Science.gov

Sample records for inhibits formyl peptide

  1. F2L, a peptide derived from heme-binding protein, inhibits formyl peptide receptor-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ha Young; Lee, Sun Young; Shin, Eun Ha; Kim, Sang Doo; Kim, Jung Mo; Lee, Mi-Sook; Ryu, Sung Ho; Bae, Yoe-Sik . E-mail: yoesik@donga.ac.kr

    2007-08-10

    F2L is an acetylated amino-terminal peptide derived from the cleavage of the human heme-binding protein. Very recently, F2L was identified as an endogenous chemoattractant peptide acting specifically through formyl peptide receptor-like (FPRL)2. In the present study, we report that F2L stimulates chemotactic migration in human neutrophils. However, F2L inhibits formyl peptide receptor (FPR) and FPRL1 activities, resulting in the complete inhibition of intracellular calcium increases, and superoxide generation induced by N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, MMK-1, or Trp-Lys-Tyr-Met-Val-D-Met (WKYMVm) in human neutrophils. In terms of the inhibitory role of F2L on FPR- and FPRL-mediated signaling, we found that F2L competitively inhibits the binding of {sup 125}I-WKYMVm to its specific receptors, FPR and FPRL1. F2L is the first endogenous molecule that inhibits FPR- and FPRL1-mediated signaling, and is expected to be useful in the study of FPR and FPRL1 signaling and in the development of drugs to treat diseases involving the FPR family of receptors.

  2. Bioactive secondary metabolites of a marine Bacillus sp. inhibit superoxide generation and elastase release in human neutrophils by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Wen-Yi; Kuo, Jimmy; Huang, Yin-Ting; Chung, Pei-Jen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that overwhelming neutrophil activation is closely related to acute and chronic inflammatory injuries. Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) plays an important role in activation of neutrophils and may represent a potent therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that IA-LBI07-1 (IA), an extract of bioactive secondary metabolites from a marine Bacillus sp., has anti-inflammatory effects in human neutrophils. IA significantly inhibited superoxide generation and elastase release in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils, but failed to suppress the cell responses activated by non-FPR1 agonists. IA did not alter superoxide production and elastase activity in cell-free systems. IA also attenuated the downstream signaling from FPR1, such as the Ca2+, MAP kinases and AKT pathways. In addition, IA inhibited the binding of N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein, a fluorescent analogue of FMLP, to FPR1 in human neutrophils and FPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. Taken together, these results show that the anti-inflammatory effects of IA in human neutrophils are through the inhibition of FPR1. Also, our data suggest that IA may have therapeutic potential to decrease tissue damage induced by human neutrophils. PMID:23736784

  3. Inhibition of formyl peptide receptor 1 reduces the efficacy of anticancer chemotherapy against carcinogen-induced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Baracco, Elisa E; Pietrocola, Federico; Buqué, Aitziber; Bloy, Norma; Senovilla, Laura; Zitvogel, Laurence; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-06-01

    The loss-of-function mutation of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) has a negative impact on the progression-free and overall survival of breast cancer patients treated with anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy. This effect may be attributed to the fact that chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires FPR1 and that such anticancer immune responses are responsible for the long-term effects of chemotherapy. Here, we investigated the possible contribution of FPR1 to the efficacy of a combination of mitoxantrone (MTX) and cyclophosphamide (CTX) for the treatment of hormone-induced breast cancer. Breast cancer induced by a combination of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) could be successfully treated with MTX plus CTX in thus far that tumor growth was retarded and overall survival was extended (as compared to vehicle-only treated controls). However, the therapeutic efficacy of the combination therapy was completely abolished when FPR1 receptors were blocked by means of cyclosporin H (CsH). Future genetic studies on neoadjuvant chemotherapy-treated breast cancers are warranted to validate these findings at the clinical level. PMID:27471610

  4. Inhibition of U-87 human glioblastoma cell proliferation and formyl peptide receptor function by oligomer procyanidins (F2) isolated from grape seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng-Jiao; Yang, Jing-Yu; Mou, Yan-Hua; Sun, Bao-Shan; Ping, Yi-Fang; Wang, Ji-Ming; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2009-05-15

    Gliomas are the most common and lethal tumor type in the brain. The present study investigated the effect of oligomer procyanidins (F2) (F2, degree of polymerization 2-15), a natural fraction isolated from grape seeds on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells. We found that F2 significantly inhibited the glioblastoma growth, with little cytotoxicity on normal cells, induced G2/M arrest and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in U-87 cells. It also induced a non-apoptotic cell death phenotype resembling paraptosis in U-87 cells. In addition, it was found for the first time that F2 in non-cytotoxic concentrations selectively inhibited U-87 cell chemotaxis mediated by a G-protein coupled receptor formyl peptide receptor FPR, which is implicated in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Further experiments indicated that F2 inhibited fMLF-induced U-87 cell calcium mobilization and MAP kinases ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, F2 attenuated the glioblastoma FPR expression, a new molecular target for glioma therapeutics, which has been shown to play important roles in glioma cells chemotaxis, proliferation and angiogenesis in addition to its promotion to tumor progression, but did not affect FPR mRNA expression in U-87 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that F2 may be a promising candidate for the development of novel anti-tumor therapeutics. PMID:19167369

  5. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  6. Solid Phase Formylation of N-Terminus Peptides.

    PubMed

    Tornesello, Anna Lucia; Sanseverino, Marina; Buonaguro, Franco Maria

    2016-01-01

    Formylation of amino groups is a critical reaction involved in several biological processes including post-translational modification of histones. The addition of a formyl group (CHO) to the N-terminal end of a peptide chain generates biologically active molecules. N-formyl-peptides can be produced by different methods. We performed the N-formylation of two chemotactic hexapetides, Met1-Leu2-Lys3-Leu4-Ile5-Val6 and Met1-Met2-Tyr3-Ala4-Leu5-Phe6, carrying out the reaction directly on peptidyl-resin following pre-activation of formic acid with N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimmide (DCC) in liquid phase. The overnight incubation at 4 °C resulted in a significant increase in production yields of formylated peptides compared to the reaction performed at room temperature. The method is consistently effective, rapid, and inexpensive. Moreover, the synthetic strategy can be applied for the formylation of all primary amines at N-terminus of peptide chains or amino groups of lysine side-chains in solid phase. PMID:27271589

  7. Functional Characterization of Three Mouse Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui-Qiong; Liao, Dan; Wang, Zhen-Guo; Wang, Zhong-Li; Zhou, Hu-Chen; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary relationship and functional correlation between human formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) and their mouse counterparts remain incompletely understood. We examined three members of the mouse formyl peptide receptor subfamily (mFprs) and found that they differ in agonist preference and cellular distributions. When stably expressed in transfected rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells, mFpr1 was readily activated by N-formylated peptides derived from Listeria monocytogenes (fMIVTLF), Staphylococcus aureus (fMIFL), and mitochondria (fMMYALF). In contrast, the Escherichia coli–derived fMLF was 1000-fold less potent. The aforementioned peptides were much less efficacious at mFpr2, which responded better to the synthetic hexapeptide WKYMVm, the synthetic agonists Quin-C1 (a substituted quinazolinone), and compound 43 (a nitrosylated pyrazolone derivative). Saturation binding assays showed that mFpr1 and mFpr2 were expressed at similar levels on the cell surface, although their affinity for N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-Ile-Ile-Lys-fluorescein isothiocyanate varied by more than 1000-fold [dissociation constant (Kd) values of 2.8 nM for mFpr1 and 4.8 μM for mFpr2]). Contrary to these receptors, mFpr-rs1 responded poorly to all the previously mentioned peptides that were tested. Fluorescent microscopy revealed an intracellular distribution pattern of mFpr-rs1. On the basis of these results, we conclude that mFpr1 is an ortholog of human FPR1 with certain pharmacologic properties of human FPR2/ALX, whereas mFpr2 has much lower affinity for formyl peptides. The intracellular distribution of mFpr-rs1 suggests an evolutionary correlation with human FPR3. PMID:23160941

  8. Epigenetic regulation of the formyl peptide receptor 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Simiele, Felice; Recchiuti, Antonio; Patruno, Sara; Plebani, Roberto; Pierdomenico, Anna Maria; Codagnone, Marilina; Romano, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Lipoxin (LX) A4, a main stop signal of inflammation, exerts potent bioactions by activating a specific G protein-coupled receptor, termed formyl peptide receptor 2 and recently renamed ALX/FPR2. Knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms that drive ALX/FPR2 gene expression is key for the development of innovative anti-inflammatory pharmacology. Here, we examined chromatin patterns of the ALX/FPR2 gene. We report that in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells, the ALX/FPR2 gene undergoes epigenetic silencing characterized by low acetylation at lysine 27 and trimethylation at lysine 4, associated with high methylation at lysine 27 of histone 3. This pattern, which is consistent with transcriptionally inaccessible chromatin leading to low ALX/FPR2 mRNA and protein expression, is reversed in polymorphonuclear leukocytes that express high ALX/FPR2 levels. Activation of p300 histone acetyltransferase and inhibition of DNA methyltransferase restored chromatin accessibility and significantly increased ALX/FPR2 mRNA transcription and protein levels in MDA-MB231 cells, as well as in pulmonary artery endothelial cells. In both cells types, changes in the histone acetylation/methylation status enhanced ALX/FPR2 signaling in response to LXA4. Collectively, these results uncover unappreciated epigenetic regulation of ALX/FPR2 expression that can be exploited for innovative approaches to inflammatory disorders. PMID:27424221

  9. The potential impacts of formyl peptide receptor 1 in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. N-formyl peptides, which originate from bacterial peptides or mitochondrial proteins bind with a high binding affinity to formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). N-formyl peptide-FPR1 is involved in the pathogenesis of sterile and infectious inflammatory processes and causes phagocytosis of pathogens or injured cells by neutrophils. Excessive activation of neutrophils by binding of N-formyl peptides is associated with tissue injury requiring drugs that block FPR1-dependent signaling. Here, we review the roles of FPR1 as a critical regulator of inflammatory processes and its involvement in pathological conditions. PMID:27100350

  10. Derivative of wheat germ agglutinin specifically inhibits formyl-peptide-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis by blocking re-expression (or recycling) of receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, H.D.; Elfman, F.; Lobo, E.; Sklar, L.; Chenoweth, D.; Hooper, C.

    1986-03-01

    The mechanism of action of a derivative of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-D) which specifically and irreversibly inhibits N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemotaxis was examined. At a concentration that completely inhibited PMN chemotaxis, WGA-D had no effect on either the uptake or release of (/sup 3/H)-FMLP by PMN. Similarly, WGA-D did not affect either the short-term binding to, or internalization by, PMN of a fluoresceinated FMLP analog. WGA-D did interfere, however, with the re-expression (or recycling) of FMLP receptors by PMN that had been preincubated with 1 ..mu..M FMLP for 10 min at 4/sup 0/C. This effect was specific for WGA-D, because it was not observed when concanavalin A was used. Scatchard plot analysis of FMLP binding to PMN after receptor re-expression demonstrated that WGA-D-treated PMN had a significant diminution in the number of high affinity receptors. WGA-D-mediated inhibition of FMLP receptor re-expression was associated with inhibition of FMLP-induced PMN chemotaxis, but had no effect on either FMLP-induced PMN superoxide anion generation or degranulation. Studies using (/sup 12/%I)-WGA-D demonstrated that PMN did not internalize WGA-D spontaneously. The data indicate that WGA-D perhaps by binding to the FMLP receptor, inhibits FMLP-induced PMN chemotaxis by blocking the re-expression (or recycling) of a population of receptors required for continuous migration.

  11. Formyl peptide-induced chemotaxis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes does not require either marked changes in cytosolic calcium or specific granule discharge. Role of formyl peptide receptor reexpression (or recycling).

    PubMed Central

    Perez, H D; Elfman, F; Marder, S; Lobo, E; Ives, H E

    1989-01-01

    We examined the role of intracellular and extracellular calcium on the ability of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes to migrate chemotactically and reexpress (or recycle) formyl peptide receptors when challenged with the synthetic chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). Extracellular calcium was not required for either optimal chemotactic responses or receptor reexpression. Depletion and chelation of intracellular calcium resulted in significant diminution in the ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to release the specific granule constituents lactoferrin and vitamin B12-binding protein during the process of chemotaxis, but had no effect on the capability of these cells to respond chemotactically. Similarly, chelation of intracellular calcium did not affect the ability of these cells to reexpress a population of formyl peptide receptors. Inhibition of receptor reexpression, by a nonagglutinating derivative of wheat-germ agglutinin, was associated with inhibition of chemotactic responses to FMLP. Thus, it appears that large changes in cytosolic free calcium are not necessary for formyl peptide-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis. In contrast, continuous reexpression (or recycling) of formyl peptide receptors is required for polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotactic responses to FMLP, a process that appears to be independent from specific granule fusion with plasma membrane. PMID:2723068

  12. Mitochondrial N-formyl peptides cause airway contraction and lung neutrophil infiltration via formyl peptide receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Wenceslau, Camilla Ferreira; Szasz, Theodora; McCarthy, Cameron G; Baban, Babak; NeSmith, Elizabeth; Webb, R Clinton

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory failure is a common characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Trauma and severe blood loss cause the release of endogenous molecules known as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MITs) are DAMPs that share similarities with bacterial N-formylated peptides, and are potent immune system activators. Recently, we observed that hemorrhagic shock-induced increases in plasma levels of F-MITs associated with lung damage, and that antagonism of formyl peptide receptors (FPR) ameliorated hemorrhagic shock-induced lung injury in rats. Corroborating these data, in the present study, it was observed that F-MITs expression is higher in plasma samples from trauma patients with SIRS or sepsis when compared to control trauma group. Therefore, to better understand the role of F-MITs in the regulation of lung and airway function, we studied the hypothesis that F-MITs lead to airway contraction and lung inflammation. We observed that F-MITs induced concentration-dependent contraction in trachea, bronchi and bronchioles. However, pre-treatment with mast cells degranulator or FPR antagonist decreased this response. Finally, intratracheal challenge with F-MITs increased neutrophil elastase expression in lung and inducible nitric oxide synthase and cell division control protein 42 expression in all airway segments. These data suggest that F-MITs could be a putative target to treat respiratory failure in trauma patients. PMID:26923940

  13. New development in studies of formyl-peptide receptors: critical roles in host defense.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangzhu; Chen, Keqiang; Xiang, Yi; Yoshimura, Teizo; Su, Shaobo; Zhu, Jianwei; Bian, Xiu-wu; Wang, Ji Ming

    2016-03-01

    Formyl-peptide receptors are a family of 7 transmembrane domain, Gi-protein-coupled receptors that possess multiple functions in many pathophysiologic processes because of their expression in a variety of cell types and their capacity to interact with a variety of structurally diverse, chemotactic ligands. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that formyl-peptide receptors are critical mediators of myeloid cell trafficking in the sequential chemotaxis signal relays in microbial infection, inflammation, and immune responses. Formyl-peptide receptors are also involved in the development and progression of cancer. In addition, one of the formyl-peptide receptor family members, Fpr2, is expressed by normal mouse-colon epithelial cells, mediates cell responses to microbial chemotactic agonists, participates in mucosal development and repair, and protects against inflammation-associated tumorigenesis. These novel discoveries greatly expanded the current understanding of the role of formyl-peptide receptors in host defense and as potential molecular targets for the development of therapeutics. PMID:26701131

  14. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses. PMID:26516201

  15. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses. PMID:26129676

  16. Formyl peptide receptors and the regulation of ACTH secretion: targets for annexin A1, lipoxins, and bacterial peptides

    PubMed Central

    John, C. D.; Sahni, V.; Mehet, D.; Morris, J. F.; Christian, H. C.; Perretti, M.; Flower, R. J.; Solito, E.; Buckingham, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    The N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a family of G-protein coupled receptors that respond to proinflammatory N-formylated bacterial peptides (e.g., formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, fMLF) and, thus, contribute to the host response to bacterial infection. Paradoxically, a growing body of evidence suggests that some members of this receptor family may also be targets for certain anti-inflammatory molecules, including annexin A1 (ANXA1), which is an important mediator of glucocorticoid (GC) action. To explore further the potential role of FPRs in mediating ANXA1 actions, we have focused on the pituitary gland, where ANXA1 has a well-defined role as a cell-cell mediator of the inhibitory effects of GCs on the secretion of corticotrophin (ACTH), and used molecular, genetic, and pharmacological approaches to address the question in well-established rodent models. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis identified mRNAs for four FPR family members in the mouse anterior pituitary gland, Fpr-rs1, Fpr-rs2, Fpr-rs6, and Fpr-rs7. Functional studies confirmed that, like dexamethasone, ANXA1 and two ANXA1-derived peptides (ANXA11-188 and ANXA1Ac2-26) inhibit the evoked release of ACTH from rodent anterior pituitary tissue in vitro. Fpr1 gene deletion failed to modify the pituitary responses to dexamethasone or ANXA1Ac2-26. However, lipoxin A4 (LXA4, 0.02-2μM, a lipid mediator with high affinity for Fpr-rs1) mimicked the inhibitory effects of ANXA1 on ACTH release as also did fMLF in high (1-100 μM) but not lower (10-100 nM) concentrations. Additionally, a nonselective FPR antagonist (Boc1, 100 μM) overcame the effects of dexamethasone, ANXA11-188, ANXA1Ac2-26, fMLF, and LXA4 on ACTH release, although at a lower concentration (50 μM), it was without effect. Together, the results suggest that the actions of ANXA1 in the pituitary gland are independent of Fpr1 but may involve other FPR family members, in particular, Fpr-rs1 or a closely related receptor. They

  17. Antagonism of human formyl peptide receptor 1 with natural compounds and their synthetic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Quinn, Mark T

    2016-08-01

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) regulates a wide variety of neutrophil functional responses and plays an important role in inflammation and the pathogenesis of various diseases. To date, a variety of natural and synthetic molecules have been identified as FPR1 ligands. Here, we review current knowledge on natural products and natural product-inspired small molecules reported to antagonize and/or inhibit the FPR1-mediated responses. Based on this literature, additional screening of selected commercially available natural compounds for their ability to inhibit fMLF-induced Ca(2+) mobilization in human neutrophils and FPR1 transfected HL-60 cells, and pharmacophore modeling, natural products with potential as FPR1 antagonists are considered and discussed in this review. The identification and characterization of natural products that antagonize FPR1 activity may have potential for the development of novel therapeutics to limit or alter the outcome of inflammatory processes. PMID:26382576

  18. The Role of Formylated Peptides and Formyl Peptide Receptor 1 in Governing Neutrophil Function during Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dorward, David A.; Lucas, Christopher D.; Chapman, Gavin B.; Haslett, Christopher; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil migration to sites of inflammation and the subsequent execution of multiple functions are designed to contain and kill invading pathogens. These highly regulated and orchestrated processes are controlled by interactions between numerous receptors and their cognate ligands. Unraveling and identifying those that are central to inflammatory processes may represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of neutrophil-dominant inflammatory disorders in which dysregulated neutrophil recruitment, function, and elimination serve to potentiate rather than resolve an initial inflammatory insult. The first G protein–coupled receptor to be described on human neutrophils, formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1), is one such receptor that plays a significant role in the execution of these functions through multiple intracellular signaling pathways. Recent work has highlighted important observations with regard to both receptor function and the importance and functional relevance of FPR1 in the pathogenesis of a range of both sterile and infective inflammatory conditions. In this review, we explore the multiple components of neutrophil migration and function in both health and disease, with a focus on the role of FPR1 in these processes. The current understanding of FPR1 structure, function, and signaling is examined, alongside discussion of the potential importance of FPR1 in inflammatory diseases suggesting that FPR1 is a key regulator of the inflammatory environment. PMID:25791526

