Science.gov

Sample records for inhibits fast axonal

  1. Inhibition of Fast Axonal Transport by Pathogenic SOD1 Involves Activation of p38 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Morfini, Gerardo A.; Bosco, Daryl A.; Brown, Hannah; Gatto, Rodolfo; Kaminska, Agnieszka; Song, Yuyu; Molla, Linda; Baker, Lisa; Marangoni, M. Natalia; Berth, Sarah; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Bagnato, Carolina; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Hayward, Lawrence J.; Pigino, Gustavo F.; Watterson, D. Martin; Huang, Chun-Fang; Banker, Gary; Brown, Robert H.; Brady, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Dying-back degeneration of motor neuron axons represents an established feature of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) associated with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations, but axon-autonomous effects of pathogenic SOD1 remained undefined. Characteristics of motor neurons affected in FALS include abnormal kinase activation, aberrant neurofilament phosphorylation, and fast axonal transport (FAT) deficits, but functional relationships among these pathogenic events were unclear. Experiments in isolated squid axoplasm reveal that FALS-related SOD1 mutant polypeptides inhibit FAT through a mechanism involving a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Mutant SOD1 activated neuronal p38 in mouse spinal cord, neuroblastoma cells and squid axoplasm. Active p38 MAP kinase phosphorylated kinesin-1, and this phosphorylation event inhibited kinesin-1. Finally, vesicle motility assays revealed previously unrecognized, isoform-specific effects of p38 on FAT. Axon-autonomous activation of the p38 pathway represents a novel gain of toxic function for FALS-linked SOD1 proteins consistent with the dying-back pattern of neurodegeneration characteristic of ALS. PMID:23776455

  2. A model for fast axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Blum, J J; Reed, M C

    1985-01-01

    A model for fast axonal transport is developed in which the essential features are that organelles may interact with mechanochemical cross-bridges that in turn interact with microtubules, forming an organelle-engine-microtubule complex which is transported along the microtubules. Computer analysis of the equations derived to describe such a system show that most of the experimental observations on fast axonal transport can be simulated by the model, indicating that the model is useful for the interpretation and design of experiments aimed at clarifying the mechanism of fast axonal transport. PMID:2416456

  3. Ultra-rapid axon-axon ephaptic inhibition of cerebellar Purkinje cells by the pinceau.

    PubMed

    Blot, Antonin; Barbour, Boris

    2014-02-01

    Excitatory synaptic activity in the brain is shaped and balanced by inhibition. Because inhibition cannot propagate, it is often recruited with a synaptic delay by incoming excitation. Cerebellar Purkinje cells are driven by long-range excitatory parallel fiber inputs, which also recruit local inhibitory basket cells. The axon initial segment of each Purkinje cell is ensheathed by basket cell axons in a structure called the pinceau, which is largely devoid of chemical synapses. In mice, we found at the single-cell level that the pinceau mediates ephaptic inhibition of Purkinje cell firing at the site of spike initiation. The reduction of firing rate was synchronous with the presynaptic action potential, eliminating a synaptic delay and allowing granule cells to inhibit Purkinje cells without a preceding phase of excitation. Axon-axon ephaptic intercellular signaling can therefore mediate near-instantaneous feedforward and lateral inhibition. PMID:24413696

  4. Accumulation of [3H]fucose-labelled glycoproteins in the Golgi apparatus of dorsal root ganglion neurons during inhibition of fast axonal transport caused by exposure of the ganglion to Co2+-containing or Ca2+-free medium.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, P A; Bennett, G

    1983-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have established that Co2+-containing or Ca2+-free media interfere with the initiation of the fast axonal transport of proteins. The present study has used light- and electron-microscope radioautography to compare the distribution of [3H]fucose-labelled glycoproteins in neuronal cell bodies of control dorsal root ganglia and ganglia incubated for 16-17 h in Ca2+-free medium or in medium containing 0.18 mM Co2+. The radioautographic reaction in control cell bodies was diffusely scattered throughout the cytoplasm; grain counts revealed that 22% of the reaction was associated with elements of the Golgi apparatus and 78% was over other organelles and the remainder of the cytoplasm. In most experimental cell bodies, 78% of the silver grains were clustered over elements of the Golgi complex whereas other organelles and the remainder of the cytoplasm were comparatively much less labelled; structural alterations of the Golgi apparatus were also produced by the modified media. In parallel studies where the radioactivity in nerve trunks and ganglia was measured by liquid scintillation counting, it was found that the Ca2+-free medium and the Co2+-containing medium both reduced by approximately 80% the quantity of [3H]fucose-labelled glycoproteins which were carried by the fast axonal transport system; they did so without interfering with the incorporation of [3H]fucose into glycoproteins. The results indicate that in the presence of Co2+ or in the absence of Ca2+ the proteins which are destined for fast axonal transport accumulate at the Golgi apparatus of neuronal cell bodies. These results thus suggest that Ca2+ is required for proteins to leave the Golgi region in transit to the fast axonal transport system. PMID:6188994

  5. The slow Wallerian degeneration gene, WldS, inhibits axonal spheroid pathology in gracile axonal dystrophy mice.

    PubMed

    Mi, Weiqian; Beirowski, Bogdan; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Adalbert, Robert; Wagner, Diana; Grumme, Daniela; Osaka, Hitoshi; Conforti, Laura; Arnhold, Stefan; Addicks, Klaus; Wada, Keiji; Ribchester, Richard R; Coleman, Michael P

    2005-02-01

    Axonal dystrophy is the hallmark of axon pathology in many neurodegenerative disorders of the CNS, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and stroke. Axons can also form larger swellings, or spheroids, as in multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injury. Some spheroids are terminal endbulbs of axon stumps, but swellings may also occur on unbroken axons and their role in axon loss remains uncertain. Similarly, it is not known whether spheroids and axonal dystrophy in so many different CNS disorders arise by a common mechanism. These surprising gaps in current knowledge result largely from the lack of experimental methods to manipulate axon pathology. The slow Wallerian degeneration gene, Wld(S), delays Wallerian degeneration after injury, and also delays 'dying-back' in peripheral nervous system disorders, revealing a mechanistic link between two forms of axon degeneration traditionally considered distinct. We now report that Wld(S) also inhibits axonal spheroid pathology in gracile axonal dystrophy (gad) mice. Both gracile nucleus (P < 0.001) and cervical gracile fascicle (P = 0.001) contained significantly fewer spheroids in gad/Wld(S) mice, and secondary signs of axon pathology such as myelin loss were also reduced. Motor nerve terminals at neuromuscular junctions continued to degenerate in gad/Wld(S) mice, consistent with previous observations that Wld(S) has a weaker effect on synapses than on axons, and probably contributing to the fact that Wld(S) did not alleviate gad symptoms. Wld(S) acts downstream of the initial pathogenic events to block gad pathology, suggesting that its effect on axonal swelling need not be specific to this disease. We conclude that axon degeneration mechanisms are more closely related than previously thought and that a link exists in gad between spheroid pathology and Wallerian degeneration that could hold for other disorders. PMID:15644421

  6. PTEN inhibition and axon regeneration and neural repair

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayat, Umar; Li, Shuxin

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic growth ability of all the neurons declines during development although some may grow better than others. Numerous intracellular signaling proteins and transcription factors have been shown to regulate the intrinsic growth capacity in mature neurons. Among them, PI3 kinase/Akt pathway is important for controlling axon elongation. As a negative regulator of this pathway, the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) appears critical to control the regenerative ability of young and adult neurons. This review will focus on recent research progress in axon regeneration and neural repair by PTEN inhibition and therapeutic potential of blocking this phosphatase for neurological disorders. Inhibition of PTEN by deletion in conditional knockout mice, knockdown by short-hairpin RNA, or blockade by pharmacological approaches, including administration of selective PTEN antagonist peptides, stimulates various degrees of axon regrowth in juvenile or adult rodents with central nervous system injuries. Importantly, post-injury PTEN suppression could enhance axonal growth and functional recovery in adult central nervous system after injury. PMID:26604880

  7. Fast and reliable identification of axons, axon initial segments and dendrites with local field potential recording

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Anders V.; Johansen, Emil Ø.; Perrier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is an essential neuronal compartment. It is usually where action potentials are initiated. Recent studies demonstrated that the AIS is a plastic structure that can be regulated by neuronal activity and by the activation of metabotropic receptors. Studying the AIS in live tissue can be difficult because its identification is not always reliable. Here we provide a new technique allowing a fast and reliable identification of the AIS in live brain slice preparations. By simultaneous recording of extracellular local field potentials and whole-cell patch-clamp recording of neurons, we can detect sinks caused by inward currents flowing across the membrane. We determine the location of the AIS by comparing the timing of these events with the action potential. We demonstrate that this method allows the unequivocal identification of the AIS of different types of neurons from the brain. PMID:26578887

  8. Chronic intermittent ethanol induced axon and myelin degeneration is attenuated by calpain inhibition.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Supriti; Knaryan, Varduhi H; Patel, Kaushal S; Mulholland, Patrick J; Becker, Howard C; Banik, Naren L

    2015-10-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes multifaceted damage to the central nervous system (CNS), underlying mechanisms of which are gradually being unraveled. In our previous studies, activation of calpain, a calcium-activated neutral protease has been found to cause detrimental alterations in spinal motor neurons following ethanol (EtOH) exposure in vitro. However, it is not known whether calpain plays a pivotal role in chronic EtOH exposure-induced structural damage to CNS in vivo. To test the possible involvement of calpain in EtOH-associated neurodegenerative mechanisms the present investigation was conducted in a well-established mouse model of alcohol dependence - chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) exposure and withdrawal. Our studies indicated significant loss of axonal proteins (neurofilament light and heavy, 50-60%), myelin proteins (myelin basic protein, 20-40% proteolipid protein, 25%) and enzyme (2', 3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, 21-55%) following CIE in multiple regions of brain including hippocampus, corpus callosum, cerebellum, and importantly in spinal cord. These CIE-induced deleterious effects escalated after withdrawal in each CNS region tested. Increased expression and activity of calpain along with enhanced ratio of active calpain to calpastatin (sole endogenous inhibitor) was observed after withdrawal compared to EtOH exposure. Pharmacological inhibition of calpain with calpeptin (25 μg/kg) prior to each EtOH vapor inhalation significantly attenuated damage to axons and myelin as demonstrated by immuno-profiles of axonal and myelin proteins, and Luxol Fast Blue staining. Calpain inhibition significantly protected the ultrastructural integrity of axons and myelin compared to control as confirmed by electron microscopy. Together, these findings confirm CIE exposure and withdrawal induced structural alterations in axons and myelin, predominantly after withdrawal and corroborate calpain inhibition as a potential protective strategy against

  9. Chronic intermittent ethanol induced axon and myelin degeneration is attenuated by calpain inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Samantaray, Supriti; Knaryan, Varduhi H.; Patel, Kaushal S.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Becker, Howard C.; Banik, Naren L.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes multifaceted damage to the central nervous system (CNS), underlying mechanisms of which are gradually being unraveled. In our previous studies, activation of calpain, a calcium-activated neutral protease has been found to cause detrimental alterations in spinal motor neurons following ethanol (EtOH) exposure in vitro. However, it is not known whether calpain plays a pivotal role in chronic EtOH exposure-induced structural damage to CNS in vivo. To test the possible involvement of calpain in EtOH-associated neurodegenerative mechanisms the present investigation was conducted in a well-established mouse model of alcohol dependence - chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) exposure and withdrawal. Our studies indicated significant loss of axonal proteins (neurofilament light and heavy, 50-60 %), myelin proteins (myelin basic protein, 20-40 % proteolipid protein, 25 %) and enzyme (2′, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase, 21-55 %) following CIE in multiple regions of brain including hippocampus, corpus callosum, cerebellum, and importantly in spinal cord. These CIE-induced deleterious effects escalated after withdrawal in each CNS region tested. Increased expression and activity of calpain along with enhanced ratio of active calpain to calpastatin (sole endogenous inhibitor) was observed after withdrawal compared to EtOH exposure. Pharmacological inhibition of calpain with calpeptin (25 μg/kg) prior to each EtOH vapor inhalation significantly attenuated damage to axons and myelin as demonstrated by immuno-profiles of axonal and myelin proteins, and Luxol Fast Blue staining. Calpain inhibition significantly protected the ultrastructural integrity of axons and myelin compared to control as confirmed by electron microscopy. Together, these findings confirm CIE exposure and withdrawal induced structural alterations in axons and myelin, predominantly after withdrawal and corroborate calpain inhibition as a potential protective strategy

  10. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF FAST AXONAL ORGANELLE TRANSPORT IN THE SCIATIC NERVE OF RATS TREATED WITH ACRYLAMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of acrylamide on fast axonal transport have been measured primarily using the indirect methods of isotope or enzyme accumulation. e report the first direct evaluation of the effects of sub-chronic acrylamide dosing (150, 300 or 500 mg/kg total dose) on the fast axonal...

  11. Regulating Axonal Responses to Injury: The Intersection between Signaling Pathways Involved in Axon Myelination and The Inhibition of Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sudheendra N. R.; Pearse, Damien D.

    2016-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors adversely affect the gene programs that govern the expression of regeneration-associated genes (RAGs) and the production of a diversity of extracellular matrix molecules (ECM). Insufficient RAG expression in the injured neuron and the presence of inhibitory ECM at the lesion, leads to structural alterations in the axon that perturb the growth machinery, or form an extraneous barrier to axonal regeneration, respectively. Here, the role of myelin, both intact and debris, in antagonizing axon regeneration has been the focus of numerous investigations. These studies have employed antagonizing antibodies and knockout animals to examine how the growth cone of the re-growing axon responds to the presence of myelin and myelin-associated inhibitors (MAIs) within the lesion environment and caudal spinal cord. However, less attention has been placed on how the myelination of the axon after SCI, whether by endogenous glia or exogenously implanted glia, may alter axon regeneration. Here, we examine the intersection between intracellular signaling pathways in neurons and glia that are involved in axon myelination and axon growth, to provide greater insight into how interrogating this complex network of molecular interactions may lead to new therapeutics targeting SCI. PMID:27375427

  12. Lysosomal proteolysis inhibition selectively disrupts axonal transport of degradative organelles and causes an Alzheimer’s-like axonal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooyeon; Sato, Yutaka; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    In the hallmark neuritic dystrophy of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), autophagic vacuoles containing incompletely digested proteins selectively accumulate in focal axonal swellings, reflecting defects in both axonal transport and autophagy. Here, we investigated the possibility that impaired lysosomal proteolysis could be a basis for both defects leading to neuritic dystrophy. In living primary mouse cortical neurons expressing fluorescence-tagged markers, LC3-positive autophagosomes forming in axons rapidly acquired the endo-lysosomal markers, Rab7 and LAMP1, and underwent exclusive retrograde movement. Proteolytic clearance of these transported autophagic vacuoles was initiated upon fusion with bi-directionally moving lysosomes that increase in number at more proximal axon levels and in the perikaryon. Disrupting lysosomal proteolysis by either inhibiting cathepsins directly or by suppressing lysosomal acidification slowed the axonal transport of autolysosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes and caused their selective accumulation within dystrophic axonal swellings. Mitochondria and other organelles lacking cathepsins moved normally under these conditions, indicating that the general functioning of the axonal transport system was preserved. Dystrophic swellings induced by lysosomal proteolysis inhibition resembled in composition those in several mouse models of AD and also acquired other AD-like features, including immunopositivity for ubiquitin, APP, and neurofilament protein hyperphosphorylation. Restoration of lysosomal proteolysis reversed the affected movements of proteolytic Rab7 vesicles, which in turn, largely cleared autophagic substrates and reversed the axonal dystrophy. These studies identify the AD-associated defects in neuronal lysosomal proteolysis as a possible basis for the selective transport abnormalities and highly characteristic pattern of neuritic dystrophy associated with AD. PMID:21613495

  13. Disruption of fast axonal transport is a pathogenic mechanism for intraneuronal amyloid beta

    PubMed Central

    Pigino, G.; Morfini, G.; Atagi, Y.; Deshpande, A.; Yu, C.; Jungbauer, L.; LaDu, M.; Busciglio, J.; Brady, S.

    2009-01-01

    The pathological mechanism by which Aβ causes neuronal dysfunction and death remains largely unknown. Deficiencies in fast axonal transport (FAT) were suggested to play a crucial role in neuronal dysfunction and loss for a diverse set of dying back neuropathologies including Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the molecular basis for pathological changes in FAT were undetermined. Recent findings indicate that soluble intracellular oligomeric Aβ (oAβ) species may play a critical role in AD pathology. Real-time analysis of vesicle mobility in isolated axoplasms perfused with oAβ showed bidirectional axonal transport inhibition as a consequence of endogenous casein kinase 2 (CK2) activation. Conversely, neither unaggregated amyloid beta nor fibrillar amyloid beta affected FAT. Inhibition of FAT by oAβ was prevented by two specific pharmacological inhibitors of CK2, as well as by competition with a CK2 substrate peptide. Furthermore, perfusion of axoplasms with active CK2 mimics the inhibitory effects of oAβ on FAT. Both oAβ and CK2 treatment of axoplasm led to increased phosphorylation of kinesin-1 light chains and subsequent release of kinesin from its cargoes. Therefore pharmacological modulation of CK2 activity may represent a promising target for therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:19321417

  14. Fast and simplified mapping of mean axon diameter using temporal diffusion spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junzhon; Li, Hua; Li, Ke; Harkins, Kevin D; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Kang, Hakmook; Dortch, Richard D; Anderson, Adam W; Does, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    Mapping axon diameter is of interest for the potential diagnosis and monitoring of various neuronal pathologies. Advanced diffusion-weighted MRI methods have been developed to measure mean axon diameters non-invasively, but suffer major drawbacks that prevent their direct translation into clinical practice, such as complex non-linear data fitting and, more importantly, long scanning times that are usually not tolerable for most human subjects. In the current study, temporal diffusion spectroscopy using oscillating diffusion gradients was used to measure mean axon diameters with high sensitivity to small axons in the central nervous system. Axon diameters have been found to be correlated with a novel metric, DDR⊥ (the rate of dispersion of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient with gradient frequency), which is a model-free quantity that does not require complex data analyses and can be obtained from two diffusion coefficient measurements in clinically relevant times with conventional MRI machines. A comprehensive investigation including computer simulations and animal experiments ex vivo showed that measurements of DDR⊥ agree closely with histological data. In humans in vivo, DDR⊥ was also found to correlate well with reported mean axon diameters in human corpus callosum, and the total scan time was only about 8 min. In conclusion, DDR⊥ may have potential to serve as a fast, simple and model-free approach to map the mean axon diameter of white matter in clinics for assessing axon diameter changes. PMID:27077155

  15. Inhibition of kinesin-5 improves regeneration of injured axons by a novel microtubule-based mechanism.

    PubMed

    Baas, Peter W; Matamoros, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Microtubules have been identified as a powerful target for augmenting regeneration of injured adult axons in the central nervous system. Drugs that stabilize microtubules have shown some promise, but there are concerns that abnormally stabilizing microtubules may have only limited benefits for regeneration, while at the same time may be detrimental to the normal work that microtubules perform for the axon. Kinesin-5 (also called kif11 or Eg5), a molecular motor protein best known for its crucial role in mitosis, acts as a brake on microtubule movements by other motor proteins in the axon. Drugs that inhibit kinesin-5, originally developed to treat cancer, result in greater mobility of microtubules in the axon and an overall shift in the forces on the microtubule array. As a result, the axon grows faster, retracts less, and more readily enters environments that are inhibitory to axonal regeneration. Thus, drugs that inhibit kinesin-5 offer a novel microtubule-based means to boost axonal regeneration without the concerns that accompany abnormal stabilization of the microtubule array. Even so, inhibiting kinesin-5 is not without its own caveats, such as potential problems with navigation of the regenerating axon to its target, as well as morphological effects on dendrites that could affect learning and memory if the drugs reach the brain. PMID:26199587

  16. Spinal irradiation does not inhibit distal axonal sprouting

    SciTech Connect

    Pamphlett, R.S.

    1988-05-01

    In an attempt to determine the relative importance of the nerve cell body and of the axon in initiating and controlling axonal regeneration, nerve cell bodies were irradiated and the ability of the distal axon to sprout was examined. Mice were subjected to either 25 or 50 Gray (Gy) of x-irradiation localized to the lumbar spinal cord. After times varying from 1 day to 6 months after irradiation, a sublethal dose of botulinum toxin (BoTx) was injected into the calf muscles of one leg. The soleus muscle was examined histologically after times varying from 1 week to 6 months after injection, and BoTx-induced ultraterminal axonal sprouting was assessed by the number of motor endplates showing sprouts, the length of the sprouts, and the long term endplate morphology. Apart from some irradiated subgroups having slightly shorter sprout lengths, no significant differences were found between irradiated and nonirradiated groups. The results suggest either that the processes in the nerve cell body responsible for initiating and supporting axonal growth are resistant to large doses of irradiation, or that growth regulatory mechanisms in the distal axon are under local control.

  17. Fast axonal transport of kinesin in the rat visual system: functionality of kinesin heavy chain isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Elluru, R G; Bloom, G S; Brady, S T

    1995-01-01

    The mechanochemical ATPase kinesin is thought to move membrane-bounded organelles along microtubules in fast axonal transport. However, fast transport includes several classes of organelles moving at rates that differ by an order of magnitude. Further, the fact that cytoplasmic forms of kinesin exist suggests that kinesins might move cytoplasmic structures such as the cytoskeleton. To define cellular roles for kinesin, the axonal transport of kinesin was characterized. Retinal proteins were pulse-labeled, and movement of radiolabeled kinesin through optic nerve and tract into the terminals was monitored by immunoprecipitation. Heavy and light chains of kinesin appeared in nerve and tract at times consistent with fast transport. Little or no kinesin moved with slow axonal transport indicating that effectively all axonal kinesin is associated with membranous organelles. Both kinesin heavy chain molecular weight variants of 130,000 and 124,000 M(r) (KHC-A and KHC-B) moved in fast anterograde transport, but KHC-A moved at 5-6 times the rate of KHC-B. KHC-A cotransported with the synaptic vesicle marker synaptophysin, while a portion of KHC-B cotransported with the mitochondrial marker hexokinase. These results suggest that KHC-A is enriched on small tubulovesicular structures like synaptic vesicles and that at least one form of KHC-B is predominantly on mitochondria. Biochemical specialization may target kinesins to appropriate organelles and facilitate differential regulation of transport. Images PMID:7538359

  18. A role for cyclin-dependent kinase(s) in the modulation of fast anterograde axonal transport: effects defined by olomoucine and the APC tumor suppressor protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, N.; Bloom, G. S.; Brady, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Proteins that interact with both cytoskeletal and membrane components are candidates to modulate membrane trafficking. The tumor suppressor proteins neurofibromin (NF1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) both bind to microtubules and interact with membrane-associated proteins. The effects of recombinant NF1 and APC fragments on vesicle motility were evaluated by measuring fast axonal transport along microtubules in axoplasm from squid giant axons. APC4 (amino acids 1034-2844) reduced only anterograde movements, whereas APC2 (aa 1034-2130) or APC3 (aa 2130-2844) reduced both anterograde and retrograde transport. NF1 had no effect on organelle movement in either direction. Because APC contains multiple cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus phosphorylation motifs, the kinase inhibitor olomoucine was examined. At concentrations in which olomoucine is specific for cyclin-dependent kinases (5 microM), it reduced only anterograde transport, whereas anterograde and retrograde movement were both affected at concentrations at which other kinases are inhibited as well (50 microM). Both anterograde and retrograde transport also were inhibited by histone H1 and KSPXK peptides, substrates for proline-directed kinases, including CDKs. Our data suggest that CDK-like axonal kinases modulate fast anterograde transport and that other axonal kinases may be involved in modulating retrograde transport. The specific effect of APC4 on anterograde transport suggests a model in which the binding of APC to microtubules may limit the activity of axonal CDK kinase or kinases in restricted domains, thereby affecting organelle transport.

  19. Optimal myelin elongation relies on YAP activation by axonal growth and inhibition by Crb3/Hippo pathway.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Ruani N; Cotter, Laurent; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Berthelot, Jade; Bartolami, Sylvain; Pereira, Jorge A; Gonzalez, Sergio; Suter, Ueli; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Fast nerve conduction relies on successive myelin segments that electrically isolate axons. Segment geometry-diameter and length-is critical for the optimization of nerve conduction and the molecular mechanisms allowing this optimized geometry are partially known. We show here that peripheral myelin elongation is dynamically regulated by stimulation of YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription cofactor activity during axonal elongation and limited by inhibition of YAP activity via the Hippo pathway. YAP promotes myelin and non-myelin genes transcription while the polarity protein Crb3, localized at the tips of the myelin sheath, activates the Hippo pathway to temper YAP activity, therefore allowing for optimal myelin growth. Dystrophic Dy(2j/2j) mice mimicking human peripheral neuropathy with reduced internodal lengths have decreased nuclear YAP which, when corrected, leads to longer internodes. These data show a novel mechanism controlling myelin growth and nerve conduction, and provide a molecular ground for disease with short myelin segments. PMID:27435623

  20. Optimal myelin elongation relies on YAP activation by axonal growth and inhibition by Crb3/Hippo pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Ruani N.; Cotter, Laurent; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Berthelot, Jade; Bartolami, Sylvain; Pereira, Jorge A.; Gonzalez, Sergio; Suter, Ueli; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Fast nerve conduction relies on successive myelin segments that electrically isolate axons. Segment geometry—diameter and length—is critical for the optimization of nerve conduction and the molecular mechanisms allowing this optimized geometry are partially known. We show here that peripheral myelin elongation is dynamically regulated by stimulation of YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription cofactor activity during axonal elongation and limited by inhibition of YAP activity via the Hippo pathway. YAP promotes myelin and non-myelin genes transcription while the polarity protein Crb3, localized at the tips of the myelin sheath, activates the Hippo pathway to temper YAP activity, therefore allowing for optimal myelin growth. Dystrophic Dy2j/2j mice mimicking human peripheral neuropathy with reduced internodal lengths have decreased nuclear YAP which, when corrected, leads to longer internodes. These data show a novel mechanism controlling myelin growth and nerve conduction, and provide a molecular ground for disease with short myelin segments. PMID:27435623

  1. Effect of MSH/ACTH peptides on fast axonal transport in intact and regenerating sciatic nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Crescitelli, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Fast axonal transport was examined in intact rats treated with ACTH 4-10 or ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766), hypophysectomized rats, adrenalectomized rats, and in ACTH 4-10 treated rats with crushed regenerating sciatic nerves by injecting /sup 3/H-leucine into the ventral horn region of the spinal cord. The distance traveled by the transported activity along the sciatic nerve and the rate of fast axonal transport were not significantly altered as a result of treatment with ACTH 4-10, ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766), hypophysectomy, or adrenalectomy. Treatment with ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766) at concentrations of 1 ..mu..g/Kg /day and 10 ..mu..g/Kg/day caused significant reductions (62% and 64% respectively) in the crest height of the fast axonal transport curve as compared to 0.9% saline treated control animals. No significant differences were found in comparing the distance, rate, slope, or crest height of ACTH 4-10 treated animals with crushed regenerating (7 or 14d) sciatic nerves to control animals. In the group of animals in days, the amount of radiolabeled activity was significantly increased in the ACTH 4-10 treated animals as compared to control animals. The results indicate that during regeneration the peptide acts to prolong the initially high levels of synthetic activity which occur in regenerating axons.

  2. Metabolic efficiency with fast spiking in the squid axon

    PubMed Central

    Moujahid, Abdelmalik; d'Anjou, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Fundamentally, action potentials in the squid axon are consequence of the entrance of sodium ions during the depolarization of the rising phase of the spike mediated by the outflow of potassium ions during the hyperpolarization of the falling phase. Perfect metabolic efficiency with a minimum charge needed for the change in voltage during the action potential would confine sodium entry to the rising phase and potassium efflux to the falling phase. However, because sodium channels remain open to a significant extent during the falling phase, a certain overlap of inward and outward currents is observed. In this work we investigate the impact of ion overlap on the number of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecules and energy cost required per action potential as a function of the temperature in a Hodgkin–Huxley model. Based on a recent approach to computing the energy cost of neuronal action potential generation not based on ion counting, we show that increased firing frequencies induced by higher temperatures imply more efficient use of sodium entry, and then a decrease in the metabolic energy cost required to restore the concentration gradients after an action potential. Also, we determine values of sodium conductance at which the hydrolysis efficiency presents a clear minimum. PMID:23162461

  3. Chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon inhibit axonal growth by interfering with the morphogenic activity of acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Dongren; Howard, Angela; Bruun, Donald; Ajua-Alemanj, Mispa; Pickart, Cecile; Lein, Pamela J.

    2008-04-01

    A primary role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is regulation of cholinergic neurotransmission by hydrolysis of synaptic acetylcholine. In the developing nervous system, however, AChE also functions as a morphogenic factor to promote axonal growth. This raises the question of whether organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) that are known to selectively bind to and inactivate the enzymatic function of AChE also interfere with its morphogenic function to perturb axonogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we exposed primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to chlorpyrifos (CPF) or its oxon metabolite (CPFO). Both OPs significantly decreased axonal length at concentrations that had no effect on cell viability, protein synthesis or the enzymatic activity of AChE. Comparative analyses of the effects of CPF and CPFO on axonal growth in DRG neurons cultured from AChE nullizygous (AChE{sup -/-}) versus wild type (AChE{sup +/+}) mice indicated that while these OPs inhibited axonal growth in AChE{sup +/+} DRG neurons, they had no effect on axonal growth in AChE{sup -/-} DRG neurons. However, transfection of AChE{sup -/-} DRG neurons with cDNA encoding full-length AChE restored the wild type response to the axon inhibitory effects of OPs. These data indicate that inhibition of axonal growth by OPs requires AChE, but the mechanism involves inhibition of the morphogenic rather than enzymatic activity of AChE. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for explaining not only the functional deficits observed in children and animals following developmental exposure to OPs, but also the increased vulnerability of the developing nervous system to OPs.

  4. Chlorpyrifos and Chlorpyrifos-Oxon Inhibit Axonal Growth by Interfering with the Morphogenic Activity of Acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongren; Howard, Angela; Bruun, Donald; Ajua-Alemanj, Mispa; Pickart, Cecile; Lein, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    A primary role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is regulation of cholinergic neurotransmission by hydrolysis of synaptic acetylcholine. In the developing nervous system, however, AChE also functions as a morphogenic factor to promote axonal growth. This raises the question of whether organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) that are known to selectively bind to and inactivate the enzymatic function of AChE also interfere with its morphogenic function to perturb axonogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we exposed primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to chlorpyrifos (CPF) or its oxon metabolite (CPFO). Both OPs significantly decreased axonal length at concentrations that had no effect on cell viability, protein synthesis or the enzymatic activity of AChE. Comparative analyses of the effects of CPF and CPFO on axonal growth in DRG neurons cultured from AChE nullizygous (AChE−/−) versus wildtype (AChE+/+) mice indicated that while these OPs inhibited axonal growth in AChE+/+ DRG neurons, they had no effect on axonal growth in AChE−/− DRG neurons. However, transfection of AChE−/− DRG neurons with cDNA encoding full-length AChE restored the wildtype response to the axon inhibitory effects of OPs. These data indicate that inhibition of axonal growth by OPs requires AChE, but the mechanism involves inhibition of the morphogenic rather than enzymatic activity of AChE. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for explaining not only the functional deficits observed in children and animals following developmental exposure to OPs, but also the increased vulnerability of the developing nervous system to OPs. PMID:18076960

  5. Fast axonal transport of labeled proteins in motoneurons of exercise-trained rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jasmin, B.J.; Lavoie, P.A.; Gardiner, P.F.

    1988-12-01

    In this study, the fast orthograde axonal transport of radiolabeled proteins was measured to determine the effects of endurance-running training on transport velocity and amounts of transported proteins in rat sciatic motoneurons. Female rats were subjected to a progressive running-training program for 10-12 wk. Twenty-four hours after the last training session, rats underwent right L4-L5 dorsal root ganglionectomy. The next day, 20 microCi of (3H)leucine was injected bilaterally in the vicinity of the motoneuronal cell bodies supplying the sciatic nerve, to study axonal transport parameters. Results showed that peak and average transport velocities of labeled proteins were significantly (P less than 0.05) increased by 22 and 29%, respectively, in the deafferented nerves of the runners as compared with controls. Moreover, the amount of total transported protein-bound radioactivity was increased in both left (40%) and right (37%) sciatic nerves of the runners. An exhaustive exercise session reduced (P less than 0.05) peak displacement (8%) and total transported protein-bound radioactivity (36%) in the sciatic nerves of control rats, whereas no changes were noticed in trained animals. The data suggest that chronic endurance running induces significant adaptations in the fast axonal transport of labeled proteins.

  6. A fast and robust method for automated analysis of axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Oliver; Knörr, Jutta; Stroebel, Armin M; Kornhuber, Johannes; Groemer, Teja W

    2011-09-01

    Cargo movement along axons and dendrites is indispensable for the survival and maintenance of neuronal networks. Key parameters of this transport such as particle velocities and pausing times are often studied using kymograph construction, which converts the transport along a line of interest from a time-lapse movie into a position versus time image. Here we present a method for the automatic analysis of such kymographs based on the Hough transform, which is a robust and fast technique to extract lines from images. The applicability of the method was tested on simulated kymograph images and real data from axonal transport of synaptophysin and tetanus toxin as well as the velocity analysis of synaptic vesicle sharing between adjacent synapses in hippocampal neurons. Efficiency analysis revealed that the algorithm is able to detect a wide range of velocities and can be used at low signal-to-noise ratios. The present work enables the quantification of axonal transport parameters with high throughput with no a priori assumptions and minimal human intervention. PMID:21695534

  7. Flipping the transcriptional switch from myelin inhibition to axon growth in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Carmel, Jason B.; Young, Wise; Hart, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Poor regeneration of severed axons in the central nervous system (CNS) limits functional recovery. Regeneration failure involves interplay of inhibitory environmental elements and the growth state of the neuron. To find internal changes in gene expression that might overcome inhibitory environmental cues, we compared several paradigms that allow growth in the inhibitory environment. Conditions that allow axon growth by axotomized and cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on CNS myelin include immaturity (the first few postnatal days), high levels of cyclic adenosine mono phosphate (cAMP), and conditioning with a peripheral nerve lesion before explant. This shift from inhibition to growth depends on transcription. Seeking to understand the transcriptome changes that allow axon growth in the CNS, we collaborated with the Marie Filbin laboratory to identify several mRNAs that are functionally relevant, as determined by gain- and loss-of-function studies. In this Perspective, we review evidence from these experiments and discuss the merits of comparing multiple regenerative paradigms to identify a core transcriptional program for CNS axon regeneration. PMID:26236189

  8. Batrachotoxin uncouples gating charge immobilization from fast Na inactivation in squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Tanguy, J; Yeh, J Z

    1988-01-01

    The fast inactivation of sodium currents and the immobolization of sodium gating charge are thought to be closely coupled to each other. This notion was tested in the squid axon in which kinetics and steady-state properties of the gating charge movement were compared before and after removal of the Na inactivation by batrachotoxin (BTX), pronase, or chloramine-T. The immobilization of gating charge was determined by measuring the total charge movement (QON) obtained by integrating the ON gating current (Ig,ON) using a double pulse protocol. After removal of the fast inactivation with pronase or chloramine-T, the gating charge movement was no longer immobilized. In contrast, after BTX modification, the channels still exhibited an immobilization of the gating charge (QON) with an onset time course and voltage dependence similar to that for the activation process. These results show that BTX can uncouple the charge immobilization from the fast Na inactivation mechanism, suggesting that the Na gating charge movement can be immobilized independently of the inactivation of the channel. PMID:2852036

  9. A cortical astrocyte subpopulation inhibits axon growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Zhe; Gou, Lin; Xu, Hanpeng

    2015-08-01

    Astrocytes are the most heterogeneous and predominant glial cell type in the central nervous system. However, the functional significance of this heterogeneity remains to be elucidated. Following injury, damaged astrocytes inhibit axonal regeneration in vivo and in vitro. Cultured primary astrocytes are commonly considered good supportive substrates for neuron attachment and axon regeneration. However, it is not known whether different populations of cells in the heterogeneous astrocyte culture affect neuron behavior in the same way. In the present study, the effect of astrocyte heterogeneity on neuronal attachment and neurite outgrowth was examined using an in vitro and in vivo coculture system. In vitro, neonatal cortical astrocytes were co-cultured with purified dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and astrocyte growth morphology, neuron attachment and neurite growth were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the heterogeneous astrocyte cells showed two different types of growth pattern, typical and atypical. Typical astrocytes were supportive to neuron attachment and neurite growth, which was consistent with previous studies, whereas atypical astrocytes inhibited neuron attachment and neurite growth. These inhibitory astrocytes exhibited a special growth pattern with various shapes and sizes, a high cell density, few oligodendrocytes on the top layer and occupied a smaller growth area compared with typical astrocytes. Neurites extended freely on typical supportive astrocyte populations, however, moved away when they reached atypical astrocyte growth pattern. Neurons growing on the atypical astrocyte pattern demonstrated minimal neurite outgrowth and these neurites had a dystrophic appearance, however, neuronal survival was unaffected. Immunocytochemistry studies demonstrated that these atypical inhibitory astrocytes were glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive cells. The existence of inhibitory astrocyte subpopulations in normal astrocytes reflects the

  10. Model of very fast (>75 Hz) network oscillations generated by electrical coupling between the proximal axons of cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Traub, Roger D; Middleton, Steven J; Knöpfel, Thomas; Whittington, Miles A

    2009-01-01

    Very fast oscillations (VFO, >75 Hz) occur transiently in vivo, in the cerebellum of mice genetically modified to model Angelman syndrome, and in a mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome. We recently reported VFO in slices of mouse cerebellar cortex (Crus I and II of ansiform and paramedian lobules), either in association with gamma oscillations (~40 Hz, evoked by nicotine), or in isolation (evoked by nicotine in combination with GABAA receptor blockade). The experimental data suggest a role for electrical coupling between Purkinje cells (blockade of VFO by drugs reducing gap junction conductance, and spikelets in some Purkinje cells); and the data suggest the specific involvement of Purkinje cell axons (because of field oscillation maxima in the granular layer). We show here that a detailed network model (1,000 multicompartment Purkinje cells) replicates the experimental data, when gap junctions are located on the proximal axons of Purkinje cells, provided sufficient spontaneous firing is present. Unlike other VFO models, most somatic spikelets do not correspond to axonal spikes in the parent axon, but reflect spikes in electrically coupled axons. The model predicts gating of VFO frequency by gNa inactivation, and experiments prolonging this inactivation time constant, with β-pompilidotoxin, are consistent with this prediction. The model also predicts that cerebellar VFO can be explained as an electrically coupled system of axons which are not intrinsic oscillators: the electrically uncoupled cells do not individually oscillate (in the model), and axonal firing rates are much lower in the uncoupled state than in the coupled state. PMID:18973579

  11. REDD2-mediated inhibition of mTOR promotes dendrite retraction induced by axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Morquette, B; Morquette, P; Agostinone, J; Feinstein, E; McKinney, R A; Kolta, A; Di Polo, A

    2015-04-01

    Dendritic defects occur in neurodegenerative diseases accompanied by axonopathy, yet the mechanisms that regulate these pathologic changes are poorly understood. Using Thy1-YFPH mice subjected to optic nerve axotomy, we demonstrate early retraction of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dendrites and selective loss of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity, which precede soma loss. Axonal injury triggered rapid upregulation of the stress-induced protein REDD2 (regulated in development and DNA damage response 2), a potent inhibitor of mTOR. Short interfering RNA-mediated REDD2 knockdown restored mTOR activity and rescued dendritic length, area and branch complexity in a rapamycin-dependent manner. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that REDD2 depletion leading to mTOR activation in RGCs restored their light response properties. Lastly, we show that REDD2-dependent mTOR activity extended RGC survival following axonal damage. These results indicate that injury-induced stress leads to REDD2 upregulation, mTOR inhibition and dendrite pathology causing neuronal dysfunction and subsequent cell death. PMID:25257176

  12. Release of kinesin from vesicles by hsc70 and regulation of fast axonal transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, M. Y.; Morfini, G.; Szebenyi, G.; Brady, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The nature of kinesin interactions with membrane-bound organelles and mechanisms for regulation of kinesin-based motility have both been surprisingly difficult to define. Most kinesin is recovered in supernatants with standard protocols for purification of motor proteins, but kinesin recovered on membrane-bound organelles is tightly bound. Partitioning of kinesin between vesicle and cytosolic fractions is highly sensitive to buffer composition. Addition of either N-ethylmaleimide or EDTA to homogenization buffers significantly increased the fraction of kinesin bound to organelles. Given that an antibody against kinesin light chain tandem repeats also releases kinesin from vesicles, these observations indicated that specific cytoplasmic factors may regulate kinesin release from membranes. Kinesin light tandem repeats contain DnaJ-like motifs, so the effects of hsp70 chaperones were evaluated. Hsc70 released kinesin from vesicles in an MgATP-dependent and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive manner. Recombinant kinesin light chains inhibited kinesin release by hsc70 and stimulated the hsc70 ATPase. Hsc70 actions may provide a mechanism to regulate kinesin function by releasing kinesin from cargo in specific subcellular domains, thereby effecting delivery of axonally transported materials.

