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Sample records for inhibits cell motility

  1. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3'-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action. PMID:26371759

  2. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3’-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action. PMID:26371759

  3. Inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and motility by fibroblasts is both contact and soluble factor dependent

    PubMed Central

    Alkasalias, Twana; Flaberg, Emilie; Kashuba, Vladimir; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Pavlova, Tatiana; Savchenko, Andrii; Szekely, Laszlo; Klein, George; Guven, Hayrettin

    2014-01-01

    Normal human and murine fibroblasts can inhibit proliferation of tumor cells when cocultured in vitro. The inhibitory capacity varies depending on the donor and the site of origin of the fibroblast. We showed previously that effective inhibition requires formation of a morphologically intact fibroblast monolayer before seeding of the tumor cells. Here we show that inhibition is extended to motility of tumor cells and we dissect the factors responsible for these inhibitory functions. We find that inhibition is due to two different sets of molecules: (i) the extracellular matrix (ECM) and other surface proteins of the fibroblasts, which are responsible for contact-dependent inhibition of tumor cell proliferation; and (ii) soluble factors secreted by fibroblasts when confronted with tumor cells (confronted conditioned media, CCM) contribute to inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and motility. However, conditioned media (CM) obtained from fibroblasts alone (nonconfronted conditioned media, NCM) did not inhibit tumor cell proliferation and motility. In addition, quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) data show up-regulation of proinflammatory genes. Moreover, comparison of CCM and NCM with an antibody array for 507 different soluble human proteins revealed differential expression of growth differentiation factor 15, dickkopf-related protein 1, endothelial-monocyte-activating polypeptide II, ectodysplasin A2, Galectin-3, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2, Nidogen1, urokinase, and matrix metalloproteinase 3. PMID:25404301

  4. Shielding of the Geomagnetic Field Alters Actin Assembly and Inhibits Cell Motility in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Wei-Chuan; Zhang, Zi-Jian; Wang, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F.; He, Rong-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that absence of the geomagnetic field (GMF), the so-called hypomagnetic field (HMF) environment, alters the biological functions in seemingly non-magnetosensitive cells and organisms, which indicates that the GMF could be sensed by non-iron-rich and non-photo-sensing cells. The underlying mechanisms of the HMF effects on those cells are closely related to their GMF sensation but remain poorly understood so far. Previously, we found that the HMF represses expressions of genes associated with cell migration and cytoskeleton assembly in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line). Here, we measured the HMF-induced changes on cell morphology, adhesion, motility and actin cytoskeleton in SH-SY5Y cells. The HMF inhibited cell adhesion and migration accompanied with a reduction in cellular F-actin amount. Moreover, following exposure to the HMF, the number of cell processes was reduced and cells were smaller in size and more round in shape. Furthermore, disordered kinetics of actin assembly in vitro were observed during exposure to the HMF, as evidenced by the presence of granule and meshed products. These results indicate that elimination of the GMF affects assembly of the motility-related actin cytoskeleton, and suggest that F-actin is a target of HMF exposure and probably a mediator of GMF sensation. PMID:27029216

  5. Knockdown of Golgi phosphoprotein 2 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and motility

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiming; Zhang, Xiaodi; Sun, Ting; Jiang, Junchang; Li, Ying; Chen, Mingliang; Wei, Zhen; Jiang, Weiqin; Zhou, Linfu

    2016-01-01

    Golgi phosphoprotein 2 (GP73) is highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, where it serves as a biomarker and indicator of disease progression. We used MTS assays, anchorage-independent cell colony formation assays and a xenograft tumor model to show that GP73-specific siRNAs inhibit HCC proliferation in HepG2, SMMC-7721, and Huh7 cell lines and in vivo. Following GP73 silencing, levels of p-Rb, a factor related to metastasis, were reduced, but cell cycle progression was unaffected. Our results suggest that GP73 silencing may not directly suppress proliferation, but may instead inhibit cell motility. Results from proliferation assays suggest GP73 reduces expression of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related factors and promotes cell motility, while transwell migration and invasion assays indicated a possible role in metastasis. Immunofluorescence co-localization microscopy and immunoblotting showed that GP73 decreases expression of N-cadherin and E-cadherin, two key factors in EMT, which may in turn decrease intracellular adhesive forces and promote cell motility. This study confirmed that GP73 expression leads to increased expression of EMT-related proteins and that GP73 silencing reduces HCC cell migration in vitro. These findings suggest that GP73 silencing through siRNA delivery may provide a novel low-toxicity therapy for the inhibition of tumor proliferation and metastasis. PMID:26870893

  6. MYBPH inhibits NM IIA assembly via direct interaction with NMHC IIA and reduces cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, Yasuyuki; Usukura, Jiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Motoshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH inhibits NMHC IIA assembly and cell motility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH interacts to assembly-competent NM IIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA. -- Abstract: Actomyosin filament assembly is a critical step in tumor cell migration. We previously found that myosin binding protein H (MYBPH) is directly transactivated by the TTF-1 lineage-survival oncogene in lung adenocarcinomas and inhibits phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) of non-muscle myosin IIA (NM IIA) via direct interaction with Rho kinase 1 (ROCK1). Here, we report that MYBPH also directly interacts with an additional molecule, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMHC IIA), which was found to occur between MYBPH and the rod portion of NMHC IIA. MYBPH inhibited NMHC IIA assembly and reduced cell motility. Conversely, siMYBPH-induced increased motility was partially, yet significantly, suppressed by blebbistatin, a non-muscle myosin II inhibitor, while more profound effects were attained by combined treatment with siROCK1 and blebbistatin. Electron microscopy observations showed well-ordered paracrystals of NMHC IIA reflecting an assembled state, which were significantly less frequently observed in the presence of MYBPH. Furthermore, an in vitro sedimentation assay showed that a greater amount of NMHC IIA was in an unassembled state in the presence of MYBPH. Interestingly, treatment with a ROCK inhibitor that impairs transition of NM IIA from an assembly-incompetent to assembly-competent state reduced the interaction between MYBPH and NMHC IIA, suggesting that MYBPH has higher affinity to assembly-competent NM IIA. These results suggest that MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA, and negatively regulates actomyosin organization at 2 distinct steps, resulting in firm inhibition of NM IIA assembly.

  7. PHLPP negatively regulates cell motility through inhibition of Akt activity and integrin expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alena J.; Wen, Yang-An; Stevens, Payton D.; Liu, Jingpeng; Wang, Chi; Gao, Tianyan

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is currently the fourth leading cause for cancer-related mortality. Malignant progression of pancreatic cancer depends not only on rapid proliferation of tumor cells but also on increased cell motility. In this study, we showed that increased PHLPP expression significantly reduced the rate of migration in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells whereas knockdown of PHLPP had the opposite effect. In addition, cell motility at the individual cell level was negatively regulated by PHLPP as determined using time-lapse imaging. Interestingly, the expression of β1 and β4 integrin proteins were decreased in PHLPP overexpressing cells and increased in PHLPP knockdown cells whereas the mRNA levels of integrin were not altered by changes in PHLPP expression. In determining the molecular mechanism underlying PHLPP-mediated regulation of integrin expression, we found that inhibition of lysosome activity rescued integrin expression in PHLPP overexpressing cells, thus suggesting that PHLPP negatively controls cell motility by inhibiting Akt activity to promote lysosome-dependent degradation of integrins. Functionally, the increased cell migration observed in PHLPP knockdown cells was effectively blocked by the neutralizing antibodies against β1 or β4 integrin. Taken together, our study identified a tumor suppressor role of PHLPP in suppressing cell motility by negatively regulating integrin expression in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:26760962

  8. miR-17 regulates melanoma cell motility by inhibiting the translation of ETV1.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ronit; Greenberg, Eyal; Nemlich, Yael; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2015-08-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive malignancy with a high metastatic potential. microRNA-17 (miR-17) is a member of the oncogenic miR-17/92 cluster. Here we study the effect of miR-17 on melanoma cell motility. Over expression of the mature or pri-microRNA form of miR-17 in WM-266-4 and 624mel melanoma lines enhances cell motility, evident in both wound healing and transwell migration assays. TargetScan algorithm predicts the PEA3-subfamily member ETV1 as a direct target of miR-17. Indeed, a 3-4-fold decrease of ETV1 protein levels are observed following miR-17 transfection into the various melanoma lines, with no significant change in ETV1 mRNA expression. Dual luciferase experiments demonstrate direct binding of miR-17 to the 3'-untranslated region of ETV1, confirmed by abolishing point mutations in the putative binding site. These combined results suggest regulation of ETV1 by miR-17 by a direct translational repression. Further, in both melanoma cell lines ETV1 knockdown by selective siRNA successfully pheno-copies the facilitated cell migration, while overexpression of ETV1 inhibits cell motility and migration. Altered ETV1 expression does not affect melanoma net-proliferation. In conclusion, we show a new role for miR-17 in melanoma, facilitating cell motility, by targeting the translation of ETV1 protein, which may support the development of metastasis. PMID:26158900

  9. A20 inhibits the motility of HCC cells induced by TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianteng; Ma, Chao; Zong, Zhaoyun; Xiao, Ying; Li, Na; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Lining; Shi, Yongyu

    2016-03-22

    Metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be facilitated by TNF-α, a prototypical inflammatory cytokine in the HCC microenvironment. A20 is a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling pathway. In the present study we ask whether A20 plays a role in HCC metastasis. We found that A20 expression was downregulated in the invasive cells of microvascular invasions (MVI) compared with the noninvasive cells in 89 tissue samples from patients with HCC by immunochemistry methods. Overexpression of A20 in HCC cell lines inhibited their motility induced by TNF-α. Furthermore, the overexpression of A20 inhibited epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), FAK activation and RAC1 activity. By contrast, knockdown of A20 in one HCC cell line results in the converse. In addition, the overexpression of A20 restrained the formation of MVI in HCC xenograft in nude mice treated with TNF-α. All the results suggested that A20 functioned as a negative regulator in motility of HCC cells induced by TNF-α. PMID:26909601

  10. A20 inhibits the motility of HCC cells induced by TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ying; Li, Na; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Lining; Shi, Yongyu

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be facilitated by TNF-α, a prototypical inflammatory cytokine in the HCC microenvironment. A20 is a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling pathway. In the present study we ask whether A20 plays a role in HCC metastasis. We found that A20 expression was downregulated in the invasive cells of microvascular invasions (MVI) compared with the noninvasive cells in 89 tissue samples from patients with HCC by immunochemistry methods. Overexpression of A20 in HCC cell lines inhibited their motility induced by TNF-α. Furthermore, the overexpression of A20 inhibited epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), FAK activation and RAC1 activity. By contrast, knockdown of A20 in one HCC cell line results in the converse. In addition, the overexpression of A20 restrained the formation of MVI in HCC xenograft in nude mice treated with TNF-α. All the results suggested that A20 functioned as a negative regulator in motility of HCC cells induced by TNF-α. PMID:26909601

  11. Prodigiosin inhibits motility and activates bacterial cell death revealing molecular biomarkers of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Darshan, N; Manonmani, H K

    2016-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin from Serratia nematodiphila darsh1, a bacterial pigment was tested against few food borne bacterial pathogens Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mode of action of prodigiosin was studied. Prodigiosin induced bactericidal activity indicating a stereotypical set of biochemical and morphological feature of Programmed cell death (PCD). PCD involves DNA fragmentation, generation of ROS, and expression of a protein with caspase-like substrate specificity in bacterial cells. Prodigiosin was observed to be internalized into bacterial cells and was localized predominantly in the membrane and the nuclear fraction, thus, facilitating intracellular trafficking and then binding of prodigiosin to the bacterial DNA. Corresponding to an increasing concentration of prodigiosin, the level of certain proteases were observed to increase in bacteria studied, thus initiating the onset of PCD. Prodigiosin at a sub-inhibitory concentration inhibits motility of pathogens. Our observations indicated that prodigiosin could be a promising antibacterial agent and could be used in the prevention of bacterial infections. PMID:27460563

  12. Piperine inhibits the growth and motility of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Greenshields, Anna L; Doucette, Carolyn D; Sutton, Kimberly M; Madera, Laurence; Annan, Henry; Yaffe, Paul B; Knickle, Allison F; Dong, Zhongmin; Hoskin, David W

    2015-02-01

    Piperine, an alkaloid from black pepper, is reported to have anticancer activities. In this study, we investigated the effect of piperine on the growth and motility of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Piperine inhibited the in vitro growth of TNBC cells, as well as hormone-dependent breast cancer cells, without affecting normal mammary epithelial cell growth. Exposure to piperine decreased the percentage of TNBC cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, G1- and G2-associated protein expression was decreased and p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression was increased in piperine-treated TNBC cells. Piperine also inhibited survival-promoting Akt activation in TNBC cells and caused caspase-dependent apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Interestingly, combined treatment with piperine and γ radiation was more cytotoxic for TNBC cells than γ radiation alone. The in vitro migration of piperine-treated TNBC cells was impaired and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 mRNA was decreased, suggesting an antimetastatic effect by piperine. Finally, intratumoral administration of piperine inhibited the growth of TNBC xenografts in immune-deficient mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that piperine may be useful in the treatment of TNBC. PMID:25444919

  13. Cucurbitacin I Inhibits Cell Motility by Indirectly Interfering with Actin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, David A.; LaFleur, Rebecca A.; Kahsai, Alem W.; Argueta, Christian E.; Beshir, Anwar B.; Fenteany, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Background Cucurbitacins are plant natural products that inhibit activation of the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway by an unknown mechanism. They are also known to cause changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that cucurbitacin I potently inhibits the migration of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell sheets during wound closure, as well as the random motility of B16-F1 mouse melanoma cells, but has no effect on movement of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae. Upon treatment of MDCK or B16-F1 cells with cucurbitacin I, there is a very rapid cessation of motility and gradual accumulation of filamentous actin aggregates. The cellular effect of the compound is similar to that observed when cells are treated with the actin filament-stabilizing agent jasplakinolide. However, we found that, unlike jasplakinolide or phallacidin, cucurbitacin I does not directly stabilize actin filaments. In in vitro actin depolymerization experiments, cucurbitacin I had no effect on the rate of actin filament disassembly at the nanomolar concentrations that inhibit cell migration. At elevated concentrations, the depolymerization rate was also unaffected, although there was a delay in the initiation of depolymerization. Therefore, cucurbitacin I targets some factor involved in cellular actin dynamics other than actin itself. Two candidate proteins that play roles in actin depolymerization are the actin-severing proteins cofilin and gelsolin. Cucurbitacin I possesses electrophilic reactivity that may lead to chemical modification of its target protein, as suggested by structure-activity relationship data. However, mass spectrometry revealed no evidence for modification of purified cofilin or gelsolin by cucurbitacin I. Conclusions/Significance Cucurbitacin I results in accumulation of actin filaments in cells by a unique indirect mechanism. Furthermore, the proximal target of

  14. Local anesthetics inhibit kinesin motility and microtentacle protrusions in human epithelial and breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jennifer R; Whipple, Rebecca A; Balzer, Eric M; Cho, Edward H; Matrone, Michael A; Peckham, Michelle; Martin, Stuart S

    2011-10-01

    Detached breast tumor cells produce dynamic microtubule protrusions that promote reattachment of cells and are termed tubulin microtentacles (McTNs) due to their mechanistic distinctions from actin-based filopodia/invadopodia and tubulin-based cilia. McTNs are enriched with vimentin and detyrosinated α-tubulin, (Glu-tubulin). Evidence suggests that vimentin and Glu-tubulin are cross-linked by kinesin motor proteins. Using known kinesin inhibitors, Lidocaine and Tetracaine, the roles of kinesins in McTN formation and function were tested. Live-cell McTN counts, adhesion assays, immunofluorescence, and video microscopy were performed to visualize inhibitor effects on McTNs. Viability and apoptosis assays were used to confirm the non-toxicity of the inhibitors. Treatments of human non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial and breast tumor cells with Lidocaine or Tetracaine caused rapid collapse of vimentin filaments. Live-cell video microscopy demonstrated that Tetracaine reduces motility of intracellular GFP-kinesin and causes centripetal collapse of McTNs. Treatment with Tetracaine inhibited the extension of McTNs and their ability to promote tumor cell aggregation and reattachment. Lidocaine showed similar effects but to a lesser degree. Our current data support a model in which the inhibition of kinesin motor proteins by Tetracaine leads to the reductions in McTNs, and provides a novel mechanism for the ability of this anesthetic to decrease metastatic progression. PMID:21069453

  15. Moscatilin inhibits lung cancer cell motility and invasion via suppression of endogenous reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kowitdamrong, Akkarawut; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Pongrakhananon, Varisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among cancer patients worldwide, and most of them have died from metastasis. Migration and invasion are prerequisite processes associated with high metastasis potential in cancers. Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative isolated from the Thai orchid Dendrobium pulchellum, has been shown to have anticancer effect against numerous cancer cell lines. However, little is known regarding the effect of moscatilin on cancer cell migration and invasion. The present study demonstrates that nontoxic concentrations of moscatilin were able to inhibit human nonsmall cell lung cancer H23 cell migration and invasion. The inhibitory effect of moscatilin was associated with an attenuation of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), in which hydroxyl radical (OH(∙)) was identified as a dominant species in the suppression of filopodia formation. Western blot analysis also revealed that moscatilin downregulated activated focal adhesion kinase (phosphorylated FAK, Tyr 397) and activated ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (phosphorylated Akt, Ser 473), whereas their parental counterparts were not detectable changed. In conclusion, our results indicate the novel molecular basis of moscalitin-inhibiting lung cancer cell motility and invasion and demonstrate a promising antimetastatic potential of such an agent for lung cancer therapy. PMID:23738332

  16. Moscatilin Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility and Invasion via Suppression of Endogenous Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kowitdamrong, Akkarawut; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Sritularak, Boonchoo

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among cancer patients worldwide, and most of them have died from metastasis. Migration and invasion are prerequisite processes associated with high metastasis potential in cancers. Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative isolated from the Thai orchid Dendrobium pulchellum, has been shown to have anticancer effect against numerous cancer cell lines. However, little is known regarding the effect of moscatilin on cancer cell migration and invasion. The present study demonstrates that nontoxic concentrations of moscatilin were able to inhibit human nonsmall cell lung cancer H23 cell migration and invasion. The inhibitory effect of moscatilin was associated with an attenuation of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), in which hydroxyl radical (OH∙) was identified as a dominant species in the suppression of filopodia formation. Western blot analysis also revealed that moscatilin downregulated activated focal adhesion kinase (phosphorylated FAK, Tyr 397) and activated ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (phosphorylated Akt, Ser 473), whereas their parental counterparts were not detectable changed. In conclusion, our results indicate the novel molecular basis of moscalitin-inhibiting lung cancer cell motility and invasion and demonstrate a promising antimetastatic potential of such an agent for lung cancer therapy. PMID:23738332

  17. Daucus carota Pentane/Diethyl Ether Fraction Inhibits Motility and Reduces Invasion of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zgheib, Perla; Daher, Costantine F; Mroueh, Mohamad; Nasrallah, Anita; Taleb, Robin I; El-Sibai, Mirvat

    2014-01-01

    Daucus carota (DC) is a herb used in folklore medicine in Lebanon to treat numerous diseases including cancer. Recent studies in our laboratory on DC oil and its fractions revealed potent anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims to investigate the effect of the most potent DC fraction, pentane/diethyl ether (50:50), on lung, skin, breast and glioblastoma cancer cell motility and invasion. Upon treatment, a pronounced decrease in cancer cell motility was observed in the 4 cell lines. The treatment also led to a decrease in cancer cell invasion and an increased cell adhesion. Additionally, the DC fraction caused a decrease in the activation of the ρ-GTPases Rac and CDC42, a finding that may partially explain the treatment-induced decrease in cell motility. The current study demonstrates a crucial effect of the DC pentane/diethyl ether fraction on cancer cell motility and metastasis, making it a potential candidate for cancer therapy specifically targeting cancer motility and metastasis. PMID:26088465

  18. Claudin-18 inhibits cell proliferation and motility mediated by inhibition of phosphorylation of PDK1 and Akt in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shimobaba, Shun; Taga, Saeko; Akizuki, Risa; Hichino, Asami; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Sugatani, Junko; Ikari, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal expression of claudin subtypes has been reported in various cancers. However, the pathological role of each claudin has not been clarified in detail. Claudin-18 was absent in human non-small cell and small cell lung cancers, although it is expressed in normal lung tissues. Here, we examined the effect of claudin-18 expression on the expression of junctional proteins, cell proliferation, and cell motility using human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Real-time PCR and western blotting showed that exogenous expression of claudin-18 had no effect on the expression of junctional proteins including claudin-1, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, and E-cadherin. Claudin-18 was mainly distributed in cell-cell contact areas concomitant with ZO-1. Cell proliferation was significantly decreased at 48 and 72h after seeding of claudin 18-expressing cells. Claudin-18 suppressed cell motility, whereas it increased cell death in anoikis. Claudin-18 decreased phosphorylated (p)-3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) and p-Akt levels without affecting p-epidermal growth factor receptor and p-phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) levels. Furthermore, claudin-18 was bound with PDK1 and suppressed the nuclear localization of PDK1. We suggest that claudin-18 suppresses the abnormal proliferation and motility of lung epithelial cells mediated by inhibition of the PI3K/PDK1/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:26919807

  19. The Effects of Cell Compressibility, Motility and Contact Inhibition on the Growth of Tumor Cell Clusters using the Cellular Potts Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jonathan F.; Lowengrub, John

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous biological examples where genes associated with migratory ability of cells also confer the cells with an increased fitness even though these genes may not have any known effect on the cell mitosis rates. Here, we provide insight into these observations by analyzing the effects of cell migration, compression, and contact inhibition on the growth of tumor cell clusters using the Cellular Potts Model (CPM) in a monolayer geometry. This is a follow-up of a previous study (Thalhauser et al., Biol. Direct, 2010, 5:21) in which a Moran-type model was used to study the interaction of cell proliferation, migratory potential and death on the emergence of invasive phenotypes. Here, we extend the study to include the effects of cell size and shape. In particular, we investigate the interplay between cell motility and compressibility within the CPM and find that the CPM predicts that increased cell motility leads to smaller cells. This is an artifact in the CPM. An analysis of the CPM reveals an explicit inverse-relationship between the cell stiffness and motility parameters. We use this relationship to compensate for motility-induced changes in cell size in the CPM so that in the corrected CPM, cell size is independent of the cell motility. We find that subject to comparable levels of compression, clusters of motile cells grow faster than clusters of less motile cells, in qualitative agreement with biological observations and our previous study. Increasing compression tends to reduce growth rates. Contact inhibition penalizes clumped cells by halting their growth and gives motile cells an even greater advantage. Finally, our model predicts cell size distributions that are consistent with those observed in clusters of neuroblastoma cells cultured in low and high density conditions. PMID:24211749

  20. Targeting the MAP kinase pathway in astrocytoma cells using a recombinant anthrax lethal toxin as a way to inhibit cell motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Al-Dimassi, Saleh; Salloum, Gilbert; Saykali, Bechara; Khoury, Oula; Liu, Shihui; Leppla, Stephen H; Abi-Habib, Ralph; El-Sibai, Mirvat

    2016-05-01

    Malignant astrocytomas are highly invasive into adjacent and distant regions of the normal brain. Understanding and targeting cancer cell invasion is an important therapeutic approach. Cell invasion is a complex process that replies on many signaling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (MAPK). In many cell lines, the use of MAPK-targeted drugs proved to be a potential method to inhibit cancer cell motility. In the present study, we use a recombinant anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx), which selectively inhibits the MAPK pathway, in order to target invasion. LeTx proved ineffective on cell survival in astrocytoma (as well as normal cells). However, astrocytoma cells that were treated with LeTx showed a significant decrease in cell motility as seen by wound healing as well as random 2D motility in serum. The cells also showed a decrease in invasion across a collagen matrix. The effect of LeTx on cell migration was mediated though the deregulation of Rho GTPases, which play a role in cell motility. Finally, the effect of LeTx on cell migration and Rho GTPases was mimicked by the inhibition of the MAPK pathway. In this study, we describe for the first time the effect of the LeTx on cancer cell motility and invasion not cell survival making it a potentially selective brain tumor invasion inhibitor. PMID:26984023

  1. α-TEA inhibits the growth and motility of human colon cancer cells via targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jialin; Gao, Peng; Xu, Yang; Li, Zhaozhu

    2016-01-01

    Colon or colorectal cancer is a common type of human cancer, which originates in the intestine crassum or the rectum. In the United States, colorectal cancer has one of the highest rates of cancer-related mortality. Investigating novel chemotherapeutic approaches is significant in the treatment of cancers, such as colorectal cancer. α-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid (α-TEA) is a potent anticancer agent in multiple types of human cancer. However, its effect remains to be determined in colon cancer. In this study, HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells were used to investigate the anticancer role of α-TEA. It was demonstrated that α-TEA inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, it was shown that α-TEA downregulated the activity of RhoA and phosphorylated Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) substrate myosin light chain (MLC) using a pull-down assay and western blotting, respectively, implying that the RhoA/ROCK pathway is involved in α-TEA-mediated cell growth and motility inhibition. In order to confirm this hypothesis a RhoA inhibitor (clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme), a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) and RhoA small interfering (si)RNA were applied to block RhoA/ROCK signaling. This resulted in the attenuation of MLC phosphorylation, and augmentation of α-TEA-mediated growth and motility inhibition in colon cancer cells. In conclusion, these results indicate that α-TEA inhibits growth and motility in colon cancer cells possibly by targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling. Moreover, combined with RhoA or ROCK inhibitors, α-TEA may exhibit a more effective inhibitory role in colon cancer. PMID:27432222

  2. α-TEA inhibits the growth and motility of human colon cancer cells via targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jialin; Gao, Peng; Xu, Yang; Li, Zhaozhu

    2016-09-01

    Colon or colorectal cancer is a common type of human cancer, which originates in the intestine crassum or the rectum. In the United States, colorectal cancer has one of the highest rates of cancer‑related mortality. Investigating novel chemotherapeutic approaches is significant in the treatment of cancers, such as colorectal cancer. α-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid (α-TEA) is a potent anticancer agent in multiple types of human cancer. However, its effect remains to be determined in colon cancer. In this study, HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells were used to investigate the anticancer role of α-TEA. It was demonstrated that α-TEA inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, it was shown that α-TEA downregulated the activity of RhoA and phosphorylated Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) substrate myosin light chain (MLC) using a pull-down assay and western blotting, respectively, implying that the RhoA/ROCK pathway is involved in α-TEA-mediated cell growth and motility inhibition. In order to confirm this hypothesis a RhoA inhibitor (clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme), a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) and RhoA small interfering (si)RNA were applied to block RhoA/ROCK signaling. This resulted in the attenuation of MLC phosphorylation, and augmentation of α-TEA-mediated growth and motility inhibition in colon cancer cells. In conclusion, these results indicate that α-TEA inhibits growth and motility in colon cancer cells possibly by targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling. Moreover, combined with RhoA or ROCK inhibitors, α-TEA may exhibit a more effective inhibitory role in colon cancer. PMID:27432222

  3. Autocrine netrin function inhibits glioma cell motility and promotes focal adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Jarjour, Andrew A; Durko, Margaret; Luk, Tamarah L; Marçal, Nathalie; Shekarabi, Masoud; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    Deregulation of mechanisms that control cell motility plays a key role in tumor progression by promoting tumor cell dissemination. Secreted netrins and their receptors, Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC), neogenin, and the UNC5 homologues, regulate cell and axon migration, cell adhesion, and tissue morphogenesis. Netrin and netrin receptor expression have previously been shown to be disrupted in invasive tumors, including glioblastoma. We determined that the human glioblastoma cell lines U87, U343, and U373 all express neogenin, UNC5 homologues, and netrin-1 or netrin-3, but only U87 cells express DCC. Using transfilter migration assays, we demonstrate DCC-dependent chemoattractant migration of U87 cells up a gradient of netrin-1. In contrast, U343 and U373 cells, which do not express DCC, were neither attracted nor repelled. Ectopic expression of DCC by U343 and U373 cells resulted in these cells becoming competent to respond to a gradient of netrin-1 as a chemoattractant, and also slowed their rate of spontaneous migration. Here, in addition to netrins' well-characterized chemotropic activity, we demonstrate an autocrine function for netrin-1 and netrin-3 in U87 and U373 cells that slows migration. We provide evidence that netrins promote the maturation of focal complexes, structures associated with cell movement, into focal adhesions. Consistent with this, netrin, DCC, and UNC5 homologues were associated with focal adhesions, but not focal complexes. Disrupting netrin or DCC function did not alter cell proliferation or survival. Our findings provide evidence that DCC can slow cell migration, and that neogenin and UNC5 homologues are not sufficient to substitute for DCC function in these cells. Furthermore, we identify a role for netrins as autocrine inhibitors of cell motility that promote focal adhesion formation. These findings suggest that disruption of netrin signalling may disable a mechanism that normally restrains inappropriate cell migration. PMID

  4. Silibinin inhibits fibronectin induced motility, invasiveness and survival in human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells via targeting integrin signaling.

    PubMed

    Deep, Gagan; Kumar, Rahul; Jain, Anil K; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Preventing or inhibiting metastasis-related events through non-toxic agents could be a useful approach for lowering high mortality among PCA patients. We have earlier reported that natural flavonoid silibinin possesses strong anti-metastatic efficacy against PCA however, mechanism/s of its action still remains largely unknown. One of the major events during metastasis is the replacement of cell-cell interaction with integrins-based cell-matrix interaction that controls motility, invasiveness and survival of cancer cells. Accordingly, here we examined silibinin effect on advanced human PCA PC3 cells' interaction with extracellular matrix component fibronectin. Silibinin (50-200 μM) treatment significantly decreased the fibronectin (5 μg/ml)-induced motile morphology via targeting actin cytoskeleton organization in PC3 cells. Silibinin also decreased the fibronectin-induced cell proliferation and motility but significantly increased cell death in PC3 cells. Silibinin also inhibited the PC3 cells invasiveness in Transwell invasion assays with fibronectin or cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) serving as chemoattractant. Importantly, PC3-luc cells cultured on fibronectin showed rapid dissemination and localized in lungs following tail vein injection in athymic male nude mice; however, in silibinin-treated PC3-luc cells, dissemination and lung localization was largely compromised. Molecular analyses revealed that silibinin treatment modulated the fibronectin-induced expression of integrins (α5, αV, β1 and β3), actin-remodeling (FAK, Src, GTPases, ARP2 and cortactin), apoptosis (cPARP and cleaved caspase 3), EMT (E-cadherin and β-catenin), and cell survival (survivin and Akt) related signaling molecules in PC3 cells. Furthermore, PC3-xenograft tissue analyses confirmed the inhibitory effect of silibinin on fibronectin and integrins expression. Together, these

  5. Cell motility on nanotopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Masahiro; Tsai, Irene; Green, Angelo; Jacobson, Bruce; Russell, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    Cell motility is strongly influenced by the structure of the substratum. Understanding cells motility on a surface has significant applications both in vivo and in vitro applications, such as biological sensors and hip replacement. A gradient surface is used to study the effect of the lateral nanotopography on cell motility. A gradient surface is generated by block copolymer and homopolymer blends, where the concentration of the components varies uniformly across the surface. The two homopolymers phase separate on the micron scale and this length scale gradually decrease to the nanoscopic, i.e. microphase separation of the diblock, as the copolymer concentration increases. Quantitative analysis of the speed of cell migration is correlated to the lateral length scale of the surface.

  6. Genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of Akt1 isoform attenuates bladder cancer cell proliferation, motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Sabbineni, Harika; Alwhaibi, Abdulrahman; Goc, Anna; Gao, Fei; Pruitt, Alanna; Somanath, Payaningal R

    2015-10-01

    Isoform specific expression, intracellular localization and function of Akt in bladder cancer are not known. In the current study, we identified Akt1, followed by Akt2 and Akt3 as the predominant Akt isoform in human T24 and UM-UC-3 metastatic bladder cancer cells. Whereas Akt1 is localized at the membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, Akt2 is solely cytoplasmic and Akt3 is mostly localized in the nucleus in T24 cells. ShRNA-mediated Akt1 knockdown resulted in impaired T24 cell survival, proliferation, colony formation, migration and microinvasion. Whereas pharmacological inhibition of Akt1 resulted in impaired T24 and UM-UC-3 cell motility, viability and proliferation, effect of pharmacological inhibition by Akt2 inhibitor was limited to proliferation in T24, but not UM-UC-3 cells. Our data provide important clues on the therapeutic benefits of targeting Akt1 for bladder cancer therapy. PMID:26148825

  7. Modeling collective cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    Eukaryotic cells often move in groups, a critical aspect of many biological and medical processes including wound healing, morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Modeling can provide useful insights into the fundamental mechanisms of collective cell motility. Constructing models that incorporate the physical properties of the cells, however, is challenging. Here, I discuss our efforts to build a comprehensive cell motility model that includes cell membrane properties, cell-substrate interactions, cell polarity, and cell-cell interaction. The model will be applied to a variety of systems, including motion on micropatterned substrates and the migration of border cells in Drosophila. This work was supported by NIH Grant No. P01 GM078586 and NSF Grant No. 1068869.