  19. Resolvin D1 inhibits TGF-β1-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition of A549 lung cancer cells via lipoxin A4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor 2 and GPR32.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Ja; Park, Mi Kyung; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Chang Hoon

    2013-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) is a key event for tumor cells to initiate metastasis which lead to switching of E-cadherin to N-cadherin. Resolvins are known to promote the resolution of inflammation and phagocytosis of macrophages. However, the role of resolvins in EMT of cancer is not known. Therefore, we examined the effects of resolvins on transforming growth factor, beta 1 (TGF-β1)-induced EMT. Expression of E-cadherin and N-cadherin in A549 lung cancer cells was evaluated by Western blot and confocal microscopy. Involvement of lipoxin A4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor 2 (ALX/FPR2) was examined by gene silencing. TGF-β1 induced expression of N-cadherin in A549 lung cancer cells, and resolvin D1 and D2 inhibited the expression of N-cadherin at low concentrations (1-100 nM). Resolvin D1 and D2 also suppressed the expression of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1). The effects of resolvin D1 and D2 were confirmed in other lung cancer cell lines such as H838, H1299, and H1703. Resolvin D1 and D2 did not affect the proliferation of A549 lung cancer cells. Resolvin D1 and D2 also suppressed the TGF-β1-induced morphological change. Resolvin D1 and D2 also inhibited the TGF-β1-induced migration and invasion of A549 cells. Resolvin D1 is known to act via ALX/FPR2 and GPR32. Thus, we examined the involvement of ALX/FPR2 and GPR32 in the suppressive effects of resolvin D1 on TGF-β1-induced EMT of A549 cells. Gene silencing of ALX/FPR2 and GPR32 blocked the action of resolvin D1. Overexpression of ALX/FPR2 or GPR32 increased the effects of resolvin D1. These results suggest that resolvin D1 inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT via ALX/FPR2 and GPR32 by reducing the expression of ZEB1. PMID:24120851

  20. Recognition of bacterial signal peptides by mammalian formyl peptide receptors: a new mechanism for sensing pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-03-20

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  1. Human neutrophils are activated by a peptide fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin B presumably via formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Goy, Sebastian D; Olling, Alexandra; Neumann, Detlef; Pich, Andreas; Gerhard, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile may induce antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and, in severe cases, pseudomembranous colitis characterized by tremendous neutrophil infiltration. All symptoms are caused by two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. We describe here the activation of isolated human blood neutrophils by TcdB and, moreover, by toxin fragments generated by limited proteolytical digestion. Kinetics and profiles of TcdB-induced rise in intracellular-free Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species production were similar to that induced by fMLF, which activates the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) recognizing formylated bacterial peptide sequences. Transfection assays with the FPR-1 isoform hFPR26 in HEK293 cells, heterologous desensitization experiments and FPR inhibition via cyclosporine H strongly suggest activation of cells via FPR-1. Domain analyses revealed that the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain of TcdB is a potent activator of FPR pointing towards an additional mechanism that might contribute to pathogenesis. This pro-inflammatory ligand effect can be triggered even by cleaved and, thus, non-cytotoxic toxin. In summary, we report (i) a ligand effect on neutrophils as completely new molecular mode of action, (ii) pathogenic potential of truncated or proteolytically cleaved 'non-cytotoxic' fragments and (iii) an interaction of the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain instead of the C-terminal receptor binding domain of TcdB with target cells. PMID:25529763

  2. FITC Conjugation Markedly Enhances Hepatic Clearance of N-Formyl Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Elvevold, Kjetil; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur; Smedsrød, Bård

    2016-01-01

    In both septic and aseptic inflammation, N-formyl peptides may enter the circulation and induce a systemic inflammatory response syndrome similar to that observed during septic shock. The inflammatory response is brought about by the binding of N-formyl peptide to formyl peptide receptors (FPRs), specific signaling receptors expressed on myeloid as well as non-myeloid cells involved in the inflammatory process. N-formyl peptides conjugated with fluorochromes, such as fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) are increasingly experimentally used to identify tissues involved in inflammation. Hypothesizing that the process of FITC-conjugation may transfer formyl peptide to a ligand that is efficiently cleared from the circulation by the natural powerful hepatic scavenging regime we studied the biodistribution of intravenously administered FITC-fNLPNTL (Fluorescein-isothiocyanate- N-Formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys) in mice. Our findings can be summarized as follows: i) In contrast to unconjugated fNLPNTL, FITC-fNLPNTL was rapidly taken up in the liver; ii) Mouse and human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatocytes express formyl peptide receptor 1 (FRP1) on both mRNA (PCR) and protein (Western blot) levels; iii) Immunohistochemistry showed that mouse and human liver sections expressed FRP1 in LSECs and hepatocytes; and iv) Uptake of FITC-fNLPNTL could be largely blocked in mouse and human hepatocytes by surplus-unconjugated fNLPNTL, thereby suggesting that the hepatocytes in both species recognized FITC-fNLPNTL and fNLPNTL as indistinguishable ligands. This was in contrast to the mouse and human LSECs, in which the uptake of FITC-fNLPNTL was mediated by both FRP1 and a scavenger receptor, specifically expressed on LSECs. Based on these results we conclude that a significant proportion of FITC-fNLPNTL is taken up in LSECs via a scavenger receptor naturally expressed in these cells. This calls for great caution when using FITC-fNLPNTL and other chromogen

  3. FITC Conjugation Markedly Enhances Hepatic Clearance of N-Formyl Peptides.

    PubMed

    Øie, Cristina Ionica; Snapkov, Igor; Elvevold, Kjetil; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur; Smedsrød, Bård

    2016-01-01

    In both septic and aseptic inflammation, N-formyl peptides may enter the circulation and induce a systemic inflammatory response syndrome similar to that observed during septic shock. The inflammatory response is brought about by the binding of N-formyl peptide to formyl peptide receptors (FPRs), specific signaling receptors expressed on myeloid as well as non-myeloid cells involved in the inflammatory process. N-formyl peptides conjugated with fluorochromes, such as fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) are increasingly experimentally used to identify tissues involved in inflammation. Hypothesizing that the process of FITC-conjugation may transfer formyl peptide to a ligand that is efficiently cleared from the circulation by the natural powerful hepatic scavenging regime we studied the biodistribution of intravenously administered FITC-fNLPNTL (Fluorescein-isothiocyanate- N-Formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys) in mice. Our findings can be summarized as follows: i) In contrast to unconjugated fNLPNTL, FITC-fNLPNTL was rapidly taken up in the liver; ii) Mouse and human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatocytes express formyl peptide receptor 1 (FRP1) on both mRNA (PCR) and protein (Western blot) levels; iii) Immunohistochemistry showed that mouse and human liver sections expressed FRP1 in LSECs and hepatocytes; and iv) Uptake of FITC-fNLPNTL could be largely blocked in mouse and human hepatocytes by surplus-unconjugated fNLPNTL, thereby suggesting that the hepatocytes in both species recognized FITC-fNLPNTL and fNLPNTL as indistinguishable ligands. This was in contrast to the mouse and human LSECs, in which the uptake of FITC-fNLPNTL was mediated by both FRP1 and a scavenger receptor, specifically expressed on LSECs. Based on these results we conclude that a significant proportion of FITC-fNLPNTL is taken up in LSECs via a scavenger receptor naturally expressed in these cells. This calls for great caution when using FITC-fNLPNTL and other chromogen

  4. Mitochondrial-derived N-formyl peptides: novel links between trauma, vascular collapse and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wenceslau, C F; McCarthy, C G; Goulopoulou, S; Szasz, T; NeSmith, E G; Webb, R C

    2013-10-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in trauma patients despite aggressive treatment. Traumatic injury may trigger infective or non-infective systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Sepsis and SIRS are accompanied by an inability to regulate the inflammatory response but the cause of this perturbation is still unknown. The major pathophysiological characteristic of sepsis is the vascular collapse (i.e., loss of control of vascular tone); however, at the cellular level the final mediator of extreme vasodilatation has yet to be identified. After trauma, cellular injury releases endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that activate the innate immune system. Mitochondrial DAMPs express at least two molecular signatures, N-formyl peptides and mitochondrial DNA that act on formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) and Toll-like receptor 9, respectively. N-Formyl peptides are potent immunocyte activators and, once released in the circulation, they induce modulation of vascular tone by cellular mechanisms that are not completely understood. We have observed that N-formyl peptides from bacterial (FMLP) and mitochondrial (FMIT) sources induce FPR-mediated vasodilatation in resistance arteries. Accordingly, we propose that tissue and cellular trauma induces the release of N-formyl peptides from mitochondria triggering inflammation and vascular collapse via activation of FPR and contributing to the development of sepsis. The proposed hypothesis provides clinically significant information linking trauma, mitochondrial N-formyl peptides and inflammation to vascular collapse and sepsis. If our hypothesis is true, it may lead to new strategies in the management of sepsis that can help clinicians effectively manage non-infectious and infectious inflammatory responses. PMID:23890799

  5. Cathepsin G-regulated Release of Formyl Peptide Receptor Agonists Modulate Neutrophil Effector Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Woloszynek, Josh C.; Hu, Ying; Pham, Christine T. N.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases play an important role in inflammation by modulating neutrophil effector functions. We have previously shown that neutrophils deficient in the serine proteases cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase (CG/NE neutrophils) exhibit severe defects in chemokine CXCL2 release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production when activated on immobilized immune complex. Exogenously added active CG rescues these defects, but the mechanism remains undefined. Using a protease-based proteomic approach, we found that, in vitro, the addition of exogenous CG to immune complex-stimulated CG/NE neutrophils led to a decrease in the level of cell-associated annexin A1 (AnxA1) and cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP), both known inflammatory mediators. We further confirmed that, in vivo, CG was required for the extracellular release of AnxA1 and CRAMP in a subcutaneous air pouch model. In vitro, CG efficiently cleaved AnxA1, releasing the active N-terminal peptide Ac2-26, and processed CRAMP in limited fashion. Ac2-26 and CRAMP peptides enhanced the release of CXCL2 by CG/NE neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner via formyl peptide receptor (FPR) stimulation. Blockade of FPRs by an antagonist, Boc2 (t-Boc-Phe-d-Leu-Phe-d-Leu-Phe), abrogates CXCL2 release, whereas addition of FPR agonists, fMLF and F2L, relieves Boc2 inhibition. Furthermore, the addition of active CG, but not inactive CG, also relieves Boc2 inhibition. These findings suggest that CG modulates neutrophil effector functions partly by controlling the release (and proteolysis) of FPR agonists. Unexpectedly, we found that mature CRAMP, but not Ac2-26, induced ROS production through an FPR-independent pathway. PMID:22879591

  6. Walker 256 Tumor Growth Suppression by Crotoxin Involves Formyl Peptide Receptors and Lipoxin A4.

    PubMed

    Brigatte, Patrícia; Faiad, Odair Jorge; Ferreira Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio; Landgraf, Richardt G; Palma, Mario Sergio; Cury, Yara; Curi, Rui; Sampaio, Sandra Coccuzzo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Crotoxin (CTX), the main toxin of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom, on Walker 256 tumor growth, the pain symptoms associated (hyperalgesia and allodynia), and participation of endogenous lipoxin A4. Treatment with CTX (s.c.), daily, for 5 days reduced tumor growth at the 5th day after injection of Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the plantar surface of adult rat hind paw. This observation was associated with inhibition of new blood vessel formation and decrease in blood vessel diameter. The treatment with CTX raised plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and its natural analogue 15-epi-LXA4, an effect mediated by formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). In fact, the treatment with Boc-2, an inhibitor of FPRs, abolished the increase in plasma levels of these mediators triggered by CTX. The blockage of these receptors also abolished the inhibitory action of CTX on tumor growth and blood vessel formation and the decrease in blood vessel diameter. Together, the results herein presented demonstrate that CTX increases plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and 15-epi-LXA4, which might inhibit both tumor growth and formation of new vessels via FPRs. PMID:27190493

  7. Walker 256 Tumor Growth Suppression by Crotoxin Involves Formyl Peptide Receptors and Lipoxin A4

    PubMed Central

    Brigatte, Patrícia; Faiad, Odair Jorge; Ferreira Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio; Landgraf, Richardt G.; Palma, Mario Sergio; Cury, Yara; Curi, Rui; Sampaio, Sandra Coccuzzo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Crotoxin (CTX), the main toxin of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom, on Walker 256 tumor growth, the pain symptoms associated (hyperalgesia and allodynia), and participation of endogenous lipoxin A4. Treatment with CTX (s.c.), daily, for 5 days reduced tumor growth at the 5th day after injection of Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the plantar surface of adult rat hind paw. This observation was associated with inhibition of new blood vessel formation and decrease in blood vessel diameter. The treatment with CTX raised plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and its natural analogue 15-epi-LXA4, an effect mediated by formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). In fact, the treatment with Boc-2, an inhibitor of FPRs, abolished the increase in plasma levels of these mediators triggered by CTX. The blockage of these receptors also abolished the inhibitory action of CTX on tumor growth and blood vessel formation and the decrease in blood vessel diameter. Together, the results herein presented demonstrate that CTX increases plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and 15-epi-LXA4, which might inhibit both tumor growth and formation of new vessels via FPRs. PMID:27190493

  8. Non-peptide ligand binding to the formyl peptide receptor FPR2--A comparison to peptide ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Stepniewski, Tomasz M; Filipek, Slawomir

    2015-07-15

    Ligands of the FPR2 receptor initiate many signaling pathways including activation of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway. The possible actions include also calcium flux, superoxide generation, as well as migration and proliferation of monocytes. FPR2 activation may induce a pro- and anti-inflammatory effect depending on the ligand type. It is also found that this receptor is involved in tumor growth. Most of currently known FPR2 ligands are agonists since they were designed based on N-formyl peptides, which are natural agonists of formyl receptors. Since the non-peptide drugs are indispensable for effective treatment strategies, we performed a docking study of such ligands employing a generated dual template homology model of the FPR2 receptor. The study revealed different binding modes of particular classes of these drugs. Based on the obtained docking poses we proposed a detailed location of three hydrophobic pockets in orthosteric binding site of FPR2. Our model emphasizes the importance of aromatic stacking, especially with regard to residues His102(3.29) and Phe257(6.51), for binding of FPR2 ligands. We also identified other residues important for non-peptide ligand binding in the binding site of FPR2. PMID:25882522

  9. Identification of FAM3D as a new endogenous chemotaxis agonist for the formyl peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinjian; Xu, Enquan; Liang, Weiwei; Pei, Xiaolei; Chen, Dixin; Zheng, Danfeng; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Can; Wang, Pingzhang; She, Shaoping; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Jing; Mo, Xiaoning; Zhang, Yingmei; Ma, Dalong; Wang, Ying

    2016-05-01

    The family with sequence similarity 3 (FAM3) gene family is a cytokine-like gene family with four members FAM3A, FAM3B, FAM3C and FAM3D. In this study, we found that FAM3D strongly chemoattracted human peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. To identify the FAM3D receptor, we used chemotaxis, receptor internalization, Ca(2+) flux and radioligand-binding assays in FAM3D-stimulated HEK293 cells that transiently expressed formyl peptide receptor (FPR)1 or FPR2 to show that FAM3D was a high affinity ligand of these receptors, both of which were highly expressed on the surface of neutrophils, and monocytes and macrophages. After being injected into the mouse peritoneal cavity, FAM3D chemoattracted CD11b+ Ly6G+ neutrophils in a short time. In response to FAM3D stimulation, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and phosphorylated p38 MAPK family proteins were upregulated in the mouse neutrophils, and this increase was inhibited upon treatment with an inhibitor of FPR1 or FPR2. FAM3D has been reported to be constitutively expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. We found that FAM3D expression increased significantly during colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium. Taken together, we propose that FAM3D plays a role in gastrointestinal homeostasis and inflammation through its receptors FPR1 and FPR2. PMID:26966188

  10. Formyl Peptide Receptor Activation Elicits Endothelial Cell Contraction and Vascular Leakage.

    PubMed

    Wenceslau, Camilla F; McCarthy, Cameron G; Webb, R Clinton

    2016-01-01

    The major pathophysiological characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis is the loss of control of vascular tone and endothelial barrier dysfunction. These changes are attributed to pro-inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed that in patients and rats without infection, cell components from damaged tissue are the primary instigators of vascular damage. Mitochondria share several characteristics with bacteria, and when fragments of mitochondria are released into the circulation after injury, they are recognized by the innate immune system. N-Formyl peptides are common molecular signatures of bacteria and mitochondria and are known to play a role in the initiation of inflammation by activating the formyl peptide receptor (FPR). We have demonstrated that infusion of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MIT) leads to sepsis-like symptoms, including vascular leakage. We have also observed that F-MIT, via FPR activation, elicits changes in cytoskeleton-regulating proteins in endothelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that these FPR-mediated changes in cytoskeleton can cause endothelial cell contraction and, consequently vascular leakage. Here, we propose that endothelial FPR is a key contributor to impaired barrier function in SIRS and sepsis patients following trauma. PMID:27532003

  11. Formyl Peptide Receptor Activation Elicits Endothelial Cell Contraction and Vascular Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Wenceslau, Camilla F.; McCarthy, Cameron G.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2016-01-01

    The major pathophysiological characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis is the loss of control of vascular tone and endothelial barrier dysfunction. These changes are attributed to pro-inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed that in patients and rats without infection, cell components from damaged tissue are the primary instigators of vascular damage. Mitochondria share several characteristics with bacteria, and when fragments of mitochondria are released into the circulation after injury, they are recognized by the innate immune system. N-Formyl peptides are common molecular signatures of bacteria and mitochondria and are known to play a role in the initiation of inflammation by activating the formyl peptide receptor (FPR). We have demonstrated that infusion of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MIT) leads to sepsis-like symptoms, including vascular leakage. We have also observed that F-MIT, via FPR activation, elicits changes in cytoskeleton-regulating proteins in endothelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that these FPR-mediated changes in cytoskeleton can cause endothelial cell contraction and, consequently vascular leakage. Here, we propose that endothelial FPR is a key contributor to impaired barrier function in SIRS and sepsis patients following trauma. PMID:27532003

  12. Characterization of the formyl peptide chemotactic receptor appearing at the phagocytic cell surface after exposure to phorbol myristate acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.P.; Melnick, D.A.; Malech, H.L.

