid from carcinoma, the pancreaticoduodenectomy is an appropriate treatment choice for carcinoid tumors located within the intra-pancreatic bile duct. PMID:17227590

  2. Interferon alpha and rapamycin inhibit the growth of carcinoid and medullary thyroid cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Motylewska, Ewelina; Lawnicka, Hanna; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Sicinska, Paulina; Niedziela, Agata; Melen-Mucha, Gabriela; Stepien, Henryk

    2014-08-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are highly vascularized neoplasms characterized by rising incidence. Moreover, the neuroendocrine cells were shown to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptors. Therefore, angiomodulators could be potentially a new group of drugs enhancing still unsatisfactory effectiveness of NET therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the direct influence of angiomodulators: VEGF and five endogenous and exogenous antiangiogenic compounds (endostatin, interferon alpha [IFNα], rapamycin, JV1-36, semaxinib [SU5416]) on the growth of two NET cell lines: lung carcinoid H727 cell line and medullary thyroid cancer TT cell line in vitro. IFNα and rapamycin induced the inhibitory effect on H727 and TT cell viability and proliferation, increasing apoptosis and arresting the cell cycle. Also semaxinib (10(-5)M) inhibited proliferation of both cell lines. VEGF and endostatin did not influence the growth of H727 and TT cells. The inhibitory effect of IFNα, rapamycin and semaxinib on carcinoid and medullary thyroid cancer growth was revealed in our in vitro study, although some other antiangiogenic agents did not directly influence H727 and TT cell growth. Thus, IFNα and mTOR inhibitors as multidirectionally acting drugs with antiangiogenic effect could be potentially efficient in treatment of neuroendocrine tumors and are worth further studies. PMID:24948064

  3. Gastric Carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Borch, Kurt; Ahrén, Bo; Ahlman, Håkan; Falkmer, Sture; Granérus, Göran; Grimelius, Lars

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze tumor biology and the outcome of differentiated treatment in relation to tumor subtype in patients with gastric carcinoid. Background: Gastric carcinoids may be subdivided into ECL cell carcinoids (type 1 associated with atrophic gastritis, type 2 associated with gastrinoma, type 3 without predisposing conditions) and miscellaneous types (type 4). The biologic behavior and prognosis vary considerably in relation to type. Methods: A total of 65 patients from 24 hospitals (51 type 1, 1 type 2, 4 type 3, and 9 type 4) were included. Management recommendations were issued for newly diagnosed cases, that is, endoscopic or surgical treatment of type 1 and 2 carcinoids (including antrectomy to abolish hypergastrinemia) and radical resection for type 3 and 4 carcinoids. Results: Infiltration beyond the submucosa occurred in 9 of 51 type 1, 4 of 4 type 3, and 7 of 9 type 4 carcinoids. Metastases occurred in 4 of 51 type 1 (3 regional lymph nodes, 1 liver), the single type 2 (regional lymph nodes), 3 of 4 type 3 (all liver), and 7 of 9 type 4 carcinoids (all liver). Of the patients with type 1 carcinoid, 3 had no specific treatment, 40 were treated with endoscopic or surgical excision (in 10 cases combined with antrectomy), 7 underwent total gastrectomy, and 1 underwent proximal gastric resection. Radical tumor removal was not possible in 2 of 4 patients with type 3 and 7 of 9 patients with type 4 carcinoid. Five- and 10-year crude survival rates were 96.1% and 73.9% for type 1 (not different from the general population), but only 33.3% and 22.2% for type 4 carcinoids. Conclusion: Subtyping of gastric carcinoids is helpful in the prediction of malignant potential and long-term survival and is a guide to management. Long-term survival did not differ from that of the general population regarding type 1 carcinoids but was poor regarding type 4 carcinoids. PMID:15973103

  4. Detection of somatostatin receptors in surgical and percutaneous needle biopsy samples of carcinoids and islet cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Reubi, J C; Kvols, L K; Waser, B; Nagorney, D M; Heitz, P U; Charboneau, J W; Reading, C C; Moertel, C

    1990-09-15

    Somatostatin (SS) receptor status was investigated in the tumor tissues from 62 patients with carcinoid tumors and 15 patients with islet cell carcinomas using receptor autoradiography techniques with two different iodinated somatostatin analogues as radioligands, a [Leu8, DTrp22, Tyr25]somatostatin-28 and a somatostatin octapeptide, Tyr3-octreotide. The carcinoid tumors were either primaries (n = 32) or metastases (n = 43), sampled as surgical specimens or as small needle liver biopsies. Fifty-four of 62 carcinoid patients had SS receptor-positive tumors (87%). All 15 islet cell carcinoma patients had positive tumors (4 primaries, 11 metastases), i.e., 3 vipomas, 3 insulinomas, 2 glucagonomas, 1 gastrinoma, 2 polyfunctional tumors, and 4 nonfunctioning tumors. Saturation and competition experiments on tissue sections revealed saturable, high affinity binding sites pharmacologically specific for bioactive SS analogues. In a majority of the tumors, the receptors were densely distributed and were always homogeneously found in the whole tumor. All except two tumors were labeled with both radioligands. Multiple liver metastases (n = 16) from three different patients were all shown to contain a comparable amount of receptors. SS receptors could be demonstrated even in very small tissue samples of liver metastases obtained by percutaneous liver biopsies (mean weight, 6.8 mg). The majority of the eight SS receptor-negative carcinoids were mainly bronchial carcinoids (n = 5), usually poorly differentiated. On the contrary, SS receptor-positive cases were never found to be anaplastic. All tumors except one from patients pretreated with octreotide (3 days to 3.8 years) were SS receptor positive. In the majority of carcinoids or islet cell carcinomas, the SS receptor status correlated with the in vivo biochemical response (hormone inhibition) to octreotide. These data demonstrate (a) the high prevalence of SS receptors in the primary tumors of both carcinoids and islet cell

  5. A Rare Combination of Ovarian and Uterine Leiomyomas with Goblet Cell Carcinoid of the Appendix

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaikh, Abdulrahman F.; Darwish, Abdulla; Nagaraj, Veena; Alsada, Abeer

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of the rare combination of unilateral ovarian leiomyoma, uterine leiomyoma, and goblet cell carcinoid tumor of the appendix in a premenopausal woman who presented with right iliac pain. Immunohistochemistry study for desmin (muscle marker) and chromogranin and synaptophysin (neuroendocrine markers) confirmed immunophenotyping origin. Interestingly, both tumors showed positive reaction for estrogen receptor. To our knowledge, such a combination has not been reported previously in the literature. In this paper, the pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of both types of tumors are discussed. PMID:25685587

  6. What's New in Lung Carcinoid Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for lung carcinoid tumors What’s new in lung carcinoid tumor research and treatment? Many ... controlling when our cells grow and divide into new cells. Certain genes that cause cells to grow, ...

  7. Chrysin suppresses achaete-scute complex-like 1 and alters the neuroendocrine phenotype of carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Somnay, Y R; Dull, B Z; Eide, J; Jaskula-Sztul, R; Chen, H

    2015-10-01

    Carcinoids are neuroendocrine neoplasms that cause significant morbidity and mortality and for which few effective therapies are available. Given the recent identification of the anticancer flavonoid chrysin, we sought to investigate its therapeutic potential in carcinoids. Here we report chrysin's ability to modulate the achaete-scute complex-like 1 (ASCL1), a neuroendocrine-specific transcription factor highly implicated in the malignant phenotype of carcinoids and other neuroendocrine cancers. Moreover, we elucidate the role of ASCL1 in carcinoid growth and bioactivity. Treatment of two carcinoid cell lines (BON and H727) with varying chrysin concentrations suppressed cell proliferation, while reducing expression of ASCL1 and the neuroendocrine biomarker chromogranin A (CgA), demonstrated by western blotting. Propidium iodide and phycoerythrin AnnexinV/7-aminoactinomycin D staining and sorting following chrysin treatment revealed S/G2 phase arrest and apoptosis, respectively. This was corroborated by chrysin-induced cleavage of caspase-3 and poly ADP-ribose polymerase and activation of p21(Waf1/Cip1). Furthermore, direct ASCL1 knockdown with an ASCL1-specific small interfering RNA inhibited CgA and synaptophysin expression as well as carcinoid proliferation, while also reducing cyclin B1 and D1 and increasing p21(Waf1/Cip1) and p27(Kip1) expression, suggesting an arrest of the cell cycle. Collectively, these findings warrant the deliberation of targeted ASCL1 suppression by chrysin or other agents as a therapeutic approach for carcinoid management. PMID:26403073

  8. Do We Know What Causes Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Can gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors be prevented? Do we know what causes gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors? Researchers have ... our genes, which control how our cells function. We look like our parents because they are the ...

  9. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  10. Chrysin suppresses the achaete-scute complex-like1 and alters the neuroendocrine phenotype of carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Somnay, Yash R.; Dull, Barbara Zarebczan; Eide, Jacob; Jaskula-Sztul, Renata; Chen, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoids are neuroendocrine neoplasms that cause significant morbidity and mortality, and for which few effective therapies are available. Given the recent identification of the anti-cancer flavonoid chrysin, we sought to investigate its therapeutic potential in carcinoids. Here, we report chrysin’s ability to modulate the achaete-scute complex-like1 (ASCL1), a neuroendocrine-specific transcription factor highly implicated in the malignant phenotype of carcinoids and other neuroendocrine cancers. Moreover, we elucidate the role of ASCL1 in carcinoid growth and bioactivity. Treatment of two carcinoid cell lines (BON and H727) with varying chrysin concentrations suppressed cell proliferation, while reducing expression of ASCL1 and the neuroendocrine biomarker chromogranin A (CgA), demonstrated by Western blotting. Propidium iodide and PE AnnexinV/7-AAD staining and sorting following chrysin treatment revealed S/G2 phase arrest and apoptosis, respectively. This was corroborated by chrysin-induced cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP and activation of p21Waf1/Cip1. Furthermore, direct ASCL1 knockdown with an ASCL1-specific small interfering RNA inhibited CgA and synaptophysin expression as well as carcinoid proliferation, while also reducing cyclin B1 and D1, and increasing p21Waf1/Cip1 and p27Kip1 expression, suggesting an arrest of the cell-cycle. Collectively, these findings warrant the deliberation of targeted ASCL1 suppression by chrysin or other agents as a therapeutic approach for carcinoid management. PMID:26403073

  11. Atypical carcinoid and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung: a proteomic dataset from formalin-fixed archival samples.

    PubMed

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Abbondio, Marcello; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Eccher, Albino; Rindi, Guido; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Uzzau, Sergio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Here we present a dataset generated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples from two rare lung neuroendocrine tumor subtypes (namely, two atypical carcinoids, ACs, and two large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, LCNECs). Samples were subjected to a shotgun proteomics pipeline, comprising full-length protein extraction, SDS removal through spin columns, in solution trypsin digestion, long gradient liquid chromatography peptide separation and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1260 and 2436 proteins were identified in the AC and LCNEC samples, respectively, with FDR <1%. MS data are available in the PeptideAtlas repository at http://www.peptideatlas.org/PASS/PASS00375. PMID:27054153

  12. Atypical carcinoid and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung: a proteomic dataset from formalin-fixed archival samples

    PubMed Central

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Abbondio, Marcello; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Eccher, Albino; Rindi, Guido; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Uzzau, Sergio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a dataset generated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples from two rare lung neuroendocrine tumor subtypes (namely, two atypical carcinoids, ACs, and two large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, LCNECs). Samples were subjected to a shotgun proteomics pipeline, comprising full-length protein extraction, SDS removal through spin columns, in solution trypsin digestion, long gradient liquid chromatography peptide separation and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1260 and 2436 proteins were identified in the AC and LCNEC samples, respectively, with FDR <1%. MS data are available in the PeptideAtlas repository at http://www.peptideatlas.org/PASS/PASS00375. PMID:27054153

  13. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for lung carcinoid tumor symptoms Surgery to treat lung carcinoid tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  14. [Carcinoid of the Appendix Goblet Cells Metastasize to the Orbit - a Clinical Case Report and Review of the Literature].

    PubMed

    Matějka, V M; Mukenšnabl, P; Tupý, R; Fiala, O; Fínek, J

    2016-01-01

    Goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) of the appendix is extremely rare, representing approximately 5% of all primary appendiceal neoplasms. Histologically there are three groups of GCC: group A (typical GCC), adenocarcinoma ex GCC signet ring cell type (group B), and adenocarcinoma ex GCC poorly differentiated carcinoma type (group C), which is the most aggressive. GCC metastasizes in 15-60% of cases, mainly to the ovaries, pelvis, abdominal cavity, ribs, vertebrae, and lymph nodes. Hematogenous metastasis to the liver or other parenchymal organs can occur, but this is very rare. The different organs metastases havent been described yet. The primary mode of treatment is radical surgical resection or debulking, followed by chemotherapy; however, patients with unresectable or recurrent GCC are candidates for systemic therapy. Here, we report a case of very aggressive GCC of the appendix, which had metastazed to the liver at the time of diagnosis and subsequently metastasized to the orbit. PMID:27296408

  15. Carcinoid Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... a roadmap to this full guide. About the endocrine system The body’s endocrine system is made up of cells that produce hormones. ... the hormone-producing cells of the body’s neuroendocrine system, which is made up of ... endocrine cells and nerve cells. Neuroendocrine cells are found ...

  16. Bronchial carcinoid tumor treated with interferon and a new vaccine against NeuGcGM3 antigen expressed in malignant carcinoid cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M C Barroso; Macías, Abraham A; Saurez, Martínez G; Fernández, Molina L E; Lage, Dávila A

    2007-06-01

    A case of a 16-year-old female with a disseminated tumor was reported six years after surgical treatment. In October 1993 the diagnosis of a bronchial carcinoid tumor was made and a left pneumonectomy was performed. No adjuvant treatment was indicated. In May 1999 a relapse was confirmed by cytology, and a treatment with rec-hIFNalpha (10 MU intramuscular, thrice/week) was indicated. Her clinical condition improved, (ECOG 2 to 0), after three months of stable disease at evaluation, up to March 2002 when she developed a progressive disease as documented by abdominal CT scan. The histological block of the primary tumor was sent to the Centre of Molecular Immunology in order to evaluate the recognition of the ganglioside molecule on the tumor by immunohistochemistry, which was informed as positive. In April 2002 we decided to begin a compassionate treatment with the vaccine NGcGM3/VSSP Montanide ISA 51 in combination with rec-hIFNalpha. Since then up to now (56 months after progression with rec-hIFNalpha alone) the patient still has stable disease. In summary, we observed very encouraging results that could support further studies in this type of patients. PMID:17611391

  17. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Progressive Carcinoid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Atypical Carcinoid Tumor; Foregut Carcinoid Tumor; Hindgut Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Midgut Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1

  18. Carcinoid Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read more from Advanced Acclerator Applications FDA Priority Review of Lexicon’s New Drug Application for Telotristat Etiprate ... CARCINOID SYNDROME. “The FDA has granted a Priority Review of the NDA filing and set a Prescription ...

  19. Giant thymic carcinoid.

    PubMed

    John, L C; Hornick, P; Lang, S; Wallis, J; Edmondson, S J

    1991-05-01

    Thymic carcinoid is a rare tumour. It may present with ectopic endocrine secretion or with symptoms of compression as a result of its size. A case is reported which presented with symptoms of compression where the size of the tumour was uniquely large such as to warrant the term giant thymic carcinoid. The typical histological features are described, together with its possible origin and its likely prognosis. PMID:1852667

  20. Diagnosis and management of typical and atypical lung carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Sara; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Macerelli, Marianna; Proto, Claudia; Vitali, Milena; Signorelli, Diego; Ganzinelli, Monica; Scanagatta, Paolo; Duranti, Leonardo; Trama, Annalisa; Buzzoni, Roberto; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Pastorino, Ugo; de Braud, Filippo; Garassino, Marina Chiara

    2016-04-01

    An estimated 20% to 30% of all neuroendocrine tumours originate in the bronchial tree and lungs. According to the 2015 World Health Organization categorization, these tumours are separated into four subtypes characterized by increasing biological aggressiveness: typical carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and small-cell carcinoma. Although typical and atypical lung carcinoids account for less than 1-5% of all pulmonary malignancies, the incidence of these neoplasms has risen significantly in recent decades. Surgery is the treatment of choice for loco-regional disease but for advanced lung carcinoids there is no recognized standard of care and successful management requires a multidisciplinary approach. The aim of this review is to provide a useful guide for the clinical management of lung carcinoids. PMID:26917456

  1. Stages of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  2. One very rare and one new tracheal tumour found by electron microscopy: glomus tumour and acinic cell tumour resembling carcinoid tumours by light microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Heard, B E; Dewar, A; Firmin, R K; Lennox, S C

    1982-01-01

    Tracheal tumours were removed surgically from two patients and diagnosed as carcinoid tumours by routine light microscopy. At a later date, electron microscopy was performed on stored tumour tissue and no neurosecretory granules were found in either case. One showed features of a glomus tumour and the other of an acinic cell tumour. Only two glomus tumours appear to have been reported previously in the trachea, and no acinic cell tumours. Electron microscopy is thus sometimes of great assistance in diagnosing accurately unusual tumours of the lower respiratory tract. Images PMID:6281934

  3. ECL-cell carcinoids and carcinoma in patients homozygous for an inactivating mutation in the gastric H(+) K(+) ATPase alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Fossmark, Reidar; Calvete, Oriol; Mjønes, Patricia; Benitez, Javier; Waldum, Helge L

    2016-07-01

    A family with a missense variant of the ATP4A gene encoding the alpha subunit of the gastric proton pump (H(+) K(+) ATPase) has recently been described. Homozygous siblings were hypergastrinemic (median gastrin 486 pM) and had gastric tumours diagnosed at a median age of 33 years. In the current histopathological study, we further characterized the tumours found in the gastric corpus. The tumours had the histological appearance of carcinoids (NET G1 or G2) and were immunoreactive for the general neuroendocrine markers chromogranin A (CgA) and synaptophysin as well as the ECL-cell markers vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and histidine decarbozylase (HDC). One of the tumours consisted of a NET G2 component, but also had a component with glandular growth, which morphologically was classified as an intestinal type adenocarcinoma. Many glands of the adenocarcinoma contained a large proportion of cells positive for neuroendocrine markers, especially the small vesicle marker synaptophysin and the cytoplasmic enzyme HDC. In conclusion, patients homozygous for an inactivating ATP4A mutation develop gastric ECL-cell carcinoids in their 3rd or 4th decade. The adenocarcinoma may be classified as neuroendocrine with ECL-cell differentiation. PMID:27150581

  4. Can Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems. Carcinoid tumors often are found incidentally (by accident). These tumors aren’t causing any symptoms but ... Carcinoid Tumors? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Talking ...

  5. Chromogranin-reactive endocrine cells in argyrophilic carcinomas ("carcinoids") and normal tissue of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolati, G.; Gugliotta, P.; Sapino, A.; Eusebi, V.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    Breast carcinomas, either positive or negative with the Grimelius' silver procedure, benign fibroadenomas, duct papillomas, and areas of histologically normal breast tissue were tested immunocytochemically with the mouse monoclonal antibody LK2H10 directed against human chromogranin. This is regarded as a general stain for polypeptide-hormone-producing cells and tumors. In 3 of the 9 cases of argyrophilic carcinoma, but in none of 12 ductal infiltrating carcinomas, chromogranin-positive cells were found: the number of reactive cells was very low in 1 case, while in the other 2 carcinomas about 50% of the argyrophilic cells appeared stained. In areas of histologically normal breast tissue, rare argyrophilic chromogranin-positive cells were detected. This study is the first reported evidence concerning the presence of endocrinelike cells probably belonging to the diffuse neuroendocrine system in the normal mammary parenchyma. Our data are consistent with the endocrine nature of at least some of the breast argyrophilic carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figures 3 and 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:4025508

  6. Frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes in pulmonary carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Sun, Ruping; Ozretić, Luka; Seidal, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Leenders, Frauke; George, Julie; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Pinther, Berit; Bosco, Graziella; Konrad, Kathryn; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Schneider, Peter M; Bogus, Magdalena; Soltermann, Alex; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Ansén, Sascha; Stoelben, Erich; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Solomon, Benjamin; Field, John K; Hyde, Russell; Davies, Michael PA.; Heukamp, Lukas C; Petersen, Iver; Perner, Sven; Lovly, Christine; Cappuzzo, Federico; Travis, William D; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Haas, Stefan A.; Buettner, Reinhard; Thomas, Roman K

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoids are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the lung. The molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of these tumors have not been systematically studied so far. Here we perform gene copy number analysis (n=54), genome/exome (n=44) and transcriptome (n=69) sequencing of pulmonary carcinoids and observe frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes. Covalent histone modifiers and subunits of the SWI/SNF complex are mutated in 40% and 22.2% of the cases respectively, with MEN1, PSIP1 and ARID1A being recurrently affected. In contrast to small-cell lung cancer and large-cell neuroendocrine tumors, TP53 and RB1 mutations are rare events, suggesting that pulmonary carcinoids are not early progenitor lesions of the highly aggressive lung neuroendocrine tumors but arise through independent cellular mechanisms. These data also suggest that inactivation of chromatin remodeling genes is sufficient to drive transformation in pulmonary carcinoids. PMID:24670920

  7. Multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Doi, Momoko; Ikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Kawamura, Takuji; Katsura, Kanade

    2016-08-01

    We report multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins who, respectively, had 42 and 36 carcinoid tumors in the lower rectum. This is the first report about carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins. Both twins developed a similar number of rectal carcinoids with a similar distribution. Investigation of their genetic background may provide information about the origin of these tumors. PMID:27334481

  8. [Thymic carcinoid associated with ectopic ACTH syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T; Inoue, C; Sasaki, H; Satou, K; Kimura, N

    1996-04-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted to Sendai Red Cross Hospital complaining of chest and back pain associated with Cushing's syndrome. Based on the abnormally high levels of ACTH, cortisol, and CRH in plasma the patient was suspected of having ectopic ACTH syndrome. Histological examination of an extirpated rib and pleural tumor led to the diagnosis of atypical carcinoid tumor, with ribbon and festoon formation, immunoreactivity to ACTH, NSE, Chg-A, and argyrophilia in the tumor cells. Anti-cancer chemotherapy was not effective, and the patient died within a year after the onset of Cushing's syndrome. An autopsy revealed that the patient had an ACTH- and CRH-producing thymic carcinoid with metastases to many organs. The pituitary was atrophic with Crooke's hyaline change. There were many CRH-positive cells in the paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, where no remarkable pathologic changes were seen. PMID:8691671

  9. Ghrelin- and serotonin-producing gastric carcinoid.

    PubMed

    Latta, Eleanor; Rotondo, Fabio; Leiter, Lawrence A; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman

    2012-06-01

    We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with gastric carcinoid. The tumor was surgically removed and immunohistochemical investigation demonstrated a rare combination: ghrelin and serotonin in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. The functional significance of simultaneous production of ghrelin and serotonin is not clear. It may be that an autocrine/paracrine interaction exists between these two different hormones. PMID:21424696

  10. Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Ayub, Adil; Naeem, Buria; Najam, Sehrish; Ahmed, Zubair; Jafri, Wasim; Hamid, Saeed

    2016-03-01

    Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor (PHCT) represents an extremely rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported to date. These tumors are rarely associated with metastasis and surgical resection is usually curative. Herein, we report two cases of PHCT associated with poor outcomes due to late diagnosis. Both cases presented late with non-specific symptoms. One patient presented after a 2-week history of symptoms and the second case had a longstanding two years symptomatic interval during which he remained undiagnosed and not properly worked up. Both these cases were diagnosed with hepatic carcinoid tumor, which originates from neuroendocrine cells. Case 1 opted for palliative care and expired in one month’s time. Surgical resection was advised to the second case, but he left against medical advice. PMID:26975959

  11. Treatment of Lung Carcinoid by Type and Extent of Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor about lung carcinoid tumors? Treatment of lung carcinoid, by type and extent of disease The ... those that can’t be removed completely Resectable lung carcinoid tumors Resectable carcinoid tumors haven’t spread ...

  12. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors? What should you ask your doctor about gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors? It is important to ... Staging Treating Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors ...

  13. Carcinoid Heart Disease in a Primary Ovarian Carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    T., Kolouch; H., Linkova; O., Lang; V., Ciprova; L., Brunerova

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoids are very rare, and only their insular form is associated with carcinoid syndrome. We herein describe a case report of an elderly woman who presented with typical carcinoid syndrome, which is routinely characterized by right-sided heart failure, diarrhoea, flushes, and other common manifestations. Further examination and biochemical testing of the patient confirmed suspected carcinoid tumor. However, the tumor was surprisingly localized in the left ovary. The presence of the patient’s severe combined tricuspid valve disease would create impossible surgical management conditions, so we decided to first perform cardio-surgery with tricuspid valve replacement. After tumor removal, levels of hydroxyindolacetic acid did not normalize and although the patient was asymptomatic, a small lesion was detected by tectrotyd scan paravertebrally. Treatment with lanreotide led to complete remission with negative biochemical and imaging signs of tumor. Thus, to summarize, carcinoid tumor even in an atypical localization (ovary) should be considered in elderly female patients with severe combined tricuspid valve disease due to carcinoid syndrome. PMID:27122940

  14. Diagnostic Utility of Orthopedia Homeobox (OTP) in Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Daisuke; Papaxoinis, George; Mansoor, Wasat

    2016-06-01

    Recently, Orthopedia Homeobox (OTP) was described as a prognostic marker for pulmonary carcinoid tumors; however, little is known about the function and distribution pattern of this transcription factor in normal organs/tissues and in tumors. Consequently, OTP expression was investigated in a variety of tumors, with special interest in pulmonary and nonpulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas. OTP immunohistochemical analysis was performed on a total of 162 pulmonary carcinoid tumors, 31 pulmonary neuroendocrine hyperplasias, 104 pulmonary high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas (large cell neuroendocrine and small cell neuroendocrine), 102 nonpulmonary NETs (G1/G2 NETs, small cell and large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, and Merkel cell carcinomas), 150 endocrine tumors (thyroid, parathyroid, adrenocortical, and pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas), 279 adenocarcinomas, and 88 squamous cell carcinomas of various organs, including those of the lungs and others. In addition, normal tissues from various organs were studied. OTP nuclear expression was seen in 80% of lung carcinoid tumors. Among other tumors, 4 small-cell carcinomas showed focal expression (2 pulmonary and 2 bladder), but all other tumors were completely negative. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of OTP were 80.2% and 99.4%, respectively. All TTF1-positive lung carcinoid tumors were diffusely positive for OTP, but none of the OTP-negative carcinoid tumors was positive for TTF1. OTP expression was not seen in any normal tissues/organs. OTP was also negative in neuroendocrine cells of the normal bronchus/bronchiole. However, OTP was strongly expressed in neuroendocrine hyperplasia, including reactive and preneoplastic hyperplasia. Our results suggest that OTP may serve as a useful diagnostic marker for lung carcinoid tumors. PMID:26927888

  15. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » How are lung carcinoid tumors diagnosed? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  16. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  17. General Information about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL IN VIVO MODEL OF CARCINOID SYNDROME*

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Lindsey N.; Chen, L. Andy; Larson, Shawn D.; Silva, Scott R.; Rychahou, Piotr G.; Boor, Paul J.; Li, Jing; DeFreitas, Gilberto; Stafford, W. Lane; Townsend, Courtney M.

    2009-01-01

    Carcinoid syndrome, characterized by flushing, diarrhea, and valvular heart disease, can occur following carcinoid tumor metastasis to the liver, and systemic release of bioactive hormones into the systemic circulation. Treatment of this devastating disease is hampered by the lack of an in vivo model that recapitulates the clinical syndrome. Here, we have injected BON cells, a novel human carcinoid cell line established in our laboratory, into the spleens of athymic nude mice to establish liver metastases. The majority of mice injected intrasplenically with BON cells developed significant increases in plasma serotonin (5-HT) and urine 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and several mice exhibited mesenteric fibrosis, diarrhea, and fibrotic cardiac valvular disease reminiscent of carcinoid syndrome both by echocardiographic and histopathologic evaluation. Mice pre-treated with octreotide, a long-acting somatostatin analog, or bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, developed fewer liver metastases and manifestations of carcinoid syndrome, including valvular heart disease. We have provided an important in vivo model to further delineate novel treatment modalities for carcinoid syndrome that will also be useful to elucidate the factors contributing to the sequelae of carcinoid disease (eg, mesenteric fibrosis, valvular heart disease). PMID:19336516

  20. What's New in Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors What’s new in gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor research and treatment? There ... for the causes of , ways to prevent , and new approaches to diagnose and treat GI carcinoid tumors. ...