  8. Huaier Aqueous Extract Inhibits Ovarian Cancer Cell Motility via the AKT/GSK3β/β-Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Nan; Yu, Yinhua; Hua, Keqin; Feng, Weiwei

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine has gained popularity due to its ability to kill tumor cells. Recently, the apoptotic and anti-angiogenic effects of Trametes robiniophila murr (Huaier) have been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate its effect on cell mobility and tumor growth in ovarian cancer. Cell viability and motility were measured using SRB, scratch and migration assays. Cell apoptosis was analysed by annexin V/PI staining. Using a reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) assay, we analyzed the levels of 153 proteins and/or phosphorylations in Huaier-treated and untreated cells. Huaier inhibited cell viability and induced both early and late apoptosis in SKOV3, SKOV3.ip1 and Hey cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Cell invasiveness and migration were also suppressed significantly. The RPPA results showed significant differences (of at least 30%; P <0.05) in the levels of 7 molecules in SKOV3 cells and 10 in SKOV3.ip1 cells between the untreated and treated cells. Most of the molecules identified play roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis or cell adhesion/invasion. Western blot analysis further validated that Huaier treatment resulted in decreased AKT phosphorylation, enhanced expression of total GSK3β, inhibition of the phosphorylation of GSK3β on S9, reduction of both cytoplasmic β-catenin expression and nuclear β-catenin translocation, and transcriptional repression of several Wnt/β-catenin target genes (DIXDC1, LRP6, WNT5A, and cyclin D1). After knocking down GSK3β, β-catenin expression could not be inhibited by Huaier. Finally, Huaier inhibited the growth of ovarian tumor xenografts in vivo. These studies indicate that Huaier inhibits tumor cell mobility in ovarian cancer via the AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:23667667

  9. Huaier aqueous extract inhibits ovarian cancer cell motility via the AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaohui; Lyu, Tianjiao; Jia, Nan; Yu, Yinhua; Hua, Keqin; Feng, Weiwei

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine has gained popularity due to its ability to kill tumor cells. Recently, the apoptotic and anti-angiogenic effects of Trametes robiniophila murr (Huaier) have been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate its effect on cell mobility and tumor growth in ovarian cancer. Cell viability and motility were measured using SRB, scratch and migration assays. Cell apoptosis was analysed by annexin V/PI staining. Using a reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) assay, we analyzed the levels of 153 proteins and/or phosphorylations in Huaier-treated and untreated cells. Huaier inhibited cell viability and induced both early and late apoptosis in SKOV3, SKOV3.ip1 and Hey cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Cell invasiveness and migration were also suppressed significantly. The RPPA results showed significant differences (of at least 30%; P <0.05) in the levels of 7 molecules in SKOV3 cells and 10 in SKOV3.ip1 cells between the untreated and treated cells. Most of the molecules identified play roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis or cell adhesion/invasion. Western blot analysis further validated that Huaier treatment resulted in decreased AKT phosphorylation, enhanced expression of total GSK3β, inhibition of the phosphorylation of GSK3β on S9, reduction of both cytoplasmic β-catenin expression and nuclear β-catenin translocation, and transcriptional repression of several Wnt/β-catenin target genes (DIXDC1, LRP6, WNT5A, and cyclin D1). After knocking down GSK3β, β-catenin expression could not be inhibited by Huaier. Finally, Huaier inhibited the growth of ovarian tumor xenografts in vivo. These studies indicate that Huaier inhibits tumor cell mobility in ovarian cancer via the AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:23667667

  10. N-(2-methyl-indol-1H-5-yl)-1-naphthalenesulfonamide: A novel reversible antimitotic agent inhibiting cancer cell motility.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Luquero, Clara; Galiana-Roselló, Cristina; Ramis, Guillem; Villalonga-Planells, Ruth; García-España, Enrique; Fernández de Mattos, Silvia; Peláez, Rafael; Llinares, José M; González-Rosende, M Eugenia; Villalonga, Priam

    2016-09-01

    A series of compounds containing the sulfonamide scaffold were synthesized and screened for their in vitro anticancer activity against a representative panel of human cancer cell lines, leading to the identification of N-(2-methyl-1H-indol-5-yl)-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (8e) as a compound showing a remarkable activity across the panel, with IC50 values in the nanomolar-to-low micromolar range. Cell cycle distribution analysis revealed that 8e promoted a severe G2/M arrest, which was followed by cellular senescence as indicated by the detection of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) in 8e-treated cells. Prolonged 8e treatment also led to the onset of apoptosis, in correlation with the detection of increased Caspase 3/7 activities. Despite increasing γ-H2A.X levels, a well-established readout for DNA double-strand breaks, in vitro DNA binding studies with 8e did not support interaction with DNA. In agreement with this, 8e failed to activate the cellular DNA damage checkpoint. Importantly, tubulin staining showed that 8e promoted a severe disorganization of microtubules and mitotic spindle formation was not detected in 8e-treated cells. Accordingly, 8e inhibited tubulin polymerization in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and was also able to robustly inhibit cancer cell motility. Docking analysis revealed a compatible interaction with the colchicine-binding site of tubulin. Remarkably, these cellular effects were reversible since disruption of treatment resulted in the reorganization of microtubules, cell cycle re-entry and loss of senescent markers. Collectively, our data suggest that this compound may be a promising new anticancer agent capable of both reducing cancer cell growth and motility. PMID:27349984

  11. A novel small-molecule compound targeting CD147 inhibits the motility and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhi-Guang; Wang, Li; Cui, Hong-Yong; Peng, Jian-Long; Wang, Shi-Jie; Geng, Jie-Jie; Liu, Ji-D; Feng, Fei; Song, Fei; Li, Ling; Zhu, Ping; Jiang, Jian-Li; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2016-02-23

    CD147, a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is highly expressed in various cancer types and plays important roles in tumor progression, especially by promoting the motility and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. These crucial roles make CD147 an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in HCC, but no small-molecule inhibitors of CD147 have been developed to date. To identify a candidate inhibitor, we used a pharmacophore model derived from the structure of CD147 to virtually screen over 300,000 compounds. The 100 highest-ranked compounds were subjected to biological assays, and the most potent one, dubbed AC-73 (ID number: AN-465/42834501), was studied further. We confirmed that AC-73 targeted CD147 and further demonstrated it can specifically disrupt CD147 dimerization. Moreover, molecular docking and mutagenesis experiments showed that the possible binding sites of AC-73 on CD147 included Glu64 and Glu73 in the N-terminal IgC2 domain, which two residues are located in the dimer interface of CD147. Functional assays revealed that AC-73 inhibited the motility and invasion of typical HCC cells, but not HCC cells that lacked the CD147 gene, demonstrating on-target action. Further, AC-73 reduced HCC metastasis by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 via down-regulation of the CD147/ERK1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. Finally, AC-73 attenuated progression in an orthotopic nude mouse model of liver metastasis, suggesting that AC-73 or its derivatives have potential for use in HCC intervention. We conclude that the novel small-molecule inhibitor AC-73 inhibits HCC mobility and invasion, probably by disrupting CD147 dimerization and thereby mainly suppressing the CD147/ERK1/2/STAT3/MMP-2 pathways, which are crucial for cancer progression. PMID:26882566

  12. A novel small-molecule compound targeting CD147 inhibits the motility and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jian-long; Wang, Shi-jie; Geng, Jie-jie; Liu, Ji-de; Feng, Fei; Song, Fei; Li, Ling; Zhu, Ping; Jiang, Jian-li; Chen, Zhi-nan

    2016-01-01

    CD147, a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is highly expressed in various cancer types and plays important roles in tumor progression, especially by promoting the motility and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. These crucial roles make CD147 an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in HCC, but no small-molecule inhibitors of CD147 have been developed to date. To identify a candidate inhibitor, we used a pharmacophore model derived from the structure of CD147 to virtually screen over 300,000 compounds. The 100 highest-ranked compounds were subjected to biological assays, and the most potent one, dubbed AC-73 (ID number: AN-465/42834501), was studied further. We confirmed that AC-73 targeted CD147 and further demonstrated it can specifically disrupt CD147 dimerization. Moreover, molecular docking and mutagenesis experiments showed that the possible binding sites of AC-73 on CD147 included Glu64 and Glu73 in the N-terminal IgC2 domain, which two residues are located in the dimer interface of CD147. Functional assays revealed that AC-73 inhibited the motility and invasion of typical HCC cells, but not HCC cells that lacked the CD147 gene, demonstrating on-target action. Further, AC-73 reduced HCC metastasis by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 via down-regulation of the CD147/ERK1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. Finally, AC-73 attenuated progression in an orthotopic nude mouse model of liver metastasis, suggesting that AC-73 or its derivatives have potential for use in HCC intervention. We conclude that the novel small-molecule inhibitor AC-73 inhibits HCC mobility and invasion, probably by disrupting CD147 dimerization and thereby mainly suppressing the CD147/ERK1/2/STAT3/MMP-2 pathways, which are crucial for cancer progression. PMID:26882566

  13. A Cronobacter turicensis O1 Antigen-Specific Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits Bacterial Motility and Entry into Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Angelika; Dietrich, Richard; Kleinsteuber, Ina; Canals, Rocío; Zurfluh, Katrin; Weiner, Kerstin; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Cronobacter turicensis is an opportunistic foodborne pathogen that can cause a rare but sometimes lethal infection in neonates. Little is known about the virulence mechanisms and intracellular lifestyle of this pathogen. In this study, we developed an IgG monoclonal antibody (MAb; MAb 2G4) that specifically recognizes the O1 antigen of C. turicensis cells. The antilipopolysaccharide antibody bound predominantly monovalently to the O antigen and reduced bacterial growth without causing cell agglutination. Furthermore, binding of the antibody to the O1 antigen of C. turicensis cells caused a significant reduction of the membrane potential which is required to energize flagellar rotation, accompanied by a decreased flagellum-based motility. These results indicate that binding of IgG to the O antigen of C. turicensis causes a direct antimicrobial effect. In addition, this feature of the antibody enabled new insight into the pathogenicity of C. turicensis. In a tissue culture infection model, pretreatment of C. turicensis with MAb 2G4 showed no difference in adhesion to human epithelial cells, whereas invasion of bacteria into Caco-2 cells was significantly inhibited. PMID:25534937

  14. Cell Proliferation and Motility Are Inhibited by G1 Phase Arrest in 15-kDa Selenoprotein-Deficient Chang Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jeyoung; Huh, Jang Hoe; Na, Ji-Woon; Lu, Qiao; Carlson, Bradley A.; Tobe, Ryuta; Tsuji, Petra A.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Lee, Byeong Jae

    2015-01-01

    The 15-kDa selenoprotein (Sep15) is a selenoprotein residing in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and implicated in quality control of protein folding. Herein, we established an inducible RNAi cell line that targets Sep15 mRNA in Chang liver cells. RNAi-induced Sep15 deficiency led to inhibition of cell proliferation, whereas cell growth was resumed after removal of the knockdown inducer. Sep15-deficient cells were arrested at the G1 phase by upregulating p21 and p27, and these cells were also characterized by ER stress. In addition, Sep15 deficiency led to the relocation of focal adhesions to the periphery of the cell basement and to the decrease of the migratory and invasive ability. All these changes were reversible depending on Sep15 status. Rescuing the knockdown state by expressing a silent mutant Sep15 mRNA that is resistant to siRNA also reversed the phenotypic changes. Our results suggest that SEP15 plays important roles in the regulation of the G1 phase during the cell cycle as well as in cell motility in Chang liver cells, and that this selenoprotein offers a novel functional link between the cell cycle and cell motility. PMID:25728752

  15. Inhibition of breast cancer cell motility with a non-cyclooxygenase inhibitory derivative of sulindac by suppressing TGFβ/miR-21 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ruixia; Feng, Xiangling; Li, Wei; Piazza, Gary A.; Xi, Yaguang

    2016-01-01

    Compelling efficacy on intervention of tumorigenesis by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been documented intensively. However, the toxicities related to cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition resulting in suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limit their clinical use for human cancer chemoprevention. A novel derivative of the NSAID sulindac sulfide (SS), referred as sulindac sulfide amide (SSA), was recently developed, which lacks COX inhibitory activity, yet shows greater suppressive effect than SS on growth of various cancer cells. In this study, we focus on the inhibitory activity of SSA on breast tumor cell motility, which has not been studied previously. Our results show that SSA treatment at non-cytotoxic concentrations can specifically reduce breast tumor cell motility without influencing tumor cell growth, and the mechanism of action involves the suppression of TGFβ signaling by directly blocking Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Moreover, miR-21, a well-documented oncogenic miRNA for promoting tumor cell metastasis, was also found to be involved in inhibitory activity of SSA in breast tumor cell motility through the modulation of TGFβ pathway. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a non-COX inhibitory derivative of sulindac can inhibit breast tumor metastasis by a mechanism involving the TGFβ/miR-21 signaling axis. PMID:26769851

  16. Targeting tumor cell motility to prevent metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Trenis D.; Ashby, William J.; Lewis, John D.; Zijlstra, Andries

    2011-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity in patients with solid tumors invariably results from the disruption of normal biological function caused by disseminating tumor cells. Tumor cell migration is under intense investigation as the underlying cause of cancer metastasis. The need for tumor cell motility in the progression of metastasis has been established experimentally and is supported empirically by basic and clinical research implicating a large collection of migration-related genes. However, there are few clinical interventions designed to specifically target the motility of tumor cells and adjuvant therapy to specifically prevent cancer cell dissemination is severely limited. In an attempt to define motility targets suitable for treating metastasis, we have parsed the molecular determinants of tumor cell motility into five underlying principles including cell autonomous ability, soluble communication, cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix adhesion, and integrating these determinants of migration on molecular scaffolds. The current challenge is to implement meaningful and sustainable inhibition of metastasis by developing clinically viable disruption of molecular targets that control these fundamental capabilities. PMID:21664937

  17. Mechanics of motility initiation and motility arrest in crawling cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recho, Pierre; Putelat, Thibaut; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-11-01

    Motility initiation in crawling cells requires transformation of a symmetric state into a polarized state. In contrast, motility arrest is associated with re-symmetrization of the internal configuration of a cell. Experiments on keratocytes suggest that polarization is triggered by the increased contractility of motor proteins but the conditions of re-symmetrization remain unknown. In this paper we show that if adhesion with the extra-cellular substrate is sufficiently low, the progressive intensification of motor-induced contraction may be responsible for both transitions: from static (symmetric) to motile (polarized) at a lower contractility threshold and from motile (polarized) back to static (symmetric) at a higher contractility threshold. Our model of lamellipodial cell motility is based on a 1D projection of the complex intra-cellular dynamics on the direction of locomotion. In the interest of analytical transparency we also neglect active protrusion and view adhesion as passive. Despite the unavoidable oversimplifications associated with these assumptions, the model reproduces quantitatively the motility initiation pattern in fish keratocytes and reveals a crucial role played in cell motility by the nonlocal feedback between the mechanics and the transport of active agents. A prediction of the model that a crawling cell can stop and re-symmetrize when contractility increases sufficiently far beyond the motility initiation threshold still awaits experimental verification.

  18. The Shape of Motile Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Keren, Kinneret

    2010-01-01

    Motile cells — fan-like keratocytes, hand-shaped nerve growth cones, polygonal fibroblasts, to name but a few — come in different shapes and sizes. We discuss the origins of this diversity as well as what shape tells us about the physics and biochemistry underlying cell movement. We start with geometric rules describing cell-edge kinetics that govern cell shape, followed by a discussion of the underlying biophysics; we consider actin treadmilling, actin–myosin contraction, cell-membrane deformations, adhesion, and the complex interactions between these modules, as well as their regulation by microtubules and Rho GTPases. Focusing on several different cell types, including keratocytes and fibroblasts, we discuss how dynamic cell morphology emerges from the interplay between the different motility modules and the environment. PMID:19906578

  19. Activation of β2-adrenergic receptor by (R,R’)-4’-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol inhibits proliferation and motility of melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wnorowski, Artur; Sadowska, Mariola; Paul, Rajib K.; Singh, Nagendra S.; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Jimenez, Lucita; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Toll, Lawrence; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W.

    2015-01-01

    (R,R’)-4’-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol [(R,R’)-MNF] is a highly-selective β2 adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) agonist. Incubation of a panel of human-derived melanoma cell lines with (R,R’)-MNF resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of motility as assessed by in vitro wound healing and xCELLigence migration and invasion assays. Activity of (R,R’)-MNF positively correlated with the β2-AR expression levels across tested cell lines. The anti-motility activity of (R,R’)-MNF was inhibited by the β2-AR antagonist ICI-118,551 and the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89. The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and the phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor Ro 20–1724 mimicked the ability of (R,R’)-MNF to inhibit migration of melanoma cell lines in culture, highlighting the importance of cAMP for this phenomenon. (R,R’)-MNF caused significant inhibition of cell growth in β2-AR-expressing cells as monitored by radiolabeled thymidine incorporation and xCELLigence system. The MEK/ERK cascade functions in cellular proliferation, and constitutive phosphorylation of MEK and ERK at their active sites was significantly reduced upon β2-AR activation with (R,R’)-MNF. Protein synthesis was inhibited concomitantly both with increased eEF2 phosphorylation and lower expression of tumor cell regulators, EGF receptors, cyclin A and MMP-9. Taken together, these results identified β2-AR as a novel potential target for melanoma management, and (R,R’)-MNF as an efficient trigger of anti-tumorigenic cAMP/PKA-dependent signaling in β2-AR-expressing lesions. PMID:25703025

  20. Hyaluronan stimulates pancreatic cancer cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Bo; Kohi, Shiro; Koga, Atsuhiro; Hirata, Keiji; Sato, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) accumulates in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but functional significance of HA in the aggressive phenotype remains unknown. We used different models to investigate the effect of HA on PDAC cell motility by wound healing and transwell migration assay. Changes in cell motility were examined in 8 PDAC cell lines in response to inhibition of HA production by treatment with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) and to promotion by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or by co-culture with tumor-derived stromal fibroblasts. We also investigated changes in cell motility by adding exogenous HA. Additionally, mRNA expressions of hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases were examined using real time RT-PCR. Inhibition of HA by 4-MU significantly decreased the migration, whereas promotion of HA by TPA or co-culture with tumor-derived fibroblasts significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. The changes in HA production by these treatments tended to be associated with changes in HAS3 mRNA expression. Furthermore, addition of exogenous HA, especially low-molecular-weight HA, significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. These findings suggest that HA stimulates PDAC cell migration and thus represents an ideal therapeutic target to prevent invasion and metastasis. PMID:26684359

  1. Procyanidin B2 3,3″-di-O-gallate inhibits endothelial cells growth and motility by targeting VEGFR2 and integrin signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Deep, Gagan; Wempe, Michael F.; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2015-01-01

    Targeting angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of carcinogenesis, using non-toxic phytochemicals has emerged as a translational opportunity for angioprevention and to control advanced stages of malignancy. Herein, we investigated the inhibitory effects and associated mechanism/s of action of Procyanidin B2-3,3″-di-O-gallate (B2G2), a major component of grape seed extract, on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human prostate microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs). Our results showed that B2G2 (10–40 μM) inhibits growth and induces death in both HUVECs and HPMECs. Additional studies revealed that B2G2 causes a G1 arrest in cell cycle progression of HUVECs by down-regulating cyclins (D1 and A), CDKs (Cdk2 and Cdc2) and Cdc25c phosphatase and up-regulating CDK inhibitors (p21 and p27) expression. B2G2 also induced strong apoptotic death in HUVECs through increasing p53, Bax and Smac/Diablo expression while decreasing Bcl-2 and survivin levels. Additionally, B2G2 inhibited the growth factors-induced capillary tube formation in HUVECs and HPMECs. Interestingly, conditioned media (CCM) from prostate cancer (PCA) cells (LNCaP and PC3) grown under normoxic (~21% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) conditions significantly enhanced the tube formation in HUVECs, which was compromised in presence of conditioned media from B2G2-treated PCA cells. B2G2 also inhibited the motility and invasiveness of both HUVECs and HPMECs. Mechanistic studies showed that B2G2 targets VEGFR2/PI3K/Akt and integrin signaling molecules which are important for endothelial cells survival, proliferation, tube formation and motility. Overall, we report that B2G2 inhibits several attributes of angiogenesis in cell culture; therefore, warrants further investigation for its efficacy for angioprevention and cancer control. PMID:25552257

  2. Zerumbone suppresses the motility and tumorigenecity of triple negative breast cancer cells via the inhibition of TGF-β1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangmin; Lee, Jeongmin; Jeon, Myeongjin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin

    2016-01-12

    Aberrant transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays an important role in the development of cancer such as tumor metastasis and invasion. TGF-β-responsive gene signature is highly activated in chemotherapy-treated triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Here, we investigated the effect of zerumbone (ZER) on TGF-β1 signaling pathway and tumorigenecity of TNBC cells. Our results showed that the level of TGF-β1 mRNA expression and cell invasiveness were higher in TNBC cells than in non-TNBC cells. On the other hand, the cell motility of TNBC cells was completely suppressed by LY2109761, a novel selective TGF-β receptor type I/II (TβRI/II) dual inhibitor. In addition, FN and MMP-2 expression, which play an important role on cell motility in various cancer cells, were dose-dependently decreased by LY2109761. TGF-β1 increased FN, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in HCC1806 TNBC cells. TGF-β1-induced MMP-9 expression was decreased by both a MEK inhibitor, UO126, and a smad3 inhibitor, SIS3. Induction of FN and MMP-2 by TGF-β1 was just decreased by SIS3. Overexpression of smad3 significantly increased FN, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression. Interestingly, ZER significantly suppressed TGF-β1-induced FN, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression in HCC1806 cells. In addition, ZER completely decreased TGF-β1-induced the phosphorylation of smad3. Finally, we observed that ZER suppressed the tumorigenecity such as tumor volume, weight, Ki67 expression, and metastasis in TNBC cells xenograft models. Taken together, we demonstrated that ZER suppresses TGF-β1-induced FN, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression through the inactivation of smad3 and inhibits the tumorigenecity of TNBC cells. Therefore, we suggest that ZER may act as a promising drug for treatment of TNBC. PMID:26637807

  3. Elastic mismatch enhances cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresler, Yony; Palmieri, Benoit; Grant, Martin

    In recent years, the study of physics phenomena in cancer has drawn considerable attention. In cancer metastasis, a soft cancer cell leaves the tumor, and must pass through the endothelium before reaching the bloodstream. Using a phase-field model we have shown that the elasticity mismatch between cells alone is sufficient to enhance the motility of thesofter cancer cell by means of bursty migration, in agreement with experiment. We will present further characterization of these behaviour, as well as new possible applications for this model.

  4. Murine epidermal growth factor (EGF) fragment (33-42) inhibits both EGF- and laminin-dependent endothelial cell motility and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J; Allen, W E; Scott, W N; Bailie, J R; Walker, B; McFerran, N V; Wilson, D J

    1995-09-01

    Laminin, murine epidermal growth factor (mEGF), and the synthetic laminin peptide Lam.B1(925-933) (a linear peptide from the B1 chain of murine laminin, CDPGY1GSR-amide) all stimulate endothelial cell motility above basal rates, whereas a synthetic mEGF fragment, mEGF33-42 (a linear peptide from the C-loop of mEGF, acetyl-C-[S-Acm]-VIGYSGDR-C-[S-Acm]-amide), inhibits motility. In both human SK HEP-1 and embryonic chick endothelial cells, mEGF33-42 blocks both EGF- and laminin-stimulated locomotion of endothelial cells. In vivo, mEGF33-42 also blocks both laminin- and mEGF-induced angiogenesis in the chick. In the human cell line. Lam.B1(925-933) has an additive effect in coincubation with either laminin or mEGF, but it blocks their effects in the chick cells. Lam.B1(925-933) alone stimulates angiogenesis in the chick but blocks laminin-induced angiogenesis. Thus, mEGF33-42 acts as a general laminin antagonist, whereas Lam.B1(925-933) acts as a laminin agonist in human cells, but in chick cells it acts as a partial antagonist. We propose that the presence of an anionic group at the eighth residue of mEGF33-42 may be the source of the antagonistic effects seen with this peptide as compared with the laminin fragment. These findings have important implications in the design of human antiangiogenic agents, and also in the use of chick models in the study of human disease. PMID:7543818

  5. All-trans-retinoic Acid Modulates the Plasticity and Inhibits the Motility of Breast Cancer Cells: ROLE OF NOTCH1 AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR (TGFβ).

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Adriana; Affatato, Roberta; Centritto, Floriana; Fratelli, Maddalena; Kurosaki, Mami; Barzago, Maria Monica; Bolis, Marco; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Paroni, Gabriela

    2015-07-17

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is a natural compound proposed for the treatment/chemoprevention of breast cancer. Increasing evidence indicates that aberrant regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a determinant of the cancer cell invasive and metastatic behavior. The effects of ATRA on EMT are largely unknown. In HER2-positive SKBR3 and UACC812 cells, showing co-amplification of the ERBB2 and RARA genes, ATRA activates a RARα-dependent epithelial differentiation program. In SKBR3 cells, this causes the formation/reorganization of adherens and tight junctions. Epithelial differentiation and augmented cell-cell contacts underlie the anti-migratory action exerted by the retinoid in cells exposed to the EMT-inducing factors EGF and heregulin-β1. Down-regulation of NOTCH1, an emerging EMT modulator, is involved in the inhibition of motility by ATRA. Indeed, the retinoid blocks NOTCH1 up-regulation by EGF and/or heregulin-β1. Pharmacological inhibition of γ-secretase and NOTCH1 processing also abrogates SKBR3 cell migration. Stimulation of TGFβ contributes to the anti-migratory effect of ATRA. The retinoid switches TGFβ from an EMT-inducing and pro-migratory determinant to an anti-migratory mediator. Inhibition of the NOTCH1 pathway not only plays a role in the anti-migratory action of ATRA; it is relevant also for the anti-proliferative activity of the retinoid in HCC1599 breast cancer cells, which are addicted to NOTCH1 for growth/viability. This effect is enhanced by the combination of ATRA and the γ-secretase inhibitor N-(N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl)-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester, supporting the concept that the two compounds act at the transcriptional and post-translational levels along the NOTCH1 pathway. PMID:26018078

  6. The heterochronic microRNA let-7 inhibits cell motility by regulating the genes in the actin cytoskeleton pathway in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaowen; Guo, Jinyi; Zheng, Lan; Li, Chunsheng; Zheng, Tim M; Tanyi, Janos L; Liang, Shun; Benedetto, Chiara; Mitidieri, Marco; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Youcheng; Huang, Qihong; Zhang, Lin

    2013-03-01

    The heterochronic gene let-7 serves as a tumor suppressor microRNA by targeting various oncogenic pathways in cancer cells. Considerable evidence indicates that reduced expression of let-7 might be associated with poor clinical outcome in patients with cancer. Here, we report that the expression levels of three let-7 family members, let-7a, let-7b, and let-7g, were significantly decreased in the patients with breast cancer with lymph node metastasis compared with those without lymph node metastasis. Enforced expression of let-7b significantly inhibits breast cancer cell motility and affects actin dynamics. Using bioinformatic and experimental approaches, four genes in the actin cytoskeleton pathway, including PAK1, DIAPH2, RDX, and ITGB8, were identified as let-7 direct targets. Blocking the expression of PAK1, DIAPH2, and RDX significantly inhibits breast cancer cell migration induced by let-7b repression. Our results indicate that reconstitution of let-7 expression in tumor cells could provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of metastatic disease. PMID:23339187

  7. Integrin-free tetraspanin CD151 can inhibit tumor cell motility upon clustering and is a clinical indicator of prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, T. D.; Martínez, C. H.; Vasquez; Hebron, K.; Jones-Paris, C.; Arnold, S.A.; Chan, S.M.; Chalasani, V.; Gomez-Lemus, J.A.; Williams, A.K.; Chin, J.L.; Giannico, G.A.; Ketova, T.; Lewis, J.D.; Zijlstra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Normal physiology relies on the organization of transmembrane proteins by molecular scaffolds, such as tetraspanins. Oncogenesis frequently involves changes in their organization or expression. The tetraspanin CD151 is thought to contribute to cancer progression through direct interaction with the laminin-binding integrins α3β1 and α6β1. However, this interaction cannot explain the ability of CD151 to control migration in the absence of these integrins or on non-laminin substrates. We demonstrate that CD151 can regulate tumor cell migration without direct integrin binding and that integrin-free CD151 (CD151free) correlates clinically with tumor progression and metastasis. Clustering CD151free through its integrin-binding domain promotes accumulation in areas of cell-cell contact leading to enhanced adhesion and inhibition of tumor cell motility in vitro and in vivo. CD151free clustering is a strong regulator of motility even in the absence of α3 expression but requires PKCα, suggesting that CD151 can control migration independent of its integrin associations. The histological detection of CD151free in prostate cancer correlates with poor patient outcome. When CD151free is present, patients are more likely to recur after radical prostatectomy and progression to metastatic disease is accelerated. Multivariable analysis identifies CD151free as an independent predictor of survival. Moreover, the detection of CD151free can stratify survival among patients with elevated PSA. Cumulatively these studies demonstrate that a subpopulation of CD151 exists on the surface of tumor cells that can regulate migration independent of its integrin partner. The clinical correlation of CD151free with prostate cancer progression suggests that it may contribute to the disease and predict cancer progression. PMID:24220242

  8. MicroRNA-610 is downregulated in glioma cells, and inhibits proliferation and motility by directly targeting MDM2.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yu; Peng, Yong; Ou, Yangzhu; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-09-01

    The expression of microRNA (miR)-610 has previously been reported to be downregulated in gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, miR-610 has yet to be investigated in human glioma. In the present study, miR-610 expression was analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Post‑transfection with miR‑610 mimics and inhibitors, MTT assay, cell migration and invasion assays, western blot analysis and a luciferase assay were performed in glioma cell lines. The results demonstrated that miR‑610 was downregulated in glioma tissues compared with their normal adjacent tissues and normal brain tissues (P<0.05). The reduced expression levels of miR‑610 were associated with World Health Organization grade and the Karnofsky performance status of patients with glioma. Furthermore, the present study revealed that miR‑610 inhibited cell growth, migration and invasion in glioma cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to provide evidence suggesting that miR‑610 directly targets MDM2 proto-oncogene E3 ubiquitin protein ligase to function as a tumor suppressor in glioma. These results indicate that miR‑610 may be investigated as a target for therapeutic drugs designed to treat glioma. PMID:27485527

  9. NZ51, a ring-expanded nucleoside analog, inhibits motility and viability of breast cancer cells by targeting the RNA helicase DDX3

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Min; Vesuna, Farhad; Botlagunta, Mahendran; Bol, Guus Martinus; Irving, Ashley; Bergman, Yehudit; Hosmane, Ramachandra S.; Kato, Yoshinori; Winnard, Paul T.; Raman, Venu

    2015-01-01

    DDX3X (DDX3), a human RNA helicase, is over expressed in multiple breast cancer cell lines and its expression levels are directly correlated to cellular aggressiveness. NZ51, a ring-expanded nucleoside analogue (REN) has been reported to inhibit the ATP dependent helicase activity of DDX3. Molecular modeling of NZ51 binding to DDX3 indicated that the 5:7-fused imidazodiazepine ring of NZ51 was incorporated into the ATP binding pocket of DDX3. In this study, we investigated the anticancer properties of NZ51 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. NZ51 treatment decreased cellular motility and cell viability of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. Biological knockdown of DDX3 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in decreased proliferation rates and reduced clonogenicity. In addition, NZ51 was effective in killing breast cancer cells under hypoxic conditions with the same potency as observed during normoxia. Mechanistic studies indicated that NZ51 did not cause DDX3 degradation, but greatly diminished its functionality. Moreover, in vivo experiments demonstrated that DDX3 knockdown by shRNA resulted in reduced tumor volume and metastasis without altering tumor vascular volume or permeability-surface area. In initial in vivo experiments, NZ51 treatment did not significantly reduce tumor volume. Further studies are needed to optimize drug formulation, dose and delivery. Continuing work will determine the in vitro-in vivo correlation of NZ51 activity and its utility in a clinical setting. PMID:26337079

  10. The α-tocopherol derivative ESeroS-GS induces cell death and inhibits cell motility of breast cancer cells through the regulation of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijing; Zhao, Xingyu; Zhao, Kai; Wei, Peng; Fang, Yi; Zhang, Fenglin; Zhang, Bo; Ogata, Kazumi; Mori, Akitane; Wei, Taotao

    2014-12-15

    Cancer cells are known to exhibit different hallmarks compared with normal cells. Therefore, targeting these features may improve the response to cancer therapy. In this study, we provided direct evidence that the α-tocopherol derivative ESeroS-GS inhibited the viability, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells. ESeroS-GS induced cell death in different cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but showed no significant effects on MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells. Although the ESeroS-GS-induced cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells was accompanied with the generation of reactive oxygen species and the down regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), no such effect on reactive oxygen species and MMP was seen in MCF-10A cells. Further studies indicated that ESeroS-GS down-regulated the expression of hexokinase II, SDH B, UQCRC2 and COX II in MDA-MB-231 cells but not in MCF-10A cells. The down-regulation of these enzymes accounts for the decreased oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and glycolysis in MDA-MB-231 cells upon ESeroS-GS treatment. We also found that sub-toxic concentration of ESeroS-GS treatment resulted in the impairment of F-actin cytoskeleton assembly and the consequently decreased migratory and invasive ability of MDA-MB-231 cells, which might be due to the inhibition of cellular energy metabolism. These results indicate that ESeroS-GS shows potential to become a novel anti-cancer agent by targeting the energy metabolism of cancer cells. PMID:25446928

  11. A selective alpha1D-adrenoreceptor antagonist inhibits human prostate cancer cell proliferation and motility "in vitro".

    PubMed

    Colciago, Alessandra; Mornati, Ornella; Ferri, Nicola; Castelnovo, Luca Franco; Fumagalli, Laura; Bolchi, Cristiano; Pallavicini, Marco; Valoti, Ermanno; Negri-Cesi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The progression of prostate cancer (PC) to a metastatic hormone refractory disease is the major contributor to the overall cancer mortality in men, mainly because the conventional therapies are generally ineffective at this stage. Thus, other therapeutic options are needed as alternatives or in addition to the classic approaches to prevent or delay tumor progression. Catecholamines participate to the control of prostate cell functions by the activation of alpha1-adrenoreceptors (alpha1-AR) and increased sympathetic activity has been linked to PC development and evolution. Molecular and pharmacological studies identified three alpha1-AR subtypes (A, B and D), which differ in tissue distribution, cell signaling, pharmacology and physiological role. Within the prostate, alpha1A-ARs mainly control stromal cell functions, while alpha1B- and alpha1D- subtypes seem to modulate glandular epithelial cell growth. The possible direct contribution of alpha1D-ARs in tumor biology is supported by their overexpression in PC. The studies here presented investigate the "in vitro" antitumor action of A175, a selective alpha1D-AR antagonist we have recently obtained by modifying the potent, but not subtype-selective alpha1-AR antagonist (S)-WB4101, in the hormone-refractory PC3 and DU145 PC cell lines. The results indicate that A175 has an alpha1D-AR-mediated significant and dose-dependent antiproliferative action that possibly involves the induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, but not apoptosis. In addition, A175 reduces cell migration and adhesiveness to culture plates. In conclusion, our work clarified some cellular aspects promoted by alpha1D-AR activity modulation and supports a further pharmacological approach in the cure of hormone-refractory PC, by targeting specifically this AR subtype. PMID:26621245

  12. Mechanism of shape determination in motile cells

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Kinneret; Pincus, Zachary; Allen, Greg M.; Barnhart, Erin L.; Marriott, Gerard; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    The shape of motile cells is determined by many dynamic processes spanning several orders of magnitude in space and time, from local polymerization of actin monomers at subsecond timescales to global, cell-scale geometry that may persist for hours. Understanding the mechanism of shape determination in cells has proved to be extremely challenging due to the numerous components involved and the complexity of their interactions. Here we harness the natural phenotypic variability in a large population of motile epithelial keratocytes from fish (Hypsophrys nicaraguensis) to reveal mechanisms of shape determination. We find that the cells inhabit a low-dimensional, highly correlated spectrum of possible functional states. We further show that a model of actin network treadmilling in an inextensible membrane bag can quantitatively recapitulate this spectrum and predict both cell shape and speed. Our model provides a simple biochemical and biophysical basis for the observed morphology and behaviour of motile cells. PMID:18497816

  13. SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is involved in a wide array of cellular processes, including glucose homeostasis, energy metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis, and immune response. However, it is un...

  14. [Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits virulence related motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Wu, Da-qiang; Huang, Wei-feng; Duan, Qiang-jun; Cheng, Hui-juan; Wang, Chang-zhong

    2015-04-01

    Sodium houttuyfonate (SH) is a derivative of effective component of a Chinese material medica, Houttuynia cordata, which is applied in anti-infection of microorganism. But, the antimicrobial mechanisms of SH still remain unclear. Here, we firstly discovered that SH effectively inhibits the three types of virulence related motility of.Pseudomonas aeruginosa, i.e., swimming, twitching and swarming. The plate assay results showed that the inhibitory action of SH against swimming and twitching in 24 h and swarming in 48 h is dose-dependent; and bacteria nearly lost all of the motile activities under the concentration of 1 x minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (512 mg x L(-1) same as azithromycin positive group (1 x MIC, 16 mg x L(-1)). Furthermore, we found that the expression of structural gene flgB and pilG is down-regulated by SH, which implies that inhibitory mechanism of SH against motility of P. aeruginosa may be due to the inhibition of flagella and pili bioformation of P. aeruginosa by SR Therefore, our presented results firstly demonstrate that SH effectively inhibits the motility activities of P. aeruginosa, and suggest that SH could be a promising antipseudomonas agents in clinic. PMID:26281603

  15. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Swarming Motility by 1-Naphthol and Other Bicyclic Compounds Bearing Hydroxyl Groups

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25681177

  16. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility by 1-naphthol and other bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25681177

  17. Two-Dimensional Motility of a Macrophage Cell Line on Microcontact-Printed Fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Hind, Laurel E.; MacKay, Joanna L.; Cox, Dianne; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of macrophages to migrate to sites of infection and inflammation is critical for their role in the innate immune response. Macrophage cell lines have made it possible to study the roles of individual proteins responsible for migration using molecular biology, but it has not been possible to reliably elicit the motility of macrophage cell lines in two-dimensions. In the past, measurements of the motility of macrophage cell lines have been largely limited to transwell assays which provide limited quantitative information on motility and limited ability to visualize cell morphology. We used microcontact printing to create polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces functionalized with fibronectin that otherwise support little macrophage adhesion. We used these surfaces to measure macrophage migration in two-dimensions and found that these cells migrate efficiently in a uniform field of colony-stimulating factor-1, CSF-1. Knockdown of Cdc42 led to a non-statistically significant reduction in motility, whereas chemical inhibition of PI3K activity led to a complete loss of motility. Inhibition of the RhoA kinase, ROCK, did not abolish the motility of these cells but caused a quantitative change in motility, reducing motility significantly on high concentrations of fibronectin but not on low concentrations. This study illustrates the importance of studying cell motility on well controlled materials to better understand the exact roles of specific proteins on macrophage migration. PMID:25186818

  18. Radiation-induced motility alterations in medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rieken, Stefan; Rieber, Juliane; Brons, Stephan; Habermehl, Daniel; Rief, Harald; Orschiedt, Lena; Lindel, Katja; Weber, Klaus J; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2015-05-01

    Photon irradiation has been repeatedly suspected of increasing tumor cell motility and promoting locoregional recurrence of disease. This study was set up to analyse possible mechanisms underlying the potentially radiation-altered motility in medulloblastoma cells. Medulloblastoma cell lines D425 and Med8A were analyzed in migration and adhesion experiments with and without photon and carbon ion irradiation. Expression of integrins was determined by quantitative FACS analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase concentrations within cell culture supernatants were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test. Both photon and carbon ion irradiation significantly reduced chemotactic medulloblastoma cell transmigration through 8-μm pore size membranes, while simultaneously increasing adherence to fibronectin- and collagen I- and IV-coated surfaces. Correspondingly, both photon and carbon ion irradiation downregulate soluble MMP9 concentrations, while upregulating cell surface expression of proadhesive extracellular matrix protein-binding integrin α5. The observed phenotype of radiation-altered motility is more pronounced following carbon ion than photon irradiation. Both photon and (even more so) carbon ion irradiation are effective in inhibiting medulloblastoma cell migration through downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and upregulation of proadhesive cell surface integrin α5, which lead to increased cell adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:25736470

  19. Motile responses in outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zenner, H P

    1986-01-01

    Motile responses of cochlear hair cells open new perspectives for the understanding of cochlear hearing mechanisms and hearing disorders located in hair cells. Direct visualization of hair cell motility was achieved by a method for the study of living isolated mammalian outer hair cells (OHCs) which has overcome some of the complexities in dealing with the heterogeneous organ of Corti. Electrophysiological giga-seal whole-cell recordings of single OHC prepared by this approach had revealed negative cell potentials ranging from -32 mV to -70 mV (Gitter et al. (1986) Oto-Rhino-Laryngol. in press). Elucidation of HC motility has come from two lines of experiments. One follows from the observation that exposure of the lateral and basal membrane parts of living OHCs to increasing bath K+ concentrations resulted in a sustained reversible depolarization of the cell. Here, we report that by depolarization of the cell membrane in the presence of 25-125 mM K+/Cl- a sustained contraction of OHC was induced. This was followed by relaxation in the presence of artificial perilymph containing 5.4 mM K+/Cl-. By alternating these procedures OHCs were made to undergo as many as five cycles of contraction and relaxation. External Ca2+ was not required for the initial contraction but was essential for relaxation. Following repeated contraction/relaxation cycles the cytoplasm of individual OHCs exhibited a filamentous network, correlating with a new infracuticular anti-actin binding capacity. The second series of experiments originates in the observation that permeabilized OHCs contracted in the presence of ATP. No response was seen in the presence of control nucleotides.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3733547

  20. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use both analytic and computational models to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. In both models, of we are specifically interested in stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which act in the direction of cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, low waves and locomotive forces, and attempt characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  1. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use a simply analytic model in conjuction with computational experiments to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. Of particlar interest are stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which may be used to aid in cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, flow waves, adhesion, and locomotive forces in an attempt to characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  2. Reduced Protein Synthesis Fidelity Inhibits Flagellar Biosynthesis and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongqiang; Evans, Christopher R.; Ling, Jiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate translation of the genetic information from DNA to protein is maintained by multiple quality control steps from bacteria to mammals. Genetic and environmental alterations have been shown to compromise translational quality control and reduce fidelity during protein synthesis. The physiological impact of increased translational errors is not fully understood. While generally considered harmful, translational errors have recently been shown to benefit cells under certain stress conditions. In this work, we describe a novel regulatory pathway in which reduced translational fidelity downregulates expression of flagellar genes and suppresses bacterial motility. Electron microscopy imaging shows that the error-prone Escherichia coli strain lacks mature flagella. Further genetic analyses reveal that translational errors upregulate expression of a small RNA DsrA through enhancing its transcription, and deleting DsrA from the error-prone strain restores motility. DsrA regulates expression of H-NS and RpoS, both of which regulate flagellar genes. We demonstrate that an increased level of DsrA in the error-prone strain suppresses motility through the H-NS pathway. Our work suggests that bacteria are capable of switching on and off the flagellar system by altering translational fidelity, which may serve as a previously unknown mechanism to improve fitness in response to environmental cues. PMID:27468805

  3. Mechanics and polarity in cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, D.; Zanzottera, A.

    2016-09-01

    The motility of a fish keratocyte on a flat substrate exhibits two distinct regimes: the non-migrating and the migrating one. In both configurations the shape is fixed in time and, when the cell is moving, the velocity is constant in magnitude and direction. Transition from a stable configuration to the other one can be produced by a mechanical or chemotactic perturbation. In order to point out the mechanical nature of such a bistable behaviour, we focus on the actin dynamics inside the cell using a minimal mathematical model. While the protein diffusion, recruitment and segregation govern the polarization process, we show that the free actin mass balance, driven by diffusion, and the polymerized actin retrograde flow, regulated by the active stress, are sufficient ingredients to account for the motile bistability. The length and velocity of the cell are predicted on the basis of the parameters of the substrate and of the cell itself. The key physical ingredient of the theory is the exchange among actin phases at the edges of the cell, that plays a central role both in kinematics and in dynamics.