    1986-02-15

    The biochemistry and subcellular source of new formyl peptide chemotactic receptor appearing at the human neutrophil and differentiated HL-60 (d-HL-60) cell surface after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) were examined. Formyl peptide receptor was analyzed by affinity labeling with formyl-norleu-leu-phe-norleu- (/sup 125/I)iodotyr-lys and ethylene glycol bis(succinimidyl succinate) followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and densitometric analysis of autoradiographs. PMA, a specific granule secretagogue, increases affinity labeling of formyl peptide receptors on the neutrophil surface by 100%, and on d-HL-60, which lack specific granule markers, by 20%. Papain treatment markedly reduces surface labeling of formyl peptide receptor in both neutrophils and d-HL-60, and results in the appearance of a lower m.w. membrane-bound receptor fragment. PMA stimulation of papain-treated cells increases uncleaved surface receptor on neutrophils by 400%, and on D-HL-60 by only 45%. This newly appearing receptor is the same apparent m.w. (55,000 to 75,000 for neutrophils; 62,000 to 80,000 for d-HL-60) and yields the same papain cleavage product as receptor on the surface of unstimulated cells. These observations suggest that specific granule membranes contain large amounts of formyl peptide receptor, which is biochemically identical to that found on the cell surface and can be mobilized to the cell surface with appropriate stimulation.

  13. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    PubMed Central

    YE, RICHARD D.; BOULAY, FRANÇOIS; WANG, JI MING; DAHLGREN, CLAES; GERARD, CRAIG; PARMENTIER, MARC; SERHAN, CHARLES N.; MURPHY, PHILIP M.

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation. The three human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2/ALX, and FPR3) share significant sequence homology and are encoded by clustered genes. Collectively, these receptors bind an extraordinarily numerous and structurally diverse group of agonistic ligands, including N-formyl and nonformyl peptides of different composition, that chemoattract and activate phagocytes. N-formyl peptides, which are encoded in nature only by bacterial and mitochondrial genes and result from obligatory initiation of bacterial and mitochondrial protein synthesis with N-formylmethionine, is the only ligand class common to all three human receptors. Surprisingly, the endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide annexin 1 and its N-terminal fragments also bind human FPR1 and FPR2/ALX, and the anti-inflammatory eicosanoid lipoxin A4 is an agonist at FPR2/ALX. In comparison, fewer agonists have been identified for FPR3, the third member in this receptor family. Structural and functional studies of the FPRs have produced important information for understanding the general pharmacological principles governing all leukocyte chemoattractant receptors. This article aims to provide an overview of the discovery and pharmacological characterization of FPRs, to introduce an International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR)-recommended nomenclature, and to discuss unmet challenges, including the mechanisms used by these receptors to bind diverse ligands and mediate different biological functions. PMID:19498085

  14. The sensing of bacteria: emerging principles for the detection of signal sequences by formyl peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Bufe, Bernd; Zufall, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The ability to detect specific chemical signatures released by bacteria and other microorganisms is a fundamental feature of immune defense against pathogens. There is increasing evidence that chemodetection of such microorganism-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) occurs at many places in the body including specific sets of chemosensory neurons in the mammalian nose. Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a unique family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can detect the presence of bacteria and function as chemotactic receptors. Here, we highlight the recent discovery of a vast family of natural FPR agonists, the bacterial signal peptides (or signal sequences), thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms of bacterial sensing by human and mouse FPRs. Signal peptides in bacteria are formylated, N-terminal protein signatures required for directing the transfer of proteins through the plasma membrane. After their cleavage and release, signal peptides are available for FPR detection and thus provide a previously unrecognized MAMP. With over 170 000 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent one of the largest families of GPCR ligands and one of the most complex classes of natural activators of the innate immune system. By recognizing a conserved three-dimensional peptide motif, FPRs employ an unusual detection mechanism that combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and sensitivity, thus solving the problem of detecting thousands of distinct sequences yet maintaining selectivity. How signal peptides are released by bacteria and sensed by GPCRs and how these processes shape the responses of other cells and whole organisms represents an important topic for future research. PMID:27305707

  15. Formyl Peptide Receptor as a Novel Therapeutic Target for Anxiety-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Giuseppa; Gobbetti, Thomas; Panza, Elisabetta; Perretti, Mauro; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; D'Acquisto, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPR) belong to a family of sensors of the immune system that detect microbe-associated molecules and inform various cellular and sensorial mechanisms to the presence of pathogens in the host. Here we demonstrate that Fpr2/3-deficient mice show a distinct profile of behaviour characterised by reduced anxiety in the marble burying and light-dark box paradigms, increased exploratory behaviour in an open-field, together with superior performance on a novel object recognition test. Pharmacological blockade with a formyl peptide receptor antagonist, Boc2, in wild type mice reproduced most of the behavioural changes observed in the Fpr2/3-/- mice, including a significant improvement in novel object discrimination and reduced anxiety in a light/dark shuttle test. These effects were associated with reduced FPR signalling in the gut as shown by the significant reduction in the levels of p-p38. Collectively, these findings suggest that homeostatic FPR signalling exerts a modulatory effect on anxiety-like behaviours. These findings thus suggest that therapies targeting FPRs may be a novel approach to ameliorate behavioural abnormalities present in neuropsychiatric disorders at the cognitive-emotional interface. PMID:25517119

  16. Formyl peptide receptor as a novel therapeutic target for anxiety-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Irene; Rattazzi, Lorenza; Piras, Giuseppa; Gobbetti, Thomas; Panza, Elisabetta; Perretti, Mauro; Dalley, Jeffrey W; D'Acquisto, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPR) belong to a family of sensors of the immune system that detect microbe-associated molecules and inform various cellular and sensorial mechanisms to the presence of pathogens in the host. Here we demonstrate that Fpr2/3-deficient mice show a distinct profile of behaviour characterised by reduced anxiety in the marble burying and light-dark box paradigms, increased exploratory behaviour in an open-field, together with superior performance on a novel object recognition test. Pharmacological blockade with a formyl peptide receptor antagonist, Boc2, in wild type mice reproduced most of the behavioural changes observed in the Fpr2/3(-/-) mice, including a significant improvement in novel object discrimination and reduced anxiety in a light/dark shuttle test. These effects were associated with reduced FPR signalling in the gut as shown by the significant reduction in the levels of p-p38. Collectively, these findings suggest that homeostatic FPR signalling exerts a modulatory effect on anxiety-like behaviours. These findings thus suggest that therapies targeting FPRs may be a novel approach to ameliorate behavioural abnormalities present in neuropsychiatric disorders at the cognitive-emotional interface. PMID:25517119

  17. Mitochondrial DAMPs from femoral reamings activate neutrophils via formyl peptide receptors and P44/42 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Carl J.; Sursal, Tolga; Rodriguez, Edward K.; Appleton, Paul T.; Zhang, Qin; Itagaki, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis Fractures and femoral reaming are associated with lung injury. The mechanisms linking fractures and inflammation are unclear; but tissue disruption might release mitochondria. Mitochondria are evolutionarily derived from bacteria and contain “Damage Associated Molecular Patterns” (DAMPs) like formylated peptides that can activate immunocytes. We therefore studied whether fracture reaming releases mitochondrial DAMPs (MTD) and how MTD act on immune cells. Methods Femur fracture reamings (FFx) from 10 patients were spun to remove bone particulates. Supernatants were assayed for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mitochondria were isolated from the residual reaming slurry, sonicated and spun at 12,000g. The resultant MTD were assayed for their ability to cause neutrophil (PMN) Ca2+ transient production, p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation, IL-8 release and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) release with and without formyl peptide receptor-1 (FPR1) blockade. Rats were injected with MTD and whole lung assayed for p44/42 activation. Results mtDNA appears at many thousand fold normal plasma levels in FFx and at intermediate levels in patients’ plasma, suggesting release from fracture to plasma. FFx MTD caused brisk PMN Ca2+ flux, activated PMN p44/42 MAPK and caused PMN release of IL-8 and MMP9. Responses to MTD were inhibited by FPR1 blockade using Cyclosporin H and anti-FPR1. MTD injection caused P44/42 phosphorylation in rat lung. Conclusions FFx reaming releases mitochondria into the wound and circulation. MTD then activates PMN. Release of damage signals like MTD from FFx may underlie activation of the cytokine cascades known to be associated with facture fixation and lung injury. PMID:20736789

  18. Specialized functions of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. II. Hmt binds N-formylated peptides of mitochondrial and prokaryotic origin

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The physiological functions of the mouse telomeric major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, including Hmt, are unknown. Hmt presents a polymorphic, N-formylated peptide encoded by the mitochondrial gene ND1 forming the cell surface maternally transmitted antigen (Mta). Because the N-formyl moiety is required for Hmt binding, we proposed that Hmt may function generally in presentation of N-formylated antigens. This hypothesis was validated by a competitive binding assay, demonstrating that synthetic N-formyl peptides from other mitochondrial genes also bound Hmt. Bacteria similarly initiate protein synthesis with N-formylmethionine; indeed, we established that Hmt can also present prokaryotic peptides in an N- formyl-dependent manner. These results indicate biochemical specialization of this MHC-peptide interaction and suggest a unique role for Hmt in prokaryotic host defenses. PMID:1919442

  19. Formyl peptide receptors from immune and vomeronasal system exhibit distinct agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Zufall, Frank

    2012-09-28

    The formyl peptide receptor (Fpr) family is well known for its contribution to immune defense against pathogens in human and rodent leukocytes. Recently, several structurally related members of these receptors were discovered in sensory neurons of the mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO), key detectors of pheromones and related semiochemicals. Although the biological role of vomeronasal Fprs is not yet clear, the known contribution of other Fprs to host immune defense suggested that they could contribute to vomeronasal pathogen sensing. Precise knowledge about the agonist properties of mouse Fprs is required to determine their function. We expressed all seven mouse and three human Fprs using an in vitro system and tested their activation with 32 selected compounds by conducting high throughput calcium measurements. We found an intriguing functional conservation between human and mouse immune Fprs that is most likely a consequence of closely similar biological constraints. By contrast, our data suggest a neofunctionalization of the vomeronasal Fprs. We show that the vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 can be activated robustly by W-peptide and structural derivatives but not by other typical ligands of immune Fprs. mFpr-rs1 exhibits a stereo-selective preference for peptides containing d-amino acids. The same peptide motifs are contained in pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, the ligand profile of mFpr-rs1 is consistent with a role in vomeronasal pathogen sensing. PMID:22859307

  20. Distinct Signaling Cascades Elicited by Different Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 (FPR2) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Parisi, Melania; Ammendola, Rosario

    2013-01-01

    The formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) is a remarkably versatile transmembrane protein belonging to the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family. FPR2 is activated by an array of ligands, which include structurally unrelated lipids and peptide/proteins agonists, resulting in different intracellular responses in a ligand-specific fashion. In addition to the anti-inflammatory lipid, lipoxin A4, several other endogenous agonists also bind FPR2, including serum amyloid A, glucocorticoid-induced annexin 1, urokinase and its receptor, suggesting that the activation of FPR2 may result in potent pro- or anti-inflammatory responses. Other endogenous ligands, also present in biological samples, include resolvins, amyloidogenic proteins, such as beta amyloid (Aβ)-42 and prion protein (Prp)106–126, the neuroprotective peptide, humanin, antibacterial peptides, annexin 1-derived peptides, chemokine variants, the neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP)-27, and mitochondrial peptides. Upon activation, intracellular domains of FPR2 mediate signaling to G-proteins, which trigger several agonist-dependent signal transduction pathways, including activation of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, p38MAPK, as well as the phosphorylation of cytosolic tyrosine kinases, tyrosine kinase receptor transactivation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of regulatory transcriptional factors, release of calcium and production of oxidants. FPR2 is an attractive therapeutic target, because of its involvement in a range of normal physiological processes and pathological diseases. Here, we review and discuss the most significant findings on the intracellular pathways and on the cross-communication between FPR2 and tyrosine kinase receptors triggered by different FPR2 agonists. PMID

  1. Basic characteristics of the neutrophil receptors that recognize formylated peptides, a danger-associated molecular pattern generated by bacteria and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Claes; Gabl, Michael; Holdfeldt, André; Winther, Malene; Forsman, Huamei

    2016-08-15

    Proper recruitment and activation of neutrophils to/at sites of infection/inflammation relies largely on the surface expression of chemoattractant receptors of which a formyl peptide receptor (FPR1) was the first to be cloned and characterized in more detail. This receptor displays high affinity for bacterial- or mitochondrial-derived peptides that contain a formylated methionine in the N-terminus. The neutrophil chemoattractant receptors belong to the group of 7-transmembrane domain receptors that signal through activation of heterotrimeric G proteins. These receptors have been shown to be important in host defense against microbial intruders and in regulating inflammatory reactions. The two FPRs (FPR1, FPR2) expressed in neutrophils share significant sequence homology and bind many structurally diverse activating (agonistic) and inhibiting (antagonistic) ligands, ranging from peptides to lipopeptides containing peptide sequences derived from intracellular regions of the FPRs. Recent structural and functional studies of the two neutrophil FPRs have generated important information for our understanding of general pharmacological principles, governing regulation of neutrophil function and inflammation and increased knowledge of more general G-protein coupled receptor features, such as ligand recognition, biased signaling, allosteric modulation, and a unique receptor cross-talk phenomenon. This article aims to summarize recent discoveries and pharmacological characterization of neutrophil FPRs and to discuss unmet challenges, including recognition by the receptors of diverse ligands and how biased signals mediate different biological effects. PMID:27131862

  2. Synthetic cycle of the initiation module of a formylating nonribosomal peptide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Janice M; Aloise, Martin N; Harrison, Paul M; Schmeing, T Martin

    2016-01-14

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are very large proteins that produce small peptide molecules with wide-ranging biological activities, including environmentally friendly chemicals and many widely used therapeutics. NRPSs are macromolecular machines, with modular assembly-line logic, a complex catalytic cycle, moving parts and many active sites. In addition to the core domains required to link the substrates, they often include specialized tailoring domains, which introduce chemical modifications and allow the product to access a large expanse of chemical space. It is still unknown how the NRPS tailoring domains are structurally accommodated into megaenzymes or how they have adapted to function in nonribosomal peptide synthesis. Here we present a series of crystal structures of the initiation module of an antibiotic-producing NRPS, linear gramicidin synthetase. This module includes the specialized tailoring formylation domain, and states are captured that represent every major step of the assembly-line synthesis in the initiation module. The transitions between conformations are large in scale, with both the peptidyl carrier protein domain and the adenylation subdomain undergoing huge movements to transport substrate between distal active sites. The structures highlight the great versatility of NRPSs, as small domains repurpose and recycle their limited interfaces to interact with their various binding partners. Understanding tailoring domains is important if NRPSs are to be utilized in the production of novel therapeutics. PMID:26762462

  3. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced foam cell formation is mediated by formyl peptide receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ha Young; Oh, Eunseo; Kim, Sang Doo; Seo, Jeong Kon; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2014-01-17

    The increased level of LDL and its modification into oxLDL has been regarded as an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Although some scavenger receptors including CD36 and RAGE have been considered as target receptors for oxLDL, involvement of other receptors should be investigated for oxLDL-induced pathological responses. In this study, we found that oxLDL-induced foam cell formation was inhibited by formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) antagonist WRW(4). oxLDL also stimulated calcium signaling and chemotactic migration in FPR2-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not in vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. Moreover, oxLDL stimulated TNF-α production, which was also almost completely inhibited by FPR2 antagonist. Our findings therefore suggest that oxLDL stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration, TNF-α production, and foam cell formation via FPR2 signaling, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis. PMID:24361884

  4. Ligand-induced adhesion to activated endothelium and to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in lymphocytes transfected with the N-formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Honda, S; Campbell, J J; Andrew, D P; Engelhardt, B; Butcher, B A; Warnock, R A; Ye, R D; Butcher, E C

    1994-04-15

    Binding of FMLP to the neutrophil N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) transmits signals through pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins triggering Ca2+ flux, superoxide production, granule exocytosis, and neutrophil aggregation and adhesion involving the beta 2 (CD18) integrins. Expression of the FPR in mouse fibroblasts or human kidney cells has been shown to confer an N-formyl peptide-inducible Ca2+ flux in transfectants. Here we demonstrate that the transfected receptor can also support ligand-induced alterations in cellular adhesion. We established stable transfectants of mouse L1-2 pre-B cells with cDNA for human FPR (L1-2 FPR cells). The transfectants bind N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein with 1.4 x 10(5) sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 3.3 nM. Stimulation with FMLP induces a transient Ca2+ flux. FMLP also triggers adhesion of L1-2 FPR cells to TNF-alpha- or LPS-activated bEnd3 cells (mouse brain-derived endothelial cells) and to purified mouse VCAM-1. Binding is inhibited by Abs to VCAM-1 and to the alpha-chain of its lymphocyte receptor (the alpha 4 beta 1 integrin, VLA-4). Stimulation with FMLP does not induce a change in cell surface expression of alpha 4. Induced adhesion to VCAM-1 is rapid, detectable at the earliest times measurable (30 to 60 s after FMLP addition), and is inhibited by pertussis toxin. We conclude that FPR can mediate integrin activation not only in neutrophils but also in lymphocytes, and can trigger rapid adhesion via lymphocyte alpha 4 beta 1. The adhesion of lymphocytes is critical to their migration and targeting; our results suggest the possibility of manipulating adhesive responses through expression of chemoattractant receptors in lymphoid cells engineered for cellular therapy, allowing targeted adhesion and potentially migration in response to locally administered ligands. PMID:7511663

  5. Mitochondrial protein-derived cryptides: Are endogenous N-formylated peptides including mitocryptide-2 components of mitochondrial damage-associated molecular patterns?