  1. Reversible right-sided heart failure secondary to carcinoid crisis.

    PubMed

    Soto Herrera, Mariana; Restrepo, José A; Díaz, Jesús H; Ramos, Andrés; Felipe Buitrago, Andrés; Gómez Mejía, Mabel

    2013-01-01

    Carcinoid crisis is an infrequent and little-described complication of neuroendocrine tumors that can be life threatening. It may develop during induction of anesthesia, intraoperatively, during tumor manipulation and arterial embolization, or even spontaneously. The massive release of neuroendocrine substances can lead to potentially fatal complications. Somatostatin analogs inhibit the release of these substances and are the mainstay of treatment. The following case report describes a patient with reversible acute right-sided heart failure posterior to hepatic artery embolization. PMID:24804121

  2. Scintigraphic imaging of carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M.; Kamanabroo, D.

    1985-05-01

    131-1-metaiodobenzylguanidine (131-1-MIBG) is used for scintigraphic localization and treatment of pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma. Several other tumors, deriving from neuroectoderm (APUD tumors) may also produce catecholamines. 4 patients with surgically proven carcinoid tumors were studied by 131-1-MIBG scintigraphy. Scintigraphic images were performed with a computer assisted gamma camera 2.24, 48 and 72 hours after IV injection of 26 MBq 131-I-MIBG. In one patient single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 185 Mgq 123-I-MIBG was performed additionally. Catecholamines were determined in 24-hours-urinary samples by HPLC. Serotonine was determined in plasma. Catecholamine excretion was normal in all patients, whereas serotonine was elevated in all of them. In 2 of 4 patients slight tracer uptake was observed in some of liver metastases, whereas other metastases in the liver and the primary tumor did not show 131-1-MIBG uptake. In one patient with a carcinoid tumor of the pancreas 131-1-MIBG scintigraphy and SPECT with 123-1-MIBG was positive. In one patient scintigraphy was false negative. MIBG scintigraphy is not only suitable for imaging pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma, but may also localize carcinoid tumors and their metastases.

  3. Carcinoid Syndrome-Induced Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadjee, Abdulmohsin; Morshedzadeh, Jack H.; Ranjan, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Carcinoid tumors are rare neuroendocrine malignancies that secrete multiple bioactive substances. These bioactive substances are responsible for the carcinoid syndrome characterized by diarrhea, flushing, syncope, and right-sided valvular heart disease. Previous case reports have described carcinoid syndrome associated with coronary vasospasm and the well-characterized carcinoid heart disease. Case. Our patient is a 73-year-old female with complex past medical history most notable for metastatic carcinoid tumors diagnosed in 2013-05. She initially presented in 2014-09 with syncope and dizziness associated with sinus pause on an event monitor. She received a pacemaker given normal left ventricular function and was discharged. However, she was readmitted with similar symptoms corresponding to multiple episodes of ventricular tachycardia. She was started on high-dose beta blockade and has had no recurrence of arrhythmia over a follow-up period of 12 months. Conclusion. We hypothesize that the patient's ventricular tachycardia was mediated by the multiple bioactive substances secreted by her carcinoid tumors. Her carcinoid tumor biomarkers were elevated and other explanations for arrhythmia were investigated and ruled out. To our knowledge, this is the first case of ventricular tachycardia mediated by carcinoid syndrome and suppressed by beta-blocker. Further investigation into this relationship is needed. PMID:27088017

  4. P30. Ki-67 expression in lung carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Budimir, Bernard; Kukulj, Suzana; Brcic, Luka; Opasic, Luka; Cucevic, Branka; Serdarevic, Marina; Drpa, Gordana; Sovic, Slavica

    2014-01-01

    Background Ki-67 is nuclear protein with essential role in the control and timing of cell proliferation, largely studied in neuroendocrine tumors, but yet without clear clinical implications. A difference of percentage of Ki-67 labeling index (LI) was observed in different neuroendocrine tumors. This study intended to determine difference of Ki-67 LI between typical (TC) and atypical lung carcinoid (AC) using imunohistochemical methods, and to correlate clinical parameters with percentage of Ki-67 LI in TC and AC. Methods and participants A total of 49 specimens of TC and AC between year 2007 and 2009 were retrieved from our archive. Minimum follow-up period was 5 years. The clinical parameters included age, gender, tumor size, node and metastasis stage, recurrence of disease, therapy and overall survival (OS). Ki-67 was evaluated in the areas of highest positivity, and expressed as percentage of 400 tumor cells. Results Median value Ki-67 LI for atypical carcinoid was 17.1 (min 1.5, max 61.5). Median value Ki-67 LI for typical carcinoid was 3.8 (min 0.3, max 16). Although there is statistical difference in an average tumor size between AC and TC (P=0.02), there was no correlation between tumor size and Ki-67 expression. There was statistical difference between AC and TC concerning recurrence/metastatic disease (P=0.01) and OS (P=0.004), but none is in any relation with Ki-67 LI. The 5-year OS for typical carcinoid is 97.4% (95% CI: 97.3-97.5). The 5-year OS for atypical carcinoid is 60% (95% CI: 30-90). Conclusions Our study showed that Ki-67 LI was useful in dividing TC and AC, which is in concordance with published data. We also demonstrated that lower Ki-67 LI correlated with survival of the patients, regardless of carcinoid type. This study did not show any significant difference between AC and TC and Ki-67 LI in regards with age, gender, tumor size, recurrence/metastatic disease, therapy and overall survival, probably because small number of participants.

  5. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Éden Sartor; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; Corrêa, Isaac José Felippe; Robles, Laercio; Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumors are extremely rare neoplasms derived from hormone-producing neuroendocrine cells. It is difficult to make their diagnosis before biopsy, surgical resection or necropsy. A recent publication described only 94 cases of these tumors. There is no sex predilection and apparently it has no association with cirrhosis or preexisting hepatic disease. The most effective treatment is hepatectomy, and resection is determined by size and location of the lesions. PMID:25628206

  6. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Benafif, Sarah; Eeles, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours arise in cells of the diffuse neuroendocrine system and can develop in a number of anatomical sites including the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. There has been a move away from the use of the term carcinoid tumour to the more appropriate use of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) to highlight the potential for invasion and metastasis associated with some NETs. Although most cases are sporadic, 15-20% of cases are related to a hereditary syndrome, the most common of these being multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1). Other hereditary syndromes include the following: von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), neurofibromatosis 1 and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), which are all associated with a germline mutation of the associated tumour suppressor gene and an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Familial small intestinal NET (SI NET) is a recently described condition which is also inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. There appears to be more than one causative gene; thus far, only the IPMK gene has been identified as a causative germline mutation. This was identified by carrying out whole-exome sequencing of germline and tumour DNA in a family with multiple members diagnosed with SI NET. Identification of NET predisposition genes in other families via these methods will allow the development of dedicated NET gene panels which can be used to screen NET patients and at-risk relatives for hereditary mutations. Close surveillance of at-risk individuals is important to detect NETs early when curative surgery can be offered and the morbidity and mortality of metastatic NETs can be avoided. PMID:27075353

  7. Carcinoid Tumors of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, John G.; Marks, Charles; Hearn, David

    1974-01-01

    The charts of 135 patients with gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors diagnosed over a 22-year period at 2 hospitals are reviewed and the clinical and pathological aspects discussed. Carcinoids occur most commonly in the appendix, jejunoileum, and rectum. Those smaller than 1 cm in diameter provide evidence of malignant potential only occasionally; lesions in the 1-1.9 cm range do this quite variably, and tumors 2 cm and larger are almost always invasive or metastatic or both. All gastrointestinal carcinoids except those of the appendix enlarge, invade, and metastasize predictably if given sufficient time. Most carcinoids except those of the rectum have already been adequately treated surgically when diagnosed by the pathologist. Local excision is effective treatment for noninvasive rectal carcinoids smaller than 2 cm in diameter, but those that have invaded or grown to 2 cm should undergo more radical resection. In general, gastrointestinal carcinoids carry better prognoses than do adenocarcinomata, and even in the presence of distant metastases long-term survival occurs in a significant number of patients. The frequent concomitance of associated malignant diseases accounts for as many or more deaths in these patients than the carcinoids themselves. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:4421375

  8. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor in children.

    PubMed

    Foley, David S; Sunil, Indira; Debski, Robert; Ignacio, Romeo C; Nagaraj, Hirkati S

    2008-11-01

    Primary carcinoid tumors of the liver are rare, with fewer than 60 cases currently reported in the English literature. We present the evaluation and management of a solid hepatic tumor in a 14-year-old boy. Intraoperative biopsy was indeterminant for malignant potential, and the patient underwent complete resection by left hepatic lobectomy. Final histopathologic evaluation of the mass revealed a carcinoid tumor. Extensive endoscopic and radiologic workup revealed no other primary source. The patient recovered well from surgery and is currently free of disease 32 months after initial resection. Review of the literature suggests that primary hepatic carcinoid tumors are particularly rare in children. As the liver is frequently a site for carcinoid metastasis from the gastrointestinal tract, any patient with a suspected primary hepatic carcinoid tumor must undergo an extensive search for an extrahepatic primary site. These tumors are typically indolent but may metastasize. In addition, medical therapy is of limited benefit in reducing tumor bulk. The mainstay for treatment of primary hepatic carcinoid tumors is surgical resection, and these tumors carry a more favorable prognosis than other primary hepatic malignancies and metastatic carcinoid. Follow-up is long-term, as these tumors can recur many years after initial resection. PMID:18970916

  9. The clinical presentation and management of carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dobson, R; Burgess, M I; Pritchard, D M; Cuthbertson, D J

    2014-04-15

    Carcinoid heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Although cases of carcinoid syndrome and severe carcinoid heart disease requiring urgent intervention are well described, many patients with significant carcinoid heart disease may have insidious symptoms or even be asymptomatic. As haemodynamically significant carcinoid heart disease may be clinically silent, specific and individualised considerations must be made as to the most appropriate clinical criteria and time point at which surgical valve replacement should be undertaken in patients with carcinoid heart disease. PMID:24636550

  10. A Case of Very Well-Differentiated Adenocarcinoma With Carcinoid Tumor in the Ascending Colon

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Hayato; Sakurai, Shinji; Tsukagoshi, Ritsuko; Suzuki, Masaki; Tabe, Yuichi; Fukasawa, Takaharu; Kiriyama, Shinsuke; Fukuchi, Minoru; Naitoh, Hiroshi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumors with mixed glandular and neuroendocrine characteristics with at least 30% of each component are classified as mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) by the World Health Organization 2010 classification. We report here a case of very well-differentiated adenocarcinoma accompanied by carcinoid tumor, categorized as MANEC. A 41-year-old Japanese man was clinically diagnosed with ascending colon cancer and underwent right hemicolectomy. Using an immunohistologic technique, the pathologic diagnosis was very well-differentiated adenocarcinoma accompanied by carcinoid tumor and marked eosinophil infiltration, which was categorized as MANEC. By immunohistochemical analysis, tumor cells of the carcinoid component exhibited very low proliferation activity. Our case was thought to be MANEC without high malignant potential. MANEC as per the World Health Organization 2010 classification seems to include tumors with diverse grades of malignancy, and it might need to have subclassifications according to the malignancy potential of the tumor cells. PMID:24670022

  11. A case of very well-differentiated adenocarcinoma with carcinoid tumor in the ascending colon.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Hayato; Sakurai, Shinji; Tsukagoshi, Ritsuko; Suzuki, Masaki; Tabe, Yuichi; Fukasawa, Takaharu; Kiriyama, Shinsuke; Fukuchi, Minoru; Naitoh, Hiroshi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumors with mixed glandular and neuroendocrine characteristics with at least 30% of each component are classified as mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) by the World Health Organization 2010 classification. We report here a case of very well-differentiated adenocarcinoma accompanied by carcinoid tumor, categorized as MANEC. A 41-year-old Japanese man was clinically diagnosed with ascending colon cancer and underwent right hemicolectomy. Using an immunohistologic technique, the pathologic diagnosis was very well-differentiated adenocarcinoma accompanied by carcinoid tumor and marked eosinophil infiltration, which was categorized as MANEC. By immunohistochemical analysis, tumor cells of the carcinoid component exhibited very low proliferation activity. Our case was thought to be MANEC without high malignant potential. MANEC as per the World Health Organization 2010 classification seems to include tumors with diverse grades of malignancy, and it might need to have subclassifications according to the malignancy potential of the tumor cells. PMID:24670022

  12. What Are the Key Statistics for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What are the key statistics about lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  13. What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What are the risk factors for lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  14. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What should you ask your doctor about lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  15. What Happens after Treatment for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What happens after treatment for lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  16. What Are the Key Statistics about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors? What are the key statistics about gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors? Although the exact number ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

  17. A Case of Ectopic ACTH-Producing Pulmonary Carcinoid Arising in an Extralobar Pulmonary Sequestration.

    PubMed

    Sato, Seijiro; Kitahara, Akihiko; Koike, Terumoto; Hashimoto, Takehisa; Ohashi, Riuko; Kameda, Yoichi; Tsuchida, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-producing bronchopulmonary carcinoid arising in a bronchopulmonary sequestration is extremely rare. The case of a 67-year-old woman with a 1.7-cm nodule in the mediastinal side of the left lower lobe is presented. At 52 years of age, she was diagnosed as having ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome (CS). However, no ectopic source of ACTH-secretion was detected. Seven years later, she underwent a bilateral adrenalectomy because of aggravation of her health condition. This time, tumor excision was performed by thoracoscopic surgery. The tumor adhered sparsely to the mediastinal pleura and the left lower lobe and was bluntly separated from these tissues. Pathologically, the tumor was a typical carcinoid arising in an extralobar pulmonary sequestration. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the secretion of ACTH by bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumor cells. After surgery, the serum ACTH level was almost normalized, and the dexamethasone (1 mg) suppression test showed significant suppression of ACTH. PMID:26378053

  18. Cryo-recanalization in a case of carcinoid tumor - An interesting case report

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Rakesh K; Madan, Arun; Chawla, Aditya; Arora, Harsh Nandini

    2015-01-01

    The term “cryotherapy” comes from the Greek cryo (κρύο) meaning cold, and therapy (θεραπεία) meaning cure. Cryosurgery is the application of extreme cold to destroy abnormal or diseased tissue. Carcinoid tumors of the lung are a fascinating but uncommon group of pulmonary neoplasms. In the past, these tumors were grouped with benign or less aggressive malignant pulmonary tumors, namely bronchial adenomas. Recent studies have revealed that carcinoid lung tumors are the most indolent form of a spectrum of bronchopulmonary neuroendocrine tumors that, at its extreme, include small cell carcinoma of the lung as its most malignant member. They commonly present as endobronchial obstructions, and if complete, can be life-threatening and require immediate intervention.[1] Recently, we have treated a patient of carcinoid tumor of lung who was managed with cryo-recanalization with excellent response. PMID:26628773

  19. An ileal endometrioma: of carcinoids and cadherin.

    PubMed

    Pannala, Rahul; Gafni-Kane, Adam; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M

    2007-02-01

    A 38-year-old woman with history of prior adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome presented with intermittent right lower quadrant (RLQ) abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, and non-bloody diarrhea for 2 months. Symptoms were not related to her menstrual periods. Examination revealed only an ill-defined mass in the RLQ. Investigations for infectious causes, inflammatory bowel disease, and carcinoid tumor were negative. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a terminal ileal mass with mesenteric stranding and dilatation of the proximal bowel. At laparotomy, a fibrotic, terminal ileal mass with matted adhesions involving the mesentery and retroperitoneum was resected. Histopathological examination identified multiple foci of endometriosis extending from the serosal surface into the mucosa of the terminal ileum. Immunostaining revealed E- and P-cadherin, but not N-cadherin immuno-positivity. Mucosal involvement without cyclical menstrual symptoms and intestinal obstruction is an unusual presentation of intestinal endometriosis. Although the mechanism of endometriosis is not clear, the role of cell adhesion molecules such as cadherins has received attention. Increased expression of E- and P-cadherin and decreased N-cadherin expression in our patient demonstrates differential expression of these cadherins in endometriotic tissue. Future studies may investigate patterns of differential expression of these cadherins in a series of cases to elucidate the mechanisms of migration of endometriotic tissue. PMID:17390177

  20. JNK Inhibition Inhibits Lateral Line Neuromast Hair Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chengfu; Lin, Jinchao; Sun, Shaoyang; He, Yingzi

    2016-01-01

    JNK signaling is known to play a role in regulating cell behaviors such as cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, and recent studies have suggested important roles for JNK signaling in embryonic development. However, the precise function of JNK signaling in hair cell development remains poorly studied. In this study, we used the small molecule JNK inhibitor SP600125 to examine the effect of JNK signaling abrogation on the development of hair cells in the zebrafish lateral line neuromast. Our results showed that SP600125 reduced the numbers of both hair cells and supporting cells in neuromasts during larval development in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, JNK inhibition strongly inhibited the proliferation of neuromast cells, which likely explains the decrease in the number of differentiated hair cells in inhibitor-treated larvae. Furthermore, western blot and in situ analysis showed that JNK inhibition induced cell cycle arrest through induction of p21 expression. We also showed that SP600125 induced cell death in developing neuromasts as measured by cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and this was accompanied with an induction of p53 gene expression. Together these results indicate that JNK might be an important regulator in the development of hair cells in the lateral line in zebrafish by controlling both cell cycle progression and apoptosis. PMID:26903805

  1. Primary renal carcinoid tumor: A radiologic review

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Leslie; Shaban, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is the classic famous anonym of neuroendocrine neoplasms. Primary renal carcinoid tumors are extremely rare, first described by Resnick and colleagues in 1966, with fewer than a total of 100 cases reported in the literature. Thus, given the paucity of cases, the clinical and histological behavior is not well understood, impairing the ability to predict prognosis. Computed tomography and (occasionally) octreotide studies are used in the diagnosis and followup of these rare entites. A review of 85 cases in the literature shows that no distinctive imaging features differentiate them from other primary renal masses. The lesions tend to demonstrate a hypodense appearance and do not usually enhance in the arterial phases, but can occasionally calcify. Octreotide scans do not seem to help in the diagnosis; however, they are more commonly used in the postoperative followup. In addition, we report a new case of primary renal carcinoid in a horseshoe kidney. PMID:27186242

  2. [Carcinoid of the appendix. A case report].

    PubMed

    Spallitta, S I; Termine, G; Stella, M; Calistro, V; Marozzi, P

    2000-01-01

    A case of a young male operated on for acute appendicitis due to a carcinoid of the base is reported. Since the tumor was infiltrating the resection margin of the appendix, the patient was later treated with a right hemicolectomy. Carcinoid tumor is unusual, but can be encountered several times during the career of a surgeon (1/200-300 appendicectomy). The tumor is more frequent in women (2-4:1), located at the tip of the appendix (62-78%) and has a diameter less than 1 cm in 70-95% of cases. It is more frequently diagnosed incidentally after an operation for acute appendicitis and occasionally during other procedures (colectomy, cholecystectomy, salpingectomy). Liver metastases are rare (< 2%), related to the dimension of the primitive tumor (21-100% when > 2 cm) and can cause a "carcinoid syndrome": flush, diarrhea bronchoconstriction, cardiac valve disease. Diagnosis is made by the pathologist and staging by conventional radiologic procedures (TAC, US), dosage of neuroendocrine mediators such as 24 hours urinary 5-HIAA. Nowadays 111In-octreotide scintigraphy (SRS) has an 86% sensitivity to detect the carcinoid and is useful for staging and for planning a surgical intervention. Simple appendectomy is adequate treatment for appendiceal carcinoids less than 1 cm in diameter. Adequate treatment for tumors greater than 2 cm is right hemicolectomy. A point of controversy is what to do for tumors in the 1 to 2 cm range. It seems that appendectomy alone is sufficient except in those cases when mesoappendiceal invasion is identified. When surgical margins after appendectomy are not free of tumor, additional surgery seems warranted. Carcinoid tumor of the appendix has a good prognosis with a 5-year-survival rate, of 85.9-100%. When liver metastases are encountered octreotide can relieve symptoms and sometimes the progression of the disease. PMID:10832290

  3. Pulmonary carcinoid presenting as multiple subcutaneous nodules.

    PubMed

    Oleksowicz, L; Morris, J C; Phelps, R G; Bruckner, H W

    1990-02-28

    A 60-year-old female presented with a one-year history of multiple enlarging tender subcutaneous nodules. Initial biopsy demonstrated a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Mammography showed multiple nodular breast lesions. After the patient failed to respond to tamoxifen, a second biopsy demonstrated a metastatic carcinoid tumor. Further search revealed a single small pulmonary nodule, which on aspiration biopsy proved to be a carcinoid tumor. The patient failed to respond to treatment with streptozotocin and 5'-fluorouracil. Therapy with leucovorin calcium and 5'-fluorouracil then produced a partial response. PMID:2321273

  4. Atypical Bronchial Carcinoid Masquerading as Bronchial Asthma.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, V; Iqbal; Kumar, Vinod

    2015-11-01

    A case study of 35-year-old woman with persistent breathlessness and wheezing that had been unsuccessfully treated with inhaled beta 2-agonists and steroids for about two years. Patient developed dry cough and haemoptysis, so investigated further. Spirometry demonstrated a restrictive pattern. Chest CT demonstrated well defined hyperdense lesion in right middle lobe. Biopsy taken from the mass during bronchoscopy demonstrated the picture of atypical bronchial carcinoid. In this case, due to the lack of awareness, diagnosis of carcinoid was delayed by two years. PMID:27608788

  5. Intranuclear Pseudo-inclusions and Grooves in Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Maral; Kumar, Perikala Vijayananda

    2016-02-01

    Cytologic findings of pulmonary carcinoid have been well described. We report new cytological findings in a case of carcinoid tumor. The patient is a 36-year-old man presenting with hemoptysis of about six months in duration. Chest CT scans showed a well-defined round polypoid lesion measuring 1 × 1 cm within the right upper lobe of the bronchus with hyperinflation of the right upper lobe. Trans-bronchial fine needle aspiration and biopsy were done. Cytologic smears showed isolated and loose clusters of uniform round to spindle shape cells with round centrally located nuclei, fine granular (salt and pepper) chromatin and pale cytoplasm. Intranuclear pseudo-inclusions and grooves were seen in some tumor cells. No mitotic figures or necrosis were evident. A cytological diagnosis of carcinoid tumor was made and histopathologic examination and subsequent immunohistochemical study confirmed the diagnosis. Carcinoid tumor may be reliably diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology smears. Intranuclear pseudo-inclusions and grooves may be evident in tumor cells. PMID:26838088

  6. Acromegaly due to a Macroinvasive Plurihormonal Pituitary Adenoma and a Rectal Carcinoid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Sang Ouk; Hwang, Jin-Kyung; Rhee, Sang Youl; Chon, Suk; Oh, Seungjoon; Lee, Misu; Pellegata, Natalia S.

    2015-01-01

    A macroinvasive pituitary adenoma with plurihormonality usually causes acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia, and also accompanies with neurologic symptoms such as visual disturbances. However, its concurrent presentation with a rectal carcinoid tumor is rarely observed. This study reports the history, biochemical, colonoscopic and immunohistochemical results of a 48-year-old female with acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia. Despite the large size and invasive nature of the pituitary adenoma to adjacent anatomical structures, she did not complain of any neurologic symptoms such as visual disturbance or headache. Immunohistochemical staining of the surgical specimen from the pituitary adenoma revealed that the tumor cells were positive for growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Staining for pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1) was shown to be strongly positive, which could have been possibly contributing to the plurihormonality of this adenoma. Colonoscopy found a rectal polyp that was identified to be a carcinoid tumor using immunohistochemical staining. A macroinvasive pituitary adenoma with concomitant rectal carcinoid tumor was secreting GH, PRL, and TSH, which were believed to be in association with over-expression of Pit-1. This is the first case report of double primary tumors comprising a plurihormonal pituitary macroadenoma and rectal carcinoid tumor. PMID:25559714

  7. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization with DSM for primary hepatic malignant carcinoid.

    PubMed

    Hijioka, Susumu; Ikari, Takaaki; Kamei, Akira; Takano, Koichi; Asahara, Shingo; Fujita, Naoya; Shimizu, Miyuki; Kuraoka, Kensuke; Fijita, Rikiya; Kanda, Hiroaki; Kato, Yo

    2007-03-01

    A 66-year-old male with multiple liver tumors was diagnosed as having malignant carcinoid. The case exhibited carcinoid syndrome with wheezing and high urine 5-Hydroxy-Indole Acetic Acid and serum serotonin concentrations. A search for the primary lesion failed to detect tumors except those in the liver, leading to the diagnosis of primary hepatic carcinoid. Repeated transcatheter arterial chemoembolization with degradable starch microspheres decreased the tumors in size and improved the subjective symptoms. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization with degradable starch microspheres is a useful treatment for unresectable malignant carcinoid of liver origin. PMID:17523279

  8. Umbilical hernia simulating recurrent carcinoid on octreoscan.

    PubMed

    Hirschl, David A; Li, Yi; Chun, K J; Freeman, Leonard M

    2011-07-01

    Physiologic bowel activity on In-111 octreotide imaging is commonly seen. However, on occasion, normal bowel activity may mimic lesions in the abdomen, which can be very difficult to differentiate, particularly after surgical intervention. We report a case of focal bowel activity simulating a lesion in a patient who had an In-111 octreotide scan (Octreoscan), postoperatively, looking for recurrent carcinoid. SPECT/CT demonstrated that the uptake was localized in the anterior abdomen, and corresponded to a loop of bowel within a ventral hernia at the site of surgical incision. The correlation with CT as well as the precise localization made possible by the fusion images helped avoid misinterpretation of this finding as possible recurrent carcinoid. PMID:21637071

  9. Ovarian carcinoid presenting with right heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Damen, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented with a pelvic mass as well as a 6-month history of progressive bilateral peripheral oedema with more recent breathlessness and abdominal distension. She was found to have significant right heart failure (RHF) which was extensively investigated. No significant lung disease or pulmonary embolism was identified to explain the findings. Severe tricuspid incompetence was thus thought to be secondary to the systemic effects of a carcinoid tumour, confirmed to be ovarian in origin (on positron emission tomography/CT scan and histopathology). Prior to major pelvic surgery for removal of the ovarian mass, she underwent tricuspid and pulmonary valve replacement surgery due to the deteriorating right heart function. She had an uneventful recovery after both operations and continues to be followed up closely with serial ovarian and carcinoid tumour markers. PMID:24872492

  10. Expression of neurotensin messenger RNA in a human carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Ishizuka, J; Townsend, C M; Rajaraman, S; Thompson, J C

    1991-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT), a distal gut peptide, has important regulatory and trophic effects throughout the gut; however the intracellular mechanisms that regulate the gene expression and release of human NT are not known. The purpose of this endeavor was to study a functioning human pancreatic carcinoid cell line (called BON) in vitro that expresses the NT gene, and to study the effect of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signal-transduction pathway on the expression and release of human NT. RNA was prepared from BON cell line (which has been established in this laboratory); the RNA was analyzed for NT mRNA expression by Northern hybridization with a complementary DNA probe. RNA blot analysis demonstrated that the NT gene is expressed in BON and is transcribed to two mRNAs of 1.0- and 1.5-kb sizes. In the second part of this study, BON cells were treated with either forskolin (FSK), which increases intracellular levels of cAMP, or with serotonin (5-HT), which reduces cAMP in BON cells. Forskolin produced a dose-dependent increase in NT peptide release and, furthermore, FSK (10(-6) mol/L) rapidly increased NT mRNA abundance 1 hour after addition; conversely, 5-HT (10(-5) mol/L) decreased NT mRNA at 1 hour. Neurotensin mRNA levels returned to control values by 3 hours after either FSK or 5-HT, which suggests that the transcript half-life for NT is relatively short. These findings show that the expression and peptide release of human NT is mediated, in part, by the cAMP signal-transduction pathway. Our human carcinoid cell line will provide a useful model to study the in vitro regulation of NT gene expression and peptide release. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1659338

  11. Pulmonary carcinoid tumors and asbestos exposure

    PubMed Central

    Clin, Bénédicte; Andujar, Pascal; Abd Al Samad, Issam; Azpitarte, Chantal; Le Pimpec-Barthes, Françoise; Billon-Galland, Marie-Annick; Danel, Claire; Galateau-Salle, Françoise; Housset, Bruno; Legrand-Cattan, Karinne; Matrat, Mireille; Monnet, Isabelle; Riquet, Marc; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The hypothesis that asbestos exposure may have more specific associations with particular histological types of lung cancer remains controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between asbestos exposure and pulmonary carcinoid tumors. Methods A retrospective case-control study was conducted in 28 cases undergoing surgery for pulmonary carcinoid tumors and aged over 40 years, and in 56 controls with lung cancer of a different histological type, matched for gender and age, from 1994 to 1999, recruited in 2 hospitals in the region of Paris. Asbestos exposure was assessed via expertise of a standardized occupational questionnaire and mineralogical analysis of lung tissue, with quantification of asbestos bodies (AB). Results Definite asbestos exposure was identified in 25% of cases and 14% of controls (ns). Cumulative asbestos exposure was significantly higher in cases than in controls (p<0.05), and results of the quantification of AB tended to be higher in cases than in controls (24% and 9% had more than 1,000 AB/g dry lung tissue, respectively, p=0.09). Mean cumulative smoking was lower in cases than in controls (p<0.05). Conclusion This study argues in favor of a relationship between asbestos exposure and certain pulmonary carcinoid tumors. PMID:22562831

  12. Inhibition of medulloblastoma cell invasion by Slit.

    PubMed

    Werbowetski-Ogilvie, T E; Seyed Sadr, M; Jabado, N; Angers-Loustau, A; Agar, N Y R; Wu, J; Bjerkvig, R; Antel, J P; Faury, D; Rao, Y; Del Maestro, R F

    2006-08-24

    Invasion of brain tumor cells has made primary malignant brain neoplasms among the most recalcitrant to therapeutic strategies. We tested whether the secreted protein Slit2, which guides the projection of axons and developing neurons, could modulate brain tumor cell invasion. Slit2 inhibited the invasion of medulloblastoma cells in a variety of in vitro models. The effect of Slit2 was inhibited by the Robo ectodomain. Time-lapse videomicroscopy indicated that Slit2 reduced medulloblastoma invasion rate without affecting cell direction or proliferation. Both medulloblastoma and glioma tumors express Robo1 and Slit2, but only medulloblastoma invasion is inhibited by recombinant Slit2 protein. Downregulation of activated Cdc42 may contribute to this differential response. Our findings reinforce the concept that neurodevelopmental cues such as Slit2 may provide insights into brain tumor invasion. PMID:16636676

  13. In vitro chemoresistance testing in well differentiated carcinoid tumors.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Well-differentiated, “typical” carcinoid tumors traditionally have a very poor response to chemotherapy. We hypothesized that tumor specimens from well differentiated carcinoid tumors would be highly resistant to the effects of chemotherapy when tested against a variety of antineoplastic agents in v...