  4. Correlation of cell membrane dynamics and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Essential events of cell development and homeostasis are revealed by the associated changes of cell morphology and therefore have been widely used as a key indicator of physiological states and molecular pathways affecting various cellular functions via cytoskeleton. Cell motility is a complex phenomenon primarily driven by the actin network, which plays an important role in shaping the morphology of the cells. Most of the morphology based features are approximated from cell periphery but its dynamics have received none to scant attention. We aim to bridge the gap between membrane dynamics and cell states from the perspective of whole cell movement by identifying cell edge patterns and its correlation with cell dynamics. Results We present a systematic study to extract, classify, and compare cell dynamics in terms of cell motility and edge activity. Cell motility features extracted by fitting a persistent random walk were used to identify the initial set of cell subpopulations. We propose algorithms to extract edge features along the entire cell periphery such as protrusion and retraction velocity. These constitute a unique set of multivariate time-lapse edge features that are then used to profile subclasses of cell dynamics by unsupervised clustering. Conclusions By comparing membrane dynamic patterns exhibited by each subclass of cells, correlated trends of edge and cell movements were identified. Our findings are consistent with published literature and we also identified that motility patterns are influenced by edge features from initial time points compared to later sampling intervals. PMID:22372978

  5. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher’s equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase–a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics. PMID:27362260

  6. RelA inhibits Bacillus subtilis motility and chaining.

    PubMed

    Ababneh, Qutaiba O; Herman, Jennifer K

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide second messengers pppGpp and ppGpp [(p)ppGpp] are responsible for the global downregulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, and growth rate that occurs during the stringent response. More recent studies suggest that (p)ppGpp is also an important effector in many nonstringent processes, including virulence, persister cell formation, and biofilm production. In Bacillus subtilis, (p)ppGpp production is primarily determined by the net activity of RelA, a bifunctional (p)ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase, and two monofunctional (p)ppGpp synthetases, YwaC and YjbM. We observe that in B. subtilis, a relA mutant grows exclusively as unchained, motile cells, phenotypes regulated by the alternative sigma factor SigD. Our data indicate that the relA mutant is trapped in a SigD "on" state during exponential growth, implicating RelA and (p)ppGpp levels in the regulation of cell chaining and motility in B. subtilis. Our results also suggest that minor variations in basal (p)ppGpp levels can significantly skew developmental decision-making outcomes. PMID:25331430

  7. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  8. Computational and Modeling Strategies for Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Adalsteinsson, David; Elston, Timothy C.; Jacobson, Ken; Kapustina, Maryna; Forest, M. Gregory

    A predictive simulation of the dynamics of a living cell remains a fundamental modeling and computational challenge. The challenge does not even make sense unless one specifies the level of detail and the phenomena of interest, whether the focus is on near-equilibrium or strongly nonequilibrium behavior, and on localized, subcellular, or global cell behavior. Therefore, choices have to be made clear at the outset, ranging from distinguishing between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, specificity within each of these types, whether the cell is "normal," whether one wants to model mitosis, blebs, migration, division, deformation due to confined flow as with red blood cells, and the level of microscopic detail for any of these processes. The review article by Hoffman and Crocker [48] is both an excellent overview of cell mechanics and an inspiration for our approach. One might be interested, for example, in duplicating the intricate experimental details reported in [43]: "actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process," or to duplicate experimental evidence of traveling waves in cells recovering from actin depolymerization [42, 35]. Modeling studies of lamellipodial structure, protrusion, and retraction behavior range from early mechanistic models [84] to more recent deterministic [112, 97] and stochastic [51] approaches with significant biochemical and structural detail. Recent microscopic-macroscopic models and algorithms for cell blebbing have been developed by Young and Mitran [116], which update cytoskeletal microstructure via statistical sampling techniques together with fluid variables. Alternatively, whole cell compartment models (without spatial details) of oscillations in spreading cells have been proposed [35, 92, 109] which show positive and negative feedback

  9. Patterns of periodic holes created by increased cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting-Hsuan; Guo, Chunyan; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yucheng; Boström, Kristina I.; Wong, Margaret N.; Tintut, Yin; Demer, Linda L.; Ho, Chih-Ming; Garfinkel, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The reaction and diffusion of morphogens is a mechanism widely used to explain many spatial patterns in physics, chemistry and developmental biology. However, because experimental control is limited in most biological systems, it is often unclear what mechanisms account for the biological patterns that arise. Here, we study a biological model of cultured vascular mesenchymal cells (VMCs), which normally self-organize into aggregates that form into labyrinthine configurations. We use an experimental control and a mathematical model that includes reacting and diffusing morphogens and a third variable reflecting local cell density. With direct measurements showing that cell motility was increased ninefold and threefold by inhibiting either Rho kinase or non-muscle myosin-II, respectively, our experimental results and mathematical modelling demonstrate that increased motility alters the multicellular pattern of the VMC cultures, from labyrinthine to a pattern of periodic holes. These results suggest implications for the tissue engineering of functional replacements for trabecular or spongy tissue such as endocardium and bone. PMID:22649581

  10. LRRK2 G2019S mutation attenuates microglial motility by inhibiting focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Insup; Kim, Beomsue; Byun, Ji-Won; Baik, Sung Hoon; Huh, Yun Hyun; Kim, Jong-Hyeon; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Song, Woo Keun; Shin, Joo-Ho; Seo, Hyemyung; Suh, Young Ho; Jou, Ilo; Park, Sang Myun; Kang, Ho Chul; Joe, Eun-Hye

    2015-01-01

    In response to brain injury, microglia rapidly extend processes that isolate lesion sites and protect the brain from further injury. Here we report that microglia carrying a pathogenic mutation in the Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated gene, G2019S-LRRK2 (GS-Tg microglia), show retarded ADP-induced motility and delayed isolation of injury, compared with non-Tg microglia. Conversely, LRRK2 knockdown microglia are highly motile compared with control cells. In our functional assays, LRRK2 binds to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phosphorylates its Thr–X–Arg/Lys (TXR/K) motif(s), eventually attenuating FAK activity marked by decreased pY397 phosphorylation (pY397). GS-LRRK2 decreases the levels of pY397 in the brain, microglia and HEK cells. In addition, treatment with an inhibitor of LRRK2 kinase restores pY397 levels, decreased pTXR levels and rescued motility of GS-Tg microglia. These results collectively suggest that G2019S mutation of LRRK2 may contribute to the development of PD by inhibiting microglial response to brain injury. PMID:26365310

  11. A mechanism for cell motility by active polar gels

    PubMed Central

    Marth, W.; Praetorius, S.; Voigt, A.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse a generic motility model, with the motility mechanism arising by contractile stress due to the interaction of myosin and actin. A hydrodynamic active polar gel theory is used to model the cytoplasm of a cell and is combined with a Helfrich-type model to account for membrane properties. The overall model allows consideration of the motility without the necessity for local adhesion. Besides a detailed numerical approach together with convergence studies for the highly nonlinear free boundary problem, we also compare the induced flow field of the motile cell with that of classical squirmer models and identify the motile cell as a puller or pusher, depending on the strength of the myosin–actin interactions. PMID:25926698

  12. Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibits the Motility of Pathogenic Salmonella by Affecting the Driving Forces of Motility and the Chemotactic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Islam, Md. Shafiqul; Guo, Yijie; Ihara, Kohei; Tomioka, Rintaro; Masuda, Mizuki; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key pattern recognition molecule in the lectin pathway of the complement system, an important component of innate immunity. MBL functions as an opsonin which enhances the sequential immune process such as phagocytosis. We here report an inhibitory effect of MBL on the motility of pathogenic bacteria, which occurs by affecting the energy source required for motility and the signaling pathway of chemotaxis. When Salmonella cells were treated with a physiological concentration of MBL, their motile fraction and free-swimming speed decreased. Rotation assays of a single flagellum showed that the flagellar rotation rate was significantly reduced by the addition of MBL. Measurements of the intracellular pH and membrane potential revealed that MBL affected a driving force for the Salmonella flagellum, the electrochemical potential difference of protons. We also found that MBL treatment increased the reversal frequency of Salmonella flagellar rotation, which interfered with the relative positive chemotaxis toward an attractive substrate. We thus propose that the motility inhibition effect of MBL may be secondarily involved in the attack against pathogens, potentially facilitating the primary role of MBL in the complement system. PMID:27104738

  13. Glycolysis is the primary bioenergetic pathway for cell motility and cytoskeletal remodeling in human prostate and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Takumi; Verdone, James E.; Huang, Jessie; Kahlert, Ulf D.; Hernandez, James R.; Torga, Gonzalo; Zarif, Jelani C.; Epstein, Tamir; Gatenby, Robert; McCartney, Annemarie; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.; Mooney, Steven M.; An, Steven S.; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of a cancer cell to detach from the primary tumor and move to distant sites is fundamental to a lethal cancer phenotype. Metabolic transformations are associated with highly motile aggressive cellular phenotypes in tumor progression. Here, we report that cancer cell motility requires increased utilization of the glycolytic pathway. Mesenchymal cancer cells exhibited higher aerobic glycolysis compared to epithelial cancer cells while no significant change was observed in mitochondrial ATP production rate. Higher glycolysis was associated with increased rates of cytoskeletal remodeling, greater cell traction forces and faster cell migration, all of which were blocked by inhibition of glycolysis, but not by inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Thus, our results demonstrate that cancer cell motility and cytoskeleton rearrangement is energetically dependent on aerobic glycolysis and not oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial derived ATP is insufficient to compensate for inhibition of the glycolytic pathway with regard to cellular motility and CSK rearrangement, implying that localization of ATP derived from glycolytic enzymes near sites of active CSK rearrangement is more important for cell motility than total cellular ATP production rate. These results extend our understanding of cancer cell metabolism, potentially providing a target metabolic pathway associated with aggressive disease. PMID:25426557

  14. Microfabricated ratchet structures for concentrating and patterning motile bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yub Kim, Sang; Lee, Eun Se; Lee, Ho Jae; Lee, Se Yeon; Kuk Lee, Sung; Kim, Taesung

    2010-09-01

    We present a novel microfabricated concentrator for Escherichia coli that can be a stand-alone and self-contained microfluidic device because it utilizes the motility of cells. First of all, we characterize the motility of E. coli cells and various ratcheting structures that can guide cells to move in a desired direction in straight and circular channels. Then, we combine these ratcheting microstructures with the intrinsic tendency of cells to swim on the right side in microchannels to enhance the concentration rates up to 180 fold until the concentrators are fully filled with cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cells can be positioned and concentrated with a constant spacing distance on a surface, allowing spatial patterning of motile cells. These results can be applied to biosorption or biosensor devices that are powered by motile cells because they can be highly concentrated without any external mechanical and electrical energy sources. Hence, we believe that the concentrator design holds considerable potential to be applied for concentrating and patterning other motile microbes and providing a versatile structure for motility study of bacterial cells.

  15. Arginine Vasopressin Injected into the Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus Inhibits Gastric Motility in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianping; Chang, Lanlan; Xie, Jinlu; Ai, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Until now, the effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP) in the DMV on gastric motility and the possible modulating pathway between the DMV and the gastrointestinal system remain poorly understood. Objectives. We aimed to explore the role of AVP in the DMV in regulating gastric motility and the possible central and peripheral pathways. Material and Methods. Firstly, we microinjected different doses of AVP into the DMV and investigated its effects on gastric motility in rats. Then, the possible central and peripheral pathways that regulate gastric motility were also discussed by microinjecting SR49059 (a specific AVP receptor antagonist) into the DMV and intravenous injection of hexamethonium (a specific neuronal nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonist) before AVP microinjection. Results. Following microinjection of AVP (180 pmol and 18 pmol) into the DMV, the gastric motility (including total amplitude, total duration, and motility index of gastric contraction) was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05). Moreover, the inhibitory effect of AVP (180 pmol) on gastric motility could be blocked completely by both SR49059 (320 pmol) and hexamethonium (8 μmol). Conclusions. It is concluded that AVP inhibits the gastric motility by acting on the specific AVP receptor in the DMV, with the potential involvement of the parasympathetic preganglionic cholinergic fibers. PMID:26843857

  16. Time course of "escape" from calcitonin-induced inhibition of motility and resorption of disaggregated osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Kanehisa, J

    1989-01-01

    The reversible calcitonin (CT)-induced inhibition of osteoclastic activity has been studied to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the so-called "escape phenomenon." Osteoclasts disaggregated from neonatal rabbits were cultured on glass coverslips or thin bovine bone slices. Resorption activity was evaluated by using time-lapse recording and scanning electron microscopy. Addition of CT to the cultures caused most osteoclasts on glass surfaces to be immotile and contracted. From 1.5 h onward, in cultures with CT, osteoclasts started to escape from CT-induced quiescence independently of other cells. CT also prevented osteoclasts on bone slices from excavating bone while concomitant cell immobility occurred. Inhibited osteoclasts were able to regain apparent bone-resorbing potency only after resumption of cytoplasmic immobility. The resumption of bone resorption could begin as early as 9.7 h after CT addition. The observations indicate that CT-induced inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption is associated with inhibition of cytoplasmic motility and that the "escape" phenomenon reflects resumption of activity of osteoclasts that were previously inhibited by CT action rather than the resportive activity of newly formed osteoclasts. PMID:2765310

  17. Virstatin inhibits biofilm formation and motility of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen causing infections worldwide. One reason for this emergence is due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment, which may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms. Cell surface appendages are important determinants of the A. baumannii biofilm formation and as such constitute interesting targets to prevent the development of biofilm-related infections. A chemical agent called virstatin was recently described to impair the virulence of Vibrio cholerae by preventing the expression of its virulence factor, the toxin coregulated pilus (type IV pilus). The objective of this work was to investigate the potential effect of virstatin on A. baumannii biofilms. Results After a dose–response experiment, we determined that 100 μM virstatin led to an important decrease (38%) of biofilms formed by A. baumannii ATCC17978 grown under static mode. We demonstrated that the production of biofilms grown under dynamic mode was also delayed and reduced. The biofilm susceptibility to virstatin was then tested for 40 clinical and reference A. baumannii strains. 70% of the strains were susceptible to virstatin (with a decrease of 10 to 65%) when biofilms grew in static mode, whereas 60% of strains respond to the treatment when their biofilms grew in dynamic mode. As expected, motility and atomic force microscopy experiments showed that virstatin acts on the A. baumannii pili biogenesis. Conclusions By its action on pili biogenesis, virstatin demonstrated a very promising antibiofilm activity affecting more than 70% of the A. baumannii clinical isolates. PMID:24621315

  18. ANXA2 enhances the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma via remodeling the cell motility associated structures.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongyan; Xiao, Li; Duan, Wei; He, Huimin; Ma, Lele; Da, Miaomiao; Duan, Yan; Wang, Qian; Wu, Huayi; Song, Xigui; Hou, Yingchun

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ranks as the fifth most common malignancy worldwide. The detailed mechanism of signal regulation for HCC progression is still not known, and the high motility of cancer cells is known as a core property for cancer progression maintenance. Annexin A2 (ANXA2), a calcium-dependent phospholipids binding protein is highly expressed in HCC. To study the roles the excessively expressed ANXA2 during the progression of HCC, we inhibited the ANXA2 expression in SMMC-7721 cells using RNAi, followed by the analysis of cell growth, apoptosis and cell motility. To explore the relationship between the cell behaviors and its structures, the microstructure changes were observed under fluorescence microscopy, laser scanning confocal microscopy and electron microscopy. Our findings demonstrated that down-regulation of ANXA2 results in decreased the cell proliferation and motility, enhanced apoptosis, suppressed cell pseudopodia/filopodia, inhibited expression of F-actin and β-tubulin, and inhibited or depolymerized Lamin B. The cell contact inhibition was also analyzed in the paper. Take together, our results indicate that ANXA2 plays an important role to enhance the malignant behaviors of HCC cells, and the enhancement is closely based on its remodeling to cell structures. PMID:27060670

  19. SHP-2 phosphatase activity is required for PECAM-1-dependent cell motility.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Xu; Cao, Gaoyuan; Williams, James T; Delisser, Horace M

    2010-10-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) has been implicated in endothelial cell motility during angiogenesis. Although there is evidence that SHP-2 plays a role in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, the molecular basis of the activity of SHP-2 in this process has not been defined. To investigate the requirement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, studies were done in which various constructs of SHP-2 were expressed in cell transfectants expressing PECAM-1. We observed that the levels of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 association with PECAM-1 were significantly increased in cells expressing a phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, suggesting that the level of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and thus SHP-2 binding are regulated in part by bound, catalytically active SHP-2. We subsequently found that expression of PECAM-1 stimulated wound-induced migration and the formation of filopodia (a morphological feature of motile cells). These activities were associated with increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and the dephosphorylation of paxillin (an event implicated in the activation of MAPK). The phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, however, suppressed these PECAM-1-dependent phenomena, whereas the activity of PECAM-1 expressing cells was not altered by expression of wild-type SHP-2 or SHP-2 in which the scaffold/adaptor function had been disabled. Pharmacological inhibition of SHP-2 phosphatase activity also suppressed PECAM-1-dependent motility. Furthermore, PECAM-1 expression also stimulates tube formation, but none of the SHP-2 constructs affected this process. These findings therefore suggest a model for the involvement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent motility in which SHP-2, recruited by its interaction with PECAM-1, targets paxillin to ultimately activate the MAPK pathway and downstream events required for cell motility. PMID:20631249

  20. Plakoglobin regulates cell motility through Rho- and fibronectin-dependent Src signaling

    PubMed Central

    Todorović, Viktor; Desai, Bhushan V.; Patterson, Melanie J. Schroeder; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Dubash, Adi D.; Yin, Taofei; Jones, Jonathan C. R.; Green, Kathleen J.

    2010-01-01

    We previously showed that the cell–cell junction protein plakoglobin (PG) not only suppresses motility of keratinocytes in contact with each other, but also, unexpectedly, of single cells. Here we show that PG deficiency results in extracellular matrix (ECM)-dependent disruption of mature focal adhesions and cortical actin organization. Plating PG−/− cells onto ECM deposited by PG+/− cells partially restored normal cell morphology and inhibited PG−/− cell motility. In over 70 adhesion molecules whose expression we previously showed to be altered in PG−/− cells, a substantial decrease in fibronectin (FN) in PG−/− cells stood out. Re-introduction of PG into PG−/− cells restored FN expression, and keratinocyte motility was reversed by plating PG−/− cells onto FN. Somewhat surprisingly, based on previously reported roles for PG in regulating gene transcription, PG-null cells exhibited an increase, not a decrease, in FN promoter activity. Instead, PG was required for maintenance of FN mRNA stability. PG−/− cells exhibited an increase in activated Src, one of the kinases controlled by FN, a phenotype reversed by plating PG−/− cells on ECM deposited by PG+/− keratinocytes. PG−/− cells also exhibited Src-independent activation of the small GTPases Rac1 and RhoA. Both Src and RhoA inhibition attenuated PG−/− keratinocyte motility. We propose a novel role for PG in regulating cell motility through distinct ECM–Src and RhoGTPase-dependent pathways, influenced in part by PG-dependent regulation of FN mRNA stability. PMID:20876660

  1. T Cell Motility as Modulator of Interactions with Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jens V.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the balance of costimulatory and inhibitory signals during interactions with dendritic cells (DCs) determines T cell transition from a naïve to an activated or tolerant/anergic status. Although many of these molecular interactions are well reproduced in reductionist in vitro assays, the highly dynamic motility of naïve T cells in lymphoid tissue acts as an additional lever to fine-tune their activation threshold. T cell detachment from DCs providing suboptimal stimulation allows them to search for DCs with higher levels of stimulatory signals, while storing a transient memory of short encounters. In turn, adhesion of weakly reactive T cells to DCs presenting peptides presented on major histocompatibility complex with low affinity is prevented by lipid mediators. Finally, controlled recruitment of CD8+ T cells to cognate DC–CD4+ T cell clusters shapes memory T cell formation and the quality of the immune response. Dynamic physiological lymphocyte motility therefore constitutes a mechanism to mitigate low avidity T cell activation and to improve the search for “optimal” DCs, while contributing to peripheral tolerance induction in the absence of inflammation. PMID:26579132

  2. Single cell motility and trail formation in populations of microglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung Jin

    2009-03-01

    Microglia are a special type of glia cell in brain that has immune responses. They constitute about 20 % of the total glia population within the brain. Compared to other glia cells, microglia are very motile, constantly moving to destroy pathogens and to remove dead neurons. While doing so, they exhibit interesting body shapes, have cell-to-cell communications, and have chemotatic responses to each other. Interestingly, our recent in vitro studies show that their unusual motile behaviors can self-organize to form trails, similar to those in populations of ants. We have studied the changes in the physical properties of these trails by varying the cell population density and by changing the degree of spatial inhomogeneities (``pathogens''). Our experimental observations can be quite faithfully reproduced by a simple mathematical model involving many motile cells whose mechanical motion are driven by actin polymerization and depolymerization process within the individual cell body and by external chemical gradients.

  3. Flagellum Density Regulates Proteus mirabilis Swarmer Cell Motility in Viscous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Copeland, Matthew F.; Carey, Sonia; Sacotte, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an opportunistic pathogen that is frequently associated with urinary tract infections. In the lab, P. mirabilis cells become long and multinucleate and increase their number of flagella as they colonize agar surfaces during swarming. Swarming has been implicated in pathogenesis; however, it is unclear how energetically costly changes in P. mirabilis cell morphology translate into an advantage for adapting to environmental changes. We investigated two morphological changes that occur during swarming—increases in cell length and flagellum density—and discovered that an increase in the surface density of flagella enabled cells to translate rapidly through fluids of increasing viscosity; in contrast, cell length had a small effect on motility. We found that swarm cells had a surface density of flagella that was ∼5 times larger than that of vegetative cells and were motile in fluids with a viscosity that inhibits vegetative cell motility. To test the relationship between flagellum density and velocity, we overexpressed FlhD4C2, the master regulator of the flagellar operon, in vegetative cells of P. mirabilis and found that increased flagellum density produced an increase in cell velocity. Our results establish a relationship between P. mirabilis flagellum density and cell motility in viscous environments that may be relevant to its adaptation during the infection of mammalian urinary tracts and movement in contact with indwelling catheters. PMID:23144253

  4. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  5. 3D Timelapse Analysis of Muscle Satellite Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Ashley L; Atchison, Kevin; Fisher, Kevin E; Davis, George E; Cornelison, DDW

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle repair and regeneration requires the activity of satellite cells, a population of myogenic stem cells scattered throughout the tissue and activated to proliferate and differentiate in response to myotrauma or disease. While it seems likely that satellite cells would need to navigate local muscle tissue to reach damaged areas, relatively little data on such motility exist, and most studies have been with immortalized cell lines. We find that primary satellite cells are significantly more motile than myoblast cell lines, and that adhesion to laminin promotes primary cell motility more than fourfold over other substrates. Using timelapse videomicroscopy to assess satellite cell motility on single living myofibers, we have identified a requirement for the laminin-binding integrin α7β1 in satellite cell motility, as well as a role for hepatocyte growth factor in promoting directional persistence. The extensive migratory behavior of satellite cells resident on muscle fibers suggests caution when determining, based on fixed specimens, whether adjacent cells are daughters from the same mother cell. We also observed more persistent long-term contact between individual satellite cells than has been previously supposed, potential cell-cell attractive and repulsive interactions, and migration between host myofibers. Based on such activity, we assayed for expression of “pathfinding” cues, and found that satellite cells express multiple guidance ligands and receptors. Together, these data suggest that satellite cell migration in vivo may be more extensive than currently thought, and could be regulated by combinations of signals, including adhesive haptotaxis, soluble factors, and guidance cues. Stem Cells 2009;27:2527–2538 PMID:19609936

  6. Form and Function in Cell Motility: From Fibroblasts to Keratocytes

    PubMed Central

    Herant, Marc; Dembo, Micah

    2010-01-01

    Abstract It is plain enough that a horse is made for running, but similar statements about motile cells are not so obvious. Here the basis for structure-function relations in cell motility is explored by application of a new computational technique that allows realistic three-dimensional simulations of cells migrating on flat substrata. With this approach, some cyber cells spontaneously display the classic irregular protrusion cycles and handmirror morphology of a crawling fibroblast, and others the steady gliding motility and crescent morphology of a fish keratocyte. The keratocyte motif is caused by optimal recycling of the cytoskeleton from the back to the front so that more of the periphery can be devoted to protrusion. These calculations are a step toward bridging the gap between the integrated mechanics and biophysics of whole cells and the microscopic molecular biology of cytoskeletal components. PMID:20409459

  7. Actin–myosin network reorganization breaks symmetry at the cell rear to spontaneously initiate polarized cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Patricia T.; Wilson, Cyrus A.; Ji, Lin; Hebert, Benedict; Barnhart, Erin L.; Dye, Natalie A.; Wiseman, Paul W.; Danuser, Gaudenz; Theriot, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    We have analyzed the spontaneous symmetry breaking and initiation of actin-based motility in keratocytes (fish epithelial cells). In stationary keratocytes, the actin network flow was inwards and radially symmetric. Immediately before motility initiation, the actin network flow increased at the prospective cell rear and reoriented in the perinuclear region, aligning with the prospective axis of movement. Changes in actin network flow at the cell front were detectable only after cell polarization. Inhibition of myosin II or Rho kinase disrupted actin network organization and flow in the perinuclear region and decreased the motility initiation frequency, whereas increasing myosin II activity with calyculin A increased the motility initiation frequency. Local stimulation of myosin activity in stationary cells by the local application of calyculin A induced directed motility initiation away from the site of stimulation. Together, these results indicate that large-scale actin–myosin network reorganization and contractility at the cell rear initiate spontaneous symmetry breaking and polarized motility of keratocytes. PMID:17893245

  8. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway stimulates anaplastic thyroid cancer cell motility and invasiveness by activating Akt and c-Met

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Ashley J.; Doscas, Michelle E.; Ye, Jin; Heiden, Katherine B.; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Yi; Prinz, Richard A.; Xu, Xiulong

    2016-01-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is highly activated in thyroid neoplasms and promotes thyroid cancer stem-like cell phenotype, but whether the Shh pathway regulates thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that the motility and invasiveness of two anaplastic thyroid tumor cell lines, KAT-18 and SW1736, were inhibited by two inhibitors of the Shh pathway (cyclopamine and GANT61). Consistently, the cell motility and invasiveness was decreased by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, and was increased by Gli1 overexpression in KAT-18 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Akt and c-Met phosphorylation was decreased by a Gli1 inhibitor and by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, but was increased by Gli1 overexpression. LY294002, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, and a c-Met inhibitor inhibited the motility and invasiveness of Gli1-transfected KAT-18 cells more effectively than the vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of Snail, a transcription factor regulated by the Shh pathway, led to decreased cell motility and invasiveness in KAT-18 and SW1736 cells. However, key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including E-cadherin and vimentin as well as Slug were not affected by cyclopamine and GANT61 in either SW1736 or WRO82, a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. Our data suggest that the Shh pathway-stimulated thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness is largely mediated by AKT and c-Met activation with little involvement of EMT. PMID:26859575

  9. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway stimulates anaplastic thyroid cancer cell motility and invasiveness by activating Akt and c-Met.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ashley J; Doscas, Michelle E; Ye, Jin; Heiden, Katherine B; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Yi; Prinz, Richard A; Xu, Xiulong

    2016-03-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is highly activated in thyroid neoplasms and promotes thyroid cancer stem-like cell phenotype, but whether the Shh pathway regulates thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that the motility and invasiveness of two anaplastic thyroid tumor cell lines, KAT-18 and SW1736, were inhibited by two inhibitors of the Shh pathway (cyclopamine and GANT61). Consistently, the cell motility and invasiveness was decreased by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, and was increased by Gli1 overexpression in KAT-18 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Akt and c-Met phosphorylation was decreased by a Gli1 inhibitor and by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, but was increased by Gli1 overexpression. LY294002, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, and a c-Met inhibitor inhibited the motility and invasiveness of Gli1-transfected KAT-18 cells more effectively than the vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of Snail, a transcription factor regulated by the Shh pathway, led to decreased cell motility and invasiveness in KAT-18 and SW1736 cells. However, key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including E-cadherin and vimentin as well as Slug were not affected by cyclopamine and GANT61 in either SW1736 or WRO82, a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. Our data suggest that the Shh pathway-stimulated thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness is largely mediated by AKT and c-Met activation with little involvement of EMT. PMID:26859575

  10. 3D timelapse analysis of muscle satellite cell motility.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Ashley L; Atchison, Kevin; Fisher, Kevin E; Davis, George E; Cornelison, D D W

    2009-10-01

    Skeletal muscle repair and regeneration requires the activity of satellite cells, a population of myogenic stem cells scattered throughout the tissue and activated to proliferate and differentiate in response to myotrauma or disease. While it seems likely that satellite cells would need to navigate local muscle tissue to reach damaged areas, relatively little data on such motility exist, and most studies have been with immortalized cell lines. We find that primary satellite cells are significantly more motile than myoblast cell lines, and that adhesion to laminin promotes primary cell motility more than fourfold over other substrates. Using timelapse videomicroscopy to assess satellite cell motility on single living myofibers, we have identified a requirement for the laminin-binding integrin alpha 7 beta 1 in satellite cell motility, as well as a role for hepatocyte growth factor in promoting directional persistence. The extensive migratory behavior of satellite cells resident on muscle fibers suggests caution when determining, based on fixed specimens, whether adjacent cells are daughters from the same mother cell. We also observed more persistent long-term contact between individual satellite cells than has been previously supposed, potential cell-cell attractive and repulsive interactions, and migration between host myofibers. Based on such activity, we assayed for expression of "pathfinding" cues, and found that satellite cells express multiple guidance ligands and receptors. Together, these data suggest that satellite cell migration in vivo may be more extensive than currently thought, and could be regulated by combinations of signals, including adhesive haptotaxis, soluble factors, and guidance cues. PMID:19609936

  11. Lipopolysaccharide of Marinobacter litoralis inhibits swarming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Raj Kumar; Kavita, Kumari; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-06-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was isolated from a marine bacterium identified as Marinobacter litoralis BK09 using 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis. The GCMS analysis showed that the LPS contained 3-hydroxy-dodecanoic acid (C12:0 3OH) (49%), dodecanoic acid (C12:0) (24%) and decanoic acid (C10:0) (19%) as major fatty acids, and the polysaccharide constituents were fucose (53.79%), xylose (28.04%) and mannose (18.15%). The LPS almost completely inhibited swarming motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01. It also reduced biofilm formation by 50% with no adverse effect on cell growth. The production of virulence factor such as pyocyanin pigment was reduced (∼40%) by the LPS. The LPS did not show any limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) gelation activity. The repression of swarming motility, pyocyanin production and biofilm formation by the LPS suggests its potential application against P. aeruginosa infection. This is the first report on characterization and application of LPS from M. litoralis. PMID:25843881

  12. Cooperative cell motility during tandem locomotion of amoeboid cells.

    PubMed

    Bastounis, Effie; Álvarez-González, Begoña; Del Álamo, Juan C; Lasheras, Juan C; Firtel, Richard A

    2016-04-15

    Streams of migratory cells are initiated by the formation of tandem pairs of cells connected head to tail to which other cells subsequently adhere. The mechanisms regulating the transition from single to streaming cell migration remain elusive, although several molecules have been suggested to be involved. In this work, we investigate the mechanics of the locomotion ofDictyosteliumtandem pairs by analyzing the spatiotemporal evolution of their traction adhesions (TAs). We find that in migrating wild-type tandem pairs, each cell exerts traction forces on stationary sites (∼80% of the time), and the trailing cell reuses the location of the TAs of the leading cell. Both leading and trailing cells form contractile dipoles and synchronize the formation of new frontal TAs with ∼54-s time delay. Cells not expressing the lectin discoidin I or moving on discoidin I-coated substrata form fewer tandems, but the trailing cell still reuses the locations of the TAs of the leading cell, suggesting that discoidin I is not responsible for a possible chemically driven synchronization process. The migration dynamics of the tandems indicate that their TAs' reuse results from the mechanical synchronization of the leading and trailing cells' protrusions and retractions (motility cycles) aided by the cell-cell adhesions. PMID:26912787

  13. Helical motion of the cell body enhances Caulobacter crescentus motility

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Gulino, Marco; Morse, Michael; Tang, Jay X.; Powers, Thomas R.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    We resolve the 3D trajectory and the orientation of individual cells for extended times, using a digital tracking technique combined with 3D reconstructions. We have used this technique to study the motility of the uniflagellated bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and have found that each cell displays two distinct modes of motility, depending on the sense of rotation of the flagellar motor. In the forward mode, when the flagellum pushes the cell, the cell body is tilted with respect to the direction of motion, and it precesses, tracing out a helical trajectory. In the reverse mode, when the flagellum pulls the cell, the precession is smaller and the cell has a lower translation distance per rotation period and thus a lower motility. Using resistive force theory, we show how the helical motion of the cell body generates thrust and can explain the direction-dependent changes in swimming motility. The source of the cell body precession is believed to be associated with the flexibility of the hook that connects the flagellum to the cell body. PMID:25053810

  14. Overexpression of engulfment and cell motility 1 promotes cell invasion and migration of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiarui; Liu, Guoqing; Miao, Xiongying; Hua, Songwen; Zhong, Dewu

    2011-05-01

    Engulfment and cell motility 1 (Elmo1) has been linked to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells. The use of Elmo1 inhibitors is currently being evaluated in hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC), but the molecular mechanisms of their therapeutic effect have yet to be determined. Elmo1 expression in HCC tissue samples from 131 cases and in 5 HCC cell lines was determined by immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. To functionally characterize Elmo1 in HCC, Elmo1 expression in the HCCLM3 cell line was blocked by siRNA. Cell migration was measured by wound healing and transwell migration assays in vitro. Elmo1 overexpression was significantly correlated with cell invasion and the poor prognosis of HCC. Elmo1-siRNA-treated HCCLM3 cells demonstrated a reduction in cell migration. The present study demonstrated for the first time that the suppression of Elmo1 expression inhibits cell invasion in HCC. PMID:22977532

  15. Cellular acidosis inhibits assembly, disassembly, and motility of stress granules.

    PubMed

    Chudinova, E M; Nadezhdina, E S; Ivanov, P A

    2012-11-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are large ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-containing particles that form in cytoplasm in response to a variety of acute changes in the cellular environment. One of the general parameters of the cell environment is pH. In some diseases, as well as in muscle fatigue, tissue acidosis occurs, leading to decrease in intracellular pH. Here we studied whether decrease in pH causes the formation of SGs in cultured animal cells, whether it affects the formation of the SGs under the action of arsenite and, if such effects occur, what are the mechanisms of the influence of acidosis. Acidosis was simulated by decreasing the pH of the culture medium, which acidified the cytoplasm. We found that medium acidification to pH 6.0 in itself did not cause formation of SGs in cells. Moreover, acidification prevented the formation of SGs under treatment with sodium arsenite or sodium arsenite together with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and it inhibited the dissociation of preformed SGs under the influence of cycloheximide. We established that pH decrease did not affect the phosphorylation of eIF2α that occurs under the action of sodium arsenite, and even caused such phosphorylation by itself. We also found that the velocity of SG motion in cytoplasm at acidic pH was very low, and the mobile fraction of SG-incorporated PABP protein revealed by FRAP was decreased. We suppose that acidic pH impairs biochemical processes favoring assembly of RNPs in stress conditions and RNP dissociation on the termination of stress. Thus, in acidosis the reaction of the cellular translation apparatus to stress is modified. PMID:23240565

  16. SPAG9 controls the cell motility, invasion and angiogenesis of human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    YANG, XIAORONG; ZHOU, WENLAI; LIU, SHIQING

    2016-01-01

    Sperm-associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) is an oncoprotein involved in the progression of various human malignancies; however, its role in osteosarcoma (OS) remains poorly evaluated. The present study used Matrigel™ cell migration and invasion assays, tube formation assay, Cell Counting kit-8, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to investigate the role of SPAG9 in OS cell motility, invasion and angiogenesis. The results of the present study demonstrated that SPAG9 expression was upregulated in OS tissues, as compared with adjacent normal tissues, and knockdown of SPAG9 in an OS cell line inhibited cell motility and invasion via inactivation of metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that silencing of SPAG9 in OS cells inhibited tube formation, the proliferation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, and suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and secretion, contributing to a reduction in angiogenesis. The results of the present study indicated that SPAG9 may be an important regulator in OS and may be involved in metastasis. Therefore SPAG9 may be a promising target for the treatment of metastatic OS. PMID:26893659

  17. Cadmium inhibits mouse sperm motility through inducing tyrosine phosphorylation in a specific subset of proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lirui; Li, Yuhua; Fu, Jieli; Zhen, Linqing; Zhao, Na; Yang, Qiangzhen; Li, Sisi; Li, Xinhong

    2016-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has been reported to impair male fertility, primarily by disrupting sperm motility, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we investigated the effects of Cd on sperm motility, tyrosine phosphorylation, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, and ATP levels in vitro. Our results demonstrated that Cd inhibited sperm motility, GAPDH activity, AMPK activity and ATP production, and induced tyrosine phosphorylation of 55-57KDa proteins. Importantly, all the parameters affected by Cd were restored to normal levels when incubated with 10μM Cd in the presence of 30μM ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Interestingly, changes of tyrosine phosphorylation levels of 55-57KDa proteins are completely contrary to that of other parameters. These results suggest that Cd-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of 55-57KDa proteins might act as an engine to block intracellular energy metabolism and thus decrease sperm motility. PMID:27233480