    PubMed

    Marutani, Takayuki; Hattori, Tatsuya; Tsutsumi, Koki; Koike, Yusuke; Harada, Akihiko; Noguchi, Kosuke; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Mukai, Hidehito

    2016-11-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid to "nonclassical" bioactive peptides, which are fragmented peptides simultaneously produced during maturation and degradation of various functional proteins. We identified many fragmented peptides derived from various mitochondrial proteins including mitocryptide-1 and mitocryptide-2 that efficiently activate neutrophils. These endogenous, functionally active, fragmented peptides are referred to as "cryptides." Among them, mitocryptide-2 is an N-formylated cryptide cleaved from mitochondrial cytochrome b that is encoded in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It is known that 13 proteins encoded in mtDNA are translated in mitochondria as N-formylated forms, suggesting the existence of endogenous N-formylated peptides other than mitocryptide-2. Here, we investigated the effects of N-formylated peptides presumably cleaved from mtDNA-encoded proteins other than cytochrome b on the functions of neutrophilic cells to elucidate possible regulation by endogenous N-formylated cryptides. Four N-formylated cryptides derived from cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and NADH dehydrogenase subunits 4, 5, and 6 among 12 peptides from mtDNA-encoded proteins efficiently induced not only migration but also β-hexosaminidase release, which is an indicator of neutrophilic phagocytosis, in HL-60 cells differentiated into neutrophilic cells. These activities were comparable to or higher than those induced by mitocryptide-2. Although endogenous N-formylated peptides that are contained in mitochondrial damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) have yet to be molecularly identified, they have been implicated in innate immunity. Thus, N-formylated cryptides including mitocryptide-2 are first-line candidates for the contents of mitochondrial DAMPs to promote innate immune responses. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 580-587, 2016. PMID:26600263

  6. Nuclear localization of Formyl-Peptide Receptor 2 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Parisi, Melania; Fioretti, Tiziana; Sarnataro, Daniela; Esposito, Gabriella; Ammendola, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    Current models of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling describe binding of external agonists to cell surface receptors which, in turn, trigger several biological responses. New paradigms indicate that GPCRs localize to and signal at the nucleus, thus regulating distinct signaling cascades. The formyl-peptide receptor FPR2 belongs to the GPCR super-family and is coupled to PTX-sensitive Gi proteins. We show by western blot analysis, immunofluorescence experiments and radioligand binding assays that FPR2 is expressed at nuclear level in CaLu-6 and AGS cells. Nuclear FPR2 is a functional receptor, since it participates in intra-nuclear signaling, as assessed by decreased G protein-FPR2 association and enhanced ERK2, c-Jun and c-Myc phosphorylation upon stimulation of intact nuclei with the FPR2 agonist, WKYMVm. We analyzed FPR2 sequence for the search of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and we found a stretch of basic aminoacids (227-KIHKK-231) in the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor. We performed single (K230A) and multiple (H229A/K230A/K231A) mutagenesis of NLS. The constructs were individually overexpressed in HEK293 cells and immunofluorescence and western blot analysis showed that nuclear localization or translocation of FPR2 depends on the integrity of the H(229) and K(231) residues within the NLS. PMID:27177968

  7. Physiological characterization of formyl peptide receptor expressing cells in the mouse vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Ackels, Tobias; von der Weid, Benoît; Rodriguez, Ivan; Spehr, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemosensory structure that detects both hetero- and conspecific social cues. Based on largely monogenic expression of either type 1 or 2 vomeronasal receptors (V1Rs/V2Rs) or members of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family, the vomeronasal sensory epithelium harbors at least three neuronal subpopulations. While various neurophysiological properties of both V1R- and V2R-expressing neurons have been described using genetically engineered mouse models, the basic biophysical characteristics of the more recently identified FPR-expressing vomeronasal neurons have not been studied. Here, we employ a transgenic mouse strain that coexpresses an enhanced variant of yellow fluorescent protein together with FPR-rs3 allowing to identify and analyze FPR-rs3-expressing neurons in acute VNO tissue slices. Single neuron electrophysiological recordings allow comparative characterization of the biophysical properties inherent to a prototypical member of the FPR-expressing subpopulation of VNO neurons. In this study, we provide an in-depth analysis of both passive and active membrane properties, including detailed characterization of several types of voltage-activated conductances and action potential discharge patterns, in fluorescently labeled vs. unmarked vomeronasal neurons. Our results reveal striking similarities in the basic (electro) physiological architecture of both transgene-expressing and non-expressing neurons, confirming the suitability of this genetically engineered mouse model for future studies addressing more specialized issues in vomeronasal FPR neurobiology. PMID:25484858

  8. Development of small molecule non-peptide formyl peptide receptor (FPR) ligands and molecular modeling of their recognition.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, I A; Khlebnikov, A I; Giovannoni, M P; Kirpotina, L N; Cilibrizzi, A; Quinn, M T

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on a variety of cell types. These receptors play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions and sensing cellular damage. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, cataract formation, and atherogenesis. Thus, FPR ligands, both agonists and antagonists, may represent novel therapeutics for modulating host defense and innate immunity. A variety of molecules have been identified as receptor subtype-selective and mixed FPR agonists with potential therapeutic value during last decade. This review describes our efforts along with recent advances in the identification, optimization, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of small molecule non-peptide FPR agonists and antagonists, including chiral molecules. Questions regarding the interaction at the molecular level of benzimidazoles, pyrazolones, pyridazin-3(2H)-ones, N-phenylureas and other derivatives with FPR1 and FPR2 are discussed. Application of computational models for virtual screening and design of FPR ligands is also considered. PMID:24350845

  9. Involvement of the Receptor for Formylated Peptides in the in Vivo Anti-Migratory Actions of Annexin 1 and its Mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Perretti, Mauro; Getting, Stephen J.; Solito, Egle; Murphy, Philip M.; Gao, Ji-Liang

    2001-01-01

    An innovative avenue for anti-inflammatory therapy is inhibition of neutrophil extravasation by potentiating the action of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators. The glucocorticoid-inducible protein annexin 1 and derived peptides are effective in inhibiting neutrophil extravasation. Here we tested the hypothesis that an interaction with the receptor for formylated peptide (FPR), so far reported only in vitro, could be the mechanism for this in vivo action. In a model of mouse peritonitis, FPR antagonists abrogated the anti-migratory effects of peptides Ac2-26 and Ac2-12, with a partial reduction in annexin 1 effects. A similar result was obtained in FPR (knock-out) KO mice. Binding of annexin 1 to circulating leukocytes was reduced (>50%) in FPR KO mice. In vitro, annexin binding to peritoneal macrophages was also markedly reduced in FPR KO mice. Finally, evidence of direct annexin 1 binding to murine FPR was obtained with HEK-293 cells transfected with the receptor. Overall, these results indicate a functional role for FPR in the anti-migratory effect of annexin 1 and derived peptides. PMID:11395373

  10. Association analysis of formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) polymorphisms and aspirin exacerbated respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jeong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Park, Jong-Sook; Lee, Tae-Hyeong; Lee, Eun-Ju; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Uh, Soo-Taek; Chung, Il Yup; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Inseon S; Park, Byung-Lae; Shin, Hyoung-Doo; Park, Choon-Sik

    2012-04-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory diseases (AERD) are associated with the metabolism of arachidonic acid. FPR2 (formyl peptide receptor2) is a high-affinity ligand receptor for potent anti-inflammatory lipid metabolites: lipoxins. Thus, functional alterations of the FPR2 may contribute to AERD. We investigated the relationship between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FPR2 and AERD. Asthmatics were categorized into AERD <15% decreases in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)), and/or naso-ocular reactions after oral aspirin challenge (n=170) and aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA, n=268). In all, 11 SNPs were genotyped. FPR2 protein expressions on CD14-positive monocytes in peripheral blood were measured using flow cytometric analysis. We performed RT-PCR of the FPR2 mRNA expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Logistic regression analysis showed that the minor allele frequency of FPR2 -4209T>G (rs1769490) in intron 2 was significantly lower in the AERD group (n=170) than in the ATA group (n=268) (P=0.006, P(corr)=0.04, recessive model). The decline of FEV(1) after aspirin challenge was significantly lower in the subjects with GG homozygotes of FPR2 -4209T>G than those with the other genotypes (P=0.0002). Asthmatic homozygotes for FPR2 -4209T>G minor allele exhibited significantly higher FPR2 protein expression in CD14-positive monocytes than did those with the common allele of FPR2 -4209T>G allele (P=0.01). There was no difference in the expression of the wild form and the exon 2 deleted variant form of FPR2 gene according to the genotypes of FPR2 -4209T>G. The minor allele at FPR2 -4209T>G may have a protective role against the development of AERD, via increase of FPR2 protein expression in inflammatory cells. PMID:22377711

  11. Strain-specific Loss of Formyl Peptide Receptor 3 in the Murine Vomeronasal and Immune Systems.

    PubMed

    Stempel, Hendrik; Jung, Martin; Pérez-Gómez, Anabel; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Zufall, Frank; Bufe, Bernd

    2016-04-29

    Formyl peptide receptor 3 (Fpr3, also known as Fpr-rs1) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in subsets of sensory neurons of the mouse vomeronasal organ, an olfactory substructure essential for social recognition. Fpr3 has been implicated in the sensing of infection-associated olfactory cues, but its expression pattern and function are incompletely understood. To facilitate visualization of Fpr3-expressing cells, we generated and validated two new anti-Fpr3 antibodies enabling us to analyze acute Fpr3 protein expression. Fpr3 is not only expressed in murine vomeronasal sensory neurons but also in bone marrow cells, the primary source for immune cell renewal, and in mature neutrophils. Consistent with the notion that Fpr3 functions as a pathogen sensor, Fpr3 expression in the immune system is up-regulated after stimulation with a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide). These results strongly support a dual role for Fpr3 in both vomeronasal sensory neurons and immune cells. We also identify a large panel of mouse strains with severely altered expression and function of Fpr3, thus establishing the existence of natural Fpr3 knock-out strains. We attribute distinct Fpr3 expression in these strains to the presence or absence of a 12-nucleotide in-frame deletion (Fpr3Δ424-435). In vitro calcium imaging and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrate that the lack of four amino acids leads to an unstable, truncated, and non-functional receptor protein. The genome of at least 19 strains encodes a non-functional Fpr3 variant, whereas at least 13 other strains express an intact receptor. These results provide a foundation for understanding the in vivo function of Fpr3. PMID:26957543

  12. Characterization of Fpr-rs8, an atypical member of the mouse formyl peptide receptor gene family.

    PubMed

    Tiffany, H Lee; Gao, Ji-Liang; Roffe, Ester; Sechler, Joan M G; Murphy, Philip M

    2011-01-01

    The formyl peptide receptor gene family encodes G protein-coupled receptors for phagocyte chemoattractants, including bacteria- and mitochondria-derived N-formylpeptides. The human family has 3 functional genes, whereas the mouse family has 7 functional genes and 2 possible pseudogenes (ΨFpr-rs2 and ΨFpr-rs3). Here we characterize ΨFpr-rs2, a duplication of Fpr-rs2. Compared to Fpr-rs2, the ΨFpr-rs2 ORF is 186 nucleotides shorter but 98% identical. Due to a deletion and frame shift, the sequences lack homology from amino acid 219-289. Both transcripts were detected constitutively in multiple immune organs; however, ΨFpr-rs2 was consistently less abundant than Fpr-rs2. LPS induced expression of ΨFpr-rs2, but not Fpr-rs2, in spleen and bone marrow. Both transcripts were detected constitutively in thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal neutrophils, whereas only Fpr-rs2 was detected in thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages. Both transcripts were induced in LPS-stimulated macrophages. ΨFpr-rs2-GFP fusion protein appeared in cytoplasm but not plasma membrane of transfected HEK 293 cells, whereas Fpr-rs2-GFP labeled only plasma membrane. Survival of ΨFpr-rs2(-/-) mice was 33% shorter than that of wild-type and heterozygous littermates (p < 0.05), but no signature pathology was identified. Since ΨFpr-rs2 is expressed in phagocytes and regulated by bacterial products, and may affect longevity, we propose renaming it Fpr-rs8, an atypical member of the formyl peptide receptor gene family. PMID:21691049

  13. Characterization of Fpr-rs8, an Atypical Member of the Mouse Formyl Peptide Receptor Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Tiffany, H. Lee; Gao, Ji-Liang; Roffe, Ester; Sechler, Joan M.G.; Murphy, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    The formyl peptide receptor gene family encodes G protein-coupled receptors for phagocyte chemoattractants, including bacteria- and mitochondria-derived N-formylpeptides. The human family has 3 functional genes, whereas the mouse family has 7 functional genes and 2 possible pseudogenes (ΨFpr-rs2 and ΨFpr-rs3). Here we characterize ΨFpr-rs2, a duplication of Fpr-rs2. Compared to Fpr-rs2, the ΨFpr-rs2 ORF is 186 nucleotides shorter but 98% identical. Due to a deletion and frame shift, the sequences lack homology from amino acid 219–289. Both transcripts were detected constitutively in multiple immune organs; however, ΨFpr-rs2 was consistently less abundant than Fpr-rs2. LPS induced expression of ΨFpr-rs2, but not Fpr-rs2, in spleen and bone marrow. Both transcripts were detected constitutively in thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal neutrophils, whereas only Fpr-rs2 was detected in thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages. Both transcripts were induced in LPS-stimulated macrophages. ΨFpr-rs2-GFP fusion protein appeared in cytoplasm but not plasma membrane of transfected HEK 293 cells, whereas Fpr-rs2-GFP labeled only plasma membrane. Survival of ΨFpr-rs2–/– mice was 33% shorter than that of wild-type and heterozygous littermates (p < 0.05), but no signature pathology was identified. Since ΨFpr-rs2 is expressed in phagocytes and regulated by bacterial products, and may affect longevity, we propose renaming it Fpr-rs8, an atypical member of the formyl peptide receptor gene family. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:21691049

  14. N-Formyl peptides drive mitochondrial damage associated molecular pattern induced neutrophil activation through ERK1/2 and P38 MAP kinase signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hazeldine, Jon; Hampson, Peter; Opoku, Francis Adusei; Foster, Mark; Lord, Janet M

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury results in a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a phenomenon characterised by the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into the circulation and immune cell activation. Released from necrotic cells as a result of tissue damage, damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are thought to initiate the SIRS response by activating circulating immune cells through surface expressed pathogen recognition receptors. Neutrophils, the most abundant leucocyte in human circulation, are heavily implicated in the initial immune response to traumatic injury and have been shown to elicit a robust functional response to DAMP stimulation. Here, we confirm that mitochondrial DAMPs (mtDAMPs) are potent activators of human neutrophils and show for the first time that signalling through the mitogen-activated-protein-kinases p38 and extracellular-signal-related-kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is essential for this response. At 40 and/or 100 μg/ml, mtDAMPs activated human neutrophils, indicated by a significant reduction in the surface expression of L-selectin, and triggered a number of functional responses from both resting and tumour necrosis factor-α primed neutrophils, which included reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, degranulation, secretion of interleukin-8 and activation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs. Pre-treatment of neutrophils with Cyclosporin H, a selective inhibitor of formyl peptide receptor-1 (FPR-1), significantly inhibited mtDAMP-induced L-selectin shedding as well as p38 and ERK1/2 activation, suggesting that N-formyl peptides are the main constituents driving mtDAMP-induced neutrophil activation. Indeed, no evidence of L-selectin shedding or p38 and ERK1/2 activation was observed in neutrophils challenged with mitochondrial DNA alone. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of p38 or ERK1/2 either alone or in combination significantly inhibited L-selectin shedding and IL-8 secretion by mtDAMP-challenged neutrophils, revealing for the first time

  15. Annexin A1 released from apoptotic cells acts through formyl peptide receptors to dampen inflammatory monocyte activation via JAK/STAT/SOCS signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pupjalis, Danute; Goetsch, Julia; Kottas, Diane J; Gerke, Volker; Rescher, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    The immunosuppressive effects of apoptotic cells involve inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine release and establishment of an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, thus limiting the degree of inflammation and promoting resolution. We report here that this is in part mediated by the release of the anti-inflammatory mediator annexin A1 from apoptotic cells and the functional activation of annexin A1 receptors of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family on target cells. Supernatants from apoptotic neutrophils or the annexin A1 peptidomimetic Ac2-26 significantly reduced IL-6 signalling and the release of TNF-α from endotoxin-challenged monocytes. Ac2-26 activated STAT3 in a JAK-dependent manner, resulting in upregulated SOCS3 levels, and depletion of SOCS3 reversed the Ac2-26-mediated inhibition of IL-6 signalling. This identifies annexin A1 as part of the anti-inflammatory pattern of apoptotic cells and links the activation of FPRs to established signalling pathways triggering anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:21254404

  16. Real-time detection of implant-associated neutrophil responses using a formyl peptide receptor-targeting NIR nanoprobe

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Weng, Hong; Tang, Ewin N; Nair, Ashwin; Davé, Digant P; Tang, Liping

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in implant-mediated inflammation and infection. Unfortunately, current methods which monitor neutrophil activity, including enzyme measurements and histological evaluation, require many animals and cannot be used to accurately depict the dynamic cellular responses. To understand the neutrophil interactions around implant-mediated inflammation and infection it is critical to develop methods which can monitor in vivo cellular activity in real time. In this study, formyl peptide receptor (FPR)-targeting near-infrared nanoprobes were fabricated. This was accomplished by conjugating near-infrared dye with specific peptides having a high affinity to the FPRs present on activated neutrophils. The ability of FPR-targeting nanoprobes to detect and quantify activated neutrophils was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. As expected, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated on activated neutrophils in vitro. Following transplantation, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated at the biomaterial implantation site. Equally important, a strong relationship was observed between the extent of fluorescence intensity in vivo and the number of recruited neutrophils at the implantation site. Furthermore, FPR-targeting nanoprobes may be used to detect and quantify the number of neutrophils responding to a catheter-associated infection. The results show that FPR-targeting nanoprobes may serve as a powerful tool to monitor and measure the extent of neutrophil responses to biomaterial implants in vivo. PMID:22619542

  17. Leucine leucine-37 uses formyl peptide receptor-like 1 to activate signal transduction pathways, stimulate oncogenic gene expression, and enhance the invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein-coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37-induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37-stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37-treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  18. Leucine Leucine-37 Uses Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 to Activate Signal Transduction Pathways, Stimulate Oncogenic Gene Expression, and Enhance the Invasiveness of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor–like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein–coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37–induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37–stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37–treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  19. Identification of an N-terminal formylated, two-peptide bacteriocin from Enterococcus faecalis 710C.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoji; Vederas, John C; Whittal, Randy M; Zheng, Jing; Stiles, Michael E; Carlson, Denise; Franz, Charles M A P; McMullen, Lynn M; van Belkum, Marco J

    2011-05-25

    Enterococcus faecalis 710C, isolated from beef product, has a broad antimicrobial activity spectrum against foodborne pathogens. Two bacteriocins, enterocin 7A (Ent7A) and enterocin 7B (Ent7B), were purified from the culture supernatant of E. faecalis 710C and characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and electrospray infusion tandem mass spectrometry analyses. These data and subsequent genetic analysis showed that Ent7A and Ent7B are produced without N-terminal leader sequences and have amino acid sequences that are identical to those of enterocins MR10A and MR10B, respectively. However, the observed masses for Ent7A and Ent7B are 5200.80 and 5206.65 Da (monoisotopic mass), respectively, which are higher than the theoretical molecular masses of MR10A and MR10B, respectively. This study provides evidence that both Ent7A and Ent7B are formylated on the N-terminal methionine residue. Purified Ent7A and Ent7B are active against spoilage microorganisms and foodborne pathogens, including Clostridium sporogenes , Listeria monocytogenes , and Staphylococcus aureus as well as Brevundimonas diminuta , which has been associated with infections among immune-suppressed cancer patients. PMID:21469734

  20. Annexin A1 contributes to pancreatic cancer cell phenotype, behaviour and metastatic potential independently of Formyl Peptide Receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Belvedere, Raffaella; Bizzarro, Valentina; Forte, Giovanni; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Parente, Luca; Petrella, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein over-expressed in pancreatic cancer (PC). We recently reported that extracellular ANXA1 mediates PC cell motility acting on Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs). Here, we describe other mechanisms by which intracellular ANXA1 could mediate PC progression. We obtained ANXA1 Knock-Out (KO) MIA PaCa-2 cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology. LC-MS/MS analysis showed altered expression of several proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization. As a result, ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 partially lost their migratory and invasive capabilities with a mechanism that appeared independent of FPRs. The acquisition of a less aggressive phenotype has been further investigated in vivo. Wild type (WT), PGS (scrambled) and ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 cells were engrafted orthotopically in SCID mice. No differences were found about PC primary mass, conversely liver metastatization appeared particularly reduced in ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 engrafted mice. In summary, we show that intracellular ANXA1 is able to preserve the cytoskeleton integrity and to maintain a malignant phenotype in vitro. The protein has a relevant role in the metastatization process in vivo, as such it appears attractive and suitable as prognostic and therapeutic marker in PC progression. PMID:27412958