  14. Cytologic and immunohistochemical characterization of a lung carcinoid in a dog.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ul Soo; Alleman, A Rick; Choi, Ji-Hye; Kim, Hyun Wook; Youn, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Chang Woo

    2008-06-01

    An 11-year-old neutered male Yorkshire Terrier was presented to the Haemaru Referral Animal Hospital with a history of unresponsive tracheal collapse and an incidental finding of a lung nodule in the left caudal lung lobe on radiography. Thorough physical examination and imaging studies revealed no other masses. Cytologic examination of C-arm mobile fluoroscopy-guided fine-needle aspirates revealed numerous free nuclei and a low number of small round cells with moderate to abundant pale basophilic cytoplasm. Some cells contained indistinct basophilic granules in their cytoplasm, and extracellular pink material was noted. A caudal lung lobectomy was performed, and histologic evaluation of the mass revealed round to polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic granular cytoplasm and round nuclei with mild anisokaryosis and 0-3 mitotic figures per high-power field. Cells were arranged in packets separated by fine fibrovascular stroma, suggestive of a pulmonary neuroendocrine neoplasm, specifically a carcinoma/carcinoid. The cells were immunoreactive for chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase, and negative for cytokeratin, synaptophysin, calcitonin, thyroglobulin, parathyroid hormone, CD79a, light lambda, and vimentin. With these findings the tumor was diagnosed as a primary lung carcinoid. Eleven months after resection, there was no evidence of tumor regrowth or metastasis. The absence of necrosis, few mitotic figures, minimal pleomorphism, and benign behavior of this tumor resembled those of a typical carcinoid in humans. PMID:18533928

  15. Nuclear medicine in the detection, staging and treatment of gastrointestinal carcinoid tumours.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Kjell; Eriksson, Barbro

    2005-06-01

    Carcinoid tumours belong to the family of neuroendocrine tumours with a capacity to take up and concentrate amines and precursors as well as peptides, and can thereby be detected by nuclear medicine techniques. These rare tumours are difficult to diagnose at earlier stages because of small size and multiplicity. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are mostly of benefit for detection of larger primary tumours (1-3 cm) and liver and lymph-node metastases. A majority of carcinoid tumours express somatostatin receptors, particularly receptor type 2, and thus somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) can be used for detection and staging of carcinoid tumours. The detection rate of carcinoid tumours has been reported to be somewhere between 80 and 100% in different studies. The scintigraphy gives a good staging of the disease and detection of unexpected tumour sites, which were not determined by conventional imaging. This method also indicates content of somatostatin receptors, which might indicate efficacy of treatment with octreotide or other somatostatin analogues. Another new non-invasive technique for detection of carcinoid tumours is positron emission tomography (PET). The biological substance for study can be labelled for radioactive imaging with radionuclears, such as (11)C, (15)O and (18)F, with emission of positrons. More than 95% of patients studied displayed high tracer uptake from PET with (11)C-5HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan), which is significantly higher compared to both computer tomography and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. MIBG has been used for decades to visualize carcinoid tumours, because MIBG is concentrated in the endocrine cells. It was initially developed to detect phaeochromocytomas of the adrenal with reported high sensitivity (87%) and specificity as high as 99%. The method can be used when other methods fail to localize carcinoid tumours and particularly when treatment with (131)I-MIBG is being considered. Tumour

  16. Activation of Angiogenesis Differs Strongly Between Pulmonary Carcinoids and Neuroendocrine Carinomas and Is Crucial for Carcinoid Tumourgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mairinger, Fabian D.; Walter, Robert F. H.; Werner, Robert; Christoph, Daniel C.; Ting, Saskia; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Schmid, Kurt W.; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer still remains the leading cause of cancer for men after prostate cancer and breast cancer for women. Angiogenesis is considered a major microenvironment modifier. Material and Methods: Demographic data and study design; The study is based on a collective of twenty representative specimens of each tumour entity (Typical Carcinoid, Atypical Carcinoid, Large-Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma , Small Cell Lung Cancer) for mRNA expression analysis. The following methods were performed: RNA Extraction and RNA Integrity Assessment, NanoString CodeSet Design and Expression Quantification, NanoString Data Processing and Statistical Analysis. Results: KDR rendered significant association to aggressiveness of the tumour and decreases with increasing malignancy (p=0.049). A decreased expression of HIF1A and KDR mRNA as associated with a higher risk of tumour invasion in vessels (HIF1A: p=0.034; KDR: p=0.029). FIGF and HIF1A expression levels are significantly associated with progression-free survival (FIGF: p= 0.021; HIF1A: p= 0.049). CRHR2 and FLT4 are stronger expressed in female than in male patients (CRHR2: p=0.024, FLT4: p=0.004). FIGF expression is still significant between LCNEC and SCLC (p=0.023). FLT4 and KDR show highly significant association to one of the analysed groups (FLT4: p=0.001; KDR: p=0.006). Additionally, HIF1A expression differs significantly between these focus cohorts (p=0.018). Conclusion: We should consider for clinical practice application which factors affect most the tumour growth and distal metastasis, thereafter investigate easy to administer drugs with low side effects. Probably a cluster system of therapy should be established where a drug targets simultaneously different pathways of the same origin. PMID:24959299

  17. Malignant metastatic carcinoid presenting as brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, I. Vijay; Jain, S. K.; Kurmi, Dhrubajyoti; Sharma, Rakesh; Chopra, Sanjeev; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rarely known to metastasise to the brain. It is even more rare for such patients to present with symptoms related to metastases as the initial and only symptom. We present a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with hemiparesis and imaging features suggestive of brain tumor. He underwent surgery and the histopathology revealed metastatic malignant lesion of neuroendocrine origin. A subsequent work up for the primary was negative. Patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the pathophysiological features, workup and treatment options of this rare disease and discuss the methods of differentiating it from more common brain tumors. PMID:27366273

  18. Malignant metastatic carcinoid presenting as brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Sundar, I Vijay; Jain, S K; Kurmi, Dhrubajyoti; Sharma, Rakesh; Chopra, Sanjeev; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rarely known to metastasise to the brain. It is even more rare for such patients to present with symptoms related to metastases as the initial and only symptom. We present a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with hemiparesis and imaging features suggestive of brain tumor. He underwent surgery and the histopathology revealed metastatic malignant lesion of neuroendocrine origin. A subsequent work up for the primary was negative. Patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the pathophysiological features, workup and treatment options of this rare disease and discuss the methods of differentiating it from more common brain tumors. PMID:27366273

  19. Inhibition of cell-cell binding by lipid assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Bargatze, Robert F.

    2001-05-22

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  20. Carcinoid tumor of the middle ear: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo; Chen, Fei; Li, Jin-Nan; Liu, Shi-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors of the middle ear are very rare. Here we describe a 37-year-old man with multiple recurrent carcinoid tumor of the right middle ear. The CT demonstrated the recurrent mass that filled the tympanum and mastoid with osteolytic invasion, and the tumor was removed by surgery. The pathological findings showed the tumor cells, without necrosis and mitotic activity, had round, oval, or slightly irregular nuclei and finely-dispersed chromatin, arranged in cords, nests, and glandular structures. They were strongly positive for synaptophysin and CD56, but were negative for S-100 and chromogranin A. Ki-67 proliferation activity was low (<2%). With a review of the literature, the clinical, pathological characteristics and treatment modalities of this rare tumor are discussed. PMID:25400805

  1. Recurrence of primary hepatic carcinoid tumor in the remnant liver 13 yr after resection.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Kunihiko; Miyamoto, Noriyuki; Sakurai, Yasuo; Mitsui, Shinya; Kang, Jong-Hon; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nomura, Masashi; Fuminori, Itokawa; Ishiwatari, Hirotoshi; Matsunaga, Takahiro; Osanai, Manabu; Katanuma, Akio; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Anbo, Yoshinori; Masuda, Tomoshige; Kashimura, Nobuichi; Shinohara, Toshiya; Maguchi, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    We report here a case of primary hepatic carcinoid tumor (PHCT) recurring in the remnant liver 13 yr and 10 mo after first resection. A 70-yr-old man developed four hypervascular tumors in the liver in December 2003. He had undergone curative left-lobe hepatectomy for PHCT in February 1990. Histopathological examination of the tumor biopsy specimen showed that the tumor was composed of uniform round-to-oval cells with solid arrangement and the tumor cells stained positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and neuron-specific enolase. We diagnosed this case as an intrahepatic metastasis of PHCT with a long latency period, based on the fact that no primary site of carcinoid tumor could be found despite intensive examination and the immunohistochemical findings of the resected tumors were essentially same as those of PHCT in 1990. Although PHCT is reported to have a more favorable prognosis than other hepatic cancer or metastatic carcinoid tumor in the liver, long-term observation is recommended. PMID:15879630

  2. Prognosis and Survival in Patients With Gastrointestinal Tract Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shebani, Khaled O.; Souba, Wiley W.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Stark, Paul C.; Elgadi, Khaled M.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Ott, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of clinical presentation variables on the management and survival of patients with gastrointestinal (GI) tract carcinoid tumors. Methods A 20-year (1975–1995) retrospective analysis of 150 patients with GI tract carcinoid tumors at the Massachusetts General Hospital was conducted. Median follow-up was 66 months (range 1–378). Survival estimates for prognostic factors were calculated using Kaplan-Meier product limit estimators, with death from carcinoid as the outcome. Univariate analyses for each factor were obtained using a log-rank test, and multivariate survival analysis was performed. Results All but two patients underwent surgical intervention with the intent to cure (90%) or debulk the tumor (9%). Mean age at presentation was 55 ± 18 years (range 11–90). There was a slight female/male predominance (80:70). Symptoms were nonspecific; the most common were abdominal pain (40%), nausea and vomiting (29%), weight loss (19%), and GI blood loss (15%). Incidental carcinoids, discovered at the time of another procedure, occurred in 40% of patients and were noted at multiple sites throughout the GI tract. The distribution of tumors was ileojejunum (37%), appendix (31%), colon (13%), rectum (12%), stomach (4%), duodenum (1.3%), and Meckel’s diverticulum (1.3%). Of the 27 patients with documented liver metastases, carcinoid syndrome developed in only 13 patients (48%), manifested by watery diarrhea (100%), upper body flushing (70%), asthma (38%), and tricuspid regurgitation (23%). All 13 patients with carcinoid syndrome had elevated levels of 5-HIAA, but the absolute levels did not correlate with the severity of symptoms. An additional 11 patients, 3 without liver metastases, had elevated levels of 5-HIAA without any evidence of carcinoid syndrome. Multicentric carcinoid tumors occurred in 15 patients (10%), and all but one of these tumors were centered around the ileocecal valve. There was no difference in the incidence of

  3. [Obscure digestive bleeding by ileal carcinoid tumor].

    PubMed

    Nelly Manrique, María; Frisancho, Oscar; Zumaeta, Eduardo; Palomino, Américo; Rodriguez, César

    2011-01-01

    The patient is an 82 year-old female with a history of osteoarthritis, hypothyroidism and anemia for 14 years (receiving blood transfusions). She was admited to our hospital with a nine months history of malaise, anorexia, fatigue and weakness, associated with intermitten episodes of abdominal pain. She was diagnosed anemia and occult blood positive stools. Physical examination revealed a patient in generally fair condition, obese, with mild edema of lower limbs, no changes in the evaluation of chest, cardiovascular, abdomen, etc. Laboratory data was unremarkable, except for iron deficiency anemia. The upper endoscopy showed duodenal ulcer scar, fundic polyposis and chronic gastritis. Colonoscopy revealed some diverticula, a small sessile polyp and internal hemorrhoids. The diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding was made. The CT scan of the abdomen showed gallstones and fatty liver; a radiograph of intestinal transit detected a lesion apparently protruded intestinal loop for distal jejunum; enteroscopy was performed (with one team ball) anterograde and retrograde achieving assess distal jejunum and distal ileum without observing any injuries. The study of capsule endoscopy showed a polypoid tumor intestinal with evidence of having bleeding. Surgery detected the tumor in proximal ileum. The surgical specimen findings showed three tumors 0.7 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm on the proximal ileum. The microscopic examination revealed that these lesions were neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoid). The Ileal carcinoid tumor may rarely presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:21544161

  4. Inhibition of mast cells by algae.

    PubMed

    Price, Joseph A; Sanny, Charles; Shevlin, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    There is a history of use of algae as foods and as food additives, or nutraceuticals. Although algae are a safe component of human foods and animal feeds, the effects of the algae other than as a source of protein are not clear. We examined the prevalence of an antiinflammatory activity in selected algae using, as an assay system, the inhibition of histamine release from mast cells. Methanolic extracts of eleven algae were examined for activity to inhibit the release of histamine from mast cells in vitro. This activity was found widely among the samples tested. The activities of these extracts were not uniformly stable in acid methanol. Selected extracts studied further did not separate with the use of size-exclusion filtration filters. LH-20 chromatography suggested at least two main elution areas of activity of the Chlorella extract. In summary, we saw wide phylogenetic dispersion of mast cell inhibition activity, suggesting that this antiinflammatory property is common in algae. This effect was apparently due to multiple activities within the algal extracts. PMID:12639395

  5. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Osmond, Allison; Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:27610135

  6. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:27610135

  7. A rare case of carcinoid tumor in a tailgut cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jehangir, Asad; Le, Brian H.; Carter, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    Tailgut cysts are rare congenital lesions that arise from the failure of regression of the embryological tailgut. We report a case of neoplastic transformation of tailgut cyst to carcinoid tumor which is exceedingly uncommon. PMID:27406449

  8. Liver epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and invasiveness of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Kuo-Shyang; Jeng, Chi-Juei; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Sheen, I-Shyan; Li, Shih-Yun; Hung, Zih-Hang; Hsiau, Hsin-I; Yu, Ming-Che; Chang, Chiung-Fang

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a worldwide malignancy with poor prognosis. Liver progenitors or stem cells could be a potential therapy for HCC treatment since they migrate toward tumors. Rat liver epithelial (RLE) cells have both progenitor and stem cell-like properties. Therefore, our study elucidated the therapeutic effect of RLE cells in rat hepatoma cells. RLE cells were isolated from 10-day old rats and characterized for stem cell marker expression. RLE cells and rat hepatoma cells (H4-IIE-C3 cells) were co-cultured and divided into four groups with different ratios of RLE and hepatoma cells. Group A had only rat hepatoma cells as a control group. The ratios of rat hepatoma and RLE cells in group B, C and D were 5:1, 1:1 and 1:5, respectively. Effective inhibition of cell proliferation and migration was found in group D when compared to group A. There was a significant decrease in Bcl2 expression and increase in late apoptosis of rat hepatoma cells when adding more RLE cells. RLE cells reduced cell proliferation and migration of rat hepatoma cells. These results suggested that RLE cells could be used as a potential cell therapy. PMID:26647726

  9. An Asymptomatic Primary Renal Carcinoid Tumor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Linke, Colin S; Shie, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumors are exceedingly rare, with less than 100 total cases being documented in world literature. A 32-year old male was referred to our service for a slow-growing, renal mass, which was first diagnosed 9-years prior. The patient was successfully treated with radical nephrectomy. In this article, we present our case report on an asymptomatic primary renal carcinoid tumor. PMID:27335800

  10. Stat3 inhibition in neural lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Tomohiro; Mack, Laura; Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Groner, Bernd

    2012-06-01

    Abstract Deregulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is attracting attentions in neurological disorders of elderly populations, e.g., Stat3 is inactivated in hippocampal neurons of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, whereas it is often constitutively activated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), correlating with poor prognosis. Stat3-inhibiting drugs have been intensively developed for chemotherapy based on the fact that GBM, in many cases, are "addicted" to Stat3 activation. Stat3 inhibitors, however, potentially have unfavorable side effects on postmitotic neurons, normal permanent residents in the central nervous system. It is, therefore, of great importance to address detailed cellular responses of neural lineage cells including normal neurons, astrocytes, and neuronal/glial cancer cell lines to several classes of Stat3 inhibitors focusing on their effective concentrations. Here, we picked up five human and mouse cancer cell lines (Neuro-2a and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell lines and Tu-9648, U-87MG, and U-373MG glioblastoma cell lines) and treated with various Stat3 inhibitors. Among them, Stattic, FLLL31, and resveratrol potently suppressed P-Stat3 and cell viability in all the tested cell lines. Stat3 knockdown or expression of dominant-negative Stat3 further sensitized cells to the inhibitors. Expression of familial AD-related mutant amyloid precursor protein sensitized neuronal cells, not glial cells, to Stat3 inhibitors by reducing P-Stat3 levels. Primary neurons and astrocytes also responded to Stat3 inhibitors with similar sensitivities to those observed in cancer cell lines. Thus, Stat3 inhibitors should be carefully targeted to GBM cells to avoid potential neurotoxicity leading to AD-like neuropsychiatric dysfunctions. PMID:25436682

  11. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000–2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  12. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000-2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  13. SIRT1 controls cell proliferation by regulating contact inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Elizabeth H; Dai, Yan

    2016-09-16

    Contact inhibition keeps cell proliferation in check and serves as a built-in protection against cancer development by arresting cell division upon cell-cell contact. Yet the complete mechanism behind this anti-cancer process remains largely unclear. Here we present SIRT1 as a novel regulator of contact inhibition. SIRT1 performs a wide variety of functions in biological processes, but its involvement in contact inhibition has not been explored to date. We used NIH3T3 cells, which are sensitive to contact inhibition, and H460 and DU145 cancer cells, which lack contact inhibition, to investigate the relationship between SIRT1 and contact inhibition. We show that SIRT1 overexpression in NIH3T3 cells overcomes contact inhibition while SIRT1 knockdown in cancer cells restores their lost contact inhibition. Moreover, we demonstrate that p27 protein expression is controlled by SIRT1 in contact inhibition. Overall, our findings underline the critical role of SIRT1 in contact inhibition and suggest SIRT1 inhibition as a potential strategy to suppress cancer cell growth by restoring contact inhibition. PMID:27514448

  14. Rectal Mechano-sensory Function in Patients with Carcinoid Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Tine; Brock, Christina; Haase, Anne-Mette; Laurberg, Søren; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Grønbæk, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In patients with neuroendocrine tumors, excessive production of serotonin and other amines may cause the carcinoid syndrome, which is mainly characterized by diarrhea and flushing. Little is known about the pathophysiology of carcinoid diarrhea. In several other groups of patients, diarrhea may be associated with rectal hypersensitivity and increased rectal tone. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare rectal sensitivity and compliance in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and in healthy subjects. Methods Twelve patients (6 males, aged 54–78 years, median 65 years), with carcinoid diarrhea and 19 healthy subjects (7 males, aged 50–78 years, median 61 years) were included. Rectal mechanical and heat stimulation was used for assessment of rectal mechano-sensory properties. Results Overall, 5.3% higher temperatures were needed to elicit sensory responses in patients with carcinoid diarrhea than in healthy subjects (P = 0.015). Posthoc analyses revealed that the sensory threshold to heat was 48.1 ± 3.1°C in patients vs 44.7 ± 4.7°C in healthy subjects (P = 0.041). In contrast, patients and healthy subjects showed no overall differences in rectal sensory response to mechanical distension (P = 0.731) or rectal compliance (P = 0.990). Conclusions Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have higher sensory thresholds to heat stimulation in comparison to healthy subjects, but normal rectal sensation to mechanical distension and normal compliance. Therefore, treatment of carcinoid diarrhea should aim at prolonging gastrointestinal transit and decreasing secretion, rather than modifying rectal mechano-sensory function. PMID:26690884

  15. Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Replacement in a Carcinoid Heart

    PubMed Central

    Loyalka, Pranav; Schechter, Michael; Nascimbene, Angelo; Raman, Ajay Sundara; Ilieascu, Cezar A.; Gregoric, Igor D.

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid heart disease presents as right-sided heart failure attributable to the dysfunction of the tricuspid and pulmonary valves. Although surgical valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment when patients become symptomatic, it is associated with substantial perioperative mortality rates. We present a case of severe pulmonary valve stenosis secondary to carcinoid heart disease, treated successfully with percutaneous valve replacement. A 67-year-old man with severe pulmonary valve stenosis was referred to our center for pulmonary valve replacement. The patient had a history of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor of the small bowel with carcinoid syndrome, carcinoid heart disease, and tricuspid valve regurgitation previously treated with surgical valve replacement. Because of the patient's severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hostile chest anatomy seen on a computed tomographic scan dating from previous cardiothoracic surgery, we considered off-label percutaneous valve replacement a viable alternative to open-heart surgery. A 29-mm Edwards Sapien XT valve was successfully deployed over the native pulmonary valve. There were no adverse sequelae after the procedure, and the patient was discharged from the hospital the next day. This case report shows that percutaneous valve replacement can be a valid option in carcinoid heart disease patients who are not amenable to surgical valve replacement. PMID:27547148

  16. MET Inhibition in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zuoquan; Lee, Young H.; Boeke, Marta; Jilaveanu, Lucia B.; Liu, Zongzhi; Bottaro, Donald P.; Kluger, Harriet M.; Shuch, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most lethal form of kidney cancer. Small molecule VEGFR inhibitors are widely used but are not curative and various resistance mechanisms such as activation of the MET pathway have been described. Dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitors have recently shown clinical benefit but limited preclinical data evaluates their effects in ccRCC. Methods: An interrogation of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset was performed to evaluate oncogenic alterations in the MET/VEGFR2 pathway. We evaluated the in vitro effects of Cabozantinib, a dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, using a panel of ccRCC cell lines. Drug effects of cell viability and proliferation, migration, cell scatter, anchorage independent growth, and downstream MET/VEGFR2 signaling pathways were assessed. Results: Twelve percent of TCGA cases had possible MET/HGF oncogenic alterations with co-occurrence noted (p<0.001). MET/HGF altered cases had worse overall survival (p=0.044). Cabozantinib was a potent inhibitor of MET and VEGFR2 in vitro in our cell line panel. PI3K, MAPK and mTOR pathways were also suppressed by cabozantinib, however the effects on cell viability in vitro were modest. At nanomolar concentrations of cabozantinib, HGF-stimulated migration, invasion, cellular scattering and soft agar colony formation were inhibited. Conclusions: We provide further preclinical rationale for dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibition in ccRCC. While the MET pathway is implicated in VEGFR resistance, dual inhibitors may have direct anti-tumor effects in a patient subset with evidence of MET pathway involvement. Cabozantinib is a potent dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, significantly inhibits cell migration and invasion in vitro and likely has anti-angiogenic effects similar to other VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Future work involving in vivo models will be useful to better define mechanisms of potential anti-tumor activity. PMID:27390595

  17. Recurrent acute kidney injury associated with metastatic bronchial carcinoid.

    PubMed

    Barton, James C; Barton, J Clayborn; Bertoli, Luigi F

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare complication of carcinoid syndrome. A 61-year-old man developed carcinoid syndrome 51 months after pneumonectomy for bronchial carcinoid, and 8 episodes of AKI 101 to 118 months after pneumonectomy. Serum chromogranin A and urine 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels were elevated for more than 1 year before AKI occurred. Each episode was characterized by flushing, facial edema, mild diarrhea, necrosis of hepatic metastatic nodules, mild oliguria, hyponatremia, acidosis, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hyperphosphatemia. He did not have elevated urine sodium levels or osmolality, hypotension or hypertension. Plasma levels of dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine, measured during a single episode, were markedly elevated. Serum creatinine levels returned to normal after most episodes. Hyponatremia persisted but was more severe during AKI. Elevated plasma levels of vasoactive substances other than 5-hydroxytryptamine, perhaps dopamine or other catecholamines, could explain recurrent AKI. The natriuretic effect of elevated plasma dopamine levels could explain chronic hyponatremia. PMID:22008780

  18. A carcinoid tumor mimicking an isolated intracranial meningioma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Deshaies, Eric M; Adamo, Matthew A; Qian, Jiang; DiRisio, Darryl A

    2004-11-01

    This 79-year-old woman presented with progressively worsening dementia, abulia, flat affect, urinary incontinence, and profuse watery diarrhea. Results of computerized tomography and magnetic resonance studies indicated an extraaxial, dural-based mass compressing the right frontal lobe and consistent with a convexity meningioma. A right frontal craniotomy was performed and the dural-based mass was resected. Histopathological features on immunostaining of the lesion were consistent with a carcinoid tumor (low-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma). Further evaluation revealed no primary carcinoid tumor in the foregut from which they typically originate. The authors concluded that this intracranial carcinoid tumor was the primary lesion despite its unusual location and that it should be included in the differential diagnosis of dural-based, extraaxial brain lesions. PMID:15540927

  19. Spontaneous Regression of a Carcinoid Tumor following Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sewpaul, A.; Bargiela, D.; James, A.; Johnson, S. J.; French, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of spontaneous regression of a neuroendocrine tumor following pregnancy in the absence of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or alternative medicine (including herbal medicine). The diagnosis of a nonsecretory carcinoid tumor was confirmed using CT imaging, octreotide scan, and histology. Furthermore, serial imaging has demonstrated spontaneous regression of the carcinoid suggesting that pregnancy did not worsen the course of the disease but instead may have contributed to tumour regression. We discuss mechanisms underlying tumour regression and the possible effect of pregnancy on these processes. PMID:25587468

  20. Carcinoid heart disease: current understanding and future directions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirdeep; Mathur, Moses; Escarcega, Ricardo O; Bove, Alfred A

    2014-06-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare and aggressive malignancies. A multitude of vasoactive agents are central to the systemic effects of these tumors. The additional burden of cardiac dysfunction heralds a steep decline in quality of life and survival. Unfortunately, by the time carcinoid syndrome surfaces clinically, the likelihood of cardiac involvement is 50%. Although medical therapies such as somatostatin analogues may provide some symptom relief, they offer no mortality benefit. On the other hand, referral to surgery following early detection has shown increased survival. The prompt recognition of this disease is therefore of the utmost importance. PMID:24890526

  1. Mechanisms of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid inhibition of mammary cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Said, Thenaa K; Moraes, Ricardo CB; Sinha, Raghu; Medina, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in cell growth inhibition involved induction of pRb-2/p130 interaction and nuclear translocation with E2F-4, followed by significant repression in E2F-1 and PCNA nuclear levels, which led to inhibition in DNA synthesis in mammary epithelial cell lines. PMID:11250759

  2. What Are the Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a risk factor for skin cancer, while smoking is a risk factor for cancer of the lung and several ... affected. Factors with uncertain or unproven effects Smoking Smoking may increase the risk of getting a carcinoid tumor of the small ...