  13. Inhibition of TLR4 Signalling-Induced Inflammation Attenuates Secondary Injury after Diffuse Axonal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yonglin; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Junjie; Ma, Xudong; Huang, Tingqin; Pang, Honggang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that secondary injury after diffuse axonal injury (DAI) damages more axons than the initial insult, but the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are not fully understood. Recent studies show that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a critical role in promoting adaptive immune responses and have been shown to be associated with brain damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the TLR4 signalling pathway in secondary axonal injury in the cortices of DAI rats. TLR4 was mainly localized in microglial cells and neurons, and the levels of TLR4 downstream signalling molecules, including TLR4, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, toll/IR-1-(TIR-) domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon-beta, interferon regulatory factor 3, interferon β, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65, and phospho-NF-κB p65, significantly increased and peaked at 1 d after DAI. Inhibition of TLR4 by TAK-242 attenuated apoptosis, neuronal and axonal injury, and glial responses. The neuroprotective effects of TLR4 inhibition were associated with decreases in the levels of TLR4 downstream signalling molecules and inflammatory factors, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumour necrosis factor-α. These results suggest that the TLR4 signalling pathway plays an important role in secondary injury and may be an important therapeutic target following DAI. PMID:27478307

  14. Pseudophosphorylation of tau at S422 enhances SDS-stable dimer formation and impairs both anterograde and retrograde fast axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Tiernan, Chelsea T; Combs, Benjamin; Cox, Kristine; Morfini, Gerardo; Brady, Scott T; Counts, Scott E; Kanaan, Nicholas M

    2016-09-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), tau undergoes numerous modifications, including increased phosphorylation at serine-422 (pS422). In the human brain, pS422 tau protein is found in prodromal AD, correlates well with cognitive decline and neuropil thread pathology, and appears associated with increased oligomer formation and exposure of the N-terminal phosphatase-activating domain (PAD). However, whether S422 phosphorylation contributes to toxic mechanisms associated with disease-related forms of tau remains unknown. Here, we report that S422-pseudophosphorylated tau (S422E) lengthens the nucleation phase of aggregation without altering the extent of aggregation or the types of aggregates formed. When compared to unmodified tau aggregates, the S422E modification significantly increased the amount of SDS-stable tau dimers, despite similar levels of immunoreactivity with an oligomer-selective antibody (TOC1) and another antibody that reports PAD exposure (TNT1). Vesicle motility assays in isolated squid axoplasm further revealed that S422E tau monomers inhibited anterograde, kinesin-1 dependent fast axonal transport (FAT). Unexpectedly, and unlike unmodified tau aggregates, which selectively inhibit anterograde FAT, aggregates composed of S422E tau were found to inhibit both anterograde and retrograde FAT. Highlighting the relevance of these findings to human disease, pS422 tau was found to colocalize with tau oligomers and with a fraction of tau showing increased PAD exposure in the human AD brain. This study identifies novel effects of pS422 on tau biochemical properties, including prolonged nucleation and enhanced dimer formation, which correlate with a distinct inhibitory effect on FAT. Taken together, these findings identify a novel mechanistic basis by which pS422 confers upon tau a toxic effect that may directly contribute to axonal dysfunction in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:27373205

  15. N- and L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Mediate Fast Calcium Transients in Axonal Shafts of Mouse Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Barzan, Ruxandra; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Kukley, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na+ and K+ channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca2+ ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca2+ elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca2+ indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca2+ imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz). We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca2+ concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e., occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca2+ imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca2+ entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca2+ may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:27313508

  16. Robo2 acts in trans to inhibit Slit-Robo1 repulsion in pre-crossing commissural axons

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Timothy A; Santiago, Celine; Arbeille, Elise; Bashaw, Greg J

    2015-01-01

    During nervous system development, commissural axons cross the midline despite the presence of repellant ligands. In Drosophila, commissural axons avoid premature responsiveness to the midline repellant Slit by expressing the endosomal sorting receptor Commissureless, which reduces surface expression of the Slit receptor Roundabout1 (Robo1). In this study, we describe a distinct mechanism to inhibit Robo1 repulsion and promote midline crossing, in which Roundabout2 (Robo2) binds to and prevents Robo1 signaling. Unexpectedly, we find that Robo2 is expressed in midline cells during the early stages of commissural axon guidance, and that over-expression of Robo2 can rescue robo2-dependent midline crossing defects non-cell autonomously. We show that the extracellular domains required for binding to Robo1 are also required for Robo2's ability to promote midline crossing, in both gain-of-function and rescue assays. These findings indicate that at least two independent mechanisms to overcome Slit-Robo1 repulsion in pre-crossing commissural axons have evolved in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08407.001 PMID:26186094

  17. DRP1 inhibition rescues retinal ganglion cells and their axons by preserving mitochondrial integrity in a mouse model of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, K-Y; Perkins, G A; Shim, M S; Bushong, E; Alcasid, N; Ju, S; Ellisman, M H; Weinreb, R N; Ju, W-K

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness and is characterized by slow and progressive degeneration of the optic nerve head axons and retinal ganglion cell (RGC), leading to loss of visual function. Although oxidative stress and/or alteration of mitochondrial (mt) dynamics induced by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are associated with this neurodegenerative disease, the mechanisms that regulate mt dysfunction-mediated glaucomatous neurodegeneration are poorly understood. Using a mouse model of glaucoma, DBA/2J (D2), which spontaneously develops elevated IOP, as well as an in vitro RGC culture system, we show here that oxidative stress, as evidenced by increasing superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and mt transcription factor A (Tfam) protein expression, triggers mt fission and loss by increasing dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) in the retina of glaucomatous D2 mice as well as in cultured RGCs exposed to elevated hydrostatic pressure in vitro. DRP1 inhibition by overexpressing DRP1 K38A mutant blocks mt fission and triggers a subsequent reduction of oxidative stress, as evidenced by decreasing SOD2 and Tfam protein expression. DRP1 inhibition promotes RGC survival by increasing phosphorylation of Bad at serine 112 in the retina and preserves RGC axons by maintaining mt integrity in the glial lamina of glaucomatous D2 mice. These findings demonstrate an important vicious cycle involved in glaucomatous neurodegeneration that starts with elevated IOP producing oxidative stress; the oxidative stress then leads to mt fission and a specific form of mt dysfunction that generates further oxidative stress, thus perpetuating the cycle. Our findings suggest that DRP1 is a potential therapeutic target for ameliorating oxidative stress-mediated mt fission and dysfunction in RGC and its axons during glaucomatous neurodegeneration. Thus, DRP1 inhibition may provide a new therapeutic strategy for protecting both RGCs and their axons in glaucoma and other optic

  18. Lithium Enhances Axonal Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve by Inhibiting Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Activation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huanxing; Yuan, Qiuju; Qin, Dajiang; Yang, Xiaoying; So, Kwok-Fai; Wu, Wutian

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury often involves traumatic root avulsion resulting in permanent paralysis of the innervated muscles. The lack of sufficient regeneration from spinal motoneurons to the peripheral nerve (PN) is considered to be one of the major causes of the unsatisfactory outcome of various surgical interventions for repair of the devastating injury. The present study was undertaken to investigate potential inhibitory signals which influence axonal regeneration after root avulsion injury. The results of the study showed that root avulsion triggered GSK-3β activation in the injured motoneurons and remaining axons in the ventral funiculus. Systemic application of a clinical dose of lithium suppressed activated GSK-3β in the lesioned spinal cord to the normal level and induced extensive axonal regeneration into replanted ventral roots. Our study suggests that GSK-3β activity is involved in negative regulation for axonal elongation and regeneration and lithium, the specific GSK-3β inhibitor, enhances motoneuron regeneration from CNS to PNS. PMID:24967390

  19. Axon growth inhibition by RhoA/ROCK in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuki; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2014-01-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) is a serine/threonine kinase and a downstream target of the small GTPase Rho. The RhoA/ROCK pathway is associated with various neuronal functions such as migration, dendrite development, and axonal extension. Evidence from animal studies reveals that RhoA/ROCK signaling is involved in various central nervous system (CNS) diseases, including optic nerve and spinal cord injuries, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases. Given that RhoA/ROCK plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of CNS diseases, the development of therapeutic agents targeting this pathway is expected to contribute to the treatment of CNS diseases. The RhoA/ROCK pathway mediates the effects of myelin-associated axon growth inhibitors—Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein (OMgp), and repulsive guidance molecule (RGM). Blocking RhoA/ROCK signaling can reverse the inhibitory effects of these molecules on axon outgrowth, and promotes axonal sprouting and functional recovery in animal models of CNS injury. To date, several RhoA/ROCK inhibitors have been under development or in clinical trials as therapeutic agents for neurological disorders. In this review, we focus on the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway in neurological disorders. We also discuss the potential therapeutic approaches of RhoA/ROCK inhibitors for various neurological disorders. PMID:25374504

  20. Quantitative measurements and modeling of cargo–motor interactions during fast transport in the living axon

    PubMed Central

    Seamster, Pamela E; Loewenberg, Michael; Pascal, Jennifer; Chauviere, Arnaud; Gonzales, Aaron; Cristini, Vittorio; Bearer, Elaine L

    2013-01-01

    The kinesins have long been known to drive microtubule-based transport of sub-cellular components, yet the mechanisms of their attachment to cargo remain a mystery. Several different cargo-receptors have been proposed based on their in vitro binding affinities to kinesin-1. Only two of these—phosphatidyl inositol, a negatively charged lipid, and the carboxyl terminus of the amyloid precursor protein (APP-C), a trans-membrane protein—have been reported to mediate motility in living systems. A major question is how these many different cargo, receptors and motors interact to produce the complex choreography of vesicular transport within living cells. Here we describe an experimental assay that identifies cargo–motor receptors by their ability to recruit active motors and drive transport of exogenous cargo towards the synapse in living axons. Cargo is engineered by derivatizing the surface of polystyrene fluorescent nanospheres (100 nm diameter) with charged residues or with synthetic peptides derived from candidate motor receptor proteins, all designed to display a terminal COOH group. After injection into the squid giant axon, particle movements are imaged by laser-scanning confocal time-lapse microscopy. In this report we compare the motility of negatively charged beads with APP-C beads in the presence of glycine-conjugated non-motile beads using new strategies to measure bead movements. The ensuing quantitative analysis of time-lapse digital sequences reveals detailed information about bead movements: instantaneous and maximum velocities, run lengths, pause frequencies and pause durations. These measurements provide parameters for a mathematical model that predicts the spatiotemporal evolution of distribution of the two different types of bead cargo in the axon. The results reveal that negatively charged beads differ from APP-C beads in velocity and dispersion, and predict that at long time points APP-C will achieve greater progress towards the presynaptic

  1. Quantitative measurements and modeling of cargo-motor interactions during fast transport in the living axon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seamster, Pamela E.; Loewenberg, Michael; Pascal, Jennifer; Chauviere, Arnaud; Gonzales, Aaron; Cristini, Vittorio; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2012-10-01

    The kinesins have long been known to drive microtubule-based transport of sub-cellular components, yet the mechanisms of their attachment to cargo remain a mystery. Several different cargo-receptors have been proposed based on their in vitro binding affinities to kinesin-1. Only two of these—phosphatidyl inositol, a negatively charged lipid, and the carboxyl terminus of the amyloid precursor protein (APP-C), a trans-membrane protein—have been reported to mediate motility in living systems. A major question is how these many different cargo, receptors and motors interact to produce the complex choreography of vesicular transport within living cells. Here we describe an experimental assay that identifies cargo-motor receptors by their ability to recruit active motors and drive transport of exogenous cargo towards the synapse in living axons. Cargo is engineered by derivatizing the surface of polystyrene fluorescent nanospheres (100 nm diameter) with charged residues or with synthetic peptides derived from candidate motor receptor proteins, all designed to display a terminal COOH group. After injection into the squid giant axon, particle movements are imaged by laser-scanning confocal time-lapse microscopy. In this report we compare the motility of negatively charged beads with APP-C beads in the presence of glycine-conjugated non-motile beads using new strategies to measure bead movements. The ensuing quantitative analysis of time-lapse digital sequences reveals detailed information about bead movements: instantaneous and maximum velocities, run lengths, pause frequencies and pause durations. These measurements provide parameters for a mathematical model that predicts the spatiotemporal evolution of distribution of the two different types of bead cargo in the axon. The results reveal that negatively charged beads differ from APP-C beads in velocity and dispersion, and predict that at long time points APP-C will achieve greater progress towards the presynaptic

  2. 'FAS't inhibition of malaria.

    PubMed

    Surolia, Avadhesha; Ramya, T N C; Ramya, V; Surolia, Namita

    2004-11-01

    Malaria, a tropical disease caused by Plasmodium sp., has been haunting mankind for ages. Unsuccessful attempts to develop a vaccine, the emergence of resistance against the existing drugs and the increasing mortality rate all call for immediate strategies to treat it. Intense attempts are underway to develop potent analogues of the current antimalarials, as well as a search for novel drug targets in the parasite. The indispensability of apicoplast (plastid) to the survival of the parasite has attracted a lot of attention in the recent past. The present review describes the origin and the essentiality of this relict organelle to the parasite. We also show that among the apicoplast specific pathways, the fatty acid biosynthesis system is an attractive target, because its inhibition decimates the parasite swiftly unlike the 'delayed death' phenotype exhibited by the inhibition of the other apicoplast processes. As the enzymes of the fatty acid biosynthesis system are present as discrete entities, unlike those of the host, they are amenable to inhibition without impairing the operation of the host-specific pathway. The present review describes the role of these enzymes, the status of their molecular characterization and the current advancements in the area of developing inhibitors against each of the enzymes of the pathway. PMID:15315475

  3. Firing regulation of fast-spiking interneurons by autaptic inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Daqing; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Wu, Shengdun; Xia, Chuan; Zhang, Yangsong; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    Fast-spiking (FS) interneurons in the brain are self-innervated by powerful inhibitory GABAergic autaptic connections. By computational modelling, we investigate how autaptic inhibition regulates the firing response of such interneurons. Our results indicate that autaptic inhibition both boosts the current threshold for action potential generation and modulates the input-output gain of FS interneurons. The autaptic transmission delay is identified as a key parameter that controls the firing patterns and determines multistability regions of FS interneurons. Furthermore, we observe that neuronal noise influences the firing regulation of FS interneurons by autaptic inhibition and extends their dynamic range for encoding inputs. Importantly, autaptic inhibition modulates noise-induced irregular firing of FS interneurons, such that coherent firing appears at an optimal autaptic inhibition level. Our results reveal the functional roles of autaptic inhibition in taming the firing dynamics of FS interneurons.

  4. hnRNP-Q1 represses nascent axon growth in cortical neurons by inhibiting Gap-43 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kathryn R.; McAninch, Damian S.; Stefanovic, Snezana; Xing, Lei; Allen, Megan; Li, Wenqi; Feng, Yue; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita; Bassell, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by mRNA-binding proteins is critical for neuronal development and function. hnRNP-Q1 is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA processing events, including translational repression. hnRNP-Q1 is highly expressed in brain tissue, suggesting a function in regulating genes critical for neuronal development. In this study, we have identified Growth-associated protein 43 (Gap-43) mRNA as a novel target of hnRNP-Q1 and have demonstrated that hnRNP-Q1 represses Gap-43 mRNA translation and consequently GAP-43 function. GAP-43 is a neuronal protein that regulates actin dynamics in growth cones and facilitates axonal growth. Previous studies have identified factors that regulate Gap-43 mRNA stability and localization, but it remains unclear whether Gap-43 mRNA translation is also regulated. Our results reveal that hnRNP-Q1 knockdown increased nascent axon length, total neurite length, and neurite number in mouse embryonic cortical neurons and enhanced Neuro2a cell process extension; these phenotypes were rescued by GAP-43 knockdown. Additionally, we have identified a G-quadruplex structure in the 5′ untranslated region of Gap-43 mRNA that directly interacts with hnRNP-Q1 as a means to inhibit Gap-43 mRNA translation. Therefore hnRNP-Q1–mediated repression of Gap-43 mRNA translation provides an additional mechanism for regulating GAP-43 expression and function and may be critical for neuronal development. PMID:26658614

  5. Aluminum inhibits neurofilament assembly, cytoskeletal incorporation, and axonal transport. Dynamic nature of aluminum-induced perikaryal neurofilament accumulations as revealed by subunit turnover.

    PubMed

    Shea, T B; Wheeler, E; Jung, C

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism by which aluminum induces formation of perikaryal neurofilament (NF) inclusions remains unclear. Aluminum treatment inhibits: 1. The incorporation of newly synthesized NF subunits into Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton of axonal neurites; 2. Their degradation and dephosphorylation; 3. Their translocation into axonal neurites. It also fosters the accumulation of phosphorylated NFs within perikarya. In the present study, we addressed the relationship among these effects. Aluminum reduced the assembly of newly synthesized NF subunits into NFs. During examination of those subunits that did assemble in the presence of aluminum, it was revealed that aluminum also interfered with transport of newly assembled NFs into axonal neurites. Similarly, a delay in axonal transport of microinjected biotinylated NF-H was observed in aluminum-treated cells. Aluminum also inhibited the incorporation of newly synthesized and microinjected subunits into the Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton within both perikarya and neurites. Once incorporated into Triton-insoluble cytoskeletons, however, biotinylated subunits were retained within perikarya of aluminum-treated cells to a greater extent than within untreated cells. Notably, these subunits were depleted in the presence and absence of aluminum within 48 h, despite the persistence of the aluminum-induced perikaryal accumulation itself, suggesting that individual NF subunits undergo turnover even within aluminum-induced perikaryal accumulations. These findings demonstrate that aluminum interferes with multiple aspects of neurofilament dynamics and furthermore leaves open the possibility that aluminum-induced perikaryal NF whorls may not represent permanent structures, but rather may require continued recruitment of cytoskeletal constituents. PMID:9437656

  6. Serotonin spillover onto the axon initial segment of motoneurons induces central fatigue by inhibiting action potential initiation.

    PubMed

    Cotel, Florence; Exley, Richard; Cragg, Stephanie J; Perrier, Jean-François

    2013-03-19

    Motor fatigue induced by physical activity is an everyday experience characterized by a decreased capacity to generate motor force. Factors in both muscles and the central nervous system are involved. The central component of fatigue modulates the ability of motoneurons to activate muscle adequately independently of the muscle physiology. Indirect evidence indicates that central fatigue is caused by serotonin (5-HT), but the cellular mechanisms are unknown. In a slice preparation from the spinal cord of the adult turtle, we found that prolonged stimulation of the raphe-spinal pathway--as during motor exercise--activated 5-HT1A receptors that decreased motoneuronal excitability. Electrophysiological tests combined with pharmacology showed that focal activation of 5-HT1A receptors at the axon initial segment (AIS), but not on other motoneuronal compartments, inhibited the action potential initiation by modulating a Na(+) current. Immunohistochemical staining against 5-HT revealed a high-density innervation of 5-HT terminals on the somatodendritic membrane and a complete absence on the AIS. This observation raised the hypothesis that a 5-HT spillover activates receptors at this latter compartment. We tested it by measuring the level of extracellular 5-HT with cyclic voltammetry and found that prolonged stimulations of the raphe-spinal pathway increased the level of 5-HT to a concentration sufficient to activate 5-HT1A receptors. Together our results demonstrate that prolonged release of 5-HT during motor activity spills over from its release sites to the AIS of motoneurons. Here, activated 5-HT1A receptors inhibit firing and, thereby, muscle contraction. Hence, this is a cellular mechanism for central fatigue. PMID:23487756

  7. Axon guidance factor SLIT2 inhibits neural invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Göhrig, Andreas; Detjen, Katharina M; Hilfenhaus, Georg; Körner, Jan L; Welzel, Martina; Arsenic, Ruza; Schmuck, Rosa; Bahra, Marcus; Wu, Jane Y; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Fischer, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) metastasizes by neural, vascular, and local invasion routes, which limit patient survival. In nerves and vessels, SLIT2 and its ROBO receptors constitute repellent guidance cues that also direct epithelial branching. Thus, the SLIT2-ROBO system may represent a key pinch point to regulate PDAC spread. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that escaping from repellent SLIT2-ROBO signaling is essential to enable PDAC cells to appropriate their local stromal infrastructure for dissemination. Through immunohistochemical analysis, we detected SLIT2 receptors ROBO1 and ROBO4 on epithelia, nerves, and vessels in healthy pancreas and PDAC specimens, respectively. SLIT2 mRNA expression was reduced in PDAC compared with nontransformed pancreatic tissues and cell lines, suggesting a reduction in SLIT2-ROBO pathway activity in PDAC. In support of this interpretation, restoring the SLIT2 expression in SLIT2-deficient PDAC cells inhibited their bidirectional chemoattraction with neural cells, and more specifically, impaired unidirectional PDAC cell navigation along outgrowing neurites in models of neural invasion. Restoring autocrine/paracrine SLIT2 signaling was also sufficient to inhibit the directed motility of PDAC cells, but not their random movement. Conversely, RNA interference-mediated silencing of ROBO1 stimulated the motility of SLIT2-competent PDAC cells. Furthermore, culture supernatants from SLIT2-competent PDAC cells impaired migration of endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells), whereas an N-terminal SLIT2 cleavage fragment stimulated such migration. In vivo investigations of pancreatic tumors with restored SLIT2 expression demonstrated reduced invasion, metastasis, and vascularization, with opposing effects produced by ROBO1 silencing in tumor cells or sequestration of endogenous SLIT2. Analysis of clinical specimens of PDAC showed that those with low SLIT2 mRNA expression exhibited a higher incidence

  8. Inhibition of TFG function causes hereditary axon degeneration by impairing endoplasmic reticulum structure

    PubMed Central

    Beetz, Christian; Johnson, Adam; Schuh, Amber L.; Thakur, Seema; Varga, Rita-Eva; Fothergill, Thomas; Hertel, Nicole; Bomba-Warczak, Ewa; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Altmüller, Janine; Saxena, Renu; Chapman, Edwin R.; Dent, Erik W.; Nürnberg, Peter; Audhya, Anjon

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of gait disorders. Their pathological hallmark is a length-dependent distal axonopathy of nerve fibers in the corticospinal tract. Involvement of other neurons can cause additional neurological symptoms, which define a diverse set of complex hereditary spastic paraplegias. We present two siblings who have the unusual combination of early-onset spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy, and neuropathy. Genome-wide SNP-typing, linkage analysis, and exome sequencing revealed a homozygous c.316C>T (p.R106C) variant in the Trk-fused gene (TFG) as the only plausible mutation. Biochemical characterization of the mutant protein demonstrated a defect in its ability to self-assemble into an oligomeric complex, which is critical for normal TFG function. In cell lines, TFG inhibition slows protein secretion from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and alters ER morphology, disrupting organization of peripheral ER tubules and causing collapse of the ER network onto the underlying microtubule cytoskeleton. The present study provides a unique link between altered ER architecture and neurodegeneration. PMID:23479643

  9. Fast Synaptic Inhibition in Spinal Sensory Processing and Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Wildner, Hendrik; Yevenes, Gonzalo E.

    2013-01-01

    The two amino acids γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) and glycine mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in different CNS areas and serve pivotal roles in the spinal sensory processing. Under healthy conditions, they limit the excitability of spinal terminals of primary sensory nerve fibers and of intrinsic dorsal horn neurons through pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and thereby facilitate the spatial and temporal discrimination of sensory stimuli. Removal of fast inhibition not only reduces the fidelity of normal sensory processing but also provokes symptoms very much reminiscent of pathological and chronic pain syndromes. This review summarizes our knowledge of the molecular bases of spinal inhibitory neurotransmission and its organization in dorsal horn sensory circuits. Particular emphasis is placed on the role and mechanisms of spinal inhibitory malfunction in inflammatory and neuropathic chronic pain syndromes. PMID:22298656

  10. Fast online determination of surfactant inhibition in acidic phase bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Feitkenhauer, H

    2004-01-01

    Surfactants have been shown to inhibit the anaerobic digestion process severely, with the methanogenic microorganisms being the most affected. The diverse nature of surfactants used even in one (e.g. textile finishing) plant makes an online determination of surfactants sometimes very difficult and expensive. Therefore a fast online determination of inhibitory effects on the acidogenic microorganisms (first step of the degradation cascade) can help to give an early warning signal or to calculate a "pseudo"-surfactant concentration. In a two-phase system this information can be used to protect the methanogenic reactor against surfactant overloading and its long term negative effects. In this paper it is shown that the inhibition is a consequence of microbial inhibition and is not caused by an inactivation of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes (released by the cells for biopolymer cleavage). A titration technique was successfully employed to measure the surfactant inhibition in a laboratory-scale acidification reactor. Additional experiments demonstrate (using sodium dodecyl sulfate as the model substance) how inhibitory effects (and strategies to overcome inhibitory effects) can be investigated efficiently. PMID:14979534

  11. Sustained in vivo inhibition of protein domains using single-chain Fv recombinant antibodies and its application to dissect RGMa activity on axonal outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Tassew, Nardos G; Charish, Jason; Chestopalova, Larisa; Monnier, Philippe P

    2009-01-28

    Antibodies are powerful tools for delineating the specific function of protein domains, yet several limitations restrict their in vivo applicability. Here we present a new method to obtain sustained in vivo inhibition of specific protein domains using recombinant antibodies. We show that long term in vivo expression of single-chain Fv (scFv) fragments in the developing CNS can be achieved through retroviral transduction. Moreover, specific scFvs generated against the N- and C-terminal domains of the repulsive guidance molecule, RGMa, prevent proper axon targeting in the visual system. This work reveals a previously unappreciated role for the RGMa N-terminal domain in axon guidance, and provides a novel, broadly applicable and rapid procedure to functionally antagonize any protein domain in vivo. PMID:19176821

  12. Regulating Set-β's Subcellular Localization Toggles Its Function between Inhibiting and Promoting Axon Growth and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Morkin, Melina I.; Fernandez, Stephanie G.; Mlacker, Gregory M.; Shechter, Jesse M.; Liu, Xiongfei; Patel, Karan H.; Lapins, Allison; Yang, Steven; Dombrowski, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The failure of the CNS neurons to regenerate axons after injury or stroke is a major clinical problem. Transcriptional regulators like Set-β are well positioned to regulate intrinsic axon regeneration capacity, which declines developmentally in maturing CNS neurons. Set-β also functions at cellular membranes and its subcellular localization is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease, but many of its biological mechanisms have not been explored in neurons. We found that Set-β was upregulated postnatally in CNS neurons, and was primarily localized to the nucleus but was also detected in the cytoplasm and adjacent to the plasma membrane. Remarkably, nuclear Set-β suppressed, whereas Set-β localized to cytoplasmic membranes promoted neurite growth in rodent retinal ganglion cells and hippocampal neurons. Mimicking serine 9 phosphorylation, as found in Alzheimer's disease brains, delayed nuclear import and furthermore blocked the ability of nuclear Set-β to suppress neurite growth. We also present data on gene regulation and protein binding partner recruitment by Set-β in primary neurons, raising the hypothesis that nuclear Set-β may preferentially regulate gene expression whereas Set-β at cytoplasmic membranes may regulate unique cofactors, including PP2A, which we show also regulates axon growth in vitro. Finally, increasing recruitment of Set-β to cellular membranes promoted adult rat optic nerve axon regeneration after injury in vivo. Thus, Set-β differentially regulates axon growth and regeneration depending on subcellular localization and phosphorylation. PMID:24849368

  13. Fast calcium wave inhibits excessive apoptosis during epithelial wound healing.

    PubMed

    Justet, Cristian; Hernández, Julio A; Torriglia, Alicia; Chifflet, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Successful wound closure is mainly the result of two cellular processes: migration and proliferation. Apoptosis has also been suggested to play a role in the mechanisms of wound healing. The fast calcium wave (FCW), triggered immediately after a wound is produced, has been proposed to be involved in determining healing responses in epithelia. We have explored the effects of the reversible inhibition of FCW on the apoptotic and proliferative responses of healing bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) cells in culture. The most important findings of this study are that caspase-dependent apoptosis occurs during the healing process, that the amount of apoptosis has a linear dependence on the migrated distance, and that FCW inhibition greatly increases the apoptotic index. We have further been able to establish that FCW plays a role in the control of cell proliferation during BCE wound healing. These results indicate that one of the main roles of the wave is to inhibit an excessive apoptotic response of the healing migrating cells. This property might represent a basic mechanism to allow sufficient migration and proliferation of the healing cells to assure proper restitution of the injured tissue. PMID:26987821

  14. Biophysical Network Modelling of the dLGN Circuit: Different Effects of Triadic and Axonal Inhibition on Visual Responses of Relay Cells.

    PubMed

    Heiberg, Thomas; Hagen, Espen; Halnes, Geir; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2016-05-01

    Despite its prominent placement between the retina and primary visual cortex in the early visual pathway, the role of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) in molding and regulating the visual signals entering the brain is still poorly understood. A striking feature of the dLGN circuit is that relay cells (RCs) and interneurons (INs) form so-called triadic synapses, where an IN dendritic terminal can be simultaneously postsynaptic to a retinal ganglion cell (GC) input and presynaptic to an RC dendrite, allowing for so-called triadic inhibition. Taking advantage of a recently developed biophysically detailed multicompartmental model for an IN, we here investigate putative effects of these different inhibitory actions of INs, i.e., triadic inhibition and standard axonal inhibition, on the response properties of RCs. We compute and investigate so-called area-response curves, that is, trial-averaged visual spike responses vs. spot size, for circular flashing spots in a network of RCs and INs. The model parameters are grossly tuned to give results in qualitative accordance with previous in vivo data of responses to such stimuli for cat GCs and RCs. We particularly investigate how the model ingredients affect salient response properties such as the receptive-field center size of RCs and INs, maximal responses and center-surround antagonisms. For example, while triadic inhibition not involving firing of IN action potentials was found to provide only a non-linear gain control of the conversion of input spikes to output spikes by RCs, axonal inhibition was in contrast found to substantially affect the receptive-field center size: the larger the inhibition, the more the RC center size shrinks compared to the GC providing the feedforward excitation. Thus, a possible role of the different inhibitory actions from INs to RCs in the dLGN circuit is to provide separate mechanisms for overall gain control (direct triadic inhibition) and regulation of spatial resolution

  15. Biophysical Network Modelling of the dLGN Circuit: Different Effects of Triadic and Axonal Inhibition on Visual Responses of Relay Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heiberg, Thomas; Hagen, Espen; Halnes, Geir

    2016-01-01

    Despite its prominent placement between the retina and primary visual cortex in the early visual pathway, the role of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) in molding and regulating the visual signals entering the brain is still poorly understood. A striking feature of the dLGN circuit is that relay cells (RCs) and interneurons (INs) form so-called triadic synapses, where an IN dendritic terminal can be simultaneously postsynaptic to a retinal ganglion cell (GC) input and presynaptic to an RC dendrite, allowing for so-called triadic inhibition. Taking advantage of a recently developed biophysically detailed multicompartmental model for an IN, we here investigate putative effects of these different inhibitory actions of INs, i.e., triadic inhibition and standard axonal inhibition, on the response properties of RCs. We compute and investigate so-called area-response curves, that is, trial-averaged visual spike responses vs. spot size, for circular flashing spots in a network of RCs and INs. The model parameters are grossly tuned to give results in qualitative accordance with previous in vivo data of responses to such stimuli for cat GCs and RCs. We particularly investigate how the model ingredients affect salient response properties such as the receptive-field center size of RCs and INs, maximal responses and center-surround antagonisms. For example, while triadic inhibition not involving firing of IN action potentials was found to provide only a non-linear gain control of the conversion of input spikes to output spikes by RCs, axonal inhibition was in contrast found to substantially affect the receptive-field center size: the larger the inhibition, the more the RC center size shrinks compared to the GC providing the feedforward excitation. Thus, a possible role of the different inhibitory actions from INs to RCs in the dLGN circuit is to provide separate mechanisms for overall gain control (direct triadic inhibition) and regulation of spatial resolution

  16. Fenestration nodes and the wide submyelinic space form the basis for the unusually fast impulse conduction of shrimp myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Xu, K; Terakawa, S

    1999-08-01

    Saltatory impulse conduction in invertebrates is rare and has only been found in a few giant nerve fibres, such as the pairs of medial giant fibres with a compact multilayered myelin sheath found in shrimps (Penaeus chinensis and Penaeus japonicus) and the median giant fibre with a loose multilayered myelin sheath found in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. Small regions of these nerve fibres are not covered by a myelin sheath and serve as functional nodes for saltatory conduction. Remarkably, shrimp giant nerve fibres have conduction speeds of more than 200 m s-1, making them among the fastest-conducting fibres recorded, even when compared with vertebrate myelinated fibres. A common nodal structure for saltatory conduction has recently been found in the myelinated nerve fibres of the nervous systems of at least six species of Penaeus shrimp, including P. chinensis and P. japonicus. This novel node consists of fenestrated openings that are regularly spaced in the myelin sheath and are designated as fenestration nodes. The myelinated nerve fibres of the Penaeus shrimp also speed impulse conduction by broadening the gap between the axon and the myelin sheath rather than by enlarging the axon diameter as in other invertebrates. In this review, we document and discuss some of the structural and functional characteristics of the myelinated nerve fibres of Penaeus shrimp: (1) the fenestration node, which enables saltatory conduction, (2) a new type of compact multilayered myelin sheath, (3) the unique microtubular sheath that tightly surrounds the axon, (4) the extraordinarily wide space present between the microtubular sheath and the myelin sheath and (5) the main factors contributing to the fastest impulse conduction velocity so far recorded in the Animal Kingdom. PMID:10395528

  17. Promotion of axon regeneration and inhibition of astrocyte activation by alpha A-crystallin on crushed optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wei-Yang; Liu, Xiao; Gu, Xian-Liang; Ying, Xi; Wu, Nan; Xu, Hai-Wei; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effects of αA-crystallin in astrocyte gliosis after optic nerve crush (ONC) and the mechanism of α-crystallin in neuroprotection and axon regeneration. METHODS ONC was established on the Sprague-Dawley rat model and αA-crystallin (10−4 g/L, 4 µL) was intravitreously injected into the rat model. Flash-visual evoked potential (F-VEP) was examined 14d after ONC, and the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels in the retina and crush site were analyzed 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14d after ONC by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot respectively. The levels of beta Tubulin (TUJ1), growth-associated membrane phosphoprotein-43 (GAP-43), chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and neurocan were also determined by IHC 14d after ONC. RESULTS GFAP level in the retina and the optic nerve significantly increased 1d after ONC, and reached the peak level 7d post-ONC. Injection of αA-crystallin significantly decreased GFAP level in both the retina and the crush site 3d after ONC, and induced astrocytes architecture remodeling at the crush site. Quantification of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons indicated αA-crystallin markedly promoted axon regeneration in ONC rats and enhanced the regenerated axons penetrated into the glial scar. CSPGs and neurocan expression also decreased 14d after αA-crystallin injection. The amplitude (N1-P1) and latency (P1) of F-VEP were also restored. CONCLUSION Our results suggest α-crystallin promotes the axon regeneration of RGCs and suppresses the activation of astrocytes. PMID:27500100

  18. Neuronal activity biases axon selection for myelination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Jacob H.; Ravanelli, Andrew M.; Schwindt, Rani; Scott, Ethan K.; Appel, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    An essential feature of vertebrate neural development is ensheathment of axons with myelin, an insulating membrane formed by oligodendrocytes. Not all axons are myelinated, but mechanisms directing myelination of specific axons are unknown. Using zebrafish we show that activity-dependent secretion stabilizes myelin sheath formation on select axons. When VAMP2-dependent exocytosis is silenced in single axons, oligodendrocytes preferentially ensheath neighboring axons. Nascent sheaths formed on silenced axons are shorter in length, but when activity of neighboring axons is also suppressed, inhibition of sheath growth is relieved. Using in vivo time-lapse microscopy, we show that only 25% of oligodendrocyte processes that initiate axon wrapping are stabilized during normal development, and that initiation does not require activity. Instead, oligodendrocyte processes wrapping silenced axons are retracted more frequently. We propose that axon selection for myelination results from excessive and indiscriminate initiation of wrapping followed by refinement that is biased by activity-dependent secretion from axons. PMID:25849987

  19. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Amanda E.; Foust, Amanda J.; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca2+-activated K+ channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons

  20. Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Exacerbates Loss of Lower Motor Neurons and Axons during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yifeng; Stone, Sarrabeth; Cvetanovic, Marija; Lin, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are inflammatory demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases in the central nervous system (CNS). It is believed that MS and EAE are initiated by autoreactive T lymphocytes that recognize myelin antigens; however, the mechanisms responsible for neurodegeneration in these diseases remain elusive. Data indicate that vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) plays a role in the development of MS and EAE. Interestingly, VEGF-A is regarded as a neurotrophic factor in the CNS that promotes neuron survival and neurogenesis in various neurodegenerative diseases by activating VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). In this study, we sought to explore the role of the VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signaling in neurodegeneration in MS and EAE. We showed that the expression of VEGF-A was decreased in the spinal cord during EAE and that VEGFR2 was activated in lower motor neurons in the spinal cord of EAE mice. Interestingly, we found that treatment with SU5416, a selective VEGFR2 inhibitor, starting after the onset of EAE clinical symptoms exacerbated lower motor neuron loss and axon loss in the lumbar spinal cord of mice undergoing EAE, but did not alter Purkinje neuron loss in the cerebellum or upper motor neuron loss in the cerebral cortex. Moreover, SU5416 treatment had a minimal effect on EAE clinical symptoms as well as inflammation, demyelination, and oligodendrocyte loss in the lumbar spinal cord. These results imply the protective effects of the VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signaling on lower motor neurons and axons in the spinal cord in MS and EAE. PMID:27466819

  1. Low Piconewton Towing of CNS Axons against Diffusing and Surface-Bound Repellents Requires the Inhibition of Motor Protein-Associated Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilinc, Devrim; Blasiak, Agata; O'Mahony, James J.; Lee, Gil U.