  1. Annexin A1 contributes to pancreatic cancer cell phenotype, behaviour and metastatic potential independently of Formyl Peptide Receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Belvedere, Raffaella; Bizzarro, Valentina; Forte, Giovanni; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Parente, Luca; Petrella, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a Ca2+-binding protein over-expressed in pancreatic cancer (PC). We recently reported that extracellular ANXA1 mediates PC cell motility acting on Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs). Here, we describe other mechanisms by which intracellular ANXA1 could mediate PC progression. We obtained ANXA1 Knock-Out (KO) MIA PaCa-2 cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology. LC-MS/MS analysis showed altered expression of several proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization. As a result, ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 partially lost their migratory and invasive capabilities with a mechanism that appeared independent of FPRs. The acquisition of a less aggressive phenotype has been further investigated in vivo. Wild type (WT), PGS (scrambled) and ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 cells were engrafted orthotopically in SCID mice. No differences were found about PC primary mass, conversely liver metastatization appeared particularly reduced in ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 engrafted mice. In summary, we show that intracellular ANXA1 is able to preserve the cytoskeleton integrity and to maintain a malignant phenotype in vitro. The protein has a relevant role in the metastatization process in vivo, as such it appears attractive and suitable as prognostic and therapeutic marker in PC progression. PMID:27412958

  2. Gliadin Induces Neutrophil Migration via Engagement of the Formyl Peptide Receptor, FPR1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Song; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Janka-Junttila, Mirkka; Casolaro, Vincenzo; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Parent, Carole A.; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Background Gliadin, the immunogenic component within gluten and trigger of celiac disease, is known to induce the production of Interleukin-8, a potent neutrophil-activating and chemoattractant chemokine. We sought to study the involvement of neutrophils in the early immunological changes following gliadin exposure. Methods Utilizing immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, the redistribution of major tight junction protein, Zonula occludens (ZO)-1, and neutrophil recruitment were assessed in duodenal tissues of gliadin-gavaged C57BL/6 wild-type and Lys-GFP reporter mice, respectively. Intravital microscopy with Lys-GFP mice allowed monitoring of neutrophil recruitment in response to luminal gliadin exposure in real time. In vitro chemotaxis assays were used to study murine and human neutrophil chemotaxis to gliadin, synthetic alpha-gliadin peptides and the neutrophil chemoattractant, fMet-Leu-Phe, in the presence or absence of a specific inhibitor of the fMet-Leu-Phe receptor-1 (FPR1), cyclosporine H. An irrelevant protein, zein, served as a control. Results Redistribution of ZO-1 and an influx of CD11b+Lys6G+ cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine were observed upon oral gavage of gliadin. In vivo intravital microscopy revealed a slowing down of GFP+ cells within the vessels and influx in the mucosal tissue within 2 hours after challenge. In vitro chemotaxis assays showed that gliadin strongly induced neutrophil migration, similar to fMet-Leu-Phe. We identified thirteen synthetic gliadin peptide motifs that induced cell migration. Blocking of FPR1 completely abrogated the fMet-Leu-Phe-, gliadin- and synthetic peptide-induced migration. Conclusions Gliadin possesses neutrophil chemoattractant properties similar to the classical neutrophil chemoattractant, fMet-Leu-Phe, and likewise uses FPR1 in the process. PMID:26378785

  3. Synthesis, antibacterial activity, and biological evaluation of formyl hydroxyamino derivatives as novel potent peptide deformylase inhibitors against drug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shouning; Shi, Wei; Xing, Dong; Zhao, Zheng; Lv, Fengping; Yang, Liping; Yang, Yushe; Hu, Wenhao

    2014-10-30

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) has been identified as a promising target for novel antibacterial agents. In this study, a series of novel formyl hydroxyamino derivatives were designed and synthesized as PDF inhibitors and their antibacterial activities were evaluated. Among the potent PDF inhibitors (1o, 1q, 1o', 1q', and 1x), in vivo studies showed that compound 1q possesses mild toxicity, a good pharmacokinetic profile and protective effects. The good in vivo efficacy and low toxicity suggest that this class of compounds has potential for development and use in future antibacterial drugs. PMID:25151577

  4. Further Studies on 2-Arylacetamide Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones: Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of 4,6-Disubstituted Analogues as Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Dahlgren, Claes; Graziano, Alessia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Zerbinati, Serena; Vergelli, Claudia; Quinn, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) play an essential role in the regulation of endogenous inflammation and immunity. In the present studies, a large series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives bearing an arylacetamide chain at position 2 was synthesized and tested for FPR agonist activity. The pyridazin-3(2H)-one ring was confirmed to be an appropriate scaffold to support FPR agonist activity, and its modification at the 4 and 6 positions led to the identification of additional active agonists, which induced intracellular Ca2+ flux in HL-60 cells transfected with either FPR1, FPR2, or FPR3. Seven formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1)-specific and several mixed FPR1/FPR2 dual agonists were identified with low micromolar EC50 values. Furthermore, these agonists also activated human neutrophils, inducing intracellular Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis. Finally, molecular docking studies indicated that the most potent pyridazin-3(2H)-ones overlapped in their best docking poses with fMLF and WKYMVM peptides in the FPR1 and FPR2 ligand binding sites, respectively. Thus, pyridazinone-based compounds represent potential lead compounds for further development of selective and/or potent FPR agonists. PMID:23685570

  5. Human neutrophil formyl peptide receptor phosphorylation and the mucosal inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Giovanna; Gripentrog, Jeannie; Lord, Connie; Riesselman, Marcia; Sumagin, Ronen; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma; Jesaitis, Algirdas J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial/mitochondrial fMLF analogs bind FPR1, driving accumulation/activation of PMN at sites of infection/injury, while promoting wound healing in epithelia. We quantified levels of UFPR1 and TFPR1 in isolated PMN by use of phosphosensitive NFPRb and phosphorylation-independent NFPRa antibodies. UFPR1 and total TFPR were assessed inflamed mucosa, observed in human IBD. In isolated PMN after fMLF stimulation, UFPR1 declined 70% (fMLFEC50 = 11 ± 1 nM; t1/2 = 15 s) and was stable for up to 4 h, whereas TFPR1 changed only slightly. Antagonists (tBoc-FLFLF, CsH) and metabolic inhibitor NaF prevented the fMLF-dependent UFPR1 decrease. Annexin A1 fragment Ac2-26 also induced decreases in UFPR1 (Ac2-26EC50 ∼ 3 µM). Proinflammatory agents (TNF-α, LPS), phosphatase inhibitor (okadaic acid), and G-protein activator (MST) modestly increased fMLFEC50, 2- to 4-fold, whereas PTX, Ca2+ chelators (EGTA/BAPTA), H2O2, GM-CSF, ENA-78, IL-1RA, and LXA4 had no effect. Aggregation-inducing PAF, however, strongly inhibited fMLF-stimulated UFPR1 decreases. fMLF-driven PMN also demonstrated decreased UFPR1 after traversing monolayers of cultured intestinal epithelial cells, as did PMN in intestinal mucosal samples, demonstrating active inflammation from UC patients. Total TFPR remained high in PMN within inflamed crypts, migrating through crypt epithelium, and in the lamina propria-adjoining crypts, but UFPR1 was only observed at some peripheral sites on crypt aggregates. Loss of UFPR1 in PMN results from C-terminal S/T phosphorylation. Our results suggest G protein–insensitive, fMLF-dependent FPR1 phosphorylation in isolated suspension PMN, which may manifest in fMLF-driven transmigration and potentially, in actively inflamed tissues, except at minor discrete surface locations of PMN-containing crypt aggregates. PMID:25395303

  6. Serum amyloid A and pairing formyl peptide receptor 2 are expressed in corneas and involved in inflammation-mediated neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Sheng-Wei; Qi, Xia; Jia, Chang-Kai; Wang, Yi-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    AIM To solidify the involvement of Saa-related pathway in corneal neovascularization (CorNV). The pathogenesis of inflammatory CorNV is not fully understood yet, and our previous study implicated that serum amyloid A (Saa) 1 (Saa1) and Saa3 were among the genes up-regulated upon CorNV induction in mice. METHODS Microarray data obtained during our profiling project on CorNV were analyzed for the genes encoding the four SAA family members (Saa1-4), six reported SAA receptors (formyl peptide receptor 2, Tlr2, Tlr4, Cd36, Scarb1, P2rx7) and seven matrix metallopeptidases (Mmp) 1a, 1b, 2, 3, 9, 10, 13 reportedly to be expressed upon SAA pathway activation. The baseline expression or changes of interested genes were further confirmed in animals with CorNV using molecular or histological methods. CorNV was induced in Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice by placing either three interrupted 10-0 sutures or a 2 mm filter paper soaked with sodium hydroxide in the central area of the cornea. At desired time points, the corneas were harvested for histology examination or for extraction of mRNA and protein. The mRNA levels of Saa1, Saa3, Fpr2, Mmp2 and Mmp3 in corneas were detected using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and SAA3 protein in tissues detected using immunohistochemistry or western blotting. RESULTS Microarray data analysis revealed that Saa1, Saa3, Fpr2, Mmp2, Mmp3 messengers were readily detected in normal corneas and significantly up-regulated upon CorNV induction. The changes of these five genes were confirmed with real-time PCR assay. On the contrary, other SAA members (Saa2, Saa4), other SAA receptors (Tlr2, Tlr4, Cd36, P2rx7, etc), or other Mmps (Mmp1a, Mmp1b, Mmp9, Mmp10, Mmp13) did not show consistent changes. Immunohistochemistry study and western blotting further confirmed the expression of SAA3 products in normal corneas as well as their up-regulation in corneas with CorNV. CONCLUSION SAA-FPR2 pathway composing genes were expressed in normal murine corneas and

  7. H2M3wt-restricted, Listeria monocytogenes-immune CD8 T cells respond to multiple formylated peptides and to a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, C; Huffman, G R; Kurlander, R J

    1998-01-01

    A subset of H2M3wt-restricted, Listeria monocytogenes (LM)-immune CD8 effectors recognize antigen-presenting cells (APC) preincubated with heat-killed LM. The responsible product, which we have previously designated heat-killed Listeria-associated antigen (HAA), is extremely hydrophobic and resistant to proteolytic degradation. Despite the protease resistance of HAA, we now report that HAA-immune clones are uniformly responsive to fMIGWII, a formylated oligopeptide derived from the recently described LM product, lemA. While fMIGWII was by far the most potent peptide tested, over half our clones also responded to the LM-derived peptide fMIVII and cross-reactive responses to two other unrelated formylated peptides at concentrations of <1 microM were frequently observed. One of these peptides (fBlaZ) did not share any amino acid in common with fMIGWII except N-formyl methionine at position 1. Unformylated variants of the same peptides were inactive. HAA-immune CD8 cells also responded in an H2M3wt-restricted manner to APC pretreated with heat-killed or live preparations of other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria such as Streptococcus pyogenes (SP) and Proteus vulgaris (PV). Unlike fMIGWII which is water soluble and protease sensitive, the native antigens extracted from SP and PV, like HAA, were very hydrophobic and proteinase K resistant, presumably reflecting in each case the association of cross-reactive polypeptides with bacterial lipid or phospholipid. Thus, HAA/lemA-immune, H2M3wt-restricted effectors can respond to a variety of formylated peptides and bacterial antigens in vitro. Similar cross-reactions in vivo might have physiologically significant implications. PMID:9488151

  8. Peptide inhibition of human cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most prevalent congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe causing significant morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. HCMV is also an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- infected patients with AIDS, and solid organ and allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. Current treatments for HCMV-associated diseases are insufficient due to the emergence of drug-induced resistance and cytotoxicity, necessitating novel approaches to limit HCMV infection. The aim of this study was to develop therapeutic peptides targeting glycoprotein B (gB), a major glycoprotein of HCMV that is highly conserved across the Herpesviridae family, that specifically inhibit fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane preventing HCMV entry and infection. Results Using the Wimley-White Interfacial Hydrophobicity Scale (WWIHS), several regions within gB were identified that display a high potential to interact with lipid bilayers of cell membranes and hydrophobic surfaces within proteins. The ability of synthetic peptides analogous to WWIHS-positive sequences of HCMV gB to inhibit viral infectivity was evaluated. Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF) were infected with the Towne-GFP strain of HCMV (0.5 MOI), preincubated with peptides at a range of concentrations (78 nm to 100 μM), and GFP-positive cells were visualized 48 hours post-infection by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed quantitatively by flow cytometry. Peptides that inhibited HCMV infection demonstrated different inhibitory concentration curves indicating that each peptide possesses distinct biophysical properties. Peptide 174-200 showed 80% inhibition of viral infection at a concentration of 100 μM, and 51% and 62% inhibition at concentrations of 5 μM and 2.5 μM, respectively. Peptide 233-263 inhibited infection by 97% and 92% at concentrations of 100 μM and 50 μM, respectively

  9. FAM19A4 is a novel cytokine ligand of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) and is able to promote the migration and phagocytosis of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenyan; Li, Ting; Wang, Xiaolin; Yuan, Wanxiong; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Heyu; Xu, Enquan; Zhang, Yingmei; Shi, Shuang; Ma, Dalong; Han, Wenling

    2015-01-01

    FAM19A4 is an abbreviation for family with sequence similarity 19 (chemokine (C–C motif)-like) member A4, which is a secretory protein expressed in low levels in normal tissues. The biological functions of FAM19A4 remain to be determined, and its potential receptor(s) is unclarified. In this study, we demonstrated that FAM19A4 was a classical secretory protein and we verified for the first time that its mature protein is composed of 95 amino acids. We found that the expression of this novel cytokine was upregulated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated monocytes and macrophages and was typically in polarized M1. FAM19A4 shows chemotactic activities on macrophages and enhances the macrophage phagocytosis of zymosan both in vitro and in vivo with noticeable increases of the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt). FAM19A4 can also increase the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon zymosan stimulation. Furthermore, based on receptor internalization, radio ligand binding assays and receptor blockage, we demonstrated for the first time that FAM19A4 is a novel ligand of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). The above data indicate that upon inflammatory stimulation, monocyte/macrophage-derived FAM19A4 may play a crucial role in the migration and activation of macrophages during pathogenic infections. PMID:25109685

  10. Tailoring elastase inhibition with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Azoia, Nuno G; Carvalho, Ana C; Gomes, Andreia C; Güebitz, Georg; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2011-09-01

    Chronic wounds are the result of excessive amounts of tissue destructive proteases such as human neutrophil elastase (HNE). The high levels of this enzyme found on those types of wounds inactivate the endogenous inhibitor barrier thus, the search for new HNE inhibitors is required. This work presents two new HNE inhibitor peptides, which were synthesized based on the reactive-site loop of the Bowman-Birk inhibitor protein. The results obtained indicated that these new peptides are competitive inhibitors for HNE and, the inhibitory activity can be modulated by modifications introduced at the N- and C-terminal of the peptides. Furthermore, these peptides were also able to inhibit elastase from a human wound exudate while showing no cytotoxicity against human skin fibroblasts in vitro, greatly supporting their potential application in chronic wound treatment. PMID:21658384

  11. Anginex, a designed peptide that inhibits angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen, A W; van der Schaft, D W; Barendsz-Janson, A F; Cox, A; Struijker Boudier, H A; Hillen, H F; Mayo, K H

    2001-01-01

    Novel beta-sheet-forming peptide 33-mers, betapep peptides, have been designed by using a combination approach employing basic folding principles and incorporating short sequences from the beta-sheet domains of anti-angiogenic proteins. One of these designed peptides (betapep-25), named anginex, was observed to be potently anti-angiogenic. Anginex specifically inhibits vascular endothelial cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in these cells, as shown by flow-cytometric detection of sub-diploid cells, TUNEL (terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-nick-end labelling) analysis and cell morphology. Anginex also inhibits endothelial cell adhesion to and migration on different extracellular matrix components. Inhibition of angiogenesis in vitro is demonstrated in the sprout-formation assay and in vivo in the chick embryo chorio-allantoic membrane angiogenesis assay. Comparison of active and inactive betapep sequences allows structure-function relationships to be deduced. Five hydrophobic residues and two lysines appear to be crucial to activity. This is the first report of a designed peptide having a well-defined biological function as a novel cytokine, which may be an effective anti-angiogenic agent for therapeutic use against various pathological disorders, such as neoplasia, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetic retinopathy and restenosis. PMID:11171099

  12. Exocytosis of Neutrophil Formyl Peptide Receptor-Like 1 (fPRL1) Results in Downregulation of Cytoplasmic fPRL1 in Patients with Purulent Dermatitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Eiji; Kumon, Yoshitaka; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Sugiura, Tetsuro

    2007-01-01

    N-Formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (fPRL1) is a member of the chemoattractant subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors and plays a key role in inflammation via chemotaxis and the regulation of mediator release from leukocytes. Activated fPRL1 has recently been shown to induce a complicated pattern of cellular signaling in vitro, but the details of the regulation and alteration of leukocyte cellular fPRL1 during inflammation in vivo remain unclear. To clarify the alteration of neutrophil fPRL1 during inflammation in vivo, the immunohistochemical staining of neutrophil fPRL1 in samples from patients with purulent dermatitis was performed. The in vitro morphological alteration of neutrophil fPRL1 on cellular membranes by stimulation with N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) was also examined. Both the cytoplasm and the cellular membranes of blood neutrophils stained strongly for fPRL1. On the other hand, the cellular membranes of neutrophils in dermatitis tissue stained strongly for fPRL1 but the cytoplasm stained weakly. The enhancement of neutrophil fPRL1 on cellular membranes by stimulation with fMLP indicates the exocytosis of neutrophil fPRL1-containing granules. In conclusion, we for the first time confirmed the alteration of neutrophil fPRL1 in clinical cases of purulent dermatitis. Cytoplasm that was weakly stained and cellular membranes that were well stained for fPRL1 were considered to be distinctive features of activated neutrophils in purulent dermatitis tissue. PMID:17460114

  13. C-terminal tail phosphorylation of N-formyl peptide receptor: differential recognition of two neutrophil chemoattractant receptors by monoclonal antibodies NFPR1 and NFPR2.