  3. Unusual presentation of carcinoid tumor as acute cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Saxton, C.R.

    1983-07-01

    The patient described had signs, symptoms, and laboratory data consistent with acute cholecystitis. A sonogram also suggested cholecystitis, and the gallbladder was not displayed by nuclear imaging. Cholecystectomy revealed the absence of stones but showed carcinoid tumor metastatic to the gallbladder.

  4. Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Metastases From Atypical Laryngeal Carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kui-Rong; Jia, Yuan-Jing; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Wang, Qin-Ying; Bao, Yang-Yang; Feng, Zhi-Ying; Yao, Hong-Tian; Fan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoids is approximately 20%. However, the pathogenesis and natural history of, and prognostic factors for, the condition remain poorly understood. We reported a 54-year-old female presented with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Laryngoscopy revealed a 0.5 × 1.5-cm reddish mass on the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis. Under general anesthesia, a biopsy sample was obtained via suspension laryngoscopy. Routine pathology revealed atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Immunohistochemical staining of the sections of primary tumor was positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, P53, and CD56. GLUT-1, p-Akt, and PI3K were negative. The Ki-67 index was 15%. Supraglottic laryngectomy and selective right-neck dissection were performed. After 6 months, the patient complained of pain in the right wall of the chest; multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules were evident at that site and in the abdomen. An abdominal nodule was biopsied and pathology revealed that the atypical metastatic carcinoid had metastasized to both cutaneous and subcutaneous areas of the abdomen. Chemotherapy was then prescribed. Currently, the intrathecal drug delivery system remains in place. No local recurrence has been detected. Furthermore, we systematically reviewed clinical manifestations of the disease, pathogenesis, prognostic factors, and treatment. The metastasis rate (cutaneous and subcutaneous) was approximately 12.2%. Thirty patients (62.5%) with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases exhibited contemporaneous lymph node invasion. The 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 44.0%, 22.0%, and 13.0%, respectively. The prognosis of patients with atypical laryngeal carcinoids was poor. Relevant prognostic factors included the level of p53, human papilloma virus status, certain hypoxic markers, and distant metastasis. No

  5. Inhibition of Cancer Cell Migration by Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    García-Hevia, Lorena; Valiente, Rafael; Fernández-Luna, José L; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Rodríguez-Fernández, Lidia; Villegas, Juan C; González, Jesús; Fanarraga, Mónica L

    2015-08-01

    Inhibiting cancer cell migration and infiltration to other tissues makes the difference between life and death. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) display intrinsic biomimetic properties with microtubules, severely interfering with the function of these protein filaments during cell proliferation, triggering cell death. Here it is shown MWCNTs disrupt the centrosomal microtubule cytoskeletal organization triggering potent antimigratory effects in different cancer cells. PMID:26097131

  6. Mullerian inhibiting substance inhibits ovarian cell growth through an Rb-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ha, T U; Segev, D L; Barbie, D; Masiakos, P T; Tran, T T; Dombkowski, D; Glander, M; Clarke, T R; Lorenzo, H K; Donahoe, P K; Maheswaran, S

    2000-11-24

    Müllerian inhibiting substance (MIS), a transforming growth factor-beta family member, causes regression of the Müllerian duct in male embryos. MIS overexpression in transgenic mice ablates the ovary, and MIS inhibits the growth of ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro, suggesting a key role for this hormone in postnatal development of the ovary. This report describes a mechanism for MIS-mediated growth inhibition in both a human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line and a cell line derived from normal ovarian surface epithelium, which is the origin of human epithelial ovarian cancers. MIS-treated cells accumulated in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle and subsequently underwent apoptosis. MIS up-regulated the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16 through an MIS type II receptor-mediated mechanism and inhibited growth in the absence of detectable or inactive Rb protein. Prolonged treatment with MIS down-regulated the Rb-related protein p130 and increased the Rb family-regulated transcription factor E2F1, overexpression of which inhibited growth. These findings demonstrate that p16 is required for MIS-mediated growth inhibition in ovarian epithelial cells and tumor cells and suggest that up-regulation of E2F1 also plays a role in this process. PMID:10958795

  7. MicroRNA expression in ileal carcinoid tumors: downregulation of microRNA-133a with tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Ruebel, Katharina; Leontovich, Alexey A; Stilling, Gail A; Zhang, Shuya; Righi, Alberto; Jin, Long; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2010-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and can function as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. The role of miRNAs in neuroendocrine tumors such as ileal carcinoids is largely unknown. We examined the differential expression of 95 miRNAs by RT-PCR using the QuantiMir System in eight matching primary and metastatic carcinoid tumors from the ileum. All miRNAs chosen for the QuantiMir System array were based on their potential functions related to cancer biology, cell development, and apoptosis. The expression of miRNAs for the samples was normalized to miRNA-197, and the matching primary and metastatic tumors were compared. There was downregulation of miRNA-133a, -145, -146, -222, and -10b in all samples between the primary and matching metastatic tumors and upregulation of miRNA-183, -488, and -19a+b in six of eight metastatic carcinoids compared to the primary tumors. miRNA-133a was further analyzed by TaqMan real-time RT-PCR and northern hybridization using six additional matching primary and metastatic samples, which supported the PCR array findings. There were significant differences in miRNA-133a expression with downregulation in the metastasis compared to the primary in the eight original cases (P<0.009) and in the six additional cases used for validation (P<0.014). Laser capture microdissection and real-time RT-PCR analysis using normal ileum found miRNA-133a expression in normal enterochromaffin cells. In situ hybridization in normal ileum showed that some of the mucosal endocrine cells expressed miRNA-133a. Both primary and metastatic ileal carcinoid tumors expressed miRNA-133a by in situ hybridization. These results provide information about novel marker miRNAs that may be used as biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets in intestinal carcinoid tumors. PMID:20037573

  8. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    PubMed

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  9. Mitochondrial uncouplers inhibit hepatic stellate cell activation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction participates in the progression of several pathologies. Although there is increasing evidence for a mitochondrial role in liver disease, little is known about its contribution to hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. In this study we investigated the role of mitochondrial activity through mild uncoupling during in vitro activation of HSCs. Methods Cultured primary human and mouse HSCs were treated with the chemical uncouplers FCCP and Valinomycin. ATP levels were measured by luciferase assay and production of reactive oxygen species was determined using the fluorescent probe DCFH-DA. Possible cytotoxicity by uncoupler treatment was evaluated by caspase 3/7 activity and cytoplasmic protease leakage. Activation of HSCs and their response to the pro-fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β was evaluated by gene expression of activation markers and signal mediators using RT-qPCR. Proliferation was measured by incorporation of EdU and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and western blot. Results FCCP and Valinomycin treatment mildly decreased ATP and reactive oxygen species levels. Both uncouplers increased the expression of mitochondrial genes such as Tfam and COXIV while inducing morphological features of quiescent mouse HSCs and abrogating TGF-β signal transduction. Mild uncoupling reduced HSC proliferation and expression of pro-fibrogenic markers of mouse and human HSCs. Conclusions Mild mitochondrial uncoupling inhibits culture-induced HSC activation and their response to pro-fibrogenic cytokines like TGF-β. These results therefore suggest mitochondrial uncoupling of HSCs as a strategy to reduce progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:22686625

  10. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  11. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  12. Inhibition of host cell catalase by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a possible mechanism for cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Almagor, M; Yatziv, S; Kahane, I

    1983-01-01

    This study demonstrates that viable Mycoplasma pneumoniae cells inhibit catalase activity in several types of intact human cells as well as in solution. Human erythrocyte catalase was inhibited up to 72%, and the inhibition of catalase in human cultured skin fibroblasts, lung carcinoma epithelial cells, and ciliated epithelial cells from human nasal polyps ranged between 75 and 80%. UV light-killed mycoplasmas failed to inhibit catalase activity both in intact cells and in vitro. After M. pneumoniae infection of human cultured skin fibroblasts, the level of malonyldialdehyde, an indicator for membrane lipid peroxidation, was 3.5 times higher than in control fibroblasts. Virulent M. pneumoniae completely inhibited catalase activity in solution, whereas the nonvirulent strains had a lesser ability to inhibit catalase activity. These findings suggest that as a result of host cell catalase inhibition by M. pneumoniae, the toxicity of the hydrogen peroxide generated by the microorganism and the affected cell is enhanced, thereby inducing host cell damage. PMID:6407999

  13. Ozone selectively inhibits growth of human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, F.; Kao, M.S.; Lee, S.C.; Hagar, W.L.; Sweet, W.E.

    1980-08-01

    The growth of human cancer cells from lung, breast, and uterine tumors was selectively inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by ozone at 0.3 to 0.8 part per million of ozone in ambient air during 8 days of culture. Human lung diploid fibroblasts served as noncancerous control cells. The presence of ozone at 0.3 to 0.5 part per million inhibited cancer cell growth 40 and 60 percent, respectively. The noncancerous lung cells were unaffected at these levels. Exposure to ozone at 0.8 part per million inhibited cancer cell growth more than 90 percent and control cell growth less than 50 percent. Evidently, the mechanisms for defense against ozone damage are impaired in human cancer cells.

  14. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyesun; Oh, Seung-ick; Hong, Sunghoi E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Sung, Jiwon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Koh, Eui Kwan

    2014-11-17

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields.

  15. Apaf1 inhibition promotes cell recovery from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gortat, Anna; Sancho, Mónica; Mondragón, Laura; Messeguer, Àngel; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Orzáez, Mar

    2015-11-01

    The protein apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf1) is the central component of the apoptosome, a multiprotein complex that activates procaspase-9 after cytochrome c release from the mitochondria in the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. We have developed a vital method that allows fluorescence-activated cell sorting of cells at different stages of the apoptotic pathway and demonstrated that upon pharmacological inhibition of Apaf1, cells recover from doxorubicin- or hypoxia-induced early apoptosis to normal healthy cell. Inhibiting Apaf1 not only prevents procaspase-9 activation but delays massive mitochondrial damage allowing cell recovery. PMID:26361785

  16. Carcinoid heart disease from ovarian primary presenting with acute pericarditis and biventricular failure

    PubMed Central

    Vergani, D; Massironi, L; Lombardi, F; Fiorentini, C

    1998-01-01

    A case is described of a 54 year old woman who had acute pericarditis with large exudative effusion accompanied by severe right and left ventricular failure. The patient was finally diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian carcinoid teratoma. She was treated with octreotide—a somatostatin analogue—followed by radical surgical resection of the neoplasm. At one year follow up only mild carcinoid tricuspid regurgitation remained. Only 16 cases of carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian primary have been described in literature. Moreover clinically manifest acute, non-metastatic pericarditis and left heart failure are not considered as possible presentations of carcinoid heart disease, whatever the origin. In a recent series a small pericardial effusion was considered an infrequent and unexpected echocardiographic finding in carcinoid heart patients. One case of "carcinoid pericarditis" has previously been described as a consequence of pericardial metastasis. Left sided heart involvement is usually caused by bronchial carcinoids or patency of foramen ovale; both were excluded in the case presented.

 Keywords: carcinoid heart disease;  ovarian tumour;  acute pericarditis;  heart failure PMID:10065036

  17. Which endoscopic treatment is the best for small rectal carcinoid tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Kim, Jin Su; Cheung, Dae Young; Cho, Young-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of rectal carcinoids is rising because of the widespread use of screening colonoscopy. Rectal carcinoids detected incidentally are usually in earlier stages at diagnosis. Rectal carcinoids estimated endoscopically as < 10 mm in diameter without atypical features and confined to the submucosal layer can be removed endoscopically. Here, we review the efficacy and safety of various endoscopic treatments for small rectal carcinoid tumors, including conventional polypectomy, endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), cap-assisted EMR (or aspiration lumpectomy), endoscopic submucosal resection with ligating device, endoscopic submucosal dissection, and transanal endoscopic microsurgery. It is necessary to carefully choose an effective and safe primary resection method for complete histological resection. PMID:24147192

  18. Inhibition Of Call-Cell Binding By Kipid Assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O. , Bargatze, Robert F.

    2003-12-16

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  19. Vitamin D inhibition of lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Lou, Yuqing; Zhang, Weiyan; Dong, Qianggang; Han, Baohui

    2014-11-01

    Vitamin D has the capability to inhibit tumor cell proliferation and promote tumor cell apoptosis but whether this mechanism exists in lung adenocarcinoma cells remains to be studied. Our objective is to explore whether vitamin D has the capability to inhibit lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and synergize with cisplatin. Our method was to explore the effect of different concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D3 with or without cisplatin on lung adenocarcinoma cells by detecting cell proliferation rates at different time points. 1,25(OH)2D3 was capsulated with nanomaterial before acting on lung adenocarcinoma cells, and cell proliferation rates at different time points were detected with the CCK-8 method. When vitamin D was applied at a concentration of 1 × 10(-7) and 1 × 10(-6) mol/L on A549, PC9, SPC-A1, and H1650 cells for 72 h, no inhibition occurred on cell proliferation. Between the concentrations of 1 × 10(-5) and 0.5 × 10(-5) mol/L, inhibition on cell proliferation increased with drug action time. Between the concentration of 2.5 × 10(-5) and 0.03 × 10(-5) mol/L, inhibition on cell proliferation increased with increasing drug concentration. Analysis using bivariate correlations showed that the correlation coefficient of the proliferation inhibition rate and drug content was 0.580 (p < 0.0001). The correlation coefficient of proliferation inhibition rate and the drug action time was 0.379 (p = 0.01). The combined use of vitamin D and dichlorodiammine-platinum(II) (DDP) significantly increased the inhibition rate on A549 cell proliferation, which peaked after culturing for 96 h (Table 4). Further analysis using bivariate correlations showed that the correlation coefficient between proliferation inhibition rate and DDP concentration was 0.319 (p < 0.0001). The correlation coefficient of the proliferation inhibition rate and vitamin D concentration was 0.269 (p < 0.0001). The correlation coefficient of proliferation inhibition and drug action time was 0.221(p

  20. Carcinoid crisis induced by receptor radionuclide therapy with 90Y-DOTATOC in a case of liver metastases from bronchial neuroendocrine tumor (atypical carcinoid).

    PubMed

    Davì, M V; Bodei, L; Francia, G; Bartolomei, M; Oliani, C; Scilanga, L; Reghellin, D; Falconi, M; Paganelli, G; Lo Cascio, V; Ferdeghini, M

    2006-06-01

    SS receptors are overexpressed in many tumors, mainly of neuroendocrine origin, thus enabling the treatment with SS analogs. The clinical experience of receptor radionuclide therapy with the new analog [90Y-DOTA0-Tyr3 ]-octreotide [90Y-DOTATOC] has been developed over the last decade and is gaining a pivotal role in the therapeutic workout of these tumors. It is well known that some procedures performed in diagnostic and therapeutic management of endocrine tumors, such as agobiopsy and hepatic chemoembolization, can be associated with the occurrence of symptoms related to the release of vasoactive amines and/or hormonal peptides from tumor cell lysis. This is the first report of a severe carcinoid crisis developed after receptor radionuclide therapy with 90Y-DOTATOC administered in a patient affected by liver metastases from bronchial neuroendocrine tumor (atypical carcinoid). Despite protection with H1 receptor antagonists, octreotide and corticosteroids, few days after the therapy the patient complained of persistent flushing of the face and upper trunk, severe labial and periocular oedema, diarrhoea and loss of appetite. These symptoms increased and required new hospitalisation. The patient received iv infusion of octreotide associated with H1 and H2 receptor antagonists and corticosteroid therapy, which induced symptom remission within few days. The case here reported confirms that radionuclide therapy is highly effective in determining early rupture of metastatic tissue and also suggests that pre-medication should be implemented before the radiopeptide administration associated with a close monitoring of the patient in the following days. PMID:16840837

  1. Bartonella henselae inhibits apoptosis in Mono Mac 6 cells.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Volkhard A J; Schairer, Annette; Neumann, Diana; Grassl, Guntram A; Lauber, Kirsten; Lebiedziejewski, Maria; Schaller, Martin; Kyme, Pierre; Wesselborg, Sebastian; Autenrieth, Ingo B

    2005-01-01

    Bartonella henselae causes the vasculoproliferative disorders bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis probably resulting from the release of vasculoendothelial growth factor (VEGF) from infected epithelial or monocytic host cells. Here we demonstrate that B. henselae in addition to VEGF induction was also capable of inhibiting the endogenous sucide programme of monocytic host cells. Our results show that B. henselae inhibits pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC)-induced apoptosis in Mono Mac 6 cells. B. henselae was observed to be present in a vacuolic compartment of Mono Mac 6 cells. Direct contact of B. henselae with Mono Mac 6 cells was crucial for inhibition of apoptosis as shown by the use of a two-chamber model. Inhibition of apoptosis was paralleled by diminished caspase-3 activity which was significantly reduced in PDTC-stimulated and B. henselae-infected cells. The anti-apoptotic effect of B. henselae was accompanied by (i) the activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB and (ii) the induction of cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins-1 and -2 (cIAP-1, -2). Our results suggest a new synergistic mechanism in B. henselae pathogenicity by (i) inhibition of host cell apoptosis via activation of NF-kappaB and (ii) induction of host cell VEGF secretion. PMID:15617526

  2. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  3. Combined MET inhibition and topoisomerase I inhibition block cell growth of small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rolle, Cleo E; Kanteti, Rajani; Surati, Mosmi; Nandi, Suvobroto; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; Yala, Soheil; Tretiakova, Maria; Arif, Qudsia; Hembrough, Todd; Brand, Toni M; Wheeler, Deric L; Husain, Aliya N; Vokes, Everett E; Bharti, Ajit; Salgia, Ravi

    2014-03-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a devastating disease, and current therapies have not greatly improved the 5-year survival rates. Topoisomerase (Top) inhibition is a treatment modality for SCLC; however, the response is short lived. Consequently, our research has focused on improving SCLC therapeutics through the identification of novel targets. Previously, we identified MNNG HOS transforming gene (MET) to be overexpressed and functional in SCLC. Herein, we investigated the therapeutic potential of combinatorial targeting of MET using SU11274 and Top1 using 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38). MET and TOP1 gene copy numbers and protein expression were determined in 29 patients with limited (n = 11) and extensive (n = 18) disease. MET gene copy number was significantly increased (>6 copies) in extensive disease compared with limited disease (P = 0.015). Similar TOP1 gene copy numbers were detected in limited and extensive disease. Immunohistochemical staining revealed a significantly higher Top1 nuclear expression in extensive (0.93) versus limited (0.15) disease (P = 0.04). Interestingly, a significant positive correlation was detected between MET gene copy number and Top1 nuclear expression (r = 0.5). In vitro stimulation of H82 cells revealed hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced nuclear colocalization of p-MET and Top1. Furthermore, activation of the HGF/MET axis enhanced Top1 activity, which was abrogated by SU11274. Combination of SN-38 with SU11274 dramatically decreased SCLC growth as compared with either drug alone. Collectively, these findings suggest that the combinatorial inhibition of MET and Top1 is a potentially efficacious treatment strategy for SCLC. PMID:24327519

  4. 90Y-Edotreotide for Metastatic Carcinoid Refractory to Octreotide

    PubMed Central

    Bushnell, David L.; O'Dorisio, Thomas M.; O'Dorisio, M. Sue; Menda, Yusuf; Hicks, Rodney J.; Van Cutsem, Eric; Baulieu, Jean-Louis; Borson-Chazot, Francoise; Anthony, Lowell; Benson, Al B.; Oberg, Kjell; Grossman, Ashley B.; Connolly, Mary; Bouterfa, Hakim; Li, Yong; Kacena, Katherine A.; LaFrance, Norman; Pauwels, Stanislas A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Metastatic carcinoid is an incurable malignancy whose symptoms, such as diarrhea and flushing, can be debilitating and occasionally life-threatening. Although symptom relief is available with octreotide, the disease eventually becomes refractory to octreotide, leaving no proven treatment options. The goal of this study was to evaluate the clinical effect of using 90Y-edotreotide to treat symptomatic patients with carcinoid tumors. Patients and Methods Patients enrolled had metastatic carcinoid, at least one sign/symptom refractory to octreotide, and at least one measurable lesion. Study treatment consisted of three cycles of 4.4 GBq (120 mCi) 90Y-edotreotide each, once every 6 weeks. Results Ninety patients were enrolled in the study. Using Southwest Oncology Group tumor response criteria, 67 (74.%) of 90 patients (95% CI, 65.4% to 83.4%) were objectively stable or responded. A statistically significant linear trend toward improvement was demonstrated across all 12 symptoms assessed. Median progression-free survival was significantly greater (P = .03) for the 38 patients who had durable diarrhea improvement than the 18 patients who did not (18.2 v 7.9 months, respectively). Adverse events (AEs) were reported in 96.7% (87 of 90) of patients. These AEs consisted primarily of reversible GI events (76 of 90), which could be caused in part by concomitant administration of amino acid solution given to reduce radiation exposure to the kidneys. There was one case each of grade 3 oliguria and grade 4 renal failure, each lasting 6 days. Conclusion 90Y-edotreotide treatment improved symptoms associated with malignant carcinoid among subjects with no treatment alternatives. Treatment was well-tolerated and had an acceptable expected AE profile. PMID:20194865

  5. HEMA inhibits migration of dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Drake W.; Wu, Hongkun; Oh, Ju-Eun; Fakhar, Camron; Kang, Mo K.; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Park, No-Hee; Kim, Reuben H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cell migration is an important step in pulpal wound healing. Although components in the resin-based dental materials are known to have adverse effects on pulp wound healing including proliferation and mineralization, their effects on cell migration have been scarcely examined. Here, we investigated effects of 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) on migration of dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) in vitro. Methods Cell viability was assessed using MTT assay, and cell migration was evaluated using wound scratch assay and transwell migration assay at non-cytotoxic doses. Western blotting was used to examine pathways associated with migration such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Results There were no drastic changes in the cell viability below 3mM HEMA. When DPSC were treated with HEMA at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.5mM, cell migration was diminished. HEMA-treated DPSC exhibited the loss of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in a dose-dependent manner. The HEMA-mediated inhibition of cell migration was associated with phosphorylation of p38 but not GSK3, ERK or JNK pathways. When we inhibited the p38 signaling pathway using a p38 inhibitor, migration of DPSC was suppressed. Conclusion HEMA inhibits migration of dental pulp cells in vitro, suggesting that poor pulpal wound healing under resin-based dental materials may be due, in part, to inhibition of cell migration by HEMA. PMID:23953290

  6. Treatment of carcinoid syndrome with recombinant interferon alpha-2a.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, M; Bajetta, E; Zilembo, N; de Braud, F; Di Leo, A; Verusio, C; D'Aprile, M; Scanni, A; Barduagni, M; Barduagni A [corrected to Barduagni, M

    1993-01-01

    The prognosis and the quality of life of patients with carcinoid tumors is related either to symptoms from the substances secreted or to progressive tumor growth. Medical treatment with cytotoxic agents is of marginal value for increasing life expectancy and reducing clinical symptoms. Recent studies with interferon have shown interesting results. In the present investigation, 22 patients with carcinoid tumors and syndrome were treated with recombinant interferon alpha-2a (r-IFN alpha-2a) at the dose of 6 x 10(6) IU intramuscularly daily for 8 weeks and three times weekly thereafter. The primary tumor was localized in the foregut (n = 11), midgut (n = 7), hindgut (n = 1), and unknown site (n = 3). Most cases had liver metastasis. Seventeen patients had elevated 5-hydroxyindoloacetic acid (5-HIAA) excretion and 5 had flushing and/or diarrhea as the only clinical manifestation. Six cases presented a complete syndrome (flushing, diarrhea and 5-HIAA excretion). Control of symptoms was obtained in 80% and a 5-HIAA level reduction in 58% of the patients. The interferon treatment was more effective for control of the carcinoid syndrome than for control of tumor growth. The treatment was well tolerated and fever, myalgia, anorexia and fatigue were the most frequent side-effects. PMID:7686766

  7. Blue light inhibits proliferation of melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Anja; Distler, Elisabeth; Klapczynski, Anna; Arpino, Fabiola; Kuch, Natalia; Simon-Keller, Katja; Sticht, Carsten; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Photobiomodulation with blue light is used for several treatment paradigms such as neonatal jaundice, psoriasis and back pain. However, little is known about possible side effects concerning melanoma cells in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of blue LED irradiation with respect to proliferation of melanoma cells. For that purpose we used the human malignant melanoma cell line SK-MEL28. Cell proliferation was decreased in blue light irradiated cells where the effect size depended on light irradiation dosage. Furthermore, with a repeated irradiation of the melanoma cells on two consecutive days the effect could be intensified. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting with Annexin V and Propidium iodide labeling did not show a higher number of dead cells after blue light irradiation compared to non-irradiated cells. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulated genes in pathways connected to anti-inflammatory response, like B cell signaling and phagosome. Most prominent pathways with up-regulation of genes were cytochrome P450, steroid hormone biosynthesis. Furthermore, even though cells showed a decrease in proliferation, genes connected to the cell cycle were up-regulated after 24h. This result is concordant with XTT test 48h after irradiation, where irradiated cells showed the same proliferation as the no light negative control. In summary, proliferation of melanoma cells can be decreased using blue light irradiation. Nevertheless, the gene expression analysis has to be further evaluated and more studies, such as in-vivo experiments, are warranted to further assess the safety of blue light treatment.