    2014-11-01

    Growth cones, dynamic structures at axon tips, integrate chemical and physical stimuli and translate them into coordinated axon behaviour, e.g., elongation or turning. External force application to growth cones directs and enhances axon elongation in vitro; however, direct mechanical stimulation is rarely combined with chemotactic stimulation. We describe a microfluidic device that exposes isolated cortical axons to gradients of diffusing and substrate-bound molecules, and permits the simultaneous application of piconewton (pN) forces to multiple individual growth cones via magnetic tweezers. Axons treated with Y-27632, a RhoA kinase inhibitor, were successfully towed against Semaphorin 3A gradients, which repel untreated axons, with less than 12 pN acting on a small number of neural cell adhesion molecules. Treatment with Y-27632 or monastrol, a kinesin-5 inhibitor, promoted axon towing on substrates coated with chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, potent axon repellents. Thus, modulating key molecular pathways that regulate contractile stress generation in axons counteracts the effects of repellent molecules and promotes tension-induced growth. The demonstration of parallel towing of axons towards inhibitory environments with minute forces suggests that mechanochemical stimulation may be a promising therapeutic approach for the repair of the damaged central nervous system, where regenerating axons face repellent factors over-expressed in the glial scar.

  2. Dynamics of fast and slow inhibition from cerebellar Golgi cells allow flexible control of synaptic integration

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, John J.; Fioravante, Diasynou; Regehr, Wade G.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout the brain, multiple interneuron types influence distinct aspects of synaptic processing. Interneuron diversity can thereby promote differential firing from neurons receiving common excitation. In contrast, Golgi cells are the sole interneurons regulating granule cell spiking evoked by mossy fibers, thereby gating inputs to the cerebellar cortex. Here, we examine how this single interneuron type modifies activity in its targets. We find that GABAA-mediated transmission at unitary Golgi cell → granule cell synapses consists of varying contributions of fast synaptic currents and sustained inhibition. Fast IPSCs depress and slow IPSCs gradually build during high frequency Golgi cell activity. Consequently, fast and slow inhibition differentially influence granule cell spike timing during persistent mossy fiber input. Furthermore, slow inhibition reduces the gain of the mossy fiber → granule cell input-output curve, while fast inhibition increases the threshold. Thus, a lack of interneuron diversity need not prevent flexible inhibitory control of synaptic processing. PMID:19778512

  3. Potassium channel blockers as an effective treatment to restore impulse conduction in injured axons.

    PubMed

    Shi, Riyi; Sun, Wenjing

    2011-02-01

    Most axons in the vertebral central nervous system are myelinated by oligodendrocytes. Myelin protects and insulates neuronal processes, enabling the fast, saltatory conduction unique to myelinated axons. Myelin disruption resulting from trauma and biochemical reaction is a common pathological event in spinal cord injury and chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Myelin damage-induced axonal conduction block is considered to be a significant contributor to the devastating neurological deficits resulting from trauma and illness. Potassium channels are believed to play an important role in axonal conduction failure in spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis. Myelin damage has been shown to unmask potassium channels, creating aberrant potassium currents that inhibit conduction. Potassium channel blockade reduces this ionic leakage and improves conduction. The present review was mainly focused on the development of this technique of restoring axonal conduction and neurological function of demyelinated axons. The drug 4-aminopyridine has recently shown clinical success in treating multiple sclerosis symptoms. Further translational research has also identified several novel potassium channel blockers that may prove effective in restoring axonal conduction. PMID:21270902

  4. Olfactory bulb short axon cell release of GABA and dopamine produces a temporally biphasic inhibition-excitation response in external tufted cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaolin; Plachez, Celine; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam; Shipley, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for co-expression of two or more classic neurotransmitters in neurons has increased but less is known about co-transmission. Ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons, co-release dopamine (DA), the excitatory transmitter glutamate and the inhibitory transmitter GABA onto target cells in the striatum. Olfactory bulb (OB) short axon cells (SACs) form interglomerular connections and co-express markers for dopamine (DA) and GABA. Using an optogenetic approach we provide evidence that mouse OB SACs release both GABA and DA onto external tufted cells (ETCs) in other glomeruli. Optical activation of channelrhodopsin specifically expressed in DAergic SACs produced a GABAA receptor-mediated monosynaptic inhibitory response followed by DA-D1-like receptor-mediated excitatory response in ETCs. The GABAA receptor-mediated hyperpolarization activates Ih current in ETCs; synaptically released DA increases Ih, which enhances post-inhibitory rebound spiking. Thus, the opposing actions of synaptically released GABA and DA are functionally integrated by Ih to generate an inhibition-to-excitation “switch” in ETCs. Consistent with the established role of Ih in ETC burst firing, we show that endogenous DA release increases ETC spontaneous bursting frequency. ETCs transmit sensory signals to mitral/tufted output neurons and drive intraglomerular inhibition to shape glomerulus output to downstream olfactory networks. GABA and DA co-transmission from SACs to ETCs may play a key role in regulating output coding across the glomerular array. PMID:23407950

  5. The role of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in inhibiting axonal regeneration in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Feng

    2015-11-01

    The Rho/Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (Rho/ROCK) pathway is a major signaling pathway in the central nervous system, transducing inhibitory signals to block regeneration. After central nervous system damage, the main cause of impaired regeneration is the presence of factors that strongly inhibit regeneration in the surrounding microenvironment. These factors signal through the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway to inhibit regeneration. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway is crucial for advancing studies on regeneration and repair of the injured central nervous system. PMID:26807132

  6. The role of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in inhibiting axonal regeneration in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Hong-yan; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2015-01-01

    The Rho/Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (Rho/ROCK) pathway is a major signaling pathway in the central nervous system, transducing inhibitory signals to block regeneration. After central nervous system damage, the main cause of impaired regeneration is the presence of factors that strongly inhibit regeneration in the surrounding microenvironment. These factors signal through the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway to inhibit regeneration. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway is crucial for advancing studies on regeneration and repair of the injured central nervous system. PMID:26807132

  7. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  8. Silence of synaptotagmin I in INS-1 cells inhibits fast exocytosis and fast endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Xiong; Zhou Keming; Wu Zhengxing . E-mail: xutao@ibp.ac.cn; Xu Tao . E-mail: ibbwuzx@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2006-08-18

    Synaptotagmin I (Syt I) is a Ca{sup 2+} sensor for triggering fast synchronized release of neurotransmitters. However, controversy remains whether Syt I is also obligatory for the exocytosis and endocytosis of larger dense core vesicles (LDCVs) in endocrine cells. In this study, we used a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to silence the expression of Syt I and investigated the roles of Syt I on exocytosis and endocytosis in INS-1 cells. Our results demonstrated that expression of Syt I is remarkably reduced by the Syt I gene targeting shRNA. Using high-time resolution capacitance measurement, we found that the silence of Syt I decreased the calcium sensitivity of fusion of insulin granules and therefore reduced the exocytotic burst triggered by step-like [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i} elevation. In addition, the occurrence frequency and amplitude of fast endocytosis were remarkably reduced in the silenced cells. We conclude that Syt I not only participates in the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing of LDCV fusion with plasmalemma, but also plays a crucial role in fast endocytosis in INS-1 cells.

  9. Subcellular Localization Determines the Stability and Axon Protective Capacity of Axon Survival Factor Nmnat2

    PubMed Central

    Milde, Stefan; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Axons require a constant supply of the labile axon survival factor Nmnat2 from their cell bodies to avoid spontaneous axon degeneration. Here we investigate the mechanism of fast axonal transport of Nmnat2 and its site of action for axon maintenance. Using dual-colour live-cell imaging of axonal transport in SCG primary culture neurons, we find that Nmnat2 is bidirectionally trafficked in axons together with markers of the trans-Golgi network and synaptic vesicles. In contrast, there is little co-migration with mitochondria, lysosomes, and active zone precursor vesicles. Residues encoded by the small, centrally located exon 6 are necessary and sufficient for stable membrane association and vesicular axonal transport of Nmnat2. Within this sequence, a double cysteine palmitoylation motif shared with GAP43 and surrounding basic residues are all required for efficient palmitoylation and stable association with axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, however, disrupting this membrane association increases the ability of axonally localized Nmnat2 to preserve transected neurites in primary culture, while re-targeting the strongly protective cytosolic mutants back to membranes abolishes this increase. Larger deletions within the central domain including exon 6 further enhance Nmnat2 axon protective capacity to levels that exceed that of the slow Wallerian degeneration protein, WldS. The mechanism underlying the increase in axon protection appears to involve an increased half-life of the cytosolic forms, suggesting a role for palmitoylation and membrane attachment in Nmnat2 turnover. We conclude that Nmnat2 activity supports axon survival through a site of action distinct from Nmnat2 transport vesicles and that protein stability, a key determinant of axon protection, is enhanced by mutations that disrupt palmitoylation and dissociate Nmnat2 from these vesicles. PMID:23610559

  10. Isoflurane enhances both fast and slow synaptic inhibition in the hippocampus at amnestic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors has long been considered an important target for a variety of general anesthetics. In the hippocampus, two types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition coexist: GABAA,fast, which is expressed primarily at peri-somatic sites, and GABAA,slow, which is expressed primarily in the dendrites. Their spatial segregation suggests distinct functions: GABAA,slow may control plasticity of dendritic synapses, while GABAA,fast controls action potential initiation at the soma. We examined modulation of GABAA,fast and GABAA,slow inhibition by isoflurane at amnesic concentrations, and compared it to modulation by behaviorally equivalent doses of the GABAA receptor-selective drug etomidate. Methods Whole-cell recordings were conducted at near-physiological temperature from pyramidal cells in organotypic hippocampal cultures obtained from C57BL/6 x 129/SvJ F1 hybrid mice. GABAA receptor-mediated currents were isolated using glutamate receptor antagonists. GABAA,slow currents were evoked by electrical stimulation in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Miniature GABAA,fast currents were recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Results 100 µM isoflurane (approximately EC50,amnesia) slowed fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic current decay by approximately 25%. Higher concentrations, up to 400 µM, produced proportionally greater effects without altering current amplitudes. The effects on GABAA,slow were approximately one-half those produced by equi-amnesic concentrations of etomidate. Conclusions Isoflurane enhances both types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition to similar degrees at amnesic concentrations. This pattern differs from etomidate, which at low concentrations selectively enhances slow inhibition. These effects of isoflurane are sufficiently large that they may contribute substantially to its suppression of hippocampal learning and memory. PMID:22343472

  11. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition aggravates fasting-induced triglyceride accumulation in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shin-Ichi; Nakamura, Kaai; Ando, Midori; Kamei, Hiroyasu; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Although fasting induces hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation in both rodents and humans, little is known about the underlying mechanism. Because parasympathetic nervous system activity tends to attenuate the secretion of very-low-density-lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) and increase TG stores in the liver, and serum cholinesterase activity is elevated in fatty liver disease, the inhibition of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter acetylcholinesterase (AChE) may have some influence on hepatic lipid metabolism. To assess the influence of AChE inhibition on lipid metabolism, the effect of physostigmine, an AChE inhibitor, on fasting-induced increase in liver TG was investigated in mice. In comparison with ad libitum-fed mice, 30 h fasting increased liver TG accumulation accompanied by a downregulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) and liver-fatty acid binding-protein (L-FABP). Physostigmine promoted the 30 h fasting-induced increase in liver TG levels in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by a significant fall in plasma insulin levels, without a fall in plasma TG. Furthermore, physostigmine significantly attenuated the fasting-induced decrease of both mRNA and protein levels of SREBP-1 and L-FABP, and increased IRS-2 protein levels in the liver. The muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine blocked these effects of physostigmine on liver TG, serum insulin, and hepatic protein levels of SREBP-1 and L-FABP. These results demonstrate that AChE inhibition facilitated fasting-induced TG accumulation with up regulation of the hepatic L-FABP and SREBP-1 in mice, at least in part via the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Our studies highlight the crucial role of parasympathetic regulation in fasting-induced TG accumulation, and may be an important source of information on the mechanism of hepatic disorders of lipid metabolism. PMID:25383314

  12. Early events in axon/dendrite polarization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pei-lin; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of axons and dendrites is a critical step in neuronal development. Here we review the evidence that axon/dendrite formation during neuronal polarization depends on the intrinsic cytoplasmic asymmetry inherited by the postmitotic neuron, the exposure of the neuron to extracellular chemical factors, and the action of anisotropic mechanical forces imposed by the environment. To better delineate the functions of early signals among a myriad of cellular components that were shown to influence axon/dendrite formation, we discuss their functions by distinguishing their roles as determinants, mediators, or modulators and consider selective degradation of these components as a potential mechanism for axon/dendrite polarization. Finally, we examine whether these early events of axon/dendrite formation involve local autocatalytic activation and long-range inhibition, as postulated by Alan Turing for the morphogenesis of patterned biological structure. PMID:22715881

  13. Experiment vs. theory on electric inhibition of fast electron penetration of targets

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R R; Akli, K U; Batani, D; Baton, S; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D; Key, M H; King, J A; MacKinnon, A J; Norreys, P A; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C; Town, R J; Zhang, B

    2005-06-13

    A dominant force of inhibition of fast electrons in normal density matter is due to an axially directed electrostatic field. Fast electrons leave the critical density layer and enter the solid in an assumed relativistic Maxwellian energy distribution. Within a cycle of the solid density plasma frequency, the charge separation is neutralized by a background return current density j{sub b} = en{sub b}v{sub b} equal and opposite to the fast electron current density j{sub f} = en{sub f}v{sub f} [1] where it is assumed that the fast electron number density is much less than the background number density, n{sub f} << n{sub b} [2]. This charge and current neutralization allows the forward moving fast electron current to temporarily exceed the Alfven limit by many orders of magnitude [3]. During this period the cold return current, in passing through the material resistivity, ohmically generates an electric field in opposition to the fast current. As a result, the fast electron current loses its energy to the material, via the return current, in the form of heat [4]. So, although the highly energetic electrons suffer relatively little direct collisional loss of energy (owing to the inverse relation of the Coulomb cross section to velocity), their motion is substantially damped by ohmic heating of the slower return current. The equation for the ohmically generated electric field, E, is given by Ohm's law, E = j{sub c}{eta} where {eta} is the material resistivity.

  14. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course. PMID:23124982

  15. AxonQuant: A Microfluidic Chamber Culture-Coupled Algorithm That Allows High-Throughput Quantification of Axonal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Yang, Mengxue; Huang, Zhuo; Chen, Xiaoping; Maloney, Michael T.; Zhu, Li; Liu, Jianghong; Yang, Yanmin; Du, Sidan; Jiang, Xingyu; Wu, Jane Y.

    2014-01-01

    Published methods for imaging and quantitatively analyzing morphological changes in neuronal axons have serious limitations because of their small sample sizes, and their time-consuming and nonobjective nature. Here we present an improved microfluidic chamber design suitable for fast and high-throughput imaging of neuronal axons. We developed the Axon-Quant algorithm, which is suitable for automatic processing of axonal imaging data. This microfluidic chamber-coupled algorithm allows calculation of an ‘axonal continuity index’ that quantitatively measures axonal health status in a manner independent of neuronal or axonal density. This method allows quantitative analysis of axonal morphology in an automatic and nonbiased manner. Our method will facilitate large-scale high-throughput screening for genes or therapeutic compounds for neurodegenerative diseases involving axonal damage. When combined with imaging technologies utilizing different gene markers, this method will provide new insights into the mechanistic basis for axon degeneration. Our microfluidic chamber culture-coupled AxonQuant algorithm will be widely useful for studying axonal biology and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24603552

  16. Axon injury triggers EFA-6 mediated destabilization of axonal microtubules via TACC and doublecortin like kinase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lizhen; Chuang, Marian; Koorman, Thijs; Boxem, Mike; Jin, Yishi; Chisholm, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Axon injury triggers a series of changes in the axonal cytoskeleton that are prerequisites for effective axon regeneration. In Caenorhabditis elegans the signaling protein Exchange Factor for ARF-6 (EFA-6) is a potent intrinsic inhibitor of axon regrowth. Here we show that axon injury triggers rapid EFA-6-dependent inhibition of axonal microtubule (MT) dynamics, concomitant with relocalization of EFA-6. EFA-6 relocalization and axon regrowth inhibition require a conserved 18-aa motif in its otherwise intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain. The EFA-6 N-terminus binds the MT-associated proteins TAC-1/Transforming-Acidic-Coiled-Coil, and ZYG-8/Doublecortin-Like-Kinase, both of which are required for regenerative growth cone formation, and which act downstream of EFA-6. After injury TAC-1 and EFA-6 transiently relocalize to sites marked by the MT minus end binding protein PTRN-1/Patronin. We propose that EFA-6 acts as a bifunctional injury-responsive regulator of axonal MT dynamics, acting at the cell cortex in the steady state and at MT minus ends after injury. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08695.001 PMID:26339988

  17. Electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth for dynamically configurable neural networks.

    PubMed

    Honegger, Thibault; Scott, Mark A; Yanik, Mehmet F; Voldman, Joel

    2013-02-21

    Axons in the developing nervous system are directed via guidance cues, whose expression varies both spatially and temporally, to create functional neural circuits. Existing methods to create patterns of neural connectivity in vitro use only static geometries, and are unable to dynamically alter the guidance cues imparted on the cells. We introduce the use of AC electrokinetics to dynamically control axonal growth in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We find that the application of modest voltages at frequencies on the order of 10(5) Hz can cause developing axons to be stopped adjacent to the electrodes while axons away from the electric fields exhibit uninhibited growth. By switching electrodes on or off, we can reversibly inhibit or permit axon passage across the electrodes. Our models suggest that dielectrophoresis is the causative AC electrokinetic effect. We make use of our dynamic control over axon elongation to create an axon-diode via an axon-lock system that consists of a pair of electrode 'gates' that either permit or prevent axons from passing through. Finally, we developed a neural circuit consisting of three populations of neurons, separated by three axon-locks to demonstrate the assembly of a functional, engineered neural network. Action potential recordings demonstrate that the AC electrokinetic effect does not harm axons, and Ca(2+) imaging demonstrated the unidirectional nature of the synaptic connections. AC electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth has potential for creating configurable, directional neural networks. PMID:23314575

  18. Electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth for dynamically configurable neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Honegger, Thibault; Scott, Mark A.; Yanik, Mehmet F.; Voldman, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Axons in the developing nervous system are directed via guidance cues, whose expression varies both spatially and temporally, to create functional neural circuits. Existing methods to create patterns of neural connectivity in vitro use only static geometries, and are unable to dynamically alter the guidance cues imparted on the cells. We introduce the use of AC electrokinetics to dynamically control axonal growth in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We find that the application of modest voltages at frequencies on the order of 105 Hz can cause developing axons to be stopped adjacent to the electrodes while axons away from the electric fields exhibit uninhibited growth. By switching electrodes on or off, we can reversibly inhibit or permit axon passage across the electrodes. Our models suggest that dielectrophoresis is the causative AC electrokinetic effect. We make use of our dynamic control over axon elongation to create an axon-diode via an axon-lock system that consists of a pair of electrode `gates' that either permit or prevent axons from passing through. Finally, we developed a neural circuit consisting of three populations of neurons, separated by three axon-locks to demonstrate the assembly of a functional, engineered neural network. Action potential recordings demonstrate that the AC electrokinetic effect does not harm axons, and Ca2+ imaging demonstrated the unidirectional nature of the synaptic connections. AC electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth has potential for creating configurable, directional neural networks. PMID:23314575

  19. Local axonal function of STAT3 rescues axon degeneration in the pmn model of motoneuron disease

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Bhuvaneish Thangaraj; Frank, Nicolas; Bender, Florian L.P.; Asan, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Axonal maintenance, plasticity, and regeneration are influenced by signals from neighboring cells, in particular Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system. Schwann cells produce neurotrophic factors, but the mechanisms by which ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and other neurotrophic molecules modify the axonal cytoskeleton are not well understood. In this paper, we show that activated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), an intracellular mediator of the effects of CNTF and other neurotrophic cytokines, acts locally in axons of motoneurons to modify the tubulin cytoskeleton. Specifically, we show that activated STAT3 interacted with stathmin and inhibited its microtubule-destabilizing activity. Thus, ectopic CNTF-mediated activation of STAT3 restored axon elongation and maintenance in motoneurons from progressive motor neuronopathy mutant mice, a mouse model of motoneuron disease. This mechanism could also be relevant for other neurodegenerative diseases and provide a target for new therapies for axonal degeneration. PMID:23109669

  20. Prolyl isomerase Pin1 regulates axon guidance by stabilizing CRMP2A selectively in distal axons

    PubMed Central

    Balastik, Martin; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Weissova, Romana; Žiak, Jakub; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Cosker, Katharina E; Machonova, Olga; Kozmikova, Iryna; Chen, Chun-Hau; Pastorino, Lucia; Asara, John M.; Cole, Adam; Sutherland, Calum; Segal, Rosalind A.; Lu, Kun Ping

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Axon guidance relies on precise translation of the gradients of the extracellular signals into local changes of cytoskeletal dynamics, but the molecular mechanisms regulating dose-dependent responses of growth cones are still poorly understood. Here we show that during embryonic development in growing axons low level of Semaphorin3A stimulation is buffered by the prolyl isomerase Pin1. We demonstrate, that Pin1 stabilizes CDK5-phosphorylated CRMP2A, the major isoform of CRMP2 in distal axons. Consequently, Pin1 knockdown or knockout reduces CRMP2A level specifically in distal axons and inhibits axon growth, which can be fully rescued by Pin1 or CRMP2A expression. Moreover, Pin1 knockdown or knockout increases sensitivity to Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse in vitro and in vivo leading to developmental abnormalities in axon guidance. These results identify an important isoform-specific function and regulation of CRMP2A in controlling axon growth, and uncover Pin1-catalyzed prolyl isomerization as a regulatory mechanism in axon guidance. PMID:26489457

  1. Experimental evidence of electric inhibition in fast electron penetration and of electric-field-limited fast electron transport in dense matter

    PubMed

    Pisani; Bernardinello; Batani; Antonicci; Martinolli; Koenig; Gremillet; Amiranoff; Baton; Davies; Hall; Scott; Norreys; Djaoui; Rousseaux; Fews; Bandulet; Pepin

    2000-11-01

    Fast electron generation and propagation were studied in the interaction of a green laser with solids. The experiment, carried out with the LULI TW laser (350 fs, 15 J), used K(alpha) emission from buried fluorescent layers to measure electron transport. Results for conductors (Al) and insulators (plastic) are compared with simulations: in plastic, inhibition in the propagation of fast electrons is observed, due to electric fields which become the dominant factor in electron transport. PMID:11102017

  2. Early ultrastructural defects of axons and axon-glia junctions in mice lacking expression of Cnp1.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Julia M; McLaughlin, Mark; Werner, Hauke B; McCulloch, Mailis C; Barrie, Jennifer A; Brown, Angus; Faichney, Andrew Blyth; Snaidero, Nicolas; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Griffiths, Ian R

    2009-12-01

    Most axons in the central nervous system (CNS) are surrounded by a multilayered myelin sheath that promotes fast, saltatory conduction of electrical impulses. By insulating the axon, myelin also shields the axoplasm from the extracellular milieu. In the CNS, oligodendrocytes provide support for the long-term maintenance of myelinated axons, independent of the myelin sheath. Here, we use electron microscopy and morphometric analyses to examine the evolution of axonal and oligodendroglial changes in mice deficient in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) and in mice deficient in both CNP and proteolipid protein (PLP/DM20). We show that CNP is necessary for the formation of a normal inner tongue process of oligodendrocytes that myelinate small diameter axons. We also show that axonal degeneration in Cnp1 null mice is present very early in postnatal life. Importantly, compact myelin formed by transplanted Cnp1 null oligodendrocytes induces the same degenerative changes in shiverer axons that normally are dysmyelinated but structurally intact. Mice deficient in both CNP and PLP develop a more severe axonal phenotype than either single mutant, indicating that the two oligodendroglial proteins serve distinct functions in supporting the myelinated axon. These observations support a model in which the trophic functions of oligodendrocytes serve to offset the physical shielding of axons by myelin membranes. PMID:19459211

  3. Regulation of Microtubule Dynamics in Axon Regeneration: Insights from C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ngang Heok; Chisholm, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of an axon to regenerate is regulated by its external environment and by cell-intrinsic factors. Studies in a variety of organisms suggest that alterations in axonal microtubule (MT) dynamics have potent effects on axon regeneration. We review recent findings on the regulation of MT dynamics during axon regeneration, focusing on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In C. elegans the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) promotes axon regeneration, whereas the exchange factor for Arf6 (EFA-6) inhibits axon regeneration. Both DLK and EFA-6 respond to injury and control axon regeneration in part via MT dynamics. How the DLK and EFA-6 pathways are related is a topic of active investigation, as is the mechanism by which EFA-6 responds to axonal injury. We evaluate potential candidates, such as the MT affinity-regulating kinase PAR-1/MARK, in regulation of EFA-6 and axonal MT dynamics in regeneration. PMID:27350865

  4. Axons take a dive

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Paredes, Mercedes F; Huang, Eric J; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult mammalian brain, neural stem cells (NSCs) and ependymal (E1) cells share the apical surface of the ventricular–subventricular zone (V–SVZ). In a recent article, we show that supraependymal serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from the raphe nuclei in mice form an extensive plexus on the walls of the lateral ventricles where they contact E1 cells and NSCs. Here we further characterize the contacts between 5HT supraependymal axons and E1 cells in mice, and show that suprependymal axons tightly associated to E1 cells are also present in the walls of the human lateral ventricles. These observations raise interesting questions about the function of supraependymal axons in the regulation of E1 cells. PMID:26413556

  5. Myelin-Associated Inhibitors in Axonal Growth After CNS Injury

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Cédric G.; Zheng, Binhai

    2014-01-01

    There are multiple barriers to axonal growth after CNS injury. Myelin-associated inhibitors represent one group of barriers extrinsic to the injured neurons. Nogo, MAG and OMgp are three prototypical myelin inhibitors that signal through multiple neuronal receptors to exert growth inhibition. Targeting myelin inhibition alone modulates the compensatory sprouting of uninjured axons but the effect on the regeneration of injured axons is limited. Meanwhile, modulating sprouting, a naturally occurring repair mechanism, may be a more attainable therapeutic goal for promoting functional repair after CNS injury in the near term. PMID:24608164

  6. Axonal isoforms of myosin-I.

    PubMed

    Lund, Linda M; Machado, Victor M; McQuarrie, Irvine G

    2005-05-13

    We have examined spinal motor neurons in Sprague-Dawley rats to further characterize a mechanoenzyme, myosin-Igamma (myr4), which is found in high concentration during axon tract formation in neonates. We raised an antibody to myr4 and made riboprobes for in situ hybridization. Myr4 mRNA was abundant in spinal cord motor neurons (particularly during axon regrowth). Nerves undergoing Wallerian degeneration (from a crush 7 days earlier) showed anti-myr4 labeling of the axolemma and SER--after microtubules, neurofilaments, and F-actin had already been degraded--which is consistent with a described lipid-binding domain in the tail region of myosin-Is. Newly synthesized myr4 was carried in axons by the slow component (SC) of axonal transport at 1-8 mm/day, whereas, none was carried by the fast component (FC). We conclude that SC delivers myr4 to the cytoplasmic surfaces of stationary axonal membranes (SER and axolemma). This positioning would anchor the tail domain of myr4 and leave the catalytic head domain free to interact with F-actin. PMID:15809075

  7. Oligodendroglial NMDA Receptors Regulate Glucose Import and Axonal Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saab, Aiman S; Tzvetavona, Iva D; Trevisiol, Andrea; Baltan, Selva; Dibaj, Payam; Kusch, Kathrin; Möbius, Wiebke; Goetze, Bianka; Jahn, Hannah M; Huang, Wenhui; Steffens, Heinz; Schomburg, Eike D; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Pérez-Cerdá, Fernando; Bakhtiari, Davood; Matute, Carlos; Löwel, Siegrid; Griesinger, Christian; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Kirchhoff, Frank; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2016-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes make myelin and support axons metabolically with lactate. However, it is unknown how glucose utilization and glycolysis are adapted to the different axonal energy demands. Spiking axons release glutamate and oligodendrocytes express NMDA receptors of unknown function. Here we show that the stimulation of oligodendroglial NMDA receptors mobilizes glucose transporter GLUT1, leading to its incorporation into the myelin compartment in vivo. When myelinated optic nerves from conditional NMDA receptor mutants are challenged with transient oxygen-glucose deprivation, they show a reduced functional recovery when returned to oxygen-glucose but are indistinguishable from wild-type when provided with oxygen-lactate. Moreover, the functional integrity of isolated optic nerves, which are electrically silent, is extended by preincubation with NMDA, mimicking axonal activity, and shortened by NMDA receptor blockers. This reveals a novel aspect of neuronal energy metabolism in which activity-dependent glutamate release enhances oligodendroglial glucose uptake and glycolytic support of fast spiking axons. PMID:27292539

  8. A functional equivalent of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi in axons for secretion of locally synthesized proteins

    PubMed Central

    Merianda, Tanuja T.; Lin, Andrew C.; Lam, Joyce S.Y.; Vuppalanchi, Deepika; Willis, Dianna E.; Karin, Norman; Holt, Christine E.; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Subcellular localization of protein synthesis provides a means to regulate the protein composition in far reaches of a cell. This localized protein synthesis gives neuronal processes autonomy to rapidly respond to extracellular stimuli. Locally synthesized axonal proteins enable neurons to respond to guidance cues and can help to initiate regeneration after injury. Most studies of axonal mRNA translation have concentrated on cytoplasmic proteins. While ultrastructural studies suggest that axons do not have rough endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus, mRNAs for transmembrane and secreted proteins localize to axons. Here, we show that growing axons with protein synthetic activity contain ER and Golgi components needed for classical protein synthesis and secretion. Isolated axons have the capacity to traffic locally synthesized proteins into secretory pathways and inhibition of Golgi function attenuates translation-dependent axonal growth responses. Finally, the capacity for secreting locally synthesized proteins in axons appears to be increased by injury. PMID:19022387

  9. Axonal maintenance, glia, exosomes, and heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Tytell, Michael; Lasek, Raymond J; Gainer, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Of all cellular specializations, the axon is especially distinctive because it is a narrow cylinder of specialized cytoplasm called axoplasm with a length that may be orders of magnitude greater than the diameter of the cell body from which it originates. Thus, the volume of axoplasm can be much greater than the cytoplasm in the cell body. This fact raises a logistical problem with regard to axonal maintenance. Many of the components of axoplasm, such as soluble proteins and cytoskeleton, are slowly transported, taking weeks to months to travel the length of axons longer than a few millimeters after being synthesized in the cell body. Furthermore, this slow rate of supply suggests that the axon itself might not have the capacity to respond fast enough to compensate for damage to transported macromolecules. Such damage is likely in view of the mechanical fragility of an axon, especially those innervating the limbs, as rapid limb motion with high impact, like running, subjects the axons in the limbs to considerable mechanical force. Some researchers have suggested that local, intra-axonal protein synthesis is the answer to this problem. However, the translational state of axonal RNAs remains controversial. We suggest that glial cells, which envelop all axons, whether myelinated or not, are the local sources of replacement and repair macromolecules for long axons. The plausibility of this hypothesis is reinforced by reviewing several decades of work on glia-axon macromolecular transfer, together with recent investigations of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles, as vehicles for the transmission of membrane and cytoplasmic components from one cell to another. PMID:26962444

  10. Axonal maintenance, glia, exosomes, and heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Michael; Lasek, Raymond J.; Gainer, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Of all cellular specializations, the axon is especially distinctive because it is a narrow cylinder of specialized cytoplasm called axoplasm with a length that may be orders of magnitude greater than the diameter of the cell body from which it originates. Thus, the volume of axoplasm can be much greater than the cytoplasm in the cell body. This fact raises a logistical problem with regard to axonal maintenance. Many of the components of axoplasm, such as soluble proteins and cytoskeleton, are slowly transported, taking weeks to months to travel the length of axons longer than a few millimeters after being synthesized in the cell body. Furthermore, this slow rate of supply suggests that the axon itself might not have the capacity to respond fast enough to compensate for damage to transported macromolecules. Such damage is likely in view of the mechanical fragility of an axon, especially those innervating the limbs, as rapid limb motion with high impact, like running, subjects the axons in the limbs to considerable mechanical force. Some researchers have suggested that local, intra-axonal protein synthesis is the answer to this problem. However, the translational state of axonal RNAs remains controversial. We suggest that glial cells, which envelop all axons, whether myelinated or not, are the local sources of replacement and repair macromolecules for long axons. The plausibility of this hypothesis is reinforced by reviewing several decades of work on glia-axon macromolecular transfer, together with recent investigations of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles, as vehicles for the transmission of membrane and cytoplasmic components from one cell to another. PMID:26962444

  11. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Molecular Switches Regulating CNS Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Kundi, Sarina; Ahmed, Zubair

    2012-01-01

    The poor or lack of injured adult central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration results in devastating consequences and poor functional recovery. The interplay between the intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributes to robust inhibition of axon regeneration of injured CNS neurons. The insufficient or lack of trophic support for injured neurons is considered as one of the major obstacles contributing to their failure to survive and regrow their axons after injury. In the CNS, many of the signalling pathways associated with neuronal survival and axon regeneration are regulated by several classes of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) that respond to a variety of ligands. This paper highlights and summarises the most relevant recent findings pertinent to different classes of the RTK family of molecules, with a particular focus on elucidating their role in CNS axon regeneration. PMID:22848811

  12. Axons provide the secretory machinery for trafficking of voltage-gated sodium channels in peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    González, Carolina; Cánovas, José; Fresno, Javiera; Couve, Eduardo; Court, Felipe A; Couve, Andrés

    2016-02-16

    The regulation of the axonal proteome is key to generate and maintain neural function. Fast and slow axoplasmic waves have been known for decades, but alternative mechanisms to control the abundance of axonal proteins based on local synthesis have also been identified. The presence of the endoplasmic reticulum has been documented in peripheral axons, but it is still unknown whether this localized organelle participates in the delivery of axonal membrane proteins. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for action potentials and are mostly concentrated in the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Despite their fundamental role, little is known about the intracellular trafficking mechanisms that govern their availability in mature axons. Here we describe the secretory machinery in axons and its contribution to plasma membrane delivery of sodium channels. The distribution of axonal secretory components was evaluated in axons of the sciatic nerve and in spinal nerve axons after in vivo electroporation. Intracellular protein trafficking was pharmacologically blocked in vivo and in vitro. Axonal voltage-gated sodium channel mRNA and local trafficking were examined by RT-PCR and a retention-release methodology. We demonstrate that mature axons contain components of the endoplasmic reticulum and other biosynthetic organelles. Axonal organelles and sodium channel localization are sensitive to local blockade of the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. More importantly, secretory organelles are capable of delivering sodium channels to the plasma membrane in isolated axons, demonstrating an intrinsic capacity of the axonal biosynthetic route in regulating the axonal proteome in mammalian axons. PMID:26839409