    PubMed

    Riesselman, Marcia; Miettinen, Heini M; Gripentrog, Jeannie M; Lord, Connie I; Mumey, Brendan; Dratz, Edward A; Stie, Jamal; Taylor, Ross M; Jesaitis, Algirdas J

    2007-08-15

    The N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR), a G protein-coupled receptor that binds proinflammatory chemoattractant peptides, serves as a model receptor for leukocyte chemotaxis. Recombinant histidine-tagged FPR (rHis-FPR) was purified in lysophosphatidyl glycerol (LPG) by Ni(2+)-NTA agarose chromatography to >95% purity with high yield. MALDI-TOF mass analysis (>36% sequence coverage) and immunoblotting confirmed the identity as FPR. The rHis-FPR served as an immunogen for the production of 2 mAbs, NFPR1 and NFPR2, that epitope map to the FPR C-terminal tail sequences, 305-GQDFRERLI-313 and 337-NSTLPSAEVE-346, respectively. Both mAbs specifically immunoblotted rHis-FPR and recombinant FPR (rFPR) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. NFPR1 also recognized recombinant FPRL1, specifically expressed in mouse L fibroblasts. In human neutrophil membranes, both Abs labeled a 45-75 kDa species (peak M(r) approximately 60 kDa) localized primarily in the plasma membrane with a minor component in the lactoferrin-enriched intracellular fractions, consistent with FPR size and localization. NFPR1 also recognized a band of M(r) approximately 40 kDa localized, in equal proportions to the plasma membrane and lactoferrin-enriched fractions, consistent with FPRL1 size and localization. Only NFPR2 was capable of immunoprecipitation of rFPR in detergent extracts. The recognition of rFPR by NFPR2 is lost after exposure of cellular rFPR to f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF) and regained after alkaline phosphatase treatment of rFPR-bearing membranes. In neutrophils, NFPR2 immunofluorescence was lost upon fMLF stimulation. Immunoblotting approximately 60 kDa species, after phosphatase treatment of fMLF-stimulated neutrophil membranes, was also enhanced. We conclude that the region 337-346 of FPR becomes phosphorylated after fMLF activation of rFPR-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells and neutrophils. PMID:17675514

  14. Antiinflammatory effects of endotoxin. Inhibition of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocyte responses to complement (C5)-derived peptides in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, J. T.; Hartiala, K. T.; Webster, R. O.; Howes, E. L.; Goldstein, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    Although capable of provoking a variety of inflammatory effects, endotoxin (bacterial lipopolysaccharide) paradoxically has been reported to be antiinflammatory. The authors have found that single intravenous injections of Escherichia coli endotoxin, 24 hours before challenge, inhibit almost completely the vascular permeability changes and exudation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes induced in rabbit skin by reversed passive Arthus reactions. Whereas intravenous injections of endotoxin also caused modest inhibition of the vascular permeability changes induced in rabbit skin by the synthetic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), exudation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was unaffected. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes from rabbits given single injected doses of endotoxin exhibited markedly diminished chemotactic and degranulation responses to complement (C5)-derived peptides in vitro. Responses of these cells to FMLP, however, were normal. These data suggest that selective suppression of polymorphonuclear leukocyte responses to C5-derived peptides accounts, in part, for the antiinflammatory effects of endotoxin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6228151

  15. Ll-37, the Neutrophil Granule–And Epithelial Cell–Derived Cathelicidin, Utilizes Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 (Fprl1) as a Receptor to Chemoattract Human Peripheral Blood Neutrophils, Monocytes, and T Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Yang; Chen, Qian; Schmidt, Albert P.; Anderson, G. Mark; Wang, Ji Ming; Wooters, Joseph; Oppenheim, Joost J.; Chertov, Oleg

    2000-01-01

    We have previously shown that antimicrobial peptides like defensins have the capacity to mobilize leukocytes in host defense. LL-37 is the cleaved antimicrobial 37-residue, COOH-terminal peptide of hCAP18 (human cationic antimicrobial protein with a molecular size of 18 kD), the only identified member in humans of a family of proteins called cathelicidins. LL-37/hCAP18 is produced by neutrophils and various epithelial cells. Here we report that LL-37 is chemotactic for, and can induce Ca2+ mobilization in, human monocytes and formyl peptide receptor–like 1 (FPRL1)-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells. LL-37–induced Ca2+ mobilization in monocytes can also be cross-desensitized by an FPRL1-specific agonist. Furthermore, LL-37 is also chemotactic for human neutrophils and T lymphocytes that are known to express FPRL1. Our results suggest that, in addition to its microbicidal activity, LL-37 may contribute to innate and adaptive immunity by recruiting neutrophils, monocytes, and T cells to sites of microbial invasion by interacting with FPRL1. PMID:11015447

  16. Rubimetide, humanin, and MMK1 exert anxiolytic-like activities via the formyl peptide receptor 2 in mice followed by the successive activation of DP1, A2A, and GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Sonada, Soushi; Yoshikawa, Akihiro; Ohinata, Kousaku; Yoshikawa, Masaaki

    2016-09-01

    Rubimetide (Met-Arg-Trp), which had been isolated as an antihypertensive peptide from an enzymatic digest of spinach ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), showed anxiolytic-like activity prostaglandin (PG) D2-dependent manner in the elevated plus-maze test after administration at a dose of 0.1mg/kg (ip.) or 1mg/kg (p.o.) in male mice of ddY strain. In this study, we found that rubimetide has weak affinities for the FPR1 and FPR2, subtypes of formyl peptide receptor (FPR). The anxiolytic-like activity of rubimetide (0.1mg/kg, ip.) was blocked by WRW4, an antagonist of FPR2, but not by Boc-FLFLF, an antagonist of FPR1, suggesting that the anxiolytic-like activity was mediated by the FPR2. Humanin, an endogenous agonist peptide of the FPR2, exerted an anxiolytic-like activity after intracerebroventricular (icv) administration, which was also blocked by WRW4. MMK1, a synthetic agonist peptide of the FPR2, also exerted anxiolytic-like activity. Thus, FPR2 proved to mediate anxiolytic-like effect as the first example of central effect exerted by FPR agonists. As well as the anxiolytic-like activity of rubimetide, that of MMK1 was blocked by BW A868C, an antagonist of the DP1-receptor. Furthermore, anxiolytic-like activity of rubimetide was blocked by SCH58251 and bicuculline, antagonists for adenosine A2A and GABAA receptors, respectively. From these results, it is concluded that the anxiolytic-like activities of rubimetide and typical agonist peptides of the FPR2 were mediated successively by the PGD2-DP1 receptor, adenosine-A2A receptor, and GABA-GABAA receptor systems downstream of the FPR2. PMID:27475912

  17. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugné-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P < 0.05). MD simulations showed a strong affinity and fast adsorption to hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease. PMID:26116492

  18. Novel antimicrobial peptides that inhibit gram positive bacterial exotoxin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Joseph A; Nemeth, Kimberly A; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, cause serious human illnesses through combinations of surface virulence factors and secretion of exotoxins. Our prior studies using the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin and signal transduction inhibitors glycerol monolaurate and α-globin and β-globin chains of hemoglobin indicate that their abilities to inhibit exotoxin production by S. aureus are separable from abilities to inhibit growth of the organism. Additionally, our previous studies suggest that inhibition of exotoxin production, in absence of ability to kill S. aureus and normal flora lactobacilli, will prevent colonization by pathogenic S. aureus, while not interfering with lactobacilli colonization. These disparate activities may be important in development of novel anti-infective agents that do not alter normal flora. We initiated studies to explore the exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition activity of hemoglobin peptides further to develop potential agents to prevent S. aureus infections. We tested synthesized α-globin chain peptides, synthetic variants of α-globin chain peptides, and two human defensins for ability to inhibit exotoxin production without significantly inhibiting S. aureus growth. All of these peptides were weakly or not inhibitory to bacterial growth. However, the peptides were inhibitory to exotoxin production with increasing activity dependent on increasing numbers of positively-charged amino acids. Additionally, the peptides could be immobilized on agarose beads or have amino acid sequences scrambled and still retain exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition. The peptides are not toxic to human vaginal epithelial cells and do not inhibit growth of normal flora L. crispatus. These peptides may interfere with plasma membrane signal transduction in S. aureus due to their positive charges. PMID:24748386

  19. Inhibition of Escherichia coli ATP synthase by amphibian antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Thomas F; Ahmad, Zulfiqar

    2010-04-01

    Previously melittin, the alpha-helical basic honey bee venom peptide, was shown to inhibit F(1)-ATPase by binding at the beta-subunit DELSEED motif of F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. Herein, we present the inhibitory effects of the basic alpha-helical amphibian antimicrobial peptides, ascaphin-8, aurein 2.2, aurein 2.3, carein 1.8, carein 1.9, citropin 1.1, dermaseptin, maculatin 1.1, maganin II, MRP, or XT-7, on purified F(1) and membrane bound F(1)F(0)Escherichia coli ATP synthase. We found that the extent of inhibition by amphibian peptides is variable. Whereas MRP-amide inhibited ATPase essentially completely (approximately 96% inhibition), carein 1.8 did not inhibit at all (0% inhibition). Inhibition by other peptides was partial with a range of approximately 13-70%. MRP-amide was also the most potent inhibitor on molar scale (IC(50) approximately 3.25 microM). Presence of an amide group at the c-terminal of peptides was found to be critical in exerting potent inhibition of ATP synthase ( approximately 20-40% additional inhibition). Inhibition was fully reversible and found to be identical in both F(1)F(0) membrane preparations as well as in isolated purified F(1). Interestingly, growth of E. coli was abrogated in the presence of ascaphin-8, aurein 2.2, aurein 2.3, citropin 1.1, dermaseptin, magainin II-amide, MRP, MRP-amide, melittin, or melittin-amide but was unaffected in the presence of carein 1.8, carein 1.9, maculatin 1.1, magainin II, or XT-7. Hence inhibition of F(1)-ATPase and E. coli cell growth by amphibian antimicrobial peptides suggests that their antimicrobial/anticancer properties are in part linked to their actions on ATP synthase. PMID:20100509

  20. Inhibition of Escherichia coli ATP synthase by amphibian antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Thomas F.; Ahmad, Zulfiqar

    2010-01-01

    Previously melittin, the α-helical basic honey bee venom peptide, was shown to inhibit F1-ATPase by binding at the β-subunit DELSEED motif of F1Fo ATP synthase. Herein, we present the inhibitory effects of the basic α-helical amphibian antimicrobial peptides, ascaphin-8, aurein 2.2, aurein 2.3, carein 1.8, carein 1.9, citropin 1.1, dermaseptin, maculatin 1.1, maganin II, MRP, or XT-7, on purified F1 and membrane bound F1Fo E. coli ATP synthase. We found that the extent of inhibition by amphibian peptides is variable. Whereas MRP-amide inhibited ATPase essentially completely (~96% inhibition), carein 1.8 did not inhibit at all (0% inhibition). Inhibition by other peptides was partial with a range of ~13% to 70%. MRP-amide was also the most potent inhibitor on molar scale (IC50 ~3.25 µM). Presence of an amide group at the c-terminal of peptides was found to be critical in exerting potent inhibition of ATP synthase (~20–40% additional inhibition). Inhibition was fully reversible and found to be identical in both F1Fo membrane preparations as well as in isolated purified F1. Interestingly, growth of Escherichia coli was abrogated in the presence of ascaphin-8, aurein 2.2, aurein 2.3, citropin 1.1, dermaseptin, magainin II-amide, MRP, MRP-amide, melittin, or melittin-amide but was unaffected in the presence of carein 1.8, carein 1.9, maculatin 1.1, magainin II, or XT-7. Hence inhibition of F1-ATPase and E. coli cell growth by amphibian antimicrobial peptides suggests that their antimicrobial/anticancer properties are in part linked to their actions on ATP synthase. PMID:20100509

  1. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of propolis, inhibits Helicobacter pylori peptide deformylase activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kunqiang; Lu, Weiqiang; Zhu, Lili; Shen, Xu; Huang, Jin

    2013-05-31

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major causative factor for gastrointestinal illnesses, H. pylori peptide deformylase (HpPDF) catalyzes the removal of formyl group from the N-terminus of nascent polypeptide chains, which is essential for H. pylori survival and is considered as a promising drug target for anti-H. pylori therapy. Propolis, a natural antibiotic from honeybees, is reported to have an inhibitory effect on the growth of H. pylori in vitro. In addition, previous studies suggest that the main active constituents in the propolis are phenolic compounds. Therefore, we evaluated a collection of phenolic compounds derived from propolis for enzyme inhibition against HpPDF. Our study results show that Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), one of the main medicinal components of propolis, is a competitive inhibitor against HpPDF, with an IC50 value of 4.02 μM. Furthermore, absorption spectra and crystal structural characterization revealed that different from most well known PDF inhibitors, CAPE block the substrate entrance, preventing substrate from approaching the active site, but CAPE does not have chelate interaction with HpPDF and does not disrupt the metal-dependent catalysis. Our study provides valuable information for understanding the potential anti-H. pylori mechanism of propolis, and CAPE could be served as a lead compound for further anti-H. pylori drug discovery. PMID:23611786

  2. Prediction of Biofilm Inhibiting Peptides: An In silico Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudheer; Sharma, Ashok K.; Jaiswal, Shubham K.; Sharma, Vineet K.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 75% of microbial infections found in humans are caused by microbial biofilms. These biofilms are resistant to host immune system and most of the currently available antibiotics. Small peptides are extensively studied for their role as anti-microbial peptides, however, only a limited studies have shown their potential as inhibitors of biofilm. Therefore, to develop a unique computational method aimed at the prediction of biofilm inhibiting peptides, the experimentally validated biofilm inhibiting peptides sequences were used to extract sequence based features and to identify unique sequence motifs. Biofilm inhibiting peptides were observed to be abundant in positively charged and aromatic amino acids, and also showed selective abundance of some dipeptides and sequence motifs. These individual sequence based features were utilized to construct Support Vector Machine-based prediction models and additionally by including sequence motifs information, the hybrid models were constructed. Using 10-fold cross validation, the hybrid model displayed the accuracy and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 97.83% and 0.87, respectively. On the validation dataset, the hybrid model showed the accuracy and MCC value of 97.19% and 0.84, respectively. The validated model and other tools developed for the prediction of biofilm inhibiting peptides are available freely as web server at http://metagenomics.iiserb.ac.in/biofin/ and http://metabiosys.iiserb.ac.in/biofin/. PMID:27379078

  3. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Inhibits Spontaneous Contractile Activity of Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Lobov, G I; Pan'kova, M N

    2016-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous phase and tonic activity of smooth muscle strips from the capsule of isolated bovine mesenteric lymph nodes. Pretreatment with L-NAME, diclofenac, and methylene blue had practically no effect on the peptide-induced relaxation responses. In contrast, glibenclamide significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide. We suppose that the NO-dependent and cyclooxygenase signaling pathways are not involved in implementation of the inhibitory effects of atrial natriuretic peptide. ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of the smooth muscle cell membrane are the last component in the signaling pathway leading to relaxation of smooth muscles of the lymph node capsule caused by atrial natriuretic peptide; activation of these channels leads to membrane hyperpolarization and smooth muscle relaxation. PMID:27383173

  4. Peptide Extracts from Cultures of Certain Lactobacilli Inhibit Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, Luc; Vincent, Pascal; Makras, Eleftherios; Leroy, Frédéric; Pot, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori inhibition by probiotic lactobacilli has been observed in vitro and in vivo. Carefully selected probiotic Lactobacillus strains could therefore play an important role in the treatment of H. pylori infection and eradication. However, the underlying mechanism for this inhibition is not clear. The aim of this study was to examine if peptide extracts, containing bacteriocins or other antibacterial peptides, from six Lactobacillus cultures (Lactobacillus acidophilus La1, Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471, Lactobacillus casei YIT 9029, Lactobacillus gasseri K7, Lactobacillus johnsonii La1, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) contribute to the inhibition of H. pylori. Peptide extracts from cultures of Lact. amylovorus DCE 471 and Lact. johnsonii La1 were most active, reducing the viability of H. pylori ATCC 43504 with more than 2 log units within 4 h of incubation (P < 0.001). The four other extracts were less or not active. When six clinical isolates of H. pylori were tested for their susceptibility towards five inhibitory peptide extracts, similar observations were made. Again, the peptide extracts from Lact. amylovorus DCE 471 and Lact. johnsonii La1 were the most inhibitory, while the three other extracts resulted in a much lower inhibition of H. pylori. Protease-treated extracts were inactive towards H. pylori, confirming the proteinaceous nature of the inhibitory substance. PMID:26780898

  5. Antiangiogenic activity of 2-formyl-8-hydroxy-quinolinium chloride.

    PubMed

    Lam, K-H; Lee, K K-H; Kok, S H-L; Wong, R S-M; Lau, F-Y; Cheng, G Y-M; Wong, W-Y; Tong, S-W; Chan, K-W; Chan, R Y-K; Tang, J C-O; Cheng, C-H; Hau, D K-P; Bian, Z-X; Gambari, R; Chui, C-H

    2016-05-01

    Tumour growth is closely related to the development of new blood vessels to supply oxygen and nutrients to cancer cells. Without the neovascular formation, tumour volumes cannot increase and undergo metastasis. Antiangiogenesis is one of the most promising approaches for antitumour therapy. The exploration of new antiangiogenic agents would be helpful in antitumour therapy. Quinoline is an aromatic nitrogen compound characterized by a double-ring structure which exhibits a benzene ring fused to pyridine at two adjacent carbon atoms. The high stability of quinoline makes it preferable in a variety of therapeutic and pharmaceutical applications, including antitumour treatment. This work is to examine the potential antiangiogenic activity of the synthetic compound 2-Formyl-8-hydroxy-quinolinium chloride. We found that 2-Formyl-8-hydroxy-quinolinium chloride could inhibit the growth of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. Using the diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis model, 2-Formyl-8-hydroxy-quinolinium chloride showed strong antiangiogenic activity. Furthermore, 2-Formyl-8-hydroxy-quinolinium chloride could inhibit the growth of large Hep3B xenografted tumour from the nude mice. We assume that 2-Formyl-8-hydroxy-quinolinium chloride could be a potential antiangiogenic and antitumour agent and it is worthwhile to further study its underlying working mechanism. PMID:27133051

  6. A Fusion-Inhibiting Peptide against Rift Valley Fever Virus Inhibits Multiple, Diverse Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Jeffrey W.; Smith, Jeffrey M.; Ripoll, Daniel R.; Spik, Kristin W.; Taylor, Shannon L.; Badger, Catherine V.; Grant, Rebecca J.; Ogg, Monica M.; Wallqvist, Anders; Guttieri, Mary C.; Garry, Robert F.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2013-01-01

    For enveloped viruses, fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is critical for a productive infection to occur. This fusion process is mediated by at least three classes of fusion proteins (Class I, II, and III) based on the protein sequence and structure. For Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), the glycoprotein Gc (Class II fusion protein) mediates this fusion event following entry into the endocytic pathway, allowing the viral genome access to the cell cytoplasm. Here, we show that peptides analogous to the RVFV Gc stem region inhibited RVFV infectivity in cell culture by inhibiting the fusion process. Further, we show that infectivity can be inhibited for diverse, unrelated RNA viruses that have Class I (Ebola virus), Class II (Andes virus), or Class III (vesicular stomatitis virus) fusion proteins using this single peptide. Our findings are consistent with an inhibition mechanism similar to that proposed for stem peptide fusion inhibitors of dengue virus in which the RVFV inhibitory peptide first binds to both the virion and cell membranes, allowing it to traffic with the virus into the endocytic pathway. Upon acidification and rearrangement of Gc, the peptide is then able to specifically bind to Gc and prevent fusion of the viral and endocytic membranes, thus inhibiting viral infection. These results could provide novel insights into conserved features among the three classes of viral fusion proteins and offer direction for the future development of broadly active fusion inhibitors. PMID:24069485

  7. Two Pathways through Cdc42 Couple the N-Formyl Receptor to Actin Nucleation in Permeabilized Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Glogauer, M.; Hartwig, J.; Stossel, T.