  18. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Complex I Leads to Decreased Motility and Membrane Integrity Related to Increased Hydrogen Peroxide and Reduced ATP Production, while the Inhibition of Glycolysis Has Less Impact on Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Plaza Davila, María; Martin Muñoz, Patricia; Tapia, Jose A.; Ortega Ferrusola, Cristina; Balao da Silva C, Carolina; Peña, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have been proposed as the major source of reactive oxygen species in somatic cells and human spermatozoa. However, no data regarding the role of mitochondrial ROS production in stallion spermatozoa are available. To shed light on the role of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in the origin of oxidative stress in stallion spermatozoa, specific inhibitors of complex I (rotenone) and III (antimycin-A) were used. Ejaculates from seven Andalusian stallions were collected and incubated in BWW media at 37°C in the presence of rotenone, antimycin-A or control vehicle. Incubation in the presence of these inhibitors reduced sperm motility and velocity (CASA analysis) (p<0.01), but the effect was more evident in the presence of rotenone (a complex I inhibitor). These inhibitors also decreased ATP content. The inhibition of complexes I and III decreased the production of reactive oxygen species (p<0.01) as assessed by flow cytometry after staining with CellRox deep red. This observation suggests that the CellRox probe mainly identifies superoxide and that superoxide production may reflect intense mitochondrial activity rather than oxidative stress. The inhibition of complex I resulted in increased hydrogen peroxide production (p<0.01). The inhibition of glycolysis resulted in reduced sperm velocities (p<0.01) without an effect on the percentage of total motile sperm. Weak and moderate (but statistically significant) positive correlations were observed between sperm motility, velocity and membrane integrity and the production of reactive oxygen species. These results indicate that stallion sperm rely heavily on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for the production of ATP for motility but also require glycolysis to maintain high velocities. These data also indicate that increased hydrogen peroxide originating in the mitochondria is a mechanism involved in stallion sperm senescence. PMID:26407142

  19. Cooperative cell motility during tandem locomotion of amoeboid cells

    PubMed Central

    Bastounis, Effie; Álvarez-González, Begoña; del Álamo, Juan C.; Lasheras, Juan C.; Firtel, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Streams of migratory cells are initiated by the formation of tandem pairs of cells connected head to tail to which other cells subsequently adhere. The mechanisms regulating the transition from single to streaming cell migration remain elusive, although several molecules have been suggested to be involved. In this work, we investigate the mechanics of the locomotion of Dictyostelium tandem pairs by analyzing the spatiotemporal evolution of their traction adhesions (TAs). We find that in migrating wild-type tandem pairs, each cell exerts traction forces on stationary sites (∼80% of the time), and the trailing cell reuses the location of the TAs of the leading cell. Both leading and trailing cells form contractile dipoles and synchronize the formation of new frontal TAs with ∼54-s time delay. Cells not expressing the lectin discoidin I or moving on discoidin I–coated substrata form fewer tandems, but the trailing cell still reuses the locations of the TAs of the leading cell, suggesting that discoidin I is not responsible for a possible chemically driven synchronization process. The migration dynamics of the tandems indicate that their TAs’ reuse results from the mechanical synchronization of the leading and trailing cells’ protrusions and retractions (motility cycles) aided by the cell–cell adhesions. PMID:26912787

  20. Effect of gingerol on colonic motility via inhibition of calcium channel currents in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zheng-Xu; Tang, Xu-Dong; Wang, Feng-Yun; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Li, Yu-Chun; Qiu, Juan-Juan; Guo, Hui-Shu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of gingerol on colonic motility and the action of L-type calcium channel currents in this process. METHODS: The distal colon was cut along the mesenteric border and cleaned with Ca2+-free physiological saline solution. Muscle strips were removed and placed in Ca2+-free physiological saline solution, which was oxygenated continuously. Longitudinal smooth muscle samples were prepared by cutting along the muscle strips and were then placed in a chamber. Mechanical contractile activities of isolated colonic segments in rats were recorded by a 4-channel physiograph. Colon smooth muscle cells were dissociated by enzymatic digestion. L-type calcium currents were recorded using the conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. RESULTS: Gingerol inhibited the spontaneous contraction of colonic longitudinal smooth muscle in a dose-dependent manner with inhibition percentages of 13.3% ± 4.1%, 43.4% ± 3.9%, 78.2% ± 3.6% and 80.5% ± 4.5% at 25 μmol/L, 50 μmol/L, 75 μmol/L and 100 μmol/L, respectively (P < 0.01). Nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, diminished the inhibition of colonic motility by gingerol. Gingerol inhibited L-type calcium channel currents in colonic longitudinal myocytes of rats. At a 75 μmol/L concentration of gingerol, the percentage of gingerol-induced inhibition was diminished by nifedipine from 77.1% ± 4.2% to 42.6% ± 3.6% (P < 0.01). Gingerol suppressed IBa in a dose-dependent manner, and the inhibition rates were 22.7% ± 2.38%, 35.77% ± 3.14%, 49.78% ± 3.48% and 53.78% ± 4.16% of control at 0 mV, respectively, at concentrations of 25 μmol/L, 50 μmol/L, 75 μmol/L and 100 μmol/L (P < 0.01). The steady-state activation curve was shifted to the right by treatment with gingerol. The value of half activation was -14.23 ± 1.12 mV in the control group and -10.56 ± 1.04 mV in the 75 μmol/L group (P < 0.05) with slope factors, Ks, of 7.16 ± 0.84 and 7.02 ± 0.93 (P < 0.05) in the control and 75

  1. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  2. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  3. Rapid Actin-Dependent Viral Motility in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Joshua C.; Brandenburg, Boerries; Hogle, James M.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2009-01-01

    During the course of an infection, viruses take advantage of a variety of mechanisms to travel in cells, ranging from diffusion within the cytosol to active transport along cytoskeletal filaments. To study viral motility within the intrinsically heterogeneous environment of the cell, we have developed a motility assay that allows for the global and unbiased analysis of tens of thousands of virus trajectories in live cells. Using this assay, we discovered that poliovirus exhibits anomalously rapid intracellular movement that was independent of microtubules, a common track for fast and directed cargo transport. Such rapid motion, with speeds of up to 5 μm/s, allows the virus particles to quickly explore all regions of the cell with the exception of the nucleus. The rapid, microtubule-independent movement of poliovirus was observed in multiple human-derived cell lines, but appeared to be cargo-specific. Other cargo, including a closely related picornavirus, did not exhibit similar motility. Furthermore, the motility is energy-dependent and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton, suggesting an active transport mechanism. The speed of this microtubule-independent but actin-dependent movement is nearly an order of magnitude faster than the fastest speeds reported for actin-dependent transport in animal cells, either by actin polymerization or by myosin motor proteins. PMID:19751669

  4. HES6 enhances the motility of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramasinghe, Caroline M; Domaschenz, Renae; Amagase, Yoko; Williamson, Daniel; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shipley, Janet; Murai, Kasumi; Jones, Philip H

    2013-01-01

    Absract: HES6, a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors, plays multiple roles in myogenesis. It is a direct target of the myogenic transcription factor MyoD and has been shown to regulate the formation of the myotome in development, myoblast cell cycle exit and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton during terminal differentiation. Here we investigate the expression and function of HES6 in rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue tumor which expresses myogenic genes but fails to differentiate into muscle. We show that HES6 is expressed at high levels in the subset of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas expressing PAX/FOXO1 fusion genes (ARMSp). Knockdown of HES6 mRNA in the ARMSp cell line RH30 reduces proliferation and cell motility. This phenotype is rescued by expression of mouse Hes6 which is insensitive to HES6 siRNA. Furthermore, expression microarray analysis indicates that the HES6 knockdown is associated with a decrease in the levels of Transgelin, (TAGLN), a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of TAGLN decreases cell motility, whilst TAGLN overexpression rescues the motility defect resulting from HES6 knockdown. These findings indicate HES6 contributes to the pathogenesis of ARMSp by enhancing both proliferation and cell motility.

  5. Attachment of motile bacterial cells to prealigned holed microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rozhok, Sergey; Fan, Zhifang; Nyamjav, Dorjderem; Liu, Chang; Mirkin, Chad A; Holz, Richard C

    2006-12-19

    Construction of biomotors is an exciting area of scientific research that holds great promise for the development of new technologies with broad potential applications in areas such as the energy industry and medicine. Herein, we demonstrate the fabrication of prealigned microarrays of motile Escherichia coli bacterial cells on SiOx substrates. To prepare these arrays, holed surfaces with a gold layer on the bottom of the holes were utilized. The attachment of bacteria to the holes was achieved via nonspecific interactions using poly-l-lysine hydrobromide (PLL). Our data suggest that a single motile bacterial cell can be selectively attached to an individual hole on a surface and bacterial cell binding can be controlled by altering the pH, with the greatest occupancy occurring at pH 7.8. Cells attached to hole arrays remained motile for at least 4 h. These data indicate that holed surface structures provide a promising footprint for the attachment of motile bacterial cells to form high-density site-specific functional bacterial microarrays. PMID:17154612

  6. Differential effects on cell motility, embryonic stem cell self-renewal and senescence by diverse Src kinase family inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tamm, Christoffer Galito, Sara Pijuan Anneren, Cecilia

    2012-02-15

    The Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (SFKs) has been shown to play an intricate role in embryonic stem (ES) cell maintenance. In the present study we have focused on the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the vastly different effects induced by various commonly used SFK inhibitors. We show that several diverse cell types, including fibroblasts completely lacking SFKs, cannot undergo mitosis in response to SU6656 and that this is caused by an unselective inhibition of Aurora kinases. In contrast, PP2 and PD173952 block motility immediately upon exposure and forces cells to grow in dense colonies. The subsequent halt in proliferation of fibroblast and epithelial cells in the center of the colonies approximately 24 h post-treatment appears to be caused by cell-to-cell contact inhibition rather than a direct effect of SFK kinase inhibition. Interestingly, in addition to generating more homogenous and dense ES cell cultures, without any diverse effect on proliferation, PP2 and PD173652 also promote ES cell self-renewal by reducing the small amount of spontaneous differentiation typically observed under standard ES cell culture conditions. These effects could not be mirrored by the use of Gleevec, a potent inhibitor of c-Abl and PDGFR kinases that are also inhibited by PP2. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor SU6656 induces senescence in mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SU6656 inhibits mitosis in a SFK-independent manner via cross-selectivity for Aurora kinases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor PP2 impairs cell motility in various cell lines, including mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ensuing impeded motility, PP2 inhibits proliferation of various cells lines except for mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitors PP2 and PD173952 impede spontaneous differentiation in standard mouse ES culture maintenance.

  7. Tyrosine kinase-mediated axial motility of basal cells revealed by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jeremy; Kim, Bongki; Hill, Eric; Visconti, Pablo; Krapf, Dario; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph; Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are generally considered to be static relative to their neighbours. Basal cells in pseudostratified epithelia display a single long cytoplasmic process that can cross the tight junction barrier to reach the lumen. Using in vivo microscopy to visualize the epididymis, a model system for the study of pseudostratified epithelia, we report here the surprising discovery that these basal cell projections—which we call axiopodia—periodically extend and retract over time. We found that axiopodia extensions and retractions follow an oscillatory pattern. This movement, which we refer to as periodic axial motility (PAM), is controlled by c-Src and MEK1/2–ERK1/2. Therapeutic inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity induces a retraction of these projections. Such unexpected cell motility may reflect a novel mechanism by which specialized epithelial cells sample the luminal environment. PMID:26868824

  8. Tyrosine kinase-mediated axial motility of basal cells revealed by intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jeremy; Kim, Bongki; Hill, Eric; Visconti, Pablo; Krapf, Dario; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph; Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are generally considered to be static relative to their neighbours. Basal cells in pseudostratified epithelia display a single long cytoplasmic process that can cross the tight junction barrier to reach the lumen. Using in vivo microscopy to visualize the epididymis, a model system for the study of pseudostratified epithelia, we report here the surprising discovery that these basal cell projections--which we call axiopodia--periodically extend and retract over time. We found that axiopodia extensions and retractions follow an oscillatory pattern. This movement, which we refer to as periodic axial motility (PAM), is controlled by c-Src and MEK1/2-ERK1/2. Therapeutic inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity induces a retraction of these projections. Such unexpected cell motility may reflect a novel mechanism by which specialized epithelial cells sample the luminal environment. PMID:26868824

  9. Effect of Boswellia serrata on intestinal motility in rodents: inhibition of diarrhoea without constipation

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Francesca; Capasso, Francesco; Capasso, Raffaele; Ascione, Valeria; Aviello, Gabriella; Longo, Rocco; Izzo, Angelo A

    2006-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that the Ayurvedic plant Boswellia serrata may be effective in reducing diarrhoea in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of a Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSE) on intestinal motility and diarrhoea in rodents. BSE depressed electrically-, acetylcholine-, and barium chloride-induced contractions in the isolated guinea-pig ileum, being more potent in inhibiting the contractions induced by acetylcholine and barium chloride. The inhibitory effect of BSE on acetylcholine-induced contractions was reduced by the L-type Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine, but not by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid, by the phosphodiesterase type IV inhibitor rolipram or by the lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton. 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid, one of the main active ingredients of B. serrata, inhibited acetylcholine-induced contractions. BSE inhibited upper gastrointestinal transit in croton oil-treated mice as well as castor oil-induced diarrhoea. However, BSE did not affect intestinal motility in control mice, both in the small and in the large intestine. It is concluded that BSE directly inhibits intestinal motility with a mechanism involving L-type Ca2+ channels. BSE prevents diarrhoea and normalizes intestinal motility in pathophysiological states without slowing the rate of transit in control animals. These results could explain, at least in part, the clinical efficacy of this Ayurvedic remedy in reducing diarrhoea in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16633355

  10. PKCα-Mediated Signals Regulate the Motile Responses of Cochlear Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Channy; Kalinec, Federico

    2015-01-01

    There is strong evidence that changes in the actin/spectrin-based cortical cytoskeleton of outer hair cells (OHCs) regulate their motile responses as well as cochlear amplification, the process that optimizes the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the mammalian inner ear. Since a RhoA/protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway is known to inhibit the actin-spectrin interaction in other cell models, we decided to investigate whether this signaling cascade could also participate in the regulation of OHC motility. We used high-speed video microscopy and confocal microscopy to explore the effects of pharmacological activation of PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, PKCδ, PKCε, and PKCζ with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and their inhibition with bisindolylmaleimide I, as well as inhibition of RhoA and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) with C3 and Y-27632, respectively. Motile responses were induced in isolated guinea pig OHCs by stimulation with an 8 V/cm external alternating electrical field as 50 Hz bursts of square wave pulses (100 ms on/off). We found that LPA increased expression of PKCα and PKCζ only, with PKCα, but not PKCζ, phosphorylating the cytoskeletal protein adducin of both Ser-726 and Thr-445. Interestingly, however, inhibition of PKCα reduced adducin phosphorylation only at Ser-726. We also determined that LPA activation of a PKCα-mediated signaling pathway simultaneously enhanced OHC electromotile amplitude and cell shortening, and facilitated RhoA/ROCK/LIMK1-mediated cofilin phosphorylation. Altogether, our results suggest that PKCα-mediated signals, probably via adducin-mediated inhibition of actin-spectrin binding and cofilin-mediated depolymerization of actin filaments, play an essential role in the homeostatic regulation of OHC motility and cochlear amplification. PMID:25954875

  11. Neuropeptide S inhibits gastrointestinal motility and increases mucosal permeability through nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Wan Saudi, Wan Salman; Halim, Md Abdul; Rudholm-Feldreich, Tobias; Gillberg, Linda; Rosenqvist, Evelina; Tengholm, Anders; Sundbom, Magnus; Karlbom, Urban; Näslund, Erik; Webb, Dominic-Luc; Sjöblom, Markus; Hellström, Per M

    2015-10-15

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) receptor (NPSR1) polymorphisms are associated with enteral dysmotility and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study investigated the role of NPS in conjunction with nitrergic mechanisms in the regulation of intestinal motility and mucosal permeability. In rats, small intestinal myoelectric activity and luminal pressure changes in small intestine and colon, along with duodenal permeability, were studied. In human intestine, NPS and NPSR1 were localized by immunostaining. Pre- and postprandial plasma NPS was measured by ELISA in healthy and active IBD humans. Effects and mechanisms of NPS were studied in human intestinal muscle strips. In rats, NPS 100-4,000 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) had effects on the small intestine and colon. Low doses of NPS increased myoelectric spiking (P < 0.05). Higher doses reduced spiking and prolonged the cycle length of the migrating myoelectric complex, reduced intraluminal pressures (P < 0.05-0.01), and increased permeability (P < 0.01) through NO-dependent mechanisms. In human intestine, NPS localized at myenteric nerve cell bodies and fibers. NPSR1 was confined to nerve cell bodies. Circulating NPS in humans was tenfold below the ∼0.3 nmol/l dissociation constant (Kd) of NPSR1, with no difference between healthy and IBD subjects. In human intestinal muscle strips precontracted by bethanechol, NPS 1-1,000 nmol/l induced NO-dependent muscle relaxation (P < 0.05) that was sensitive also to tetrodotoxin (P < 0.01). In conclusion, NPS inhibits motility and increases permeability in neurocrine fashion acting through NO in the myenteric plexus in rats and humans. Aberrant signaling and upregulation of NPSR1 could potentially exacerbate dysmotility and hyperpermeability by local mechanisms in gastrointestinal functional and inflammatory reactions. PMID:26206857

  12. Chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and diisopropylfluorophosphate inhibit kinesin-dependent microtubule motility

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, Debra A. . E-mail: dgearhar@mcg.edu; Sickles, Dale W.; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Prendergast, Mark A.; Terry, Alvin V.

    2007-01-01

    Diisopropylfluorophosphate, originally developed as a chemical warfare agent, is structurally similar to nerve agents, and chlorpyrifos has extensive worldwide use as an agricultural pesticide. While inhibition of cholinesterases underlies the acute toxicity of these organophosphates, we previously reported impaired axonal transport in the sciatic nerves from rats treated chronically with subthreshold doses of chlorpyrifos. Those data indicate that chlorpyrifos (and/or its active metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon) might directly affect the function of kinesin and/or microtubules-the principal proteins that mediate anterograde axonal transport. The current report describes in vitro assays to assess the concentration-dependent effects of chlorpyrifos (0-10 {mu}M), chlorpyrifos-oxon (0-10 {mu}M), and diisopropylfluorophosphate (0-0.59 nM) on kinesin-dependent microtubule motility. Preincubating bovine brain microtubules with the organophosphates did not alter kinesin-mediated microtubule motility. In contrast, preincubation of bovine brain kinesin with diisopropylfluorophosphate, chlorpyrifos, or chlorpyrifos-oxon produced a concentration-dependent increase in the number of locomoting microtubules that detached from the kinesin-coated glass cover slip. Our data suggest that the organophosphates-chlorpyrifos-oxon, chlorpyrifos, and diisopropylfluorophosphate-directly affect kinesin, thereby disrupting kinesin-dependent transport on microtubules. Kinesin-dependent movement of vesicles, organelles, and other cellular components along microtubules is fundamental to the organization of all eukaryotic cells, especially in neurons where organelles and proteins synthesized in the cell body must move down long axons to pre-synaptic sites in nerve terminals. We postulate that disruption of kinesin-dependent intracellular transport could account for some of the long-term effects of organophosphates on the peripheral and central nervous system.

  13. Endothelial cell motility, coordination and pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Czirok, Andras

    2013-01-01

    How vascular networks assemble is a fundamental problem of developmental biology that also has medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how can tissue level structures be controlled through cell behavior patterns like motility and adhesion that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes? We discuss the various ideas that have been proposed as mechanisms for vascular network assembly: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and multicellular sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. All of these processes yield emergent patterns, thus endothelial cells can form an interconnected structure autonomously, without guidance from an external pre-pattern. PMID:23857825

  14. Cell Motility Resulting form Spontaneous Polymerization Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Karsten

    2014-03-01

    The crawling of living cells on solid substrates is often driven by the actin cytoskeleton, a network of structurally polar filamentous proteins that is intrinsically driven by the hydrolysis of ATP. How cells organize their actin network during crawling is still poorly understood. A possible general mechanism underlying actin organization has been offered by the observation of spontaneous actin polymerization waves in various different cell types. We use a theoretical approach to investigate the possible role of spontaneous actin waves on cell crawling. To this end, we develop a meanfield framework for studying spatiotemporal aspects of actin assembly dynamics, which helped to identify possible origins of self-organized actin waves. The impact of these waves on cell crawling is then investigated by using a phase-field approach to confine the actin network to a cellular domain. We find that spontaneous actin waves can lead to directional or amoeboidal crawling. In the latter case, the cell performs a random walk. Within our deterministic framework, this behavior is due to complex spiral waves inside the cell. Finally, we compare the seemingly random motion of our model cells to the dynamics of cells of the human immune system. These cells patrol the body in search for infected cells and we discuss possible implications of our theory for the search process' efficiency. Work was funded by the DFG through KR3430/1, GK1276, and SFB 1027.

  15. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the ‘molecular clutch’ description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of major sperm protein, which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton.

  16. Where to Go: Breaking the Symmetry in Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration in the “correct” direction is pivotal for many biological processes. Although most work is devoted to its molecular mechanisms, the cell’s preference for one direction over others, thus overcoming intrinsic random motility, epitomizes a profound principle that underlies all complex systems: the choice of one axis, in structure or motion, from a uniform or symmetric set of options. Explaining directional motility by an external chemo-attractant gradient does not solve but only shifts the problem of causation: whence the gradient? A new study in PLOS Biology shows cell migration in a self-generated gradient, offering an opportunity to take a broader look at the old dualism of extrinsic instruction versus intrinsic symmetry-breaking in cell biology. PMID:27196433

  17. Cdc42 is required for EGF-stimulated protrusion and motility in MTLn3 carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Sibai, Mirvat; Nalbant, Peri; Pang, Huan; Flinn, Rory J.; Sarmiento, Corina; Macaluso, Frank; Cammer, Michael; Condeelis, John S.; Hahn, Klaus M.; Backer, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cdc42 plays a central role in regulating the actin cytoskeleton and maintaining cell polarity. Here, we show that Cdc42 is crucial for epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated protrusion in MTLn3 carcinoma cells. When stimulated with EGF, carcinoma cells showed a rapid increase in activated Cdc42 that is primarily localized to the protruding edge of the cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cdc42 expression caused a decrease in EGF-stimulated protrusion and reduced cell motility in time-lapse studies. These changes were correlated with a decrease in barbed-end formation and Arp2/3 localization at the cell edge, and a marked defect in actin filament branching, as revealed by rotary-shadowing scanning electron microscopy. Upstream of Arp2/3, Cdc42 knockdown inhibited EGF-stimulated activation of PI 3-kinase at early (within 1 minute) but not late (within 3 minutes) time points. Membrane targeting of N-WASP, WAVE2 and IRSp53 were also inhibited. Effects on WAVE2 were not owing to Rac1 inhibition, because WAVE2 recruitment is unaffected by Rac1 knockdown. Our data suggest that Cdc42 activation is crucial for the regulation of actin polymerization in carcinoma cells, and required for both EGF-stimulated protrusion and cell motility independently of effects on Rac. PMID:17855387

  18. Activation of microbubbles by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound enhances the cytotoxicity of curcumin involving apoptosis induction and cell motility inhibition in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixiang; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xiyang; Hu, Jianmin; Liu, Yichen; Wang, Xiaobing; Liu, Quanhong

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound and microbubbles-mediated drug delivery has become a promising strategy to promote drug delivery and its therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this research was to assess the effects of microbubbles (MBs)-combined low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LPUS) on the delivery and cytotoxicity of curcumin (Cur) to human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Under the experimental condition, MBs raised the level of acoustic cavitation and enhanced plasma membrane permeability; and cellular uptake of Cur was notably improved by LPUS-MBs treatment, aggravating Cur-induced MDA-MB-231 cells death. The combined treatment markedly caused more obvious changes of cell morphology, F-actin cytoskeleton damage and cell migration inhibition. Our results demonstrated that combination of MBs and LPUS may be an efficient strategy for improving anti-tumor effect of Cur, suggesting a potential effective method for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:27245953

  19. Possible roles of the endocytic cycle in cell motility.

    PubMed

    Traynor, David; Kay, Robert R

    2007-07-15

    Starving, highly motile Dictyostelium cells maintain an active endocytic cycle, taking up their surface about every 11 minutes. Cell motility depends on a functional NSF (N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor) protein--also essential for endocytosis and membrane trafficking generally--and we, therefore, investigated possible ways in which the endocytic cycle might be required for cell movement. First, NSF, and presumably membrane trafficking, are not required for the initial polarization of the leading edge in a cyclic-AMP gradient. Second, we can detect no evidence for membrane flow from the leading edge, as photobleached or photoactivated marks in the plasma membrane move forward roughly in step with the leading edge, rather than backwards from it. Third, we find that the surface area of a cell--measured from confocal reconstructions--constantly fluctuates during movement as it projects pseudopodia and otherwise changes shape; increases of 20-30% can often occur over a few minutes. These fluctuations cannot be explained by reciprocal changes in filopodial surface area and they substantially exceed the 2-3% by which membranes can stretch. We propose that the endocytic cycle has a key function in motility by allowing adjustment of cell surface area to match changes in shape and that, without this function, movement is severely impaired. PMID:17606987

  20. Stathmin Activity Influences Sarcoma Cell Shape, Motility, and Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Belletti, Barbara; Nicoloso, Milena S.; Schiappacassi, Monica; Berton, Stefania; Lovat, Francesca; Wolf, Katarina; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; D'Andrea, Sara; Zucchetto, Antonella; Friedl, Peter; Colombatti, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    The balanced activity of microtubule-stabilizing and -destabilizing proteins determines the extent of microtubule dynamics, which is implicated in many cellular processes, including adhesion, migration, and morphology. Among the destabilizing proteins, stathmin is overexpressed in different human malignancies and has been recently linked to the regulation of cell motility. The observation that stathmin was overexpressed in human recurrent and metastatic sarcomas prompted us to investigate stathmin contribution to tumor local invasiveness and distant dissemination. We found that stathmin stimulated cell motility in and through the extracellular matrix (ECM) in vitro and increased the metastatic potential of sarcoma cells in vivo. On contact with the ECM, stathmin was negatively regulated by phosphorylation. Accordingly, a less phosphorylable stathmin point mutant impaired ECM-induced microtubule stabilization and conferred a higher invasive potential, inducing a rounded cell shape coupled with amoeboid-like motility in three-dimensional matrices. Our results indicate that stathmin plays a significant role in tumor metastasis formation, a finding that could lead to exploitation of stathmin as a target of new antimetastatic drugs. PMID:18305103

  1. RHOA and PRKCZ control different aspects of cell motility in pancreatic cancer metastatic clones

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Our understanding of the mechanism regulating pancreatic cancer metastatic phenotype is limited. We analyzed the role of RHOA and PRKCZ in the motility attitude of two subclones of the pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line SUIT-2 (S2), with different in vivo metastatic potential in nude mice: S2-m with a low metastatic potential and highly metastatic S2-CP9 using RHOA and PRKCZ cell-permeable inhibitory peptides. Methods Adhesion assays, cell permeable peptides, RHOA activity assay, western blotting Results When used in combination cell-permeable inhibitory peptides partially inhibited cell adhesion by about 50% in clone S2-CP9. In clone S2-m, the effect was limited to 15% inhibition. In a wound healing assay, S2-CP9 was sensitive only to treatment with the combination of both RHOA and PRKCZ inhibitory peptides. Conversely, S2-m was unable to migrate toward both ends of the wound in basal conditions. Migration of cells through a membrane with 8 μm pores was completely abolished in both clones by individual treatment with RHOA and PRKCZ inhibitory peptides. Conclusion Herein, we demonstrate a critical role for RHOA and PRKCZ in the regulation of different aspects of cell motility of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and demonstrate the need to inhibit both pathways to obtain a functionally relevant effect in most assays. These results indicate that RHOA and PRKCZ, and their downstream effectors, can represent important pharmacological targets that could potentially control the highly metastatic attitude of PDAC. PMID:20236512

  2. STIM1 overexpression promotes colorectal cancer progression, cell motility and COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-Y; Sun, J; Huang, M-Y; Wang, Y-S; Hou, M-F; Sun, Y; He, H; Krishna, N; Chiu, S-J; Lin, S; Yang, S; Chang, W-C

    2015-08-13

    Tumor metastasis is the major cause of death among cancer patients, with >90% of cancer-related death attributable to the spreading of metastatic cells to secondary organs. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is the predominant Ca(2+) entry mechanism in most cancer cells, and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor for store-operated channels. Here we reported that the STIM1 was overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. STIM1 overexpression in CRC was significantly associated with tumor size, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis status and serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen. Furthermore, ectopic expression of STIM1 promoted CRC cell motility, while depletion of STIM1 with short hairpin RNA inhibited CRC cell migration. Our data further suggested that STIM1 promoted CRC cell migration through increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Importantly, ectopically expressed COX-2 or exogenous PGE2 were able to rescue migration defect in STIM1 knockdown CRC cells, and inhibition of COX-2 with ibuprofen and indomethacin abrogated STIM1-mediated CRC cell motility. In short, our data provided clinicopathological significance for STIM1 and SOCE in CRC progression, and implicated a role for COX-2 in STIM1-mediated CRC metastasis. Our studies also suggested a new approach to inhibit STIM1-mediated metastasis with COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:25381814

  3. Laminin-332 Cleavage by Matriptase Alters Motility Parameters of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Manisha; Potdar, Alka A.; Yamashita, Hironobu; Weidow, Brandy; Cummings, Peter T.; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Quaranta, Vito

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Matriptase, a type II transmembrane serine protease, has been linked to initiation and promotion of epidermal carcinogenesis in a murine model, suggesting that deregulation of its role in epithelia contributes to transformation. In human prostate cancer, matriptase expression correlates with progression. It is therefore of interest to determine how matriptase may contribute to epithelial neoplastic progression. One approach for studying this is to identify potential matriptase substrates involved in epithelial integrity and/or transformation like the extracellular matrix macromolecule, laminin-332 (Ln-332), which is found in the basement membrane of many epithelia, including prostate. Proteolytic processing of Ln-332 regulates cell motility of both normal and transformed cells, which has implications in cancer progression. METHODS In vitro cleavage experiments were performed with purified Ln-332 protein and matriptase. Western blotting, enzyme inhibition assays, and mass spectrometry were used to confirm cleavage events. Matriptase overexpressing LNCaP prostate cancer cells were generated and included in Transwell migration assays and single cell motility assays, along with other prostate cells. RESULTS We report that matriptase proteolytically cleaves Ln-332 in the β3 chain. Substrate specificity was confirmed by blocking cleavage with the matriptase inhibitor, Kunitz domain-1. Transwell migration assays showed that DU145 cell motility was significantly enhanced when plated on matriptase-cleaved Ln-332. Similarly, Transwell migration of matriptase-overexpressing LNCaP cells was significantly increased on Ln-332 and, as determined by live single-cell microscopy, two motility parameters of this cell line, speed and directional persistence, were also higher. CONCLUSIONS Proteolytic processing of Ln-332 by matriptase enhances speed and directional persistence of prostate cancer cells. PMID:20672321

  4. The Influence of Electric Field and Confinement on Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Ja; Samorajski, Justin; Kreimer, Rachel; Searson, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of cells to sense and respond to endogenous electric fields is important in processes such as wound healing, development, and nerve regeneration. In cell culture, many epithelial and endothelial cell types respond to an electric field of magnitude similar to endogenous electric fields by moving preferentially either parallel or antiparallel to the field vector, a process known as galvanotaxis. Here we report on the influence of dc electric field and confinement on the motility of fibroblast cells using a chip-based platform. From analysis of cell paths we show that the influence of electric field on motility is much more complex than simply imposing a directional bias towards the cathode or anode. The cell velocity, directedness, as well as the parallel and perpendicular components of the segments along the cell path are dependent on the magnitude of the electric field. Forces in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the electric field are in competition with one another in a voltage-dependent manner, which ultimately govern the trajectories of the cells in the presence of an electric field. To further investigate the effects of cell reorientation in the presence of a field, cells are confined within microchannels to physically prohibit the alignment seen in 2D environment. Interestingly, we found that confinement results in an increase in cell velocity both in the absence and presence of an electric field compared to migration in 2D. PMID:23555674

  5. Thrombospondin-1 Modulates Actin Filament Remodeling and Cell Motility in Mouse Mammary Tumor cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ndishabandi, Dorothy; Duquette, Cameron; Billah, Ghita El-Moatassim; Reyes, Millys; Duquette, Mark; Lawler, Jack; Kazerounian, Shideh

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the secretion of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) by activated stromal cells and its accumulation in the tumor microenvironment during dysplasia inhibits primary tumor growth through inhibition of angiogenesis. This inhibitory function of TSP-1 is actuated either by inhibiting MMP9 activation and the release of VEGF from extracellular matrix or by an interaction with CD36 on the surface of endothelial cells resulting in an increase in apoptosis. In contrast, several published articles have also shown that as tumor cells become more invasive and enter the early stage of carcinoma, they up-regulate TSP-1 expression, which may promote invasion and migration. In our in vivo studies using the polyoma middle T antigen (PyT) transgenic mouse model of breast cancer, we observed that the absence of TSP-1 significantly increased the growth of primary tumors, but delayed metastasis to the lungs. In this study, we propose a mechanism for the promigratory function of TSP-1 in mouse mammary tumor cells in vitro. We demonstrate the correlations between expression of TSP-1 and its receptor integrin α3β1, which is considered a promigratory protein in cancer cells. In addition we propose that binding of TSP-1 to integrin α3β1 is important for mediating actin filament polymerization and therefore, cell motility. These findings can help explain the dual functionality of TSP-1 in cancer progression. PMID:26273699

  6. Collective cell motility promotes chemotactic prowess and resistance to chemorepulsion.

    PubMed

    Malet-Engra, Gema; Yu, Weimiao; Oldani, Amanda; Rey-Barroso, Javier; Gov, Nir S; Scita, Giorgio; Dupré, Loïc

    2015-01-19

    Collective cell migration is a widespread biological phenomenon, whereby groups of highly coordinated, adherent cells move in a polarized fashion. This migration mode is a hallmark of tissue morphogenesis during development and repair and of solid tumor dissemination. In addition to circulating as solitary cells, lymphoid malignancies can assemble into tissues as multicellular aggregates. Whether malignant lymphocytes are capable of coordinating their motility in the context of chemokine gradients is, however, unknown. Here, we show that, upon exposure to CCL19 or CXCL12 gradients, malignant B and T lymphocytes assemble into clusters that migrate directionally and display a wider chemotactic sensitivity than individual cells. Physical modeling recapitulates cluster motility statistics and shows that intracluster cell cohesion results in noise reduction and enhanced directionality. Quantitative image analysis reveals that cluster migration runs are periodically interrupted by transitory rotation and random phases that favor leader cell turnover. Additionally, internalization of CCR7 in leader cells is accompanied by protrusion retraction, loss of polarity, and the ensuing replacement by new leader cells. These mechanisms ensure sustained forward migration and resistance to chemorepulsion, a behavior of individual cells exposed to steep CCL19 gradients that depends on CCR7 endocytosis. Thus, coordinated cluster dynamics confer distinct chemotactic properties, highlighting unexpected features of lymphoid cell migration. PMID:25578904

  7. Cten Is Targeted by Kras Signalling to Regulate Cell Motility in the Colon and Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghamdi, Saleh; Albasri, Abdulkader; Cachat, Julien; Ibrahem, Salih; Muhammad, Belal A.; Jackson, Darryl; Nateri, Abdolrahman S.; Kindle, Karin B.; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    CTEN/TNS4 is an oncogene in colorectal cancer (CRC) which enhances cell motility although the mechanism of Cten regulation is unknown. We found an association between high Cten expression and KRAS/BRAF mutation in a series of CRC cell lines (p = 0.03) and hypothesised that Kras may regulate Cten. To test this, Kras was knocked-down (using small interfering (si)RNA) in CRC cell lines SW620 and DLD1 (high Cten expressors and mutant for KRAS). In each cell line, Kras knockdown was mirrored by down-regulation of Cten Since Kras signals through Braf, we tested the effect of Kras knockdown in CRC cell line Colo205 (which shows high Cten expression and is mutant for BRAF but wild type for KRAS). Cten levels were unaffected by Kras knockdown whilst Braf knockdown resulted in reduced Cten expression suggesting that Kras signals via Braf to regulate Cten. Quantification of Cten mRNA and protein analysis following proteasome inhibition suggested that regulation was of Cten transcription. Kras knockdown inhibited cell motility. To test whether this could be mediated through Cten, SW620 cells were co-transfected with Kras specific siRNAs and a Cten expression vector. Restoring Cten expression was able to restore cell motility despite Kras knockdown (transwell migration and wounding assay, p<0.001 for both). Since KRAS is mutated in many cancers, we investigated whether this relationship could be demonstrated in other tumour models. The experiments were repeated in the pancreatic cancer cell lines Colo357 & PSN-1(both high Cten expressors and mutant for KRAS). In both cell lines, Kras was shown to regulate Cten and forced expression of Cten was able to rescue loss of cell motility following Kras knockdown in PSN-1 (transwell migration assay, p<0.001). We conclude that, in the colon and pancreas, Cten is a downstream target of Kras and may be a mechanism through which Kras regulates of cell motility. PMID:21698197

  8. HDAC6 Modulates Cell Motility by Altering the Acetylation Level of Cortactin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Yuan, Zhigang; Zhang, Yingtao; Yong, Sarah; Salas-Burgos, Alexis; Koomen, John; Olashaw, Nancy; Parsons, J. Thomas; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Dent, Sharon R.; Yao, Tso-Pang; Lane, William S.; Seto, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Summary Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a tubulin-specific deacetylase that regulates microtubule-dependent cell movement. In this study, we identify the F-actin-binding protein, cortactin, as a HDAC6 substrate. We demonstrate that HDAC6 binds cortactin and that overexpression of HDAC6 leads to hypoacetylation of cortactin, while inhibition of HDAC6 activity leads to cortactin hyperacetylation. HDAC6 alters the ability of cortactin to bind F-actin by modulating a “charge patch” in its repeat region. Introduction of charge-preserving or charge-neutralizing mutations in this cortactin repeat region correlates with the gain or loss of F-actin binding ability, respectively. Cells expressing a charge-neutralizing cortactin mutant were less motile than control cells or cells expressing a charge-preserving mutant. These findings suggest that, in addition to its role in microtubule-dependent cell motility, HDAC6 influences actin-dependent cell motility by altering the acetylation status of cortactin, which, in turn, changes the F-actin binding activity of cortactin. PMID:17643370

  9. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Charles M.; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-01-01

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction–diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html. PMID:22675164

  10. Membrane tension and cytoskeleton organization in cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sens, Pierre; Plastino, Julie

    2015-07-01

    Cell membrane shape changes are important for many aspects of normal biological function, such as tissue development, wound healing and cell division and motility. Various disease states are associated with deregulation of how cells move and change shape, including notably tumor initiation and cancer cell metastasis. Cell motility is powered, in large part, by the controlled assembly and disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Much of this dynamic happens in close proximity to the plasma membrane due to the fact that actin assembly factors are membrane-bound, and thus actin filaments are generally oriented such that their growth occurs against or near the membrane. For a long time, the membrane was viewed as a relatively passive scaffold for signaling. However, results from the last five years show that this is not the whole picture, and that the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are intimately linked to the mechanics of the cell membrane. In this review, we summarize recent findings concerning the role of plasma membrane mechanics in cell cytoskeleton dynamics and architecture, showing that the cell membrane is not just an envelope or a barrier for actin assembly, but is a master regulator controlling cytoskeleton dynamics and cell polarity.