  8. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  9. Lithium inhibits tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastasis through the inhibition of TGFBIp expression in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Yong-Sun; Lee, Rina; Lee, Boram; Choi, Seung-il; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of mortality in cancer patients. Although there are many anti-cancer drugs targeting tumor growth, anti-metastatic agents are rarely developed. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are crucial for cancer progression; in particular, lymphangiogenesis is pivotal for metastasis in cancer. Here we report that lithium inhibits colon cancer metastasis by blocking lymphangiogenesis. Lithium reduces the expression of transforming growth factor-β-induced protein (TGFBIp) in colon cancer cells by inhibiting Smad3 phosphorylation via GSK3β inactivation. Moreover, lithium inhibits lymphatic endothelial cell migration, which is increased upon TGFBIp expression in tumor cells. Lithium had no significant effect on SW620 tumor growth in vitro and in vivo; however, it inhibited lymphangiogenesis in tumors. In tumor xenografts model, lithium was found to prevent metastasis to the lungs, liver, and lymph nodes by inhibiting TGFBIp-induced tumor lymphangiogenesis. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a novel role of lithium in the inhibition of colon cancer metastasis by blocking TGFBIp expression, and thereby TGFBIp-induced lymphangiogenesis, in primary tumors. PMID:26857144

  10. Lithium inhibits tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastasis through the inhibition of TGFBIp expression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Yong-Sun; Lee, Rina; Lee, Boram; Choi, Seung-Il; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of mortality in cancer patients. Although there are many anti-cancer drugs targeting tumor growth, anti-metastatic agents are rarely developed. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are crucial for cancer progression; in particular, lymphangiogenesis is pivotal for metastasis in cancer. Here we report that lithium inhibits colon cancer metastasis by blocking lymphangiogenesis. Lithium reduces the expression of transforming growth factor-β-induced protein (TGFBIp) in colon cancer cells by inhibiting Smad3 phosphorylation via GSK3β inactivation. Moreover, lithium inhibits lymphatic endothelial cell migration, which is increased upon TGFBIp expression in tumor cells. Lithium had no significant effect on SW620 tumor growth in vitro and in vivo; however, it inhibited lymphangiogenesis in tumors. In tumor xenografts model, lithium was found to prevent metastasis to the lungs, liver, and lymph nodes by inhibiting TGFBIp-induced tumor lymphangiogenesis. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a novel role of lithium in the inhibition of colon cancer metastasis by blocking TGFBIp expression, and thereby TGFBIp-induced lymphangiogenesis, in primary tumors. PMID:26857144

  11. Ghrelin Inhibits Oligodendrocyte Cell Death by Attenuating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, we reported the antiapoptotic effect of ghrelin in spinal cord injury-induced apoptotic cell death of oligodendrocytes. However, how ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocytes apoptosis, is still unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether ghrelin inhibits microglia activation and thereby inhibits oligodendrocyte apoptosis. Methods Using total cell extracts prepared from BV-2 cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without ghrelin, the levels of p-p38 phosphor-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38MAPK), phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), p-c-Jun, and pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) were examined by Western blot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated by using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. To examine the effect of ghrelin on oligodendrocyte cell death, oligodendrocytes were cocultured in transwell chambers of 24-well plates with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. After 48 hours incubation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2'-deoxyuridine, 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling staining were assessed. Results Ghrelin treatment significantly decreased levels of p-p38MAPK, p-JNK, p-c-Jun, and proNGF in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. ROS production increased in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells was also significantly inhibited by ghrelin treatment. In addition, ghrelin significantly inhibited oligodendrocyte cell death when cocultured with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Conclusion Ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by decreasing proNGF and ROS production as well as p38MAPK and JNK activation in activated microglia as an anti-inflammatory hormone. PMID:25309797

  12. Cell proliferation inhibition in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Extended durations of spaceflight have been shown to be deleterious on an organismic level; however, mechanisms underlying cellular sensitivity to the gravitational environment remain to be elucidated. The majority of the gravitational studies to date indicates that cell regulatory pathways may be influenced by their gravitational environment. Still, few cell biology experiments have been performed in space flight and even fewer experiments have been repeated on subsequent flights. With flight opportunities on STS-50, 54, and 57, Sf9 cells were flown in the BioServe Fluids Processing Apparatus and cell proliferation was measured with and without exposure to a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor. Results from these flights indicate that the Sf9 cells grew comparable to ground controls, that the CeReS inhibitor bound to its specific receptor, and that its signal transduction cascade was not gravity sensitive.

  13. Selective potentiation of lometrexol growth inhibition by dipyridamole through cell-specific inhibition of hypoxanthine salvage.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, R. N.; Aherne, G. W.; Curtin, N. J.

    1997-01-01

    The novel antifolate lometrexol (5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolate) inhibits de novo purine biosynthesis, and co-incubation with hypoxanthine abolishes its cytotoxicity. The prevention of hypoxanthine rescue from an antipurine antifolate by the nucleoside transport inhibitor dipyridamole was investigated for the first time in nine human and rodent cell lines from seven different tissues of origin. In A549, HeLa and CHO cells, dipyridamole prevented hypoxanthine rescue and so growth was inhibited by the combination of lometrexol, dipyridamole and hypoxanthine, but in HT29, HCT116, KK47, MDA231, CCRF CEM and L1210 cells dipyridamole had no effect and the combination did not inhibit growth. Dipyridamole inhibited hypoxanthine uptake in A549 but not in CCRF CEM cells. Dipyridamole prevented the hypoxanthine-induced repletion of dGTP pools, depleted by lometrexol, in A549 but not in CCRF CEM cells. Thus, the selective growth-inhibitory effect of the combination of lometrexol, dipyridamole and hypoxanthine is apparently due to the dipyridamole sensitivity (ds) or insensitivity (di) of hypoxanthine transport. Both the human and murine leukaemic cells are of the di phenotype. If this reflects the transport phenotype of normal bone marrow it would suggest that the combination of lometrexol, dipyridamole and hypoxanthine might be selectively toxic to certain tumour types and have reduced toxicity to the bone marrow. PMID:9374375

  14. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang Zhang, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  15. Smooth Muscle Cell-targeted RNA Aptamer Inhibits Neointimal Formation.

    PubMed

    Thiel, William H; Esposito, Carla L; Dickey, David D; Dassie, Justin P; Long, Matthew E; Adam, Joshua; Streeter, Jennifer; Schickling, Brandon; Takapoo, Maysam; Flenker, Katie S; Klesney-Tait, Julia; Franciscis, Vittorio de; Miller, Francis J; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-04-01

    Inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation by drug eluting stents has markedly reduced intimal hyperplasia and subsequent in-stent restenosis. However, the effects of antiproliferative drugs on endothelial cells (EC) contribute to delayed re-endothelialization and late stent thrombosis. Cell-targeted therapies to inhibit VSMC remodeling while maintaining EC health are necessary to allow vascular healing while preventing restenosis. We describe an RNA aptamer (Apt 14) that functions as a smart drug by preferentially targeting VSMCs as compared to ECs and other myocytes. Furthermore, Apt 14 inhibits phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase-B (PI3K/Akt) and VSMC migration in response to multiple agonists by a mechanism that involves inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-β phosphorylation. In a murine model of carotid injury, treatment of vessels with Apt 14 reduces neointimal formation to levels similar to those observed with paclitaxel. Importantly, we confirm that Apt 14 cross-reacts with rodent and human VSMCs, exhibits a half-life of ~300 hours in human serum, and does not elicit immune activation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We describe a VSMC-targeted RNA aptamer that blocks cell migration and inhibits intimal formation. These findings provide the foundation for the translation of cell-targeted RNA therapeutics to vascular disease. PMID:26732878

  16. Marital Status and Survival in Patients with Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Greenleaf, Erin K.; Cooper, Amanda B.; Hollenbeak, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Marital status is a known prognostic factor in overall and disease-specific survival in several types of cancer. The impact of marital status on survival in patients with carcinoid tumors remains unknown. We hypothesized that married patients have higher rates of survival than similar unmarried patients with carcinoid tumors. METHODS Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, we identified 23,126 people diagnosed with a carcinoid tumor between 2000 and 2011 and stratified them according to marital status. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to compare the characteristics and outcomes between patient cohorts. Overall and cancer-related survival were analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Multivariable survival analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards models (hazards ratio [HR]), controlling for demographics and tumor-related and treatment-related variables. Propensity score analysis was performed to determine surgical intervention distributions among married and unmarried (ie, single, separated, divorced, widowed) patients. RESULTS Marital status was significantly related to both overall and cancer-related survival in patients with carcinoid tumors. Divorced and widowed patients had worse overall survival (HR, 1.33 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.08–1.33] and 1.34 [95% CI, 1.22–1.46], respectively) and cancer-related survival (HR, 1.15 [95% CI, 1.00–1.31] and 1.15 [95% CI, 1.03–1.29], respectively) than married patients over five years. Single and separated patients had worse overall survival (HR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.08–1.33] and 1.62 [95% CI, 1.25–2.11], respectively) than married patients over five years, but not worse cancer-related survival. Unmarried patients were more likely than matched married patients to undergo definitive surgical intervention (62.67% vs 53.11%, respectively, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Even after controlling for other prognostic factors, married patients have a

  17. Crocetinic acid inhibits hedgehog signaling to inhibit pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Parthasarathy; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Paul, Santanu; Kwatra, Deep; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Islam, Shamima; Harihar, Sitaram; Ramalingam, Satish; Gutheil, William; Putty, Sandeep; Pradhan, Rohan; Padhye, Subhash; Welch, Danny R.; Anant, Shrikant; Dhar, Animesh

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and no significant treatment is currently available. Here, we describe the effect of crocetinic acid, which we purified from commercial saffron compound crocetin using high performance liquid chromatography. Crocetinic acid inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, it induced apoptosis. Moreover, the compound significantly inhibited epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, crocetinic acid decreased the number and size of the pancospheres in a dose-dependent manner, and suppressed the expression of the marker protein DCLK-1 (Doublecortin Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase-1) suggesting that crocetinic acid targets cancer stem cells (CSC). To understand the mechanism of CSC inhibition, the signaling pathways affected by purified crocetinic acid were dissected. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) upon binding to its cognate receptor patched, allows smoothened to accumulate and activate Gli transcription factor. Crocetinic acid inhibited the expression of both Shh and smoothened. Finally, these data were confirmed in vivo where the compound at a dose of 0.5 mg/Kg bw suppressed growth of tumor xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that purified crocetinic acid inhibits pancreatic CSC, thereby inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis. PMID:26317547

  18. Crocetinic acid inhibits hedgehog signaling to inhibit pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Parthasarathy; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Paul, Santanu; Kwatra, Deep; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Islam, Shamima; Harihar, Sitaram; Ramalingam, Satish; Gutheil, William; Putty, Sandeep; Pradhan, Rohan; Padhye, Subhash; Welch, Danny R; Anant, Shrikant; Dhar, Animesh

    2015-09-29

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and no significant treatment is currently available. Here, we describe the effect of crocetinic acid, which we purified from commercial saffron compound crocetin using high performance liquid chromatography. Crocetinic acid inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, it induced apoptosis. Moreover, the compound significantly inhibited epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, crocetinic acid decreased the number and size of the pancospheres in a dose-dependent manner, and suppressed the expression of the marker protein DCLK-1 (Doublecortin Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase-1) suggesting that crocetinic acid targets cancer stem cells (CSC). To understand the mechanism of CSC inhibition, the signaling pathways affected by purified crocetinic acid were dissected. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) upon binding to its cognate receptor patched, allows smoothened to accumulate and activate Gli transcription factor. Crocetinic acid inhibited the expression of both Shh and smoothened. Finally, these data were confirmed in vivo where the compound at a dose of 0.5 mg/Kg bw suppressed growth of tumor xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that purified crocetinic acid inhibits pancreatic CSC, thereby inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis. PMID:26317547

  19. Primary Carcinoid Tumour of the Kidney: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Omiyale, Ayodeji O.; Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2013-01-01

    Context. Primary renal carcinoid tumours are rare. Their pathogenesis is unknown and the clinical presentation is similar to other renal tumours thus posing diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians. Objectives. To review the literature for case reports of primary renal carcinoids. Methods. Literature was extensively searched for case reports for primary renal carcinoids. Reports of metastatic carcinoids to the kidneys were excluded. Results. Approximately less than 90 cases of primary carcinoid tumours of the kidney have been reported in the literature. A total of 29 cases of primary renal carcinoids were reviewed. The mean age of presentation was 48 years (range 29–75) with both right kidney (48.3%) and left kidney (44.8%) being equally affected. 28.6% of the cases reviewed were diagnosed as an incidental finding. The mean followup time was 20 months with 73.1% of patients without evidence of disease after surgical treatment (radical or partial nephrectomy). Primary carcinoid tumours of the kidney are often well differentiated tumours. They are often misdiagnosed because of their rarity and similar presentation with other renal tumours. Conclusions. Primary carcinoid tumours of the kidney are rare tumours with an indolent course with frequent metastasis. Metastatic work up and followup is required in their management. PMID:23997766

  20. [Cases of devascularization of the liver in hepatic metastases of carcinoid tumors. Two cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bricot, R; Boutboul, R; Le Treut, Y P

    1981-01-01

    The authors report two cases of hepatic artery's ligature in patients suffering from pan-hepatic metastases in carcinoid tumor of the bowels. They have come to believe that the hepatic devascularization (by removing the carcinoid syndrome and associated hepatalgia) offers a more comfortable chance of survival to the patient, giving him often the illusion that he is cured. PMID:7204511

  1. Hydroxyflavanone inhibits gastric carcinoma MGC-803 cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Zhan, Zhuo; Cui, Mingfu; Gao, Yongjian; Wang, Dayu; Feng, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) is the most common primary malignancy of the digestive tract, with increasing incidence in many countries. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to assess inhibition of HepG2 cell proliferation by 2’-hydroxyflavanone. The STAT3 pathway was performed. 2’-hydroxyflavanone reduced inhibitory effects on MGC-803 cell proliferation. 2’-hydroxyflavanone exhibited the highest inhibition rate. Treatment of MGC-803 cells with 400, 200, and 100 μg/ml 2’-hydroxyflavanone resulted in 88.9±0.7%, 81.2±0.5%, 68.4±0.5% decrease in cell viability, respectively, indicating an IC50 of 9.3 μg/ml. The 100 μg/ml 2’-hydroxyflavanone can significantly inhibit the STAT3 pathway activation. 2’-hydroxyflavanone inhibits MGC-803 cell proliferation by inhibiting STAT3 pathway activation. This extract is therefore a potential drug candidate for treatment of liver cancer. PMID:26629250

  2. A case of carcinoid tumor of the terminal ileum and simultaneous ovarian dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hosam

    2011-04-01

    Carcinoid tumors are slow-growing malignant neoplasms associated with an indolent clinical course. About 60% of such tumors are located within the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we describe the first case, to our knowledge, of a carcinoid tumor of the terminal ileum and a simultaneous ovarian dermoid cyst. A 57-year-old woman was presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and clinical signs of mechanical bowel obstruction. Radiograph and computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed hydroaeric levels. Laparotomy revealed a mass in the terminal ileum and a right ovarian cystic mass. Right hemicolectomy and right oopherectomy were performed. The histopathological workup showed a carcinoid tumor of the terminal ileum and ovarian dermoid cyst. Small intestinal carcinoid tumor, an uncommon disease, has been reported earlier to coincide with various neoplasms. No association between small intestinal carcinoid tumor and ovarian dermoid cyst has been reported earlier in the English literature. PMID:21389861

  3. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  4. Inhibition of cell adhesion by phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Kouichi; Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Miyake, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphorylation status of the C-terminal Thr residues of Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (ERM) is often linked to cell shape change. To determine the role of phophorylated ERM, we modified phosphorylation status of ERM and investigated changes in cell adhesion and morphology. Treatment with Calyculin-A (Cal-A), a protein phosphatase inhibitor, dramatically augmented phosphorylated ERM (phospho-ERM). Cal-A-treatment or expression of phospho-mimetic Moesin mutant (Moesin-TD) induced cell rounding in adherent cells. Moreover, reattachment of detached cells to substrate was inhibited by either treatment. Phospho-ERM, Moesin-TD and actin cytoskeleton were observed at the plasma membrane of such round cells. Augmented cell surface rigidity was also observed in both cases. Meanwhile, non-adherent KG-1 cells were rather rich in phospho-ERM. Treatment with Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor that dephosphorylates phospho-ERM, up-regulated the integrin-dependent adhesion of KG-1 cells to substrate. These findings strongly suggest the followings: (1) Phospho-ERM inhibit cell adhesion, and therefore, dephosphorylation of ERM proteins is essential for cell adhesion. (2) Phospho-ERM induce formation and/or maintenance of spherical cell shape. (3) ERM are constitutively both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated in cultured adherent and non-adherent cells. PMID:26555866

  5. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  6. Actein Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Migration in Human Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Jingdong; Guo, Qinghao

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is one of the most common malignant bone cancers worldwide. Although the traditional chemotherapies have made some progression in the past decades, the mortality of osteosarcoma in children and adolescent is very high. Herein, the role of actein in osteosarcoma was explored. Material/Methods Cell viability assay was performed in osteosarcoma cell lines 143B and U2OS. Colony formation analysis was included when cells were treated with different doses of actin. Cell cycle assay was conducted to further examine the role of actein. Cell apoptotic rate and the relative activities of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 were detected in 143B and U2OS osteosarcoma cells. Moreover, transwell assays were used to explore the effects of actein on cell metastasis. Results Actein significantly inhibited osteosarcoma cell viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Actein also dramatically suppressed the colony formation ability in osteosarcoma143B and U2OS cells. It was revealed that osteosarcoma cells were arrested in G0/G1 phase in the cell cycle progression and induced to apoptosis by administration of actein. The activities of pro-apoptotic factors such as caspase-3 and caspase-9 were significantly increased by actein. Furthermore, administration of actein decreased cell migrated and invasive abilities in both 143B and U2OS cell lines. Conclusions Actein inhibits tumor growth by inducing cell apoptosis in osteosarcoma. The inhibitive roles of actein in cell proliferation, migration and invasion suggest that actein may serve as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:27173526

  7. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Musser, Jeffrey M. B.; Heatley, J. Jill; Koinis, Anastasia V.; Suchodolski, Paulette F.; Guo, Jianhua; Escandon, Paulina; Tizard, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 μg/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture. PMID:26222794

  8. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Musser, Jeffrey M B; Heatley, J Jill; Koinis, Anastasia V; Suchodolski, Paulette F; Guo, Jianhua; Escandon, Paulina; Tizard, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 μg/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture. PMID:26222794

  9. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy. PMID:27551496

  10. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy. PMID:27551496

  11. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  12. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  13. Inhibition of cytokine production by a tumor cell product.

    PubMed Central

    Farram, E; Nelson, M; Nelson, D S; Moon, D K

    1982-01-01

    Supernatants from cultured mouse and human tumour cells, but not mouse or guinea-pig fibroblasts, inhibited the production of a lymphokine, macrophage chemotactic factor, by PHA-stimulated mouse spleen cells. The supernatants affected spleen cells from old, but not young, mice. They were most active if added at the start of the spleen cell culture and did not act by binding phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). The active material had an approximate molecular weight, on membrane filtration, of 1000-10,000 and could be bound to and eluted from Con A-Sepharose. Tumour supernatant factor(s) of similar molecular weight inhibited the production of interleukin 1 (lymphocyte activating factor) in response to lipopolysaccharide by stimulated thioglycollate-induced peritoneal exudate macrophages, but not by Corynebacterium parvum-activated macrophages. Similar tumour-produced material has been found to inhibit the early phase of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions in older mice. It is suggested that this effect is due, at least in part, to inhibition of interleukin 1 production leading to inhibition of lymphokine production. PMID:7047385

  14. Sesquiterpenoid Lactones in Tanacetum huronense Inhibit Human Glioblastoma Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Amila A; Bejcek, Bruce E; Zhang, Chuan-Rui; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2016-05-01

    Tanacetum huronense (Lake Huron tansy), which is native to the upper Midwest region of USA and Canada, was examined for the presence of anticancer compounds using an in vitro human tumor cell proliferation inhibition assay, with glioblastoma derived cell line U-87 MG. Bioassay-directed purification of the ethyl acetate extract of the aerial portion of this plant identified six active sesquiterpenoid lactones (1-6). Among these, compounds 5 and 6 are new structural analogs. One of the most abundant isolates, tanacin (4), exhibited the greatest inhibition with an IC50 value of 4.5 μg/mL. PMID:27319121

  15. Inhibition of telomerase recruitment and cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Mai; Nandakumar, Jayakrishnan; Sullivan, Kelly D; Espinosa, Joaquín M; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-11-15

    Continued proliferation of human cells requires maintenance of telomere length, usually accomplished by telomerase. Telomerase is recruited to chromosome ends by interaction with a patch of amino acids (the TEL patch, for TPP1 glutamate (E) and leucine (L)-rich patch) on the surface of telomere protein TPP1. In previous studies, interruption of this interaction by mutation prevented telomere extension in HeLa cells, but the cell culture continued to grow. We now show that the telomerase inhibitor BIBR1532 acts together with TEL patch mutations to inhibit the growth of HeLa cell lines and that apoptosis is a prominent mechanism of death of these cells. Survivor cells take over the population beginning around 40 days in culture. These cells no longer express the TEL patch mutant TPP1, apparently because of silencing of the expression cassette, a survival mechanism that would not be available to cancer cells. These results provide hope that inhibiting the binding of telomerase to the TEL patch of TPP1, perhaps together with a modest inhibition of the telomerase enzyme, could comprise an effective anticancer therapy for the ∼90% of human tumors that are telomerase-positive. PMID:24097987

  16. Inhibition of Telomerase Recruitment and Cancer Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Mai; Nandakumar, Jayakrishnan; Sullivan, Kelly D.; Espinosa, Joaquín M.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Continued proliferation of human cells requires maintenance of telomere length, usually accomplished by telomerase. Telomerase is recruited to chromosome ends by interaction with a patch of amino acids (the TEL patch, for TPP1 glutamate (E) and leucine (L)-rich patch) on the surface of telomere protein TPP1. In previous studies, interruption of this interaction by mutation prevented telomere extension in HeLa cells, but the cell culture continued to grow. We now show that the telomerase inhibitor BIBR1532 acts together with TEL patch mutations to inhibit the growth of HeLa cell lines and that apoptosis is a prominent mechanism of death of these cells. Survivor cells take over the population beginning around 40 days in culture. These cells no longer express the TEL patch mutant TPP1, apparently because of silencing of the expression cassette, a survival mechanism that would not be available to cancer cells. These results provide hope that inhibiting the binding of telomerase to the TEL patch of TPP1, perhaps together with a modest inhibition of the telomerase enzyme, could comprise an effective anticancer therapy for the ∼90% of human tumors that are telomerase-positive. PMID:24097987

  17. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag(-/-) γc(-/-) mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  18. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag-/- γc-/- mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  19. Molecular sequelae of proteasome inhibition in human multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitsiades, Nicholas; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Chauhan, Dharminder; Fanourakis, Galinos; Gu, Xuesong; Bailey, Charles; Joseph, Marie; Libermann, Towia A.; Treon, Steven P.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2002-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor PS-341 inhibits IκB degradation, prevents NF-κB activation, and induces apoptosis in several types of cancer cells, including chemoresistant multiple myeloma (MM) cells. PS-341 has marked clinical activity even in the setting of relapsed refractory MM. However, PS-341-induced apoptotic cascade(s) are not yet fully defined. By using gene expression profiling, we characterized the molecular sequelae of PS-341 treatment in MM cells and further focused on molecular pathways responsible for the anticancer actions of this promising agent. The transcriptional profile of PS-341-treated cells involved down-regulation of growth/survival signaling pathways, and up-regulation of molecules implicated in proapoptotic cascades (which are both consistent with the proapoptotic effect of proteasome inhibition), as well as up-regulation of heat-shock proteins and ubiquitin/proteasome pathway members (which can correspond to stress responses against proteasome inhibition). Further studies on these pathways showed that PS-341 decreases the levels of several antiapoptotic proteins and triggers a dual apoptotic pathway of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation, as well as activation of Jun kinase and a Fas/caspase-8-dependent apoptotic pathway [which is inhibited by a dominant negative (decoy) Fas construct]. Stimulation with IGF-1, as well as overexpression of Bcl-2 or constitutively active Akt in MM cells also modestly attenuates PS-341-induced cell death, whereas inhibitors of the BH3 domain of Bcl-2 family members or the heat-shock protein 90 enhance tumor cell sensitivity to proteasome inhibition. These data provide both insight into the molecular mechanisms of antitumor activity of PS-341 and the rationale for future clinical trials of PS-341, in combination with conventional and novel therapies, to improve patient outcome in MM. PMID:12391322

  20. Control of cerebellar granule cell output by sensory-evoked Golgi cell inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Duguid, Ian; Branco, Tiago; Chadderton, Paul; Arlt, Charlotte; Powell, Kate; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Classical feed-forward inhibition involves an excitation–inhibition sequence that enhances the temporal precision of neuronal responses by narrowing the window for synaptic integration. In the input layer of the cerebellum, feed-forward inhibition is thought to preserve the temporal fidelity of granule cell spikes during mossy fiber stimulation. Although this classical feed-forward inhibitory circuit has been demonstrated in vitro, the extent to which inhibition shapes granule cell sensory responses in vivo remains unresolved. Here we combined whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in vivo and dynamic clamp recordings in vitro to directly assess the impact of Golgi cell inhibition on sensory information transmission in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. We show that the majority of granule cells in Crus II of the cerebrocerebellum receive sensory-evoked phasic and spillover inhibition prior to mossy fiber excitation. This preceding inhibition reduces granule cell excitability and sensory-evoked spike precision, but enhances sensory response reproducibility across the granule cell population. Our findings suggest that neighboring granule cells and Golgi cells can receive segregated and functionally distinct mossy fiber inputs, enabling Golgi cells to regulate the size and reproducibility of sensory responses. PMID:26432880

  1. Prolonged cyclic strain inhibits human endothelial cell growth.

    PubMed

    Peyton, Kelly J; Liu, Xiao-ming; Durante, William

    2016-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is continuously exposed to cyclic mechanical strain due to the periodic change in vessel diameter as a result of pulsatile blood flow. Since emerging evidence indicates the cyclic strain plays an integral role in regulating endothelial cell function, the present study determined whether application of a physiologic regimen of cyclic strain (6% at 1 hertz) influences the proliferation of human arterial endothelial cells. Prolonged exposure of human dermal microvascular or human aortic endothelial cells to cyclic strain for up to 7 days resulted in a marked decrease in cell growth. The strain-mediated anti-proliferative effect was associated with the arrest of endothelial cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, did not involve cell detachment or cytotoxicity, and was due to the induction of p21. Interestingly, the inhibition in endothelial cell growth was independent of the strain regimen since prolonged application of constant or intermittent 6% strain was also able to block endothelial cell proliferation. The ability of chronic physiologic cyclic strain to inhibit endothelial cell growth represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which hemodynamic forces maintain these cells in a quiescent, non-proliferative state. PMID:26709656

  2. Pirin Inhibits Cellular Senescence in Melanocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  3. Inhibition of rhotekin exhibits antitumor effects in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEIZHEN; LIANG, ZHENYU; LI, JING

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause for cancer-related death, however, the pathogenesis mechanism is poorly understood. Although the rhotekin (RTKN) gene has been reported to encode an effector for the Rho protein that has critical roles in regulating cell growth, the role of RTKN in lung cancer has not been investigated. In clinical lung cancer patient tumor samples, we identified that the RTKN gene expression level was significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to that of the adjacent normal tissues. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of RTKN in lung cancer, we established RTKN stable knock-down A549 and SPC-A-1 lung adenocarcinoma cell lines using lentiviral transfection of RTKN shRNA and evaluated the antitumor effects. The results showed that RTKN knock-down inhibited lung adenocarcinoma cell viability, induced S phase arrest and increased cell apoptosis. In addition, RTKN knock-down inhibited lung cancer cell invasion and adhesion. Further analysis showed that the S phase promoting factors cyclindependent kinase (CDK)1 and CDK2 levels were decreased in RTKN knock-down cells, and that the DNA replication initiation complex proteins Minichromosome maintenance protein complex (MCM)2 and MCM6 were decreased as well in RTKN knock-down cells. These results indicated that the RTKN protein was associated with lung cancer in clinic samples and exerted anticancer activity in lung adenocarcinoma cells through inhibiting cell cycle progression and the DNA replication machinery. These findings suggest that RTKN inhibition may be a novel therapeutic strategy for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26935528

  4. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  5. Inhibition of REST Suppresses Proliferation and Migration in Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dianbao; Li, Ying; Wang, Rui; Li, Yunna; Shi, Ping; Kan, Zhoumi; Pang, Xining

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor, with poor prognosis and a lack of effective therapeutic options. The aberrant expression of transcription factor REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) had been reported in different kinds of tumors. However, the function of REST and its mechanisms in GBM remain elusive. Here, REST expression was inhibited by siRNA silencing in U-87 and U-251 GBM cells. Then CCK-8 assay showed significantly decreased cell proliferation, and the inhibition of migration was verified by scratch wound healing assay and transwell assay. Using cell cycle analysis and Annexin V/PI straining assay, G1 phase cell cycle arrest was found to be a reason for the suppression of cell proliferation and migration upon REST silencing, while apoptosis was not affected by REST silencing. Further, the detection of REST-downstream genes involved in cytostasis and migration inhibition demonstrated that CCND1 and CCNE1 were reduced; CDK5R1, BBC3, EGR1, SLC25A4, PDCD7, MAPK11, MAPK12, FADD and DAXX were enhanced, among which BBC3 and DAXX were direct targets of REST, as verified by ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) and Western blotting. These data suggested that REST is a master regulator that maintains GBM cells proliferation and migration, partly through regulating cell cycle by repressing downstream genes, which might represent a potential target for GBM therapy. PMID:27153061