    2000-01-01

    We developed a permeabilization method that retains coupling between N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine tripeptide (FMLP) receptor stimulation, shape changes, and barbed-end actin nucleation in human neutrophils. Using GTP analogues, phosphoinositides, a phosphoinositide-binding peptide, constitutively active or inactive Rho GTPase mutants, and activating or inhibitory peptides derived from neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome family proteins (N-WASP), we identified signaling pathways leading from the FMLP receptor to actin nucleation that require Cdc42, but then diverge. One branch traverses the actin nucleation pathway involving N-WASP and the Arp2/3 complex, whereas the other operates through active Rac to promote actin nucleation. Both pathways depend on phosphoinositide expression. Since maximal inhibition of the Arp2/3 pathway leaves an N17Rac inhibitable alternate pathway intact, we conclude that this alternate involves phosphoinositide-mediated uncapping of actin filament barbed ends. PMID:10953003

  8. A Novel Factor Xa-Inhibiting Peptide from Centipedes Venom.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yi; Shao, Yu; Chen, Hao; Ming, Xin; Wang, Jin-Bin; Li, Zhi-Yu; Wei, Ji-Fu

    2013-01-01

    Centipedes have been used as traditional medicine for thousands of years in China. Centipede venoms consist of many biochemical peptides and proteins. Factor Xa (FXa) is a serine endopeptidase that plays the key role in blood coagulation, and has been used as a new target for anti-thrombotic drug development. A novel FXa inhibitor, a natural peptide with the sequence of Thr-Asn-Gly-Tyr-Thr (TNGYT), was isolated from the venom of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans using a combination of size-exclusion and reverse-phase chromatography. The molecular weight of the TNGYT peptide was 554.3 Da measured by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The amino acid sequence of TNGYT was determined by Edman degradation. TNGYT inhibited the activity of FXa in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 41.14 mg/ml. It prolonged the partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time in both in vitro and ex vivo assays. It also significantly prolonged whole blood clotting time and bleeding time in mice. This is the first report that an FXa inhibiting peptide was isolated from centipedes venom. PMID:24273471

  9. Regulation of formyl peptide receptor binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes. Use of monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins to discriminate among different states of the receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Feltner, D.E.; Marasco, W.A.

    1989-06-01

    The regulation by monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins of (3H)FMLP binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes was studied by using dissociation techniques to identify regulatory effects on separate receptor states. Under conditions of low receptor occupancy (1 nM (3H)FMLP) and in both Na+ and K+ buffers, dissociation is heterogenous, displaying two distinct, statistically significant off rates. (3H)FMLP binding was enhanced by substituting other monovalent cations for Na+. In particular, enhanced binding in the presence of K+ relative to Na+ was caused by additional binding to both rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors. Three receptor dissociation rates, two of which appear to correspond to the two affinity states detected in equilibrium binding studies, were defined by specific GTP and pertussis toxin (PT) treatments. Neither GTP, nor PT or cholera toxins (CT) had an effect on the rate of dissociation of (3H)FMLP from the rapidly dissociating form of the receptor. Both 100 microM GTP and PT treatments increased the percentage of rapidly dissociating receptors, correspondingly decreasing the percentage of slowly dissociating receptors. The observed changes in the rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors after GTP, PT, and CT treatments were caused by an absolute decrease in the amount of binding to the slowly dissociating receptors. However, complete inhibition of slowly dissociating receptor binding by GTP, PT, or both was never observed. Both GTP and PT treatments, but not CT treatment, increased by two-fold the rate of dissociation of 1 nM (3H)FMLP from the slowly dissociating form of the receptor, resulting in a third dissociation rate. Thus, slowly dissociating receptors comprise two different receptor states, a G protein-associated guanine nucleotide and PT-sensitive state and a guanine nucleotide-insensitive state.

  10. Inhibition of aggregation of amyloid peptides by beta-sheet breaker peptides and their binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Viet, Man Hoang; Ngo, Son Tung; Lam, Nguyen Sy; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-06-01

    The effects of beta-sheet breaker peptides KLVFF and LPFFD on the oligomerization of amyloid peptides were studied by all-atom simulations. It was found that LPFFD interferes the aggregation of Aβ(16-22) peptides to a greater extent than does KLVFF. Using the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we found that the former binds more strongly to Aβ(16-22). Therefore, by simulations, we have clarified the relationship between aggregation rates and binding affinity: the stronger the ligand binding, the slower the oligomerization process. The binding affinity of pentapeptides to full-length peptide Aβ(1-40) and its mature fibrils has been considered using the Autodock and MM-PBSA methods. The hydrophobic interaction between ligands and receptors plays a more important role for association than does hydrogen bonding. The influence of beta-sheet breaker peptides on the secondary structures of monomer Aβ(1-40) was studied in detail, and it turns out that, in their presence, the total beta-sheet content can be enhanced. However, the aggregation can be slowed because the beta-content is reduced in fibril-prone regions. Both pentapeptides strongly bind to monomer Aβ(1-40), as well as to mature fibrils, but KLVFF displays a lower binding affinity than LPFFD. Our findings are in accord with earlier experiments that both of these peptides can serve as prominent inhibitors. In addition, we predict that LPFFD inhibits/degrades the fibrillogenesis of full-length amyloid peptides better than KLVFF. This is probably related to a difference in their total hydrophobicities in that the higher the hydrophobicity, the lower the inhibitory capacity. The GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water and the force field proposed by Morris et al. (Morris et al. J. Comput. Chem. 1998, 19, 1639 ) were employed for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and Autodock experiments, respectively. PMID:21563780

  11. HIV-1 TAT Inhibits Microglial Phagocytosis of Aβ Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Brian; Zhou, Yuyan; Hou, Huayan; Rrapo, Elona; Fernandez, Francisco; Tan, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated dementia (HAD) is a subcortical neuropsychiatric syndrome that has increased in prevalence in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Several studies demonstrated increased amyloidosis in brains of HIV patients and suggested that there may be a significant number of long-term HIV survivors with co-morbid Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the future. We show HIV-1 Tat protein inhibits microglial uptake of Aβ1-42 peptide, a process that is enhanced by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and rescued by the STAT1 inhibitor (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). It is hypothesized that reduced Aβ uptake occurs through IFN-γ mediated STAT1 activation. This process promotes a switch from a phagocytic to an antigen presenting phenotype in microglia through activation of class II transactivator (CIITA). Additionally, we show that HIV-1 Tat significantly disrupts apolipoprotein-3 (Apo-E3) promoted microglial Aβ uptake. As Tat has been shown to directly interact with the low density lipoprotein (LRP) receptor and thus inhibit the uptake of its ligands including apolipoprotein E4 (Apo-E4) and Aβ peptide in neurons, we further hypothesize that a similar inhibition of LRP may occur in microglia. Future studies will be required to fully characterize the mechanisms underlying IFN-γ enhancement of HIV-1 Tats disruption of microglial phagocytosis of Aβ and Apo-E3. PMID:18784813

  12. Characteristics of oedema formation induced by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine in rabbit skin.

    PubMed Central

    Hellewell, P. G.; Yarwood, H.; Williams, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    1. The characteristics of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced oedema formation were investigated in vivo in rabbit skin. 2. FMLP injected intradermally alone induced a small increase in plasma leakage, but marked synergism with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in producing oedema responses was observed. In the presence of PGE2, FMLP was equiactive with C5a des Arg and 100-1000 times more active than histamine in terms of permeability-increasing activity. The response to FMLP was not dependent on endogenous histamine release. 3. FMLP-induced responses were of long duration (t1/2 approximately 40-50 min) when compared with bradykinin (t1/2 approximately 4-5 min). 4. The activity of a range of N-formyl peptides in increasing vascular permeability in skin correlated well with their activity as neutrophil stimulants in vitro. 5. Intravenous infusion of zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP) resulted in transient neutropenia and inhibition of oedema formation induced by FMLP and C5a des Arg in the skin. Responses to bradykinin were unaffected by the infusion of ZAP. 6. Intravenous injection of the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug, ibuprofen, resulted in an inhibition of FMLP-induced, but not histamine-induced, oedema formation. This effect was independent of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition and the drug did not induced neutropenia. 7. Intravenous injection of the microtubule blocking agent colchicine inhibited FMLP-induced oedema formation. Responses to bradykinin were unaffected. When colchicine was administered after intradermal FMLP, subsequent plasma leakage was abolished. 8. The inference that receptors have evolved to bacterial secretions (i.e. FMLP) and products of the interaction of bacterial cell walls with tissue fluid (i.e. C5a des Arg), is consistent with the hypothesis that oedema formation is fundamentally a functional process concerned with regulating microbial lysis and opsonisation in an infected tissue. PMID:2497923

  13. Endogenous peptide(s) inhibiting [3H]cocaine binding in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Reith, M E; Sershen, H; Lajtha, A

    1980-12-01

    The supernatant fraction of centrifuged homogenate of brain tissue contains material that inhibits the saturable binding of [3H]cocaine to crude mouse brain membranes. This material was subjected to heat treatment to remove protein; further purification was achieved by filtering through an Amicon UM-10 membrane ultrafilter and gel filtration of the ultrafiltrate on Sephadex G-25. Sensitivity to acid hydrolysis and peptidase action indicates that the inhibitory activity resides in peptide material with low molecular weight. The partially purified inhibitor has similar effects to that of cocaine on the specific binding of various ligands to opiate and nonopiate receptors in mouse brain membranes. PMID:6261176

  14. Inhibition Effect of a Custom Peptide on Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Yu; Huang, Hsuan-Yu; Forrest, Michael D.; Pan, Yun-Ru; Wu, Wei-Jen; Chen, Hueih-Min

    2014-01-01

    Cecropin B is a natural antimicrobial peptide and CB1a is a custom, engineered modification of it. In vitro, CB1a can kill lung cancer cells at concentrations that do not kill normal lung cells. Furthermore, in vitro, CB1a can disrupt cancer cells from adhering together to form tumor-like spheroids. Mice were xenografted with human lung cancer cells; CB1a could significantly inhibit the growth of tumors in this in vivo model. Docetaxel is a drug in present clinical use against lung cancers; it can have serious side effects because its toxicity is not sufficiently limited to cancer cells. In our studies in mice: CB1a is more toxic to cancer cells than docetaxel, but dramatically less toxic to healthy cells. PMID:25310698

  15. Inhibition of cell growth by a hypothalamic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Redding, T W; Schally, A V

    1982-01-01

    A fraction purified from acetic acid extracts of porcine hypothalami was found to contain significant antimitogenic activity when tested in normal and neoplastic cell lines. Addition of this hypothalamic material (1-100 micrograms/ml) to culture media significantly inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into cellular DNA in several cell lines. Amino acid incorporation into pituitary proteins and uridine incorporation into RNA were also significantly reduced by this factor(s). Addition to the culture media of this hypothalamic material at 5 micrograms/ml and 50 micrograms/ml per day decreased by 17% and 36%, respectively, cell numbers of 3T6 fibroblast cell cultures. Time-response curves showed that the inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in 3T6 fibroblast cells begins within 2 hr after adding this fraction to the culture medium. The inhibitory action cannot be explained by a direct cytotoxic effect since 3T6 cells labeled with 51Cr and incubated for 6 hr in the presence of this hypothalamic fraction fail to show an increase in the release of 51Cr into the medium as compared with controls. Incubation with trypsin and chymotrypsin completely abolished the antimitogenic activity of this material and pepsin decreased it. This strongly suggests that the antimitogenic activity exhibited by this fraction is due to a polypeptide(s). These observations provide evidence for the presence in the mammalian hypothalamus of an antimitogenic peptide(s) that may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. PMID:6757925

  16. Venom peptides cathelicidin and lycotoxin cause strong inhibition of Escherichia coli ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Azim, Sofiya; McDowell, Derek; Cartagena, Alec; Rodriguez, Ricky; Laughlin, Thomas F; Ahmad, Zulfiqar

    2016-06-01

    Venom peptides are known to have strong antimicrobial activity and anticancer properties. King cobra cathelicidin or OH-CATH (KF-34), banded krait cathelicidin (BF-30), wolf spider lycotoxin I (IL-25), and wolf spider lycotoxin II (KE-27) venom peptides were found to strongly inhibit Escherichia coli membrane bound F1Fo ATP synthase. The potent inhibition of wild-type E. coli in comparison to the partial inhibition of null E. coli by KF-34, BF-30, Il-25, or KE-27 clearly links the bactericidal properties of these venom peptides to the binding and inhibition of ATP synthase along with the possibility of other inhibitory targets. The four venom peptides KF-34, BF-30, IL-25, and KE-27, caused ≥85% inhibition of wild-type membrane bound E.coli ATP synthase. Venom peptide induced inhibition of ATP synthase and the strong abrogation of wild-type E. coli cell growth in the presence of venom peptides demonstrates that ATP synthase is a potent membrane bound molecular target for venom peptides. Furthermore, the process of inhibition was found to be fully reversible. PMID:26930579

  17. Endosomolytic Nano-Polyplex Platform Technology for Cytosolic Peptide Delivery To Inhibit Pathological Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A platform technology has been developed and tested for delivery of intracellular-acting peptides through electrostatically complexed nanoparticles, or nano-polyplexes, formulated from an anionic endosomolytic polymer and cationic therapeutic peptides. This delivery platform has been initially tested and optimized for delivery of two unique vasoactive peptides, a phosphomimetic of heat shock protein 20 and an inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase II, to prevent pathological vasoconstriction (i.e., vasospasm) in human vascular tissue. These peptides inhibit vasoconstriction and promote vasorelaxation by modulating actin dynamics in vascular smooth muscle cells. Formulating these peptides into nano-polyplexes significantly enhances peptide uptake and retention, facilitates cytosolic delivery through a pH-dependent endosomal escape mechanism, and enhances peptide bioactivity in vitro as measured by inhibition of F-actin stress fiber formation. In comparison to treatment with the free peptides, which were endowed with cell-penetrating sequences, the nano-polyplexes significantly increased vasorelaxation, inhibited vasoconstriction, and decreased F-actin formation in the human saphenous vein ex vivo. These results suggest that these formulations have significant potential for treatment of conditions such as cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Furthermore, because many therapeutic peptides include cationic cell-penetrating segments, this simple and modular platform technology may have broad applicability as a cost-effective approach for enhancing the efficacy of cytosolically active peptides. PMID:26004140

  18. Inhibition of breast cancer growth and metastasis by a biomimetic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Lee, Seung Jae; Koskimaki, Jacob E.; Han, Zheyi; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of mortality in cancer patients. Though there are many anti-cancer drugs targeting primary tumor growth, anti-metastatic agents are rarely developed. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are crucial for cancer progression, particularly, lymphangiogenesis is pivotal for metastasis in breast cancer. Here we report that a novel collagen IV derived biomimetic peptide inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis by blocking angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. The peptide inhibits blood and lymphatic endothelial cell viability, migration, adhesion, and tube formation by targeting IGF1R and Met signals. The peptide blocks MDA-MB-231 tumor growth by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis in vivo. Moreover, the peptide inhibits lymphangiogenesis in primary tumors. MDA-MB-231 tumor conditioned media (TCM) was employed to accelerate spontaneous metastasis in tumor xenografts, and the anti-metastatic activity of the peptide was tested in this model. The peptide prevents metastasis to the lungs and lymph nodes by inhibiting TCM-induced lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis in the pre-metastatic organs. In summary, a novel biomimetic peptide inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis by blocking angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the pre-metastatic organs as well as primary tumors. PMID:25409905

  19. Inhibition of multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by peptides isolated from combinatorial phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Flachbartova, Z; Pulzova, L; Bencurova, E; Potocnakova, L; Comor, L; Bednarikova, Z; Bhide, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate and characterize novel antimicrobial peptides from peptide phage library with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes. Combinatorial phage-display library was used to affinity select peptides binding to the cell surface of multidrug resistant L. monocytogenes. After several rounds of affinity selection followed by sequencing, three peptides were revealed as the most promising candidates. Peptide L2 exhibited features common to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and was rich in Asp, His and Lys residues. Peptide L3 (NSWIQAPDTKSI), like peptide L2, inhibited bacterial growth in vitro, without any hemolytic or cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells. L1 peptide showed no inhibitory effect on Listeria. Structurally, peptides L2 and L3 formed random coils composed of α-helix and β-sheet units. Peptides L2 and L3 exhibited antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes with no haemolytic or toxic effects. Both peptides identified in this study have the potential to be beneficial in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:27296960

  20. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  1. Identification of peptides that inhibit regulator of G protein signaling 4 function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuren; Lee, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Young, Kathleen H

    2008-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) are a family of GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) that interact with heterotrimeric G proteins in the negative regulation of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. RGS4, the first identified mammalian member of the RGS family, has been implicated in many GPCR signaling pathways involved in disease states. We report herein the identification of a 16-amino-acid peptide (P17) as an inhibitor of RGS4. The peptide was found by screening a random peptide library using RGS4 as 'bait' in a yeast two-hybrid system. This peptide inhibited RGS4 GAP activity on Galpha(i1)in a GTPase assay, and blocked the interaction between RGS4 and Galpha(i1)in a pull-down assay. The peptide displayed dose-dependent inhibition of RGS4 and Galpha-interacting protein (GAIP) GAP activities, yet showed no substantial effect on RGS7. Electrophysiological studies in Xenopus oocytes demonstrated that P17 attenuates RGS4 modulation of M(2) muscarinic receptor stimulation of GIRK (G-protein-mediated inwardly rectifying potassium) channels. Deletion of an arginine at the N terminus of P17 abolished its ability to inhibit RGS4 GAP activity, as did deletions of C-terminal residues. The P17 peptide showed no similarity to any known peptide sequence. Further investigation and optimization of the peptide may provide unique information for the development of RGS4 inhibitors for future therapeutic application. PMID:18547979

  2. Substituent effects on structural stability of formyl ketene and analysis of vibrational spectra of formyl haloketenes and formyl methylketene.

    PubMed

    Badawi, H M; Al-Saadi, A; Förner, W

    2002-01-01

    The conformational behavior and the structural stability of formyl fluoroketene, formyl chloroketene and formyl methylketene were investigated by utilizing quantum mechanical DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-31I + + G** and ab initio calculations at MP2/6-311 + + G** levels. The three molecules were predicted to have a planar s-cis<-->s-trans conformational equilibrium. From the calculations, the direction of the conformational equilibrium was found to be dependent on the nature of the substituting group. In formyl haloketenes, the cis conformation, where the C=O group eclipses the ketenic group, was expected to be of lower energy than the trans conformer. In the case of formyl methylketene the conformational stability was reversed and the trans form (the aldehydic hydrogen eclipsing the ketenic group) was calculated to be about 2 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy than the cis form. The calculated cis-trans energy barrier was found to be in the order: fluoride (15.3 kcal mol(-1)) > chloride (13.1 kcal mol(-1)) > methyl (11.7 kcal mol(-1). Full optimization was performed at the ground and the transition states of the molecules. The vibrational frequencies for the stable conformers of the three ketenic systems were computed at the DFT-B3LYP level, and the zero-point corrections were included into the calculated rotational barriers. Complete vibrational assignments were made on the basis of both normal coordinate calculations and comparison with experimental results of similar molecules. PMID:11808649

  3. The in vitro biological effect of nerve growth factor is inhibited by synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Longo, F M; Vu, T K; Mobley, W C

    1990-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF)1 is a neurotrophic polypeptide that acts via specific receptors to promote the survival and growth of neurons. To delineate the NGF domain(s) responsible for eliciting biological activity, we synthesized small peptides corresponding to three regions in NGF that are hydrophilic and highly conserved. Several peptides from mouse NGF region 26-40 inhibited the neurite-promoting effect of NGF on sensory neurons in vitro. Inhibition was sequence-specific and could be overcome by increasing the concentration of NGF. Moreover, peptide actions were specific for NGF-mediated events in that they failed to block the neurotrophic activity of ciliary neuronotrophic factor (CNTF) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). In spite of the inhibition of NGF activity, peptides did not affect the binding of radiolabeled NGF. These studies define one region of NGF that may be required for neurotrophic activity. Images PMID:2100197

  4. Development of JNK2-Selective Peptide Inhibitors that Inhibit Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Kaoud, Tamer S.; Mitra, Shreya; Lee, Sunbae; Taliaferro, Juliana; Cantrell, Michael; Linse, Klaus D.; Van Den Berg, Carla L.; Dalby, Kevin N.