  11. Electroacupuncture at ST25 inhibits jejunal motility: Role of sympathetic pathways and TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhi; Zhang, Na; Lu, Chun-Xia; Pang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Kai-Yue; Jiang, Jing-Feng; Zhu, Bing; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA) at ST25 affects jejunal motility in vivo and if so, whether a sympathetic pathway is involved. METHODS: Jejunal motility was assessed using a manometric balloon placed in the jejunum approximately about 3-5 cm away from the suspensory ligament of the duodenum in anesthetized animals. The effects of EA at ST25 were measured in male Sprague-Dawley rats, some of which were treated with propranolol or clenbuterol (EA intensities: 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mA), and in male transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) (capsaicin receptor) knockout mice (EA intensities: 1, 2, and 4 mA). RESULTS: Anesthetized rats exhibited three types of fasting jejunal motor patterns (types A, B, and C), and only type C rats responded to EA stimulation. In type C rats, EA at ST25 significantly suppressed the motor activity of the jejunum in an intensity-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of EA was weakened by propranolol (β adrenoceptor antagonist) and disappeared with clenbuterol (β adrenoceptor agonist) induced inhibition of motility, suggesting that the effect of EA on motility is mediated via a sympathetic pathway. Compared with wild-type mice, EA at ST25 was less effective in TRPV1 knockout mice, suggesting that this multi-modal sensor channel participates in the mechanism. CONCLUSION: EA at ST25 was found to inhibit jejunal motility in an intensity-dependent manner, via a mechanism in which sympathetic nerves and TRPV1 receptors play an important role. PMID:26855542

  12. Homotypic RANK signaling differentially regulates proliferation, motility and cell survival in osteosarcoma and mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Beristain, Alexander G; Narala, Swami R; Di Grappa, Marco A; Khokha, Rama

    2012-02-15

    RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand) is a crucial cytokine for regulating diverse biological systems such as innate immunity, bone homeostasis and mammary gland differentiation, operating through activation of its cognate receptor RANK. In these normal physiological processes, RANKL signals through paracrine and/or heterotypic mechanisms where its expression and function is tightly controlled. Numerous pathologies involve RANKL deregulation, such as bone loss, inflammatory diseases and cancer, and aberrant RANK expression has been reported in bone cancer. Here, we investigated the significance of RANK in tumor cells with a particular emphasis on homotypic signaling. We selected RANK-positive mouse osteosarcoma and RANK-negative preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and subjected them to loss- and gain-of-RANK function analyses. By examining a spectrum of tumorigenic properties, we demonstrate that RANK homotypic signaling has a negligible effect on cell proliferation, but promotes cell motility and anchorage-independent growth of osteosarcoma cells and preosteoblasts. By contrast, establishment of RANK signaling in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial NMuMG cells promotes their proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, but not motility. Furthermore, RANK activation initiates multiple signaling pathways beyond its canonical target, NF-κB. Among these, biochemical inhibition reveals that Erk1/2 is dominant and crucial for the promotion of anchorage-independent survival and invasion of osteoblastic cells, as well as the proliferation of mammary epithelial cells. Thus, RANK signaling functionally contributes to key tumorigenic properties through a cell-autonomous homotypic mechanism. These data also identify the likely inherent differences between epithelial and mesenchymal cell responsiveness to RANK activation. PMID:22421365

  13. Membrane tension feedback on shape and motility of eukaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Benjamin; Aranson, Igor S.; Ziebert, Falko

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a phase field model of a single cell crawling on a substrate, we investigate how the properties of the cell membrane affect the shape and motility of the cell. Since the membrane influences the cell dynamics on multiple levels and provides a nontrivial feedback, we consider the following fundamental interactions: (i) the reduction of the actin polymerization rate by membrane tension; (ii) area conservation of the cell's two-dimensional cross-section vs. conservation of the circumference (i.e. membrane inextensibility); and (iii) the contribution from the membrane's bending energy to the shape and integrity of the cell. As in experiments, we investigate two pertinent observables - the cell's velocity and its aspect ratio. We find that the most important effect is the feedback of membrane tension on the actin polymerization. Bending rigidity has only minor effects, visible mostly in dynamic reshaping events, as exemplified by collisions of the cell with an obstacle.

  14. Up-regulation of neogenin-1 increases cell proliferation and motility in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Jun; Wang, Yuan-Guo; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu; La, Sun-Hyuk; Choi, Il Ju; Irimura, Tatsuro; Ro, Jae Y; Bresalier, Robert S; Chun, Kyung-Hee

    2014-05-30

    Although elevated expression of neogenin-1 has been detected in human gastric cancer tissue, its role in gastric tumorigenesis remains unclear due to the lack of neogenin-1 studies in cancer. Therefore, we demonstrated here the function and regulatory mechanism of neogenin-1 in gastric cancer. Neogenin-1 ablation decreased proliferation and migration of gastric cancer cells, whereas its over-expression reversed these effects. Xenografted analyses using gastric cancer cells displayed statistically significant inhibition of tumor growth by neogenin-1 depletion. Interestingly, galectin-3 interacted with HSF-1 directly, which facilitated nuclear-localization and binding on neogenin-1 promoter to drive its transcription and gastric cancer cell motility. The galectin-3-increased gastric cancer cell motility was down-regulated by HSF-1 depletion. Moreover, the parallel expression patterns of galectin-3 and neogenin-1, as well as those of HSF-1 and neogenin-1, were detected in the malignant tissues of gastric cancer patients. Taken together, high-expression of neogenin-1 promotes gastric cancer proliferation and motility and its expression is regulated by HSF-1 and galectin-3 interaction. In addition, we propose further studies for neogenin-1 and its associated pathways to provide them as a proper target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:24930499

  15. Lattice-free models of directed cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Carolyn; Plank, Michael J.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Directed cell migration often occurs when individual cells move in response to an external chemical stimulus. Cells can respond by moving in either the direction of increasing (chemoattraction) or decreasing (chemorepulsion) concentration. Many previous models of directed cell migration use a lattice-based framework where agents undergo a lattice-based random walk and the direction of nearest-neighbour motility events is biased in a preferred direction. Such lattice-based models can lead to unrealistic configurations of agents, since the agents always move on an artificial lattice structure which is never observed experimentally. We present a lattice-free model of directed cell migration that incorporates two key features. First, agents move on a continuous domain, with the possibility that there is some preferred direction of motion. Second, to be consistent with experimental observations, we enforce a crowding mechanism so that motility events that would lead to agent overlap are not permitted. We compare simulation data from the new lattice-free model with a more traditional lattice-based model. To provide additional insight into the lattice-free model, we construct an approximate conservation statement which corresponds to a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation in the continuum limit. The solution of this mean-field model compares well with averaged data from the individual-based model.

  16. Loss of SNAP29 Impairs Endocytic Recycling and Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, Debora; Lugassy, Yevgenia; Sprecher, Eli; Horowitz, Mia

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular membrane trafficking depends on the ordered formation and consumption of transport intermediates and requires that membranes fuse with each other in a tightly regulated and highly specific manner. Membrane anchored SNAREs assemble into SNARE complexes that bring membranes together to promote fusion. SNAP29 is a ubiquitous synaptosomal-associated SNARE protein. It interacts with several syntaxins and with the EH domain containing protein EHD1. Loss of functional SNAP29 results in CEDNIK syndrome (Cerebral Dysgenesis, Neuropathy, Ichthyosis and Keratoderma). Using fibroblast cell lines derived from CEDNIK patients, we show that SNAP29 mediates endocytic recycling of transferrin and β1-integrin. Impaired β1-integrin recycling affected cell motility, as reflected by changes in cell spreading and wound healing. No major changes were detected in exocytosis of VSVG protein from the Golgi apparatus, although the Golgi system acquired a dispersed morphology in SNAP29 deficient cells. Our results emphasize the importance of SNAP29 mediated membrane fusion in endocytic recycling and consequently, in cell motility. PMID:20305790

  17. Cadmium inhibits motility, activities of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase and axonemal dynein-ATPase of human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, R; Botana, D; Piñero, S; Proverbio, F; Marín, R

    2016-05-01

    Cd(2+) has been associated with decreased sperm motility in individuals exposed to this element, such as smokers. Among other factors, this lowered motility could be the result of inhibition exerted by Cd(2+) on the activity of the sperm ATPases associated with sperm motility. In this study, we evaluated the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase and the axonemal dynein-ATPase activities as well as sperm motility, in the presence of different free Cd(2+) concentrations in the assay media. It was found that spermatozoa incubated for 5 h in a medium containing 25 nm free Cd(2+) showed a significant inhibition of progressive motility, reaching values even lower at higher Cd(2+) concentrations. In addition, it was found that the activity of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase reached maximal inhibition at 50 nm free Cd(2+), with a K50% inhibition of 18.3 nm free Cd(2+). The dynein-ATPase activity was maximally inhibited by 25 nm free Cd(2+) in the assay medium, with a K50% inhibition of 11.3 nm Cd(2+). Our results indicate that the decreased activity of the sperm ATPases might have a critical importance in the biochemical mechanisms underlying the decreased sperm motility of individuals exposed to Cd(2+). PMID:26259968

  18. A diterpenoid from Salvia cinnabarina inhibits mouse intestinal motility in vivo.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Raffaele; Izzo, Angelo A; Capasso, Francesco; Romussi, Giovanni; Bisio, Angela; Mascolo, Nicola

    2004-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of 3,4 secoisopimara-4(18),7,15-trien-3-oic acid (compound 1) isolated from the aerial parts of Salvia cinnabarina, on upper gastrointestinal transit in mice in vivo. Compound 1 (10 - 100 mg/kg, i. p.) dose-dependently delayed gastrointestinal motility. Pretreatment ( i. p.) of mice with hexamethonium (10 mg/kg), naloxone (2 mg/kg), N(G)-nitro- L-arginine-methyl ester ( L-NAME) (25 mg/kg) or yohimbine (1 mg/kg) did not modify the inhibitory effect of compound 1 (50 mg/kg). However, the L-type Ca (2+) channel verapamil (5 mg/kg, i. p.) significantly reduced the antimotility effect of compound 1 (50 mg/kg). These results suggest that compound 1 inhibits gastrointestinal motility in mice. The effect could involve, at least in part, L-type Ca (2+) channels. PMID:15095158

  19. Extracellular Vesicles from Vascular Endothelial Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation and Motility of Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurachi, Masashi; Mikuni, Masahiko; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    We previously examined the effect of brain microvascular endothelial cell (MVEC) transplantation on rat white matter infarction, and found that MVEC transplantation promoted remyelination of demyelinated axons in the infarct region and reduced apoptotic death of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). We also found that the conditioned medium (CM) from cultured MVECs inhibited apoptosis of cultured OPCs. In this study, we examined contribution of extracellular vesicles (EVs) contained in the CM to its inhibitory effect on OPC apoptosis. Removal of EVs from the CM by ultracentrifugation reduced its inhibitory effect on OPC apoptosis. To confirm whether EVs derived from MVECs are taken up by cultured OPCs, we labeled EVs with PKH67, a fluorescent dye, and added them to OPC cultures. Many vesicular structures labeled with PKH67 were found within OPCs immediately after their addition. Next we examined the effect of MVEC-derived EVs on OPC behaviors. After 2 days in culture with EVs, there was significantly less pyknotic and more BrdU-positive OPCs when compared to control. We also examined the effect of EVs on motility of OPCs. OPCs migrated longer in the presence of EVs when compared to control. To examine whether these effects on cultured OPCs are shared by EVs from endothelial cells, we prepared EVs from conditioned media of several types of endothelial cells, and tested their effects on cultured OPCs. EVs from all types of endothelial cells we examined reduced apoptosis of OPCs and promoted their motility. Identification of the molecules contained in EVs from endothelial cells may prove helpful for establishment of effective therapies for demyelinating diseases. PMID:27403742

  20. Motile activities of Dictyostelium discoideum differ from those in Protista or vertebrate animal cells.

    PubMed

    Waligórska, Agnieszka; Wianecka-Skoczeń, Magdalena; Korohoda, Włodzimierz

    2007-01-01

    Cell movement in the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum has been examined in media differing in monovalent cation concentration (i.e. Na+ and K+). Under isotonic or even slightly hypertonic conditions, the cells move equally well in solutions in which either potassium or sodium ions dominate. However, in strongly hypertonic solutions the amoebae showed motility in a 2% potassium chloride solution, but remained motionless in a hypertonic 2% sodium chloride solution. This inhibition of D. discoideum amoebae movement in a hypertonic sodium chloride solution was fully reversible. Such behaviour corresponds to that of plant, fungi, and some invertebrate animal cells rather than protozoan or vertebrate cells. These observations suggest that studies using D. discoideum as a model for cell motility in vertebrate animal tissue cells should be considered with caution, and would seem to confirm the classification of cellular slime moulds as related rather to Fungi than to Protista. This also shows that the cell membrane models should consider the asymmetry in sodium/potassium ion concentrations found in vertebrate animal cells as one of various possibilities. PMID:18274250

  1. A genetically-encoded photoactivatable Rac controls the motility of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi I.; Frey, Daniel; Lungu, Oana I.; Jaehrig, Angelika; Schlichting, Ilme; Kuhlman, Brian; Hahn, Klaus M.

    2009-01-01

    The precise spatio-temporal dynamics of protein activity are often critical in determining cell behaviour, yet for most proteins they remain poorly understood; it remains difficult to manipulate protein activity at precise times and places within living cells. Protein activity has been controlled by light, through protein derivatization with photocleavable moieties1 or using photoreactive small molecule ligands2. However, this requires use of toxic UV wavelengths, activation is irreversible, and/or cell loading is accomplished via disruption of the cell membrane (i.e. through microinjection). We have developed a new approach to produce genetically-encoded photo-activatable derivatives of Rac1, a key GTPase regulating actin cytoskeletal dynamics3,4. Rac1 mutants were fused to the photoreactive LOV (light oxygen voltage) domain from phototropin5,6, sterically blocking Rac1 interactions until irradiation unwound a helix linking LOV to Rac1. Photoactivatable Rac1 (PA-Rac1) could be reversibly and repeatedly activated using 458 or 473 nm light to generate precisely localized cell protrusions and ruffling. Localized Rac activation or inactivation was sufficient to produce cell motility and control the direction of cell movement. Myosin was involved in Rac control of directionality but not in Rac-induced protrusion, while PAK was required for Rac-induced protrusion. PA-Rac1 was used to elucidate Rac regulation of RhoA in cell motility. Rac and Rho coordinate cytoskeletal behaviours with seconds and submicron precision7,8. Their mutual regulation remains controversial9, with data indicating that Rac inhibits and/or activates Rho10,11. Rac was shown to inhibit RhoA in living cells, with inhibition modulated at protrusions and ruffles. A PA-Rac crystal structure and modelling revealed LOV-Rac interactions that will facilitate extension of this photoactivation approach to other proteins. PMID:19693014

  2. Mathematics of cell motility: have we got its number?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical and computational modeling is rapidly becoming an essential research technique complementing traditional experimental biological methods. However, lack of standard modeling methods, difficulties of translating biological phenomena into mathematical language, and differences in biological and mathematical mentalities continue to hinder the scientific progress. Here we focus on one area—cell motility—characterized by an unusually high modeling activity, largely due to a vast amount of quantitative, biophysical data, ‘modular’ character of motility, and pioneering vision of the area’s experimental leaders. In this review, after brief introduction to biology of cell movements, we discuss quantitative models of actin dynamics, protrusion, adhesion, contraction, and cell shape and movement that made an impact on the process of biological discovery. We also comment on modeling approaches and open questions. PMID:18461331

  3. Cystinosin deficiency causes podocyte damage and loss associated with increased cell motility.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Arcolino, Fanny O; Elmonem, Mohamed A; Rastaldi, Maria P; Giardino, Laura; Cornelissen, Elisabeth M; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Levtchenko, Elena N

    2016-05-01

    The involvement of the glomerulus in the pathogenesis of cystinosis, caused by loss-of-function mutations in cystinosin (CTNS, 17p13), is a matter of controversy. Although patients with cystinosis demonstrate glomerular lesions and high-molecular-weight proteinuria starting from an early age, a mouse model of cystinosis develops only signs of proximal tubular dysfunction. Here we studied podocyte damage in patients with cystinosis by analyzing urinary podocyte excretion and by in vitro studies of podocytes deficient in cystinosin. Urine from patients with cystinosis presented a significantly higher amount of podocytes compared with controls. In culture, cystinotic podocytes accumulated cystine compatible with cystinosin deficiency. The expression of podocyte specific genes CD2AP, podocalyxin, and synaptopodin and of the WT1 protein was evident in all cell lines. Conditionally immortalized podocyte lines of 2 patients with different CTNS mutations had altered cytoskeleton, impaired cell adhesion sites, and increased individual cell motility. Moreover, these cells showed enhanced phosphorylation of both Akt1 and Akt2 (isoforms of protein kinase B). Inhibition of Akt by a specific inhibitor (Akti inhibitor 1/2) resulted in normalization of the hypermotile phenotype. Thus, our study extends the list of genetic disorders causing podocyte damage and provides the evidence of altered cell signaling cascades resulting in impaired cell adhesion and enhanced cell motility in cystinosis. PMID:27083281

  4. Na,K-ATPase β-Subunit Is Required for Epithelial Polarization, Suppression of Invasion, and Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Sigrid A.; Palmer, Lawrence G.; Quan, Karina; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Ball, William J.; Bander, Neil H.; Soler, Alejandro Peralta; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K.

    2001-01-01

    The cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin has been implicated in maintaining the polarized phenotype of epithelial cells and suppression of invasiveness and motility of carcinoma cells. Na,K-ATPase, consisting of an α- and β-subunit, maintains the sodium gradient across the plasma membrane. A functional relationship between E-cadherin and Na,K-ATPase has not previously been described. We present evidence that the Na,K-ATPase plays a crucial role in E-cadherin–mediated development of epithelial polarity, and suppression of invasiveness and motility of carcinoma cells. Moloney sarcoma virus-transformed Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MSV-MDCK) have highly reduced levels of E-cadherin and β1-subunit of Na,K-ATPase. Forced expression of E-cadherin in MSV-MDCK cells did not reestablish epithelial polarity or inhibit the invasiveness and motility of these cells. In contrast, expression of E-cadherin and Na,K-ATPase β1-subunit induced epithelial polarization, including the formation of tight junctions and desmosomes, abolished invasiveness, and reduced cell motility in MSV-MDCK cells. Our results suggest that E-cadherin–mediated cell-cell adhesion requires the Na,K-ATPase β-subunit's function to induce epithelial polarization and suppress invasiveness and motility of carcinoma cells. Involvement of the β1-subunit of Na,K-ATPase in the polarized phenotype of epithelial cells reveals a novel link between the structural organization and vectorial ion transport function of epithelial cells. PMID:11179415

  5. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  6. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  7. PTP1B inhibitor promotes endothelial cell motility by activating the DOCK180/Rac1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Yan, Feng; Ye, Qing; Wu, Xiao; Jiang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Promoting endothelial cell (EC) migration is important not only for therapeutic angiogenesis, but also for accelerating re-endothelialization after vessel injury. Several recent studies have shown that inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) may promote EC migration and angiogenesis by enhancing the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) signalling. In the present study, we demonstrated that PTP1B inhibitor could promote EC adhesion, spreading and migration, which were abolished by the inhibitor of Rac1 but not RhoA GTPase. PTP1B inhibitor significantly increased phosphorylation of p130Cas, and the interactions among p130Cas, Crk and DOCK180; whereas the phosphorylation levels of focal adhesion kinase, Src, paxillin, or Vav2 were unchanged. Gene silencing of DOCK180, but not Vav2, abrogated the effects of PTP1B inhibitor on EC motility. The effects of PTP1B inhibitor on EC motility and p130Cas/DOCK180 activation persisted in the presence of the VEGFR2 antagonist. In conclusion, we suggest that stimulation of the DOCK180 pathway represents an alternative mechanism of PTP1B inhibitor-stimulated EC motility, which does not require concomitant VEGFR2 activation as a prerequisite. Therefore, PTP1B inhibitor may be a useful therapeutic strategy for promoting EC migration in cardiovascular patients in which the VEGF/VEGFR functions are compromised. PMID:27052191

  8. The interplay between cell motility and tissue architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Kandice

    2013-03-01

    Glandular tissue form arboreal networks comprised of acini and tubes. Loss of structure is concomitant with the in vivo pathologic state. In vitro models have been shown to recapitulate the functional units of the mammary gland and other organs. Despite our much improved understanding gleaned from both in vitro and in vivo interrogation, the mechanisms by which cells are able to achieve the correct tissue organization remain elusive. How do single mammary epithelial cells form polarized acini when cultured in a surrogate basement membrane gel but not on 2D surfaces? Simply put, how does a cell know which way is up? Why do malignant breast cells show a differential response in that they form non-polarized aggregates? Recently, it was determined that non-malignant cells undergo multiple rotations to establish acini while tumor cells are randomly motile during tumor formation. Can it be that a tumor cell has simply lost its way. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, National Cancer Institute.

  9. Cellular Response to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Induces Secretion of Defensin α-1, Which Damages the Flagellum, Neutralizes Trypanosome Motility, and Inhibits Infection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Candice A.; Rachakonda, Girish; Kleshchenko, Yuliya Y.; Nde, Pius N.; Madison, M. Nia; Pratap, Siddharth; Cardenas, Tatiana C.; Taylor, Chase; Lima, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Human defensins play a fundamental role in the initiation of innate immune responses to some microbial pathogens. Here we show that colonic epithelial model HCT116 cells respond to Trypanosoma cruzi infection by secreting defensin α-1, which reduces infection. We also report the early effects of defensin α-1 on invasive trypomastigotes that involve damage of the flagellar structure to inhibit parasite motility and reduce cellular infection. Short exposure of defensin α-1 to trypomastigotes shows that defensin α-1 binds to the flagellum, resulting in flagellar membrane and axoneme alterations, followed by breaking of the flagellar membrane connected to the trypanosome body, leading to detachment and release of the parasite flagellum. In addition, defensin α-1 induces a significant reduction in parasite motility in a peptide concentration-dependent manner, which is abrogated by anti-defensin α-1 IgG. Preincubation of trypomastigotes with a concentration of defensin α-1 that inhibits 50% trypanosome motility significantly reduced cellular infection by 80%. Thus, human defensin α-1 is an innate immune molecule that is secreted by HCT116 cells in response to T. cruzi infection, inhibits T. cruzi motility, and plays an important role in reducing cellular infection. This is the first report showing a novel cellular innate immune response to a human parasite by secretion of defensin α-1, which neutralizes the motility of a human parasite to reduce cellular infection. The mode of activity of human defensin α-1 against T. cruzi and its function may provide insights for the development of new antiparasitic strategies. PMID:23980110

  10. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinases mediate calcium-induced slow motility of mammalian outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Puschner, B; Schacht, J

    1997-08-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells in vitro respond to elevation of intracellular calcium with slow shape changes over seconds to minutes ('slow motility'). This process is blocked by general calmodulin antagonists suggesting the participation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent enzymatic reactions. The present study proposes a mechanism for these reactions. Length changes of outer hair cells isolated from the guinea pig cochlea were induced by exposure to the calcium ionophore ionomycin. ATP levels remained unaffected by this treatment ruling out depletion of ATP (by activation of calcium-dependent ATPases) as a cause of the observed shape changes. Involvement of protein kinases was suggested by the inhibition of shape changes by K252a, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of protein kinase activity. Furthermore, the inhibitors ML-7 and ML-9 blocked the shape changes at concentrations compatible with inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). KN-62, an inhibitor of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), also attenuated the length changes. Inhibitors with selectivity for cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases (H-89, staurosporine) were tested to assess potential additional contributions by such enzymes. The dose dependence of their action supported the notion that the most likely mechanism of slow motility involves phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by MLCK or CaMKII or both. PMID:9282907

  11. Vimentin-mediated regulation of cell motility through modulation of beta4 integrin protein levels in oral tumor derived cells.

    PubMed

    Dmello, Crismita; Sawant, Sharada; Alam, Hunain; Gangadaran, Prakash; Tiwari, Richa; Dongre, Harsh; Rana, Neha; Barve, Sai; Costea, Daniela Elena; Chaukar, Davendra; Kane, Shubhada; Pant, Harish; Vaidya, Milind

    2016-01-01

    Vimentin expression correlates well with migratory and invasive potential of the carcinoma cells. The molecular mechanism by which vimentin regulates cell motility is not yet clear. Here, we addressed this issue by depleting vimentin in oral squamous cell carcinoma derived cell line. Vimentin knockdown cells showed enhanced adhesion and spreading to laminin-5. However, we found that they were less invasive as compared to the vector control cells. In addition, signaling associated with adhesion behavior of the cell was increased in vimentin knockdown clones. These findings suggest that the normal function of β4 integrin as mechanical adhesive device is enhanced upon vimentin downregulation. As a proof of principle, the compromised invasive potential of vimentin depleted cells could be rescued upon blocking with β4 integrin adhesion-blocking (ASC-8) antibody or downregulation of β4 integrin in vimentin knockdown background. Interestingly, plectin which associates with α6β4 integrin in the hemidesmosomes, was also found to be upregulated in vimentin knockdown clones. Furthermore, experiments on lysosome and proteasome inhibition revealed that perhaps vimentin regulates the turnover of β4 integrin and plectin. Moreover, an inverse association was observed between vimentin expression and β4 integrin in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Collectively, our results show a novel role of vimentin in modulating cell motility by destabilizing β4 integrin-mediated adhesive interactions. Further, vimentin-β4 integrin together may prove to be useful markers for prognostication of human oral cancer. PMID:26646105

  12. Paxillin controls directional cell motility in response to physical cues

    PubMed Central

    Sero, Julia E.; German, Alexandra E.; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Physical cues from the extracellular environment that influence cell shape and directional migration are transduced into changes in cytoskeletal organization and biochemistry through integrin-based cell adhesions to extracellular matrix (ECM). Paxillin is a focal adhesion (FA) scaffold protein that mediates integrin anchorage to the cytoskeleton, and has been implicated in regulation of FA assembly and cell migration. To determine whether paxillin is involved in coupling mechanical distortion with directional movement, cell shape was physically constrained by culturing cells on square-shaped fibronectin-coated adhesive islands surrounded by non-adhesive barrier regions that were created with a microcontact printing technique. Square-shaped cells preferentially formed FAs and extended lamellipodia from their corner regions when stimulated with PDGF, and loss of paxillin resulted in loss of this polarized response. Selective expression of the N- and C-terminal domains of paxillin produced opposite, but complementary, effects on suppressing or promoting lamellipodia formation in different regions of square cells, which corresponded to directional motility defects in vitro. Paxillin loss or mutation was also shown to affect the formation of circular dorsal ruffles, and this corresponded to changes in cell invasive behavior in 3D. This commentary addresses the implications of these findings in terms of how a multifunctional FA scaffold protein can link physical cues to cell adhesion, protrusion and membrane trafficking so as to control directional migration in 2D and 3D. We also discuss how microengineered ECM islands and in vivo model systems can be used to further elucidate the functions of paxillin in directional migration. PMID:23076140

  13. Integrative analysis of T cell motility from multi-channel microscopy data using TIAM.

    PubMed

    Mayya, Viveka; Neiswanger, Willie; Medina, Ricardo; Wiggins, Chris H; Dustin, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Integrative analytical approaches are needed to study and understand T cell motility as it is a highly coordinated and complex process. Several computational algorithms and tools are available to track motile cells in time-lapse microscopy images. In contrast, there has only been limited effort towards the development of tools that take advantage of multi-channel microscopy data and facilitate integrative analysis of cell-motility. We have implemented algorithms for detecting, tracking, and analyzing cell motility from multi-channel time-lapse microscopy data. We have integrated these into a MATLAB-based toolset we call TIAM (Tool for Integrative Analysis of Motility). The cells are detected by a hybrid approach involving edge detection and Hough transforms from transmitted light images. Cells are tracked using a modified nearest-neighbor association followed by an optimization routine to join shorter segments. Cell positions are used to perform local segmentation for extracting features from transmitted light, reflection and fluorescence channels and associating them with cells and cell-tracks to facilitate integrative analysis. We found that TIAM accurately captures the motility behavior of T cells and performed better than DYNAMIK, Icy, Imaris, and Volocity in detecting and tracking motile T cells. Extraction of cell-associated features from reflection and fluorescence channels was also accurate with less than 10% median error in measurements. Finally, we obtained novel insights into T cell motility that were critically dependent on the unique capabilities of TIAM. We found that 1) the CD45RO subset of human CD8 T cells moved faster and exhibited an increased propensity to attach to the substratum during CCL21-driven chemokinesis when compared to the CD45RA subset; and 2) attachment area and arrest coefficient during antigen-induced motility of the CD45A subset is correlated with surface density of integrin LFA1 at the contact. PMID:25445324

  14. In vitro cell motility as a potential mesenchymal stem cell marker for multipotency.

    PubMed

    Bertolo, Alessandro; Gemperli, Armin; Gruber, Marco; Gantenbein, Benjamin; Baur, Martin; Pötzel, Tobias; Stoyanov, Jivko

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are expected to have a fundamental role in future cell-based therapies because of their high proliferative ability, multilineage potential, and immunomodulatory properties. Autologous transplantations have the "elephant in the room" problem of wide donor variability, reflected by variability in MSC quality and characteristics, leading to uncertain outcomes in the use of these cells. We propose life imaging as a tool to characterize populations of human MSCs. Bone marrow MSCs from various donors and in vitro passages were evaluated for their in vitro motility, and the distances were correlated to the adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation potentials and the levels of senescence and cell size. Using life-image measuring of track lengths of 70 cells per population for a period of 24 hours, we observed that slow-moving cells had the higher proportion of senescent cells compared with fast ones. Larger cells moved less than smaller ones, and spindle-shaped cells had an average speed. Both fast cells and slow cells were characterized by a low differentiation potential, and average-moving cells were more effective in undergoing all three lineage differentiations. Furthermore, heterogeneity in single cell motility within a population correlated with the average-moving cells, and fast- and slow-moving cells tended toward homogeneity (i.e., a monotonous moving pattern). In conclusion, in vitro cell motility might be a useful tool to quickly characterize and distinguish the MSC population's differentiation potential before additional use. PMID:25473086

  15. Asynchrony in the growth and motility responses to environmental changes by individual bacterial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Umehara, Senkei; Hattori, Akihiro; Inoue, Ippei; Yasuda, Kenji . E-mail: yasuda.bmi@tmd.ac.jp

    2007-05-04

    Knowing how individual cells respond to environmental changes helps one understand phenotypic diversity in a bacterial cell population, so we simultaneously monitored the growth and motility of isolated motile Escherichia coli cells over several generations by using a method called on-chip single-cell cultivation. Starved cells quickly stopped growing but remained motile for several hours before gradually becoming immotile. When nutrients were restored the cells soon resumed their growth and proliferation but remained immotile for up to six generations. A flagella visualization assay suggested that deflagellation underlies the observed loss of motility. This set of results demonstrates that single-cell transgenerational study under well-characterized environmental conditions can provide information that will help us understand distinct functions within individual cells.

  16. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  17. RhoA mediates cyclooxygenase-2 signaling to disrupt the formation of adherens junctions and increase cell motility.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Wen E; Marlin, Jerry W; Chance, Terry W; Jakobi, Rolf

    2006-12-15

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) represents an important target for treatment and prevention of colorectal cancer. Although COX-2 signaling is implicated in promoting tumor cell growth and invasion, the molecular mechanisms that mediate these processes are largely unknown. In this study, we show that the RhoA pathway mediates COX-2 signaling to disrupt the formation of adherens junctions and increase cell motility. Disruption of adherens junctions promotes tumor cell invasion and metastasis and is often associated with tumor progression. We detected high levels of RhoA activity in HCA-7 colon carcinoma cells that constitutively express COX-2. Inhibition of COX-2 significantly reduced the levels of RhoA activity in HCA-7 cells, suggesting that constitutive expression of COX-2 stimulates RhoA activity. Interestingly, inhibition of COX-2 or silencing of COX-2 expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) stimulated the formation of adherens junctions, concomitant with increased protein levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin. Furthermore, inhibition of RhoA or silencing of RhoA expression with siRNA increased the levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin. Inhibition of Rho kinases (ROCK), the RhoA effector proteins, also increased levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin and stimulated formation of adherens junctions. The motility of HCA-7 cells was significantly decreased when COX-2 or RhoA was inhibited. Therefore, our data reveal a novel molecular mechanism that links COX-2 signaling to disrupt the formation of adherens junctions; COX-2 stimulates the RhoA/ROCK pathway, which reduces levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin leading to disruption of adherens junction formation and increased motility. Understanding of COX-2 downstream signaling pathways that promote tumor progression is crucial for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:17178865

  18. OBJECTIVE ANALYSIS OF SPERM MOTILITY IN THE LAKE STURGEON, ACIPENSER FULVESCENS: ACTIVATION AND INHIBITION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An objective analysis of the duration of motility of sperm from the lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, has been performed using computer-assisted sperm motion analysis at 200 frames/s. Motility was measured in both 1993 and 1994. The percentage of activated motile sperm and the...

  19. Influence of Helical Cell Shape on Motility of Helicobacter Pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Joseph; Martinez, Laura; Salama, Nina; Bansil, Rama; Boston University Collaboration; University of Washington Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria's body shape plays an important role in motility by effecting chemotaxis, swimming mechanisms, and swimming speed. A prime example of this is the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori;whose helical shape has long been believed to provide an advantage in penetrating the viscous mucus layer protecting the stomach lining, its niche environment. To explore this we have performed bacteria tracking experiments of both wild-type bacteria along with mutants, which have a straight rod shape. A wide distribution of speeds was found. This distribution reflects both a result of temporal variation in speed and different shape morphologies in the bacterial population. Our results show that body shape plays less role in a simple fluid. However, in a more viscous solution the helical shape results in increased swimming speeds. In addition, we use experimentally obtained cell shape measurements to model the hydrodynamic influence of cell shape on swimming speed using resistive force theory. The results agree with the experiment, especially when we fold in the temporal distribution. Interestingly, our results suggest distinct wild-type subpopulations with varying number of half helices can lead to different swimming speeds. NSF PHY

  20. Fibulin-3 is uniquely upregulated in malignant gliomas and promotes tumor cell motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi K; Sim, Hosung; Viapiano, Mariano S

    2009-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly invasive tumors with an almost invariably rapid and lethal outcome. Surgery and chemoradiotherapy fail to remove resistant tumor cells that disperse within normal tissue, which are a major cause for disease progression and therapy failure. Infiltration of the neural parenchyma is a distinctive property of malignant gliomas compared with other solid tumors. Thus, glioma cells are thought to produce unique molecular changes that remodel the neural extracellular matrix and form a microenvironment permissive for their motility. Here, we describe the unique expression and proinvasive role of fibulin-3, a mesenchymal matrix protein specifically upregulated in gliomas. Fibulin-3 is downregulated in peripheral tumors and is thought to inhibit tumor growth. However, we found fibulin-3 highly upregulated in gliomas and cultured glioma cells, although the protein was undetectable in normal brain or cultured astrocytes. Overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that fibulin-3 did not seem to affect glioma cell morphology or proliferation, but enhanced substrate-specific cell adhesion and promoted cell motility and dispersion in organotypic cultures. Moreover, orthotopic implantation of fibulin-3-overexpressing glioma cells resulted in diffuse tumors with increased volume and rostrocaudal extension compared with controls. Tumors and cultured cells overexpressing fibulin-3 also showed elevated expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases, such as MMP-2/MMP-9 and ADAMTS-5. Taken together, our results suggest that fibulin-3 has a unique expression and protumoral role in gliomas, and could be a potential target against tumor progression. Strategies against this glioma-specific matrix component could disrupt invasive mechanisms and restrict the dissemination of these tumors. PMID:19887559

  1. Multiple scale model for cell migration in monolayers: Elastic mismatch between cells enhances motility.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Benoit; Bresler, Yony; Wirtz, Denis; Grant, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a multiscale model for monolayer of motile cells that comprise normal and cancer cells. In the model, the two types of cells have identical properties except for their elasticity; cancer cells are softer and normal cells are stiffer. The goal is to isolate the role of elasticity mismatch on the migration potential of cancer cells in the absence of other contributions that are present in real cells. The methodology is based on a phase-field description where each cell is modeled as a highly-deformable self-propelled droplet. We simulated two types of nearly confluent monolayers. One contains a single cancer cell in a layer of normal cells and the other contains normal cells only. The simulation results demonstrate that elasticity mismatch alone is sufficient to increase the motility of the cancer cell significantly. Further, the trajectory of the cancer cell is decorated by several speed "bursts" where the cancer cell quickly relaxes from a largely deformed shape and consequently increases its translational motion. The increased motility and the amplitude and frequency of the bursts are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments. PMID:26134134

  2. Antigen-induced regulation of T-cell motility, interaction with antigen-presenting cells and activation through endogenous thrombospondin-1 and its receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sten-Erik; Uzunel, Mehmet; Talme, Toomas; Bergdahl, Eva; Sundqvist, Karl-Gösta

    2015-01-01

    Antigen recognition reduces T-cell motility, and induces prolonged contact with antigen-presenting cells and activation through mechanisms that remain unclear. Here we show that the T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD28 regulate T-cell motility, contact with antigen-presenting cells and activation through endogenous thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) and its receptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), calreticulin and CD47. Antigen stimulation induced a prominent up-regulation of TSP-1 expression, and transiently increased and subsequently decreased LRP1 expression whereas calreticulin was unaffected. This antigen-induced TSP-1/LRP1 response down-regulated a motogenic mechanism directed by LRP1-mediated processing of TSP-1 in cis within the same plasma membrane while promoting contact with antigen-presenting cells and activation through cis interaction of the C-terminal domain of TSP-1 with CD47 in response to N-terminal TSP-1 triggering by calreticulin. The antigen-induced TSP-1/LRP1 response maintained a reduced but significant motility level in activated cells. Blocking CD28 co-stimulation abrogated LRP1 and TSP-1 expression and motility. TCR/CD3 ligation alone enhanced TSP-1 expression whereas CD28 ligation alone enhanced LRP1 expression. Silencing of TSP-1 inhibited T-cell conjugation to antigen-presenting cells and T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokine responses. The Th1 response enhanced motility and increased TSP-1 expression through interleukin-2, whereas the Th2 response weakened motility and reduced LRP1 expression through interleukin-4. Ligation of the TCR and CD28 therefore elicits a TSP-1/LRP1 response that stimulates prolonged contact with antigen-presenting cells and, although down-regulating motility, maintains a significant motility level to allow serial contacts and activation. Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses differentially regulate T-cell expression of TSP-1 and LRP1 and motility. PMID:25393517

  3. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 modulates endothelial cell motility through the small G-protein Rho.