  13. Electrophysiology of Axonal Constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher; Jung, Peter; Brown, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Axons of myelinated neurons are constricted at the nodes of Ranvier, where they are directly exposed to the extracellular space and where the vast majority of the ion channels are located. These constrictions are generated by local regulation of the kinetics of neurofilaments the most important cytoskeletal elements of the axon. In this paper we discuss how this shape affects the electrophysiological function of the neuron. Specifically, although the nodes are short (about 1 μm) in comparison to the distance between nodes (hundreds of μm) they have a substantial influence on the conduction velocity of neurons. We show through computational modeling that nodal constrictions (all other features such as numbers of ion channels left constant) reduce the required fiber diameter for a given target conduction velocity by up to 50% in comparison to an unconstricted axon. We further show that the predicted optimal fiber morphologies closely match reported fiber morphologies. Supported by The National Science Foundation (IOS 1146789)

  14. Axonal transport of ribonucleoprotein particles (vaults).

    PubMed

    Li, J Y; Volknandt, W; Dahlstrom, A; Herrmann, C; Blasi, J; Das, B; Zimmermann, H

    1999-01-01

    of synaptic vesicles and vault protein. Our data show that ribonucleoprotein-immunoreactive particles can be actively transported within axons in situ from the soma to the nerve terminal and back. The results suggest that the transport of vaults is driven by fast axonal transport motors like the SV2-containing vesicles and mitochondria. Vaults exhibit an anterograde and a retrograde transport component, similar to that observed for the vesicular organelles carrying SV2 and for mitochondria. Although the function of vaults is still unknown studies of the axonal transport of this organelle may reveal insights into the mechanisms of cellular transport of ribonucleoprotein particles in general. PMID:10391483

  15. Axon diameters and conduction velocities in the macaque pyramidal tract

    PubMed Central

    Firmin, L.; Field, P.; Maier, M. A.; Kraskov, A.; Kirkwood, P. A.; Nakajima, K.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Small axons far outnumber larger fibers in the corticospinal tract, but the function of these small axons remains poorly understood. This is because they are difficult to identify, and therefore their physiology remains obscure. To assess the extent of the mismatch between anatomic and physiological measures, we compared conduction time and velocity in a large number of macaque corticospinal neurons with the distribution of axon diameters at the level of the medullary pyramid, using both light and electron microscopy. At the electron microscopic level, a total of 4,172 axons were sampled from 2 adult male macaque monkeys. We confirmed that there were virtually no unmyelinated fibers in the pyramidal tract. About 14% of pyramidal tract axons had a diameter smaller than 0.50 μm (including myelin sheath), most of these remaining undetected using light microscopy, and 52% were smaller than 1 μm. In the electrophysiological study, we determined the distribution of antidromic latencies of pyramidal tract neurons, recorded in primary motor cortex, ventral premotor cortex, and supplementary motor area and identified by pyramidal tract stimulation (799 pyramidal tract neurons, 7 adult awake macaques) or orthodromically from corticospinal axons recorded at the mid-cervical spinal level (192 axons, 5 adult anesthetized macaques). The distribution of antidromic and orthodromic latencies of corticospinal neurons was strongly biased toward those with large, fast-conducting axons. Axons smaller than 3 μm and with a conduction velocity below 18 m/s were grossly underrepresented in our electrophysiological recordings, and those below 1 μm (6 m/s) were probably not represented at all. The identity, location, and function of the majority of corticospinal neurons with small, slowly conducting axons remains unknown. PMID:24872533

  16. Contribution of Kv1.2 Voltage-gated Potassium Channel to D2 Autoreceptor Regulation of Axonal Dopamine Overflow*

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Stephanie; Thibault, Dominic; Mendez, Jose A.; Lahaie, Nicolas; Tirotta, Emanuele; Borrelli, Emiliana; Bouvier, Michel; Tempel, Bruce L.; Trudeau, Louis-Eric

    2011-01-01

    Impairments in axonal dopamine release are associated with neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and pathophysiological conditions promoting drug abuse and obesity. The D2 dopamine autoreceptor (D2-AR) exerts tight regulatory control of axonal dopamine (DA) release through a mechanism suggested to involve K+ channels. To evaluate the contribution of Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channels of the Shaker gene family to the regulation of axonal DA release by the D2-AR, the present study employed expression analyses, real time measurements of striatal DA overflow, K+ current measurements and immunoprecipitation assays. Kv1.1, -1.2, -1.3, and -1.6 mRNA and protein were detected in midbrain DA neurons purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and in primary DA neuron cultures. In addition, Kv1.1, -1.2, and -1.6 were localized to DA axonal processes in the dorsal striatum. By means of fast scan cyclic voltammetry in striatal slice preparations, we found that the inhibition of stimulation-evoked DA overflow by a D2 agonist was attenuated by Kv1.1, -1.2, and -1.6 toxin blockers. A particular role for the Kv1.2 subunit in the process whereby axonal D2-AR inhibits DA overflow was established with the use of a selective Kv1.2 blocker and Kv1.2 knock-out mice. Moreover, we demonstrate the ability of D2-AR activation to increase Kv1.2 currents in co-transfected cells and its reliance on Gβγ subunit signaling along with the physical coupling of D2-AR and Kv1.2-containing channels in striatal tissue. These findings underline the contribution of Kv1.2 in the regulation of nigrostriatal DA release by the D2-AR and thereby offer a novel mechanism by which DA release is regulated. PMID:21233214

  17. Axonal PPARγ promotes neuronal regeneration after injury.

    PubMed

    Lezana, Juan Pablo; Dagan, Shachar Y; Robinson, Ari; Goldstein, Ronald S; Fainzilber, Mike; Bronfman, Francisca C; Bronfman, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    PPARγ is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor best known for its involvement in adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. PPARγ activity has also been associated with neuroprotection in different neurological disorders, but the mechanisms involved in PPARγ effects in the nervous system are still unknown. Here we describe a new functional role for PPARγ in neuronal responses to injury. We found both PPAR transcripts and protein within sensory axons and observed an increase in PPARγ protein levels after sciatic nerve crush. This was correlated with increased retrograde transport of PPARγ after injury, increased association of PPARγ with the molecular motor dynein, and increased nuclear accumulation of PPARγ in cell bodies of sensory neurons. Furthermore, PPARγ antagonists attenuated the response of sensory neurons to sciatic nerve injury, and inhibited axonal growth of both sensory and cortical neurons in culture. Thus, axonal PPARγ is involved in neuronal injury responses required for axonal regeneration. Since PPARγ is a major molecular target of the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of drugs used in the treatment of type II diabetes, several pharmaceutical agents with acceptable safety profiles in humans are available. Our findings provide motivation and rationale for the evaluation of such agents for efficacy in central and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26446277

  18. Action Potentials Initiate in the Axon Initial Segment and Propagate Through Axon Collaterals Reliably in Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Foust, Amanda; Popovic, Marko; Zecevic, Dejan; McCormick, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Purkinje neurons are the output cells of the cerebellar cortex and generate spikes in two distinct modes, known as simple and complex spikes. Revealing the point of origin of these action potentials, and how they conduct into local axon collaterals, is important for understanding local and distal neuronal processing and communication. By utilizing a recent improvement in voltage sensitive dye imaging technique that provided exceptional spatial and temporal resolution, we were able to resolve the region of spike initiation as well as follow spike propagation into axon collaterals for each action potential initiated on single trials. All fast action potentials, for both simple and complex spikes, whether occurring spontaneously or in response to a somatic current pulse or synaptic input, initiated in the axon initial segment. At discharge frequencies of less than approximately 250 Hz, spikes propagated faithfully through the axon and axon collaterals, in a saltatory manner. Propagation failures were only observed for very high frequencies or for the spikelets associated with complex spikes. These results demonstrate that the axon initial segment is a critical decision point in Purkinje cell processing and that the properties of axon branch points are adjusted to maintain faithful transmission. PMID:20484631

  19. White matter involvement after TBI: Clues to axon and myelin repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Regina C; Mierzwa, Amanda J; Marion, Christina M; Sullivan, Genevieve M

    2016-01-01

    Impact-acceleration forces to the head cause traumatic brain injury (TBI) with damage in white matter tracts comprised of long axons traversing the brain. White matter injury after TBI involves both traumatic axonal injury (TAI) and myelin pathology that evolves throughout the post-injury time course. The axon response to initial mechanical forces and secondary insults follows the process of Wallerian degeneration, which initiates as a potentially reversible phase of intra-axonal damage and proceeds to an irreversible phase of axon fragmentation. Distal to sites of axon disconnection, myelin sheaths remain for prolonged periods, which may activate neuroinflammation and inhibit axon regeneration. In addition to TAI, TBI can cause demyelination of intact axons. These evolving features of axon and myelin pathology also represent opportunities for repair. In experimental TBI, demyelinated axons exhibit remyelination, which can serve to both protect axons and facilitate recovery of function. Myelin remodeling may also contribute to neuroplasticity. Efficient clearance of myelin debris is a potential target to attenuate the progression of chronic pathology. During the early phase of Wallerian degeneration, interventions that prevent the transition from reversible damage to axon disconnection warrant the highest priority, based on the poor regenerative capacity of axons in the CNS. Clinical evaluation of TBI will need to address the challenge of accurately detecting the extent and stage of axon damage. Distinguishing the complex white matter changes associated with axons and myelin is necessary for interpreting advanced neuroimaging approaches and for identifying a broader range of therapeutic opportunities to improve outcome after TBI. PMID:25697845

  20. β₂-adrenergic receptors protect axons during energetic stress but do not influence basal glio-axonal lactate shuttling in mouse white matter.

    PubMed

    Laureys, G; Valentino, M; Demol, F; Zammit, C; Muscat, R; Cambron, M; Kooijman, R; De Keyser, J

    2014-09-26

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that β2-adrenergic receptor activation stimulates glycogen degradation in astrocytes, generating lactate as a potential energy source for neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis in mouse cerebellar white matter we demonstrate continuous axonal lactate uptake and glial-axonal metabolic coupling of glutamate/lactate exchange. However, this physiological lactate production was not influenced by activation (clenbuterol) or blocking (ICI 118551) of β2-adrenergic receptors. In two-photon imaging experiments on ex vivo mouse corpus callosum subjected to aglycemia, β2-adrenergic activation rescued axons, whereas inhibition of axonal lactate uptake by α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4-CIN) was associated with severe axonal loss. Our results suggest that axonal protective effects of glial β2-adrenergic receptor activation are not mediated by enhanced lactate production. PMID:25064060

  1. Generation of Intensity Selectivity by Differential Synaptic Tuning: Fast-Saturating Excitation But Slow-Saturating Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mu; Tao, Huizhong W.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity defines one fundamental aspect of sensory information and is specifically represented in each sensory modality. Interestingly, only in the central auditory system are intensity-selective neurons evolved. These neurons are characterized by nonmonotonic response-level functions. The synaptic circuitry mechanisms underlying the generation of intensity selectivity from nonselective auditory nerve inputs remain largely unclear. Here, we performed in vivo whole-cell recordings from pyramidal neurons in the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), where intensity selectivity first emerges along the auditory neuraxis. Our results revealed that intensity-selective cells received fast-saturating excitation but slow-saturating inhibition with intensity increments, whereas in intensity-nonselective cells excitation and inhibition were similarly slow-saturating. The differential intensity tuning profiles of the monotonic excitation and inhibition qualitatively determined the intensity selectivity of output responses. In addition, the selectivity was further strengthened by significantly lower excitation/inhibition ratios at high-intensity levels compared with intensity-nonselective neurons. Our results demonstrate that intensity selectivity in the DCN is generated by extracting the difference between tuning profiles of nonselective excitatory and inhibitory inputs, which we propose can be achieved through a differential circuit mediated by feedforward inhibition. PMID:23238722

  2. Rapid Hebbian axonal remodeling mediated by visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Munz, Martin; Gobert, Delphine; Schohl, Anne; Poquérusse, Jessie; Podgorski, Kaspar; Spratt, Perry; Ruthazer, Edward S

    2014-05-23

    We examined how correlated firing controls axon remodeling, using in vivo time-lapse imaging and electrophysiological analysis of individual retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons that were visually stimulated either synchronously or asynchronously relative to neighboring inputs in the Xenopus laevis optic tectum. RGCs stimulated out of synchrony rapidly lost the ability to drive tectal postsynaptic partners while their axons grew and added many new branches. In contrast, synchronously activated RGCs produced fewer new branches, but these were more stable. The effects of synchronous activation were prevented by the inhibition of neurotransmitter release and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade, which is consistent with a role for synaptic NMDAR activation in the stabilization of axonal branches and suppression of further exploratory branch addition. PMID:24855269

  3. Microfluidic control of axonal guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Black, Bryan; Ordonez, Simon; Mondal, Argha; Jain, Ankur; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2014-10-01

    The precision of axonal pathfinding and the accurate formation of functional neural circuitry are crucial for an organism during development as well as during adult central and peripheral nerve regeneration. While chemical cues are believed to be primarily responsible for axonal pathfinding, we hypothesize that forces due to localized fluid flow may directly affect neuronal guidance during early organ development. Here, we report direct evidence of fluid flow influencing axonal migration, producing turning angles of up to 90°. Microfluidic flow simulations indicate that an axon may experience significant bending force due to cross-flow, which may contribute to the observed axonal turning. This method of flow-based guidance was successfully used to fasciculate one advancing axon onto another, showcasing the potential of this technique to be used for the formation of in vitro neuronal circuits.

  4. Alterations of mitochondrial dynamics allow retrograde propagation of locally initiated axonal insults

    PubMed Central

    Lassus, Benjamin; Magifico, Sebastien; Pignon, Sandra; Belenguer, Pascale; Miquel, Marie-Christine; Peyrin, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In chronic neurodegenerative syndromes, neurons progressively die through a generalized retraction pattern triggering retrograde axonal degeneration toward the cell bodies, which molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Recent observations suggest that direct activation of pro-apoptotic signaling in axons triggers local degenerative events associated with early alteration of axonal mitochondrial dynamics. This raises the question of the role of mitochondrial dynamics on both axonal vulnerability stress and their implication in the spreading of damages toward unchallenged parts of the neuron. Here, using microfluidic chambers, we assessed the consequences of interfering with OPA1 and DRP1 proteins on axonal degeneration induced by local application of rotenone. We found that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial fission prevented axonal damage induced by rotenone, in low glucose conditions. While alteration of mitochondrial dynamics per se did not lead to spontaneous axonal degeneration, it dramatically enhanced axonal vulnerability to rotenone, which had no effect in normal glucose conditions, and promoted retrograde spreading of axonal degeneration toward the cell body. Altogether, our results suggest a mitochondrial priming effect in axons as a key process of axonal degeneration. In the context of neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, mitochondria fragmentation could hasten neuronal death and initiate spatial dispersion of locally induced degenerative events. PMID:27604820

  5. Alterations of mitochondrial dynamics allow retrograde propagation of locally initiated axonal insults.

    PubMed

    Lassus, Benjamin; Magifico, Sebastien; Pignon, Sandra; Belenguer, Pascale; Miquel, Marie-Christine; Peyrin, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In chronic neurodegenerative syndromes, neurons progressively die through a generalized retraction pattern triggering retrograde axonal degeneration toward the cell bodies, which molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Recent observations suggest that direct activation of pro-apoptotic signaling in axons triggers local degenerative events associated with early alteration of axonal mitochondrial dynamics. This raises the question of the role of mitochondrial dynamics on both axonal vulnerability stress and their implication in the spreading of damages toward unchallenged parts of the neuron. Here, using microfluidic chambers, we assessed the consequences of interfering with OPA1 and DRP1 proteins on axonal degeneration induced by local application of rotenone. We found that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial fission prevented axonal damage induced by rotenone, in low glucose conditions. While alteration of mitochondrial dynamics per se did not lead to spontaneous axonal degeneration, it dramatically enhanced axonal vulnerability to rotenone, which had no effect in normal glucose conditions, and promoted retrograde spreading of axonal degeneration toward the cell body. Altogether, our results suggest a mitochondrial priming effect in axons as a key process of axonal degeneration. In the context of neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, mitochondria fragmentation could hasten neuronal death and initiate spatial dispersion of locally induced degenerative events. PMID:27604820

  6. Intrinsic Control of Axon Regeneration.

    PubMed

    He, Zhigang; Jin, Yishi

    2016-05-01

    A determinant of axon regeneration is the intrinsic growth ability of injured neurons, which dictates a battery of injury responses in axons and cell bodies. While some of these regulatory mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved, others are unique to the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) where spontaneous regeneration usually does not occur. Here we examine our current understanding of these mechanisms at cellular and molecular terms and discuss their potential implications for promoting axon regeneration and functional recovery after nerve injury. PMID:27151637

  7. Cellular strategies of axonal pathfinding.

    PubMed

    Raper, Jonathan; Mason, Carol

    2010-09-01

    Axons follow highly stereotyped and reproducible trajectories to their targets. In this review we address the properties of the first pioneer neurons to grow in the developing nervous system and what has been learned over the past several decades about the extracellular and cell surface substrata on which axons grow. We then discuss the types of guidance cues and their receptors that influence axon extension, what determines where cues are expressed, and how axons respond to the cues they encounter in their environment. PMID:20591992

  8. Dynamics of signal propagation and collision in axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follmann, Rosangela; Rosa, Epaminondas; Stein, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Long-range communication in the nervous system is usually carried out with the propagation of action potentials along the axon of nerve cells. While typically thought of as being unidirectional, it is not uncommon for axonal propagation of action potentials to happen in both directions. This is the case because action potentials can be initiated at multiple "ectopic" positions along the axon. Two ectopic action potentials generated at distinct sites, and traveling toward each other, will collide. As neuronal information is encoded in the frequency of action potentials, action potential collision and annihilation may affect the way in which neuronal information is received, processed, and transmitted. We investigate action potential propagation and collision using an axonal multicompartment model based on the Hodgkin-Huxley equations. We characterize propagation speed, refractory period, excitability, and action potential collision for slow (type I) and fast (type II) axons. In addition, our studies include experimental measurements of action potential propagation in axons of two biological systems. Both computational and experimental results unequivocally indicate that colliding action potentials do not pass each other; they are reciprocally annihilated.

  9. Signaling from axon guidance receptors.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Greg J; Klein, Rüdiger

    2010-05-01

    Determining how axon guidance receptors transmit signals to allow precise pathfinding decisions is fundamental to our understanding of nervous system development and may suggest new strategies to promote axon regeneration after injury or disease. Signaling mechanisms that act downstream of four prominent families of axon guidance cues--netrins, semaphorins, ephrins, and slits--have been extensively studied in both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems. Although details of these signaling mechanisms are still fragmentary and there appears to be considerable diversity in how different guidance receptors regulate the motility of the axonal growth cone, a number of common themes have emerged. Here, we review recent insights into how specific receptors for each of these guidance cues engage downstream regulators of the growth cone cytoskeleton to control axon guidance. PMID:20452961

  10. Role of CSPG receptor LAR phosphatase in restricting axon regeneration after CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Park, Dongsun; Ohtake, Yosuke; Li, Hui; Hayat, Umar; Li, Junjun; Selzer, Michael E.; Longo, Frank M.; Li, Shuxin

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix molecule chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are highly upregulated in scar tissues and form a potent chemical barrier for CNS axon regeneration. Recent studies support that the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (PTPσ) and its subfamily member leukocyte common antigen related phosphatase (LAR) act as transmembrane receptors to mediate CSPG inhibition. PTPσ deficiency increased regrowth of ascending axons into scar tissues and descending corticospinal tract (CST) axons into the caudal spinal cord after spinal cord injury (SCI). Pharmacological LAR inhibition enhanced serotonergic axon growth in SCI mice. However, transgenic LAR deletion on axon growth in vivo and role of LAR in regulating regrowth of other fiber tracts have not been studied. Here, we studied role of LAR in restricting regrowth of injured descending CNS axons in deficient mice. LAR deletion increased regrowth of serotonergic axons into scar tissues and caudal spinal cord after dorsal overhemitransection. LAR deletion also stimulated regrowth of CST fibers into the caudal spinal cord. LAR protein was upregulated days to weeks after injury and co-localized to serotonergic and CST axons. Moreover, LAR deletion improved functional recovery by increasing BMS locomotor scores and stride length and reducing grid walk errors. This is the first transgenic study that demonstrates crucial role of LAR in restricting regrowth of injured CNS axons. PMID:25220840

  11. Gas1 is a receptor for sonic hedgehog to repel enteric axons.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shiying; Martinelli, David C; Zheng, Xiaobin; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Fan, Chen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The myenteric plexus of the enteric nervous system controls the movement of smooth muscles in the gastrointestinal system. They extend their axons between two peripheral smooth muscle layers to form a tubular meshwork arborizing the gut wall. How a tubular axonal meshwork becomes established without invading centrally toward the gut epithelium has not been addressed. We provide evidence here that sonic hedgehog (Shh) secreted from the gut epithelium prevents central projections of enteric axons, thereby forcing their peripheral tubular distribution. Exclusion of enteric central projections by Shh requires its binding partner growth arrest specific gene 1 (Gas1) and its signaling component smoothened (Smo) in enteric neurons. Using enteric neurons differentiated from neurospheres in vitro, we show that enteric axon growth is not inhibited by Shh. Rather, when Shh is presented as a point source, enteric axons turn away from it in a Gas1-dependent manner. Of the Gαi proteins that can couple with Smo, G protein α Z (Gnaz) is found in enteric axons. Knockdown and dominant negative inhibition of Gnaz dampen the axon-repulsive response to Shh, and Gnaz mutant intestines contain centrally projected enteric axons. Together, our data uncover a previously unsuspected mechanism underlying development of centrifugal tubular organization and identify a previously unidentified effector of Shh in axon guidance. PMID:25535338

  12. MicroRNA-210 promotes sensory axon regeneration of adult mice in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi-Wen; Jiang, Jing-Jing; Yan-Gao; Wang, Rui-Ying; Tu, Guan-Jun

    2016-05-27

    Axon regeneration as a critical step in nerve repairing and remodeling after peripheral nerve injury relies on regulation of gene expression. MicroRNAs are emerging to be important epigenetic regulators of gene expression to control axon regeneration. Here we used a novel in vivo electroporation approach to transfect microRNA-210 (miR-210) or siRNAs to adult mice dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, measured the axon length 3days after sciatic nerve crush or dissociated DRG cultures in vitro to detect the effect of miR-210 in sensory axon regeneration. Importantly, we found that miR-210 overexpression could promote sensory axon regeneration and inhibit apoptsosis by ephrin-A3 (EFNA3). In addition, inhibition of endogenous miR-210 in DRG neurons impaired axon regeneration in vitro and in vivo, the regulatory effect of miR-210 was mediated by increased expression of EFNA3 because downregulation of EFNA3 fully rescued axon regeneration. We thus demonstrate that miR-210 is a new physiological regulator of sensory axon regeneration, and EFNA3 may be the functional target of miR-210. We conclude that miR-210 may play an important role in sensory axon regeneration. PMID:27102143

  13. Pathological axonal death through a MAPK cascade that triggers a local energy deficit

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Wu, Zhuhao; Renier, Nicolas; Simon, David J.; Uryu, Kunihiro; Park, David S.; Greer, Peter A.; Tournier, Cathy; Davis, Roger J.; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Summary Axonal death disrupts functional connectivity of neural circuits and is a critical feature of many neurodegenerative disorders. Pathological axon degeneration often occurs independently of known programmed death pathways, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using traumatic injury as a model, we systematically investigate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) families, and delineate a MAPK cascade that represents the early degenerative response to axonal injury. The adaptor protein Sarm1 is required for activation of this MAPK cascade, and this Sarm1-MAPK pathway disrupts axonal energy homeostasis, leading to ATP depletion before physical breakdown of damaged axons. The protective cytoNmnat1/Wlds protein inhibits activation of this MAPK cascade. Further, MKK4, a key component in the Sarm1-MAPK pathway, is antagonized by AKT signaling, which modulates the degenerative response by limiting activation of downstream JNK signaling. Our results reveal a regulatory mechanism that integrates distinct signals to instruct pathological axon degeneration. PMID:25594179

  14. Apaf1-deficient cortical neurons exhibit defects in axonal outgrowth.

    PubMed

    De Zio, Daniela; Molinari, Francesca; Rizza, Salvatore; Gatta, Lucia; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Salvatore, Anna Maria; Mathiassen, Søs Grønbæk; Cwetsch, Andrzej W; Filomeni, Giuseppe; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2015-11-01

    The establishment of neuronal polarity and axonal outgrowth are key processes affecting neuronal migration and synapse formation, their impairment likely leading to cognitive deficits. Here we have found that the apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf1), apart from its canonical role in apoptosis, plays an additional function in cortical neurons, where its deficiency specifically impairs axonal growth. Given the central role played by centrosomes and microtubules in the polarized extension of the axon, our data suggest that Apaf1-deletion affects axonal outgrowth through an impairment of centrosome organization. In line with this, centrosomal protein expression, as well as their centrosomal localization proved to be altered upon Apaf1-deletion. Strikingly, we also found that Apaf1-loss affects trans-Golgi components and leads to a robust activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK), this confirming the stressful conditions induced by Apaf1-deficiency. Since AMPK hyper-phosphorylation is known to impair a proper axon elongation, our finding contributes to explain the effect of Apaf1-deficiency on axogenesis. We also discovered that the signaling pathways mediating axonal growth and involving glycogen synthase kinase-3β, liver kinase B1, and collapsing-response mediator protein-2 are altered in Apaf1-KO neurons. Overall, our results reveal a novel non-apoptotic role for Apaf1 in axonal outgrowth, suggesting that the neuronal phenotype due to Apaf1-deletion could not only be fully ascribed to apoptosis inhibition, but might also be the result of defects in axogenesis. The discovery of new molecules involved in axonal elongation has a clinical relevance since it might help to explain neurological abnormalities occurring during early brain development. PMID:25975226

  15. G-protein beta-subunit specificity in the fast membrane-delimited inhibition of Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    García, D E; Li, B; García-Ferreiro, R E; Hernández-Ochoa, E O; Yan, K; Gautam, N; Catterall, W A; Mackie, K; Hille, B

    1998-11-15

    We investigated which subtypes of G-protein beta subunits participate in voltage-dependent modulation of N-type calcium channels. Calcium currents were recorded from cultured rat superior cervical ganglion neurons injected intranuclearly with DNA encoding five different G-protein beta subunits. Gbeta1 and Gbeta2 strongly mimicked the fast voltage-dependent inhibition of calcium channels produced by many G-protein-coupled receptors. The Gbeta5 subunit produced much weaker effects than Gbeta1 and Gbeta2, whereas Gbeta3 and Gbeta4 were nearly inactive in these electrophysiological studies. The specificity implied by these results was confirmed and extended using the yeast two-hybrid system to test for protein-protein interactions. Here, Gbeta1 or Gbeta2 coupled to the GAL4-activation domain interacted strongly with a channel sequence corresponding to the intracellular loop connecting domains I and II of a alpha1 subunit of the class B calcium channel fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain. In this assay, the Gbeta5 subunit interacted weakly, and Gbeta3 and Gbeta4 failed to interact. Together, these results suggest that Gbeta1 and/or Gbeta2 subunits account for most of the voltage-dependent inhibition of N-type calcium channels and that the linker between domains I and II of the calcium channel alpha1 subunit is a principal receptor for this inhibition. PMID:9801356

  16. SRC family kinases are required for limb trajectory selection by spinal motor axons.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tzu-Jen; Palmesino, Elena; Kania, Artur

    2009-04-29

    Signal relay by guidance receptors at the axonal growth cone is a process essential for the assembly of a functional nervous system. We investigated the in vivo function of Src family kinases (SFKs) as growth cone guidance signaling intermediates in the context of spinal lateral motor column (LMC) motor axon projection toward the ventral or dorsal limb mesenchyme. Using in situ mRNA detection we determined that Src and Fyn are expressed in LMC motor neurons of chick and mouse embryos at the time of limb trajectory selection. Inhibition of SFK activity by C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) overexpression in chick LMC axons using in ovo electroporation resulted in LMC axons selecting the inappropriate dorsoventral trajectory within the limb mesenchyme, with medial LMC axon projecting into the dorsal and ventral limb nerve with apparently random incidence. We also detected LMC axon trajectory choice errors in Src mutant mice demonstrating a nonredundant role for Src in motor axon guidance in agreement with gain and loss of Src function in chick LMC neurons which led to the redirection of LMC axons. Finally, Csk-mediated SFK inhibition attenuated the retargeting of LMC axons caused by EphA or EphB over-expression, implying the participation of SFKs in Eph-mediated LMC motor axon guidance. In summary, our findings demonstrate that SFKs are essential for motor axon guidance and suggest that they play an important role in relaying ephrin:Eph signals that mediate the selection of motor axon trajectory in the limb. PMID:19403835

  17. Protein Prenylation Constitutes an Endogenous Brake on Axonal Growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai; Kuwajima, Takaaki; Oakley, Derek; Nikulina, Elena; Hou, Jianwei; Yang, Wan Seok; Lowry, Emily Rhodes; Lamas, Nuno Jorge; Amoroso, Mackenzie Weygandt; Croft, Gist F; Hosur, Raghavendra; Wichterle, Hynek; Sebti, Said; Filbin, Marie T; Stockwell, Brent; Henderson, Christopher E

    2016-07-12

    Suboptimal axonal regeneration contributes to the consequences of nervous system trauma and neurodegenerative disease, but the intrinsic mechanisms that regulate axon growth remain unclear. We screened 50,400 small molecules for their ability to promote axon outgrowth on inhibitory substrata. The most potent hits were the statins, which stimulated growth of all mouse- and human-patient-derived neurons tested, both in vitro and in vivo, as did combined inhibition of the protein prenylation enzymes farnesyltransferase (PFT) and geranylgeranyl transferase I (PGGT-1). Compensatory sprouting of motor axons may delay clinical onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Accordingly, elevated levels of PGGT1B, which would be predicted to reduce sprouting, were found in motor neurons of early- versus late-onset ALS patients postmortem. The mevalonate-prenylation pathway therefore constitutes an endogenous brake on axonal growth, and its inhibition provides a potential therapeutic approach to accelerate neuronal regeneration in humans. PMID:27373155

  18. A dynamical system model of neurofilament transport in axons

    PubMed Central

    Craciun, Gheorghe; Brown, Anthony; Friedman, Avner

    2007-01-01

    We develop a dynamical system model for the transport of neurofilaments in axons, inspired by Brown’s “stop-and-go” model for slow axonal transport. We use fast/slow time-scale arguments to lower the number of relevant parameters in our model. Then, we use experimental data of Wang and Brown to estimate all but one parameter. We show that we can choose this last remaining parameter such that the results of our model agree with pulse-labeling experiments from three different nerve cell types, and also agree with stochastic simulation results. PMID:15975597

  19. Cortical oscillatory dynamics and benzodiazepine-site modulation of tonic inhibition in fast spiking interneurons.

    PubMed

    Prokic, Emma J; Weston, Cathryn; Yamawaki, Naoki; Hall, Stephen D; Jones, Roland S G; Stanford, Ian M; Ladds, Graham; Woodhall, Gavin L

    2015-08-01

    Tonic conductance mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors has been implicated in the modulation of network oscillatory activity. Using an in vitro brain slice to produce oscillatory activity and a kinetic model of GABAA receptor dynamics, we show that changes in tonic inhibitory input to fast spiking interneurons underlie benzodiazepine-site mediated modulation of neuronal network synchrony in rat primary motor cortex. We found that low concentrations (10 nM) of the benzodiazepine site agonist, zolpidem, reduced the power of pharmacologically-induced beta-frequency (15-30 Hz) oscillatory activity. By contrast, higher doses augmented beta power. Application of the antagonist, flumazenil, also increased beta power suggesting endogenous modulation of the benzodiazepine binding site. Voltage-clamp experiments revealed that pharmacologically-induced rhythmic inhibitory postsynaptic currents were reduced by 10 nM zolpidem, suggesting an action on inhibitory interneurons. Further voltage-clamp studies of fast spiking cells showed that 10 nM zolpidem augmented a tonic inhibitory GABAA receptor mediated current in fast spiking cells whilst higher concentrations of zolpidem reduced the tonic current. A kinetic model of zolpidem-sensitive GABAA receptors suggested that incubation with 10 nM zolpidem resulted in a high proportion of GABAA receptors locked in a kinetically slow desensitized state whilst 30 nM zolpidem favoured rapid transition into and out of desensitized states. This was confirmed experimentally using a challenge with saturating concentrations of GABA. Selective modulation of an interneuron-specific tonic current may underlie the reversal of cognitive and motor deficits afforded by low-dose zolpidem in neuropathological states. PMID:25797493

  20. Peripheral axon crush elevates transport of p75NTR in the central projection of sensory neurones of rats.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, Jean-Dominique; Patel, Jyoti; Averill, Sharon; Tomlinson, David R; Priestley, John V; Fernyhough, Paul

    2003-11-20

    The effect of peripheral axon crush on the axonal transport of the neurotrophin receptors, p75(NTR) and trkA, was studied in dorsal roots of adult rats. Lumbar dorsal roots were crushed for 3-6 h to cause accumulation of p75(NTR) and trkA. Immunohistochemistry showed the presence of the NGF receptors in axons, indicating retrograde and anterograde axonal transport in the dorsal root. Western blots confirmed that the time course of accumulation of p75(NTR) was consistent with fast axonal transport. However, trkA accumulation was too low to indicate significant levels of axonal transport. Sciatic nerve crush induced a 2-fold increase (P<0.05) in the bidirectional axonal transport of p75(NTR) in the dorsal root while trkA transport remained below detectable levels. PMID:14623136

  1. Axonal model for temperature stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fribance, Sarah; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies indicate that a rapid increase in local temperature plays an important role in nerve stimulation by laser. To analyze the temperature effect, our study modified the classical HH axonal model by incorporating a membrane capacitance-temperature relationship. The modified model successfully simulated the generation and propagation of action potentials induced by a rapid increase in local temperature when the Curie temperature of membrane capacitance is below 40 °C, while the classical model failed to simulate the axonal excitation by temperature stimulation. The new model predicts that a rapid increase in local temperature produces a rapid increase in membrane capacitance, which causes an inward membrane current across the membrane capacitor strong enough to depolarize the membrane and generate an action potential. If the Curie temperature of membrane capacitance is 31 °C, a temperature increase of 6.6-11.2 °C within 0.1-2.6 ms is required for axonal excitation and the required increase is smaller for a faster increase. The model also predicts that: (1) the temperature increase could be smaller if the global axon temperature is higher; (2) axons of small diameter require a smaller temperature increase than axons of large diameter. Our study indicates that the axonal membrane capacitance-temperature relationship plays a critical role in inducing the transient membrane depolarization by a rapidly increasing temperature, while the effects of temperature on ion channel kinetics cannot induce depolarization. The axonal model developed in this study will be very useful for analyzing the axonal response to local heating induced by pulsed infrared laser. PMID:27342462

  2. β-Tubulin mutations that cause severe neuropathies disrupt axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Hironori; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Microtubules are fundamental to neuronal morphogenesis and function. Mutations in tubulin, the major constituent of microtubules, result in neuronal diseases. Here, we have analysed β-tubulin mutations that cause neuronal diseases and we have identified mutations that strongly inhibit axonal transport of vesicles and mitochondria. These mutations are in the H12 helix of β-tubulin and change the negative charge on the surface of the microtubule. This surface is the interface between microtubules and kinesin superfamily motor proteins (KIF). The binding of axonal transport KIFs to microtubules is dominant negatively disrupted by these mutations, which alters the localization of KIFs in neurons and inhibits axon elongation in vivo. In humans, these mutations induce broad neurological symptoms, such as loss of axons in the central nervous system and peripheral neuropathy. Thus, our data identified the critical region of β-tubulin required for axonal transport and suggest a molecular mechanism for human neuronal diseases caused by tubulin mutations. PMID:23503589

  3. β-Tubulin mutations that cause severe neuropathies disrupt axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Hironori; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2013-05-15

    Microtubules are fundamental to neuronal morphogenesis and function. Mutations in tubulin, the major constituent of microtubules, result in neuronal diseases. Here, we have analysed β-tubulin mutations that cause neuronal diseases and we have identified mutations that strongly inhibit axonal transport of vesicles and mitochondria. These mutations are in the H12 helix of β-tubulin and change the negative charge on the surface of the microtubule. This surface is the interface between microtubules and kinesin superfamily motor proteins (KIF). The binding of axonal transport KIFs to microtubules is dominant negatively disrupted by these mutations, which alters the localization of KIFs in neurons and inhibits axon elongation in vivo. In humans, these mutations induce broad neurological symptoms, such as loss of axons in the central nervous system and peripheral neuropathy. Thus, our data identified the critical region of β-tubulin required for axonal transport and suggest a molecular mechanism for human neuronal diseases caused by tubulin mutations. PMID:23503589

  4. Giant axonal neuropathy: MRS findings.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Alpay; Kutlu, Ramazan; Sigirci, Ahmet; Baysal, Tamer; Altinok, Tayfun; Yakinci, Cengiz

    2003-10-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare genetic disease of childhood involving the central and peripheral nervous systems. Axonal loss with several giant axons filled with neurofilaments is the main histopathological feature of peripheral nerve biopsies in this disease. Routine neuroimaging studies reveal diffuse hyperintensities in cerebral and cerebellar white matter. In this case report, the authors present the brain magnetic resonance spectroscopic features (normal N-acetylaspartate/creatine and increased choline/creatine and myoinositol/creatine ratios), which might indicate the absence of neuroaxonal loss and the presence of significant demyelination and glial proliferation in white matter, of an 11-year-old boy diagnosed with GAN. PMID:14569833