  6. Inhibition of REST Suppresses Proliferation and Migration in Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dianbao; Li, Ying; Wang, Rui; Li, Yunna; Shi, Ping; Kan, Zhoumi; Pang, Xining

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor, with poor prognosis and a lack of effective therapeutic options. The aberrant expression of transcription factor REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) had been reported in different kinds of tumors. However, the function of REST and its mechanisms in GBM remain elusive. Here, REST expression was inhibited by siRNA silencing in U-87 and U-251 GBM cells. Then CCK-8 assay showed significantly decreased cell proliferation, and the inhibition of migration was verified by scratch wound healing assay and transwell assay. Using cell cycle analysis and Annexin V/PI straining assay, G1 phase cell cycle arrest was found to be a reason for the suppression of cell proliferation and migration upon REST silencing, while apoptosis was not affected by REST silencing. Further, the detection of REST-downstream genes involved in cytostasis and migration inhibition demonstrated that CCND1 and CCNE1 were reduced; CDK5R1, BBC3, EGR1, SLC25A4, PDCD7, MAPK11, MAPK12, FADD and DAXX were enhanced, among which BBC3 and DAXX were direct targets of REST, as verified by ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) and Western blotting. These data suggested that REST is a master regulator that maintains GBM cells proliferation and migration, partly through regulating cell cycle by repressing downstream genes, which might represent a potential target for GBM therapy. PMID:27153061

  7. Single granule cells excite Golgi cells and evoke feedback inhibition in the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yaeger, Daniel B; Trussell, Laurence O

    2015-03-18

    In cerebellum-like circuits, synapses from thousands of granule cells converge onto principal cells. This fact, combined with theoretical considerations, has led to the concept that granule cells encode afferent input as a population and that spiking in individual granule cells is relatively unimportant. However, granule cells also provide excitatory input to Golgi cells, each of which provide inhibition to hundreds of granule cells. We investigated whether spiking in individual granule cells could recruit Golgi cells and thereby trigger widespread inhibition in slices of mouse cochlear nucleus. Using paired whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, trains of action potentials at 100 Hz in single granule cells was sufficient to evoke spikes in Golgi cells in ∼40% of paired granule-to-Golgi cell recordings. High-frequency spiking in single granule cells evoked IPSCs in ∼5% of neighboring granule cells, indicating that bursts of activity in single granule cells can recruit feedback inhibition from Golgi cells. Moreover, IPSPs mediated by single Golgi cell action potentials paused granule cell firing, suggesting that inhibitory events recruited by activity in single granule cells were able to control granule cell firing. These results suggest a previously unappreciated relationship between population coding and bursting in single granule cells by which spiking in a small number of granule cells may have an impact on the activity of a much larger number of granule cells. PMID:25788690

  8. Nifuroxazide inhibits survival of multiple myeloma cells by directly inhibiting STAT3.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik A; Walker, Sarah R; Kepich, Alicia; Gashin, Laurie B; Hideshima, Teru; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C; Frank, David A

    2008-12-15

    Constitutive activation of the transcription factor STAT3 contributes to the pathogenesis of many cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Since STAT3 is dispensable in most normal tissue, targeted inhibition of STAT3 is an attractive therapy for patients with these cancers. To identify STAT3 inhibitors, we developed a transcriptionally based assay and screened a library of compounds known to be safe in humans. We found the drug nifuroxazide to be an effective inhibitor of STAT3 function. Nifuroxazide inhibits the constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3 in MM cells by reducing Jak kinase autophosphorylation, and leads to down-regulation of the STAT3 target gene Mcl-1. Nifuroxazide causes a decrease in viability of primary myeloma cells and myeloma cell lines containing STAT3 activation, but not normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although bone marrow stromal cells provide survival signals to myeloma cells, nifuroxazide can overcome this survival advantage. Reflecting the interaction of STAT3 with other cellular pathways, nifuroxazide shows enhanced cytotoxicity when combined with either the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide or the MEK inhibitor UO126. Therefore, using a mechanistic-based screen, we identified the clinically relevant drug nifuroxazide as a potent inhibitor of STAT signaling that shows cytotoxicity against myeloma cells that depend on STAT3 for survival. PMID:18824601

  9. Nifuroxazide inhibits survival of multiple myeloma cells by directly inhibiting STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Kepich, Alicia; Gashin, Laurie B.; Hideshima, Teru; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2008-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the transcription factor STAT3 contributes to the pathogenesis of many cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Since STAT3 is dispensable in most normal tissue, targeted inhibition of STAT3 is an attractive therapy for patients with these cancers. To identify STAT3 inhibitors, we developed a transcriptionally based assay and screened a library of compounds known to be safe in humans. We found the drug nifuroxazide to be an effective inhibitor of STAT3 function. Nifuroxazide inhibits the constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3 in MM cells by reducing Jak kinase autophosphorylation, and leads to down-regulation of the STAT3 target gene Mcl-1. Nifuroxazide causes a decrease in viability of primary myeloma cells and myeloma cell lines containing STAT3 activation, but not normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although bone marrow stromal cells provide survival signals to myeloma cells, nifuroxazide can overcome this survival advantage. Reflecting the interaction of STAT3 with other cellular pathways, nifuroxazide shows enhanced cytotoxicity when combined with either the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide or the MEK inhibitor UO126. Therefore, using a mechanistic-based screen, we identified the clinically relevant drug nifuroxazide as a potent inhibitor of STAT signaling that shows cytotoxicity against myeloma cells that depend on STAT3 for survival. PMID:18824601

  10. Lysyl oxidase propeptide inhibits smooth muscle cell signaling and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Paola A.; Vora, Siddharth; Sume, Siddika Selva; Yang, Dan; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Guo Ying; Palamakumbura, Amitha H.; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Ravid, Katya; Trackman, Philip C.

    2008-02-01

    Lysyl oxidase is required for the normal biosynthesis and maturation of collagen and elastin. It is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells, and its increased expression has been previously found in atherosclerosis and in models of balloon angioplasty. The lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) has more recently been found to have biological activity as a tumor suppressor, and it inhibits Erk1/2 Map kinase activation. We reasoned that LOX-PP may have functions in normal non-transformed cells. We, therefore, investigated its effects on smooth muscle cells, focusing on important biological processes mediated by Erk1/2-dependent signaling pathways including proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, we investigated whether evidence for accumulation of LOX-PP could be found in vivo in a femoral artery injury model. Recombinant LOX-PP was expressed and purified, and was found to inhibit primary rat aorta smooth muscle cell proliferation and DNA synthesis by more than 50%. TNF-{alpha}-stimulated MMP-9 expression and Erk1/2 activation were both significantly inhibited by LOX-PP. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out with affinity purified anti-LOX-PP antibody showed that LOX-PP epitopes were expressed at elevated levels in vascular lesions of injured arteries. These novel data suggest that LOX-PP may provide a feedback control mechanism that serves to inhibit properties associated with the development of vascular pathology.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells inhibit complement activation by secreting factor H.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhidan; Li, Qing; Bu, Hong; Lin, Feng

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent and broad immunosuppressive capabilities, and have shown promise in clinical trials treating many inflammatory diseases. Previous studies have found that MSCs inhibit dendritic cell, T-cell, and B-cell activities in the adaptive immunity; however, whether MSCs inhibit complement in the innate immunity, and if so, by which mechanism, have not been established. In this report, we found that MSCs constitutively secrete factor H, which potently inhibits complement activation. Depletion of factor H in the MSC-conditioned serum-free media abolishes their complement inhibitory activities. In addition, production of factor H by MSCs is augmented by inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in dose- and time-dependent manners, while IL-6 does not have a significant effect. Furthermore, the factor H production from MSCs is significantly suppressed by the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis inhibitor indomethacin and the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitor 1-methyl-d-tryptophan (1-MT), both of which inhibitors are known to efficiently dampen MSCs immunosuppressive activity. These results indicate that MSCs inhibit complement activation by producing factor H, which could be another mechanism underlying MSCs broad immunosuppressive capabilities. PMID:20163251

  12. ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transactivation in adipocyte cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Jung, Myeong Ho

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transcriptional activation. • ATF3 interacts with PPARγ. • ATF3 suppresses p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation. • ATF3 decreases the binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE. - Abstract: Previously, we reported that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) downregulates peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPARγ) gene expression and inhibits adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. Here, we investigated another role of ATF3 on the regulation of PPARγ activity. ATF3 inhibited PPARγ-stimulated transactivation of PPARγ responsive element (PPRE)-containing reporter or GAL4/PPARγ chimeric reporter. Thus, ATF3 effectively repressed rosiglitazone-stimulated expression of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2), PPARγ target gene, in 3T3-L1 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that ATF3 interacted with PPARγ. Accordingly, ATF3 prevented PPARγ from binding to PPRE on the aP2 promoter. Furthermore, ATF3 suppressed p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation of PPRE-containing reporter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that overexpression of ATF3 blocked both binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE on aP2 promoter induced by rosiglitazone treatment in 3T3-L1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that ATF3 interacts with PPARγ and represses PPARγ-mediated transactivation through suppression of p300-stimulated coactivation in 3T3-L1 cells, which may play a role in inhibition of adipocyte differentiation.

  13. Fermented red ginseng extract inhibits cancer cell proliferation and viability.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jisun; Jeon, Seong Bin; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Hyeji; Kim, Ju; Kwon, Bo Ra; Yu, Kang-Yeol; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Hwang, Seung-Mi; Choi, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Yong-Seob

    2015-04-01

    Red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is the most widely recognized medicinal herb due to its remedial effects in various disorders, such as cancers, diabetes, and heart problems. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of fermented red ginseng extract (f-RGE; provided by Jeonju Biomaterials Institute, Jeonju, South Korea) in a parallel comparison with the effect of nonfermented red ginseng extract (nf-RGE; control) on several cancer cell lines--MCF-7 breast cancer cells, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and reprogrammed MCF-7 cells (mimicking cancer stem cells). Cells were cultured at various concentrations of RGE (from 0.5 up to 5 mg/mL) and their viabilities and proliferative properties were examined. Our data demonstrate the following: (1) nf-RGE inhibited cell viability at ≥1 mg/mL for MCF-7 cells and ≥2 mg/mL for HepG2 cells, (2) in the presence of a carcinogenic agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), nf-RGE treatment in combination with paclitaxel synergistically decreased MCF-7 as well as HepG2 cell viability, (3) f-RGE (which contained a greater level of Rg3 content) more effectively decreased the viability of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells compared to nf-RGE, and (4) f-RGE appeared more potent for inhibiting cancerous differentiation of reprogrammed MCF-7 cells in a synergistic fashion with paclitaxel, especially in the presence of TPA, compared to nf-RGE. These findings suggest that f-RGE treatment may be more effective for decreasing cancer cell survival by inducing apoptotic cell death and also presumably for preventing cancer stem cell differentiation compared to nf-RGE. PMID:25658580

  14. Antisense inhibition of hyaluronan synthase-2 in human osteosarcoma cells inhibits hyaluronan retention and tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ynishida@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Knudson, Warren; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2005-07-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor associated with childhood and adolescence. The results of numerous studies have suggested that hyaluronan plays an important role in regulating the aggressive behavior of various types of cancer cells. However, no studies have addressed hyaluronan with respect to osteosarcomas. In this investigation, the mRNA expression copy number of three mammalian hyaluronan synthases (HAS) was determined using competitive RT-PCR in the osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line, MG-63. MG-63 are highly malignant osteosarcoma cells with an abundant hyaluronan-rich matrix. The results demonstrated that HAS-2 is the predominant HAS in MG-63. Accumulation of intracellular hyaluronan increased in association with the proliferative phase of these cells. The selective inhibition of HAS-2 mRNA in MG-63 cells by antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides resulted in reduced hyaluronan accumulation by these cells. As expected, the reduction in hyaluronan disrupted the assembly of cell-associated matrices. However, of most interest, coincident with the reduction in hyaluronan, there was a substantial decrease in cell proliferation, a decrease in cell motility and a decrease in cell invasiveness. These data suggest that hyaluronan synthesized by HAS-2 in MG-63 plays a crucial role in osteosarcoma cell proliferation, motility, and invasion.

  15. FH535 inhibited metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng-Yao; Liang, Rong-Rui; Chen, Kai; Shen, Meng; Tian, Ya-Li; Li, Dao-Ming; Duan, Wei-Ming; Gui, Qi; Gong, Fei-Ran; Lian, Lian; Li, Wei; Tao, Min

    2015-01-01

    FH535 is a small-molecule inhibitor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which a substantial body of evidence has proven is activated in various cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. We investigated the inhibitory effect of FH535 on the metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells. Western blotting and luciferase reporter gene assay indicated that FH535 markedly inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway viability in pancreatic cancer cells. In vitro wound healing, invasion, and adhesion assays revealed that FH535 significantly inhibited pancreatic cancer cell metastasis. We also observed the inhibitory effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cell growth via the tetrazolium and plate clone formation assays. Microarray analyses suggested that changes in the expression of multiple genes could be involved in the anti-cancer effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate for the first time that FH535 inhibits pancreatic cancer cell metastasis and growth, providing new insight into therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26185454

  16. Maduramicin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Myoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Gu, Ying; Singh, Karnika; Shang, Chaowei; Barzegar, Mansoureh; Jiang, Shanxiang; Huang, Shile

    2014-01-01

    Maduramicin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic derived from the bacterium Actinomadura yumaensis, is currently used as a feed additive against coccidiosis in poultry worldwide. It has been clinically observed that maduramicin can cause skeletal muscle and heart cell damage, resulting in skeletal muscle degeneration, heart failure, and even death in animals and humans, if improperly used. However, the mechanism of its toxic action in myoblasts is not well understood. Using mouse myoblasts (C2C12) and human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD and Rh30) cells as an experimental model for myoblasts, here we found that maduramicin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Further studies revealed that maduramicin induced accumulation of the cells at G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis in the cells. Concurrently, maduramicin downregulated protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6), and CDC25A, and upregulated expression of the CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), resulting in decreased phosphorylation of Rb. Maduramicin also induced expression of BAK, BAD, DR4, TRADD and TRAIL, leading to activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 as well as cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). Taken together, our results suggest that maduramicin executes its toxicity in myoblasts at least by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptotic cell death. PMID:25531367

  17. Maduramicin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in myoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Gu, Ying; Singh, Karnika; Shang, Chaowei; Barzegar, Mansoureh; Jiang, Shanxiang; Huang, Shile

    2014-01-01

    Maduramicin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic derived from the bacterium Actinomadura yumaensis, is currently used as a feed additive against coccidiosis in poultry worldwide. It has been clinically observed that maduramicin can cause skeletal muscle and heart cell damage, resulting in skeletal muscle degeneration, heart failure, and even death in animals and humans, if improperly used. However, the mechanism of its toxic action in myoblasts is not well understood. Using mouse myoblasts (C2C12) and human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD and Rh30) cells as an experimental model for myoblasts, here we found that maduramicin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Further studies revealed that maduramicin induced accumulation of the cells at G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis in the cells. Concurrently, maduramicin downregulated protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6), and CDC25A, and upregulated expression of the CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), resulting in decreased phosphorylation of Rb. Maduramicin also induced expression of BAK, BAD, DR4, TRADD and TRAIL, leading to activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 as well as cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). Taken together, our results suggest that maduramicin executes its toxicity in myoblasts at least by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptotic cell death. PMID:25531367

  18. Chemotherapy and irradiation for locally advanced and metastatic pulmonary carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Curtis R.; Wirth, Lori J.; Nishino, Mizuki; Chen, Aileen B.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Kulke, Matthew H.; McNamee, Ciaran J.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The optimal management of locally advanced and metastatic pulmonary carcinoid tumors remains to be determined. Materials and methods A retrospective review was conducted on patients with typical and atypical pulmonary carcinoid tumors treated at our institutions between 1990 and 2012. Results 300 patients were identified with pulmonary carcinoid, (80 patients with atypical carcinoid), of whom 29 presented with metastatic disease (16 atypical). Of evaluable patients, 26 (41%) with stages I–III atypical carcinoid tumors recurred at a median time of 3.7 years (range, 0.4–32), compared to 3 (1%) patients with typical carcinoid (range, 8–12.3). 39 patients were treated with chemotherapy, including 30 patients with metastatic disease (27 atypical), and 7 patients were treated with adjuvant platinum–etoposide chemoradiation (6 atypical, 1 typical, 6 stage IIIA, 1 stage IIB). At a median follow-up of 2 years there were 2 recurrences in the 7 patients receiving adjuvant treatment. Median survival after diagnosis of metastatic disease for patients with atypical pulmonary carcinoid was 3.3 years with a 5-year survival of 24%. Treatment regimens showing efficacy in pulmonary carcinoid include 15 patients treated with octreotide-based therapies (10% response rate (RR), 70% disease control rate (DCR), 15 month median progression-free survival (PFS)), 13 patients treated with etoposide + platinum (23% RR, 69% DCR, 7 month median PFS), and 14 patients treated with temozolomide-based therapies (14% RR, 57% DCR, 10 month median PFS). 8 of 10 patients with octreotide-avid disease treated with an octreotide-based regimen experienced disease control (1 partial response, 7 stable disease) for a median of 18 months (range 6–72 months). Conclusions These results support our previous finding that a subset of pulmonary carcinoid tumors are responsive to chemotherapy. PMID:25218177

  19. Diffuse Neuroendocrine Cell Hyperplasia: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cansız Ersöz, Cevriye; Cangır, Ayten Kayı; Dizbay Sak, Serpil

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) is a rare pulmonary disorder characterised by a proliferation of neuroendocrine cells within the lung. It is believed that a minority of the patients with DIPNECH can develop carcinoid tumors. Here, we report two new cases of DIPNECH with coexisting carcinoid tumors. PMID:27293939

  20. Andrographolide inhibits multiple myeloma cells by inhibiting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Wang, Jianrong

    2016-02-01

    Andrographolide is an active component from the extract of Andrographis paniculata [(Burm.f) Nees], a medicinal plant from the Acanthaceae family. Pharmacological studies have revealed that andrographolide possesses anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, immune regulatory and hepatoprotective properties, and is efficacious in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, while exhibiting low toxicity and low cost. The present study aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of andrographolide on the growth of multiple myeloma (MM) cells and its possible impact on the Toll-like receptor (TLR)4/nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway. Cell proliferation was detected using an MTT assay, cellular apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry, and caspase-9/3 activation were assessed using colorimetric assay kits. Furthermore, TLR4 and NF-κB protein expression was determined by western blot analysis. The results revealed that andrographolide reduced the proliferation, while increasing cellular apoptosis and caspase-9/3 activation of MM cells, in addition to downregulating the expression of TLR4 and NF-κB protein. Of note, TLR4- or NF-κB-targeting small-interfering (si)RNA enhanced the andrographolide-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis of MM cells. The results of the present study therefore suggested that andrographolide inhibited multiple myeloma cells via the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26707811

  1. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-09-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process. PMID:26265439

  2. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process. PMID:26265439

  3. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Mice H22 Hepatoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yiye; Ni, Yanbo; Yang, Jing; Lin, Xutao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is widely recognized that astaxanthin (ASX), a member of the carotenoid family, has strong biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and immune-modulation activities. Previous studies have confirmed that ASX can effectively inhibit hepatoma cells in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS MTT was used to assay proliferation of mice H22 cells, and flow cytometry was used to determine apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of H22 cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, anti-tumor activity of ASX was observed in mice. RESULTS ASX inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, promoted cell necrosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G2 phase in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS This study indicated that ASX can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mice H22 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27333866

  4. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Mice H22 Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Ni, Yanbo; Yang, Jing; Lin, Xutao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    Background It is widely recognized that astaxanthin (ASX), a member of the carotenoid family, has strong biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and immune-modulation activities. Previous studies have confirmed that ASX can effectively inhibit hepatoma cells in vitro. Material/Methods MTT was used to assay proliferation of mice H22 cells, and flow cytometry was used to determine apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of H22 cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, anti-tumor activity of ASX was observed in mice. Results ASX inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, promoted cell necrosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G2 phase in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions This study indicated that ASX can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mice H22 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27333866

  5. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances—serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications. PMID:27594907

  6. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances-serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications. PMID:27594907

  7. Growth inhibition by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in mesothelioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nutt, Joyce E; O'Toole, Kieran; Gonzalez, David; Lunec, John

    2009-06-01

    Clinical outcome following chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma is poor and improvements are needed. This preclinical study investigates the effect of five tyrosine kinase inhibitors (PTK787, ZD6474, ZD1839, SU6668 and SU11248) on the growth of three mesothelioma cell lines (NCI H226, NCI H28 and MSTO 211H), the presence of growth factor receptors and inhibition of their downstream signalling pathways. GI50 values were determined: ZD6474 and SU11248, mainly VEGFR2 inhibitors, gave the lowest GI50 across all cell lines (3.5-6.9 microM) whereas ZD1839 gave a GI50 in this range only in H28 cells. All cell lines were positive for EGFR, but only H226 cells were positive for VEGFR2 by Western blotting. ZD6474 and ZD1839 inhibited EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT and ERK, whereas VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 was completely inhibited with 0.1 microM SU11248. VEGFR2 was detected in tumour samples by immunohistochemistry. VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors warrant further investigation in mesothelioma. PMID:19318229

  8. Estrogen inhibits cell cycle progression and retinoblastoma phosphorylation in rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jay W.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-10-31

    Estrogen promotes the growth of some ovarian cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, but has been shown to inhibit growth of normal ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells at micromolar concentrations (1μg/ml). OSE cells express the estrogen receptor (ER)-α, and are the source of 90% of various cancers. The potential sensitivity of OSE cells to estrogen stresses the importance of understanding the estrogen-dependent mechanisms at play in OSE proliferation and transformation, as well as in anticancer treatment. We investigated the effects of estradiol on cell proliferation in vitro, and demonstrate an intracellular locus of action of estradiol in cultured rhesus ovarian surface epithelial (RhOSE) cells. We show that ovarian and breast cells are growth-inhibited by micromolar concentration of estradiol and that this inhibition correlates with estrogen receptor expression. We further show that normal rhesus OSE cells do not activate ERK or Akt in response to estradiol nor does estradiol block the ability of serum to stimulate ERK or induce cyclin D expression. Contrarily, estradiol inhibits serum-dependent retinoblastoma protein (Rb) phosphorylation and blocks DNA synthesis. This inhibition does not formally arrest cells and is reversible within hours of estrogen withdrawal. Our data are consistent with growth inhibition by activation of Rb and indicate that sensitivity to hormone therapy in anticancer treatment can be modulated by cell cycle regulators downstream of the estrogen receptor.

  9. Apigenin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation through G2/M cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Ujiki, Michael B; Ding, Xian-Zhong; Salabat, M Reza; Bentrem, David J; Golkar, Laleh; Milam, Ben; Talamonti, Mark S; Bell, Richard H; Iwamura, Takeshi; Adrian, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    Background Many chemotherapeutic agents have been used to treat pancreatic cancer without success. Apigenin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been shown to inhibit growth in some cancer cell lines but has not been studied in pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that apigenin would inhibit pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro. Results Apigenin caused both time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation in four pancreatic cancer cell lines. Apigenin induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. Apigenin reduced levels of cyclin A, cyclin B, phosphorylated forms of cdc2 and cdc25, which are all proteins required for G2/M transition. Conclusion Apigenin inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells through suppression of cyclin B-associated cdc2 activity and G2/M arrest, and may be a valuable drug for the treatment or prevention of pancreatic cancer. PMID:17196098

  10. Carbendazim Inhibits Cancer Cell Proliferation by Suppressing Microtubule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yenjerla, Mythili; Cox, Corey; Wilson, Leslie; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Carbendazim (methyl 2-benzimidazolecarbamate) is widely used as a systemic fungicide in human food production and appears to act on fungal tubulin. However, it also inhibits proliferation of human cancer cells, including drug- and multidrug-resistant and p53-deficient cell lines. Because of its promising preclinical anti-tumor activity, it has undergone phase I clinical trials and is under further clinical development. Although it weakly inhibits polymerization of brain microtubules and induces G2/M arrest in tumor cells, its mechanism of action in human cells has not been fully elucidated. We examined its mechanism of action in MCF7 human breast cancer cells and found that it inhibits proliferation (IC50, 10 μM) and half-maximally arrests mitosis at a similar concentration (8 μM), in concert with suppression of microtubule dynamic instability without appreciable microtubule depolymerization. It induces mitotic spindle abnormalities and reduces the metaphase intercentromere distance of sister chromatids, indicating reduction of tension on kinetochores, thus leading to metaphase arrest. With microtubules assembled in vitro from pure tubulin, carbendazim also suppresses dynamic instability, reducing the dynamicity by 50% at 10 μM, with only minimal (21%) reduction of polymer mass. Carbendazim binds to mammalian tubulin (Kd, 42.8 ± 4.0 μM). Unlike some benzimidazoles that bind to the colchicine site in tubulin, carbendazim neither competes with colchicine nor competes with vinblastine for binding to brain tubulin. Thus, carbendazim binds to an as yet unidentified site in tubulin and inhibits tumor cell proliferation by suppressing the growing and shortening phases of microtubule dynamic instability, thus inducing mitotic arrest. PMID:19001156

  11. Contact inhibition of locomotion determines cell-cell and cell-substrate forces in tissues.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Juliane; Camley, Brian A; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    2016-03-01

    Cells organized in tissues exert forces on their neighbors and their environment. Those cellular forces determine tissue homeostasis as well as reorganization during embryonic development and wound healing. To understand how cellular forces are generated and how they can influence the tissue state, we develop a particle-based simulation model for adhesive cell clusters and monolayers. Cells are contractile, exert forces on their substrate and on each other, and interact through contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL), meaning that cell-cell contacts suppress force transduction to the substrate and propulsion forces align away from neighbors. Our model captures the traction force patterns of small clusters of nonmotile cells and larger sheets of motile Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. In agreement with observations in a spreading MDCK colony, the cell density in the center increases as cells divide and the tissue grows. A feedback between cell density, CIL, and cell-cell adhesion gives rise to a linear relationship between cell density and intercellular tensile stress and forces the tissue into a nonmotile state characterized by a broad distribution of traction forces. Our model also captures the experimentally observed tissue flow around circular obstacles, and CIL accounts for traction forces at the edge. PMID:26903658

  12. Baicalein Inhibits MCF-7 Cell Proliferation In Vitro, Induces Radiosensitivity, and Inhibits Hypoxia Inducible Factor.