    PubMed

    Gratzinger, Dita; Canosa, Sandra; Engelhardt, Britta; Madri, Joseph A

    2003-08-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), an immunoglobulin family vascular adhesion molecule, is involved in endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis (1, 2). We found that endothelial cells lacking PECAM-1 exhibit increased single cell motility and extension formation but poor wound healing migration, reminiscent of cells in which Rho activity has been suppressed by overexpressing a GTPase-activating protein (3). The ability of PECAM-1 to restore wound healing migration to PECAM-1-deficient cells was independent of its extracellular domain or signaling via its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif. PECAM-1-deficient endothelial cells had a selective defect in RhoGTP loading, and inhibition of Rho activity mimicked the PECAM-1-deficient phenotype of increased chemokinetic single cell motility at the expense of coordinated wound healing migration. The wound healing advantage of PECAM-1-positive endothelial cells was not only Rho mediated but pertussis toxin inhibitable, characteristic of migration mediated by heterotrimeric G-protein-linked seven-transmembrane receptor signaling such as signaling in response to the serum sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) (4, 5). Indeed, we found that the wound healing defect of PECAM-1 null endothelial cells is minimized in sphingolipid-depleted media; moreover, PECAM-1 null endothelial cells fail to increase their migration in response to S1P. We have also found that PECAM-1 localizes to rafts and that in its absence heterotrimeric G-protein components are differentially recruited to rafts, providing a potential mechanism for PECAM-1-mediated coordination of S1P signaling. PECAM-1 may thus support the effective S1P/RhoGTP signaling required for wound healing endothelial migration by allowing for the spatially directed, coordinated activation of Galpha signaling pathways. PMID:12890700

  4. Fibroblastic reticular cell-derived lysophosphatidic acid regulates confined intranodal T-cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Akira; Kobayashi, Daichi; Aoi, Keita; Sasaki, Naoko; Sugiura, Yuki; Igarashi, Hidemitsu; Tohya, Kazuo; Inoue, Asuka; Hata, Erina; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Hayasaka, Haruko; Kikuta, Junichi; Scandella, Elke; Ludewig, Burkhard; Ishii, Satoshi; Aoki, Junken; Suematsu, Makoto; Ishii, Masaru; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Umemoto, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are highly confined environments with a cell-dense three-dimensional meshwork, in which lymphocyte migration is regulated by intracellular contractile proteins. However, the molecular cues directing intranodal cell migration remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) produced by LN fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) acts locally to LPA2 to induce T-cell motility. In vivo, either specific ablation of LPA-producing ectoenzyme autotaxin in FRCs or LPA2 deficiency in T cells markedly decreased intranodal T cell motility, and FRC-derived LPA critically affected the LPA2-dependent T-cell motility. In vitro, LPA activated the small GTPase RhoA in T cells and limited T-cell adhesion to the underlying substrate via LPA2. The LPA-LPA2 axis also enhanced T-cell migration through narrow pores in a three-dimensional environment, in a ROCK-myosin II-dependent manner. These results strongly suggest that FRC-derived LPA serves as a cell-extrinsic factor that optimizes T-cell movement through the densely packed LN reticular network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10561.001 PMID:26830463

  5. Theory of deformable substrates for cell motility studies.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, M A

    1996-01-01

    Linear theory is used to relate the tractions F applied by a cell to the resulting deformation of fluid, viscoelastic, or solid substrates. The theory is used to fit data in which the motion of a fluid surface in the neighborhood of a motile keratocyte is visualized with the aid of embedded beads. The data are best fit by modeling the surface layer as a two-dimensional, nearly incompressible fluid. The data favor this model over another plausible model, the planar free boundary of a three-dimensional fluid. In the resulting diagrams for the distribution of F, it is found that both curl F and div F are concentrated in the lateral extrema of the lamellipodium. In a second investigation, a nonlinear theory of weak wrinkles in a solid substrate is proposed. The in-plane stress tensor plays the role of a metric. Compression wrinkles are found in regions where this metric is negative definite. Tension wrinkles arise, in linear approximation, at points on the boundary between positive definite and indefinite regions, and are conjectured to be stabilized by nonlinear effects. Data for the wrinkles that would be produced by keratocyte traction are computed, and these agree qualitatively with observed keratocyte wrinkles. Images FIGURE 7 PMID:8842205

  6. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) (II. 2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile Inhibition of Motility and Stalk Production in the Marine Diatom Achnanthes longipes).

    PubMed

    Wang, Y.; Lu, J.; Mollet, J. C.; Gretz, M. R.; Hoagland, K. D.

    1997-04-01

    The cellulose synthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) and the DCB analogs 2-chloro-6-fluorobenzonitrile, 3-amino-2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, and 5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfonyl-(3-cyano-2, 4-dichloro)aniline (DCBF) inhibited extracellular adhesive production in the marine diatom Achnanthes longipes, resulting in a loss of motility and a lack of permanent adhesion. The effect was fully reversible upon removal of the inhibitor, and cell growth was not affected at concentrations of inhibitors adequate to effectively interrupt the adhesion sequence. Video microscopy revealed that the adhesion sequence was mediated by the export and assembly of polymers, and consisted of initial attachment followed by cell motility and eventual production of permanent adhesive structures in the form of stalks that elevated the diatom above the substratum. A. longipes adhesive polymers are primarily composed of noncellulosic polysaccharides (B.A. Wustman, M.R. Gretz, and K.D. Hoagland [1997] Plant Physiol 113: 1059-1069). These results, together with the discovery of DCB inhibition of extracellular matrix assembly in noncellulosic red algal unicells (S.M. Arad, O. Dubinsky, and B. Simon [1994] Phycologia 33: 158-162), indicate that DCB inhibits synthesis of noncellulosic extracellular polysaccharides. A fluorescent probe, DCBF, was synthesized and shown to inhibit adhesive polymer production in the same manner as DCB. DCBF specifically labeled an 18-kD polypeptide isolated from a membrane fraction. Inhibition of adhesion by DCB and its analogs provides evidence of a direct relationship between polysaccharide synthesis and motility and permanent adhesion. PMID:12223661

  7. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) (II. 2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile Inhibition of Motility and Stalk Production in the Marine Diatom Achnanthes longipes).

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Lu, J.; Mollet, J. C.; Gretz, M. R.; Hoagland, K. D.

    1997-01-01

    The cellulose synthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) and the DCB analogs 2-chloro-6-fluorobenzonitrile, 3-amino-2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, and 5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfonyl-(3-cyano-2, 4-dichloro)aniline (DCBF) inhibited extracellular adhesive production in the marine diatom Achnanthes longipes, resulting in a loss of motility and a lack of permanent adhesion. The effect was fully reversible upon removal of the inhibitor, and cell growth was not affected at concentrations of inhibitors adequate to effectively interrupt the adhesion sequence. Video microscopy revealed that the adhesion sequence was mediated by the export and assembly of polymers, and consisted of initial attachment followed by cell motility and eventual production of permanent adhesive structures in the form of stalks that elevated the diatom above the substratum. A. longipes adhesive polymers are primarily composed of noncellulosic polysaccharides (B.A. Wustman, M.R. Gretz, and K.D. Hoagland [1997] Plant Physiol 113: 1059-1069). These results, together with the discovery of DCB inhibition of extracellular matrix assembly in noncellulosic red algal unicells (S.M. Arad, O. Dubinsky, and B. Simon [1994] Phycologia 33: 158-162), indicate that DCB inhibits synthesis of noncellulosic extracellular polysaccharides. A fluorescent probe, DCBF, was synthesized and shown to inhibit adhesive polymer production in the same manner as DCB. DCBF specifically labeled an 18-kD polypeptide isolated from a membrane fraction. Inhibition of adhesion by DCB and its analogs provides evidence of a direct relationship between polysaccharide synthesis and motility and permanent adhesion. PMID:12223661

  8. Olanzapine May Inhibit Colonic Motility Associated with the 5-HT Receptor and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiarui; Qiao, Ying; Le, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study whether the effects of olanzapine on gastrointestinal motility is related to the serotonin antagonism and myosin light chain kinase. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. Olanzapine gavage was performed for each treatment group during the course of 30 continuous days, while the same volume of saline was given to the rats in the control group. Defecation of the rats was observed on days 7 and 30 after olanzapine gavage. The effects of olanzapine on contraction of colonic smooth muscles were observed in ex vivo experiments. A Western blot was used to evaluate expression levels of the serotonin transporter (SERT) and MLCK in colon segments of the rats. Results ResultsaaCompared to the control group, 5-160 µ M of olanzapine could inhibit dose-dependently the contraction of colonic smooth muscle ex vivo experiments. The maximum smooth muscle contraction effects of 5-HT and acetylcholine significantly decreased after treatment with 40-160 µ M of olanzapine. Constipation was found in the olanzapine-treated rats on day 7 and have sustained day 30 after gavage. Expression of MLCK in olanzapine-treated rats was significantly decreased, whereas the expression of SERT significantly increased on the day 7, then significantly decreased on the day 30 after olanzapine gavage. Conclusion SERT and MLCK may involve in the inhibition of colonic contraction induced by olanzapine. PMID:27081386

  9. Interstitial flows promote an amoeboid cell phenotype and motility of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Huang, Yu Ling; Zheng, Angela; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    Lymph nodes, the drainage systems for interstitial flows, are clinically known to be the first metastatic sites of many cancer types including breast and prostate cancers. Here, we demonstrate that breast cancer cell morphology and motility is modulated by interstitial flows in a cell-ECM adhesion dependent manner. The average aspect ratios of the cells are significantly lower (or are more amoeboid like) in the presence of the flow in comparison to the case when the flow is absent. The addition of exogenous adhesion molecules within the extracellular matrix (type I collagen) enhances the overall aspect ratio (or are more mesenchymal like) of the cell population. Using measured cell trajectories, we find that the persistence of the amoeboid cells (aspect ratio less than 2.0) is shorter than that of mesenchymal cells. However, the maximum speed of the amoeboid cells is larger than that of mesenchymal cells. Together these findings provide the novel insight that interstitial flows promote amoeboid cell morphology and motility and highlight the plasticity of tumor cell motility in response to its biophysical environment. Supported by NIH Grant R21CA138366.

  10. Effects of cochlear loading on the motility of active outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Ó Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Outer hair cells (OHCs) power the amplification of sound-induced vibrations in the mammalian inner ear through an active process that involves hair-bundle motility and somatic motility. It is unclear, though, how either mechanism can be effective at high frequencies, especially when OHCs are mechanically loaded by other structures in the cochlea. We address this issue by developing a model of an active OHC on the basis of observations from isolated cells, then we use the model to predict the response of an active OHC in the intact cochlea. We find that active hair-bundle motility amplifies the receptor potential that drives somatic motility. Inertial loading of a hair bundle by the tectorial membrane reduces the bundle’s reactive load, allowing the OHC’s active motility to influence the motion of the cochlear partition. The system exhibits enhanced sensitivity and tuning only when it operates near a dynamical instability, a Hopf bifurcation. This analysis clarifies the roles of cochlear structures and shows how the two mechanisms of motility function synergistically to create the cochlear amplifier. The results suggest that somatic motility evolved to enhance a preexisting amplifier based on active hair-bundle motility, thus allowing mammals to hear high-frequency sounds. PMID:23509256

  11. Cigarette smoke induces cell motility via platelet-activating factor accumulation in breast cancer cells: a potential mechanism for metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Kispert, Shannon; Marentette, John; McHowat, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are a result of metastasis rather than the primary tumor. Although cigarette smoking has been determined as a risk factor for several cancers, its role in metastasis has not been studied in detail. We propose that cigarette smoking contributes to metastatic disease via inhibition of breast cancer cell platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), resulting in PAF accumulation and a subsequent increase in cell motility. We studied several breast cell lines, including immortalized mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A), luminal A hormone positive MCF-7, basal-like triple negative MDA-MB-468, and claudin-low triple-negative highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells. We exposed cells to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for up to 48 h. CSE inhibited PAF-AH activity, increased PAF accumulation, and increased cell motility in MDA-MB-231 metastatic triple negative breast cancer cells. The calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) inhibitor, (S) bromoenol lactone ((S)-BEL) was used to prevent the accumulation of PAF and further prevented the increase in cell motility seen previously when cells were exposed to CSE. Thus, iPLA2 or PAF may represent a therapeutic target to manage metastatic disease, particularly in triple-negative breast cancer patients who smoke. PMID:25802360

  12. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  13. URI promotes gastric cancer cell motility, survival, and resistance to adriamycin in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Fei; Luo, Dongwei; Li, Na; Wang, Qian; Xu, Zhonghai; Bian, Huiqin; Liang, Yuting; Lu, Yaojuan; Zheng, Qiping; Gu, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor (URI), a RNA polymerase II Subunit 5-Interacting protein, is known to participate in the regulation of nutrient-sensitive mTOR-dependent transcription programs. Multiple studies have recently demonstrated that URI functions as an oncoprotein, possibly through the mTOR pathway, and regulates tumor cell motility, invasion, and metastasis. However, whether and how URI plays a role in gastric oncogenesis has not been elucidated. Due to drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis, the prognosis of gastric cancer remains poor. This study aims to explore the effects of URI on gastric cancer cells by focusing on their migratory ability and resistance to adriamycin. URI was over-expressed or knocked-down in MGC-803 and HGC-27 gastric cancer cells using URI plasmid or siRNA transfection approach. The cell viability, apoptosis, and migration ability were then examined by the CCK-8 assay, flow cytometer Annexin V/PI staining, and the Transwell cell migration assay respectively. The protein levels of apoptosis and EMT related genes were detected by western blot. The results showed that overexpression of URI promoted while knock-down of URI inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation. URI overexpression resulted in increased Bcl-2 expression but decreased levels of Bax, cleaved PARP-1 and cleaved caspase-3. Conversely, cells treated with URI siRNA showed increased adriamycin induced apoptosis, along with reduced Bcl-2, but increased Bax, cleaved PARP-1 and cleaved caspase-3 expression. We have also shown that overexpression of URI enhanced cancer cell proliferation and migration with higher levels of Snail and Vimentin, whereas knockdown of URI in MGC-803 and HGC-27 cells inhibited proliferation and migration with decreased Snail and Vimentin expression. Together, our results support that URI promotes cell survival and mobility and acts as a chemotherapeutics resistant protein in MGC-803 and HGC-27 cells. URI might be a potential biomarker

  14. Three-dimensional patterning of multiple cell populations through orthogonal genetic control of cell motility

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Joanna L.; Sood, Anshum

    2013-01-01

    The ability to independently assemble multiple cell types within a three-dimensional matrix would be a powerful enabling tool for modeling and engineering complex tissues. Here we introduce a strategy to dynamically pattern distinct subpopulations of cells through genetic regulation of cell motility. We first describe glioma cell lines that were genetically engineered to stably express constitutively active or dominant negative Rac1 GTPase mutants under the control of either a doxycycline-inducible or cumate-inducible promoter. We culture each population as multicellular spheroids and show that by adding or withdrawing the appropriate inducer at specific times, we can control the timing and extent of Rac1-dependent cell migration into three-dimensional collagen matrices. We then report results with mixed spheroids in which one subpopulation of cells expresses dominant negative Rac1 under a doxycycline-inducible promoter and the other expresses dominant negative Rac1 under a cumate-inducible promoter. Using this system, we demonstrate that doxycycline and cumate addition suppress Rac1-dependent motility in a subpopulation-specific and temporally-controlled manner. This allows us to orthogonally control the motility of each subpopulation and spatially assemble the cells into radially symmetric three-dimensional patterns through the synchronized addition and removal of doxycycline and cumate. This synthetic biology-inspired strategy offers a novel means of spatially organizing multiple cell populations in conventional matrix scaffolds and complements the emerging suite of technologies that seek to pattern cells by engineering extracellular matrix properties. PMID:24622945

  15. Daclatasvir inhibits hepatitis C virus NS5A motility and hyper-accumulation of phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Chukkapalli, Vineela; Berger, Kristi L.; Kelly, Sean M.; Thomas, Meryl; Deiters, Alexander; Randall, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have the potential to revolutionize the HCV therapeutic regime. An integral component of DAA combination therapies are HCV NS5A inhibitors. It has previously been proposed that NS5A DAAs inhibit two functions of NS5A: RNA replication and virion assembly. In this study, we characterize the impact of a prototype NS5A DAA, daclatasvir (DCV), on HCV replication compartment formation. DCV impaired HCV replicase localization and NS5A motility. In order to characterize the mechanism behind altered HCV replicase localization, we examined the impact of DCV on the interaction of NS5A with its essential cellular cofactor, phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase III α (PI4KA). We observed that DCV does not inhibit PI4KA directly, nor does it impair early events of the NS5A-PI4KA interaction that can occur when NS5A is expressed alone. NS5A functions that are unaffected by DCV include PI4KA binding, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation, and a basal accumulation of the PI4KA product, PI4P. However, DCV impairs late steps in PI4KA activation that requires NS5A expressed in the context of the HCV polyprotein. These NS5A functions include hyper-stimulation of PI4P levels and appropriate replication compartment formation. The data are most consistent with a model wherein DCV inhibits conformational changes in the NS5A protein or protein complex formations that occur in the context of HCV polyprotein expression and stimulate PI4P hyper-accumulation and replication compartment formation. PMID:25546252

  16. Direct inhibition of the actomyosin motility by local anesthetics in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Y; Mashimo, T; Yoshiya, I; Kaseda, K; Harada, Y; Yanagida, T

    1996-01-01

    Using a recently developed in vitro motility assay, we have demonstrated that local anesthetics directly inhibit myosin-based movement of single actin filaments in a reversible dose-dependent manner. This is the first reported account of the actions of local anesthetics on purified proteins at the molecular level. In this study, two tertiary amine local anesthetics, lidocaine and tetracaine, were used. The inhibitory action of the local anesthetics on actomyosin sliding movement was pH dependent; the anesthetics were more potent at higher pH values, and this reaction was accompanied by an increased proportion of the uncharged form of the anesthetics. QX-314, a permanently charged derivative of lidocaine, had no effect on actomyosin sliding movement. These results indicate that the uncharged form of local anesthetics is predominantly responsible for the inhibition of actomyosin sliding movement. The local anesthetics inhibited sliding movement but hardly interfered with the binding of actin filaments to myosin on the surface or with actomyosin ATPase activity at low ionic strength. To characterize the actomyosin interaction in the presence of anesthetics, we measured the binding and breaking force of the actomyosin complex. The binding of actin filaments to myosin on the surface was not affected by lidocaine at low ionic strength. The breaking force, measured using optical tweezers, was approximately 1.5 pN per micron of an actin filament, which was much smaller than in rigor and isometric force. The binding and breaking force greatly decreased with increasing ionic strength, indicating that the remaining interaction is ionic in nature. The result suggests that the binding and ATPase of actomyosin are governed predominantly by ionic interaction, which is hardly affected by anesthetics; whereas the force generation requires hydrophobic interaction, which plays a major part of the strong binding and is blocked by anesthetics, in addition to the ionic interaction

  17. Cell Division Resets Polarity and Motility for the Bacterium Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Cameron W.; Madukoma, Chinedu S.; Mahserejian, Shant; Alber, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Links between cell division and other cellular processes are poorly understood. It is difficult to simultaneously examine division and function in most cell types. Most of the research probing aspects of cell division has experimented with stationary or immobilized cells or distinctly asymmetrical cells. Here we took an alternative approach by examining cell division events within motile groups of cells growing on solid medium by time-lapse microscopy. A total of 558 cell divisions were identified among approximately 12,000 cells. We found an interconnection of division, motility, and polarity in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. For every division event, motile cells stop moving to divide. Progeny cells of binary fission subsequently move in opposing directions. This behavior involves M. xanthus Frz proteins that regulate M. xanthus motility reversals but is independent of type IV pilus “S motility.” The inheritance of opposing polarity is correlated with the distribution of the G protein RomR within these dividing cells. The constriction at the point of division limits the intracellular distribution of RomR. Thus, the asymmetric distribution of RomR at the parent cell poles becomes mirrored at new poles initiated at the site of division. PMID:25157084

  18. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Kupffer cell phagosomal motility, bacterial clearance, and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christa Y; Molina, Ramon M; Louzada, Andressa; Murdaugh, Kimberly M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Brain, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc oxide engineered nanoparticles (ZnO ENPs) have potential as nanomedicines due to their inherent properties. Studies have described their pulmonary impact, but less is known about the consequences of ZnO ENP interactions with the liver. This study was designed to describe the effects of ZnO ENPs on the liver and Kupffer cells after intravenous (IV) administration. Materials and methods First, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine the tissue distribution of neutron-activated 65ZnO ENPs post-IV injection in Wistar Han rats. Then, a noninvasive in vivo method to assess Kupffer cell phagosomal motility was employed using ferromagnetic iron particles and magnetometry. We also examined whether prior IV injection of ZnO ENPs altered Kupffer cell bactericidal activity on circulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Serum and liver tissues were collected to assess liver-injury biomarkers and histological changes, respectively. Results We found that the liver was the major site of initial uptake of 65ZnO ENPs. There was a time-dependent decrease in tissue levels of 65Zn in all organs examined, refecting particle dissolution. In vivo magnetometry showed a time-dependent and transient reduction in Kupffer cell phagosomal motility. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa 24 hours post-ZnO ENP injection showed an initial (30 minutes) delay in vascular bacterial clearance. However, by 4 hours, IV-injected bacteria were cleared from the blood, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys. Seven days post-ZnO ENP injection, creatine phosphokinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in serum were significantly increased. Histological evidence of hepatocyte damage and marginated neutrophils were observed in the liver. Conclusion Administration of ZnO ENPs transiently inhibited Kupffer cell phagosomal motility and later induced hepatocyte injury, but did not alter bacterial clearance from the blood or killing in the liver, spleen, lungs, or kidneys. Our data show that

  19. Altering the motility of Trypanosoma cruzi with rabbit polyclonal anti-peptide antibodies reduces infection to susceptible mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Finkelsztein, Eli J; Diaz-Soto, Juan C; Vargas-Zambrano, Juan C; Suesca, Elizabeth; Guzmán, Fanny; López, Manuel C; Thomas, M Carmen; Forero-Shelton, Manu; Cuellar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción J; González, John M

    2015-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi's trypomastigotes are highly active and their incessant motility seems to be important for mammalian host cell infection. The kinetoplastid membrane protein-11 (KMP-11) is a protein expressed in all parasite stages, which induces a cellular and humoral immune response in the infected host, and is hypothesized to participate in the parasite's motility. An N-terminal peptide from KMP-11, termed K1 or TcTLE, induced polyclonal antibodies that inhibit parasitic invasion of Vero cells. The goal of this study was to evaluate the motility and infectivity of T. cruzi when exposed to polyclonal anti-TcTLE antibodies. Rabbits were immunized with TcTLE peptide along with FIS peptide as an immunomodulator. ELISA assay results showed that post-immunization sera contained high titers of polyclonal anti-TcTLE antibodies, which were also reactive against the native KMP-11 protein and live parasites as detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry assays. Trypomastigotes of T. cruzi were incubated with pre- or post-immunization sera, and infectivity to human astrocytes was assessed by Giemsa staining/light microscope and flow cytometry using carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeled parasites. T. cruzi infection in astrocytes decreased approximately by 30% upon incubation with post-immunization sera compared with pre-immunization sera. Furthermore, trypomastigotes were recorded by video microscopy and the parasite's flagellar speed was calculated by tracking the flagella. Trypomastigotes exposed to post-immunization sera had qualitative alterations in motility and significantly slower flagella (45.5 µm/s), compared with those exposed to pre-immunization sera (69.2 µm/s). In summary, polyclonal anti-TcTLE serum significantly reduced the parasite's flagellar speed and cell infectivity. These findings support that KMP-11 could be important for parasite motility, and that by targeting its N-terminal peptide infectivity can be reduced

  20. The anti-motility signaling mechanism of TGFβ3 that controls cell traffic during skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Han, Arum; Bandyopadhyay, Balaji; Jayaprakash, Priyamvada; Lua, Ingrid; Sahu, Divya; Chen, Mei; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2012-12-15

    When skin is wounded, migration of epidermal keratinocytes at the wound edge initiates within hours, whereas migration of dermal fibroblasts toward the wounded area remains undetectable until several days later. This "cell type traffic" regulation ensures proper healing of the wound, as disruptions of the regulation could either cause delay of wound healing or result in hypertrophic scars. TGFβ3 is the critical traffic controller that selectively halts migration of the dermal, but not epidermal, cells to ensure completion of wound re-epithelialization prior to wound remodeling. However, the mechanism of TGFβ3's anti-motility signaling has never been investigated. We report here that activated TβRII transmits the anti-motility signal of TGFβ3 in full to TβRI, since expression of the constitutively activated TβRI-TD mutant was sufficient to replace TGFβ3 to block PDGF-bb-induced dermal fibroblast migration. Second, the three components of R-Smad complex are all required. Individual downregulation of Smad2, Smad3 or Smad4 prevented TGFβ3 from inhibiting dermal fibroblast migration. Third, Protein Kinase Array allowed us to identify the protein kinase A (PKA) as a specific downstream effector of R-Smads in dermal fibroblasts. Activation of PKA alone blocked PDGF-bb-induced dermal fibroblast migration, just like TGFβ3. Downregulation of PKA's catalytic subunit nullified the anti-motility signaling of TGFβ3. This is the first report on anti-motility signaling mechanism by TGFβ family cytokines. Significance of this finding is not only limited to wound healing but also to other human disorders, such as heart attack and cancer, where the diseased cells have often managed to avoid the anti-motility effect of TGFβ. PMID:23259050

  1. Swimming motility plays a key role in the stochastic dynamics of cell clumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xianghong; Nellas, Ricky B.; Byrn, Matthew W.; Russell, Matthew H.; Bible, Amber N.; Alexandre, Gladys; Shen, Tongye

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic cell-to-cell interactions are a prerequisite to many biological processes, including development and biofilm formation. Flagellum induced motility has been shown to modulate the initial cell-cell or cell-surface interaction and to contribute to the emergence of macroscopic patterns. While the role of swimming motility in surface colonization has been analyzed in some detail, a quantitative physical analysis of transient interactions between motile cells is lacking. We examined the Brownian dynamics of swimming cells in a crowded environment using a model of motorized adhesive tandem particles. Focusing on the motility and geometry of an exemplary motile bacterium Azospirillum brasilense, which is capable of transient cell-cell association (clumping), we constructed a physical model with proper parameters for the computer simulation of the clumping dynamics. By modulating mechanical interaction (‘stickiness’) between cells and swimming speed, we investigated how equilibrium and active features affect the clumping dynamics. We found that the modulation of active motion is required for the initial aggregation of cells to occur at a realistic time scale. Slowing down the rotation of flagellar motors (and thus swimming speeds) is correlated to the degree of clumping, which is consistent with the experimental results obtained for A. brasilense.

  2. Role of HER-2 activity in the regulation of malignant meningioma cell proliferation and motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weijia; Tu, Yi; Wang, Shanshan; Xu, Shan; Xu, Linlin; Xiong, Yifeng; Mei, Jinhong; Wang, Chunliang

    2015-09-01

    Meningiomas are common types of intracranial tumor. Invasive and malignant meningiomas present a significant therapeutic challenge due to high rates of recurrence and invasion. Understanding the molecular mechanism of invasion may assist in designing novel therapeutic approaches and improving patient survival rates. The HER‑2 gene has been demonstrated to be a useful predictor of tumor aggression, which promotes the survival and growth of cancer cells through the mitogen‑activated protein kinase and/or phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. Until now, few studies have investigated the associateion between meningiomas and the expression of HER‑2, and the significance of HER‑2 in meningiomas remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the HER‑2 gene on the biological behaviors of human malignant meningioma cells. The results demonstrated that downregulation of the expression of HER‑2 by small interfering RNA in human meningioma cells significantly inhibited cell motility and proliferation, led to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1‑phase and increased early apoptosis. By contrast, the overexpression of HER‑2 group resulted in meningioma cell invasion, migration and proliferation being significantly enhanced, cell cycle was promoted at the G1/S‑phase and early apoptosis was decreased. Accordingly, the inhibition of HER‑2 also prevented the protein expression of PI3K and phosphorylated AKT. The results demonstrated that regulation of the HER‑2 gene can affect the proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis abilities of human meningioma cells in vitro. Furthermore, PI3K/AKT may contribute to the carcinogenesis and development of human meningiomas in combination with HER-2. PMID:25998419

  3. Cortactin Controls Cell Motility and Lamellipodial Dynamics by Regulating ECM Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Bong Hwan; Zhu, Xiaodong; Kaverina, Irina; Weaver, Alissa

    2011-01-01

    Background Branched actin assembly is critical for both cell motility and membrane trafficking. The branched actin regulator, cortactin, is generally considered to promote cell migration by controlling leading edge lamellipodial dynamics. However, recent reports indicate that lamellipodia are not required for cell movement, suggesting an alternate mechanism. Results Since cortactin also regulates membrane trafficking and adhesion dynamics, we hypothesized that altered secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM) and/or integrin trafficking might underlie motility defects of cortactin-knockdown (KD) cells. Consistent with a primary defect in ECM secretion, both motility and lamellipodial defects of cortactin-KD cells were fully rescued by plating on increasing concentrations of exogenous ECM. Furthermore, cortactin-KD cell speed defects were rescued on cell-free autocrine ECM produced by control cells but not on ECM produced by cortactin-KD cells. Investigation of the mechanism revealed that whereas endocytosed FN is redeposited at the basal cell surface by control cells, cortactin-KD cells exhibit defective FN secretion and abnormal FN retention in a late endocytic/lysosomal compartment. Cortactin-KD motility and FN deposition defects were phenocopied by KD in control cells of the lysosomal fusion regulator Synaptotagmin-7. Rescue of cortactin-KD cells by expression of cortactin binding domain mutants revealed that interaction with Arp2/3 complex and actin filaments is essential for rescue of both cell motility and autocrine ECM secretion phenotypes whereas binding of SH3 domain partners is not required. Conclusions Efficient cell motility, promoted by cortactin regulation of branched actin networks, involves processing and resecretion of internalized ECM from a late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. PMID:21856159

  4. Scapinin, the Protein Phosphatase 1 Binding Protein, Enhances Cell Spreading and Motility by Interacting with the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sagara, Junji; Arata, Toshiaki; Taniguchi, Shunichiro

    2009-01-01

    Scapinin, also named phactr3, is an actin and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) binding protein, which is expressed in the adult brain and some tumor cells. At present, the role(s) of scapinin in the brain and tumors are poorly understood. We show that the RPEL-repeat domain of scapinin, which is responsible for its direct interaction with actin, inhibits actin polymerization in vitro. Next, we established a Hela cell line, where scapinin expression was induced by tetracycline. In these cells, expression of scapinin stimulated cell spreading and motility. Scapinin was colocalized with actin at the edge of spreading cells. To explore the roles of the RPEL-repeat and PP1-binding domains, we expressed wild-type and mutant scapinins as fusion proteins with green fluorescence protein (GFP) in Cos7 cells. Expression of GFP-scapinin (wild type) also stimulated cell spreading, but mutation in the RPEL-repeat domain abolished both the actin binding and the cell spreading activity. PP1-binding deficient mutants strongly induced cell retraction. Long and branched cytoplasmic processes were developed during the cell retraction. These results suggest that scapinin enhances cell spreading and motility through direct interaction with actin and that PP1 plays a regulatory role in scapinin-induced morphological changes. PMID:19158953

  5. Automated detection of whole-cell mitochondrial motility and its dependence on cytoarchitectural integrity.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Judith; Chou, Philip; Eckmann, David M

    2015-07-01

    Current methodologies used for mitochondrial motility analysis tend to either overlook individual mitochondrial tracks or analyze only peripheral mitochondria instead of mitochondria in all regions of the cell. Furthermore, motility analysis of an individual mitochondrion is usually quantified by establishing an arbitrary threshold for "directed" motion. In this work, we created a custom, publicly available computational algorithm based on a previously published approach (Giedt et al., 2012. Ann Biomed Eng 40:1903-1916) in order to characterize the distribution of mitochondrial movements at the whole-cell level, while still preserving information about single mitochondria. Our technique is easy to use, robust, and computationally inexpensive. Images are first pre-processed for increased resolution, and then individual mitochondria are tracked based on object connectivity in space and time. When our method is applied to microscopy fields encompassing entire cells, we reveal that the mitochondrial net distances in fibroblasts follow a lognormal distribution within a given cell or group of cells. The ability to model whole-cell mitochondrial motility as a lognormal distribution provides a new quantitative paradigm for comparing mitochondrial motility in naïve and treated cells. We further demonstrate that microtubule and microfilament depolymerization shift the lognormal distribution in directions which indicate decreased and increased mitochondrial movement, respectively. These findings advance earlier work on neuronal axons (Morris and Hollenbeck, 1993. J Cell Sci 104:917-927) by relating them to a different cell type, applying them on a global scale, and automating measurement of mitochondrial motility in general. PMID:25678368

  6. Automated single-cell motility analysis on a chip using lensfree microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarsky, Ivan; Lyb, Yunbo; Weaver, Westbrook; Su, Ting-Wei; Mudanyali, Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan; di Carlo, Dino

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative cell motility studies are necessary for understanding biophysical processes, developing models for cell locomotion and for drug discovery. Such studies are typically performed by controlling environmental conditions around a lens-based microscope, requiring costly instruments while still remaining limited in field-of-view. Here we present a compact cell monitoring platform utilizing a wide-field (24 mm2) lensless holographic microscope that enables automated single-cell tracking of large populations that is compatible with a standard laboratory incubator. We used this platform to track NIH 3T3 cells on polyacrylamide gels over 20 hrs. We report that, over an order of magnitude of stiffness values, collagen IV surfaces lead to enhanced motility compared to fibronectin, in agreement with biological uses of these structural proteins. The increased throughput associated with lensfree on-chip imaging enables higher statistical significance in observed cell behavior and may facilitate rapid screening of drugs and genes that affect cell motility.

  7. Cell Shapes and Traction Forces Determine Stress in Motile Confluent Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbo; Bi, Dapeng; Czajkowski, Michael; Manning, Lisa; Marchetti, Cristina

    Collective cell migration is a highly regulated process involved in wound healing, cancer metastasis and morphogenesis. The understanding of the regulatory mechanism requires the study of mechanical interactions among cells that coordinate their active motion. To this end, we develop a method that determines cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces. This approach allows us for the first time to calculate membrane tensions and hydrostatic pressures at a cellular level in collective migrating cell layers out of equilibrium. It helps us understand the mechanical origin of tissue stresses as previous inferred using Traction Force Microscopy (TFM). We test this approach on a new model of motile confluent tissue, which we term Self-propelled Voronoi Model (SPV) that incorporates cell elasticity, Contractility and motility. With the model, we explore the mechanical properties of confluent motile tissue as a function of cell activities and cell shapes in various geometries.

  8. Tyrosine kinase-independent inhibition by genistein on spermatogenic T-type calcium channels attenuates mouse sperm motility and acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jin; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Shengnan; Sun, Weihao; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2009-02-01

    Although the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor, genistein, has been widely used to investigate the possible involvement of PTK during reproductive functions, it is unknown whether it modulates sperm calcium channel activity. In the present study, we recorded T-type calcium currents (I(Ca,T)) in mouse spermatogenic cells using whole-cell patch clamp and found that extracellular application of genistein reversibly decreased I(Ca,T) in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) approximately 22.7 microM). To determine whether TK activity is required for I(Ca,T) inhibition, we found that peroxovanadate, a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, was ineffective in preventing the inhibitory effect of genistein. Furthermore, intracellular perfusion of the cells with ATP-gamma-S also did not alter the inhibitory effect of genistein. To further reveal the direct inhibitory mechanism of genistein on I(Ca,T), we applied into the bath lavendustin A, a PTK inhibitor structurally unrelated to genistein, and found that the current amplitude remained unchanged. Moreover, daidzein, an inactive structural analog of genistein, robustly inhibited the currents. The inhibitory effect of genistein on T-type calcium channels was associated with a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of inactivation. Genistein was observed to decrease sperm motility and to significantly inhibit sperm acrosome reaction (AR) evoked by zona pellucida. Using transfected HEK293 cells system, only Cav3.1 and Cav3.2, instead of Cav3.3, channels were inhibited by genistein. Since T-type calcium channels are the key components in the male reproduction, such as in AR and sperm motility, our data suggest that this PTK-independent inhibition of genistein on I(Ca,T) might be involved in its anti-reproductive effects. PMID:18789523

  9. Increased aerobic glycolysis is important for the motility of activated VSMC and inhibited by indirubin-3′-monoxime

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Elke H.; Schachner, Daniel; Donati, Maddalena; Grojer, Christoph S.; Dirsch, Verena M.