  5. Nongenomic glucocorticoid inhibition via endocannabinoid release in the hypothalamus: a fast feedback mechanism.

    PubMed

    Di, Shi; Malcher-Lopes, Renato; Halmos, Katalin Cs; Tasker, Jeffrey G

    2003-06-15

    Glucocorticoid negative feedback in the brain controls stress, feeding, and neural-immune interactions by regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, but the mechanisms of inhibition of hypothalamic neurosecretory cells have never been elucidated. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in an acute hypothalamic slice preparation, we demonstrate a rapid suppression of excitatory glutamatergic synaptic inputs to parvocellular neurosecretory neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) by the glucocorticoids dexamethasone and corticosterone. The effect was maintained with dexamethasone conjugated to bovine serum albumin and was not seen with direct intracellular glucocorticoid perfusion via the patch pipette, suggesting actions at a membrane receptor. The presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release by glucocorticoids was blocked by postsynaptic inhibition of G-protein activity with intracellular GDP-beta-S application, implicating a postsynaptic G-protein-coupled receptor and the release of a retrograde messenger. The glucocorticoid effect was not blocked by the nitric oxide synthesis antagonist N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride or by hemoglobin but was blocked completely by the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonists AM251 [N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] and AM281 [1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-4-morpholinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] and mimicked and occluded by the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 [(beta)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone mesylate], indicating that it was mediated by retrograde endocannabinoid release. Several peptidergic subtypes of parvocellular neuron, identified by single-cell reverse transcripton-PCR analysis, were subject to rapid inhibitory glucocorticoid regulation, including corticotropin-releasing hormone-, thyrotropin-releasing hormone

  6. Clustered voltage-gated Na+ channels in Aplysia axons.

    PubMed

    Johnston, W L; Dyer, J R; Castellucci, V F; Dunn, R J

    1996-03-01

    Clustering of voltage-gated Na+ channels is critical for the fast saltatory conduction of action potentials in vertebrate myelinated axons. However, the mechanisms responsible for the generation and maintenance of Na+ channel clustering are not well understood. In this study we have raised an antibody against the cloned SCAP-1 voltage-gated Na+ channel of the marine invertebrate Aplysia californica and used it to examine Na+ channel localization in Aplysia ganglia and in cultured Aplysia sensory neurons. Our results show that there is a large cytoplasmic pool of Na+ channels in the soma of Aplysia neurons. Furthermore, we show that Na+ channels in Aplysia axons are not homogeneously distributed but, rather, are present in distinct clusters. Theoretical considerations indicate that Na+ channel clustering may enhance action potential conduction. We propose that clustered Na+ channels may be a fundamental property of many axons, and perhaps of many membranes that conduct Na(+)-dependent action potentials. PMID:8774441

  7. Fusimotor axons in the kitten.

    PubMed

    Gregory, J E; Proske, U

    1986-11-01

    In kittens 1- to 23-days old growth of axons in the soleus nerve has been studied using the structural parameters nerve length, internodal length, and axonal diameter. In addition, single functional fusimotor axons were isolated in lumbosacral ventral roots, and the responses of muscle spindles in soleus were studied during fusimotor stimulation. While nerve length over the soleus nerve to lumbar spinal root increased from 41 to 76 mm during the 22 days, mean internodal length increased from 250 to 410 microns. Mean axon diameter increased from 2.1 to 4.1 microns. In the youngest animals values for both internodal length and axon diameter were distributed uniformly about the mean. From day 11 onward the distributions became bimodal, including a growing number of new axons in the small-myelinated range. Filaments of ventral root were isolated that on repetitive stimulation had a specific excitatory effect on the discharge of muscle spindles. The responses could be attributed to axons that were not associated with measurable tension and were therefore likely to be fusimotor fibers. Measurements of the conduction velocity of skeletomotor and fusimotor axons showed that conduction speed increased progressively with age for both groups, but the rate of increase was more than three times faster in the most rapidly conducting skeletomotor axons compared with the fusimotor axons. The distribution of conduction velocities for fusimotor fibers showed two peaks, one in the range typical for conduction in unmyelinated fibers, 0.5-1.0 m/s, the second at 3-4 m/s. The small number of values in the range of 1-2 m/s was attributed to the process of myelination. It is suggested that conduction speed increases discontinuously over this part of the range as impulse conduction changes from continuous propagation to saltatory transmission. Eighteen fusimotor axons could be classified as having either a static or a dynamic action on spindle discharge. Repetitive stimulation of fusimotor

  8. Mechanistic logic underlying the axonal transport of cytosolic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Das, Utpal; Tang, Yong; Roy, Subhojit

    2011-01-01

    Proteins vital to presynaptic function are synthesized in the neuronal perikarya and delivered into synapses via two modes of axonal transport. While membrane-anchoring proteins are conveyed in fast axonal transport via motor-driven vesicles, cytosolic proteins travel in slow axonal transport; via mechanisms that are poorly understood. We found that in cultured axons, populations of cytosolic proteins tagged to photoactivable-GFP (PA-GFP) move with a slow motor-dependent anterograde bias; distinct from vesicular-trafficking or diffusion of untagged PA-GFP. The overall bias is likely generated by an intricate particle-kinetics involving transient assembly and short-range vectorial spurts. In-vivo biochemical studies reveal that cytosolic proteins are organized into higher-order structures within axon-enriched fractions that are largely segregated from vesicles. Data-driven biophysical modeling best predicts a scenario where soluble molecules dynamically assemble into mobile supra-molecular structures. We propose a model where cytosolic proteins are transported by dynamically assembling into multi-protein complexes that are directly/indirectly conveyed by motors. PMID:21555071

  9. Full length talin stimulates integrin activation and axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Lik; Kwok, Jessica C.F.; Heller, Janosch P.D.; Zhao, Rongrong; Eva, Richard; Fawcett, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Integrin function is regulated by activation involving conformational changes that modulate ligand-binding affinity and downstream signaling. Activation is regulated through inside-out signaling which is controlled by many signaling pathways via a final common pathway through kindlin and talin, which bind to the intracellular tail of beta integrins. Previous studies have shown that the axon growth inhibitory molecules NogoA and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) inactivate integrins. Overexpressing kindlin-1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons activates integrins, enabling their axons to overcome inhibitory molecules in the environment, and promoting regeneration in vivo following dorsal root crush. Other studies have indicated that expression of the talin head alone or with kindlin can enhance integrin activation. Here, using adult rat DRG neurons, we investigate the effects of overexpressing various forms of talin on axon growth and integrin signaling. We found that overexpression of the talin head activated axonal integrins but inhibited downstream signaling via FAK, and did not promote axon growth. Similarly, co-expression of the talin head and kindlin-1 prevented the growth-promoting effect of kindlin-1, suggesting that the talin head acts as a form of dominant negative for integrin function. Using full-length talin constructs in PC12 cells we observed that neurite growth was enhanced by the expression of wild-type talin and more so by two ‘activated’ forms of talin produced by point mutation (on laminin and aggrecan–laminin substrates). Nevertheless, co-expression of full-length talin with kindlin did not promote neurite growth more than either molecule alone. In vivo, we find that talin is present in PNS axons (sciatic nerve), and also in CNS axons of the corticospinal tract. PMID:25771432

  10. N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine regulates Hedgehog signaling and promotes growth of cortical axons

    PubMed Central

    Kharebava, Giorgi; Rashid, Mohammad A.; Lee, Ji-Won; Sarkar, Sarmila; Kevala, Karl; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Axonogenesis, a process for the establishment of neuron connectivity, is central to brain function. The role of metabolites derived from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) that is specifically enriched in the brain, has not been addressed in axon development. In this study, we tested if synaptamide (N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine), an endogenous metabolite of DHA, affects axon growth in cultured cortical neurons. We found that synaptamide increased the average axon length, inhibited GLI family zinc finger 1 (GLI1) transcription and sonic hedgehog (Shh) target gene expression while inducing cAMP elevation. Similar effects were produced by cyclopamine, a regulator of the Shh pathway. Conversely, Shh antagonized elevation of cAMP and blocked synaptamide-mediated increase in axon length. Activation of Shh pathway by a smoothened (SMO) agonist (SAG) or overexpression of SMO did not inhibit axon growth mediated by synaptamide or cyclopamine. Instead, adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 abolished synaptamide-mediated axon growth indicating requirement of cAMP elevation for this process. Our findings establish that synaptamide promotes axon growth while Shh antagonizes synaptamide-mediated cAMP elevation and axon growth by a SMO-independent, non-canonical pathway. PMID:26545965

  11. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 is a novel target to promote axonal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Brochier, Camille; Jones, James I.; Willis, Dianna E.; Langley, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic options for the restoration of neurological functions after acute axonal injury are severely limited. In addition to limiting neuronal loss, effective treatments face the challenge of restoring axonal growth within an injury environment where inhibitory molecules from damaged myelin and activated astrocytes act as molecular and physical barriers. Overcoming these barriers to permit axon growth is critical for the development of any repair strategy in the central nervous system. Here, we identify poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) as a previously unidentified and critical mediator of multiple growth-inhibitory signals. We show that exposure of neurons to growth-limiting molecules—such as myelin-derived Nogo and myelin-associated glycoprotein—or reactive astrocyte-produced chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans activates PARP1, resulting in the accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) in the cell body and axon and limited axonal growth. Accordingly, we find that pharmacological inhibition or genetic loss of PARP1 markedly facilitates axon regeneration over nonpermissive substrates. Together, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of axon growth inhibition and identify PARP1 as an effective target to promote axon regeneration. PMID:26598704

  12. The role of autophagy in axonal degeneration of the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jan Christoph; Lingor, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Different pathological conditions including glaucoma, optic neuritis, hereditary optic atrophy and traumatic injury lead to a degeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons in the optic nerve. Besides this clinical relevance, several experimental models employ the optic nerve as a model system to examine general mechanisms of axonal degeneration in the central nervous system. Several experimental studies have demonstrated that an activation of autophagy is a prominent feature of axonal degeneration in the optic nerve independent of the underlying pathological condition. However, the function of autophagy in axonal degeneration remains still unclear. Inhibition of autophagy was found to attenuate axonal degeneration within the first hours after optic nerve lesion. Other studies focusing on survival of retinal ganglion cells at later postlesional time points report contradicting results, where both inhibition and induction of autophagy were beneficial for survival, depending on the model system or examination time. Therefore, a more precise understanding of the role and the kinetics of autophagy in axonal degeneration is mandatory to develop new therapies for diseases of the optic nerve. Here, we review the literature on the pathophysiological role of autophagy in axonal degeneration in the optic nerve and discuss its implications for future therapeutic approaches in diseases of the eye and the central nervous system involving axonal degeneration. PMID:26315785

  13. Chondroitin-4-sulfation negatively regulates axonal guidance and growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hang; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; McCann, Thomas E.; Unsworth, Edward; Goldsmith, Paul; Yu, Zu-Xi; Tan, Fei; Santiago, Lizzie; Mills, Edward M.; Wang, Yu; Symes, Aviva J.; Geller, Herbert M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains endow extracellular matrix proteoglycans with diversity and complexity based upon the length, composition, and charge distribution of the polysaccharide chain. Using cultured primary neurons, we show that specific sulfation in the GAG chains of chondroitin sulfate (CS) mediates neuronal guidance cues and axonal growth inhibition. Chondroitin-4-sulfate (CS-A), but not chondroitin-6-sulfate (CS-C), exhibits a strong negative guidance cue to mouse cerebellar granule neurons. Enzymatic and gene-based manipulations of 4-sulfation in the GAG side chains alter their ability to direct growing axons. Furthermore, 4-sulfated CS GAG chains are rapidly and significantly increased in regions that do not support axonal regeneration proximal to spinal cord lesions in mice. Thus, our findings provide the evidence showing that specific sulfation along the carbohydrate backbone carries instructions to regulate neuronal function. PMID:18768934

  14. The axonal cytoskeleton: from organization to function

    PubMed Central

    Kevenaar, Josta T.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2015-01-01

    The axon is the single long fiber that extends from the neuron and transmits electrical signals away from the cell body. The neuronal cytoskeleton, composed of microtubules (MTs), actin filaments and neurofilaments, is not only required for axon formation and axonal transport but also provides the structural basis for several specialized axonal structures, such as the axon initial segment (AIS) and presynaptic boutons. Emerging evidence suggest that the unique cytoskeleton organization in the axon is essential for its structure and integrity. In addition, the increasing number of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases linked to defect in actin- and microtubule-dependent processes emphasizes the importance of a properly regulated cytoskeleton for normal axonal functioning. Here, we provide an overview of the current understanding of actin and microtubule organization within the axon and discuss models for the functional role of the cytoskeleton at specialized axonal structures. PMID:26321907

  15. Pathfinding in a large vertebrate axon tract: isotypic interactions guide retinotectal axons at multiple choice points

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Andrew J.; Law, Mei-Yee; Chien, Chi-Bin

    2008-01-01

    Summary Navigating axons respond to environmental guidance signals, but can also follow axons that have gone before—pioneer axons. Pioneers have been studied extensively in simple systems, but the role of axon-axon interactions remains largely unexplored in large vertebrate axon tracts, where cohorts of identical axons could potentially use isotypic interactions to guide each other through multiple choice points. Furthermore, the relative importance of axon-axon interactions compared to axon-autonomous receptor function has not been assessed. Here we test the role of axon-axon interactions in retinotectal development, by devising a technique to selectively remove or replace early-born retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). We find that early RGCs are both necessary and sufficient for later axons to exit the eye. Furthermore, introducing misrouted axons by transplantation reveals that guidance from eye to tectum relies heavily on interactions between axons, including both pioneer-follower and community effects. We conclude that axon-axon interactions and ligand-receptor signaling have coequal roles, cooperating to ensure the fidelity of axon guidance in developing vertebrate tracts. PMID:18653554

  16. RIPK1 mediates axonal degeneration by promoting inflammation and necroptosis in ALS.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yasushi; Ofengeim, Dimitry; Najafov, Ayaz; Das, Sudeshna; Saberi, Shahram; Li, Ying; Hitomi, Junichi; Zhu, Hong; Chen, Hongbo; Mayo, Lior; Geng, Jiefei; Amin, Palak; DeWitt, Judy Park; Mookhtiar, Adnan Kasim; Florez, Marcus; Ouchida, Amanda Tomie; Fan, Jian-bing; Pasparakis, Manolis; Kelliher, Michelle A; Ravits, John; Yuan, Junying

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in the optineurin (OPTN) gene have been implicated in both familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the role of this protein in the central nervous system (CNS) and how it may contribute to ALS pathology are unclear. Here, we found that optineurin actively suppressed receptor-interacting kinase 1 (RIPK1)-dependent signaling by regulating its turnover. Loss of OPTN led to progressive dysmyelination and axonal degeneration through engagement of necroptotic machinery in the CNS, including RIPK1, RIPK3, and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL). Furthermore, RIPK1- and RIPK3-mediated axonal pathology was commonly observed in SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice and pathological samples from human ALS patients. Thus, RIPK1 and RIPK3 play a critical role in mediating progressive axonal degeneration. Furthermore, inhibiting RIPK1 kinase may provide an axonal protective strategy for the treatment of ALS and other human degenerative diseases characterized by axonal degeneration. PMID:27493188

  17. Pulse exposure of cultured rat neurons to aluminum-maltol affected the axonal transport system.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Y; Nakamura, Y; Miyamae, Y; Hashimoto, R; Takeda, M

    1998-08-01

    Although chronic aluminum neurotoxicity has been well established, the mechanism of the toxicity has not been elucidated yet. In order to simplify the study of the aluminum neurotoxicity, we employed the pulse exposure of cultured rat cortical neurons to 250 microM aluminum-maltol for 1 h at the early stage (6 h after plating), which resulted in abnormal distribution of neurofilament L (NFL) and fast axonal transported proteins, whereas the axonal transport of tubulin, actin, and clathrin were not impaired. Otherwise, the pulse exposure of neurons at the late stage (4 days after plating) to the same concentration of aluminum-maltol did not affect the cell morphology and the distribution of NFL. The pulse exposure of cultured neurons to aluminum-maltol at the early stage might affect the axonal transport system of NFL and fast axonal transported proteins. PMID:9756345

  18. Magnesium Sensitizes Slow Vacuolar Channels to Physiological Cytosolic Calcium and Inhibits Fast Vacuolar Channels in Fava Bean Guard Cell Vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Pei; Ward; Schroeder

    1999-11-01

    Vacuolar ion channels in guard cells play important roles during stomatal movement and are regulated by many factors including Ca(2+), calmodulin, protein kinases, and phosphatases. We report that physiological cytosolic and luminal Mg(2+) levels strongly regulate vacuolar ion channels in fava bean (Vicia faba) guard cells. Luminal Mg(2+) inhibited fast vacuolar (FV) currents with a K(i) of approximately 0.23 mM in a voltage-dependent manner at positive potentials on the cytoplasmic side. Cytosolic Mg(2+) at 1 mM also inhibited FV currents. Furthermore, in the absence of cytosolic Mg(2+), cytosolic Ca(2+) at less than 10 µM did not activate slow vacuolar (SV) currents. However, when cytosolic Mg(2+) was present, submicromolar concentrations of cytosolic Ca(2+) activated SV currents with a K(d) of approximately 227 nM, suggesting a synergistic Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) effect. The activation potential of SV currents was shifted toward physiological potentials in the presence of cytosolic Mg(2+) concentrations. The direction of SV currents could also be changed from outward to both outward and inward currents. Our data predict a model for SV channel regulation, including a cytosolic binding site for Ca(2+) with an affinity in the submicromolar range and a cytosolic low-affinity Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) binding site. SV channels are predicted to contain a third binding site on the vacuolar luminal side, which binds Ca(2+) and is inhibitory. In conclusion, cytosolic Mg(2+) sensitizes SV channels to physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Furthermore, we propose that cytosolic and vacuolar Mg(2+) concentrations ensure that FV channels do not function as a continuous vacuolar K(+) leak, which would prohibit stomatal opening. PMID:10557247

  19. Axonal transport of herpes simplex virions to epidermal cells: evidence for a specialized mode of virus transport and assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Penfold, M E; Armati, P; Cunningham, A L

    1994-01-01

    To examine the transmission of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from axon to epidermal cell, an in vitro model was constructed consisting of human fetal dorsal root ganglia cultured in the central chamber of a dual-chamber tissue culture system separated from autologous skin explants in an exterior chamber by concentric steel cylinders adhering to the substratum through silicon grease and agarose. Axons grew through the agarose viral diffusion barrier and terminated on epidermal cells in the exterior chamber. After inoculation of HSV onto dorsal root ganglia, anterograde axonal transport of glycoprotein and nucleocapsid antigen was observed by confocal microscopy to appear in exterior chamber axons within 12 h and in epidermal cells within 16 h, moving at 2-3 mm/h. Although both enveloped and unenveloped nucleocapsids were observed in the neuronal soma by transmission electron microscopy, only nucleocapsids were observed in the axons, closely associated with microtubules. Nodule formation at the surface of HSV-infected axons, becoming more dense at the axon terminus on epidermal cells, and patches of axolemmal HSV glycoprotein D expression were observed by scanning (immuno)electron microscopy, probably representing virus emerging from the axolemma. These findings strongly suggest a specialized mode of viral transport, assembly, and egress in sensory neurons: microtubule-associated intermediate-fast anterograde axonal transport of unenveloped nucleocapsids with separate transport of glycoproteins to the distal regions of the axon and assembly prior to virus emergence at the axon terminus. Images PMID:7517552

  20. Genetic Deletion of the Transcriptional Repressor NFIL3 Enhances Axon Growth In Vitro but Not Axonal Repair In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    van der Kallen, Loek R.; Eggers, Ruben; Ehlert, Erich M.; Verhaagen, Joost; Smit, August B.; van Kesteren, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    Axonal regeneration after injury requires the coordinated expression of genes in injured neurons. We previously showed that either reducing expression or blocking function of the transcriptional repressor NFIL3 activates transcription of regeneration-associated genes Arg1 and Gap43 and strongly promotes axon outgrowth in vitro. Here we tested whether genetic deletion or dominant-negative inhibition of NFIL3 could promote axon regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve lesion in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, we observed no changes in the expression of regeneration-associated genes and a significant delay in functional recovery following genetic deletion of Nfil3. When NFIL3 function was inhibited specifically in dorsal root ganglia prior to sciatic nerve injury, we observed a decrease in regenerative axon growth into the distal nerve segment rather than an increase. Finally, we show that deletion of Nfil3 changes sciatic nerve lesion-induced expression in dorsal root ganglia of genes that are not typically involved in regeneration, including several olfactory receptors and developmental transcription factors. Together our findings show that removal of NFIL3 in vivo does not recapitulate the regeneration-promoting effects that were previously observed in vitro, indicating that in vivo transcriptional control of regeneration is probably more complex and more robust against perturbation than in vitro data may suggest. PMID:25993115

  1. Imaging Axonal Transport of Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinnan; Schwarz, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal mitochondria need to be transported and distributed in axons and dendrites in order to ensure an adequate energy supply and provide sufficient Ca2+ buffering in each portion of these highly extended cells. Errors in mitochondrial transport are implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we present useful tools to analyze axonal transport of mitochondria both in vitro in cultured rat neurons and in vivo in Drosophila larval neurons. These methods enable investigators to take advantage of both systems to study the properties of mitochondrial motility under normal or pathological conditions. PMID:19426876

  2. Asthma as an axon reflex.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P J

    1986-02-01

    In asthma, damage to airway epithelium, possibly caused by eosinophil products, exposes C-fibre afferent nerve endings. Stimulation of these endings by inflammatory mediators such as bradykinin may result in an axon (local) reflex with antidromic conduction down afferent nerve collaterals and release of sensory neuropeptides such as substance P, neurokinin A, and calcitonin gene-related peptide. These peptides are potent inducers of airway smooth muscle contraction, bronchial oedema, extravasation of plasma, mucus hypersecretion, and possibly inflammatory cell infiltration and secretion. Thus, axon reflexes could account for at least some of the pathophysiology of asthma and this concept might lead to new strategies for treatment. PMID:2418322

  3. Selective control of small versus large diameter axons using infrared laser light (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothet, Emilie H.; Shaw, Kendrick M.; Horn, Charles C.; Lu, Hui; Wang, Yves T.; Jansen, E. Duco; Chiel, Hillel J.; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    Sensory information is conveyed to the central nervous system via small diameter unmyelinated fibers. In general, smaller diameter axons have slower conduction velocities. Selective control of such fibers could create new clinical treatments for chronic pain, nausea in response to chemo-therapeutic agents, or hypertension. Electrical stimulation can control axonal activity, but induced axonal current is proportional to cross-sectional area, so that large diameter fibers are affected first. Physiologically, however, synaptic inputs generally affect small diameter fibers before large diameter fibers (the size principle). A more physiological modality that first affected small diameter fibers could have fewer side effects (e.g., not recruiting motor axons). A novel mathematical analysis of the cable equation demonstrates that the minimum length along the axon for inducing block scales with the square root of axon diameter. This implies that the minimum length along an axon for inhibition will scale as the square root of axon diameter, so that lower radiant exposures of infrared light will selectively affect small diameter, slower conducting fibers before those of large diameter. This prediction was tested in identified neurons from the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Radiant exposure to block a neuron with a slower conduction velocity (B43) was consistently lower than that needed to block a faster conduction velocity neuron (B3). Furthermore, in the vagus nerve of the musk shrew, lower radiant exposure blocked slow conducting fibers before blocking faster conducting fibers. Infrared light can selectively control smaller diameter fibers, suggesting many novel clinical treatments.

  4. Absence of SARM1 Rescues Development and Survival of NMNAT2-Deficient Axons

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, Jonathan; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Coleman, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary SARM1 function and nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) loss both promote axon degeneration, but their relative relationship in the process is unknown. Here, we show that NMNAT2 loss and resultant changes to NMNAT metabolites occur in injured SARM1-deficient axons despite their delayed degeneration and that axon degeneration specifically induced by NMNAT2 depletion requires SARM1. Strikingly, SARM1 deficiency also corrects axon outgrowth in mice lacking NMNAT2, independently of NMNAT metabolites, preventing perinatal lethality. Furthermore, NAMPT inhibition partially restores outgrowth of NMNAT2-deficient axons, suggesting that the NMNAT substrate, NMN, contributes to this phenotype. NMNAT2-depletion-dependent degeneration of established axons and restricted extension of developing axons are thus both SARM1 dependent, and SARM1 acts either downstream of NMNAT2 loss and NMN accumulation in a linear pathway or in a parallel branch of a convergent pathway. Understanding the pathway will help establish relationships with other modulators of axon survival and facilitate the development of effective therapies for axonopathies. PMID:25818290

  5. Axon-axon interactions in neuronal circuit assembly: lessons from olfactory map formation.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takeshi; Sakano, Hitoshi

    2011-11-01

    During the development of the nervous system, neurons often connect axons and dendrites over long distances, which are navigated by chemical cues. During the past few decades, studies on axon guidance have focused on chemical cues provided by the axonal target or intermediate target. However, recent studies have shed light on the roles and mechanisms underlying axon-axon interactions during neuronal circuit assembly. The roles of axon-axon interactions are best exemplified in recent studies on olfactory map formation in vertebrates. Pioneer-follower interaction is essential for the axonal pathfinding process. Pre-target axon sorting establishes the anterior-posterior map order. The temporal order of axonal projection is converted to dorsal-ventral topography with the aid of secreted molecules provided by early-arriving axons. An activity-dependent process to form a discrete map also depends on axon sorting. Thus, an emerging principle of olfactory map formation is the 'self-organisation' of axons rather than the 'lock and key' matching between axons and targets. In this review, we discuss how axon-axon interactions contribute to neuronal circuit assembly. PMID:22103421

  6. Nonsynaptic Communication Through ATP Release from Volume-Activated Anion Channels in Axons

    PubMed Central

    Fields, R. Douglas; Ni, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    The release of neuronal messengers outside synapses has broad biological implications, particularly with regard to communication between axons and glia. We identify a mechanism for nonsynaptic, nonvesicular release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from axons through volume-activated anion channels (VAACs) activated by microscopic axon swelling during action potential firing. We used a combination of single-photon imaging of ATP release, together with imaging for intrinsic optical signals, intracellular calcium ions (Ca2+), time-lapse video, and confocal microscopy, to investigate action potential–induced nonsynaptic release of this neurotransmitter. ATP release from cultured embryonic dorsal root ganglion axons persisted when bafilomycin or botulinum toxin was used to block vesicular release, whereas pharmacological inhibition of VAACs or prevention of action potential–induced axon swelling inhibited ATP release and disrupted activity-dependent signaling between axons and astrocytes. This nonvesicular, nonsynaptic communication could mediate various activity-dependent interactions between axons and nervous system cells in normal conditions, development, and disease. PMID:20923934

  7. Task-dependent inhibition of slow-twitch soleus and excitation of fast-twitch gastrocnemius do not require high movement speed and velocity-dependent sensory feedback

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Ricky; Prilutsky, Boris I.

    2014-01-01

    Although individual heads of triceps surae, soleus (SO) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles, are often considered close functional synergists, previous studies have shown distinct activity patterns between them in some motor behaviors. The goal of this study was to test two hypotheses explaining inhibition of slow SO with respect to fast MG: (1) inhibition occurs at high movement velocities and mediated by velocity-dependent sensory feedback and (2) inhibition depends on the ankle-knee joint moment combination and does not require high movement velocities. The hypotheses were tested by comparing the SO EMG/MG EMG ratio during fast and slow motor behaviors (cat paw shake responses vs. back, straight leg load lifting in humans), which had the same ankle extension-knee flexion moment combination; and during fast and slow behaviors with the ankle extension-knee extension moment combination (human vertical jumping and stance phase of walking in cats and leg load lifting in humans). In addition, SO EMG/MG EMG ratio was determined during cat paw shake responses and walking before and after removal of stretch velocity-dependent sensory feedback by self-reinnervating SO and/or gastrocnemius. We found the ratio SO EMG/MG EMG below 1 (p < 0.05) during fast paw shake responses and slow back load lifting, requiring the ankle extension-knee flexion moment combination; whereas the ratio SO EMG/MG EMG was above 1 (p < 0.05) during fast vertical jumping and slow tasks of walking and leg load lifting, requiring ankle extension-knee extension moments. Removal of velocity-dependent sensory feedback did not affect the SO EMG/MG EMG ratio in cats. We concluded that the relative inhibition of SO does not require high muscle velocities, depends on ankle-knee moment combinations, and is mechanically advantageous for allowing a greater MG contribution to ankle extension and knee flexion moments. PMID:25389407

  8. Task-dependent inhibition of slow-twitch soleus and excitation of fast-twitch gastrocnemius do not require high movement speed and velocity-dependent sensory feedback.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ricky; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2014-01-01

    Although individual heads of triceps surae, soleus (SO) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles, are often considered close functional synergists, previous studies have shown distinct activity patterns between them in some motor behaviors. The goal of this study was to test two hypotheses explaining inhibition of slow SO with respect to fast MG: (1) inhibition occurs at high movement velocities and mediated by velocity-dependent sensory feedback and (2) inhibition depends on the ankle-knee joint moment combination and does not require high movement velocities. The hypotheses were tested by comparing the SO EMG/MG EMG ratio during fast and slow motor behaviors (cat paw shake responses vs. back, straight leg load lifting in humans), which had the same ankle extension-knee flexion moment combination; and during fast and slow behaviors with the ankle extension-knee extension moment combination (human vertical jumping and stance phase of walking in cats and leg load lifting in humans). In addition, SO EMG/MG EMG ratio was determined during cat paw shake responses and walking before and after removal of stretch velocity-dependent sensory feedback by self-reinnervating SO and/or gastrocnemius. We found the ratio SO EMG/MG EMG below 1 (p < 0.05) during fast paw shake responses and slow back load lifting, requiring the ankle extension-knee flexion moment combination; whereas the ratio SO EMG/MG EMG was above 1 (p < 0.05) during fast vertical jumping and slow tasks of walking and leg load lifting, requiring ankle extension-knee extension moments. Removal of velocity-dependent sensory feedback did not affect the SO EMG/MG EMG ratio in cats. We concluded that the relative inhibition of SO does not require high muscle velocities, depends on ankle-knee moment combinations, and is mechanically advantageous for allowing a greater MG contribution to ankle extension and knee flexion moments. PMID:25389407

  9. Calcium-dependent proteasome activation is required for axonal neurofilament degradation.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo Youn; Jang, So Young; Shin, Yoon Kyung; Suh, Duk Joon; Park, Hwan Tae

    2013-12-25

    Even though many studies have identified roles of proteasomes in axonal degeneration, the molecular mechanisms by which axonal injury regulates proteasome activity are still unclear. In the present study, we found evidence indicating that extracellular calcium influx is an upstream regulator of proteasome activity during axonal degeneration in injured peripheral nerves. In degenerating axons, the increase in proteasome activity and the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins were significantly suppressed by extracellular calcium chelation. In addition, electron microscopic findings revealed selective inhibition of neurofilament degradation, but not microtubule depolymerization or mitochondrial swelling, by the inhibition of calpain and proteasomes. Taken together, our findings suggest that calcium increase and subsequent proteasome activation are an essential initiator of neurofilament degradation in Wallerian degeneration. PMID:25206662

  10. Optofluidic control of axonal guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Ordonez, Simon; Black, Bryan; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Significant efforts are being made for control on axonal guidance due to its importance in nerve regeneration and in the formation of functional neuronal circuitry in-vitro. These include several physical (topographic modification, optical force, and electric field), chemical (surface functionalization cues) and hybrid (electro-chemical, photochemical etc) methods. Here, we report comparison of the effect of linear flow versus microfluidic flow produced by an opticallydriven micromotor in guiding retinal ganglion axons. A circularly polarized laser tweezers was used to hold, position and spin birefringent calcite particle near growth cone, which in turn resulted in microfluidic flow. The flow rate and resulting shear-force on axons could be controlled by a varying the power of the laser tweezers beam. The calcite particles were placed separately in one chamber and single particle was transported through microfluidic channel to another chamber containing the retina explant. In presence of flow, the turning of axons was found to strongly correlate with the direction of flow. Turning angle as high as 90° was achieved. Optofluidic-manipulation can be applied to other types of mammalian neurons and also can be extended to stimulate mechano-sensing neurons.

  11. Consistent and fast inhibition of colon carcinogenesis by polyethylene glycol in mice and rats given various carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Corpet, D E; Parnaud, G; Delverdier, M; Peiffer, G; Taché, S

    2000-06-15

    We have previously shown that dietary polyethylene-glycol (PEG) suppresses the occurrence of azoxymethane-induced cancers in an accelerated rat model of colon carcinogenesis. To determine the consistency of this preventive effect, we carried out a long-term study in rats fed the standard American Institute of Nutrition 1976 diet, and 7 short-term prevention studies in rodents. A total of 337 F344 rats, 20 Sprague Dawley rats, and 40 OF1 mice were all given initiating dose(s) of colon carcinogen, and were randomly allocated to experimental groups 7 d later. Treated groups received drinking water containing 5% PEG. After 30 or 162 d, the animals were examined for aberrant crypt foci or tumors in the colon. After two 20 mg/kg azoxymethane injections, the number of F344 rats with colon tumor was lower in rats receiving PEG for 162 d than in carcinogen-injected controls, 5/21 versus 25/27 (P < 0.0001). PEG-fed rats had no invasive cancer, and 10 times fewer colon tumors than controls (0.3+/-0.1 and 3.1+/-0.5 respectively, P < 0.0001). A three-day PEG treatment was sufficient to halve the number of azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci in F344 rats (P = 0.0006). After 16 d of treatment, PEG-fed rats had five times fewer foci than controls (21+/-14 and 100+/-23 respectively, P < 0.0001), but the inhibition was reversible in part when treatment was discontinued. Aberrant crypt foci initiated by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea intra-rectally (40 mg/kg) or by 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline p.o. (2 x 200 mg/kg) were suppressed by PEG (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.003 respectively). PEG was active in F344 rats, in Sprague Dawley rats (P = 0.0005), and in OF1 mice (P = 0.001). PEGs with MW between 3350 and 12000 (but not PEG 400), and PEG 8000 from five suppliers, markedly inhibited azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci (all P < 0.01). The prevention was stronger in rats fed a high-fat diet (P < 0.0001) than in rats fed a rodent chow (P = 0.02). PEG was thus a fast

  12. Reduced BACE1 activity enhances clearance of myelin debris and regeneration of axons in the injured peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Mohamed H.; Pan, Bao Han; Hoffman, Paul N.; Ferraris, Dana; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Nguyen, Thien; Wong, Philip C.; Price, Donald L.; Slusher, Barbara S.; Griffin, John W.

    2012-01-01

    β- site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is an aspartyl protease best known for its role in generating the amyloid β peptides that are present in plaques of Alzheimer's Disease. BACE1 has been an attractive target for drug development. In cultured embryonic neurons BACE1-cleaved N-terminal APP is further processed to generate a fragment that can trigger axonal degeneration, suggesting a vital role for BACE1 in axonal health. In addition, BACE1 cleaves neuregulin 1 type III, a protein critical for myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells during development. Here, we asked if axonal degeneration or axonal regeneration in adult nerves might be affected by inhibition or elimination of BACE1. We report that BACE1 knockout and wild-type nerves degenerated at a similar rate after axotomy and to a similar extent in the experimental neuropathies produced by administration of paclitaxel and acrylamide. These data indicate N-APP is not the sole culprit in axonal degeneration in adult nerves. Unexpectedly, however, we observed that BACE1 knockout mice had markedly enhanced clearance of axonal and myelin debris from degenerated fibers, accelerated axonal regeneration, and earlier reinnervation of neuromuscular junctions, compared to littermate controls. These observations were reproduced in part by pharmacological inhibition of BACE1. These data suggest BACE1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach to accelerate regeneration and recovery after peripheral nerve damage. PMID:21490216

  13. MicroRNA-26a supports mammalian axon regeneration in vivo by suppressing GSK3β expression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J-J; Liu, C-M; Zhang, B-Y; Wang, X-W; Zhang, M; Saijilafu; Zhang, S-R; Hall, P; Hu, Y-W; Zhou, F-Q

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are emerging to be important epigenetic factors that control axon regeneration. Here, we report that microRNA-26a (miR-26a) is a physiological regulator of mammalian axon regeneration in vivo. We demonstrated that endogenous miR-26a acted to target specifically glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) in adult mouse sensory neurons in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of endogenous miR-26a in sensory neurons impaired axon regeneration in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the regulatory effect of miR-26a was mediated by increased expression of GSK3β because downregulation or pharmacological inhibition of GSK3β fully rescued axon regeneration. Our results also suggested that the miR-26a-GSK3β pathway regulated axon regeneration at the neuronal soma by controlling gene expression. We provided biochemical and functional evidences that the regeneration-associated transcription factor Smad1 acted downstream of miR-26a and GSK3β to control sensory axon regeneration. Our study reveals a novel miR-26a-GSK3β-Smad1 signaling pathway in the regulation of mammalian axon regeneration. Moreover, we provide the first evidence that, in addition to inhibition of GSK3β kinase activity, maintaining a lower protein level of GSK3β in neurons by the microRNA is necessary for efficient axon regeneration. PMID:26313916

  14. CLUSTERED K+ CHANNEL COMPLEXES IN AXONS

    PubMed Central

    Rasband, Matthew N.