    PubMed

    Gade, Shruti; Gandhi, Nitin Motilal

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is a key transcription factor responsible for imparting adaptability to the cancer cells growing in tumors. HIF induces the modulation of glucose metabolism, angiogenesis, and prosurvival signaling. Therefore, HIF is one of the attractive targets to treat solid tumors. Results presented in this study indicate that Baicalein (BA) inhibits HIF stabilization and also reduces its transcription activity in MCF-7 cells in vitro. Furthermore, BA was found to have antiproliferative ability as determined by the MTT assay and clonogenic survival. BA also induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells at the concentration of 50 µM. We also report the radiosensitization of MCF-7 cells when they are treated with BA, resulting in higher γ-radiation-induced DNA damage. BA is extensively used in Chinese medicine and is known to be nontoxic at pharmacological doses. Our studies indicate that BA is one of the attractive natural compounds suitable for further evaluation as an adjuvant therapy. PMID:26756423

  13. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  14. Inhibition of Cerebellar Granule Cell Turning by Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Kumada, Tatsuro; Komuro, Yutaro; Li, Ying; Hu, Taofang; Wang, Zhe; Littner, Yoav; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Ectopic neurons are often found in the brains of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) patients, suggesting that alcohol exposure impairs neuronal cell migration. Although it has been reported that alcohol decreases the speed of neuronal cell migration, little is known about whether alcohol also affects the turning of neurons. Here we show that ethanol exposure inhibits the turning of cerebellar granule cells in vivo and in vitro. First, in vivo studies using P10 mice demonstrated that a single i.p. injection of ethanol not only reduces the number of turning granule cells but also alters the mode of turning at the EGL-ML border of the cerebellum. Second, in vitro analysis using microexplant cultures of P0-P3 mouse cerebella revealed that ethanol directly reduces the frequency of spontaneous granule cell turning in a dose-dependent manner. Third, the action of ethanol on the frequency of granule cell turning was significantly ameliorated by stimulating Ca2+ and cGMP signaling or by inhibiting cAMP signaling. Taken together, these results indicate that ethanol affects the frequency and mode of cerebellar granule cell turning through alteration of the Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways, suggesting that the abnormal allocation of neurons found in the brains of FASD and FSA patients results, at least in part, from impaired turning of immature neurons by alcohol. PMID:20691765

  15. Ethylene Inhibits Cell Proliferation of the Arabidopsis Root Meristem.

    PubMed

    Street, Ian H; Aman, Sitwat; Zubo, Yan; Ramzan, Aleena; Wang, Xiaomin; Shakeel, Samina N; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-09-01

    The root system of plants plays a critical role in plant growth and survival, with root growth being dependent on both cell proliferation and cell elongation. Multiple phytohormones interact to control root growth, including ethylene, which is primarily known for its role in controlling root cell elongation. We find that ethylene also negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic analysis indicates that the inhibition of cell proliferation involves two pathways operating downstream of the ethylene receptors. The major pathway is the canonical ethylene signal transduction pathway that incorporates CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2, and the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 family of transcription factors. The secondary pathway is a phosphorelay based on genetic analysis of receptor histidine kinase activity and mutants involving the type B response regulators. Analysis of ethylene-dependent gene expression and genetic analysis supports SHORT HYPOCOTYL2, a repressor of auxin signaling, as one mediator of the ethylene response and furthermore, indicates that SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 is a point of convergence for both ethylene and cytokinin in negatively regulating cell proliferation. Additional analysis indicates that ethylene signaling contributes but is not required for cytokinin to inhibit activity of the root meristem. These results identify key elements, along with points of cross talk with cytokinin and auxin, by which ethylene negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root apical meristem. PMID:26149574

  16. Triptolide induces apoptotic cell death of human cholangiocarcinoma cells through inhibition of myeloid cell leukemia-1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating neoplasm, is highly resistant to current chemotherapies. CCA cells frequently overexpress the antiapoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia-1(Mcl-1), which is responsible for its extraordinary ability to evade cell death. Triptolide, a bioactive ingredient extracted from Chinese medicinal plant, has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in several cancers. Methods CCK-8 assay was performed to detect cell survival rate in vitro. DAPI staining and Flow cytometry were used to analyze apoptosis. Western blot was performed to determine the expression levels of caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, PARP, and Mcl-1. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence were used to detect the expression levels of Mcl-1. The nude mice xenograft model was used to evaluate the antitumor effect of triptolide in vivo. Results Triptolide reduced cell viability in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 12.6 ± 0.6 nM, 20.5 ± 4.2 nM, and 18.5 ± 0.7 nM at 48 h for HuCCT1, QBC939, and FRH0201 respectively. Triptolide induced apoptosis in CCA cell lines in part through mitochondrial pathway. Using quantitative real-time PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence, we have shown that triptolide downregulates Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, triptolide inhibited the CCA growth in vivo. Conclusions Triptolide has profound antitumor effect on CCA, probably by inducing apoptosis through inhibition of Mcl-1. Triptolide would be a promising therapeutic agent for CCA. PMID:24742042

  17. Inhibition of the proteasome induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in mantle cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Christian; Ringshausen, Ingo; Schneller, Folker; Fend, Falko; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Häcker, Georg; Goetze, Katharina; Oostendorp, Robert; Peschel, Christian; Decker, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a distinctive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtype, characterized by overexpression of cyclin D1 as a consequence of the chromosomal translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32). MCL remains an incurable disease, combining the unfavourable clinical features of aggressive and indolent lymphomas. The blastic variant of MCL, which is often associated with additional cytogenetic alterations, has an even worse prognosis and new treatment options are clearly needed. The present study investigated the effect of a specific proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin, on cell cycle progression and apoptosis in two lymphoma cell lines harbouring the t(11;14)(q13;q32) and additional cytogenetic alterations, including p53 mutation (NCEB) and p16 deletion (Granta 519). Granta cells were more susceptible to inhibition of the proteasome with respect to inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis induction. No changes were observed in the expression levels of the G1 regulatory molecules cyclin D1 and cdk4, but cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction was accompanied by accumulation of the cdk inhibitor p21 in both cell lines. Increased p53 expression was only observed in Granta cells with wild-type p53. Cleavage of procaspase-3 and -9 was observed but cleavage of procaspase-8 was not involved in apoptosis induction. The proapoptotic effect of lactacystin was reversed by pretreatment with the pancaspase inhibitor zVAD.fmk. Lactacystin was also effective in inducing apoptosis in lymphoma cells from MCL patients. We conclude that inhibition of the proteasome might be a promising therapeutic approach for this incurable disease. PMID:12846895

  18. Mast Cell Stabilizer Ketotifen Inhibits Gouty Inflammation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chen, Si-Jin; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2016-01-01

    Gout, an extremely painful arthritis with relapsing inflammatory attacks, is a common inflammatory joint disease in adults. We examined the therapeutic effect of ketotifen, a mast cell stabilizer, on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced acute inflammation. Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were injected with MSU crystals (5 mg per rat) into air pouch. Ketotifen (0, 0.1, 03, and 1 mg/kg) was given 1 hour before MSU crystal injection. Lavage histamine, leukocyte counts, mast cell counts, nitric oxide, and proinflammatory mediator levels were assessed 12 hours after MSU injection. Ketotifen significantly inhibited MSU-induced mast cell activation and histamine concentration in air pouch lavage. Ketotifen dose-dependently inhibited MSU-initiated leukocyte infiltration into the air pouch. Furthermore, ketotifen significantly decreased proinflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6, production in MSU-treated rats. Ketotifen may attenuate MSU-induced acute inflammation by inhibiting mast cell activation and leukocyte infiltration in rats. Furthermore, ketotifen has the potential to be a new approach in managing patients with gouty inflammation in the future. PMID:23884077

  19. CD101 inhibits the expansion of colitogenic T cells.

    PubMed

    Schey, R; Dornhoff, H; Baier, J L C; Purtak, M; Opoka, R; Koller, A K; Atreya, R; Rau, T T; Daniel, C; Amann, K; Bogdan, C; Mattner, J

    2016-09-01

    CD101 exerts negative-costimulatory effects in vitro, but its function in vivo remains poorly defined. CD101 is abundantly expressed on lymphoid and myeloid cells in intestinal tissues, but absent from naïve splenic T cells. Here, we assessed the impact of CD101 on the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using a T-cell transfer model of chronic colitis, we found that in recipients of naïve T cells from CD101(+/+) donors up to 30% of the recovered lymphocytes expressed CD101, correlating with an increased interleukin (IL)-2-mediated FoxP3 expression. Transfer of CD101(-/-) T cells caused more severe colitis and was associated with an expansion of IL-17-producing T cells and an enhanced expression of IL-2Rα/β independently of FoxP3. The co-transfer of naïve and regulatory T cells (Treg) protected most effectively from colitis, when both donor and recipient mice expressed CD101. Although the expression of CD101 on T cells was sufficient for Treg-function and the inhibition of T-cell proliferation, sustained IL-10 production required additional CD101 expression by myeloid cells. Finally, in patients with IBD a reduced CD101 expression on peripheral and intestinal monocytes and CD4(+) T cells correlated with enhanced IL-17 production and disease activity. Thus, CD101 deficiency is a novel marker for progressive colitis and potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26813346

  20. Inhibition of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in man by distinct suppressor cell systems.

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, P I; Spencer, C E

    1979-01-01

    Studies were designed to investigate whether the suppressor cell systems that regulate the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses belong to the same subsets of T cells or different subsets. Mitogen-activated suppressor cells were simultaneously assayed for their ability to inhibit (a) pokeweed mitogen-induced generation of plasma cells, (b) blastogenic response of lymphocytes to allogeneic cells, and (c) generation of killer cells in the cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity assay. We found that suppressor cells that inhibited the generation of plasma cells were activated by concanavalin A (Con A) and were both radiation and prednisone sensitive. Suppressors that inhibited the blastogenic response in lymphocytes to allogenic cells were also activated by Con A but differed in that they were both radiation and prednisone resistant. In contrast, suppressors that inhibited the generation of the killer cells were activated with phytohemagglutinin and not Con A. These suppressors were prednisone and radiation resistant. These observations cannot be explained by differences at the pro-suppressor or suppressor activator levels as both T cell subsets are radiosensitive. Alternatively, heterogeneity of suppressor cell systems may explain these differences. PMID:156197

  1. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  2. Erianin inhibits the proliferation of T47D cells by inhibiting cell cycles, inducing apoptosis and suppressing migration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Fu, Xueqi; Wang, Yongsen; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Yu; Hao, Tian; Hu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Erianin is a natural product extracted from Dendrobiumchrysotoxum. To investigate the antitumor activity of Erianin in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, we treated T47D cells with Erianin and evaluated the effects of Erianin treatment on multiple cancer-associated pathways. Erianin inhibited the proliferation of T47D cells effectively. Erianin induced apoptosis in T47D cells through reducing Bcl-2 expression and activating caspase signaling. Furthermore, it also suppressed the expression of CDKs and caused cell cycle arrest. In addition, Erianin treatment suppressed the migration of T47D cells, most likely through regulating the homeostatic expression of MPP and TIMP. Meanwhile, Erianin did not affect the proliferation of normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. Together, these results demonstrated that Erianin might have the potential to be an effective drug to treat the ER positive breast cancer. PMID:27508028

  3. Erianin inhibits the proliferation of T47D cells by inhibiting cell cycles, inducing apoptosis and suppressing migration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Fu, Xueqi; Wang, Yongsen; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Yu; Hao, Tian; Hu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Erianin is a natural product extracted from Dendrobiumchrysotoxum. To investigate the antitumor activity of Erianin in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, we treated T47D cells with Erianin and evaluated the effects of Erianin treatment on multiple cancer-associated pathways. Erianin inhibited the proliferation of T47D cells effectively. Erianin induced apoptosis in T47D cells through reducing Bcl-2 expression and activating caspase signaling. Furthermore, it also suppressed the expression of CDKs and caused cell cycle arrest. In addition, Erianin treatment suppressed the migration of T47D cells, most likely through regulating the homeostatic expression of MPP and TIMP. Meanwhile, Erianin did not affect the proliferation of normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. Together, these results demonstrated that Erianin might have the potential to be an effective drug to treat the ER positive breast cancer. PMID:27508028

  4. Silencing of CDC42 inhibits neuroblastoma cell proliferation and transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sora; Craig, Brian T.; Romain, Carmelle V.; Qiao, Jingbo; Chung, Dai H.

    2014-01-01

    Cell division cycle 42 (CDC42), a small GTPase of the Rho-subfamily, regulates diverse cellular functions including proliferation, cytoskeletal rearrangement and even promotes malignant transformation. Here, we found that increased expression of CDC42 correlated with undifferentiated neuroblastoma as compared to a more benign phenotype. CDC42 inhibition decreased cell growth and soft agar colony formation, and increased cell death in BE(2)-C and BE(2)-M17 cell lines, but not in SK-N-AS. In addition, silencing of CDC42 decreased expression of N-myc in BE(2)-C and BE(2)-M17 cells. Our findings suggest that CDC42 may play a role in the regulation of aggressive neuroblastoma behavior. PMID:25264923

  5. Fatostatin Inhibits Cancer Cell Proliferation by Affecting Mitotic Microtubule Spindle Assembly and Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Gholkar, Ankur A; Cheung, Keith; Williams, Kevin J; Lo, Yu-Chen; Hamideh, Shadia A; Nnebe, Chelsea; Khuu, Cindy; Bensinger, Steven J; Torres, Jorge Z

    2016-08-12

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors have become attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition in the treatment of metabolic diseases and cancer. SREBPs are critical for the production and metabolism of lipids and cholesterol, which are essential for cellular homeostasis and cell proliferation. Fatostatin was recently discovered as a specific inhibitor of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which is required for SREBP activation. Fatostatin possesses antitumor properties including the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, and it arrests cancer cells in G2/M phase. Although Fatostatin has been viewed as an antitumor agent due to its inhibition of SREBP and its effect on lipid metabolism, we show that Fatostatin's anticancer properties can also be attributed to its inhibition of cell division. We analyzed the effect of SREBP activity inhibitors including Fatostatin, PF-429242, and Betulin on the cell cycle and determined that only Fatostatin possessed antimitotic properties. Fatostatin inhibited tubulin polymerization, arrested cells in mitosis, activated the spindle assembly checkpoint, and triggered mitotic catastrophe and reduced cell viability. Thus Fatostatin's ability to inhibit SREBP activity and cell division could prove beneficial in treating aggressive types of cancers such as glioblastomas that have elevated lipid metabolism and fast proliferation rates and often develop resistance to current anticancer therapies. PMID:27378817

  6. Small intestinal ulceration secondary to carcinoid tumour arising in a Meckel's diverticulum.

    PubMed Central

    McCluggage, W G; McConnell, L; Sloan, J M; Ellis, P K; Irwin, S T

    1999-01-01

    A solitary small intestinal ulcer associated with a carcinoid tumour in a nearby Meckel's diverticulum was found in a 77 year old man presenting with massive rectal bleeding. Angiography and a radioisotope study localised the bleeding to the ileum. At operation, the Meckel's diverticulum was identified, with bleeding from an ulcer just distal to it. Pathological examination revealed a small carcinoid tumour confined to the Meckel's diverticulum. Close to the opening of the diverticulum, within the ileum, a well demarcated ulcer was present. Histology showed a non-specific ulcer which eroded a large blood vessel. This is the first documented occurrence of solitary small intestinal ulceration in association with a carcinoid tumour. Carcinoid tumour should be added to the list of possible causes of small intestinal ulceration. The ulceration may be secondary to release of cytokines by the tumour. Images PMID:10343617

  7. Tumores carcinoides gastrointestinales—Versión para profesionales de salud

    Cancer.gov

    Información del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer para profesionales de salud sobre el tratamiento del tumor carcinoide gastrointestinal, así como referencias a estudios clínicos y otros temas relacionados.

  8. I-123 MIBG imaging of metastatic carcinoid tumor from the rectum.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, N; Seto, H; Ishiki, M; Shimizu, M; Kageyama, M; Wu, Y W; Nagayoshi, T; Kamisaki, Y; Kakishita, M

    1995-04-01

    I-131 MIBG, a specific radiopharmaceutical agent for scintigraphic imaging and treatment of pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma may be useful for detection of apudomas. Scintigraphy with I-123 radiolabeled MIBG was performed in a patient with metastatic carcinoid tumor from the rectum. I-123 MIBG scintigraphic findings showed multiple areas of abnormal tumor uptake of hepatic and bone metastases from the rectal carcinoid. Bone scintigraphy demonstrated multiple metastatic lesions. Computed tomography revealed multiple solid tumors of the liver. This report describes accumulation of I-123 MIBG in the liver and bone metastases from the rectal carcinoid. Radioiodine MIBG scintigraphy may be useful for detecting metastatic lesions, for evaluating postoperative recurrence, and also for the treatment of the carcinoid tumor. PMID:7788995

  9. Ivermectin Inhibits Growth of Chlamydia trachomatis in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pettengill, Matthew A.; Lam, Verissa W.; Ollawa, Ikechukwu; Marques-da-Silva, Camila; Ojcius, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Ivermectin is currently approved for treatment of both clinical and veterinary infections by nematodes, including Onchocerca cervicalis in horses and Onchocerca volvulus in humans. However, ivermectin has never been shown to be effective against bacterial pathogens. Here we show that ivermectin also inhibits infection of epithelial cells by the bacterial pathogen, Chlamydia trachomatis, at doses that could be envisioned clinically for sexually-transmitted or ocular infections by Chlamydia. PMID:23119027

  10. Ivermectin inhibits growth of Chlamydia trachomatis in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pettengill, Matthew A; Lam, Verissa W; Ollawa, Ikechukwu; Marques-da-Silva, Camila; Ojcius, David M

    2012-01-01

    Ivermectin is currently approved for treatment of both clinical and veterinary infections by nematodes, including Onchocerca cervicalis in horses and Onchocerca volvulus in humans. However, ivermectin has never been shown to be effective against bacterial pathogens. Here we show that ivermectin also inhibits infection of epithelial cells by the bacterial pathogen, Chlamydia trachomatis, at doses that could be envisioned clinically for sexually-transmitted or ocular infections by Chlamydia. PMID:23119027

  11. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo; Yoo, Young-Do; Park, Won-Bong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  12. Honokiol inhibits melanoma stem cells by targeting notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Venugopal, Anand; Ramamoorthy, Prabhu; Standing, David; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Umar, Shahid; Jensen, Roy A; Anant, Shrikant; Mammen, Joshua M V

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive disease with limited therapeutic options. Here, we determined the effects of honokiol (HNK), a biphenolic natural compound on melanoma cells and stemness. HNK significantly inhibited melanoma cell proliferation, viability, clonogenicity and induced autophagy. In addition, HNK significantly inhibited melanosphere formation in a dose dependent manner. Western blot analyses also demonstrated reduction in stem cell markers CD271, CD166, Jarid1b, and ABCB5. We next examined the effect of HNK on Notch signaling, a pathway involved in stem cell self-renewal. Four different Notch receptors exist in cells, which when cleaved by a series of enzymatic reactions catalyzed by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Converting Enzyme (TACE) and γ-secretase protein complex, results in the release of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which then translocates to the nucleus and induces target gene expression. Western blot analyses demonstrated that in HNK treated cells there is a significant reduction in the expression of cleaved Notch-2. In addition, there was a reduction in the expression of downstream target proteins, Hes-1 and cyclin D1. Moreover, HNK treatment suppressed the expression of TACE and γ-secretase complex proteins in melanoma cells. To confirm that suppression of Notch-2 activation is critical for HNK activity, we overexpressed NICD1, NICD2, and performed HNK treatment. NICD2, but not NICD1, partially restored the expression of Hes-1 and cyclin D1, and increased melanosphere formation. Taken together, these data suggest that HNK is a potent inhibitor of melanoma cells, in part, through the targeting of melanoma stem cells by suppressing Notch-2 signaling. PMID:25491779

  13. Radiosensitization by Inhibiting STAT1 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhouguang; Tretiakova, Maria; Zhang Zhongfa; Li Yan; Wang Xiaozhen; Zhu, Julie Xiaohong; Gao Yuanhong; Mai Weiyuan; Furge, Kyle; Qian Chaonan; Amato, Robert; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been historically regarded as a radioresistant malignancy, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is not understood. This study investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), a transcription factor downstream of the interferon-signaling pathway, in radioresistant RCC. Methods and Materials: The expressions of STAT1 and STAT3 in 164 human clear cell RCC samples, 47 papillary RCC samples, and 15 normal kidney tissue samples were examined by microarray expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the total and phosphorylated STAT1 expression in CRL-1932 (786-O) (human clear cell RCC), SKRC-39 (human papillary RCC), CCL-116 (human fibroblast), and CRL-1441 (G-401) (human Wilms tumor). STAT1 was reduced or inhibited by fludarabine and siRNA, respectively, and the effects on radiation-induced cell death were investigated using clonogenic assays. Results: STAT1 expression, but not STAT3 expression, was significantly greater in human RCC samples (p = 1.5 x 10{sup -8} for clear cell; and p = 3.6 x 10{sup -4} for papillary). Similarly, the expression of STAT1 was relatively greater in the two RCC cell lines. STAT1 expression was reduced by both fludarabine and siRNA, significantly increasing the radiosensitivity in both RCC cell lines. Conclusion: This is the first study reporting the overexpression of STAT1 in human clear cell and papillary RCC tissues. Radiosensitization in RCC cell lines was observed by a reduction or inhibition of STAT1 signaling, using fludarabine or siRNA. Our data suggest that STAT1 may play a key role in RCC radioresistance and manipulation of this pathway may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy.

  14. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  15. Oxidative stress inhibits distant metastasis by human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Piskounova, Elena; Agathocleous, Michalis; Murphy, Malea M.; Hu, Zeping; Huddlestun, Sara E.; Zhao, Zhiyu; Leitch, A. Marilyn; Johnson, Timothy M.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Morrison, Sean J.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancer cells commonly enter the blood and disseminate systemically but are highly inefficient at forming distant metastases for poorly understood reasons. We studied human melanomas that differed in their metastasis histories in patients and in their capacity to metastasize in NSG mice. All melanomas had high frequencies of cells that formed subcutaneous tumours, but much lower percentages of cells that formed tumours after intravenous or intrasplenic transplantation, particularly among inefficient metastasizers. Melanoma cells in the blood and visceral organs experienced oxidative stress not observed in established subcutaneous tumours. Successfully metastasizing melanomas underwent reversible metabolic changes during metastasis that increased their capacity to withstand oxidative stress, including increased dependence upon NADPH-generating enzymes in the folate pathway. Anti-oxidants promoted distant metastasis in NSG mice. Folate pathway inhibition using low-dose methotrexate, ALDH1L2 knockdown, or MTHFD1 knockdown inhibited distant metastasis without significantly affecting the growth of subcutaneous tumors in the same mice. Oxidative stress thus limits distant metastasis by melanoma cells in vivo. PMID:26466563

  16. Hepatic metastases of primary jejunal carcinoid tumor: A case report with radiological findings

    PubMed Central

    Avcu, Serhat; Özen, Özkan; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Bora, Aydın

    2009-01-01

    Context: Carcinoid tumors represent a group of well-differentiated tumors originating from the diffuse endocrine system outside the pancreas and thyroid. The overall prevalence of carcinoid tumors in the United States is estimated to be one to two cases per 100,000 persons. Various sites of origin of this neoplasm are appendix - 30-45%, small bowel - 25-35% (duodenum 2%, jejunum 7%, ileum 91%, multiple sites 15-35%), rectum 10-15%, caecum - 5%, and stomach - 0.5%. Liver metastases from jejunal and ileal carcinoids are generally hypervascular. Case report: Here we report a case of primary jejunal carcinoid tumor in a 66-year-old woman metastasizing to liver with ultrasonography, computed tomography, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) findings. Conclusion: Primary jejunal carcinoid tumor is a rare entity. DWI can help in the differential diagnosis of hepatic hypervascular metastatic mass lesions from benign ones, as well as in the diagnosis of carcinoid tumor. PMID:22666712

  17. Inhibition of mast cell-dependent conversion of cultured macrophages into foam cells with antiallergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Kovanen, P T

    2000-12-01

    Degranulation of isolated, rat peritoneal mast cells in the presence of low density lipoprotein (LDL) induces cholesteryl ester accumulation in cocultured macrophages with ensuing foam cell formation. This event occurs when the macrophages phagocytose LDL particles that have been bound to the heparin proteoglycans of exocytosed granules. In an attempt to inhibit such foam cell formation pharmacologically, rat peritoneal mast cells that had been passively sensitized with anti-ovalbumin-IgE were treated with 2 mast cell-stabilizing antianaphylactic drugs, MY-1250 or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Both drugs were found to inhibit antigen (ovalbumin)-triggered release of histamine from the mast cells, revealing mast cell stabilization. In cocultures of rat peritoneal macrophages and passively sensitized mast cells, addition of MY-1250 before addition of the antigen resulted in parallel reductions in histamine release from mast cells, uptake of [(14)C]sucrose-LDL, and accumulation of LDL-derived cholesteryl esters in the cocultured macrophages. Similarly, when passively sensitized mast cells were stimulated with antigen in the presence of DSCG and the preconditioned media containing all substances released from the drug-treated mast cells were collected and added to macrophages cultured in LDL-containing medium, uptake and esterification of LDL cholesterol by the macrophages were inhibited. The inhibitory effects of both drugs were mast cell-specific because neither drug inhibited the ability of macrophages to take up and esterify LDL cholesterol. Analysis of heparin proteoglycan contents of the incubation media revealed that both drugs had inhibited mast cells from expelling their granule remnants. Thus, both MY-1250 and DSCG prevent mast cells from releasing the heparin proteoglycan-containing vehicles that bind LDL and carry it into macrophages. This study suggests that antiallergic pharmacological agents could be used in animal models to prevent mast cell

  18. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. PMID:26976217

  19. IARS2 silencing induces non-small cell lung cancer cells proliferation inhibition, cell cycle arrest and promotes cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, J; Liu, W; Li, R; Liu, J; Zhang, Y; Tang, W; Wang, K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential role of Ileucyl-tRNA synthetase (IARS2) silencing in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The silencing of IARS2 in H1299 cells and A549 cells were performed by lentivirus encoding shRNAs. The efficiency of IARS2 silencing was detected by quantitative real time PCR and western blot. The effects of IARS2 silencing on cell growth, cell apoptosis, cell cycle and cell colony formation ability were assessed by cells counting, MTT assay, flow cytometer analysis and soft agar colony formation assay, respectively. Compared with negative control group, IARS2 was significantly knockdown by transfection with lentivirus encoding shRNA of IARS2. The IARS2 silencing significantly inhibited the cells proliferation and cells colony formation ability, induced cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and promoted cell apoptosis. IARS2 silencing induced NSCLC cells growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and promoted cell apoptosis. These results suggest that IARS2 may be a novel target for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:26639235

  20. Simulated microgravity inhibits cell wall regeneration of Penicillium decumbens protoplasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Sun, Y.; Yi, Z. C.; Rong, L.; Zhuang, F. Y.; Fan, Y. B.

    2010-09-01

    This work compares cell wall regeneration from protoplasts of the fungus Penicillium decumbens under rotary culture (simulated microgravity) and stationary cultures. Using an optimized lytic enzyme mixture, protoplasts were successfully released with a yield of 5.3 × 10 5 cells/mL. Under simulated microgravity conditions, the protoplast regeneration efficiency was 33.8%, lower than 44.9% under stationary conditions. Laser scanning confocal microscopy gave direct evidence for reduced formation of polysaccharides under simulated conditions. Scanning electron microscopy showed the delayed process of cell wall regeneration by simulated microgravity. The delayed regeneration of P. decumbens cell wall under simulated microgravity was likely caused by the inhibition of polysaccharide synthesis. This research contributes to the understanding of how gravitational loads affect morphological and physiological processes of fungi.

  1. Ozone inhibits guard cell K+ channels implicated in stomatal opening

    PubMed Central

    Torsethaugen, Gro; Pell, Eva J.; Assmann, Sarah M.