    2016-01-01

    Increased aerobic glycolysis is a recognized feature of multiple cellular phenotypes and offers a potential point for drug interference, as pursued by anti-tumor agents targeting the Warburg effect. This study aimed at examining the role of aerobic glycolysis for migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and its susceptibility to the small molecule indirubin-3′-monoxime (I3MO). Activation of VSMC with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) resulted in migration and increased glycolytic activity which was accompanied by an increased glucose uptake and hexokinase (HK) 2 expression. Inhibition of glycolysis or hexokinase by pharmacological agents or siRNA-mediated knockdown significantly reduced the migratory behavior in VSMC without affecting cell viability or early actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. I3MO, previously recognized as inhibitor of VSMC migration, was able to counteract the PDGF-activated increase in glycolysis and HK2 abundance. Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 could be identified as crucial event in upregulation of HK2 and glycolytic activity in PDGF-stimulated VSMC and as point of interference for I3MO. I3MO did not inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α-dependent transcription nor influence miRNA 143 levels, other potential regulators of HK2 levels. Overall, we demonstrate that increased aerobic glycolysis is an important factor for the motility of activated VSMC and that the anti-migratory property of I3MO may partly depend on impairment of glycolysis via a compromised STAT3/HK2 signaling axis. PMID:27185663

  10. Interaction of Motility, Directional Sensing, and Polarity Modules Recreates the Behaviors of Chemotaxing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Changji; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Devreotes, Peter N.; Iglesias, Pablo A.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis involves the coordinated action of separable but interrelated processes: motility, gradient sensing, and polarization. We have hypothesized that these are mediated by separate modules that account for these processes individually and that, when combined, recreate most of the behaviors of chemotactic cells. Here, we describe a mathematical model where the modules are implemented in terms of reaction-diffusion equations. Migration and the accompanying changes in cellular morphology are demonstrated in simulations using a mechanical model of the cell cortex implemented in the level set framework. The central module is an excitable network that accounts for random migration. The response to combinations of uniform stimuli and gradients is mediated by a local excitation, global inhibition module that biases the direction in which excitability is directed. A polarization module linked to the excitable network through the cytoskeleton allows unstimulated cells to move persistently and, for cells in gradients, to gradually acquire distinct sensitivity between front and back. Finally, by varying the strengths of various feedback loops in the model we obtain cellular behaviors that mirror those of genetically altered cell lines. PMID:23861660

  11. Amphiregulin enhances alpha6beta1 integrin expression and cell motility in human chondrosarcoma cells through Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK/AP-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-Chieh; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Chih-Yang; Fong, Yi-Chin; Hsu, Chin-Jung; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Su, Jen-Liang; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2015-05-10

    Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor that produces cartilage matrix. The most lethal aspect is its metastatic property. We demonstrated that amphiregulin (AR) is significantly upregulated in highly aggressive cells. AR silencing markedly suppressed cell migration. Exogenous AR markedly increased cell migration by transactivation of α6β1 integrin expression. A neutralizing α6β1 integrin antibody can abolish AR-induced cell motility. Knockdown of AR inhibits metastasis of cells to the lung in vivo. Furthermore, elevated AR expression is positively correlated with α6β1 integrin levels and higher grades in patients. These findings can potentially serve as biomarker and therapeutic approach for controlling chondrosarcoma metastasis. PMID:25825984

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates cell motility in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ssu-Ming; Lin, Chingju; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Chiu, Chien-Ming; Fang, Chia-Wei; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Dar-Ren; Yeh, Wei-Lan

    2015-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that has been shown to affect cancer cell metastasis and migration. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of BDNF-induced cell migration in colon cancer cells. The migratory activities of two colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and SW480, were found to be increased in the presence of human BDNF. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO)-1 is known to be involved in the development and progression of tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie HO-1 in the regulation of colon cancer cell migration remain unclear. Expression of HO-1 protein and mRNA increased in response to BDNF stimulation. The BDNF-induced increase in cell migration was antagonized by a HO-1 inhibitor and HO-1 siRNA. Furthermore, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also increased in response to BDNF stimulation, as did VEGF mRNA expression and transcriptional activity. The increase in BDNF-induced cancer cell migration was antagonized by a VEGF-neutralizing antibody. Moreover, transfection with HO-1 siRNA effectively reduced the increased VEGF expression induced by BDNF. The BDNF-induced cell migration was regulated by the ERK, p38, and Akt signaling pathways. Furthermore, BDNF-increased HO-1 and VEGF promoter transcriptional activity were inhibited by ERK, p38, and AKT pharmacological inhibitors and dominant-negative mutants in colon cancer cells. These results indicate that BDNF increases the migration of colon cancer cells by regulating VEGF/HO-1 activation through the ERK, p38, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. The results of this study may provide a relevant contribution to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which BDNF promotes colon cancer cell motility. PMID:25876647

  13. Computer-assisted quantification of motile and invasive capabilities of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Karthiga Santhana; Pillong, Max; Kunze, Jens; Burghardt, Isabel; Weller, Michael; Grotzer, Michael A.; Schneider, Gisbert; Baumgartner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput analysis of cancer cell dissemination and its control by extrinsic and intrinsic cellular factors is hampered by the lack of adequate and efficient analytical tools for quantifying cell motility. Oncology research would greatly benefit from such a methodology that allows to rapidly determine the motile behaviour of cancer cells under different environmental conditions, including inside three-dimensional matrices. We combined automated microscopy imaging of two- and three-dimensional cell cultures with computational image analysis into a single assay platform for studying cell dissemination in high-throughput. We have validated this new approach for medulloblastoma, a metastatic paediatric brain tumour, in combination with the activation of growth factor signalling pathways with established pro-migratory functions. The platform enabled the detection of primary tumour and patient-derived xenograft cell sensitivity to growth factor-dependent motility and dissemination and identified tumour subgroup-specific responses to selected growth factors of excellent diagnostic value. PMID:26486848

  14. PD-1 promotes immune exhaustion by inducing antiviral T cell motility paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Heydari, Sara; Sacristán, Catarina; Nayak, Debasis; Cammer, Michael; Herz, Jasmin; Cheng, Xiaoxiao; Davis, Simon J.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Immune responses to persistent viral infections and cancer often fail because of intense regulation of antigen-specific T cells—a process referred to as immune exhaustion. The mechanisms that underlie the induction of exhaustion are not completely understood. To gain novel insights into this process, we simultaneously examined the dynamics of virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in the living spleen by two-photon microscopy (TPM) during the establishment of an acute or persistent viral infection. We demonstrate that immune exhaustion during viral persistence maps anatomically to the splenic marginal zone/red pulp and is defined by prolonged motility paralysis of virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Unexpectedly, therapeutic blockade of PD-1–PD-L1 restored CD8+ T cell motility within 30 min, despite the presence of high viral loads. This result was supported by planar bilayer data showing that PD-L1 localizes to the central supramolecular activation cluster, decreases antiviral CD8+ T cell motility, and promotes stable immunological synapse formation. Restoration of T cell motility in vivo was followed by recovery of cell signaling and effector functions, which gave rise to a fatal disease mediated by IFN-γ. We conclude that motility paralysis is a manifestation of immune exhaustion induced by PD-1 that prevents antiviral CD8+ T cells from performing their effector functions and subjects them to prolonged states of negative immune regulation. PMID:23530125

  15. Human NK cell development requires CD56-mediated motility and formation of the developmental synapse.

    PubMed

    Mace, Emily M; Gunesch, Justin T; Dixon, Amera; Orange, Jordan S

    2016-01-01

    While distinct stages of natural killer (NK) cell development have been defined, the molecular interactions that shape human NK cell maturation are poorly understood. Here we define intercellular interactions between developing NK cells and stromal cells which, through contact-dependent mechanisms, promote the generation of mature, functional human NK cells from CD34(+) precursors. We show that developing NK cells undergo unique, developmental stage-specific sustained and transient interactions with developmentally supportive stromal cells, and that the relative motility of NK cells increases as they move through development in vitro and ex vivo. These interactions include the formation of a synapse between developing NK cells and stromal cells, which we term the developmental synapse. Finally, we identify a role for CD56 in developmental synapse structure, NK cell motility and NK cell development. Thus, we define the developmental synapse leading to human NK cell functional maturation. PMID:27435370

  16. Human NK cell development requires CD56-mediated motility and formation of the developmental synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emily M.; Gunesch, Justin T.; Dixon, Amera; Orange, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    While distinct stages of natural killer (NK) cell development have been defined, the molecular interactions that shape human NK cell maturation are poorly understood. Here we define intercellular interactions between developing NK cells and stromal cells which, through contact-dependent mechanisms, promote the generation of mature, functional human NK cells from CD34+ precursors. We show that developing NK cells undergo unique, developmental stage-specific sustained and transient interactions with developmentally supportive stromal cells, and that the relative motility of NK cells increases as they move through development in vitro and ex vivo. These interactions include the formation of a synapse between developing NK cells and stromal cells, which we term the developmental synapse. Finally, we identify a role for CD56 in developmental synapse structure, NK cell motility and NK cell development. Thus, we define the developmental synapse leading to human NK cell functional maturation. PMID:27435370

  17. MT1-MMP dependent repression of the tumor suppressor SPRY4 contributes to MT1-MMP driven melanoma cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Shaverdashvili, Khvaramze; Zhang, Keman; Osman, Iman; Honda, Kord; Jobava, Rauli; Bedogni, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is the deadliest of all skin cancers. Despite progress in diagnostics and treatment of melanoma, the prognosis for metastatic patients remains poor. We previously showed that Membrane-type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is one of the drivers of melanoma metastasis. Classically, MT1-MMP regulates a verity of cellular functions including cell-to-cell interaction and cell-to-matrix communication. Recently, MT1-MMP has been found to also modulate gene expression. To specifically assess MT1-MMP dependent gene regulation in melanoma, microarray gene expression analysis was performed in a melanoma cell line whose metastatic properties depend on the activity of MT1-MMP. We identified the tumor suppressor gene SPRY4 as a new transcriptional target of MT1-MMP that is negatively regulated by the protease. Knockdown of MT1-MMP enhances SPRY4 expression at the mRNA and protein level. SPRY4 expression inversely correlates with that of MT1-MMP in melanoma samples and importantly, correlates with melanoma patient survival. SPRY4 modulates MT1-MMP dependent cell migration such that inhibition of SPRY4 rescues cell migration that has been impaired by MT1-MMP knock down. MT1-MMP decreases SPRY4 in part through an MMP2/RAC1 axis we previously show promotes cell motility downstream of MT1-MMP. These results identify the tumor suppressor SPRY4 as a novel molecular effector of MT1-MMP affecting melanoma cell motility. PMID:26392417

  18. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 3a (eIF3a) Promotes Cell Proliferation and Motility in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu Qian; Liu, Yu; Yao, Min Ya; Jin, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Identifying a target molecule that is crucially involved in pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis is necessary in developing an effective treatment. The study aimed to investigate the role of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) in the cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic cancer. Our data showed that the expression of eIF3a was upregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as compared with its expression in normal pancreatic tissues. Knockdown of eIF3a by a specific shRNA caused significant decreases in cell proliferation and clonogenic abilities in pancreatic cancer SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Consistently, the pancreatic cancer cell growth rates were also impaired in xenotransplanted mice. Moreover, wound-healing assay showed that depletion of eIF3a significantly slowed down the wound recovery processes in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Transwell migration and invasion assays further showed that cell migration and invasion abilities were significantly inhibited by knockdown of eIF3a in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Statistical analysis of eIF3a expression in 140 cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma samples revealed that eIF3a expression was significantly associated with tumor metastasis and TNM staging. These analyses suggest that eIF3a contributes to cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27550487

  19. Regulation of Motility, Invasion and Metastatic Potential of Squamous Cell Carcinoma by 1,25D3

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyu; Yu, Wei-Dong; Su, Bing; Seshadri, Mukund; Luo, Wei; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND 1,25D3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, has been shown to exhibit broad spectrum anti-tumor activity in xenograft animal models. However, its activity against metastatic disease has not been extensively investigated. METHODS Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or 1,25D3-resistant variant SCC-DR cells were treated with 1,25D3. Actin organization was examined by immunofluorescence assay. Cell migration was assessed by “wound” healing and chemotactic migration assay. Cell invasion was assessed by Matrigel-based invasion assay and in situ zymography. MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and secretion was examined by immunoblot analysis and ELISA, respectively. E-cadherin expression was assessed by flow cytometry, immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Knockdown of E-cadherin was achieved by siRNA. Experimental metastasis mouse model was done by intravenous injection of tumor cells. Lung tumor development was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, gross observation and histology. RESULTS SCC cellular morphology and actin organization were altered by 10 nM of 1,25D3. 1,25D3 inhibited SCC cell motility and invasion, which was associated with reduced expression and secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. 1,25D3 promoted the expression of E-cadherin. These findings were not observed in SCC-DR cells. Knock down of E-cadherin rescued 1,25D3-inhibited cell migration. Intravenous injection of SCC or SCC-DR cells resulted in the establishment of extensive pulmonary lesions in saline-treated C3H mice. Treatment with 1,25D3 resulted in a marked reduction in the formation of lung tumor colonies in animals injected with SCC but not SCC-DR cells. CONCLUSIONS 1,25D3 suppresses SCC cell motility, invasion and metastasis, partially through the promotion of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. PMID:22833444

  20. Suppressive effects of 3-bromopyruvate on the proliferation and the motility of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The compound 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) is an analogue of pyruvate, which is the final product of glycolysis that enters the citric acid cycle. The present study aimed to investigate the suppressive effects of 3BP on the proliferation and motility of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. HLF and PLC/PRF/5 cells were cultured with 3BP and subjected to an MTS assay. Apoptosis was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Cell motility was analyzed using a scratch assay. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to determine the expression levels of cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)9. Proliferation of both cell lines was significantly suppressed by 3BP at 100 µM (P<0.05). The expression level of cyclin D1 was decreased after 3BP treatment at 100 µM in both cell lines (P<0.05). Pyknotic nuclei were observed in the cells cultured with 3BP at 100 µM. These results revealed that 3BP suppressed cell proliferation, decreased the expression of cyclin D1, and induced apoptosis in HCC cells. 3BP significantly suppressed motility in both cell lines (P<0.05). The expression level of MMP9 was significantly decreased (P<0.05). 3BP suppressed the proliferation and motility of HCC cells by decreasing the expression of cyclin D1 and MMP9. PMID:26530887

  1. Metastasis-associated 5T4 antigen disrupts cell-cell contacts and induces cellular motility in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Carsberg, C J; Myers, K A; Stern, P L

    1996-09-27

    The 5T4 antigen is defined by a monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for human trophoblast. It is also expressed by many types of tumour cell and has been associated with metastasis and poor clinical outcome in a number of cancers. This pattern of expression is consistent with a mechanistic involvement of 5T4 molecules in the spread of cancer cells. The 5T4 antigen is a transmembrane glycoprotein with a 310 amino acid extracellular domain and a 44 amino acid cytoplasmic domain. Transfection of full-length 5T4 cDNA into epithelial cells alters cell-cell contacts and cellular motility. Thus, in 5T4-transfected CL-S1 murine mammary cells, 5T4 expression is associated with dendritic morphology, accompanied by abrogation of actin/cadherin-containing contacts and increased motility. In transfected MDCK canine kidney epithelial cells, 5T4 over-expression also results in increased motility, but disruption of cell-cell contacts, either by culturing cells in low calcium medium or by addition of HGF/SF, is needed. The effects of 5T4 expression on morphology and motility are separable since cells transfected with a truncated form of 5T4 cDNA in which the cytoplasmic domain is deleted reveal that the latter is necessary to abrogate actin/cadherin-containing contacts but does not influence the effects on motility. Thus, 5T4 molecules can deliver signals through both the extracellular and intracellular domains, and the resultant effects are consistent with a role for 5T4 molecules in invasion processes. PMID:8895545

  2. Polymerization, bending, tension: What happens at the leading edge of motile cells?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcke, M.; Zimmermann, J.

    2014-06-01

    The forces experienced by filaments in actin based propulsion in reconstituted systems and cell motility, the mechanical properties of the lamellipodium of motile cells due to filament branching and cross-linking, the free filament contour length between branch points, the mechanisms of the force-velocity relation and velocity oscillations are all topics of ongoing debate. Here, we review results with a modelling concept considering the F-actin network as weakly cross-linked in a region with dynamic depth close to the propelled obstacle and gel-like further back. It offers quantitative explanations for steady motion and oscillation mechanisms in reconstituted systems and motile cells, and the force-velocity relation of fish keratocytes.

  3. Regulation of T-lymphocyte motility, adhesion and de-adhesion by a cell surface mechanism directed by low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and endogenous thrombospondin-1

    PubMed Central

    Talme, Toomas; Bergdahl, Eva; Sundqvist, Karl-Gösta

    2014-01-01

    T lymphocytes are highly motile and constantly reposition themselves between a free-floating vascular state, transient adhesion and migration in tissues. The regulation behind this unique dynamic behaviour remains unclear. Here we show that T cells have a cell surface mechanism for integrated regulation of motility and adhesion and that integrin ligands and CXCL12/SDF-1 influence motility and adhesion through this mechanism. Targeting cell surface-expressed low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) with an antibody, or blocking transport of LRP1 to the cell surface, perturbed the cell surface distribution of endogenous thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) while inhibiting motility and potentiating cytoplasmic spreading on intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and fibronectin. Integrin ligands and CXCL12 stimulated motility and enhanced cell surface expression of LRP1, intact TSP-1 and a 130 000 MW TSP-1 fragment while preventing formation of a de-adhesion-coupled 110 000 MW TSP-1 fragment. The appearance of the 130 000 MW TSP-1 fragment was inhibited by the antibody that targeted LRP1 expression, inhibited motility and enhanced spreading. The TSP-1 binding site in the LRP1-associated protein, calreticulin, stimulated adhesion to ICAM-1 through intact TSP-1 and CD47. Shear flow enhanced cell surface expression of intact TSP-1. Hence, chemokines and integrin ligands up-regulate a dominant motogenic pathway through LRP1 and TSP-1 cleavage and activate an associated adhesion pathway through the LRP1–calreticulin complex, intact TSP-1 and CD47. This regulation of T-cell motility and adhesion makes pro-adhesive stimuli favour motile responses, which may explain why T cells prioritize movement before permanent adhesion. PMID:24877199

  4. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  5. The Interplay between Signaling and Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cell Motility and Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarfaty, Ilan

    2013-03-01

    The initiation and growth of tumor metastases require tumor cells go through a transition between collective-to-individual cell migration. Understanding the molecular, cellular and physical mechanisms of these different migration modes is limited. We focus on the tumor cell migration induced by Hepatocyte Growth Factor / Scatter Factor (HGF/SF) - Met-signaling, a master regulator of cell motility in normal and malignant processes. Met has been implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis and several Met targeting agents have been introduced into the clinic, and are currently in all phases of clinical trials Our analysis demonstrates that Met signaling dramatically alter the morpho-kinetic dynamics of collective migration of tumor cells. It induce a ``wave'' of increasing velocities that propagates back from the leading edge, increases cells' orientation and cooperation capabilities. In parallel Met signaling induces amoeboid cell motility that increased cell individuality. The decision making regarding the motility mode is dependent on the extent of activation of unique signal and metabolic cues. We present a combination of molecular imaging, conceptual and modeling framework for the analysis and assessment of the collective mesenchymal to epithelial versus amoeboid motility. Combined together our analysis can contribute to the understanding of metastasis and personalizing anti Met targeted therapy.

  6. Small molecule targeting Cdc42-intersectin interaction disrupts Golgi organization and suppresses cell motility.

    PubMed

    Friesland, Amy; Zhao, Yaxue; Chen, Yan-Hua; Wang, Lie; Zhou, Huchen; Lu, Qun

    2013-01-22

    Signaling through the Rho family of small GTPases has been intensely investigated for its crucial roles in a wide variety of human diseases. Although RhoA and Rac1 signaling pathways are frequently exploited with the aid of effective small molecule modulators, studies of the Cdc42 subclass have lagged because of a lack of such means. We have applied high-throughput in silico screening and identified compounds that are able to fit into the surface groove of Cdc42, which is critical for guanine nucleotide exchange factor binding. Based on the interaction between Cdc42 and intersectin (ITSN), a specific Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, we discovered compounds that rendered ITSN-like interactions in the binding pocket. By using in vitro binding and imaging as well as biochemical and cell-based assays, we demonstrated that ZCL278 has emerged as a selective Cdc42 small molecule modulator that directly binds to Cdc42 and inhibits its functions. In Swiss 3T3 fibroblast cultures, ZCL278 abolished microspike formation and disrupted GM130-docked Golgi structures, two of the most prominent Cdc42-mediated subcellular events. ZCL278 reduces the perinuclear accumulation of active Cdc42 in contrast to NSC23766, a selective Rac inhibitor. ZCL278 suppresses Cdc42-mediated neuronal branching and growth cone dynamics as well as actin-based motility and migration in a metastatic prostate cancer cell line (i.e., PC-3) without disrupting cell viability. Thus, ZCL278 is a small molecule that specifically targets Cdc42-ITSN interaction and inhibits Cdc42-mediated cellular processes, thus providing a powerful tool for research of Cdc42 subclass of Rho GTPases in human pathogenesis, such as those of cancer and neurological disorders. PMID:23284167

  7. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) plays a key role in ovarian cancer cell adhesion and motility

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Renquan; Sun, Xinghui; Xiao, Ran; Zhou, Lei; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated stable transduced HE4 overexpression and knockdown cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 was associated with EOC cell adhesion and motility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 might have some effects on activation of EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 play an important role in EOC tumorigenicity. -- Abstract: Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a novel and specific biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We previously demonstrated that serum HE4 levels were significantly elevated in the majority of EOC patients but not in subjects with benign disease or healthy controls. However, the precise mechanism of HE4 protein function is unknown. In this study, we generated HE4-overexpressing SKOV3 cells and found that stably transduced cells promoted cell adhesion and migration. Knockdown of HE4 expression was achieved by stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a construct encoding a short hairpin DNA directed against the HE4 gene. Correspondingly, the proliferation and spreading ability of HE4-expressed cells were inhibited by HE4 suppression. Mechanistically, impaired EGFR and Erk1/2 phosphorylation were observed in cells with HE4 knockdown. The phosphorylation was restored when the knockdown cells were cultured in conditioned medium containing HE4. Moreover, in vivo tumorigenicity showed that HE4 suppression markedly inhibited the growth of tumors. This suggests that expression of HE4 is associated with cancer cell adhesion, migration and tumor growth, which can be related to its effects on the EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Our results provide evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that may underlie the motility-promoting role of HE4 in EOC progression. The role of HE4 as a target for gene-based therapy might be considered in future studies.

  8. A Comparison of Computational Models for Eukaryotic Cell Shape and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, William R.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell motility involves complex interactions of signalling molecules, cytoskeleton, cell membrane, and mechanics interacting in space and time. Collectively, these components are used by the cell to interpret and respond to external stimuli, leading to polarization, protrusion, adhesion formation, and myosin-facilitated retraction. When these processes are choreographed correctly, shape change and motility results. A wealth of experimental data have identified numerous molecular constituents involved in these processes, but the complexity of their interactions and spatial organization make this a challenging problem to understand. This has motivated theoretical and computational approaches with simplified caricatures of cell structure and behaviour, each aiming to gain better understanding of certain kinds of cells and/or repertoire of behaviour. Reaction–diffusion (RD) equations as well as equations of viscoelastic flows have been used to describe the motility machinery. In this review, we describe some of the recent computational models for cell motility, concentrating on simulations of cell shape changes (mainly in two but also three dimensions). The problem is challenging not only due to the difficulty of abstracting and simplifying biological complexity but also because computing RD or fluid flow equations in deforming regions, known as a “free-boundary” problem, is an extremely challenging problem in applied mathematics. Here we describe the distinct approaches, comparing their strengths and weaknesses, and the kinds of biological questions that they have been able to address. PMID:23300403

  9. Blockade of Aquaporin 1 Inhibits Proliferation, Motility, and Metastatic Potential of Mesothelioma In Vitro but not in an In Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Klebe, Sonja; Griggs, Kim; Cheng, Yuen; Driml, Jack; Henderson, Douglas W.; Reid, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive tumor of the serosal membranes, mostly the pleura. It is related to asbestos exposure and has a poor prognosis. MM has a long latency period, and incidence is predicted to remain stable or increase until 2020. Currently, no biomarkers for a specific targeted therapy are available. Previously, we observed that expression of aquaporin 1 (AQP1) was an indicator of prognosis in two independent cohorts. Here we determine whether AQP1 inhibition has therapeutic potential in the treatment of MM. Methods. Functional studies were performed with H226 cells and primary MM cells harvested from pleural effusions. AQP1 expression and mesothelial phenotype was determined by immunohistochemistry. AQP1 function was inhibited by a pharmacological blocker (AqB050) or AQP1-specific siRNA. Cell proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent cell growth were assessed. A nude mouse heterotopic xenograft model of MM was utilised for the in vivo studies. Results. Inhibition of AQP1 significantly decreases cell proliferation, metastatic potential, and motility without inducing nonspecific cytotoxicity or increasing apoptosis. In vivo blockade of AQP1 had no biologically significant effect on growth of established tumours. Conclusions. Targeted blockade of AQP1 restricts MM growth and migration in vitro. Further work is warranted to fully evaluate treatment potential in vivo. PMID:25821338

  10. CHRNA5 as negative regulator of nicotine signaling in normal and cancer bronchial cells: effects on motility, migration and p63 expression.

    PubMed

    Krais, Annette M; Hautefeuille, Agnès H; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Krutovskikh, Vladimir; Tournier, Jean-Marie; Birembaut, Philippe; Thépot, Amélie; Paliwal, Anupam; Herceg, Zdenko; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Hainaut, Pierre L

    2011-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have linked lung cancer risk with a region of chromosome 15q25.1 containing CHRNA3, CHRNA5 and CHRNB4 encoding α3, α5 and β4 subunits of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), respectively. One of the strongest associations was observed for a non-silent single-nucleotide polymorphism at codon 398 in CHRNA5. Here, we have used pharmacological (antagonists) or genetic (RNA interference) interventions to modulate the activity of CHRNA5 in non-transformed bronchial cells and in lung cancer cell lines. In both cell types, silencing CHRNA5 or inhibiting receptors containing nAChR α5 with α-conotoxin MII exerted a nicotine-like effect, with increased motility and invasiveness in vitro and increasing calcium influx. The effects on motility were enhanced by addition of nicotine but blocked by inhibiting CHRNA7, which encodes the homopentameric receptor α7 subunit. Silencing CHRNA5 also decreased the expression of cell adhesion molecules P120 and ZO-1 in lung cancer cells as well as the expression of DeltaNp63α in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. These results demonstrate a role for CHRNA5 in modulating adhesion and motility in bronchial cells, as well as in regulating p63, a potential oncogene in squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:21586512

  11. CHRNA5 as negative regulator of nicotine signaling in normal and cancer bronchial cells: effects on motility, migration and p63 expression

    PubMed Central

    Krais, Annette M.; Hautefeuille, Agnès H.; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Krutovskikh, Vladimir; Tournier, Jean-Marie; Birembaut, Philippe; Thépot, Amélie; Paliwal, Anupam; Herceg, Zdenko; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Hainaut, Pierre L.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have linked lung cancer risk with a region of chromosome 15q25.1 containing CHRNA3, CHRNA5 and CHRNB4 encoding α3, α5 and β4 subunits of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), respectively. One of the strongest associations was observed for a non-silent single-nucleotide polymorphism at codon 398 in CHRNA5. Here, we have used pharmacological (antagonists) or genetic (RNA interference) interventions to modulate the activity of CHRNA5 in non-transformed bronchial cells and in lung cancer cell lines. In both cell types, silencing CHRNA5 or inhibiting receptors containing nAChR α5 with α-conotoxin MII exerted a nicotine-like effect, with increased motility and invasiveness in vitro and increasing calcium influx. The effects on motility were enhanced by addition of nicotine but blocked by inhibiting CHRNA7, which encodes the homopentameric receptor α7 subunit. Silencing CHRNA5 also decreased the expression of cell adhesion molecules P120 and ZO-1 in lung cancer cells as well as the expression of DeltaNp63α in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. These results demonstrate a role for CHRNA5 in modulating adhesion and motility in bronchial cells, as well as in regulating p63, a potential oncogene in squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:21586512

  12. Cortical Contractility Triggers a Stochastic Switch to Fast Amoeboid Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Verena; Wieser, Stefan; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Smutny, Michael; Morita, Hitoshi; Sako, Keisuke; Barone, Vanessa; Ritsch-Marte, Monika; Sixt, Michael; Voituriez, Raphaël; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Summary 3D amoeboid cell migration is central to many developmental and disease-related processes such as cancer metastasis. Here, we identify a unique prototypic amoeboid cell migration mode in early zebrafish embryos, termed stable-bleb migration. Stable-bleb cells display an invariant polarized balloon-like shape with exceptional migration speed and persistence. Progenitor cells can be reversibly transformed into stable-bleb cells irrespective of their primary fate and motile characteristics by increasing myosin II activity through biochemical or mechanical stimuli. Using a combination of theory and experiments, we show that, in stable-bleb cells, cortical contractility fluctuations trigger a stochastic switch into amoeboid motility, and a positive feedback between cortical flows and gradients in contractility maintains stable-bleb cell polarization. We further show that rearward cortical flows drive stable-bleb cell migration in various adhesive and non-adhesive environments, unraveling a highly versatile amoeboid migration phenotype. PMID:25679761

  13. Signaling Pathways Used by Ergot Alkaloids to Inhibit Bovine Sperm Motility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids exert their toxic or pharmaceutical effects through membrane receptor-mediated activities. This study investigated the signaling pathways involved in the in vitro inhibitory effects of both ergotamine (ET) and dihydroergotamine (DEHT) on bovine sperm motility using specific inhibitor...

  14. Electroacupuncture at ST25 Inhibits Cisapride-Induced Gastric Motility in an Intensity-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Pang, Tingting; Lu, Chunxia; Wang, Kaiyue; Liang, Chao; Yu, Zhi; Zhu, Bing; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of frequency-specific EAS. However, evaluation of intensity-response effects is challenging and has yet to be addressed. Aims. Using cisapride to promote gastric emptying, we measured the intensity-response relationship of EA at ST25 on gastric motility. Methods. We determined the effects of EA at ST25 using intensities (0.5, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mA) on gastric motility in rats injected with cisapride (0.2, 0.02, and 0.002 mg/kg). Results. Utilizing three concentrations of cisapride yielded significantly differing levels of gastric motility. Furthermore, log IC50 values for EAS were different within each group. Given the same EA intensity, cisapride antagonism decreased progressively in each group as a function of drug concentration. The relative amount of cisapride antagonized by EAS did not change in a linear fashion. Finally, EAS at different intensities within the three groups induced a similar pattern of cisapride antagonism. Conclusions. The ability of EAS to elicit a decrease in cisapride-induced gastric motility pressure was demonstrated in this study. The study encompasses construct validity to mirror individualized treatment being based on patients' subjective feelings, not on a set fixed EA intensity. Clinically utilizing EAS at the smallest intensity can achieve the desired therapeutic effect. PMID:26997963

  15. Electroacupuncture at ST25 Inhibits Cisapride-Induced Gastric Motility in an Intensity-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tingting; Wang, Kaiyue; Liang, Chao; Yu, Zhi; Zhu, Bing; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of frequency-specific EAS. However, evaluation of intensity-response effects is challenging and has yet to be addressed. Aims. Using cisapride to promote gastric emptying, we measured the intensity-response relationship of EA at ST25 on gastric motility. Methods. We determined the effects of EA at ST25 using intensities (0.5, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mA) on gastric motility in rats injected with cisapride (0.2, 0.02, and 0.002 mg/kg). Results. Utilizing three concentrations of cisapride yielded significantly differing levels of gastric motility. Furthermore, log IC50 values for EAS were different within each group. Given the same EA intensity, cisapride antagonism decreased progressively in each group as a function of drug concentration. The relative amount of cisapride antagonized by EAS did not change in a linear fashion. Finally, EAS at different intensities within the three groups induced a similar pattern of cisapride antagonism. Conclusions. The ability of EAS to elicit a decrease in cisapride-induced gastric motility pressure was demonstrated in this study. The study encompasses construct validity to mirror individualized treatment being based on patients' subjective feelings, not on a set fixed EA intensity. Clinically utilizing EAS at the smallest intensity can achieve the desired therapeutic effect. PMID:26997963

  16. S100A4 is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells and promotes cell growth and cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Na; Sato, Daisuke; Saiki, Yuriko; Sunamura, Makoto; Fukushige, Shinichi; Horii, Akira

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • We observed frequent overexpression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines. • Knockdown of S100A4 suppressed proliferation in lung cancer cells. • Forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility in lung cancer cells. • PRDM2 was found to be one of the downstream suppressed genes of S100A4. - Abstract: S100A4, a small calcium-binding protein belonging to the S100 protein family, is commonly overexpressed in a variety of tumor types and is widely accepted to associate with metastasis by regulating the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. However, its biological role in lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that S100A4 was frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells, irrespective of histological subtype. Then we performed knockdown and forced expression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines and found that specific knockdown of S100A4 effectively suppressed cell proliferation only in lung cancer cells with S100A4-overexpression; forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility only in S100A4 low-expressing lung cancer cells. PRDM2 and VASH1, identified as novel upregulated genes by microarray after specific knockdown of S100A4 in pancreatic cancer, were also analyzed, and we found that PRDM2 was significantly upregulated after S100A4-knockdown in one of two analyzed S100A4-overexpressing lung cancer cells. Our present results suggest that S100A4 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis by means of cell proliferation and motility by a pathway similar to that in pancreatic cancer.

  17. Sperm Motility in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  18. The dynein cortical anchor Num1 activates dynein motility by relieving Pac1/LIS1-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Lindsay G; Markus, Steven M

    2015-10-26

    Cortically anchored dynein orients the spindle through interactions with astral microtubules. In budding yeast, dynein is offloaded to Num1 receptors from microtubule plus ends. Rather than walking toward minus ends, dynein remains associated with plus ends due in part to its association with Pac1/LIS1, an inhibitor of dynein motility. The mechanism by which dynein is switched from "off" at the plus ends to "on" at the cell cortex remains unknown. Here, we show that overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1 specifically depletes dynein-dynactin-Pac1/LIS1 complexes from microtubule plus ends and reduces dynein-Pac1/LIS1 colocalization. Depletion of dynein from plus ends requires its microtubule-binding domain, suggesting that motility is required. An enhanced Pac1/LIS1 affinity mutant of dynein or overexpression of Pac1/LIS1 rescues dynein plus end depletion. Live-cell imaging reveals minus end-directed dynein-dynactin motility along microtubules upon overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1, an event that is not observed in wild-type cells. Our findings indicate that dynein activity is directly switched "on" by Num1, which induces Pac1/LIS1 removal. PMID:26483554

  19. The dynein cortical anchor Num1 activates dynein motility by relieving Pac1/LIS1-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Lindsay G.