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels regulate diverse neuronal properties including action potential threshold, amplitude, and duration, frequency of firing, neurotransmitter release, and resting membrane potential. In axons, Kv channels are clustered at a variety of functionally important sites including axon initial segments, juxtaparanodes of myelinated axons, nodes of Ranvier, and cerebellar basket cell terminals. These channels are part of larger protein complexes that include cell adhesion molecules and scaffolding proteins. These interacting proteins play important roles in recruiting K+ channels to distinct axonal domains. Here, I review the composition, functions, and mechanism of localization of these K+ channel complexes in axons. PMID:20816921

  15. MicroRNA 146a locally mediates distal axonal growth of dorsal root ganglia neurons under high glucose and sildenafil conditions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Longfei; Wang, Lei; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Szalad, Alexandra; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2016-08-01

    Axonal loss contributes to induction of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, ameliorates neurological dysfunction in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. However, the direct effect of high glucose and sildenafil on axonal growth has not been extensively investigated. Using rat primary dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons cultured in a microfluidic chamber, we investigated the effect of axonal application of high glucose and sildenafil on distal axonal growth. We found that axonal, but not cell body, application of high glucose locally inhibited distal axonal growth. However, axonal application of sildenafil overcame high glucose-reduced axonal growth. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis of distal axonal samples revealed that high glucose reduced axonal miR-146a levels and substantially increased miR-146a target genes, IRAK1 and TRAF6 in the axon. In contrast, sildenafil significantly reversed high glucose-reduced miR-146a levels and high glucose-increased IRAK1 and TRAF6. Gain- and loss-of function of miR-146a in DRG neurons revealed that miR-146a mediated the local effect of high glucose on the distal axonal growth. These in vitro data provide new insights into molecular mechanisms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27167084

  16. UNC-119 suppresses axon branching in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Knobel, K M; Davis, W S; Jorgensen, E M; Bastiani, M J

    2001-10-01

    The architecture of the differentiated nervous system is stable but the molecular mechanisms that are required for stabilization are unknown. We characterized the gene unc-119 in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and demonstrate that it is required to stabilize the differentiated structure of the nervous system. In unc-119 mutants, motor neuron commissures are excessively branched in adults. However, live imaging demonstrated that growth cone behavior during extension was fairly normal with the exception that the overall rate of migration was reduced. Later, after development was complete, secondary growth cones sprouted from existing motor neuron axons and cell bodies. These new growth cones extended supernumerary branches to the dorsal nerve cord at the same time the previously formed axons retracted. These defects could be suppressed by expressing the UNC-119 protein after embryonic development; thus demonstrating that UNC-119 is required for the maintenance of the nervous system architecture. Finally, UNC-119 is located in neuron cell bodies and axons and acts cell-autonomously to inhibit axon branching. PMID:11641230

  17. Human intraretinal myelination: Axon diameters and axon/myelin thickness ratios

    PubMed Central

    FitzGibbon, Thomas; Nestorovski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Human intraretinal myelination of ganglion cell axons occurs in about 1% of the population. We examined myelin thickness and axon diameter in human retinal specimens containing myelinated retinal ganglion cell axons. Materials and Methods: Two eyes containing myelinated patches were prepared for electron microscopy. Two areas were examined in one retina and five in the second retina. Measurements were compared to normal retinal and optic nerve samples and the rabbit retina, which normally contains myelinated axons. Measurements were made using a graphics tablet. Results: Mean axon diameter of myelinated axons at all locations were significantly larger than unmyelinated axons (P ≤ 0.01). Myelinated axons within the patches were significantly larger than axons within the optic nerve (P < 0.01). The relationship between axon diameter/fiber diameter (the G-ratio) seen in the retinal sites differed from that in the nerve. G-ratios were higher and myelin thickness was positively correlated to axon diameter (P < 0.01) in the retina but negatively correlated to axon diameter in the nerve (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Intraretinally myelinated axons are larger than non-myelinated axons from the same population and suggests that glial cells can induce diameter changes in retinal axons that are not normally myelinated. This effect is more dramatic on intraretinal axons compared with the normal transition zone as axons enter the optic nerve and these changes are abnormal. Whether intraretinal myelin alters axonal conduction velocity or blocks axonal conduction remains to be clarified and these issues may have different clinical outcomes. PMID:24212308

  18. Axon degeneration: context defines distinct pathways.

    PubMed

    Geden, Matthew J; Deshmukh, Mohanish

    2016-08-01

    Axon degeneration is an essential part of development, plasticity, and injury response and has been primarily studied in mammalian models in three contexts: 1) Axotomy-induced Wallerian degeneration, 2) Apoptosis-induced axon degeneration (axon apoptosis), and 3) Axon pruning. These three contexts dictate engagement of distinct pathways for axon degeneration. Recent advances have identified the importance of SARM1, NMNATs, NAD+ depletion, and MAPK signaling in axotomy-induced Wallerian degeneration. Interestingly, apoptosis-induced axon degeneration and axon pruning have many shared mechanisms both in signaling (e.g. DLK, JNKs, GSK3α/β) and execution (e.g. Puma, Bax, caspase-9, caspase-3). However, the specific mechanisms by which caspases are activated during apoptosis versus pruning appear distinct, with apoptosis requiring Apaf-1 but not caspase-6 while pruning requires caspase-6 but not Apaf-1. PMID:27197022

  19. Polarized domains of myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Salzer, James L

    2003-10-01

    The entire length of myelinated axons is organized into a series of polarized domains that center around nodes of Ranvier. These domains, which are crucial for normal saltatory conduction, consist of distinct multiprotein complexes of cell adhesion molecules, ion channels, and scaffolding molecules; they also differ in their diameter, organelle content, and rates of axonal transport. Juxtacrine signals from myelinating glia direct their sequential assembly. The composition, mechanisms of assembly, and function of these molecular domains will be reviewed. I also discuss similarities of this domain organization to that of polarized epithelia and present emerging evidence that disorders of domain organization and function contribute to the axonopathies of myelin and other neurologic disorders. PMID:14556710

  20. Critical role of trkB receptors in reactive axonal sprouting and hyperexcitability after axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Aungst, Stephanie; England, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes many long-term neurological complications. Some of these conditions, such as posttraumatic epilepsy, are characterized by increased excitability that typically arises after a latent period lasting from months to years, suggesting that slow injury-induced processes are critical. We tested the hypothesis that trkB activation promotes delayed injury-induced hyperexcitability in part by promoting reactive axonal sprouting. We modeled penetrative TBI with transection of the Schaffer collateral pathway in knock-in mice having an introduced mutation in the trkB receptor (trkBF616A) that renders it susceptible to inhibition by the novel small molecule 1NMPP1. We observed that trkB activation was increased in area CA3 1 day after injury and that expression of a marker of axonal growth, GAP43, was increased 7 days after lesion. Extracellular field potentials in stratum pyramidale of area CA3 in acute slices from sham-operated and lesioned mice were normal in control saline. Abnormal bursts of population spikes were observed under conditions that were mildly proconvulsive but only in slices taken from mice lesioned 7–21 days earlier and not in slices from control mice. trkB activation, GAP43 upregulation, and hyperexcitability were diminished by systemic administration of 1NMPP1 for 7 days after the lesion. Synaptic transmission from area CA3 to area CA1 recovered 7 days after lesion in untreated mice but not in mice treated with 1NMPP1. We conclude that trkB receptor activation and reactive axonal sprouting are critical factors in injury-induced hyperexcitability and may contribute to the neurological complications of TBI. PMID:23155176

  1. Mechanisms of sodium channel clustering and its influence on axonal impulse conduction.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Sean A; Desmazières, Anne; Fricker, Desdemona; Lubetzki, Catherine; Sol-Foulon, Nathalie

    2016-02-01

    The efficient propagation of action potentials along nervous fibers is necessary for animals to interact with the environment with timeliness and precision. Myelination of axons is an essential step to ensure fast action potential propagation by saltatory conduction, a process that requires highly concentrated voltage-gated sodium channels at the nodes of Ranvier. Recent studies suggest that the clustering of sodium channels can influence axonal impulse conduction in both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, which could have major implications in disease, particularly demyelinating pathology. This comprehensive review summarizes the mechanisms governing the clustering of sodium channels at the peripheral and central nervous system nodes and the specific roles of their clustering in influencing action potential conduction. We further highlight the classical biophysical parameters implicated in conduction timing, followed by a detailed discussion on how sodium channel clustering along unmyelinated axons can impact axonal impulse conduction in both physiological and pathological contexts. PMID:26514731

  2. Synapse-Level Determination of Action Potential Duration by K(+) Channel Clustering in Axons.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew J M; DelCanto, Gina; Yu, Jianqing J; Kamasawa, Naomi; Christie, Jason M

    2016-07-20

    In axons, an action potential (AP) is thought to be broadcast as an unwavering binary pulse over its arbor, driving neurotransmission uniformly at release sites. Yet by recording from axons of cerebellar stellate cell (SC) interneurons, we show that AP width varies between presynaptic bouton sites, even within the same axon branch. The varicose geometry of SC boutons alone does not impose differences in spike duration. Rather, axonal patching revealed heterogeneous peak conductance densities of currents mediated mainly by fast-activating Kv3-type potassium channels, with clustered hotspots at boutons and restricted expression at adjoining shafts. Blockade of Kv channels at individual boutons indicates that currents immediately local to a release site direct spike repolarization at that location. Thus, the clustered arrangement and variable expression density of Kv3 channels at boutons are key determinants underlying compartmentalized control of AP width in a near synapse-by-synapse manner, multiplying the signaling capacity of these structures. PMID:27346528

  3. On the Universality of Axon P Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingyi; Pan, Linqiang; Paun, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    Axon P systems are computing models with a linear structure in the sense that all nodes (i.e., computing units) are arranged one by one along the axon. Such models have a good biological motivation: an axon in a nervous system is a complex information processor of impulse signals. Because the structure of axon P systems is linear, the computational power of such systems has been proved to be greatly restricted; in particular, axon P systems are not universal as language generators. It remains open whether axon P systems are universal as number generators. In this paper, we prove that axon P systems are universal as both number generators and function computing devices, and investigate the number of nodes needed to construct a universal axon P system. It is proved that four nodes (respectively, nine nodes) are enough for axon P systems to achieve universality as number generators (respectively, function computing devices). These results illustrate that the simple linear structure is enough for axon P systems to achieve a desired computational power. PMID:25680218

  4. Floor plate-derived neuropilin-2 functions as a secreted semaphorin sink to facilitate commissural axon midline crossing

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Enriquez, Berenice; Wu, Zhuhao; Martinez, Edward; Olsen, Olav; Kaprielian, Zaven; Maness, Patricia F.; Yoshida, Yutaka; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Tran, Tracy S.

    2015-01-01

    Commissural axon guidance depends on a myriad of cues expressed by intermediate targets. Secreted semaphorins signal through neuropilin-2/plexin-A1 receptor complexes on post-crossing commissural axons to mediate floor plate repulsion in the mouse spinal cord. Here, we show that neuropilin-2/plexin-A1 are also coexpressed on commissural axons prior to midline crossing and can mediate precrossing semaphorin-induced repulsion in vitro. How premature semaphorin-induced repulsion of precrossing axons is suppressed in vivo is not known. We discovered that a novel source of floor plate-derived, but not axon-derived, neuropilin-2 is required for precrossing axon pathfinding. Floor plate-specific deletion of neuropilin-2 significantly reduces the presence of precrossing axons in the ventral spinal cord, which can be rescued by inhibiting plexin-A1 signaling in vivo. Our results show that floor plate-derived neuropilin-2 is developmentally regulated, functioning as a molecular sink to sequester semaphorins, preventing premature repulsion of precrossing axons prior to subsequent down-regulation, and allowing for semaphorin-mediated repulsion of post-crossing axons. PMID:26680304

  5. Inhibitory Injury Signaling Represses Axon Regeneration After Dorsal Root Injury.

    PubMed

    Mar, Fernando M; Simões, Anabel R; Rodrigo, Inês S; Sousa, Mónica M

    2016-09-01

    Following injury to peripheral axons, besides increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), the positive injury signals extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT-3) are locally activated and retrogradely transported to the cell body, where they induce a pro-regenerative program. Here, to further understand the importance of injury signaling for successful axon regeneration, we used dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons that have a central branch without regenerative capacity and a peripheral branch that regrows after lesion. Although injury to the DRG central branch (dorsal root injury (DRI)) activated ERK, JNK, and STAT-3 and increased cAMP levels, it did not elicit gain of intrinsic growth capacity nor the ability to overcome myelin inhibition, as occurred after peripheral branch injury (sciatic nerve injury (SNI)). Besides, gain of growth capacity after SNI was independent of ERK and cAMP. Antibody microarrays of dynein-immunoprecipitated axoplasm from rats with either DRI or SNI revealed a broad differential activation and transport of signals after each injury type and further supported that ERK, JNK, STAT-3, and cAMP signaling pathways are minor contributors to the differential intrinsic axon growth capacity of both injury models. Increased levels of inhibitory injury signals including GSK3β and ROCKII were identified after DRI, not only in axons but also in DRG cell bodies. In summary, our work shows that activation and transport of positive injury signals are not sufficient to promote increased axon growth capacity and that differential modulation of inhibitory molecules may contribute to limited regenerative response. PMID:26298667

  6. Enzyme-instructed self-assembly of taxol promotes axonal branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Bin; Miao, Qingqing; Tang, Anming; Liang, Gaolin

    2015-09-01

    Axonal branching is important for vertebrate neuron signaling. Taxol has a biphasic effect on axonal branching (i.e., high concentration inhibits axonal growth but low concentration restores it). To the best of our knowledge, low concentration of taxol to promote axonal branching has not been reported yet. Herein, we rationally designed a taxol derivative Fmoc-Phe-Phe-Lys(taxol)-Tyr(H2PO4)-OH (1) which could be subjected to alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-catalyzed self-assembly to form taxol nanofibers. We found that, at 10 μM, 1 has a microtubule (MT) condensation effect similar to that of taxol on mammalian cells but with more chronic toxicity than taxol on the cells. At a low concentration of 10 nM, 1 not only promoted neurite elongation as taxol did but also promoted axonal branching which was not achieved by using taxol. We propose that self-assembly of 1 along the MTs prohibited their lateral contacts and thus promoted axonal branching. Our strategy of enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA) of a taxol derivative provides a new tool for scientists to study the morphology of neurons, as well as their behaviours.Axonal branching is important for vertebrate neuron signaling. Taxol has a biphasic effect on axonal branching (i.e., high concentration inhibits axonal growth but low concentration restores it). To the best of our knowledge, low concentration of taxol to promote axonal branching has not been reported yet. Herein, we rationally designed a taxol derivative Fmoc-Phe-Phe-Lys(taxol)-Tyr(H2PO4)-OH (1) which could be subjected to alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-catalyzed self-assembly to form taxol nanofibers. We found that, at 10 μM, 1 has a microtubule (MT) condensation effect similar to that of taxol on mammalian cells but with more chronic toxicity than taxol on the cells. At a low concentration of 10 nM, 1 not only promoted neurite elongation as taxol did but also promoted axonal branching which was not achieved by using taxol. We propose that self-assembly of 1

  7. Molecular mechanisms of scar-sourced axon growth inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Yosuke; Li, Shuxin

    2014-01-01

    Astrogliosis is a defense response of the CNS to minimize primary damage and to repair injured tissues, but it ultimately generates harmful effects by upregulating inhibitory molecules to suppress neuronal elongation and forming potent barriers to axon regeneration. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are highly expressed by reactive scars and are potent contributors to the non-permissive environment in mature CNS. Surmounting strong inhibition by CSPG-rich scar is an important therapeutic goal for achieving functional recovery after CNS injuries. Currently, enzymatic digestion of CSPGs with locally applied chondroitinase ABC is the main in vivo approach to overcome scar inhibition, but several disadvantages may prevent using this bacterial enzyme as a therapeutic option for patients. A better understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying CSPG function may facilitate development of new effective therapies to overcome scar-mediated inhibition. Previous studies support that CSPGs act by non-specifically hindering the binding of matrix molecules to their cell surface receptors through steric interactions, but two members of the leukocyte common antigen related (LAR) phosphatase subfamily, protein tyrosine phosphatase σ and LAR, are functional receptors that bind CSPGs with high affinity and mediate CSPG inhibition. CSPGs may also act by binding two receptors for myelin-associated growth inhibitors, Nogo receptors 1 and 3. Thus, CSPGs inhibit axon growth through multiple mechanisms, making them especially potent and difficult therapeutic targets. Identification of CSPG receptors is not only important for understanding the scar-mediated growth suppression, but also for developing novel and selective therapies to promote axon sprouting and/or regeneration after CNS injuries. PMID:25192646

  8. The Highwire ubiquitin ligase promotes axonal degeneration by tuning levels of Nmnat protein.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xin; Hao, Yan; Sun, Kan; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Xia; Mishra, Bibhudatta; Soppina, Pushpanjali; Wu, Chunlai; Hume, Richard I; Collins, Catherine A

    2012-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a hallmark of many neuropathies, neurodegenerative diseases, and injuries. Here, using a Drosophila injury model, we have identified a highly conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase, Highwire (Hiw), as an important regulator of axonal and synaptic degeneration. Mutations in hiw strongly inhibit Wallerian degeneration in multiple neuron types and developmental stages. This new phenotype is mediated by a new downstream target of Hiw: the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenyltransferase (Nmnat), which acts in parallel to a previously known target of Hiw, the Wallenda dileucine zipper kinase (Wnd/DLK) MAPKKK. Hiw promotes a rapid disappearance of Nmnat protein in the distal stump after injury. An increased level of Nmnat protein in hiw mutants is both required and sufficient to inhibit degeneration. Ectopically expressed mouse Nmnat2 is also subject to regulation by Hiw in distal axons and synapses. These findings implicate an important role for endogenous Nmnat and its regulation, via a conserved mechanism, in the initiation of axonal degeneration. Through independent regulation of Wnd/DLK, whose function is required for proximal axons to regenerate, Hiw plays a central role in coordinating both regenerative and degenerative responses to axonal injury. PMID:23226106

  9. Human Genetic Disorders of Axon Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews symptoms and signs of aberrant axon connectivity in humans, and summarizes major human genetic disorders that result, or have been proposed to result, from defective axon guidance. These include corpus callosum agenesis, L1 syndrome, Joubert syndrome and related disorders, horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis, Kallmann syndrome, albinism, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 1, Duane retraction syndrome, and pontine tegmental cap dysplasia. Genes mutated in these disorders can encode axon growth cone ligands and receptors, downstream signaling molecules, and axon transport motors, as well as proteins without currently recognized roles in axon guidance. Advances in neuroimaging and genetic techniques have the potential to rapidly expand this field, and it is feasible that axon guidance disorders will soon be recognized as a new and significant category of human neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:20300212

  10. Borderless regulates glial extension and axon ensheathment.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Scott; Chen, Yixu; Rao, Yong

    2016-06-15

    Ensheathment of axons by glial processes is essential for normal brain function. While considerable progress has been made to define molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of axon ensheathment, less is known about molecular details of early events for the wrapping of axons by glial processes in the developing nervous system. In this study, we investigate the role of the transmembrane protein Borderless (Bdl) in the developing Drosophila visual system. Bdl belongs to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, and its in vivo function is unknown. We show that Bdl is expressed in wrapping glia (WG) in the developing eye disc. Cell-type-specific transgene rescue and knockdown indicate that Bdl is specifically required in WG for the extension of glial processes along photoreceptor axons in the optic lobe, and axon ensheathment. Our results identify Bdl as a novel glia-specific cell-surface recognition molecule in regulating glial extension and axon ensheathment. PMID:27131624

  11. Degeneration and regeneration of ganglion cell axons.

    PubMed

    Weise, J; Ankerhold, R; Bähr, M

    2000-01-15

    The retino-tectal system has been used to study developmental aspects of axon growth, synapse formation and the establishment of a precise topographic order as well as degeneration and regeneration of adult retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons after axonal lesion. This paper reviews some novel findings that provide new insights into the mechanisms of developmental RGC axon growth, pathfinding, and target formation. It also focuses on the cellular and molecular cascades that underlie RGC degeneration following an axonal lesion and on some therapeutic strategies to enhance survival of axotomized RGCs in vivo. In addition, this review deals with problems related to the induction of regeneration after axonal lesion in the adult CNS using the retino-tectal system as model. Different therapeutic approaches to promote RGC regeneration and requirements for specific target formation of regenerating RGCs in vitro and in vivo are discussed. PMID:10649506

  12. Axonal regeneration proceeds through specific axonal fusion in transected C. elegans neurons

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Brent; Nguyen, Ken C. Q.; Hall, David H.; Ben-Yakar, Adela; Hilliard, Massimo A.

    2011-01-01

    Functional neuronal recovery following injury arises when severed axons reconnect with their targets. In C. elegans following laser-induced axotomy, the axon still attached to the cell body is able to regrow and reconnect with its separated distal fragment. Here we show that reconnection of separated axon fragments during regeneration of C. elegans mechanosensory neurons occurs through a mechanism of axonal fusion, which prevents Wallerian degeneration of the distal fragment. Through electron microscopy analysis and imaging with the photoconvertible fluorescent protein Kaede, we show that the fusion process re-establishes membrane continuity and repristinates anterograde and retrograde cytoplasmic diffusion. We also provide evidence that axonal fusion occurs with a remarkable level of accuracy, with the proximal re-growing axon recognizing its own separated distal fragment. Thus, efficient axonal regeneration can occur by selective reconnection and fusion of separated axonal fragments beyond an injury site, with restoration of the damaged neuronal tract. PMID:21416556

  13. AxonSeg: Open Source Software for Axon and Myelin Segmentation and Morphometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zaimi, Aldo; Duval, Tanguy; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only). Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i) image pre-processing; (ii) pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis (DA) to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information; (iii) automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image; and (iv) atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM), SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg. PMID:27594833

  14. Demyelination increases axonal stationary mitochondrial size and the speed of axonal mitochondrial transport

    PubMed Central

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Kidd, Grahame J.; Komuro, Hitoshi; Trapp, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Axonal degeneration contributes to permanent neurological disability in inherited and acquired diseases of myelin. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as a major contributor to this axonal degeneration. It remains to be determined, however, if myelination, demyelination or remyelination alter the size and distribution of axonal mitochondrial stationary sites or the rates of axonal mitochondrial transport. Using live myelinated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, we investigated whether myelination and lysolecithin-induced demyelination affect axonal mitochondria. Myelination increased the size of axonal stationary mitochondrial sites by 2.3 fold. Following demyelination, the size of axonal stationary mitochondrial sites was increased by an additional 2.2 fold and the transport velocity of motile mitochondria was increased by 47%. These measures returned to the levels of myelinated axons following remyelination. Demyelination induced activating transcription factor (ATF) 3 in DRG neurons. Knockdown of neuronal ATF3 by shRNA abolished the demyelination-induced increase in axonal mitochondrial transport and increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in axonal mitochondria, suggesting that neuronal ATF3 expression and increased mitochondrial transport protect demyelinated axons from oxidative damage. In response to insufficient ATP production, demyelinated axons increase the size of stationary mitochondrial sites and thereby balance ATP production with the increased energy needs of nerve conduction. PMID:20463228

  15. AxonSeg: Open Source Software for Axon and Myelin Segmentation and Morphometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zaimi, Aldo; Duval, Tanguy; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only). Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i) image pre-processing; (ii) pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis (DA) to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information; (iii) automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image; and (iv) atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM), SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg. PMID:27594833

  16. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  17. Efficient simulations of tubulin-driven axonal growth.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Stefan; Henningsson, Erik; Heyden, Anders

    2016-08-01

    This work concerns efficient and reliable numerical simulations of the dynamic behaviour of a moving-boundary model for tubulin-driven axonal growth. The model is nonlinear and consists of a coupled set of a partial differential equation (PDE) and two ordinary differential equations. The PDE is defined on a computational domain with a moving boundary, which is part of the solution. Numerical simulations based on standard explicit time-stepping methods are too time consuming due to the small time steps required for numerical stability. On the other hand standard implicit schemes are too complex due to the nonlinear equations that needs to be solved in each step. Instead, we propose to use the Peaceman-Rachford splitting scheme combined with temporal and spatial scalings of the model. Simulations based on this scheme have shown to be efficient, accurate, and reliable which makes it possible to evaluate the model, e.g. its dependency on biological and physical model parameters. These evaluations show among other things that the initial axon growth is very fast, that the active transport is the dominant reason over diffusion for the growth velocity, and that the polymerization rate in the growth cone does not affect the final axon length. PMID:27121476

  18. A PIK3C3-ankyrin-B-dynactin pathway promotes axonal growth and multiorganelle transport.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Damaris Nadia; Badea, Alexandra; Davis, Jonathan; Hostettler, Janell; He, Jiang; Zhong, Guisheng; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Bennett, Vann

    2014-12-22

    Axon growth requires long-range transport of organelles, but how these cargoes recruit their motors and how their traffic is regulated are not fully resolved. In this paper, we identify a new pathway based on the class III PI3-kinase (PIK3C3), ankyrin-B (AnkB), and dynactin, which promotes fast axonal transport of synaptic vesicles, mitochondria, endosomes, and lysosomes. We show that dynactin associates with cargo through AnkB interactions with both the dynactin subunit p62 and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) lipids generated by PIK3C3. AnkB knockout resulted in shortened axon tracts and marked reduction in membrane association of dynactin and dynein, whereas it did not affect the organization of spectrin-actin axonal rings imaged by 3D-STORM. Loss of AnkB or of its linkages to either p62 or PtdIns(3)P or loss of PIK3C3 all impaired organelle transport and particularly retrograde transport in hippocampal neurons. Our results establish new functional relationships between PIK3C3, dynactin, and AnkB that together promote axonal transport of organelles and are required for normal axon length. PMID:25533844

  19. Single axon IPSPs elicited in pyramidal cells by three classes of interneurones in slices of rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A M; West, D C; Hahn, J; Deuchars, J

    1996-10-01

    1. Using dual intracellular recordings in slices of adult rat neocortex, twenty-four IPSPs activated by single presynaptic interneurones were studied in simultaneously recorded pyramidal cells. Fast spiking interneurones inhibited one in four or five of their close pyramidal neighbours. No reciprocal connections were observed. After recordings neurones were filled with biocytin. 2. Interneurones that elicited IPSPs were classified as classical fast spiking (n = 10), as non-classical fast spiking (n = 3, including one burst-firing interneurone), as unclassified, or slow interneurones (n = 8), or as regular spiking interneurones (n = 3), i.e. interneurones whose electrophysiological characteristics were indistinguishable from those of pyramidal cells. 3. All of the seven classical fast spiking cells anatomically fully recovered had aspiny, beaded dendrites. Their partially myelinated axons ramified extensively, varying widely in shape and extent, but randomly selected labelled axon terminals typically innervated somata and large calibre dendrites on electron microscopic examination. One 'autapse' was demonstrated. One presumptive regular spiking interneurone axon made four somatic and five dendritic connections with unlabelled targets. 4. Full anatomical reconstructions of labelled classical fast spiking interneurones and their postsynaptic pyramids (n = 5) demonstrated one to five boutons per connection. The two recorded IPSPs that were fully reconstructed morphologically (3 and 5 terminals) were, however, amongst the smallest recorded (< 0.4 mV). Some connections may therefore involve larger numbers of contacts. 5. Single axon IPSPs were between 0.2 and 3.5 mV in average amplitude at -55 to -60 mV. Extrapolated reversal potentials were between -70 and -82 mV. IPSP time course correlated with the type of presynaptic interneurone, but not with IPSP latency, amplitude, reversal potential, or sensitivity to current injected at the soma. 6. Classical fast spiking

  20. The axonal transport of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, William M.; Hollenbeck, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Vigorous transport of cytoplasmic components along axons over substantial distances is crucial for the maintenance of neuron structure and function. The transport of mitochondria, which serves to distribute mitochondrial functions in a dynamic and non-uniform fashion, has attracted special interest in recent years following the discovery of functional connections among microtubules, motor proteins and mitochondria, and their influences on neurodegenerative diseases. Although the motor proteins that drive mitochondrial movement are now well characterized, the mechanisms by which anterograde and retrograde movement are coordinated with one another and with stationary axonal mitochondria are not yet understood. In this Commentary, we review why mitochondria move and how they move, focusing particularly on recent studies of transport regulation, which implicate control of motor activity by specific cell-signaling pathways, regulation of motor access to transport tracks and static microtubule–mitochondrion linkers. A detailed mechanism for modulating anterograde mitochondrial transport has been identified that involves Miro, a mitochondrial Ca2+-binding GTPase, which with associated proteins, can bind and control kinesin-1. Elements of the Miro complex also have important roles in mitochondrial fission–fusion dynamics, highlighting questions about the interdependence of biogenesis, transport, dynamics, maintenance and degradation. PMID:22619228

  1. Gray Matter Axonal Connectivity Maps

    PubMed Central

    Bonilha, Leonardo; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Nesland, Travis; Rorden, Chris; Fridriksson, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Structural brain connectivity is generally assessed through methods that rely on pre-defined regions of interest (e.g., Brodmann’s areas), thus preventing analyses that are largely free from a priori anatomical assumptions. Here, we introduce a novel and practical technique to evaluate a voxel-based measure of axonal projections connecting gray matter tissue [gray matter axonal connectivity map (GMAC)]. GMACs are compatible with voxel-based statistical approaches, and can be used to assess whole brain, scale-free, gray matter connectivity. In this study, we demonstrate how whole-brain GMACs can be generated from conventional structural connectome methodology, describing each step in detail, as well as providing tools to allow for the calculation of GMAC. To illustrate the utility of GMAC, we demonstrate the relationship between age and gray matter connectivity, using voxel-based analyses of GMAC. We discuss the potential role of GMAC in further analyses of cortical connectivity in healthy and clinical populations. PMID:25798111

  2. Neurofilament spacing, phosphorylation, and axon diameter in regenerating and uninjured lamprey axons.

    PubMed

    Pijak, D S; Hall, G F; Tenicki, P J; Boulos, A S; Lurie, D I; Selzer, M E

    1996-05-13

    It has been postulated that phosphorylation of the carboxy terminus sidearms of neurofilaments (NFs) increases axon diameter through repulsive electrostatic forces that increase sidearm extension and interfilament spacing. To evaluate this hypothesis, the relationships among NF phosphorylation, NF spacing, and axon diameter were examined in uninjured and spinal cord-transected larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus). In untransected animals, axon diameters in the spinal cord varied from 0.5 to 50 microns. Antibodies specific for highly phosphorylated NFs labeled only large axons (> 10 microns), whereas antibodies for lightly phosphorylated NFs labeled medium-sized and small axons more darkly than large axons. For most axons in untransected animals, diameter was inversely related to NF packing density, but the interfilament distances of the largest axons were only 1.5 times those of the smallest axons. In addition, the lightly phosphorylated NFs of the small axons in the dorsal columns were widely spaced, suggesting that phosphorylation of NFs does not rigidly determine their spacing and that NF spacing does not rigidly determine axon diameter. Regenerating neurites of giant reticulospinal axons (GRAs) have diameters only 5-10% of those of their parent axons. If axon caliber is controlled by NF phosphorylation via mutual electrostatic repulsion, then NFs in the slender regenerating neurites should be lightly phosphorylated and densely packed (similar to NFs in uninjured small caliber axons), whereas NFs in the parent GRAs should be highly phosphorylated and loosely packed. However, although linear density of NFs (the number of NFs per micrometer) in these slender regenerating neurites was twice that in their parent axons, they were highly phosphorylated. Following sectioning of these same axons close to the cell body, axon-like neurites regenerated ectopically from dendritic tips. These ectopically regenerating neurites had NF linear densities 2.5 times those of

  3. Cable energy function of cortical axons

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L.; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na+-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na+-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20–70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship. PMID:27439954

  4. Cable energy function of cortical axons.

    PubMed

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na(+)-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na(+)-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20-70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship. PMID:27439954

  5. A short splicing isoform of afadin suppresses the cortical axon branching in a dominant-negative manner.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kentaro; Iwasawa, Nariaki; Negishi, Manabu; Oinuma, Izumi

    2015-05-15

    Precise wiring patterns of axons are among the remarkable features of neuronal circuit formation, and establishment of the proper neuronal network requires control of outgrowth, branching, and guidance of axons. R-Ras is a Ras-family small GTPase that has essential roles in multiple phases of axonal development. We recently identified afadin, an F-actin-binding protein, as an effector of R-Ras mediating axon branching through F-actin reorganization. Afadin comprises two isoforms--l-afadin, having the F-actin-binding domain, and s-afadin, lacking the F-actin-binding domain. Compared with l-afadin, s-afadin, the short splicing variant of l-afadin, contains RA domains but lacks the F-actin-binding domain. Neurons express both isoforms; however, the function of s-afadin in brain remains unknown. Here we identify s-afadin as an endogenous inhibitor of cortical axon branching. In contrast to the abundant and constant expression of l-afadin throughout neuronal development, the expression of s-afadin is relatively low when cortical axons branch actively. Ectopic expression and knockdown of s-afadin suppress and promote branching, respectively. s-Afadin blocks the R-Ras-mediated membrane translocation of l-afadin and axon branching by inhibiting the binding of l-afadin to R-Ras. Thus s-afadin acts as a dominant-negative isoform in R-Ras-afadin-regulated axon branching. PMID:25808489

  6. Diapause Formation and Downregulation of Insulin-Like Signaling via DAF-16/FOXO Delays Axonal Degeneration and Neuronal Loss

    PubMed Central

    Calixto, Andrea; Jara, Juan S.; Court, Felipe A.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a key event in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative conditions. We show here that mec-4d triggered axonal degeneration of Caenorhabditis elegans neurons and mammalian axons share mechanistical similarities, as both are rescued by inhibition of calcium increase, mitochondrial dysfunction, and NMNAT overexpression. We then explore whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in axonal degeneration and neuronal demise. C. elegans dauers have enhanced anti-ROS systems, and dauer mec-4d worms are completely protected from axonal degeneration and neuronal loss. Mechanistically, downregulation of the Insulin/IGF-1-like signaling (IIS) pathway protects neurons from degenerating in a DAF-16/FOXO–dependent manner and is related to superoxide dismutase and catalase-increased expression. Caloric restriction and systemic antioxidant treatment, which decrease oxidative damage, protect C. elegans axons from mec-4d-mediated degeneration and delay Wallerian degeneration in mice. In summary, we show that the IIS pathway is essential in maintaining neuronal homeostasis under pro-degenerative stimuli and identify ROS as a key intermediate of neuronal degeneration in vivo. Since axonal degeneration represents an early pathological event in neurodegeneration, our work identifies potential targets for therapeutic intervention in several conditions characterized by axonal loss and functional impairment. PMID:23300463

  7. Regulation of Axonal Transport by Protein Kinases.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Katherine L; Greensmith, Linda; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular transport of organelles, proteins, lipids, and RNA along the axon is essential for neuronal function and survival. This process, called axonal transport, is mediated by two classes of ATP-dependent motors, kinesins, and cytoplasmic dynein, which carry their cargoes along microtubule tracks. Protein kinases regulate axonal transport through direct phosphorylation of motors, adapter proteins, and cargoes, and indirectly through modification of the microtubule network. The misregulation of axonal transport by protein kinases has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several nervous system disorders. Here, we review the role of protein kinases acting directly on axonal transport and discuss how their deregulation affects neuronal function, paving the way for the exploitation of these enzymes as novel drug targets. PMID:26410600

  8. Dynamics of Mitochondrial Transport in Axons

    PubMed Central

    Niescier, Robert F.; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Joo, Se Hun; Chang, Karen T.; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons. PMID:27242435

  9. Dynamics of Mitochondrial Transport in Axons.

    PubMed

    Niescier, Robert F; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Joo, Se Hun; Chang, Karen T; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons. PMID:27242435

  10. Mapping mean axon diameter and axonal volume fraction by MRI using temporal diffusion spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junzhong; Li, Hua; Harkins, Kevin D.; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Kang, Hakmook; Does, Mark D.; Gore, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Mapping mean axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction may have significant clinical potential because nerve conduction velocity is directly dependent on axon diameter, and several neurodegenerative diseases affect axons of specific sizes and alter axon counts. Diffusion-weighted MRI methods based on the pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) sequence have been reported to be able to assess axon diameter and volume fraction non-invasively. However, due to the relatively long diffusion times used, e.g. > 20 ms, the sensitivity to small axons (diameter < 2 µm) is low, and the derived mean axon diameter has been reported to be overestimated. In the current study, oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) diffusion sequences with variable frequency gradients were used to assess rat spinal white matter tracts with relatively short effective diffusion times (1 – 5 ms). In contrast to previous PGSE-based methods, the extra-axonal diffusion cannot be modeled as hindered (Gaussian) diffusion when short diffusion times are used. Appropriate frequency-dependent rates are therefore incorporated into our analysis and validated by histology-based computer simulation of water diffusion. OGSE data were analyzed to derive mean axon diameters and intra-axonal volume fractions of rat spinal white matter tracts (mean axon diameter ~ 1.27 – 5.54 µm). The estimated values were in good agreement with histology, including the small axon diameters (< 2.5 µm). This study establishes a framework for quantification of nerve morphology using the OGSE method with high sensitivity to small axons. PMID:25225002

  11. Cholinergic afferent stimulation induces axonal function plasticity in adult hippocampal granule cells.

    PubMed

    Martinello, Katiuscia; Huang, Zhuo; Lujan, Rafael; Tran, Baouyen; Watanabe, Masahiko; Cooper, Edward C; Brown, David A; Shah, Mala M

    2015-01-21

    Acetylcholine critically influences hippocampal-dependent learning. Cholinergic fibers innervate hippocampal neuron axons, dendrites, and somata. The effects of acetylcholine on axonal information processing, though, remain unknown. By stimulating cholinergic fibers and making electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells, we show that synaptically released acetylcholine preferentially lowered the action potential threshold, enhancing intrinsic excitability and synaptic potential-spike coupling. These effects persisted for at least 30 min after the stimulation paradigm and were due to muscarinic receptor activation. This caused sustained elevation of axonal intracellular Ca(2+) via T-type Ca(2+) channels, as indicated by two-photon imaging. The enhanced Ca(2+) levels inhibited an axonal KV7/M current, decreasing the spike threshold. In support, immunohistochemistry revealed muscarinic M1 receptor, CaV3.2, and KV7.2/7.3 subunit localization in granule cell axons. Since alterations in axonal signaling affect neuronal firing patterns and neurotransmitter release, this is an unreported cellular mechanism by which acetylcholine might, at least partly, enhance cognitive processing. PMID:25578363

  12. Axonal and Schwann Cell BACE1 Is Equally Required for Remyelination of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiangyou; Hu, Jinxuan; Dai, Lu; Trapp, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is being pursued as a therapeutic target for treating patients with Alzheimer's disease because BACE1 is the sole β-secretase for generating β-amyloid peptide. Knowledge regarding the other cellular functions of BACE1 is therefore critical for the safe use of BACE1 inhibitors in human patients. BACE1 deficiency in mice causes hypomyelination during development and impairs remyelination in injured sciatic nerves. Since BACE1 is expected to be ubiquitously expressed, we asked whether axonal or Schwann cell BACE1 is required for optimal remyelination. By swapping sciatic nerve segments from BACE1-null mice with the corresponding wild-type nerve segments or vice versa, we tested how a deficiency of BACE1 in Schwann cells or axons affects remyelination. Our results show that BACE1 in axons and Schwann cells is similarly important for remyelination of regenerated axons. Nerve injury induces BACE1 transcription and protein levels are elevated in Schwann cells. Expression of type I neuregulin 1 (Nrg1), rather than type III Nrg1, was induced by Schwann cells, and the abolished Nrg1 cleavage in BACE1-null Schwann cells contributed to decreased remyelination of regenerated axons. Hence, this study is the first to demonstrate the equal importance of axonal and Schwann cell BACE1 for remyelination of injured nerves. PMID:25740511