    1999-01-01

    Ozone (O3) deleteriously affects organisms ranging from humans to crop plants, yet little is understood regarding the underlying mechanisms. In plants, O3 decreases CO2 assimilation, but whether this could result from direct O3 action on guard cells remained unknown. Potassium flux causes osmotically driven changes in guard cell volume that regulate apertures of associated microscopic pores through which CO2 is supplied to the photosynthetic mesophyll tissue. We show in Vicia faba that O3 inhibits (i) guard cell K+ channels that mediate K+ uptake that drives stomatal opening; (ii) stomatal opening in isolated epidermes; and (iii) stomatal opening in leaves, such that CO2 assimilation is reduced without direct effects of O3 on photosynthetic capacity. Direct O3 effects on guard cells may have ecological and agronomic implications for plant productivity and for response to other environmental stressors including drought. PMID:10557363

  2. TLR2 Activation Inhibits Embryonic Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Okun, Eitan; Griffioen, Kathleen J.; Gen-Son, Tae; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roberts, Nicholas J.; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Hutchison, Emmette; Cheng, Aiwu; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Lathia, Justin D.; van Praag, Henriette; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play essential roles in innate immunity, and increasing evidence indicates that these receptors are expressed in neurons, astrocytes and microglia in the brain, where they mediate responses to infection, stress and injury. To address the possibility that TLR2 heterodimer activation could affect progenitor cells in the developing brain, we analyzed the expression of TLR2 throughout the mouse cortical development, and assessed the role of TLR2 heterodimer activation in neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. TLR2 mRNA and protein was expressed in the cortex in embryonic and early postnatal stages of development, and in cultured cortical NPC. While NPC from TLR2-deficient and wild type embryos had the same proliferative capacity, TLR2 activation by the synthetic bacterial lipopeptides Pam3CSK4 and FSL1, or low molecular weight hyaluronan, an endogenous ligand for TLR2, inhibited neurosphere formation in vitro. Intracerebral in utero administration of TLR2 ligands resulted in ventricular dysgenesis characterized by increased ventricle size, reduced proliferative area around the ventricles, increased cell density, an increase in PH3+ cells and a decrease in BrdU+ cells in the sub-ventricular zone. Our findings indicate that loss of TLR2 does not result in defects in cerebral development. However, TLR2 is expressed and functional in the developing telencephalon from early embryonic stages and infectious agent-related activation of TLR2 inhibits NPC proliferation. TLR2–mediated inhibition of NPC proliferation may therefore be a mechanism by which infection, ischemia and inflammation adversely affect brain development. PMID:20456021

  3. Green tea polyphenols inhibit testosterone production in rat Leydig cells

    PubMed Central

    Figueiroa, Marina S; César Vieira, Juliany S B; Leite, Disleide S; Filho, Ruben C O Andrade; Ferreira, Fabiano; Gouveia, Patrícia S; Udrisar, Daniel P; Wanderley, Maria I

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the acute effects of green tea extract (GTE) and its polyphenol constituents, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and (−)-epicatechin (EC), on basal and stimulated testosterone production by rat Leydig cells in vitro. Leydig cells purified in a Percoll gradient were incubated for 3 h with GTE, EGCG or EC and the testosterone precursor androstenedione, in the presence or absence of either protein kinase A (PKA) or protein kinase C (PKC) activators. The reversibility of the effect was studied by pretreating cells for 15 min with GTE or EGCG, allowing them to recover for 1 h and challenging them for 2 h with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH), 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol or androstenedione. GTE and EGCG, but not EC, inhibited both basal and kinase-stimulated testosterone production. Under the pretreatment conditions, the inhibitory effect of the higher concentration of GTE/EGCG on hCG/LHRH-stimulated or 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol-induced testosterone production was maintained, whereas androstenedione-supported testosterone production returned to control levels. At the lower concentration of GTE/EGCG, the inhibitory effect of these polyphenols on 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol-supported testosterone production was reversed. The inhibitory effects of GTE may be explained by the action of its principal component, EGCG, and the presence of a gallate group in its structure seems important for its high efficacy in inhibiting testosterone production. The mechanisms underlying the effects of GTE and EGCG involve the inhibition of the PKA/PKC signalling pathways, as well as the inhibition of P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase function. PMID:19330017

  4. Inhibition of regulated cell death by cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Stefan; Dewitz, Christin; Fändrich, Fred; Kunzendorf, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Development of the means to efficiently and continuously renew missing and non-functional proteins in diseased cells remains a major goal in modern molecular medicine. While gene therapy has the potential to achieve this, substantial obstacles must be overcome before clinical application can be considered. A promising alternative approach is the direct delivery of non-permeant active biomolecules, such as oligonucleotides, peptides and proteins, to the affected cells with the purpose of ameliorating an advanced disease process. In addition to receptor-mediated endocytosis, cell-penetrating peptides are widely used as vectors for rapid translocation of conjugated molecules across cell membranes into intracellular compartments and the delivery of these therapeutic molecules is generally referred to as novel prospective protein therapy. As a broad coverage of the enormous amount of published data in this field is unrewarding, this review will provide a brief, focused overview of the technology and a summary of recent studies of the most commonly used protein transduction domains and their potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cellular damage and the prevention of regulated cell death. PMID:27048815

  5. Depolarization counteracts glucocorticoid inhibition of adenohypophysical corticotroph cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, M C; Shipston, M J; Antoni, F A

    1998-01-01

    In AtT20 mouse corticotroph tumour cells large conductance Ca2+-activated K+-channels (BK-channels) have an essential role in the early glucocorticoid inhibition of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) secretion evoked by corticotrophin-releasing factor. The present study examined whether or not BK-channels are also pivotal to glucocorticoid inhibition of normal rat anterior pituitary cells. A membrane-permeant, non-metabolizable cyclic AMP analogue, 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio)adenosine-3′,5′-cyclic-monophosphate (CPT-cAMP) was used as the primary secretagogue stimulus, as this mimics the increase of intracellular cyclic AMP caused by corticotrophin-releasing factor, but is not subject to the complex Ca2+-dependent regulation of cyclic AMP metabolism that is evident in corticotroph cells. Experiments in AtT20 cells showed that ACTH secretion stimulated by 1 mM CPT-cAMP was suppressed to 34±1.5% (n=12) of the control stimulus by a maximal dose of 100 nM dexamethasone. The ACTH secretion evoked by the combination of 1 mM CPT-cAMP with either 5 μM (−)BayK8644 (L-type Ca2+-channel activator) or 5 mM TEA (K+-channel blocker) was respectively 69.1±7.6% and 69.3±11.8% of control after 2 h preincubation with 100 nM dexamethasone (P<0.05 vs CPT-cAMP). The ACTH response elicited by 5 μM (−)BayK8644 and 5 mM TEA given together was completely resistant to inhibition by 100 nM dexamethasone. Furthermore, TEA and (−)BayK8644 given together synergistically stimulated ACTH release in combination with 0.1 mM or 1 mM CPT-cAMP, and these ACTH responses were not inhibited by 100 nM dexamethasone. In primary cultures of rat anterior pituitary cells, TEA (up to 20 mM), charybdotoxin (30 nM) or apamin (100 nM) failed to modify the glucocorticoid inhibition of 0.1 mM CPT-cAMP-induced ACTH release. The combination of 5 mM TEA and 5 μM (−)BayK8644 elicited a small but significant increase in ACTH secretion but did not modify the inhibition of 0.3

  6. Inhibition to retinal rod bipolar cells is regulated by light levels

    PubMed Central

    Mazade, Reece E.; Klein, Justin S.

    2013-01-01

    The retina responds to a wide range of light stimuli by adaptation of retinal signaling to background light intensity and the use of two different photoreceptors: rods that sense dim light and cones that sense bright light. Rods signal to rod bipolar cells that receive significant inhibition from amacrine cells in the dark, especially from a rod bipolar cell-activated GABAergic amacrine cell. This inhibition modulates the output of rod bipolar cells onto downstream neurons. However, it was not clear how the inhibition of rod bipolar cells changes when rod signaling is limited by an adapting background light and cone signaling becomes dominant. We found that both light-evoked and spontaneous rod bipolar cell inhibition significantly decrease with light adaptation. This suggests a global decrease in the activity of amacrine cells that provide input to rod bipolar cells with light adaptation. However, inhibition to rod bipolar cells is also limited by GABAergic connections between amacrine cells, which decrease GABAergic input to rod bipolar cells. When we removed this serial inhibition, the light-evoked inhibition to rod bipolar cells remained after light adaptation. These results suggest that decreased inhibition to rod bipolar cells after light adaptation is due to decreased rod pathway activity as well as an active increase in inhibition between amacrine cells. Together these serve to limit rod bipolar cell inhibition after light adaptation, when the rod pathway is inactive and modulation of the signal is not required. This suggests an efficiency mechanism in the retina to limit unnecessary signaling. PMID:23596335

  7. The Traditional Chinese Medicine Baicalein Potently Inhibits Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Jiasheng; Liu, Tianrun; Jiang, Lin; Wu, Xiangsong; Cao, Yang; Li, Maolan; Dong, Qian; Liu, Yingbin; Xu, Haineng

    2016-01-01

    Baicalein, a traditional Chinese medicine, is a member of the flavone subclass of flavonoids. It has been reported to have anticancer activities in several human cancer cell lines in vitro. However, the therapeutic effects of baicalein on human gastric cancer and the mechanisms of action of baicalein have not been extensively studied. In the present study, we utilized a cell viability assay and an in vivo tumor growth assay to test the inhibitory effects of baicalein on gastric cancer. Analyses of the cell cycle, apoptosis and alterations in protein levels were performed to elucidate how baicalein functions in gastric cancer. We found that baicalein could potently inhibit gastric cancer cell growth and colony formation. Baicalein robustly induced arrest at the S phase in the gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901. It induced SGC-7901 cell apoptosis and disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of protein expression levels in SGC-7901 cells showed downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax in response to baicalein treatment. These results indicate that baicalein induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells through the mitochondrial pathway. In an in vivo subcutaneous xenograft model, baicalein exhibited excellent tumor inhibitory effects. These results indicate that baicalein may be a potential drug for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26918059

  8. Cucurbitacin B inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis via STAT3 pathway inhibition in A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, MENG; BIAN, ZHI-GANG; ZHANG, YI; WANG, JIA-HE; KAN, LIANG; WANG, XIN; NIU, HUI-YAN; HE, PING

    2014-01-01

    Natural products are a great source of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. The present study was conducted to investigate whether cucurbitacin B (CuB), one of the most potent and widely used cucurbitacins, inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in the A549 lung cancer cell line. Furthermore, CuB induced apoptosis of A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. The present study also demonstrated that CuB dose-dependently inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation, with cell cycle inhibition and cyclin B1 downregulation. Apoptosis induced by CuB was shown to be associated with cytochrome c release, B-cell lymphoma 2 downregulation and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway inhibition. CuB may prove to be a useful approach for the chemotherapy of lung cancer. PMID:25242136

  9. Cucurbitacin B inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis via STAT3 pathway inhibition in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Bian, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jia-He; Kan, Liang; Wang, Xin; Niu, Hui-Yan; He, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Natural products are a great source of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. The present study was conducted to investigate whether cucurbitacin B (CuB), one of the most potent and widely used cucurbitacins, inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in the A549 lung cancer cell line. Furthermore, CuB induced apoptosis of A549 cells in a -concentration-dependent manner, as determined by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. The present study also demonstrated that CuB dose-dependently inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation, with cell cycle inhibition and cyclin B1 downregulation. Apoptosis induced by CuB was shown to be associated with cytochrome c release, B-cell lymphoma 2 downregulation and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway inhibition. CuB may prove to be a useful approach for the chemotherapy of lung cancer. PMID:25242136

  10. IL-17 Inhibits Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Masahiro; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Sonomoto, Koshiro; Fukuyo, Shunsuke; Oshita, Koichi; Okada, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into cells of mesenchymal lineages, such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Here we investigated the effects of IL-17, a key cytokine in chronic inflammation, on chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs. Methods Human bone marrow MSCs were pellet cultured in chondrogenic induction medium containing TGF-β3. Chondrogenic differentiation was detected by cartilage matrix accumulation and chondrogenic marker gene expression. Results Over-expression of cartilage matrix and chondrogenic marker genes was noted in chondrogenic cultures, but was inhibited by IL-17 in a dose-dependent manner. Expression and phosphorylation of SOX9, the master transcription factor for chondrogenesis, were induced within 2 days and phosphorylated SOX9 was stably maintained until day 21. IL-17 did not alter total SOX9 expression, but significantly suppressed SOX9 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. At day 7, IL-17 also suppressed the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), which is known to phosphorylate SOX9. H89, a selective PKA inhibitor, also suppressed SOX9 phosphorylation, expression of chondrogenic markers and cartilage matrix, and also decreased chondrogenesis. Conclusions IL-17 inhibited chondrogenesis of human MSCs through the suppression of PKA activity and SOX9 phosphorylation. These results suggest that chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs can be inhibited by a mechanism triggered by IL-17 under chronic inflammation. PMID:24260226

  11. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:25961580

  12. Substituted oxines inhibit endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis†

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Shridhar; Shim, Joong Sup; Zhang, Feiran; Chong, Curtis Robert; Liu, Jun O.

    2013-01-01

    Two substituted oxines, nitroxoline (5) and 5-chloroquinolin-8-yl phenylcarbamate (22), were identified as hits in a high-throughput screen aimed at finding new anti-angiogenic agents. In a previous study, we have elucidated the molecular mechanism of antiproliferative activity of nitroxoline in endothelial cells, which comprises of a dual inhibition of type 2 human methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP2) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). Structure–activity relationship study (SAR) of nitroxoline offered many surprises where minor modifications yielded oxine derivatives with increased potency against human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), but with entirely different as yet unknown mechanisms. For example, 5-nitrosoquinolin-8-ol (33) inhibited HUVEC growth with sub-micromolar IC50, but did not affect MetAP2 or MetAP1, and it only showed weak inhibition against SIRT1. Other sub-micromolar inhibitors were derivatives of 5-aminoquinolin-8-ol (34) and 8-sulfonamidoquinoline (32). A sulfamate derivative of nitroxoline (48) was found to be more potent than nitroxoline with the retention of activities against MetAP2 and SIRT1. The bioactivity of the second hit, micromolar HUVEC and MetAP2 inhibitor carbamate 22 was improved further with an SAR study culminating in carbamate 24 which is a nanomolar inhibitor of HUVEC and MetAP2. PMID:22391578

  13. Biochemistry of growth inhibition by ammonium ions in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryll, T.; Valley, U.; Wagner, R. . Cell Culture Techniques Dept.)

    1994-06-20

    The intracellular pool of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine has been shown to act as a central target during the inhibitory action of ammonium ions in vitro cultivated mammalian cell cultures. This pool has been demonstrated to be elevated at the end of a batch cultivation and very quickly as a response to exogenously applied ammonium chloride by using four different cell lines (hybridoma, BHK, CHO, and Ltk-929). The amount of enlarged UDP aminohexoses is correlated to the inhibitor concentration and additionally dependent on the cell line. The formation of the UDP sugars is associated with a transient reduction of the UTP pool. Moreover, the quick formation of UDP-GNAC is strictly dependent on the presence of, glucose and ammonium. Both metabolites act as biochemical precursors. Additionally, the formation of UDP-GNAc after ammonium application has been shown to increase with an elevated cultivation pH and to be independent of the inhibition of transcription and translation processes. The intracellular amount of UDP-GNAc correlates with the level of growth inhibition in mammalian cell lines.

  14. Cardiac Progenitor Cell Commitment is Inhibited by Nuclear Akt Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Wu, Weitao; Quijada, Pearl; Sussman, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Stem cell therapies to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue represent a novel approach to treat heart disease. However, the majority of adoptively transferred stem cells delivered to damaged myocardium do not survive long enough to impart protective benefits, resulting in modest functional improvements. Strategies to improve survival and proliferation of stem cells show promise for significantly enhancing cardiac function and regeneration. Objective Determine if injected cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) genetically modified to overexpress nuclear Akt (CPCeA) increase structural and functional benefits to infarcted myocardium relative to control CPCs. Methods and Results CPCeA exhibit significantly increased proliferation and secretion of paracrine factors compared to CPCs. However, CPCeA exhibit impaired capacity for lineage commitment in vitro. Infarcted hearts receiving intramyocardial injection of CPCeA have increased recruitment of endogenous c-kit cells compared to CPCs, but neither population provides long-term functional and structural improvements compared to saline injected controls. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt alleviated blockade of lineage commitment in CPCeA. Conclusions Although overexpression of nuclear Akt promotes rapid proliferation and secretion of protective paracrine factors, the inability of CPCeA to undergo lineage commitment hinders their capacity to provide functional or structural benefits to infarcted hearts. Despite enhanced recruitment of endogenous CPCs, lack of functional improvement in CPCeA treated hearts demonstrates CPC lineage commitment is essential to the regenerative response. Effective stem cell therapies must promote cellular survival and proliferation without inhibiting lineage commitment. Since CPCeA exhibit remarkable proliferative potential, an inducible system mediating nuclear Akt expression could be useful to augment cell therapy approaches. PMID:21350213

  15. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of KrasG12D-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radio-sensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:23182391

  16. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  17. Inhibition of cell growth by a hypothalamic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Redding, T W; Schally, A V

    1982-01-01

    A fraction purified from acetic acid extracts of porcine hypothalami was found to contain significant antimitogenic activity when tested in normal and neoplastic cell lines. Addition of this hypothalamic material (1-100 micrograms/ml) to culture media significantly inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into cellular DNA in several cell lines. Amino acid incorporation into pituitary proteins and uridine incorporation into RNA were also significantly reduced by this factor(s). Addition to the culture media of this hypothalamic material at 5 micrograms/ml and 50 micrograms/ml per day decreased by 17% and 36%, respectively, cell numbers of 3T6 fibroblast cell cultures. Time-response curves showed that the inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in 3T6 fibroblast cells begins within 2 hr after adding this fraction to the culture medium. The inhibitory action cannot be explained by a direct cytotoxic effect since 3T6 cells labeled with 51Cr and incubated for 6 hr in the presence of this hypothalamic fraction fail to show an increase in the release of 51Cr into the medium as compared with controls. Incubation with trypsin and chymotrypsin completely abolished the antimitogenic activity of this material and pepsin decreased it. This strongly suggests that the antimitogenic activity exhibited by this fraction is due to a polypeptide(s). These observations provide evidence for the presence in the mammalian hypothalamus of an antimitogenic peptide(s) that may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. PMID:6757925

  18. Myocardin inhibits cellular proliferation by inhibiting NF-kappaB(p65)-dependent cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ru-Hang; Zheng, Xi-Long; Callis, Thomas E; Stansfield, William E; He, Jiayin; Baldwin, Albert S; Wang, Da-Zhi; Selzman, Craig H

    2008-03-01

    We previously reported the importance of the serum response factor (SRF) cofactor myocardin in controlling muscle gene expression as well as the fundamental role for the inflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB in governing cellular fate. Inactivation of myocardin has been implicated in malignant tumor growth. However, the underlying mechanism of myocardin regulation of cellular growth remains unclear. Here we show that NF-kappaB(p65) represses myocardin activation of cardiac and smooth muscle genes in a CArG-box-dependent manner. Consistent with their functional interaction, p65 directly interacts with myocardin and inhibits the formation of the myocardin/SRF/CArG ternary complex in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, myocardin decreases p65-mediated target gene activation by interfering with p65 DNA binding and abrogates LPS-induced TNF-alpha expression. Importantly, myocardin inhibits cellular proliferation by interfering with NF-kappaB-dependent cell-cycle regulation. Cumulatively, these findings identify a function for myocardin as an SRF-independent transcriptional repressor and cell-cycle regulator and provide a molecular mechanism by which interaction between NF-kappaB and myocardin plays a central role in modulating cellular proliferation and differentiation. PMID:18296632

  19. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  20. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  1. Polydatin Inhibits Formation of Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Liu, Meixia; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Wengao; Liu, Longtao

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, a Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. Polydatin, one of the major active ingredients in Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, has been recently shown to possess extensive cardiovascular pharmacological activities. In present study, we examined the effects of Polydatin on the formation of peritoneal macrophage-derived foam cells in Apolipoprotein E gene knockout mice (ApoE−/−) and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Peritoneal macrophages were collected from ApoE−/− mice and cultured in vitro. These cells sequentially were divided into four groups: Control group, Model group, Lovastatin group, and Polydatin group. Our results demonstrated that Polydatin significantly inhibits the formation of foam cells derived from peritoneal macrophages. Further studies indicated that Polydatin regulates the metabolism of intracellular lipid and possesses anti-inflammatory effects, which may be regulated through the PPAR-γ signaling pathways. PMID:26557864

  2. A triterpenoid from wild bitter gourd inhibits breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li-Yuan; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chu, Po-Chen; Lin, Wei-Yu; Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The antitumor activity of 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al (TCD), a triterpenoid isolated from wild bitter gourd, in breast cancer cells was investigated. TCD suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with IC50 values at 72 h of 19 and 23 μM, respectively, via a PPARγ−independent manner. TCD induced cell apoptosis accompanied with pleiotrophic biological modulations including down-regulation of Akt-NF-κB signaling, up-regulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and p53, increased reactive oxygen species generation, inhibition of histone deacetylases protein expression, and cytoprotective autophagy. Together, these findings provided the translational value of TCD and wild bitter gourd as an antitumor agent for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26926586

  3. A triterpenoid from wild bitter gourd inhibits breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Li-Yuan; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chu, Po-Chen; Lin, Wei-Yu; Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The antitumor activity of 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al (TCD), a triterpenoid isolated from wild bitter gourd, in breast cancer cells was investigated. TCD suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with IC50 values at 72 h of 19 and 23 μM, respectively, via a PPARγ-independent manner. TCD induced cell apoptosis accompanied with pleiotrophic biological modulations including down-regulation of Akt-NF-κB signaling, up-regulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and p53, increased reactive oxygen species generation, inhibition of histone deacetylases protein expression, and cytoprotective autophagy. Together, these findings provided the translational value of TCD and wild bitter gourd as an antitumor agent for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26926586

  4. A triterpenoid from wild bitter gourd inhibits breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Li-Yuan; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chu, Po-Chen; Lin, Wei-Yu; Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2016-03-01

    The antitumor activity of 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al (TCD), a triterpenoid isolated from wild bitter gourd, in breast cancer cells was investigated. TCD suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with IC50 values at 72 h of 19 and 23 μM, respectively, via a PPARγ-independent manner. TCD induced cell apoptosis accompanied with pleiotrophic biological modulations including down-regulation of Akt-NF-κB signaling, up-regulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and p53, increased reactive oxygen species generation, inhibition of histone deacetylases protein expression, and cytoprotective autophagy. Together, these findings provided the translational value of TCD and wild bitter gourd as an antitumor agent for patients with breast cancer.

  5. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  6. Migrastatin Analogues Inhibit Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Majchrzak, Kinga; Lo Re, Daniele; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Bulkowska, Małgorzata; Homa, Agata; Pawłowski, Karol; Motyl, Tomasz; Murphy, Paul V.; Król, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer spread to other organs is the main cause of death of oncological patients. Migration of cancer cells from a primary tumour is the crucial step in the complex process of metastasis, therefore blocking this process is currently the main treatment strategy. Metastasis inhibitors derived from natural products, such as, migrastatin, are very promising anticancer agents. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of six migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-1 to 6) on migration and invasion of canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines isolated from primary tumours and their metastases to the lungs. Canine mammary tumours constitute a valuable tool for studying multiple aspect of human cancer. Results Our results showed that two of six fully synthetic analogues of migrastatin: MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were potent inhibitors of canine mammary cancer cells migration and invasion. These data were obtained using the wound healing test, as well as trans-well migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, the treatment of cancer cells with the most effective compound (MGSTA-6) disturbed binding between filamentous F-actin and fascin1. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that treatment with MGSTA-6 increased the presence of unbound fascin1 and reduced co-localization of F-actin and fascin1 in canine cancer cells. Most likely, actin filaments were not cross-linked by fascin1 and did not generate the typical filopodial architecture of actin filaments in response to the activity of MGSTA-6. Thus, administration of MGSTA-6 results in decreased formation of filopodia protrusions and stress fibres in canine mammary cancer cells, causing inhibition of cancer migration and invasion. Conclusion Two synthetic migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6) were shown to be promising compounds for inhibition of cancer metastasis. They may have beneficial therapeutic effects in cancer therapy in dogs, especially in combination with other anticancer drugs. However, further in

  7. Honokiol Inhibits Androgen Receptor Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Karlsson, A. Isabella; Bonner, Michael Y.; Arbiser, Jack L.; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have shown previously that honokiol (HNK), a bioactive component of the medicinal plant Magnolia officinalis, inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the effect of HNK on androgen receptor (AR) signaling is not known. METHODS LNCaP, C4-2, and TRAMP-C1 cells were used for various assays. Trypan blue dye exclusion assay or clonogenic assay was performed for determination of cell viability. The effects of HNK and/or its analogs on protein levels of AR and its target gene product prostate specific antigen (PSA) were determined by western blotting. RNA interference of p53 was achieved by transient transfection. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed for mRNA expression of AR. Nuclear translocation of AR was visualized by microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by DNA fragmentation assay or flow cytometry after Annexin V-propidium iodide staining. RESULTS HNK and its dichloroacetate analog (HDCA) were relatively more effective in suppressing cell viability and AR protein level than honokiol epoxide or biseugenol. Nuclear translocation of AR stimulated by a synthetic androgen (R1881) was markedly suppressed in the presence of HNK. Downregulation of AR protein resulting from HNK exposure was attributable to transcriptional repression as well as proteasomal degradation. HNK-mediated suppression of AR protein was maintained in LNCaP cells after knockdown of p53 protein. HNK-induced apoptosis was not affected by R1881 treatment. CONCLUSIONS The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that HNK inhibits activity of AR in prostate cancer cells regardless of the p53 status. PMID:24338950

  8. Resistance to telomerase inhibition by human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, Bojana; Crowe, David L

    2011-04-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures at the ends of chromosomes that are composed of a repetitive G rich sequence and telomeric binding proteins. Telomeres prevent the degradation of chromosomal ends and protect against inappropriate recombination. Telomere attrition involves a tumor suppressor pathway that limits the replication of premalignant cells. The loss of telomeric DNA with each round of replication leads to growth arrest accompanied by senescence or apoptosis. Many tumor cells activate the telomerase gene to bypass senescence. Telomerase is a multisubunit ribonucleoprotein that uses an RNA template to catalyze the addition of telomeric DNA to chromosomal ends. Overexpression of the TERT subunit leads to telomere lengthening and extension of the replicative lifespan. Dominant-negative telomerase has been shown to inhibit telomerase activity in many tumor cell lines, and this is associated with telomere shortening and apoptosis. Additionally, pharmacological telomerase inhibitors have been developed which lead to progressive telomere shortening and programmed cell death. In this study, we report a series of human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines that have high telomerase activity and short telomeres. Dominant-negative telomerase expression and pharmacological telomerase inhibition failed to completely inhibit enzymatic activity which was accompanied by the lack of telomere shortening. These cells continued to proliferate and demonstrated fewer responsive genes when treated with a pharmacological telomerase inhibitor. We concluded that some human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines are resistant to telomerase inhibition. PMID:21305252

  9. Citral inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Chaouki, Wahid; Leger, David Y; Liagre, Bertrand; Beneytout, Jean-Louis; Hmamouchi, Mohamed

    2009-10-01

    Many natural components of plants extract are studied for their beneficial effects on health and particularly on carcinogenesis chemoprevention. In this study, we investigated the effect of citral (3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal), a key component of essential oils extracted from several herbal plants, on the proliferation rate, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis of the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The effects of this compound were also tested on cyclo-oxygenase activity. Citral treatment caused inhibition of MCF-7 cell growth (IC(50)-48 h: 18 x 10(-5)m), with a cycle arrest in G(2)/M phase and apoptosis induction. Moreover, we observed a decrease in prostaglandin E(2) synthesis 48 h after citral treatment. These findings suggest that citral has a potential chemopreventive effect. PMID:19656204

  10. Farnesyltransferase inhibitor R115777 inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Delphine; Camara-Clayette, Valérie; Barbarat, Aurélie; Salles, Gilles; Coiffier, Bertrand; Ribrag, Vincent; Thieblemont, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity of the farnesyltranseferase inhibitor R115777 was evaluated in cell lines representative of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed in four human MCL cell lines (Granta, NCEB, REC, and UPN1) in presence of R115777, alone or in combination with vincristin, doxorubicin, bortezomib, cisplatin and cytarabine. Inhibition of farnesylation was determined by the appearance of prelamin A. The antitumor activity of R115777, administered p.o. at 100, 250 and 500mg/kg, was determined in vivo in nude mice xenografted with UPN1 cells. R115777 inhibited the growth of MCL cell lines in vitro with inhibitory concentrations ranging between 2 and 15nM. A fifty percent decrease of cell viability was observed at concentrations comprised between 0.08 and 17μM. Apoptosis, evaluated by annexin V and activated caspase 3 staining, was induced in all cell lines, in 40 to 71% of the cells depending on the cell lines. In addition, R115777 significantly increased the cytotoxic effect of vincristine, doxorubicin, bortezomib, cisplatin and cytarabine (p=0.001, p=0.016, p=0.006, p=0.014 and p=0.007 respectively). Exposure of MCL cell lines to R115777 during 72 hours resulted in inhibition of protein farnesylation. R115777 administered p.o. twice daily for 8 consecutive days to mice bearing established s.c. UPN1 xenograft displayed cytostatic activity at the 500 mg/kg dosage. We have demonstrated that inhibition of farnesyltransferase by R115777 was associated with growth inhibition and apoptosis of MCL cell lines in vitro and tumor xenograft stability in vivo. PMID:17639395