    2015-01-01

    Cortically anchored dynein orients the spindle through interactions with astral microtubules. In budding yeast, dynein is offloaded to Num1 receptors from microtubule plus ends. Rather than walking toward minus ends, dynein remains associated with plus ends due in part to its association with Pac1/LIS1, an inhibitor of dynein motility. The mechanism by which dynein is switched from “off” at the plus ends to “on” at the cell cortex remains unknown. Here, we show that overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1 specifically depletes dynein–dynactin–Pac1/LIS1 complexes from microtubule plus ends and reduces dynein-Pac1/LIS1 colocalization. Depletion of dynein from plus ends requires its microtubule-binding domain, suggesting that motility is required. An enhanced Pac1/LIS1 affinity mutant of dynein or overexpression of Pac1/LIS1 rescues dynein plus end depletion. Live-cell imaging reveals minus end–directed dynein–dynactin motility along microtubules upon overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1, an event that is not observed in wild-type cells. Our findings indicate that dynein activity is directly switched “on” by Num1, which induces Pac1/LIS1 removal. PMID:26483554

  20. Impact of altered actin gene expression on vinculin, talin, cell spreading, and motility.

    PubMed

    Schevzov, G; Lloyd, C; Gunning, P

    1995-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a strong correlation between the expression of vinculin and the shape and motility of a cell (Rodriguez Fernandez et al., 1992a, b, 1993). This hypothesis was tested by comparing the expression of vinculin and talin with the motility of morphologically altered myoblasts. These mouse C2 myoblasts were previously generated by directly perturbing the cell cytoskeleton via the stable transfection of a mutant-form of the beta-actin gene (beta sm) and three different forms of the gamma-actin gene; gamma, gamma minus 3'UTR (gamma delta'UTR), and gamma minus intron III (gamma delta IVSIII) (Schevzov et al., 1992; Lloyd and Gunning, 1993). In the case of the beta sm and gamma-actin transfectants, a two-fold decrease in the cell surface area was coupled, as predicted, with a decrease in vinculin and talin expression. In contrast, the gamma delta IVSIII transfectants with a seven-fold decrease in the cell surface area showed an unpredicted slight increase in vinculin and talin expression and the gamma delta 3'-UTR transfectants with a slight increase in the cell surface area showed no changes in talin expression and a decrease in vinculin expression. We conclude that changes in actin gene expression alone can impact on the expression of vinculin and talin. Furthermore, we observed that these actin transfectants failed to show a consistent relationship between cell shape, motility, and the expression of vinculin. However, a relationship between talin and cell motility was found to exist, suggesting a role for talin in the establishment of focal contacts necessary for motility. PMID:7646816

  1. Regulation of Chlamydomonas flagella and ependymal cell motile cilia by ceramide-mediated translocation of GSK3

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ji Na; Hardin, Kara; Dinkins, Michael; Wang, Guanghu; He, Qian; Mujadzic, Tarik; Zhu, Gu; Bielawski, Jacek; Spassieva, Stefka; Bieberich, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are important organelles formed by cell membrane protrusions; however, little is known about their regulation by membrane lipids. We characterize a novel activation mechanism for glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) by the sphingolipids phytoceramide and ceramide that is critical for ciliogenesis in Chlamydomonas and murine ependymal cells, respectively. We show for the first time that Chlamydomonas expresses serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT), the first enzyme in (phyto)ceramide biosynthesis. Inhibition of SPT in Chlamydomonas by myriocin led to loss of flagella and reduced tubulin acetylation, which was prevented by supplementation with the precursor dihydrosphingosine. Immunocytochemistry showed that (phyto)ceramide was colocalized with phospho–Tyr-216-GSK3 (pYGSK3) at the base and tip of Chlamydomonas flagella and motile cilia in ependymal cells. The (phyto)ceramide distribution was consistent with that of a bifunctional ceramide analogue UV cross-linked and visualized by click-chemistry–mediated fluorescent labeling. Ceramide depletion, by myriocin or neutral sphingomyelinase deficiency (fro/fro mouse), led to GSK3 dephosphorylation and defective flagella and cilia. Motile cilia were rescued and pYGSK3 localization restored by incubation of fro/fro ependymal cells with exogenous C24:1 ceramide, which directly bound to pYGSK3. Our findings suggest that (phyto)ceramide-mediated translocation of pYGSK into flagella and cilia is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism fundamental to the regulation of ciliogenesis. PMID:26446842

  2. Motility and chemotaxis in tissue penetration of oral epithelial cell layers by Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Lux, R; Miller, J N; Park, N H; Shi, W

    2001-10-01

    The ability to penetrate tissue is an important virulence factor for pathogenic spirochetes. Previous studies have recognized the role of motility in allowing pathogenic spirochetes to invade tissues and migrate to sites favorable for bacterial proliferation. However, the nature of the movements, whether they are random or controlled by chemotaxis systems, has yet to be established. In this study, we addressed the role of motility and chemotaxis in tissue penetration by the periodontal disease-associated oral spirochete Treponema denticola using an oral epithelial cell line-based experimental approach. Wild-type T. denticola ATCC 35405 was found to penetrate the tissue layers effectively, whereas a nonmotile mutant was unable to overcome the tissue barrier. Interestingly, the chemotaxis mutants also showed impaired tissue penetration. A cheA mutant that is motile but lacks the central kinase of the chemotaxis pathway showed only about 2 to 3% of the wild-type penetration rate. The two known chemoreceptors of T. denticola, DmcA and DmcB, also appear to be involved in the invasion process. The dmc mutants were actively motile but exhibited reduced tissue penetration of about 30 and 10% of the wild-type behavior, respectively. These data suggest that not only motility but also chemotaxis is involved in the tissue penetration by T. denticola. PMID:11553571

  3. Motility and Chemotaxis in Tissue Penetration of Oral Epithelial Cell Layers by Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Renate; Miller, James N.; Park, No-Hee; Shi, Wenyuan

    2001-01-01

    The ability to penetrate tissue is an important virulence factor for pathogenic spirochetes. Previous studies have recognized the role of motility in allowing pathogenic spirochetes to invade tissues and migrate to sites favorable for bacterial proliferation. However, the nature of the movements, whether they are random or controlled by chemotaxis systems, has yet to be established. In this study, we addressed the role of motility and chemotaxis in tissue penetration by the periodontal disease-associated oral spirochete Treponema denticola using an oral epithelial cell line-based experimental approach. Wild-type T. denticola ATCC 35405 was found to penetrate the tissue layers effectively, whereas a nonmotile mutant was unable to overcome the tissue barrier. Interestingly, the chemotaxis mutants also showed impaired tissue penetration. A cheA mutant that is motile but lacks the central kinase of the chemotaxis pathway showed only about 2 to 3% of the wild-type penetration rate. The two known chemoreceptors of T. denticola, DmcA and DmcB, also appear to be involved in the invasion process. The dmc mutants were actively motile but exhibited reduced tissue penetration of about 30 and 10% of the wild-type behavior, respectively. These data suggest that not only motility but also chemotaxis is involved in the tissue penetration by T. denticola. PMID:11553571

  4. Macroscopic limits of individual-based models for motile cell populations with volume exclusion.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Louise; Maini, Philip K; Baker, Ruth E

    2012-09-01

    Partial differential equation models are ubiquitous in studies of motile cell populations, giving a phenomenological description of events which can be analyzed and simulated using a wide range of existing tools. However, these models are seldom derived from individual cell behaviors and so it is difficult to accurately include biological hypotheses on this spatial scale. Moreover, studies which do attempt to link individual- and population-level behavior generally employ lattice-based frameworks in which the artifacts of lattice choice at the population level are unclear. In this work we derive limiting population-level descriptions of a motile cell population from an off-lattice, individual-based model (IBM) and investigate the effects of volume exclusion on the population-level dynamics. While motility with excluded volume in on-lattice IBMs can be accurately described by Fickian diffusion, we demonstrate that this is not the case off lattice. We show that the balance between two key parameters in the IBM (the distance moved in one step and the radius of an individual) determines whether volume exclusion results in enhanced or slowed diffusion. The magnitude of this effect is shown to increase with the number of cells and the rate of their movement. The method we describe is extendable to higher-dimensional and more complex systems and thereby provides a framework for deriving biologically realistic, continuum descriptions of motile populations. PMID:23030940

  5. From molecular signal activation to locomotion: an integrated, multiscale analysis of cell motility on defined matrices.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Amit; Kumar, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    The adhesion, mechanics, and motility of eukaryotic cells are highly sensitive to the ligand density and stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM). This relationship bears profound implications for stem cell engineering, tumor invasion and metastasis. Yet, our quantitative understanding of how ECM biophysical properties, mechanotransductive signals, and assembly of contractile and adhesive structures collude to control these cell behaviors remains extremely limited. Here we present a novel multiscale model of cell migration on ECMs of defined biophysical properties that integrates local activation of biochemical signals with adhesion and force generation at the cell-ECM interface. We capture the mechanosensitivity of individual cellular components by dynamically coupling ECM properties to the activation of Rho and Rac GTPases in specific portions of the cell with actomyosin contractility, cell-ECM adhesion bond formation and rupture, and process extension and retraction. We show that our framework is capable of recreating key experimentally-observed features of the relationship between cell migration and ECM biophysical properties. In particular, our model predicts for the first time recently reported transitions from filopodial to "stick-slip" to gliding motility on ECMs of increasing stiffness, previously observed dependences of migration speed on ECM stiffness and ligand density, and high-resolution measurements of mechanosensitive protrusion dynamics during cell motility we newly obtained for this study. It also relates the biphasic dependence of cell migration speed on ECM stiffness to the tendency of the cell to polarize. By enabling the investigation of experimentally-inaccessible microscale relationships between mechanotransductive signaling, adhesion, and motility, our model offers new insight into how these factors interact with one another to produce complex migration patterns across a variety of ECM conditions. PMID:21483802

  6. The Stem Cell Marker CD133 Associates with Enhanced Colony Formation and Cell Motility in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elsaba, Tarek M. A.; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Robins, Adrian R.; Crook, Simon; Seth, Rashmi; Jackson, Darryl; McCart, Amy; Silver, Andrew R.; Tomlinson, Ian P. M.; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    CD133 is a membrane molecule that has been, controversially, reported as a CSC marker in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we sought to clarify the expression and role of CD133 in CRC. Initially the size of the CD133−expressing (CD133+) population in eight well-described CRC cell lines was measured by flow cytometry and was found to range from 0% to >95%. The cell line HT29 has a CD133+ population of >95% and was chosen for functional evaluation of CD133 after gene knockdown by RNA interference. A time course assay showed that CD133 inhibition had no significant effect on cell proliferation or apoptosis. However, CD133 knockdown did result in greater susceptibility to staurosporine-induced apoptosis (p = 0.01) and reduction in cell motility (p<0.04). Since gene knockdown may cause “off-target” effects, the cell line SW480 (which has a CD133+ population of 40%) was sorted into pure CD133+ and CD133− populations to allow functional comparison of isogenic populations separated only by CD133 expression. In concordance with the knockdown experiments, a time course assay showed no significant proliferative differences between the CD133+/CD133− populations. Also greater resistance to staurosporine-induced apoptosis (p = 0.008), greater cell motility (p = 0.03) and greater colony forming efficiency was seen in the CD133+ population than the CD133− population in both 2D and 3D culture (p<0.0001 and p<0.003 respectively). Finally, the plasticity of CD133 expression in tumour cells was tested. Quantitative PCR analysis showed there was transcriptional repression in the CD133− population of SW480. Prolonged culture of a pure CD133− population resulted in re-emergence of CD133+ cells. We conclude that CD133 expression in CRCs is associated with some features attributable to stemness and that there is plasticity of CD133 expression. Further studies are necessary to delineate the mechanistic basis of these features. PMID:20502714

  7. Role of the RNA-binding protein IMP-2 in muscle cell motility.

    PubMed

    Boudoukha, Selim; Cuvellier, Sylvain; Polesskaya, Anna

    2010-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs) are a family of posttranscriptional regulatory factors with well-understood roles in embryonic development and cancer but with poorly characterized functions in normal adult cells and tissues. We now show that IMP-2, the most ubiquitously expressed member of the family, is abundant in human and mouse adult skeletal myoblasts, where it is indispensable for cell motility and for stabilization of microtubules. To explore the functions of IMP-2, we analyzed the transcripts that were differentially regulated in IMP-2-depleted myoblasts and bound to IMP-2 in normal myoblasts. Among them were the mRNAs of PINCH-2, an important mediator of cell adhesion and motility, and MURF-3, a microtubule-stabilizing protein. By gain- and loss-of-function assays and gel shift experiments, we show that IMP-2 regulates the expression of PINCH-2 and MURF-3 proteins via direct binding to their mRNAs. Upregulation of PINCH-2 in IMP-2-depleted myoblasts is the key event responsible for their decreased motility. Our data reveal how the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by IMP-2 contributes to the control of adhesion structures and stable microtubules and demonstrate an important function for IMP-2 in cellular motility. PMID:20956565

  8. GAR22β regulates cell migration, sperm motility, and axoneme structure

    PubMed Central

    Gamper, Ivonne; Fleck, David; Barlin, Meltem; Spehr, Marc; Sayad, Sara El; Kleine, Henning; Maxeiner, Sebastian; Schalla, Carmen; Aydin, Gülcan; Hoss, Mareike; Litchfield, David W.; Lüscher, Bernhard; Zenke, Martin; Sechi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal cytoskeleton remodeling is pivotal for cell adhesion and migration. Here we investigated the function of Gas2-related protein on chromosome 22 (GAR22β), a poorly characterized protein that interacts with actin and microtubules. Primary and immortalized GAR22β−/− Sertoli cells moved faster than wild-type cells. In addition, GAR22β−/− cells showed a more prominent focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β overexpression or its reexpression in GAR22β−/− cells reduced cell motility and focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β–actin interaction was stronger than GAR22β–microtubule interaction, resulting in GAR22β localization and dynamics that mirrored those of the actin cytoskeleton. Mechanistically, GAR22β interacted with the regulator of microtubule dynamics end-binding protein 1 (EB1) via a novel noncanonical amino acid sequence, and this GAR22β–EB1 interaction was required for the ability of GAR22β to modulate cell motility. We found that GAR22β is highly expressed in mouse testes, and its absence resulted in reduced spermatozoa generation, lower actin levels in testes, and impaired motility and ultrastructural disorganization of spermatozoa. Collectively our findings identify GAR22β as a novel regulator of cell adhesion and migration and provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of diverse cytoskeleton-dependent processes. PMID:26564797

  9. Spironolactone inhibits podocyte motility via decreasing integrin β1 and increasing integrin β3 in podocytes under high-glucose conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Zhang, Li; Shi, Wei; Chen, Yuanhan; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Shuangxin; Liang, Xinling; Ling, Ting; Yu, Chunping; Huang, Zhongshun; Tan, Xiaofan; Zhao, Xinchen; Ye, Zhiming; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Wenjian; Li, Ruizhao; Ma, Jianchao

    2015-11-01

    Integrin β1 and β3 expression by podocytes is required to maintain glomerular structural integrity. Previous studies have shown that aldosterone (ALD) is involved in glomerular podocyte injury, and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blocker spironolactone effectively reduces proteinuria in patients with diabetic nephropathy. The present study was designed to observe the effects of spironolactone on β1 and β3 integrin expression and podocyte motility under in vitro diabetic conditions. Immortalized mouse podocytes were cultured in media containing normal glucose (NG) levels, high glucose (HG) or HG plus spironolacton. The expression of β1 and β3 integrin in podocytes was detected by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence and western blot analyses. The effects of spironolacton on podocyte motility was further evaluated using a wound healing assay. HG stimulation markedly decreased mRNA and protein expression of integrin β1, and significantly increased mRNA and protein expression of integrin β3 in cultured podocytes. However, simultaneous treatment with spironolacton (10‑7 mol/l) significantly attenuated HG-mediated increases in integrin β3 and decreases in integrin β1 expression. Furthermore, the migration of podocytes induced by HG was abrogated by concomitant treatment with spironolacton. In conclusion, the present study suggested that HG decreased the expression of integrin β1 in cultured podocytes, accompanied with an increase of integrin β3. Spironolactone inhibited cell motility and stabilized podoctyes treated with HG, probably through partly normalizing the expression of integrin β1 and decreasing the expression of integrin β3. PMID:26352002

  10. Uncovering the mechanism of trapping and cell orientation during Neisseria gonorrhoeae twitching motility.

    PubMed

    Zaburdaev, Vasily; Biais, Nicolas; Schmiedeberg, Michael; Eriksson, Jens; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Sheetz, Michael P; Weitz, David A

    2014-10-01

    Neisseria gonorrheae bacteria are the causative agent of the second most common sexually transmitted infection in the world. The bacteria move on a surface by means of twitching motility. Their movement is mediated by multiple long and flexible filaments, called type IV pili, that extend from the cell body, attach to the surface, and retract, thus generating a pulling force. Moving cells also use pili to aggregate and form microcolonies. However, the mechanism by which the pili surrounding the cell body work together to propel bacteria remains unclear. Understanding this process will help describe the motility of N. gonorrheae bacteria, and thus the dissemination of the disease which they cause. In this article we track individual twitching cells and observe that their trajectories consist of alternating moving and pausing intervals, while the cell body is preferably oriented with its wide side toward the direction of motion. Based on these data, we propose a model for the collective pili operation of N. gonorrheae bacteria that explains the experimentally observed behavior. Individual pili function independently but can lead to coordinated motion or pausing via the force balance. The geometry of the cell defines its orientation during motion. We show that by changing pili substrate interactions, the motility pattern can be altered in a predictable way. Although the model proposed is tangibly simple, it still has sufficient robustness to incorporate further advanced pili features and various cell geometries to describe other bacteria that employ pili to move on surfaces. PMID:25296304

  11. Automated single-cell motility analysis on a chip using lensfree microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pushkarsky, Ivan; Lyb, Yunbo; Weaver, Westbrook; Su, Ting-Wei; Mudanyali, Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative cell motility studies are necessary for understanding biophysical processes, developing models for cell locomotion and for drug discovery. Such studies are typically performed by controlling environmental conditions around a lens-based microscope, requiring costly instruments while still remaining limited in field-of-view. Here we present a compact cell monitoring platform utilizing a wide-field (24 mm2) lensless holographic microscope that enables automated single-cell tracking of large populations that is compatible with a standard laboratory incubator. We used this platform to track NIH 3T3 cells on polyacrylamide gels over 20 hrs. We report that, over an order of magnitude of stiffness values, collagen IV surfaces lead to enhanced motility compared to fibronectin, in agreement with biological uses of these structural proteins. The increased throughput associated with lensfree on-chip imaging enables higher statistical significance in observed cell behavior and may facilitate rapid screening of drugs and genes that affect cell motility. PMID:24739819

  12. Stimulation of glioma cell motility by expression, proteolysis, and release of the L1 neural cell recognition molecule

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Muhua; Adla, Shalini; Temburni, Murali K; Patel, Vivek P; Lagow, Errin L; Brady, Owen A; Tian, Jing; Boulos, Magdy I; Galileo, Deni S

    2009-01-01

    Background Malignant glioma cells are particularly motile and can travel diffusely through the brain parenchyma, apparently without following anatomical structures to guide their migration. The neural adhesion/recognition protein L1 (L1CAM; CD171) has been implicated in contributing to stimulation of motility and metastasis of several non-neural cancer types. We explored the expression and function of L1 protein as a stimulator of glioma cell motility using human high-grade glioma surgical specimens and established rat and human glioma cell lines. Results L1 protein expression was found in 17 out of 18 human high-grade glioma surgical specimens by western blotting. L1 mRNA was found to be present in human U-87/LacZ and rat C6 and 9L glioma cell lines. The glioma cell lines were negative for surface full length L1 by flow cytometry and high resolution immunocytochemistry of live cells. However, fixed and permeablized cells exhibited positive staining as numerous intracellular puncta. Western blots of cell line extracts revealed L1 proteolysis into a large soluble ectodomain (~180 kDa) and a smaller transmembrane proteolytic fragment (~32 kDa). Exosomal vesicles released by the glioma cell lines were purified and contained both full-length L1 and the proteolyzed transmembrane fragment. Glioma cell lines expressed L1-binding αvβ5 integrin cell surface receptors. Quantitative time-lapse analyses showed that motility was reduced significantly in glioma cell lines by 1) infection with an antisense-L1 retroviral vector and 2) L1 ectodomain-binding antibodies. Conclusion Our novel results support a model of autocrine/paracrine stimulation of cell motility in glioma cells by a cleaved L1 ectodomain and/or released exosomal vesicles containing L1. This mechanism could explain the diffuse migratory behavior of high-grade glioma cancer cells within the brain. PMID:19874583

  13. Inactivation of Rab23 inhibits the invasion and motility of pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Z Z; Xu, L B; Cai, J L; Wang, J S; Zhou, B; Hu, H

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is charac-terized by a poor prognosis and high mortality rate. In this study, we investigated the expression of Rab23 in non-tumor pancreatic tissues and PDACs via immunohistochemistry. Rab23 was found in 39 of 58 (67.2%) and in 11 of 30 (36.7%) of the PDAC and non-tumor pan-creatic tissue samples (P = 0.0073), respectively. There were signifi-cant correlations between Rab23 expression and unfavorable variables, including cancer differentiation level (P = 0.0089), lymph nodal (P = 0.0099), and distant metastases (P = 0.0173). Inactivation with small interfering RNA against Rab23 in the human pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1 inhibited the migration and invasive potential of the cells. Our data provide new insight into the essential role of Rab23 in PDAC inva-sion and metastasis and suggest that Rab23 expression is a useful indi-cator of metastatic potential; hence, it may be a new therapeutic target for this common malignancy. PMID:25867419

  14. Inhibition of intestinal motility and secretion by extracts of Epilobium spp. in mice.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Federica; Fonte, Giuseppina; Saija, Antonella; Tita, Beatrice

    2006-10-11

    Ethanol extracts of the fresh aerial parts of various Epilobium species were tested to elucidate the mechanism of their gastrointestinal activity in animals. The methods of charcoal meal, castor oil-induced diarrhoea, and enteropooling assay were used to evaluate their effect on mouse gut at various dose levels. The extracts were found to have a significant activity in all models. Moreover, the extracts resulted to possess very little toxicity. Thus, it can be concluded that Epilobium possesses anti-diarrhoeal, anti-motility, and anti-secretory activities and can prove beneficial in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:16713155

  15. Automated characterization of cell shape changes during amoeboid motility by skeletonization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability of a cell to change shape is crucial for the proper function of many cellular processes, including cell migration. One type of cell migration, referred to as amoeboid motility, involves alternating cycles of morphological expansion and retraction. Traditionally, this process has been characterized by a number of parameters providing global information about shape changes, which are insufficient to distinguish phenotypes based on local pseudopodial activities that typify amoeboid motility. Results We developed a method that automatically detects and characterizes pseudopodial behavior of cells. The method uses skeletonization, a technique from morphological image processing to reduce a shape into a series of connected lines. It involves a series of automatic algorithms including image segmentation, boundary smoothing, skeletonization and branch pruning, and takes into account the cell shape changes between successive frames to detect protrusion and retraction activities. In addition, the activities are clustered into different groups, each representing the protruding and retracting history of an individual pseudopod. Conclusions We illustrate the algorithms on movies of chemotaxing Dictyostelium cells and show that our method makes it possible to capture the spatial and temporal dynamics as well as the stochastic features of the pseudopodial behavior. Thus, the method provides a powerful tool for investigating amoeboid motility. PMID:20334652

  16. Both contractile axial and lateral traction force dynamics drive amoeboid cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Bastounis, Effie; Meili, Ruedi; Álvarez-González, Begoña; Francois, Joshua; del Álamo, Juan C.; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotaxing Dictyostelium discoideum cells adapt their morphology and migration speed in response to intrinsic and extrinsic cues. Using Fourier traction force microscopy, we measured the spatiotemporal evolution of shape and traction stresses and constructed traction tension kymographs to analyze cell motility as a function of the dynamics of the cell’s mechanically active traction adhesions. We show that wild-type cells migrate in a step-wise fashion, mainly forming stationary traction adhesions along their anterior–posterior axes and exerting strong contractile axial forces. We demonstrate that lateral forces are also important for motility, especially for migration on highly adhesive substrates. Analysis of two mutant strains lacking distinct actin cross-linkers (mhcA− and abp120− cells) on normal and highly adhesive substrates supports a key role for lateral contractions in amoeboid cell motility, whereas the differences in their traction adhesion dynamics suggest that these two strains use distinct mechanisms to achieve migration. Finally, we provide evidence that the above patterns of migration may be conserved in mammalian amoeboid cells. PMID:24637328

  17. Mutant p53 in cell adhesion and motility.

    PubMed

    Yeudall, W Andrew; Wrighton, Katharine H; Deb, Sumitra

    2013-01-01

    Pro-oncogenic properties of mutant p53 were investigated with the aid of migration assays, adhesion assays, and soft agar growth assays using cells stably expressing gain-of-function p53 mutants. To determine cell migration, "wound-healing" (scratch) assays and haptotactic (chamber) assays were used. H1299 cells expressing mutant p53 were found to migrate more rapidly than cells transfected with empty vector alone. Results from both types of migration assay were broadly similar. Migratory ability differed for different p53 mutants, suggesting allele-specific effects. Cells expressing p53 mutants also showed enhanced adhesion to extracellular matrix compare to controls. Furthermore, stable transfection of mutant p53-H179L into NIH3T3 fibroblasts was sufficient to allow anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. PMID:23150443

  18. Archaeal Signal Transduction: Impact of Protein Phosphatase Deletions on Cell Size, Motility, and Energy Metabolism in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius*

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Julia; Esser, Dominik; Orell, Alvaro; Amman, Fabian; Pham, Trong Khoa; Noirel, Josselin; Lindås, Ann-Christin; Bernander, Rolf; Wright, Phillip C.; Siebers, Bettina; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the in vitro and in vivo functions of the only two identified protein phosphatases, Saci-PTP and Saci-PP2A, in the crenarchaeal model organism Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were investigated. Biochemical characterization revealed that Saci-PTP is a dual-specific phosphatase (against pSer/pThr and pTyr), whereas Saci-PP2A exhibited specific pSer/pThr activity and inhibition by okadaic acid. Deletion of saci_pp2a resulted in pronounced alterations in growth, cell shape and cell size, which could be partially complemented. Transcriptome analysis of the three strains (Δsaci_ptp, Δsaci_pp2a and the MW001 parental strain) revealed 155 genes that were differentially expressed in the deletion mutants, and showed significant changes in expression of genes encoding the archaella (archaeal motility structure), components of the respiratory chain and transcriptional regulators. Phosphoproteome studies revealed 801 unique phosphoproteins in total, with an increase in identified phosphopeptides in the deletion mutants. Proteins from most functional categories were affected by phosphorylation, including components of the motility system, the respiratory chain, and regulatory proteins. In the saci_pp2a deletion mutant the up-regulation at the transcript level, as well as the observed phosphorylation pattern, resembled starvation stress responses. Hypermotility was also observed in the saci_pp2a deletion mutant. The results highlight the importance of protein phosphorylation in regulating essential cellular processes in the crenarchaeon S. acidocaldarius. PMID:24078887

  19. Ophiobolin A from Bipolaris oryzae perturbs motility and membrane integrities of porcine sperm and induces cell death on mammalian somatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bencsik, Ottó; Papp, Tamás; Berta, Máté; Zana, Annamária; Forgó, Péter; Dombi, György; Andersson, Maria A; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Szekeres, András

    2014-09-01

    Bipolaris oryzae is a phytopathogenic fungus causing a brown spot disease in rice, and produces substance that strongly perturbs motility and membrane integrities of boar spermatozoa. The substance was isolated from the liquid culture of the fungal strain using extraction and a multi-step semi-preparative HPLC procedures. Based on the results of mass spectrometric and 2D NMR techniques, the bioactive molecule was identified as ophiobolin A, a previously described sesterterpene-type compound. The purified ophiobolin A exhibited strong motility inhibition and viability reduction on boar spermatozoa. Furthermore, it damaged the sperm mitochondria significantly at sublethal concentration by the dissipation of transmembrane potential in the mitochondrial inner membrane, while the plasma membrane permeability barrier remained intact. The study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of ophiobolin A toward somatic cell lines is higher by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared to other mitochondriotoxic mycotoxins, and towards sperm cells unique by replacing the progressive motility by shivering tail beating at low exposure concentration. PMID:25251540

  20. Ophiobolin A from Bipolaris oryzae Perturbs Motility and Membrane Integrities of Porcine Sperm and Induces Cell Death on Mammalian Somatic Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bencsik, Ottó; Papp, Tamás; Berta, Máté; Zana, Annamária; Forgó, Péter; Dombi, György; Andersson, Maria A.; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Szekeres, András

    2014-01-01

    Bipolaris oryzae is a phytopathogenic fungus causing a brown spot disease in rice, and produces substance that strongly perturbs motility and membrane integrities of boar spermatozoa. The substance was isolated from the liquid culture of the fungal strain using extraction and a multi-step semi-preparative HPLC procedures. Based on the results of mass spectrometric and 2D NMR techniques, the bioactive molecule was identified as ophiobolin A, a previously described sesterterpene-type compound. The purified ophiobolin A exhibited strong motility inhibition and viability reduction on boar spermatozoa. Furthermore, it damaged the sperm mitochondria significantly at sublethal concentration by the dissipation of transmembrane potential in the mitochondrial inner membrane, while the plasma membrane permeability barrier remained intact. The study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of ophiobolin A toward somatic cell lines is higher by 1–2 orders of magnitude compared to other mitochondriotoxic mycotoxins, and towards sperm cells unique by replacing the progressive motility by shivering tail beating at low exposure concentration. PMID:25251540

  1. Cell Motility Is Decreased in Macrophages Activated by Cancer Cell-Conditioned Medium

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ahreum; Ryu, Yun-Kyoung; Lee, Jae-Wook; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a role in innate immune responses to various foreign antigens. Many products from primary tumors influence the activation and transmigration of macrophages. Here, we investigated a migration of macrophages stimulated with cancer cell culture-conditioned medium (CM). Macrophage activation by treatment with CM of B16F10 cells were judged by the increase in protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). The location where macrophages were at 4 h-incubation with control medium or CM was different from where they were at 5 h-incubation in culture dish. Percentage of superimposed macrophages at every 1 h interval was gradually increased by CM treatment as compared to control. Total coverage of migrated track expressed in coordinates was smaller and total distance of migration was shorter in CM-treated macrophages than that in control. Rac1 activity in CM-treated macrophages was also decreased as compared to that in control. When macrophages were treated with CM in the presence of dexamethasone (Dex), an increase in COX2 protein levels, and a decrease in Rac1 activity and total coverage of migration were reversed. In the meanwhile, biphasic changes were detected by Dex treatment in section distance of migration at each time interval, which was more decreased at early time and then increased at later time. Taken together, data demonstrate that macrophage motility could be reduced in accordance with activation in response to cancer cell products. It suggests that macrophage motility could be a novel marker to monitor cancer-associated inflammatory diseases and the efficacy of anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:24404340

  2. Urotensin II receptor determines prognosis of bladder cancer regulating cell motility/invasion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Transitional Cancer (NMIBC) and Muscle Invasive Bladder Transitional Cancer (MIBC)/invasive have different gene profile and clinical course. NMIBC prognosis is not completely predictable, since the relapse rate is higher than 20%, even in the form of MIBC. The aim of this study is to evaluate if UTR expression can discriminate between NMIBC and MIBC and predict the risk of relapses in NMIBCs. Methods We have investigated upon urotensin-II (UII) receptor (UTR) expression in vivo in 159 patients affected by NMIBC. The biological role of UTR was also investigated in vitro. UTR expression was evaluated in a tissue-micro-array, consisting of normal, NMIBC and invasive bTCC samples. Results UTR discriminated between NMIBC and MIBC and showed a significant correlation between low UTR expression and shorter disease free survival in NMIBC. The superagonist UPG84 induced growth suppression at nM concentrations on 3/4 cell lines. Bladder cancer cell treatment with the antagonist urantide or the knock-down of UTR with a specific shRNA significantly blocked both the motility and invasion of bladder cancer cells. Conclusions The evaluation of UTR expression can discriminate between NMIBC at high and low risk of relapse. Moreover, our data suggest that UTR is involved in the regulation of motility, invasion and proliferation of bladder cancer cells. High UTR expression is an independent prognostic factor of good prognosis for NMIBC regulating motility and invasion of bladder cancer cells. PMID:24893613

  3. Direct Correlation between Motile Behavior and Protein Abundance in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Yann S; Gillet, Sébastien; Frankel, Nicholas W; Weibel, Douglas B; Emonet, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how stochastic molecular fluctuations affect cell behavior requires the quantification of both behavior and protein numbers in the same cells. Here, we combine automated microscopy with in situ hydrogel polymerization to measure single-cell protein expression after tracking swimming behavior. We characterized the distribution of non-genetic phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli motility, which affects single-cell exploration. By expressing fluorescently tagged chemotaxis proteins (CheR and CheB) at different levels, we quantitatively mapped motile phenotype (tumble bias) to protein numbers using thousands of single-cell measurements. Our results disagreed with established models until we incorporated the role of CheB in receptor deamidation and the slow fluctuations in receptor methylation. Beyond refining models, our central finding is that changes in numbers of CheR and CheB affect the population mean tumble bias and its variance independently. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the degree of phenotypic diversity of a population by adjusting the global level of expression of CheR and CheB while keeping their ratio constant, which, as shown in previous studies, confers functional robustness to the system. Since genetic control of protein expression is heritable, our results suggest that non-genetic diversity in motile behavior is selectable, supporting earlier hypotheses that such diversity confers a selective advantage. PMID:27599206

  4. Manipulating directional cell motility using intracellular superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael; Clemons, Tristan D.; Ho, Diwei; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Lázaro, Francisco J.; House, Michael J.; St. Pierre, Timothy G.; Fear, Mark W.; Wood, Fiona M.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the ability for magnetic nanoparticles to influence cellular migration in the presence of an external magnetic field. We found that the direction of migrating keratinocytes can be controlled and the migration speed of fibroblasts can be increased with the internalisation of these nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The possibility of shepherding cells towards a region of interest through the use of internalized nanoparticles is an attractive prospect for cell tracking, cell therapies, and tissue engineering applications.This study investigated the ability for magnetic nanoparticles to influence cellular migration in the presence of an external magnetic field. We found that the direction of migrating keratinocytes can be controlled and the migration speed of fibroblasts can be increased with the internalisation of these nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The possibility of shepherding cells towards a region of interest through the use of internalized nanoparticles is an attractive prospect for cell tracking, cell therapies, and tissue engineering applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterisation, supporting experimental data, video time course study of cellular uptake of the nanoparticles and complete experimental details are all provided in the ESI. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06594h

  5. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  6. Constitutively Active 5-HT Receptors: An Explanation of How 5-HT Antagonists Inhibit Gut Motility in Species Where 5-HT is Not an Enteric Neurotransmitter?

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.

    2015-01-01

    Antagonists of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors are well known to inhibit gastrointestinal (GI)-motility and transit in a variety of mammals, including humans. Originally, these observations had been interpreted by many investigators (including us) as evidence that endogenous 5-HT plays a major role in GI motility. This seemed a logical assumption. However, the story changed dramatically after recent studies revealed that 5-HT antagonists still blocked major GI motility patterns (peristalsis and colonic migrating motor complexes) in segments of intestine depleted of all 5-HT. Then, these results were further supported by Dr. Gershons' laboratory, which showed that genetic deletion of all genes that synthesizes 5-HT had minor, or no inhibitory effects on GI transit in vivo. If 5-HT was essential for GI motility patterns and transit, then one would expect major disruptions in motility and transit when 5-HT synthesis was genetically ablated. This does not occur. The inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility clearly occur independently of any 5-HT in the gut. Evidence now suggests that 5-HT antagonists act on 5-HT receptors in the gut which are constitutively active, and don't require 5-HT for their activation. This would explain a long-standing mystery of how 5-HT antagonists inhibit gut motility in species like mice, rats, and humans where 5-HT is not an enteric neurotransmitter. Studies are now increasingly demonstrating that the presence of a neurochemical in enteric neurons does not mean they function as neurotransmitters. Caution should be exercised when interpreting any inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility. PMID:26732863

  7. Chemokine-guided cell migration and motility in zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Jeroen; Raz, Erez

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are vertebrate-specific, structurally related proteins that function primarily in controlling cell movements by activating specific 7-transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play critical roles in a large number of biological processes and are also involved in a range of pathological conditions. For these reasons, chemokines are at the focus of studies in developmental biology and of clinically oriented research aimed at controlling cancer, inflammation, and immunological diseases. The small size of the zebrafish embryos, their rapid external development, and optical properties as well as the large number of eggs and the fast expansion in genetic tools available make this model an extremely useful one for studying the function of chemokines and chemokine receptors in an in vivo setting. Here, we review the findings relevant to the role that chemokines play in the context of directed single-cell migration, primarily in neutrophils and germ cells, and compare it to the collective cell migration of the zebrafish lateral line. We present the current knowledge concerning the formation of the chemokine gradient, its interpretation within the cell, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to chemokine signals during directed migration. PMID:25762592

  8. Epigenetic Silencing of SPINT2 promotes Cancer Cell Motility via HGF-MET Pathway Activation in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Soonyean; Kim, Hye-Eun; Min, Michelle; Raghunathan, Rekha; Panova, Izabela P.; Munshi, Ruchi; Ryu, Byungwoo

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant HGF-MET signaling activation via interactions with surrounding stromal cells in tumor microenvironment plays significant roles in malignant tumor progression. However, extracellular proteolytic regulation of HGF activation which is influenced by the tumor microenvironment and its consequential effects on melanoma malignancy remain uncharacterized. In this study we identified SPINT2: a proteolytic inhibitor of hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA), which plays a significant role in the suppression of the HGF-MET pathway and malignant melanoma progression. SPINT2 expression is significantly lower in metastatic melanoma tissues compared to those in early stage primary melanomas which also corresponded with DNA methylation levels isolated from tissue samples. Treatment with the DNA hypomethylating agent decitabine in cultured melanoma cells induced transcriptional reactivation of SPINT2, suggesting that this gene is epigenetically silenced in malignant melanomas. Furthermore, we show that ectopically expressed SPINT2 in melanoma cells inhibits HGF induced MET-AKT signaling pathway and decreases malignant phenotype potential such as cell motility, and invasive growth of melanoma cells. These results suggest that SPINT2 is associated with tumor suppressive functions in melanoma by inhibiting an extracellular signal regulator of HGF which is typically activated by tumor-stromal interactions. These findings indicate that epigenetic impairment of the tightly regulated cytokine-receptor communications in tumor microenvironment may contribute to malignant tumor progression. PMID:25910030

  9. A generic methodological framework for studying single cell motility in high-throughput time-lapse data

    PubMed Central

    Schoenauer Sebag, Alice; Plancade, Sandra; Raulet-Tomkiewicz, Céline; Barouki, Robert; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Walter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Motility is a fundamental cellular attribute, which plays a major part in processes ranging from embryonic development to metastasis. Traditionally, single cell motility is often studied by live cell imaging. Yet, such studies were so far limited to low throughput. To systematically study cell motility at a large scale, we need robust methods to quantify cell trajectories in live cell imaging data. Results: The primary contribution of this article is to present Motility study Integrated Workflow (MotIW), a generic workflow for the study of single cell motility in high-throughput time-lapse screening data. It is composed of cell tracking, cell trajectory mapping to an original feature space and hit detection according to a new statistical procedure. We show that this workflow is scalable and demonstrates its power by application to simulated data, as well as large-scale live cell imaging data. This application enables the identification of an ontology of cell motility patterns in a fully unsupervised manner. Availability and implementation: Python code and examples are available online (http://cbio.ensmp.fr/∼aschoenauer/motiw.html) Contact: thomas.walter@mines-paristech.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26072499

  10. Hepatocyte growth factor stimulates motility, chemotaxis and mitogenesis in ovarian carcinoma cells expressing high levels of c-met.

    PubMed

    Corps, A N; Sowter, H M; Smith, S K

    1997-09-26

    A proportion of ovarian carcinomas markedly overexpress the proto-oncogene c-met, which encodes the receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). HGF may either stimulate or inhibit the multiplication of its target cells, and may also promote motogenesis and morphogenesis. In this study, we established that the ovarian carcinoma-derived cell-line SK-OV-3 expressed about 20-fold higher levels of c-met protein than are expressed by a second line, CH1. This enabled us to test functional consequences of high-level expression of c-met in ovarian carcinoma cells. The addition of HGF to attached cultures of SK-OV-3 cells caused a change to a motile phenotype, that was evident after 4-6 hr and affected essentially all of the cells by 24 hr. When HGF was placed in the lower compartment of a migration chamber, it induced a 17-fold increase in the migration of SK-OV-3 cells to the lower surface of the filter. Finally, HGF stimulated the incorporation of [3H]-thymidine by cultures of SK-OV-3 cells incubated in medium containing either low (0.2%) or full (10%) FCS. None of these responses were obtained when HGF was added to CH1 cells. We conclude that high levels of c-met expression in ovarian cancer cells may lead to a range of responses to HGF that would promote tumour growth and dissemination. PMID:9334823