  13. Axonal and Schwann cell BACE1 is equally required for remyelination of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiangyou; Hu, Jinxuan; Dai, Lu; Trapp, Bruce; Yan, Riqiang

    2015-03-01

    Inhibition of β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is being pursued as a therapeutic target for treating patients with Alzheimer's disease because BACE1 is the sole β-secretase for generating β-amyloid peptide. Knowledge regarding the other cellular functions of BACE1 is therefore critical for the safe use of BACE1 inhibitors in human patients. BACE1 deficiency in mice causes hypomyelination during development and impairs remyelination in injured sciatic nerves. Since BACE1 is expected to be ubiquitously expressed, we asked whether axonal or Schwann cell BACE1 is required for optimal remyelination. By swapping sciatic nerve segments from BACE1-null mice with the corresponding wild-type nerve segments or vice versa, we tested how a deficiency of BACE1 in Schwann cells or axons affects remyelination. Our results show that BACE1 in axons and Schwann cells is similarly important for remyelination of regenerated axons. Nerve injury induces BACE1 transcription and protein levels are elevated in Schwann cells. Expression of type I neuregulin 1 (Nrg1), rather than type III Nrg1, was induced by Schwann cells, and the abolished Nrg1 cleavage in BACE1-null Schwann cells contributed to decreased remyelination of regenerated axons. Hence, this study is the first to demonstrate the equal importance of axonal and Schwann cell BACE1 for remyelination of injured nerves. PMID:25740511

  14. Enzyme-instructed self-assembly of taxol promotes axonal branching.

    PubMed

    Mei, Bin; Miao, Qingqing; Tang, Anming; Liang, Gaolin

    2015-10-14

    Axonal branching is important for vertebrate neuron signaling. Taxol has a biphasic effect on axonal branching (i.e., high concentration inhibits axonal growth but low concentration restores it). To the best of our knowledge, low concentration of taxol to promote axonal branching has not been reported yet. Herein, we rationally designed a taxol derivative Fmoc-Phe-Phe-Lys(taxol)-Tyr(H2PO4)-OH (1) which could be subjected to alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-catalyzed self-assembly to form taxol nanofibers. We found that, at 10 μM, 1 has a microtubule (MT) condensation effect similar to that of taxol on mammalian cells but with more chronic toxicity than taxol on the cells. At a low concentration of 10 nM, 1 not only promoted neurite elongation as taxol did but also promoted axonal branching which was not achieved by using taxol. We propose that self-assembly of 1 along the MTs prohibited their lateral contacts and thus promoted axonal branching. Our strategy of enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA) of a taxol derivative provides a new tool for scientists to study the morphology of neurons, as well as their behaviours. PMID:26359218

  15. Matrine protects neuro-axon from CNS inflammation-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Kan, Quan-Cheng; Lv, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Xu, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Zhu, Lin

    2015-02-01

    Neuro-axonal injury in the central nervous system (CNS) is one of the major pathological hallmarks of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Matrine (MAT), a quinolizidine alkaloid derived from the herb Radix Sophorae Flave, has recently been shown to effectively suppress EAE through an anti-inflammatory mechanism. However, whether MAT can also protect myelin/axons from damage is not known. In the present study we show that, while untreated rats developed severe clinical disease, CNS inflammatory demyelination, and axonal damage, these clinical and pathological signs were significantly reduced by MAT treatment. Consistently, MAT treatment reduced the concentration of myelin basic protein in serum and downregulated expression of β-amyloid (Aβ) and B-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE-1) in the CNS. Further, the CNS of MAT-treated rats exhibited increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), an important factor for neuronal survival and axonal growth. Together, these results demonstrate that MAT effectively prevented neuro-axonal injury, which can likely be attributed to inhibiting risk factors such as BACE-1 and upregulating neuroprotective factors such as BDNF. We conclude that this novel natural reagent, MAT, which effectively protects neuro-axons from CNS inflammation-induced damage, could be a potential candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as MS. PMID:25576296

  16. Why do axons differ in caliber?

    PubMed Central

    Perge, János A.; Niven, Jeremy E.; Mugnaini, Enrico; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Sterling, Peter

    2012-01-01

    CNS axons differ in diameter (d) by nearly 100-fold (~ 0.1 to 10μm); therefore they differ in cross-sectional area (d2) and volume by nearly 10,000-fold. If, as found for optic nerve, mitochondrial volume-fraction is constant with axon diameter, energy capacity would rise with axon volume, also as d2. Given constraints on space and energy, we asked what functional requirements set an axon’s diameter? Surveying 16 fiber groups spanning nearly the full range of diameters in five species (guinea pig, rat, monkey, locust, octopus), we found that: (i) thin axons are most numerous; (ii) mean firing frequencies, estimated for 9 of the identified axon classes, are low for thin fibers and high for thick ones, ranging from ~1 to >100Hz; (iii) a tract’s distribution of fiber diameters, whether narrow or broad, and whether symmetric or skewed, reflects heterogeneity of information rates conveyed by its individual fibers; (iv) mitochondrial volume/axon length, rises ≥ d2. To explain the pressure towards thin diameters we note an established law of diminishing returns: an axon, to double its information rate, must more than double its firing rate. Since diameter is apparently linear with firing rate, doubling information rate would more than quadruple an axon’s volume and energy use. Thicker axons may be needed to encode features that cannot be efficiently decoded if their information is spread over several low-rate channels. Thus information rate may be the main variable that sets axon caliber - with axons constrained to deliver information at the lowest acceptable rate. PMID:22238098

  17. Axon fasciculation in the developing olfactory nerve

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) axons exit the olfactory epithelium (OE) and extend toward the olfactory bulb (OB) where they coalesce into glomeruli. Each OSN expresses only 1 of approximately 1,200 odor receptors (ORs). OSNs expressing the same OR are distributed in restricted zones of the OE. However, within a zone, the OSNs expressing a specific OR are not contiguous - distribution appears stochastic. Upon reaching the OB the OSN axons expressing the same OR reproducibly coalesce into two to three glomeruli. While ORs appear necessary for appropriate convergence of axons, a variety of adhesion associated molecules and activity-dependent mechanisms are also implicated. Recent data suggest pre-target OSN axon sorting may influence glomerular convergence. Here, using regional and OR-specific markers, we addressed the spatio-temporal properties associated with the onset of homotypic fasciculation in embryonic mice and assessed the degree to which subpopulations of axons remain segregated as they extend toward the nascent OB. We show that immediately upon crossing the basal lamina, axons uniformly turn sharply, usually at an approximately 90° angle toward the OB. Molecularly defined subpopulations of axons show evidence of spatial segregation within the nascent nerve by embryonic day 12, within 48 hours of the first OSN axons crossing the basal lamina, but at least 72 hours before synapse formation in the developing OB. Homotypic fasciculation of OSN axons expressing the same OR appears to be a hierarchical process. While regional segregation occurs in the mesenchyme, the final convergence of OR-specific subpopulations does not occur until the axons reach the inner nerve layer of the OB. PMID:20723208

  18. Mitochondrial Dynamics Decrease Prior to Axon Degeneration Induced by Vincristine and are Partially Rescued by Overexpressed cytNmnat1

    PubMed Central

    Berbusse, Gregory W.; Woods, Laken C.; Vohra, Bhupinder P. S.; Naylor, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Axon degeneration is a prominent feature of various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, and is often characterized by aberrant mitochondrial dynamics. Mitochondrial fission, fusion, and motility have been shown to be particularly important in progressive neurodegeneration. Thus we investigated these imperative dynamics, as well as mitochondrial fragmentation in vincristine induced axon degradation in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. CytNmnat1 inhibits axon degeneration in various paradigms including vincristine toxicity. The mechanism of its protection is not yet fully understood; therefore, we also investigated the effect of cytNmnat1 on mitochondrial dynamics in vincristine treated neurons. We observed that vincristine treatment decreases the rate of mitochondrial fission, fusion and motility and induces mitochondrial fragmentation. These mitochondrial events precede visible axon degeneration. Overexpression of cytNmnat1 inhibits axon degeneration and preserves the normal mitochondrial dynamics and motility in vincristine treated neurons. We suggest the alterations in mitochondrial structure and dynamics are early events which lead to axon degeneration and cytNmnat1 blocks axon degeneration by halting the vincristine induced changes to mitochondrial structure and dynamics. PMID:27486387

  19. Mitochondrial Dynamics Decrease Prior to Axon Degeneration Induced by Vincristine and are Partially Rescued by Overexpressed cytNmnat1.

    PubMed

    Berbusse, Gregory W; Woods, Laken C; Vohra, Bhupinder P S; Naylor, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Axon degeneration is a prominent feature of various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, and is often characterized by aberrant mitochondrial dynamics. Mitochondrial fission, fusion, and motility have been shown to be particularly important in progressive neurodegeneration. Thus we investigated these imperative dynamics, as well as mitochondrial fragmentation in vincristine induced axon degradation in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. CytNmnat1 inhibits axon degeneration in various paradigms including vincristine toxicity. The mechanism of its protection is not yet fully understood; therefore, we also investigated the effect of cytNmnat1 on mitochondrial dynamics in vincristine treated neurons. We observed that vincristine treatment decreases the rate of mitochondrial fission, fusion and motility and induces mitochondrial fragmentation. These mitochondrial events precede visible axon degeneration. Overexpression of cytNmnat1 inhibits axon degeneration and preserves the normal mitochondrial dynamics and motility in vincristine treated neurons. We suggest the alterations in mitochondrial structure and dynamics are early events which lead to axon degeneration and cytNmnat1 blocks axon degeneration by halting the vincristine induced changes to mitochondrial structure and dynamics. PMID:27486387

  20. Immature astrocytes promote CNS axonal regeneration when combined with chondroitinase ABC

    PubMed Central

    Filous, Angela R.; Miller, Jared H.; Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M.; Horn, Kevin P.; Alilain, Warren J.; Silver, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration of injured adult CNS axons is inhibited by formation of a glial scar. Immature astrocytes are able to support robust neurite outgrowth and reduce scarring, therefore, we tested whether these cells would have this effect if transplanted into brain injuries. Utilizing an in vitro spot gradient model that recreates the strongly inhibitory proteoglycan environment of the glial scar we found that, alone, immature, but not mature, astrocytes had a limited ability to form bridges across the most inhibitory outer rim. In turn, the astrocyte bridges could promote adult sensory axon re-growth across the gradient. The use of selective enzyme inhibitors revealed that MMP-2 enables immature astrocytes to cross the proteoglycan rim. The bridge-building process and axon regeneration across the immature glial bridges were greatly enhanced by chondroitinase ABC pre-treatment of the spots. We used microlesions in the cingulum of the adult rat brains to test the ability of matrix modification and immature astrocytes to form a bridge for axon regeneration in vivo. Injured axons were visualized via p75 immunolabeling and the extent to which these axons regenerated was quantified. Immature astrocytes co-injected with chondroitinase ABC induced axonal regeneration beyond the distal edge of the lesion. However, when used alone, neither treatment was capable of promoting axonal regeneration. Our findings indicate that when faced with a minimal lesion, neurons of the basal forebrain can regenerate in the presence of a proper bridge across the lesion and when levels of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in the glial scar are reduced. PMID:20629049

  1. Wnt Signalling Promotes Actin Dynamics during Axon Remodelling through the Actin-Binding Protein Eps8

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    Upon arrival at their synaptic targets, axons slow down their growth and extensively remodel before the assembly of presynaptic boutons. Wnt proteins are target-derived secreted factors that promote axonal remodelling and synaptic assembly. In the developing spinal cord, Wnts secreted by motor neurons promote axonal remodelling of NT-3 responsive dorsal root ganglia neurons. Axon remodelling induced by Wnts is characterised by growth cone pausing and enlargement, processes that depend on the re-organisation of microtubules. However, the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that Wnt3a regulates the actin cytoskeleton by rapidly inducing F-actin accumulation in growth cones from rodent DRG neurons through the scaffold protein Dishevelled-1 (Dvl1) and the serine-threonine kinase Gsk3β. Importantly, these changes in actin cytoskeleton occurs before enlargement of the growth cones is evident. Time-lapse imaging shows that Wnt3a increases lamellar protrusion and filopodia velocity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of actin assembly demonstrates that Wnt3a increases actin dynamics. Through a yeast-two hybrid screen, we identified the actin-binding protein Eps8 as a direct interactor of Dvl1, a scaffold protein crucial for the Wnt signalling pathway. Gain of function of Eps8 mimics Wnt-mediated axon remodelling, whereas Eps8 silencing blocks the axon remodelling activity of Wnt3a. Importantly, blockade of the Dvl1-Eps8 interaction completely abolishes Wnt3a-mediated axonal remodelling. These findings demonstrate a novel role for Wnt-Dvl1 signalling through Eps8 in the regulation of axonal remodeling. PMID:26252776

  2. Hydrogels as scaffolds and delivery systems to enhance axonal regeneration after injuries

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Molina, Oscar A.; Velasco, Iván

    2015-01-01

    Damage caused to neural tissue by disease or injury frequently produces a discontinuity in the nervous system (NS). Such damage generates diverse alterations that are commonly permanent, due to the limited regeneration capacity of the adult NS, particularly the Central Nervous System (CNS). The cellular reaction to noxious stimulus leads to several events such as the formation of glial and fibrous scars, which inhibit axonal regeneration in both the CNS and the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS). Although in the PNS there is some degree of nerve regeneration, it is common that the growing axons reinnervate incorrect areas, causing mismatches. Providing a permissive substrate for axonal regeneration in combination with delivery systems for the release of molecules, which enhances axonal growth, could increase regeneration and the recovery of functions in the CNS or the PNS. Currently, there are no effective vehicles to supply growth factors or cells to the damaged/diseased NS. Hydrogels are polymers that are biodegradable, biocompatible and have the capacity to deliver a large range of molecules in situ. The inclusion of cultured neural cells into hydrogels forming three-dimensional structures allows the formation of synapses and neuronal survival. There is also evidence showing that hydrogels constitute an amenable substrate for axonal growth of endogenous or grafted cells, overcoming the presence of axonal regeneration inhibitory molecules, in both the CNS and PNS. Recent experiments suggest that hydrogels can carry and deliver several proteins relevant for improving neuronal survival and axonal growth. Although the use of hydrogels is appealing, its effectiveness is still a matter of discussion, and more results are needed to achieve consistent recovery using different parameters. This review also discusses areas of opportunity where hydrogels can be applied, in order to promote axonal regeneration of the NS. PMID:25741236

  3. Rescuing axons from degeneration does not affect retinal ganglion cell death.

    PubMed

    de Lima, S; Mietto, B S; Paula, C; Muniz, T; Martinez, A M B; Gardino, P F

    2016-01-01

    After a traumatic injury to the central nervous system, the distal stumps of axons undergo Wallerian degeneration (WD), an event that comprises cytoskeleton and myelin breakdown, astrocytic gliosis, and overexpression of proteins that inhibit axonal regrowth. By contrast, injured neuronal cell bodies show features characteristic of attempts to initiate the regenerative process of elongating their axons. The main molecular event that leads to WD is an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration, which activates calpains, calcium-dependent proteases that degrade cytoskeleton proteins. The aim of our study was to investigate whether preventing axonal degeneration would impact the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after crushing the optic nerve. We observed that male Wistar rats (weighing 200-400 g; n=18) treated with an exogenous calpain inhibitor (20 mM) administered via direct application of the inhibitor embedded within the copolymer resin Evlax immediately following optic nerve crush showed a delay in the onset of WD. This delayed onset was characterized by a decrease in the number of degenerated fibers (P<0.05) and an increase in the number of preserved fibers (P<0.05) 4 days after injury. Additionally, most preserved fibers showed a normal G-ratio. These results indicated that calpain inhibition prevented the degeneration of optic nerve fibers, rescuing axons from the process of axonal degeneration. However, analysis of retinal ganglion cell survival demonstrated no difference between the calpain inhibitor- and vehicle-treated groups, suggesting that although the calpain inhibitor prevented axonal degeneration, it had no effect on RGC survival after optic nerve damage. PMID:27007653

  4. Rescuing axons from degeneration does not affect retinal ganglion cell death

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, S.; Mietto, B.S.; Paula, C.; Muniz, T.; Martinez, A.M.B.; Gardino, P.F.

    2016-01-01

    After a traumatic injury to the central nervous system, the distal stumps of axons undergo Wallerian degeneration (WD), an event that comprises cytoskeleton and myelin breakdown, astrocytic gliosis, and overexpression of proteins that inhibit axonal regrowth. By contrast, injured neuronal cell bodies show features characteristic of attempts to initiate the regenerative process of elongating their axons. The main molecular event that leads to WD is an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration, which activates calpains, calcium-dependent proteases that degrade cytoskeleton proteins. The aim of our study was to investigate whether preventing axonal degeneration would impact the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after crushing the optic nerve. We observed that male Wistar rats (weighing 200-400 g; n=18) treated with an exogenous calpain inhibitor (20 mM) administered via direct application of the inhibitor embedded within the copolymer resin Evlax immediately following optic nerve crush showed a delay in the onset of WD. This delayed onset was characterized by a decrease in the number of degenerated fibers (P<0.05) and an increase in the number of preserved fibers (P<0.05) 4 days after injury. Additionally, most preserved fibers showed a normal G-ratio. These results indicated that calpain inhibition prevented the degeneration of optic nerve fibers, rescuing axons from the process of axonal degeneration. However, analysis of retinal ganglion cell survival demonstrated no difference between the calpain inhibitor- and vehicle-treated groups, suggesting that although the calpain inhibitor prevented axonal degeneration, it had no effect on RGC survival after optic nerve damage. PMID:27007653

  5. Nanotherapeutics of PTEN Inhibitor with Mesoporous Silica Nanocarrier Effective for Axonal Outgrowth of Adult Neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Soo; El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Kim, Jong-Wan; Ahn, Hong-Sun; Kim, Hyukmin; Son, Young-Jin; Kim, Hae-Won; Hyun, Jung Keun

    2016-07-27

    Development of therapeutic strategies such as effective drug delivery is an urgent and yet unmet need for repair of damaged nervous systems. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) regulates axonal regrowth of central and peripheral nervous systems; its inhibition, meanwhile, facilitates axonal outgrowth of injured neurons. Here we show that nanotherapeutics based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles loading PTEN-inhibitor bisperoxovanadium (BpV) are effective for delivery of drug molecules and consequent improvement of axonal outgrowth. Mesoporous nanocarriers loaded BpV drug at large amount (27 μg per 1 mg of carrier), and released sustainably over 10 d. Nanocarrier-BpV treatment of primary neurons from the dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) of rats and mice at various concentrations induced them to actively take up the nanocomplexes with an uptake efficiency as high as 85%. The nanocomplex-administered neurons exhibited significantly enhanced axonal outgrowth compared with those treated with free-BpV drug. The expression of a series of proteins involved in PTEN inhibition and downstream signaling was substantially up-/down-regulated by the nanocarrier-BpV system. Injection of the nanocarriers into neural tissues (DRG, brain cortex, and spinal cord), moreover, demonstrated successful integration into neurons, glial cells, oligodendrocytes, and macrophages, suggesting the possible nanotherapeutics applications in vivo. Together, PTEN-inhibitor delivery via mesoporous nanocarriers can be considered a promising strategy for stimulating axonal regeneration in central and peripheral nervous systems. PMID:27386893

  6. IMP2 axonal localization, RNA interactome, and function in the development of axon trajectories.

    PubMed

    Preitner, Nicolas; Quan, Jie; Li, Xinmin; Nielsen, Finn C; Flanagan, John G

    2016-08-01

    RNA-based regulatory mechanisms play important roles in the development and plasticity of neural circuits and neurological disease. Developing axons provide a model well suited to the study of RNA-based regulation, and contain specific subsets of mRNAs that are locally translated and have roles in axon pathfinding. However, the RNA-binding proteins involved in axon pathfinding, and their corresponding mRNA targets, are still largely unknown. Here we find that the RNA-binding protein IMP2 (Igf2bp2) is strikingly enriched in developing axon tracts, including in spinal commissural axons. We used the HITS-CLIP approach to perform a genome-wide identification of RNAs that interact directly with IMP2 in the native context of developing mouse brain. This IMP2 interactome was highly enriched for mRNA targets related to axon guidance. Accordingly, IMP2 knockdown in the developing spinal cord led to strong defects in commissural axon trajectories at the midline intermediate target. These results reveal a highly distinctive axonal enrichment of IMP2, show that it interacts with a network of axon guidance-related mRNAs, and reveal that it is required for normal axon pathfinding during vertebrate development. PMID:27385015

  7. Peripheral nerve axons contain machinery for co-translational secretion of axonally-generated proteins.

    PubMed

    Merianda, Tanuja; Twiss, Jeffery

    2013-08-01

    The axonal compartment of developing neurons and mature peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons has the capacity to locally synthesize proteins. Axonally-synthesized proteins have been shown to facilitate axonal pathfinding and maintenance in developing central nervous system (CNS) and PNS neurons, and to facilitate the regeneration of mature PNS neurons. RNA-profiling studies of the axons of cultured neurons have shown a surprisingly complex population of mRNAs that encode proteins for a myriad of functions. Although classic-appearing rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus have not been documented in axons by ultrastructural studies, axonal RNA profiling studies show several membrane and secreted protein-encoding mRNAs whose translation products would need access to a localized secretory mechanism. We previously showed that the axons of cultured neurons contain functional equivalents of RER and Golgi apparatus. Here, we show that markers for the signal-recognition particle, RER, ER, and Golgi apparatus are present in PNS axons in vivo. Co-localization of these proteins mirrors that seen for cultured axons where locally-translated proteins are localized to the axoplasmic membrane. Moreover, nerve injury increases the levels and/or aggregation of these proteins, suggesting that the regenerating axon has an increased capacity for membrane targeting of locally synthesized proteins. PMID:23839054

  8. Intraretinal projection of retinal ganglion cell axons as a model system for studying axon navigation

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zheng-Zheng

    2008-01-01

    The initial step of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axon pathfinding involves directed growth of RGC axons toward the center of the retina, the optic disc, a process termed “intraretinal guidance”. Due to the accessibility of the system, and with various embryological, molecular, and genetic approaches, significant progress has been made in recent years toward understanding the mechanisms involved in the precise guidance of the RGC axons. As axons are extending from RGCs located throughout the retina, a multitude of factors expressed along with the differentiation wave are important for the guidance of the RGC axons. To ensure that the RGC axons are oriented correctly, restricted to the optic fiber layer (OFL) of the retina, and exit the eye properly, different sets of positive and negative factors cooperate in the process. Fasciculation mediated by a number of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and modulation of axonal response to guidance factors provide additional mechanisms to ensure proper guidance of the RGC axons. The intraretinal axon guidance thus serves as an excellent model system for studying how different signals are regulated, modulated and integrated for guiding a large number of axons in three-dimensional space. PMID:17320832

  9. Emerging brain morphologies from axonal elongation

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Maria A.; Miller, Kyle E.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the characteristic morphology of our brain remains a challenging, yet important task in human evolution, developmental biology, and neurosciences. Mathematical modeling shapes our understanding of cortical folding and provides functional relations between cortical wavelength, thickness, and stiffness. Yet, current mathematical models are phenomenologically isotropic and typically predict non-physiological, periodic folding patterns. Here we establish a mechanistic model for cortical folding, in which macroscopic changes in white matter volume are a natural consequence of microscopic axonal growth. To calibrate our model, we consult axon elongation experiments in chick sensory neurons. We demonstrate that a single parameter, the axonal growth rate, explains a wide variety of in vitro conditions including immediate axonal thinning and gradual thickness restoration. We embed our axonal growth model into a continuum model for brain development using axonal orientation distributions motivated by diffusion spectrum imaging. Our simulations suggest that white matter anisotropy - as an emergent property from directional axonal growth - intrinsically induces symmetry breaking, and predicts more physiological, less regular morphologies with regionally varying gyral wavelengths and sulcal depths. Mechanistic modeling of brain development could establish valuable relationships between brain connectivity, brain anatomy, and brain function. PMID:25824370

  10. Imaging axon pathfinding in zebrafish in vivo.

    PubMed

    Leung, Louis; Holt, Christine E

    2012-09-01

    Axon pathfinding in the developing animal involves a highly dynamic process in which the axonal growth cone makes continuous decisions as it navigates toward its target. Changes occurring in the growth cone with respect to retracting from or extending into complex new territories can occur in minutes. Thus, the advent of strategies to visualize axon path-finding in vivo in a live intact animal is crucial for a better understanding of how the growth cone makes such rapid decisions in response to multiple cues. Combining these strategies with loss-of-function and/or gain-of-function techniques, one can gain some insight as to which molecules are crucial to particular growth cone behaviors at specific choice points during navigation. The major advantage of using zebrafish lies in the accessibility of major axon tracts for live microscopy, as their embryonic development occurs ex utero. Furthermore, the robust embryos remain healthy during immobilization and allow for good imaging for long periods. This protocol describes the method for stabilizing and preparing live zebrafish embryos for imaging labeled axonal tracts at high spatial and temporal resolution for up to 72 h. It has been used for retinotectal axon pathfinding, but can be adapted to visualize other axon tracts of interest. PMID:22949713

  11. Cargo distributions differentiate pathological axonal transport impairments

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cassie S.; Lee, Robert H.; Coulter, Wallace H.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal transport is an essential process in neurons, analogous to shipping goods, by which energetic and cellular building supplies are carried downstream (anterogradely) and wastes are carried upstream (retrogradely) by molecular motors, which act as cargo porters. Impairments in axonal transport have been linked to devastating and often lethal neurodegenerative diseases, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Huntington’s, and Alzheimer’s. Axonal transport impairment types include a decrease in available motors for cargo transport (motor depletion), the presence of defective or non-functional motors (motor dilution), and the presence of increased or larger cargos (protein aggregation). An impediment to potential treatment identification has been the inability to determine what type(s) of axonal transport impairment candidates that could be present in a given disease. In this study, we utilize a computational model and common axonal transport experimental metrics to reveal the axonal transport impairment general characteristics or “signatures” that result from three general defect types of motor depletion, motor dilution, and protein aggregation. Our results not only provide a means to discern these general impairments types, they also reveal key dynamic and emergent features of axonal transport, which potentially underlie multiple impairment types. The identified characteristics, as well as the analytical method, can be used to help elucidate the axonal transport impairments observed in experimental and clinical data. For example, using the model-predicted defect signatures, we identify the defect candidates, which are most likely to be responsible for the axonal transport impairments in the G93A SOD1 mouse model of ALS. PMID:22285784

  12. Vanadate and fluoride effects on Na sup + -K sup + -Cl sup minus cotransport in squid giant axon

    SciTech Connect

    Altamirano, A.A.; Breitwieser, G.E.; Russel, J.M. )

    1988-04-01

    The effects of vanadate and fluoride on the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-Cl{sup {minus}} cotransporter of the squid giant axon were assessed. In axons not treated with these agents, intracellular dialysis with ATP-depleting fluids caused bumetanide-inhibitable {sup 36}Cl influx to fall with a half time of {approximately}16 min. In the presence of either 40 {mu}M vanadate or 5 mM fluoride, the decay of bumetanide-inhibitable {sup 36}Cl influx was significantly slowed; half time for vanadate-treated axons is 45 min and four fluoride-treated axons is 37 min. These agents are not exerting their effects on Na{sup +}-K{sup +}Cl{sup {minus}} cotransport by influencing the rate of ATP depletion of the axon, since they had no effect on the ATP hydrolysis rate of an optic ganglia homogenate. We therefore suggest that these data support the hypothesis that Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-Cl{sup {minus}} cotransport in squid axons is regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism and that vanadate and fluoride reduce the rate of dephosphorylation by inhibiting a protein phosphatase.

  13. Axonal regeneration. Systemic administration of epothilone B promotes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Jörg; Hellal, Farida; Flynn, Kevin C; Dupraz, Sebastian; Elliott, David A; Tedeschi, Andrea; Bates, Margaret; Sliwinski, Christopher; Brook, Gary; Dobrindt, Kristina; Peitz, Michael; Brüstle, Oliver; Norenberg, Michael D; Blesch, Armin; Weidner, Norbert; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Bixby, John L; Bradke, Frank

    2015-04-17

    After central nervous system (CNS) injury, inhibitory factors in the lesion scar and poor axon growth potential prevent axon regeneration. Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and promotes axon growth. However, the cellular mechanisms of this dual effect remain unclear. Here, delayed systemic administration of a blood-brain barrier-permeable microtubule-stabilizing drug, epothilone B (epoB), decreased scarring after rodent spinal cord injury (SCI) by abrogating polarization and directed migration of scar-forming fibroblasts. Conversely, epothilone B reactivated neuronal polarization by inducing concerted microtubule polymerization into the axon tip, which propelled axon growth through an inhibitory environment. Together, these drug-elicited effects promoted axon regeneration and improved motor function after SCI. With recent clinical approval, epothilones hold promise for clinical use after CNS injury. PMID:25765066

  14. Calcium Release from Intra-Axonal Endoplasmic Reticulum Leads to Axon Degeneration through Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Rosario; Martinez, Nicolas W.; Lillo, Jorge; Pihan, Phillipe; Hernandez, Diego; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal degeneration represents an early pathological event in neurodegeneration, constituting an important target for neuroprotection. Regardless of the initial injury, which could be toxic, mechanical, metabolic, or genetic, degeneration of axons shares a common mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction and production of reactive oxygen species. Critical steps in this degenerative process are still unknown. Here we show that calcium release from the axonal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through ryanodine and IP3 channels activates the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and contributes to axonal degeneration triggered by both mechanical and toxic insults in ex vivo and in vitro mouse and rat model systems. These data reveal a critical and early ER-dependent step during axonal degeneration, providing novel targets for axonal protection in neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:24849352

  15. Excitability tuning of axons in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ohura, Shunsuke; Kamiya, Haruyuki

    2016-05-01

    The axon is a long neuronal process that originates from the soma and extends towards the presynaptic terminals. The pioneering studies on the squid giant axon or the spinal cord motoneuron established that the axon conducts action potentials faithfully to the presynaptic terminals with self-regenerative processes of membrane excitation. Recent studies challenged the notion that the fundamental understandings obtained from the study of squid giant axons are readily applicable to the axons in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). These studies revealed that the functional and structural properties of the CNS axons are much more variable than previously thought. In this review article, we summarize the recent understandings of axon physiology in the mammalian CNS due to progress in the subcellular recording techniques which allow direct recordings from the axonal membranes, with emphasis on the hippocampal mossy fibers as a representative en passant axons typical for cortical axons. PMID:26493201

  16. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers.

    PubMed

    Daanen, H A; Ducharme, M B

    2000-02-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilatation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in water at either 5 degrees C or 35 degrees C. Axon reflexes were pronounced in the middle finger of the hand in warm water, but absent from the hand in cold water, even though the stimulation was rated as "rather painful" to "painful". These results showed that axon reflexes do not occur in a cold-exposed hand and thus are unlikely to explain the CIVD phenomenon. PMID:10638384

  17. A Possible Role for Integrin Signaling in Diffuse Axonal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kerscher, Lucas; Franck, Christian; Goss, Josue A.; Alford, Patrick W.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, investigators have attempted to establish the pathophysiological mechanisms by which non-penetrating injuries damage the brain. Several studies have implicated either membrane poration or ion channel dysfunction pursuant to neuronal cell death as the primary mechanism of injury. We hypothesized that traumatic stimulation of integrins may be an important etiological contributor to mild Traumatic Brain Injury. In order to study the effects of forces at the cellular level, we utilized two hierarchical, in vitro systems to mimic traumatic injury to rat cortical neurons: a high velocity stretcher and a magnetic tweezer system. In one system, we controlled focal adhesion formation in neurons cultured on a stretchable substrate loaded with an abrupt, one dimensional strain. With the second system, we used magnetic tweezers to directly simulate the abrupt injury forces endured by a focal adhesion on the neurite. Both systems revealed variations in the rate and nature of neuronal injury as a function of focal adhesion density and direct integrin stimulation without membrane poration. Pharmacological inhibition of calpains did not mitigate the injury yet the inhibition of Rho-kinase immediately after injury reduced axonal injury. These data suggest that integrin-mediated activation of Rho may be a contributor to the diffuse axonal injury reported in mild Traumatic Brain Injury. PMID:21799943

  18. Regulation of conduction time along axons.

    PubMed

    Seidl, A H

    2014-09-12

    Timely delivery of information is essential for proper functioning of the nervous system. Precise regulation of nerve conduction velocity is needed for correct exertion of motor skills, sensory integration and cognitive functions. In vertebrates, the rapid transmission of signals along nerve fibers is made possible by the myelination of axons and the resulting saltatory conduction in between nodes of Ranvier. Myelin is a specialization of glia cells and is provided by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. Myelination not only maximizes conduction velocity, but also provides a means to systematically regulate conduction times in the nervous system. Systematic regulation of conduction velocity along axons, and thus systematic regulation of conduction time in between neural areas, is a common occurrence in the nervous system. To date, little is understood about the mechanism that underlies systematic conduction velocity regulation and conduction time synchrony. Node assembly, internode distance (node spacing) and axon diameter - all parameters determining the speed of signal propagation along axons - are controlled by myelinating glia. Therefore, an interaction between glial cells and neurons has been suggested. This review summarizes examples of neural systems in which conduction velocity is regulated by anatomical variations along axons. While functional implications in these systems are not always clear, recent studies on the auditory system of birds and mammals present examples of conduction velocity regulation in systems with high temporal precision and a defined biological function. Together these findings suggest an active process that shapes the interaction between axons and myelinating glia to control conduction velocity along axons. Future studies involving these systems may provide further insight into how specific conduction times in the brain are established and maintained in development. Throughout the text, conduction velocity is used for the

  19. Quantitative mapping of the per‐axon diffusion coefficients in brain white matter

    PubMed Central

    Kruggel, Frithjof; Alexander, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This article presents a simple method for estimating the effective diffusion coefficients parallel and perpendicular to the axons unconfounded by the intravoxel fiber orientation distribution. We also call these parameters the per‐axon or microscopic diffusion coefficients. Theory and Methods Diffusion MR imaging is used to probe the underlying tissue material. The key observation is that for a fixed b‐value the spherical mean of the diffusion signal over the gradient directions does not depend on the axon orientation distribution. By exploiting this invariance property, we propose a simple, fast, and robust estimator of the per‐axon diffusion coefficients, which we refer to as the spherical mean technique. Results We demonstrate quantitative maps of the axon‐scale diffusion process, which has factored out the effects due to fiber dispersion and crossing, in human brain white matter. These microscopic diffusion coefficients are estimated in vivo using a widely available off‐the‐shelf pulse sequence featuring multiple b‐shells and high‐angular gradient resolution. Conclusion The estimation of the per‐axon diffusion coefficients is essential for the accurate recovery of the fiber orientation distribution. In addition, the spherical mean technique enables us to discriminate microscopic tissue features from fiber dispersion, which potentially improves the sensitivity and/or specificity to various neurological conditions. Magn Reson Med, 2015. Magn Reson Med 75:1752–1763, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25974332

  20. Delayed Feedback Model of Axonal Length Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Karamched, Bhargav R.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in cell biology is how the sizes of cells and organelles are regulated at various stages of development. Size homeostasis is particularly challenging for neurons, whose axons can extend from hundreds of microns to meters (in humans). Recently, a molecular-motor-based mechanism for axonal length sensing has been proposed, in which axonal length is encoded by the frequency of an oscillating retrograde signal. In this article, we develop a mathematical model of this length-sensing mechanism in which advection-diffusion equations for bidirectional motor transport are coupled to a chemical signaling network. We show that chemical oscillations emerge due to delayed negative feedback via a Hopf bifurcation, resulting in a frequency that is a monotonically decreasing function of axonal length. Knockdown of either kinesin or dynein causes an increase in the oscillation frequency, suggesting that the length-sensing mechanism would produce longer axons, which is consistent with experimental findings. One major prediction of the model is that fluctuations in the transport of molecular motors lead to a reduction in the reliability of the frequency-encoding mechanism for long axons. PMID:25954897

  1. microRNAs in axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Archana N.; Bellon, Anaïs; Baudet, Marie-Laure

    2014-01-01

    Brain wiring is a highly intricate process in which trillions of neuronal connections are established. Its initial phase is particularly crucial in establishing the general framework of neuronal circuits. During this early step, differentiating neurons extend axons, which reach their target by navigating through a complex environment with extreme precision. Research in the past 20 years has unraveled a vast and complex array of chemotropic cues that guide the leading tip of axons, the growth cone, throughout its journey. Tight regulation of these cues, and of their receptors and signaling pathways, is necessary for the high degree of accuracy required during circuit formation. However, little is known about the nature of regulatory molecules or mechanisms fine-tuning axonal cue response. Here we review recent, and somewhat fragmented, research on the possibility that microRNAs (miRNAs) could be key fine-tuning regulatory molecules in axon guidance. miRNAs appear to shape long-range axon guidance, fasciculation and targeting. We also present several lines of evidence suggesting that miRNAs could have a compartmentalized and differential action at the cell soma, and within axons and growth cones. PMID:24672429

  2. Imaging axon pathfinding in Xenopus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Leung, Louis; Holt, Christine E

    2012-09-01

    Axon pathfinding in the developing animal involves a highly dynamic process in which the axonal growth cone makes continuous decisions as it navigates toward its target. Changes occurring in the growth cone with respect to retracting from or extending into complex new territories can occur in minutes. Thus, the advent of strategies to visualize axon path-finding in vivo in a live intact animal is crucial for a better understanding of how the growth cone makes such rapid decisions in response to multiple cues. Combining these strategies with loss-of-function and/or gain-of-function techniques allows one to gain some insight as to which molecules are crucial to particular growth cone behaviors at specific choice points during navigation. The main advantage of using Xenopus lies in the accessibility of major axon tracts for live microscopy, as their embryonic development occurs ex utero. Furthermore, the robust embryos remain healthy during immobilization and allow for good imaging for long periods. This protocol describes the methods for stabilizing and preparing live Xenopus embryos for imaging labeled axonal tracts at high spatial and temporal resolution for up to 72 h. This approach can been used to investigate how the knockdown of certain gene functions can affect the speed of navigation through the well-studied Xenopus retinotectal pathway. It can be adapted to visualize other axon tracts of interest. PMID:22949712

  3. Transient axonal glycoprotein-1 induces apoptosis-related gene expression without triggering apoptosis in U251 glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Haigang; Song, Shanshan; Chen, Zhongcan; Wang, Yaxiao; Yang, Lujun; Du, Mouxuan; Ke, Yiquan; Xu, Ruxiang; Jin, Baozhe; Jiang, Xiaodan

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that transient axonal glycoprotein-1, a ligand of amyloid precursor protein, increases the secretion of amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain and is involved in apoptosis in Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we examined the effects of transient axonal glycoprotein-1 on U251 glioma cells. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that transient axonal glycoprotein-1 did not inhibit the proliferation of U251 cells, but promoted cell viability. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay showed that transient axonal glycoprotein-1 did not induce U251 cell apoptosis. Real-time PCR revealed that transient axonal glycoprotein-1 substantially upregulated levels of amyloid precursor protein intracellular C-terminal domain, and p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA expression. Thus, transient axonal glycoprotein-1 increased apoptosis-related gene expression in U251 cells without inducing apoptosis. Instead, transient axonal glycoprotein-1 promoted the proliferation of these glioma cells. PMID:25206849

  4. USP47 and C Terminus of Hsp70-Interacting Protein (CHIP) Antagonistically Regulate Katanin-p60-Mediated Axonal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seung Wook; Oh, Kyu Hee; Park, Esther; Chang, Hyun Min; Park, Jung Mi; Seong, Min Woo; Ka, Seung Hyeun; Song, Woo Keun; Park, Dong Eun; Baas, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Katanin is a heterodimeric enzyme that severs and disassembles microtubules. While the p60 subunit has the enzyme activity, the p80 subunit regulates the p60 activity. The microtubule-severing activity of katanin plays an essential role in axonal growth. However, the mechanisms by which neuronal cells regulate the expression of katanin-p60 remains unknown. Here we showed that USP47 and C terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) antagonistically regulate the stability of katanin-p60 and thereby axonal growth. USP47 was identified as a katanin-p60-specific deubiquitinating enzyme for its stabilization. We also identified CHIP as a ubiquitin E3 ligase that promotes proteasome-mediated degradation of katanin-p60. Moreover, USP47 promoted axonal growth of cultured rat hippocampal neurons, whereas CHIP inhibited it. Significantly, treatment with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), an inducer of axonal growth, increased the levels of USP47 and katanin-p60, but not CHIP. Consistently, bFGF treatment resulted in a marked decrease in the level of ubiquitinated katanin-p60 and thereby in the promotion of axonal growth. On the other hand, the level of USP47, but not CHIP, decreased concurrently with that of katanin-p60 as axons reached their target cells. These results indicate that USP47 plays a crucial role in the control of axonal growth during neuronal development by antagonizing CHIP-mediated katanin-p60 degradation. PMID:23904609

  5. Active mechanistic target of rapamycin plays an ancillary rather than essential role in zebrafish CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Diekmann, Heike; Kalbhen, Pascal; Fischer, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    The developmental decrease of the intrinsic regenerative ability of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is associated with reduced activity of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in mature neurons such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). While mTOR activity is further decreased upon axonal injury, maintenance of its pre-injury level, for instance by genetic deletion of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), markedly promotes axon regeneration in mammals. The current study now addressed the question whether active mTOR might generally play a central role in axon regeneration by analyzing its requirement in regeneration-competent zebrafish. Remarkably, regulation of mTOR activity after optic nerve injury in zebrafish is fundamentally different compared to mammals. Hardly any activity was detected in naïve RGCs, whereas it was markedly increased upon axotomy in vivo as well as in dissociated cell cultures. After a short burst, mTOR activity was quickly attenuated, which is contrary to the requirements for axon regeneration in mammals. Surprisingly, mTOR activity was not essential for axonal growth per se, but correlated with cytokine- and PTEN inhibitor-induced neurite extension in vitro. Moreover, inhibition of mTOR using rapamycin significantly reduced axon regeneration in vivo and compromised functional recovery after optic nerve injury. Therefore, axotomy-induced mTOR activity is involved in CNS axon regeneration in zebrafish similar to mammals, although it plays an ancillary rather than essential role in this regeneration-competent species. PMID:26217179

  6. In vivo imaging of cell behaviors and F-actin reveals LIM-HD transcription factor regulation of peripheral versus central sensory axon development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Development of specific neuronal morphology requires precise control over cell motility processes, including axon formation, outgrowth and branching. Dynamic remodeling of the filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton is critical for these processes; however, little is known about the mechanisms controlling motile axon behaviors and F-actin dynamics in vivo. Neuronal structure is specified in part by intrinsic transcription factor activity, yet the molecular and cellular steps between transcription and axon behavior are not well understood. Zebrafish Rohon-Beard (RB) sensory neurons have a unique morphology, with central axons that extend in the spinal cord and a peripheral axon that innervates the skin. LIM homeodomain (LIM-HD) transcription factor activity is required for formation of peripheral RB axons. To understand how neuronal morphogenesis is controlled in vivo and how LIM-HD transcription factor activity differentially regulates peripheral versus central axons, we used live imaging of axon behavior and F-actin distribution in vivo. Results We used an F-actin biosensor containing the actin-binding domain of utrophin to characterize actin rearrangements during specific developmental processes in vivo, including axon initiation, consolidation and branching. We found that peripheral axons initiate from a specific cellular compartment and that F-actin accumulation and protrusive activity precede peripheral axon initiation. Moreover, disruption of LIM-HD transcriptional activity has different effects on the motility of peripheral versus central axons; it inhibits peripheral axon initiation, growth and branching, while increasing the growth rate of central axons. Our imaging revealed that LIM-HD transcription factor activity is not required for F-actin based protrusive activity or F-actin accumulation during peripheral axon initiation, but can affect positioning of F-actin accumulation and axon formation. Conclusion Our ability to image the dynamics of

  7. Expression of an Activated Integrin Promotes Long-Distance Sensory Axon Regeneration in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Menghon; Chew, Daniel J.; Moloney, Elizabeth B.; Verhaagen, Joost; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    After CNS injury, axon regeneration is blocked by an inhibitory environment consisting of the highly upregulated tenascin-C and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Tenascin-C promotes growth of axons if they express a tenascin-binding integrin, particularly α9β1. Additionally, integrins can be inactivated by CSPGs, and this inhibition can be overcome by the presence of a β1-binding integrin activator, kindlin-1. We examined the synergistic effect of α9 integrin and kindlin-1 on sensory axon regeneration in adult rat spinal cord after dorsal root crush and adeno-associated virus transgene expression in dorsal root ganglia. After 12 weeks, axons from C6–C7 dorsal root ganglia regenerated through the tenascin-C-rich dorsal root entry zone into the dorsal column up to C1 level and above (>25 mm axon length) through a normal pathway. Animals also showed anatomical and electrophysiological evidence of reconnection to the dorsal horn and behavioral recovery in mechanical pressure, thermal pain, and ladder-walking tasks. Expression of α9 integrin or kindlin-1 alone promoted much less regeneration and recovery. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The study demonstrates that long-distance sensory axon regeneration over a normal pathway and with sensory and sensory–motor recovery can be achieved. This was achieved by expressing an integrin that recognizes tenascin-C, one of the components of glial scar tissue, and an integrin activator. This enabled extensive long-distance (>25 mm) regeneration of both myelinated and unmyelinated sensory axons with topographically correct connections in the spinal cord. The extent of growth and recovery we have seen would probably be clinically significant. Restoration of sensation to hands, perineum, and genitalia would be a significant improvement for a spinal cord-injured patient. PMID:27383601

  8. Axonal Dysfunction Precedes Motor Neuronal Death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Yuta; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Misawa, Sonoko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Watanabe, Keisuke; Amino, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Wide-spread fasciculations are a characteristic feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggesting motor axonal hyperexcitability. Previous excitability studies have shown increased nodal persistent sodium conductances and decreased potassium currents in motor axons of ALS patients, both of the changes inducing hyperexcitability. Altered axonal excitability potentially contributes to motor neuron death in ALS, but the relationship of the extent of motor neuronal death and abnormal excitability has not been fully elucidated. We performed multiple nerve excitability measurements in the median nerve at the wrist of 140 ALS patients and analyzed the relationship of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude (index of motor neuronal loss) and excitability indices, such as strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, recovery cycle and current-threshold relationships. Compared to age-matched normal controls (n = 44), ALS patients (n = 140) had longer strength-duration time constant (SDTC: a measure of nodal persistent sodium current; p < 0.05), greater threshold changes in depolarizing threshold electrotonus (p < 0.05) and depolarizing current threshold relationship (i.e. less accommodation; (p < 0.05), greater superexcitability (a measure of fast potassium current; p < 0.05) and reduced late subexcitability (a measure of slow potassium current; p < 0.05), suggesting increased persistent sodium currents and decreased potassium currents. The reduced potassium currents were found even in the patient subgroups with normal CMAP (> 5mV). Regression analyses showed that SDTC (R = -0.22) and depolarizing threshold electrotonus (R = -0.22) increased with CMAP decline. These findings suggest that motor nerve hyperexcitability occurs in the early stage of the disease, and precedes motor neuronal loss in ALS. Modulation of altered ion channel function could be a treatment option for ALS. PMID:27383069

  9. Axonal Dysfunction Precedes Motor Neuronal Death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Yuta; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Misawa, Sonoko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Watanabe, Keisuke; Amino, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Wide-spread fasciculations are a characteristic feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggesting motor axonal hyperexcitability. Previous excitability studies have shown increased nodal persistent sodium conductances and decreased potassium currents in motor axons of ALS patients, both of the changes inducing hyperexcitability. Altered axonal excitability potentially contributes to motor neuron death in ALS, but the relationship of the extent of motor neuronal death and abnormal excitability has not been fully elucidated. We performed multiple nerve excitability measurements in the median nerve at the wrist of 140 ALS patients and analyzed the relationship of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude (index of motor neuronal loss) and excitability indices, such as strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, recovery cycle and current-threshold relationships. Compared to age-matched normal controls (n = 44), ALS patients (n = 140) had longer strength-duration time constant (SDTC: a measure of nodal persistent sodium current; p < 0.05), greater threshold changes in depolarizing threshold electrotonus (p < 0.05) and depolarizing current threshold relationship (i.e. less accommodation; (p < 0.05), greater superexcitability (a measure of fast potassium current; p < 0.05) and reduced late subexcitability (a measure of slow potassium current; p < 0.05), suggesting increased persistent sodium currents and decreased potassium currents. The reduced potassium currents were found even in the patient subgroups with normal CMAP (> 5mV). Regression analyses showed that SDTC (R = -0.22) and depolarizing threshold electrotonus (R = -0.22) increased with CMAP decline. These findings suggest that motor nerve hyperexcitability occurs in the early stage of the disease, and precedes motor neuronal loss in ALS. Modulation of altered ion channel function could be a treatment option for ALS. PMID:27383069

  10. Mechanical breaking of microtubules in axons during dynamic stretch injury underlies delayed elasticity, microtubule disassembly, and axon degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang-Schomer, Min D.; Patel, Ankur R.; Baas, Peter W.; Smith, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about which components of the axonal cytoskeleton might break during rapid mechanical deformation, such as occurs in traumatic brain injury. Here, we micropatterned neuronal cell cultures on silicone membranes to induce dynamic stretch exclusively of axon fascicles. After stretch, undulating distortions formed along the axons that gradually relaxed back to a straight orientation, demonstrating a delayed elastic response. Subsequently, swellings developed, leading to degeneration of almost all axons by 24 h. Stabilizing the microtubules with taxol maintained the undulating geometry after injury but greatly reduced axon degeneration. Conversely, destabilizing microtubules with nocodazole prevented undulations but greatly increased the rate of axon loss. Ultrastructural analyses of axons postinjury revealed immediate breakage and buckling of microtubules in axon undulations and progressive loss of microtubules. Collectively, these data suggest that dynamic stretch of axons induces direct mechanical failure at specific points along microtubules. This microtubule disorganization impedes normal relaxation of the axons, resulting in undulations. However, this physical damage also triggers progressive disassembly of the microtubules around the breakage points. While the disintegration of microtubules allows delayed recovery of the “normal” straight axon morphology, it comes at a great cost by interrupting axonal transport, leading to axonal swelling and degeneration.—Tang-Schomer, M. D., Patel, A. R,, Baas, P. W., Smith, D. H. Mechanical breaking of microtubules in axons during dynamic stretch injury underlies delayed elasticity, microtubule disassembly, and axon degeneration. PMID:20019243

  11. Fibrinogen-induced perivascular microglial clustering is required for the development of axonal damage in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Davalos, Dimitrios; Kyu Ryu, Jae; Merlini, Mario; Baeten, Kim M.; Le Moan, Natacha; Petersen, Mark A.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Smirnoff, Dimitri S.; Bedard, Catherine; Hakozaki, Hiroyuki; Gonias Murray, Sara; Ling, Jennie B.; Lassmann, Hans; Degen, Jay L.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier disruption, microglial activation and neurodegeneration are hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. However, the initial triggers that activate innate immune responses and their role in axonal damage remain unknown. Here we show that the blood protein fibrinogen induces rapid microglial responses toward the vasculature and is required for axonal damage in neuroinflammation. Using in vivo two-photon microscopy, we demonstrate that microglia form perivascular clusters before myelin loss or paralysis onset and that, of the plasma proteins, fibrinogen specifically induces rapid and sustained microglial responses in vivo. Fibrinogen leakage correlates with areas of axonal damage and induces reactive oxygen species release in microglia. Blocking fibrin formation with anticoagulant treatment or genetically eliminating the fibrinogen binding motif recognized by the microglial integrin receptor CD11b/CD18 inhibits perivascular microglial clustering and axonal damage. Thus, early and progressive perivascular microglial clustering triggered by fibrinogen leakage upon blood-brain barrier disruption contributes to axonal damage in neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:23187627

  12. Neurofascin as a novel target for autoantibody-mediated axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Mathey, Emily K.; Derfuss, Tobias; Storch, Maria K.; Williams, Kieran R.; Hales, Kimberly; Woolley, David R.; Al-Hayani, Abdulmonem; Davies, Stephen N.; Rasband, Matthew N.; Olsson, Tomas; Moldenhauer, Anja; Velhin, Sviataslau; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Meinl, Edgar; Linington, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Axonal injury is considered the major cause of disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), but the underlying effector mechanisms are poorly understood. Starting with a proteomics-based approach, we identified neurofascin-specific autoantibodies in patients with MS. These autoantibodies recognize the native form of the extracellular domains of both neurofascin 186 (NF186), a neuronal protein concentrated in myelinated fibers at nodes of Ranvier, and NF155, the oligodendrocyte-specific isoform of neurofascin. Our in vitro studies with hippocampal slice cultures indicate that neurofascin antibodies inhibit axonal conduction in a complement-dependent manner. To evaluate whether circulating antineurofascin antibodies mediate a pathogenic effect in vivo, we cotransferred these antibodies with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein–specific encephalitogenic T cells to mimic the inflammatory pathology of MS and breach the blood–brain barrier. In this animal model, antibodies to neurofascin selectively targeted nodes of Ranvier, resulting in deposition of complement, axonal injury, and disease exacerbation. Collectively, these results identify a novel mechanism of immune-mediated axonal injury that can contribute to axonal pathology in MS. PMID:17846150

  13. Axotomy-induced HIF-serotonin signalling axis promotes axon regeneration in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Alam, Tanimul; Maruyama, Hiroki; Li, Chun; Pastuhov, Strahil Iv; Nix, Paola; Bastiani, Michael; Hisamoto, Naoki; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of axons to regenerate after injury remain poorly understood. Here we show that in Caenorhabditis elegans, axotomy induces ectopic expression of serotonin (5-HT) in axotomized non-serotonergic neurons via HIF-1, a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, and that 5-HT subsequently promotes axon regeneration by autocrine signalling through the SER-7 5-HT receptor. Furthermore, we identify the rhgf-1 and rga-5 genes, encoding homologues of RhoGEF and RhoGAP, respectively, as regulators of axon regeneration. We demonstrate that one pathway initiated by SER-7 acts upstream of the C. elegans RhoA homolog RHO-1 in neuron regeneration, which functions via G12α and RHGF-1. In this pathway, RHO-1 inhibits diacylglycerol kinase, resulting in an increase in diacylglycerol. SER-7 also promotes axon regeneration by activating the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling pathway. Thus, HIF-1-mediated activation of 5-HT signalling promotes axon regeneration by activating both the RhoA and cAMP pathways. PMID:26790951

  14. Axotomy-induced HIF-serotonin signalling axis promotes axon regeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Tanimul; Maruyama, Hiroki; Li, Chun; Pastuhov, Strahil Iv.; Nix, Paola; Bastiani, Michael; Hisamoto, Naoki; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of axons to regenerate after injury remain poorly understood. Here we show that in Caenorhabditis elegans, axotomy induces ectopic expression of serotonin (5-HT) in axotomized non-serotonergic neurons via HIF-1, a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, and that 5-HT subsequently promotes axon regeneration by autocrine signalling through the SER-7 5-HT receptor. Furthermore, we identify the rhgf-1 and rga-5 genes, encoding homologues of RhoGEF and RhoGAP, respectively, as regulators of axon regeneration. We demonstrate that one pathway initiated by SER-7 acts upstream of the C. elegans RhoA homolog RHO-1 in neuron regeneration, which functions via G12α and RHGF-1. In this pathway, RHO-1 inhibits diacylglycerol kinase, resulting in an increase in diacylglycerol. SER-7 also promotes axon regeneration by activating the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling pathway. Thus, HIF-1-mediated activation of 5-HT signalling promotes axon regeneration by activating both the RhoA and cAMP pathways. PMID:26790951

  15. Molecular basis of the inhibition of the fast inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5 by tarantula toxin Jingzhaotoxin-II.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Zhou, Xi; Tang, Cheng; Zhang, Yunxiao; Tao, Huai; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2015-06-01

    Jingzhaotoxin-II (JZTX-II) is a 32-residue peptide from the Chinese tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao venom, and preferentially inhibits the fast inactivation of the voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in rat cardiac myocytes. In the present study, we elucidated the action mechanism of JZTX-II inhibiting hNav1.5, a VGSC subtype mainly distributed in human cardiac myocytes. Among the four VGSC subtypes tested, hNav1.5 was the most sensitive to JZTX-II (EC50=125±4nM). Although JZTX-II had little or no effect on steady-state inactivation of the residual currents conducted by hNav1.5, it caused a 10mV hyperpolarized shift of activation. Moreover, JZTX-II increased the recovery rate of hNav1.5 channels, which should lead to a shorter transition from the inactivation to closed state. JZTX-II dissociated from toxin-channel complex via extreme depolarization and subsequently rebound to the channel upon repolarization. Mutagenesis analyses showed that the domain IV (DIV) voltage-sensor domain (VSD) was critical for JZTX-II binding to hNav1.5 and some mutations located in S1-S2 and S3-S4 extracellular loops of hNav1.5 DIV additively reduced the toxin sensitivity of hNav1.5. Our data identified the mechanism underlying JZTX-II inhibiting hNav1.5, similar to scorpion α-toxins, involving binding to neurotoxin receptor site 3. PMID:25817910

  16. Axon diameter and axonal transport: In vivo and in vitro effects of androgens

    PubMed Central

    Pesaresi, M; Soon-Shiong, R; French, L; Kaplan, DR; Miller, FD; Paus, T.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is a sex hormone involved in brain maturation via multiple molecular mechanisms. Previous human studies described age-related changes in the overall volume and morphological properties of white matter during male puberty. Based on this work, we have proposed that testosterone may induce an increase of radial growth and, possibly, modulate axonal transport. In order to determine whether this is the case we have used two different experimental approaches. With electron microscopy, we have evaluated sex differences in the structural properties of axons in the corpus callosum (splenium) of young rats, and tested consequences of castration carried out after weaning. Then we examined in vitro the effect of the non-aromatizable androgen Mibolerone on the structure and bidirectional transport of wheat-germ agglutinin vesicles in the axons of cultured sympathetic neurons. With electron microscopy, we found robust sex differences in axonal diameter (males>females) and g ratio (males>females). Removal of endogenous testosterone by castration was associated with lower axon diameter and lower g ratio in castrated (vs. intact) males. In vitro, Mibolerone influenced the axonal transport in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and increased the axon caliber as compared with vehicle-treated neurons. These findings are consistent with the role of testosterone in shaping the axon by regulating its radial growth, as predicted by the initial human studies. PMID:25956809

  17. Cytoplasmic structure in rapid-frozen axons

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Turtle optic nerves were rapid-frozen from the living state, fractured, etched, and rotary shadowed. Stereo views of fractured axons show that axoplasm consists of three types of longitudinally oriented domains. One type consists of neurofilament bundles in which individual filaments are interconnected by a cross-bridging network. Contiguous to neurofilament domains are domains containing microtubules suspended in a loose, granular matrix. A third domain is confined to a zone, 80-100 nm wide, next to the axonal membrane and consists of a dense filamentous network connecting the longitudinal elements of the axonal cytoskeleton to particles on the inner surface of the axolemma. Three classes of membrane-limited organelles are distinguished: axoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and discrete vesicular organelles. The vesicular organelles must include lysosomes, multivesicular bodies, and vesicles which are retrogradely transported in axons, though some vesicular organelles may be components of the axoplasmic reticulum. Organelles in each class have a characteristic relationship to the axonal cytoskeleton. The axoplasmic reticulum enters all three domains of axoplasm, but mitochondria and vesicular organelles are excluded from the neurofilament bundles, a distribution confirmed in thin sections of cryoembedded axons. Vesicular organelles differ from mitochondria in at least three ways with respect to their relationships to adjacent axoplasm: (a) one, or sometimes both, of their ends are associated with a gap in the surrounding granular axoplasm; (b) an appendage is typically associated with one of their ends; and (c) they are not attached or closely apposed to microtubules. Mitochondria, on the other hand, are only rarely associated with gaps in the axoplasm, do not have an appendage, and are virtually always attached to one or more microtubules by an irregular array of side-arms. We propose that the longitudinally oriented microtubule domains are channels within which

  18. Activity-dependent extracellular K+ accumulation in rat optic nerve: the role of glial and axonal Na+ pumps

    PubMed Central

    Ransom, Christopher B; Ransom, Bruce R; Sontheimer, Harald

    2000-01-01

    We measured activity-dependent changes in [K+]o with K+-selective microelectrodes in adult rat optic nerve, a CNS white matter tract, to investigate the factors responsible for post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o.Post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o followed a double-exponential time course with an initial, fast time constant, τfast, of 0.9 ± 0.2 s (mean ±s.d.) and a later, slow time constant, τslow, of 4.2 ± 1 s following a 1 s, 100 Hz stimulus. τfast, but not τslow, decreased with increasing activity-dependent rises in [K+]o. τslow, but not τfast, increased with increasing stimulus duration.Post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o was temperature sensitive. The apparent temperature coefficients (Q10, 27–37°C) for the fast and slow components following a 1 s, 100 Hz stimulus were 1.7 and 2.6, respectively.Post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o was sensitive to Na+ pump inhibition with 50 μM strophanthidin. Following a 1 s, 100 Hz stimulus, 50 μM strophanthidin increased τfast and τslow by 81 and 464%, respectively. Strophanthidin reduced the temperature sensitivity of post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o.Post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o was minimally affected by the K+ channel blocker Ba2+ (0.2 mm). Following a 10 s, 100 Hz stimulus, 0.2 mm Ba2+ increased τfast and τslow by 24 and 18%, respectively.Stimulated increases in [K+]o were followed by undershoots of [K+]o. Post-stimulus undershoot amplitude increased with stimulus duration but was independent of the peak preceding [K+]o increase.These observations imply that two distinct processes contribute to post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o in central white matter. The results are compatible with a model of K+ removal that attributes the fast, initial phase of K+ removal to K+ uptake by glial Na+ pumps and the slower, sustained decline to K+ uptake via axonal Na+ pumps. PMID:10713967

  19. Onset of diffuse reflectivity and fast electron flux inhibition in 528-nm-laser{endash}solid interactions at ultrahigh intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, T.; Theobald, W.; Sauerbrey, R.; Uschmann, I.; Altenbernd, D.; Teubner, U.; Gibbon, P.; Foerster, E.; Malka, G.; Miquel, J.L.

    1997-10-01

    Using a high-power femtosecond frequency-doubled Nd:glass laser system with a contrast ratio of 10{sup 12}, the interaction between light and matter up to intensities of 10{sup 19} Wthinspcm{sup {minus}2}has been investigated. The absorption of the laser light in solid aluminum is almost independent of the polarization, peaks at about 25{degree}, and reaches values of almost 45{percent}. Assuming an exponential electron distribution, a temperature of 420 keV at 4{times}10{sup 18} Wthinspcm{sup {minus}2}was measured. These experiments and the detection of the hard-x-ray radiation (60 keV{endash}1 MeV) implied a conversion efficiency of 10{sup {minus}4}{endash}10{sup {minus}3} into suprathermal electrons. A second low-energy electron distribution either with trajectories mainly parallel to the target surface or with a reduced penetration depth due to flux inhibition was also inferred from K{alpha} line radiation measurements. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Mitochondrial immobilization mediated by syntaphilin facilitates survival of demyelinated axons

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Nobuhiko; Chiang, Hao; Mahad, Don J.; Kidd, Grahame J.; Liu, LiPing; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Sheng, Zu-Hang; Komuro, Hitoshi; Trapp, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a primary cause of permanent neurological disability in individuals with the CNS demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. Dysfunction of axonal mitochondria and imbalanced energy demand and supply are implicated in degeneration of chronically demyelinated axons. The purpose of this study was to define the roles of mitochondrial volume and distribution in axonal degeneration following acute CNS demyelination. We show that the axonal mitochondrial volume increase following acute demyelination of WT CNS axons does not occur in demyelinated axons deficient in syntaphilin, an axonal molecule that immobilizes stationary mitochondria to microtubules. These findings were supported by time-lapse imaging of WT and syntaphilin-deficient axons in vitro. When demyelinated, axons deficient in syntaphilin degenerate at a significantly greater rate than WT axons, and this degeneration can be rescued by reducing axonal electrical activity with the Na+ channel blocker flecainide. These results support the concept that syntaphilin-mediated immobilization of mitochondria to microtubules is required for the volume increase of axonal mitochondria following acute demyelination and protects against axonal degeneration in the CNS. PMID:24958879

  1. Wnt5a Evokes Cortical Axon Outgrowth and Repulsive Guidance by Tau Mediated Reorganization of Dynamic Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Fothergill, Thomas; Hutchins, B Ian; Dent, Erik W; Kali, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Wnt5a guides cortical axons in vivo by repulsion and in vitro evokes cortical axon outgrowth and repulsion by calcium signaling pathways. Here we examined the role of microtubule (MT) reorganization and dynamics in mediating effects of Wnt5a. Inhibiting MT dynamics with nocodazole and taxol abolished Wnt5a evoked axon outgrowth and repulsion of cultured hamster cortical neurons. EGFP-EB3 labeled dynamic MTs visualized in live cell imaging revealed that growth cone MTs align with the nascent axon. Wnt5a increased axon outgrowth by reorganization of dynamic MTs from a splayed to a bundled array oriented in the direction of axon extension, and Wnt5a gradients induced asymmetric redistribution of dynamic MTs toward the far side of the growth cone. Wnt5a gradients also evoked calcium transients that were highest on the far side of the growth cone. Calcium signaling and the reorganization of dynamic MTs could be linked by tau, a MT associated protein that stabilizes MTs. Tau is phosphorylated at the Ser 262 MT binding site by CaMKII, and is required for Wnt5a induced axon outgrowth and repulsive turning. Phosphorylation of tau at Ser262 is known to detach tau from MTs to increase their dynamics. Using transfection with tau constructs mutated at Ser262, we found that this site is required for the growth and guidance effects of Wnt5a by mediating reorganization of dynamic MTs in cortical growth cones. Moreover, CaMKII inhibition also prevents MT reorganization required for Wnt5a induced axon outgrowth, thus linking Wnt/calcium signaling to tau mediated MT reorganization during growth cone behaviors. © 2013 The Authors. Developmental Neurobiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.Develop Neurobiol 74: 797–817, 2014 PMID:23818454

  2. Hyperactivated Stat3 boosts axon regeneration in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Saloni T; Luo, Xueting; Park, Kevin K; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2016-06-01

    Axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is intrinsically and extrinsically inhibited by multiple factors. One major factor contributing to intrinsic regeneration failure is the inability of mature neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) to activate regeneration-associated transcription factors (TFs) post-injury. A prior study identified TFs overexpressed in neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) compared to the CNS; some of these could be involved in the ability of PNS neurons to regenerate. Of these, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), as well its downstream regeneration-associated targets, showed a significant upregulation in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons, and a constitutively active variant of Stat3 (Stat3CA) promoted neurite growth when expressed in cerebellar neurons (Lerch et al., 2012; Smith et al., 2011). To further enhance STAT3's neurite outgrowth enhancing activity, Stat3CA was fused with a viral activation domain (VP16). VP16 hyperactivates TFs by recruiting transcriptional co-factors to the DNA binding domain (Hirai et al., 2010). Overexpression of this VP16-Stat3CA chimera in primary cortical neurons led to a significant increase of neurite outgrowth as well as Stat3 transcriptional activity in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo transduction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) with AAV constructs expressing VP16-Stat3CA resulted in regeneration of optic nerve axons after injury, to a greater degree than for those expressing Stat3CA alone. These findings confirm and extend the concept that overexpression of hyperactivated transcription factors identified as functioning in PNS regeneration can promote axon regeneration in the CNS. PMID:27060489

  3. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    SciTech Connect

    Larrivee, D. )

    1990-09-01

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of (3H)proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the (3H)proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced (3H)proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins (3H)proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons.

  4. How Schwann Cells Sort Axons: New Concepts.

    PubMed

    Feltri, M Laura; Poitelon, Yannick; Previtali, Stefano Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerves contain large myelinated and small unmyelinated (Remak) fibers that perform different functions. The choice to myelinate or not is dictated to Schwann cells by the axon itself, based on the amount of neuregulin I-type III exposed on its membrane. Peripheral axons are more important in determining the final myelination fate than central axons, and the implications for this difference in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes are discussed. Interestingly, this choice is reversible during pathology, accounting for the remarkable plasticity of Schwann cells, and contributing to the regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system. Radial sorting is the process by which Schwann cells choose larger axons to myelinate during development. This crucial morphogenetic step is a prerequisite for myelination and for differentiation of Remak fibers, and is arrested in human diseases due to mutations in genes coding for extracellular matrix and linkage molecules. In this review we will summarize progresses made in the last years by a flurry of reverse genetic experiments in mice and fish. This work revealed novel molecules that control radial sorting, and contributed unexpected ideas to our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control radial sorting of axons. PMID:25686621

  5. Tau reduction prevents Aβ-induced axonal transport deficits by blocking activation of GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jordan C.; Fomenko, Vira; Miyamoto, Takashi; Suberbielle, Elsa; Knox, Joseph A.; Ho, Kaitlyn; Kim, Daniel H.; Yu, Gui-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Axonal transport deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are attributed to amyloid β (Aβ) peptides and pathological forms of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Genetic ablation of tau prevents neuronal overexcitation and axonal transport deficits caused by recombinant Aβ oligomers. Relevance of these findings to naturally secreted Aβ and mechanisms underlying tau’s enabling effect are unknown. Here we demonstrate deficits in anterograde axonal transport of mitochondria in primary neurons from transgenic mice expressing familial AD-linked forms of human amyloid precursor protein. We show that these deficits depend on Aβ1–42 production and are prevented by tau reduction. The copathogenic effect of tau did not depend on its microtubule binding, interactions with Fyn, or potential role in neuronal development. Inhibition of neuronal activity, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, or glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity or expression also abolished Aβ-induced transport deficits. Tau ablation prevented Aβ-induced GSK3β activation. Thus, tau allows Aβ oligomers to inhibit axonal transport through activation of GSK3β, possibly by facilitating aberrant neuronal activity. PMID:25963821

  6. Axon regeneration impediment: the role of paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Yan; Fu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative capacity is weak after central nervous system injury because of the absence of an enhancing microenvironment and presence of an inhibitory microenvironment for neuronal and axonal repair. In addition to the Nogo receptor (NgR), the paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PirB) is a recently discovered coreceptor of Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. Concurrent blocking of NgR and PirB almost completely eliminates the inhibitory effect of myelin-associated inhibitory molecules on axonal regeneration. PirB participates in a key pathological process of the nervous system, specifically axonal regeneration inhibition. PirB is an inhibitory receptor similar to NgR, but their effects are not identical. This study summarizes the structure, distribution, relationship with common nervous system diseases, and known mechanisms of PirB, and concludes that PirB is also distributed in cells of the immune and hematopoietic systems. Further investigations are needed to determine if immunomodulation and blood cell migration involve inhibition of axonal regeneration. PMID:26487866

  7. Glucocorticoid Fast Feedback Inhibition of Stress-Induced ACTH Secretion in the Male Rat: Rate Independence and Stress-State Resistance.

    PubMed

    Osterlund, Chad D; Rodriguez-Santiago, Mariana; Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Newsom, Ryan J; Chadayammuri, Anjali P; Spencer, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Normal glucocorticoid secretion is critical for physiological and mental health. Glucocorticoid secretion is dynamically regulated by glucocorticoid-negative feedback; however, the mechanisms of that feedback process are poorly understood. We assessed the temporal characteristics of glucocorticoid-negative feedback in vivo using a procedure for drug infusions and serial blood collection in unanesthetized rats that produced a minimal disruption of basal ACTH plasma levels. We compared the negative feedback effectiveness present when stress onset coincides with corticosterone's (CORT) rapidly rising phase (30 sec pretreatment), high plateau phase (15 min pretreatment), or restored basal phase (60 min pretreatment) as well as effectiveness when CORT infusion occurs after the onset of stress (5 min poststress onset). CORT treatment prior to stress onset acted remarkably fast (within 30 sec) to suppress stress-induced ACTH secretion. Furthermore, fast feedback induction did not require rapid increases in CORT at the time of stress onset (hormone rate independent), and those feedback actions were relatively long lasting (≥15 min). In contrast, CORT elevation after stress onset produced limited and delayed ACTH suppression (stress state resistance). There was a parallel stress-state resistance for CORT inhibition of stress-induced Crh heteronuclear RNA in the paraventricular nucleus but not Pomc heteronuclear RNA in the anterior pituitary. CORT treatment did not suppress stress-induced prolactin secretion, suggesting that CORT feedback is restricted to the control of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis elements of a stress response. These temporal, stress-state, and system-level features of in vivo CORT feedback provide an important physiological context for ex vivo studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of CORT-negative feedback. PMID:27145013

  8. Giant axonal neuropathy: visual and oculomotor deficits.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, T H; Guitton, D; Coupland, S G

    1980-08-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy, a generalised disorder or neurofilaments, presents as a chronic, progressive peripheral neuropathy in childhood. Evidence for central nervous system involvement is demonstrated in this study of four male patients with giant axonal neuropathy who had defective visual function and abnormal ocular motility. The visual system was studied by electroretinography, which showed normal retinal function, and by visual evoked potentials, which showed disease of both optic nerves and retrochiasmal visual pathways. The ocular motility disorder, studied by electrooculography, comprised defective pursuit, inability to maintain eccentric gaze with gaze paretic and rebound nystagmus, abnormal optokinetic responses and failure of suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex by fixation. These findings suggested involvement by giant axonal neuropathy of the cerebellar and brain stem pathways important in the control of ocular motility. PMID:7192592

  9. Axonal Fiber Terminations Concentrate on Gyri

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingxin; Guo, Lei; Li, Kaiming; Wang, Yonghua; Chen, Guojun; Li, Longchuan; Chen, Hanbo; Deng, Fan; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Tuo; Huang, Ling; Faraco, Carlos; Zhang, Degang; Guo, Cong; Yap, Pew-Thian; Hu, Xintao; Li, Gang; Lv, Jinglei; Yuan, Yixuan; Zhu, Dajiang; Han, Junwei; Sabatinelli, Dean; Zhao, Qun; Miller, L. Stephen; Xu, Bingqian; Shen, Ping; Platt, Simon; Shen, Dinggang; Hu, Xiaoping

    2012-01-01

    Convoluted cortical folding and neuronal wiring are 2 prominent attributes of the mammalian brain. However, the macroscale intrinsic relationship between these 2 general cross-species attributes, as well as the underlying principles that sculpt the architecture of the cerebral cortex, remains unclear. Here, we show that the axonal fibers connected to gyri are significantly denser than those connected to sulci. In human, chimpanzee, and macaque brains, a dominant fraction of axonal fibers were found to be connected to the gyri. This finding has been replicated in a range of mammalian brains via diffusion tensor imaging and high–angular resolution diffusion imaging. These results may have shed some lights on fundamental mechanisms for development and organization of the cerebral cortex, suggesting that axonal pushing is a mechanism of cortical folding. PMID:22190432

  10. Microfluidic device for unidirectional axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malishev, E.; Pimashkin, A.; Gladkov, A.; Pigareva, Y.; Bukatin, A.; Kazantsev, V.; Mukhina, I.; Dubina, M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the communication and connectivity development of neuron networks, we designed microfluidic devices with several chambers for growing dissociated neuronal cultures from mice fetal hippocampus (E18). The chambers were connected with microchannels providing unidirectional axonal growth between “Source” and “Target” neural sub-networks. Experiments were performed in a hippocampal cultures plated in a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip, aligned with a 60 microelectrode array (MEA). Axonal growth through microchannels was observed with brightfield, phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, and after 7 days in vitro electrical activity was recorded. Visual inspection and spike propagation analysis showed the predominant axonal growth in microchannels in a direction from “Source” to “Target”.