    2012-01-01

    Despite their lack of selectivity towards c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) isoforms, peptides derived from the JIP (JNK Interacting Protein) scaffolds linked to the cell-penetrating peptide TAT are widely used to investigate JNK-mediated signaling events. To engineer an isoform-selective peptide inhibitor, several JIP-based peptide sequences were designed and tested. A JIP sequence connected through a flexible linker to either the N-terminus of an inverted TAT sequence (JIP10-Δ-TATi), or to a poly-arginine sequence (JIP10-Δ-R9) enabled the potent inhibition of JNK2 (IC50~90 nM) and exhibited 10-fold selectivity for JNK2 over JNK1 and JNK3. Examination of both peptides in HEK293 cells revealed a potent ability to inhibit the induction of both JNK activation and c-Jun phosphorylation in cells treated with anisomycin. Notably, Western blot analysis indicates that only a fraction of total JNK must be activated to elicit robust c-Jun phosphorylation. To examine the potential of each peptide to selectively modulate JNK2 signaling in vivo, their ability to inhibit the migration of Polyoma Middle-T Antigen Mammary Tumor (PyVMT) cells was assessed. PyVMTjnk2-/- cells exhibit a lower migration potential compared to PyVMTjnk2+/+ cells, and this migration potential is restored through the over-expression of GFP-JNK2α. Both JIP10-Δ-TATi and JIP10-Δ-R9 inhibit the migration of PyVMTjnk2+/+ cells and PyVMTjnk2-/- cells expressing GFP-JNK2α. However, neither peptide inhibits the migration of PyVMTjnk2-/- cells. A control form of JIP10-Δ-TATi containing a single leucine to arginine mutation lacks ability to inhibit JNK2 in vitro cell-free and cell-based assays and does not inhibit the migration of PyVMTjnk2+/+ cells. Together, these data suggest that JIP10-Δ-TATi and JIP10-Δ-R9 inhibit the migration of PyVMT cells through the selective inhibition of JNK2. Finally, the mechanism of inhibition of a D-retro-inverso JIP peptide, previously reported to inhibit JNK, was examined

  5. Identification of a glycogenolysis-inhibiting peptide from the corpora cardiaca of locusts.

    PubMed

    Clynen, Elke; Huybrechts, Jurgen; Baggerman, Geert; Van Doorn, Jan; Van Der Horst, Dick; De Loof, Arnold; Schoofs, Liliane

    2003-08-01

    A mass spectrometric study of the peptidome of the neurohemal part of the corpora cardiaca of Locusta migratoria and Schistocerca gregaria shows that it contains several unknown peptides. We were able to identify the sequence of one of these peptides as pQSDLFLLSPK. This sequence is identical to the part of the Locusta insulin-related peptide (IRP) precursor that is situated between the signal peptide and the B-chain. We designated this peptide as IRP copeptide. This IRP copeptide is also present in the pars intercerebralis, which is likely to be the site of synthesis. It is identical in both L. migratoria and S. gregaria. It shows no effect on the hemolymph lipid concentration in vivo or muscle contraction in vitro. The IRP copeptide is able to cause a decreased phosphorylase activity in locust fat body in vitro, opposite to the effect of the adipokinetic hormones and therefore possibly represents a glycogenolysis-inhibiting peptide. PMID:12865323

  6. Metalloprotease inhibitors GM6001 and TAPI-0 inhibit the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis by targeting peptide deformylase of the bacterium.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Amit; Patel, Bhairavi; Sieber, Stephan A; Chen, Ding; Pachikara, Niseema; Zhong, Guangming; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Fan, Huizhou

    2006-06-16

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium responsible for a number of human diseases. The mechanism underlying the intracellular parasitology of Chlamydiae remains poorly understood. In searching for host factors required for chlamydial infection, we discovered that C. trachomatis growth was effectively inhibited with GM6001 and TAPI-0, two compounds known as specific inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases. The inhibition was independent of chlamydial entry of the cell, suggesting that the loss of extracellular metalloprotease activities of the host cell is unlikely to be the mechanism for the growth suppression. Nucleotide sequences of candidate metalloprotease genes remained unchanged in a chlamydial variant designated GR10, which had been selected for resistance to the inhibitors. Nevertheless, GR10 displayed a single base mutation in the presumable promoter region of the gene for peptide deformylase (PDF), a metal-dependent enzyme that removes the N-formyl group from newly synthesized bacterial proteins. The mutation correlated with an increased PDF expression level and resistance to actinonin, a known PDF inhibitor with antibacterial activity, as compared with the parental strain. Recombinant chlamydial PDF was covalently labeled with a hydroxamate-based molecular probe designated AspR1, which was developed for the detection of metalloproteases. The AspR1 labeling of the chlamydial PDF became significantly less efficient in the presence of excessive amounts of GM6001 and TAPI-0. Finally, the PDF enzyme activity was efficiently inhibited with GM6001 and TAPI-0. Taken together, our results suggest that the metalloprotease inhibitors suppress chlamydial growth by targeting the bacterial PDF. These findings have important biochemical and medical implications. PMID:16565079

  7. Inhibition of superoxide anion production by extracellular acidification in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Murata, Naoya; Mogi, Chihiro; Tobo, Masayuki; Nakakura, Takashi; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular acidification inhibited formyl-Met-Leu-Phe- or C5a-induced superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production in differentiated HL-60 neutrophil-like cells and human neutrophils. A cAMP-increasing agonist, prostaglandin E(1), also inhibited the formyl peptide-induced O(2)(-) production. The inhibitory action on the O(2)(-) production by extracellular acidic pH was associated with cAMP accumulation and partly attenuated by H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. A significant amount of mRNAs for T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) and other proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1)-family receptors is expressed in these cells. These results suggest that cAMP/protein kinase A, possibly through proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, may be involved in extracellular acidic pH-induced inhibition of O(2)(-) production. PMID:19539899

  8. Major peptides from amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) protein inhibit HMG-CoA reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  9. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  10. Molecular charge dominates the inhibition of actomyosin in skinned muscle fibers by SH1 peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, P B; Beck, T W; Bursell, J; Kushmerick, M J

    1991-01-01

    It is not definitively known whether the highly conserved region of myosin heavy chain around SH1 (Cys 707) is part of the actin-binding site. We tested this possibility by assaying for competitive inhibition of maximum Ca-activated force production of skinned muscle fibers by synthetic peptides which had sequences derived from the SH1 region of myosin. Force was inhibited by a heptapeptide (IRICRKG) with an apparent K0.5 of about 4 mM. Unloaded shortening velocity of fibers, determined by the slack test, and maximum Ca-activated myofibrillar MgATPase activity were also inhibited by this peptide, but both required higher concentrations. We found that other cationic peptides also inhibited force in a manner that depended on the charge of the peptide; increasing the net positive charge of the peptide increased its efficacy. The inhibition was not significantly affected by altering solution ionic strength (100-200 mM). Disulfide bond formation was not involved in the inhibitory mechanism because a peptide with Thr substituted for Cys was inhibitory in the presence or absence of DTT. Our data demonstrate that the net charge was the predominant molecular characteristic correlated with the ability of peptides from this region of myosin heavy chain to inhibit force production. Thus, the hypothesis that the SH1 region of myosin is an essential part of the force-producing interaction with actin during the cross-bridge cycle (Eto, M., R. Suzuki, F. Morita, H. Kuwayama, N. Nishi, and S. Tokura., 1990, J. Biochem. 108:499-504; Keane et al., 1990, Nature (Lond.). 344:265-268) is not supported. PMID:1912278

  11. Peptides in common bean fractions inhibit human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luna Vital, Diego A; González de Mejía, Elvira; Dia, Vermont P; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to characterize peptides present in common bean non-digestible fractions (NDF) produced after enzymatic digestion and determine their antiproliferative action on human colorectal cancer cells. Five NDF peptides represented 70% of total protein (GLTSK, LSGNK, GEGSGA, MPACGSS and MTEEY) with antiproliferative activity on human colon cancer cells. Based on the antiproliferative effect, HCT116 cell line was most sensitive to bean Azufrado Higuera (IC50=0.53 mg/ml) and RKO to Bayo Madero (IC50=0.51 mg/ml) peptide extracts. Both cultivars increased significantly (p<0.05) the expression of p53 in HCT116 by 76% and 68%, respectively. Azufrado Higuera modified the expression of cell cycle regulation proteins p21 and cyclin B1. Bayo Madero modified the expression of mitochondrial activated apoptotic proteins BAD, cytC, c-casp3, Survivin, BIRC7. Results suggest that peptides present in common bean NDF contributed to the antiproliferative effect on human colorectal cancer cells by modifying molecules involved in either cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. PMID:24679790

  12. Selected antimicrobial peptides inhibit in vitro growth of Campylobacter spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics are urgently needed for food-animal production. A goal of our laboratory is to develop and evaluate antimicrobial peptides (AMP) to control and reduce foodborne pathogens in poultry. AMP have been found in most every class of living organism where they h...

  13. Ribosomal crystallography: peptide bond formation and its inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bashan, Anat; Zarivach, Raz; Schluenzen, Frank; Agmon, Ilana; Harms, Joerg; Auerbach, Tamar; Baram, David; Berisio, Rita; Bartels, Heike; Hansen, Harly A S; Fucini, Paola; Wilson, Daniel; Peretz, Moshe; Kessler, Maggie; Yonath, Ada

    2003-09-01

    Ribosomes, the universal cellular organelles catalyzing the translation of genetic code into proteins, are protein/RNA assemblies, of a molecular weight 2.5 mega Daltons or higher. They are built of two subunits that associate for performing protein biosynthesis. The large subunit creates the peptide bond and provides the path for emerging proteins. The small has key roles in initiating the process and controlling its fidelity. Crystallographic studies on complexes of the small and the large eubacterial ribosomal subunits with substrate analogs, antibiotics, and inhibitors confirmed that the ribosomal RNA governs most of its activities, and indicated that the main catalytic contribution of the ribosome is the precise positioning and alignment of its substrates, the tRNA molecules. A symmetry-related region of a significant size, containing about two hundred nucleotides, was revealed in all known structures of the large ribosomal subunit, despite the asymmetric nature of the ribosome. The symmetry rotation axis, identified in the middle of the peptide-bond formation site, coincides with the bond connecting the tRNA double-helical features with its single-stranded 3' end, which is the moiety carrying the amino acids. This thus implies sovereign movements of tRNA features and suggests that tRNA translocation involves a rotatory motion within the ribosomal active site. This motion is guided and anchored by ribosomal nucleotides belonging to the active site walls, and results in geometry suitable for peptide-bond formation with no significant rearrangements. The sole geometrical requirement for this proposed mechanism is that the initial P-site tRNA adopts the flipped orientation. The rotatory motion is the major component of unified machinery for peptide-bond formation, translocation, and nascent protein progression, since its spiral nature ensures the entrance of the nascent peptide into the ribosomal exit tunnel. This tunnel, assumed to be a passive path for the

  14. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Inhibits Human Small-Cell Lung Cancer Proliferation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruno, Kaname; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1998-11-01

    Small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is an aggressive, rapidly growing and metastasizing, and highly fatal neoplasm. We report that vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibits the proliferation of SCLC cells in culture and dramatically suppresses the growth of SCLC tumor-cell implants in athymic nude mice. In both cases, the inhibition was mediated apparently by a cAMP-dependent mechanism, because the inhibition was enhanced by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in proportion to increases in intracellular cAMP levels, and the inhibition was abolished by selective inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. If confirmed in clinical trials, this antiproliferative action of vasoactive intestinal peptide may offer a new and promising means of suppressing SCLC in human subjects, without the toxic side effects of chemotherapeutic agents.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE9 protein has high activity binding peptides which inhibit target cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Diana P; Ocampo, Marisol; Pabón, Laura; Herrera, Chonny; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Munoz, Marina; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2016-05-01

    PE/PPE proteins are involved in several processes during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection of target cells; studying them is extremely interesting as they are the only ones from the Mycobacterium genus, they abound in pathogenic species such as Mtb and their function remains yet unknown. The PE9 protein (Rv1088) was characterised, the rv1088 gene was identified by PCR in Mtb complex strains and its expression and localisation on mycobacterial surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunoelectron microscopy. Bioinformatics tools were used for predicting PE9 protein structural aspects and experimental study involved the circular dichroism of synthetic peptides. The peptides were tested in binding assays involving U937 and A549 cells; two high activity binding peptides (HABPs) were found for both cell lines (39226-(1)MSYMIATPAALTAAATDIDGI(21) and 39232-(125)YQRHFGTGGQPEFRQHSEHRR(144)), one for U937 (39231-(104)YAGAGRRQRRRRSGDGQWRLRQ(124)) and one for A549 (39230-(83)YGTGVFRRRRGRQTVTAAEHRA(103)). HABP 39232 inhibited mycobacterial entry to A549 cells (∼70%) and U937 cells (∼50%), peptides 39226 and 39231 inhibited entry to U937 cells (∼60% and 80%, respectively) and peptide 39230 inhibited entry to A549 cells (∼60%). This emphasised HABPs' functional importance in recognition between Mtb H37Rv and target cell receptors. These peptide sequences could be involved in invasion and were recognised by the host's immune system, thereby highlighting their use when designing an efficient anti-tuberculosis multiantigenic vaccine. PMID:26851205

  16. Identification of the minimum peptide from mouse myostatin prodomain for human myostatin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Kentaro; Noguchi, Yuri; Aoki, Shin; Takayama, Shota; Yoshida, Momoko; Asari, Tomo; Yakushiji, Fumika; Nishimatsu, Shin-ichiro; Ohsawa, Yutaka; Itoh, Fumiko; Negishi, Yoichi; Sunada, Yoshihide; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2015-02-12

    Myostatin, an endogenous negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass, is a therapeutic target for muscle atrophic disorders. Here, we identified minimum peptides 2 and 7 to effectively inhibit myostatin activity, which consist of 24 and 23 amino acids, respectively, derived from mouse myostatin prodomain. These peptides, which had the propensity to form α-helix structure, interacted to myostatin with KD values of 30-36 nM. Moreover, peptide 2 significantly increased muscle mass in Duchenne muscular dystrophy model mice. PMID:25569186

  17. Inhibition of inflammation by a p38 MAP kinase targeted cell permeable peptide.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Meng, Xianmei; He, Junyun; Gu, Jun

    2008-11-01

    p38 MAPK has been the key therapeutic target for multiple inflammation diseases. However, the clinical applications of p38 inhibitors, most of which target on the ATP binding groove in the kinase, have been held back, largely because of their limited specificity and severe side-effects. An alternative strategy to generate highly selective p38 inhibitor is to block the specific interaction in the p38 signal pathway. Based on the hypothesis that specific binding peptides targeting on the docking groove would interfere the intrinsic interaction between p38 and its partners, we have designed a fusion peptide containing 12aa p38 docking sequence derived from MKK3b and 11aa HIV-TAT transmembrane sequence to form a cell permeable peptide. The peptide specifically binds to p38, and aborts its interaction with upstream kinase as well as downstream substrates, and thus to inhibit p38 phosphorylation and its signaling. Furthermore, the induction and secretion of TNFalpha and other inflammatory factors by LPS are blocked in peptide treated cells and mice. Finally the peptide has been shown to significantly inhibit ear oedema in mice. Therefore, the peptide holds great potential as an anti-inflammation agent for the treatment of inflammation and its related diseases. PMID:18991745

  18. Inhibition of duck hepatitis B virus replication by mimic peptides in vitro

    PubMed Central

    JIA, HONGYU; LIU, CHANGHONG; YANG, YING; ZHU, HAIHONG; CHEN, FENG; LIU, JIHONG; ZHOU, LINFU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of specific mimic peptides targeting duck hepatitis B virus polymerase (DHBVP) on duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) replication in primary duck hepatocytes. Phage display technology (PDT) was used to screen for mimic peptides specifically targeting DHBVP and the associated coding sequences were determined using DNA sequencing. The selected mimic peptides were then used to treat primary duck hepatocytes infected with DHBV in vitro. Infected hepatocytes expressing the mimic peptides intracellularly were also prepared. The cells were divided into mimic peptide groups (EXP groups), an entecavir-treated group (positive control) and a negative control group. The medium was changed every 48 h. Following a 10-day incubation, the cell supernatants were collected. DHBV-DNA in the cellular nucleus, cytoplasm and culture supernatant was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Eight mimic peptides were selected following three PDT screening rounds for investigation in the DHBV-infected primary duck hepatocytes. The qPCR results showed that following direct treatment with mimic peptide 2 or 7, intracellular expression of mimic peptide 2 or 7, or treatment with entecavir, the DHBV-DNA levels in the culture supernatant and cytoplasm of duck hepatocytes were significantly lower than those in the negative control (P<0.05). The cytoplasmic DHBV-DNA content of the cells treated with mimic peptide 7 was lower than that in the other groups (P<0.05). In addition, the DHBV-DNA content of the nuclear fractions following the intracellular expression of mimic peptide 7 was significantly lower than that in the other groups (P<0.05). Mimic peptides specifically targeting DHBVP, administered directly or expressed intracellularly, can significantly inhibit DHBV replication in vitro. PMID:26640539

  19. Designed Coiled-Coil Peptides Inhibit the Type Three Secretion System of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Larzábal, Mariano; Mercado, Elsa C.; Vilte, Daniel A.; Salazar-González, Hector; Cataldi, Angel; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Background Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are two categories of E. coli strains associated with human disease. A major virulence factor of both pathotypes is the expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS), responsible for their ability to adhere to gut mucosa causing a characteristic attaching and effacing lesion (A/E). The TTSS translocates effector proteins directly into the host cell that subvert mammalian cell biochemistry. Methods/Principal Findings We examined synthetic peptides designed to inhibit the TTSS. CoilA and CoilB peptides, both representing coiled-coil regions of the translocator protein EspA, and CoilD peptide, corresponding to a coiled–coil region of the needle protein EscF, were effective in inhibiting the TTSS dependent hemolysis of red blood cells by the EPEC E2348/69 strain. CoilA and CoilB peptides also reduced the formation of actin pedestals by the same strain in HEp-2 cells and impaired the TTSS-mediated protein translocation into the epithelial cell. Interestingly, CoilA and CoilB were able to block EspA assembly, destabilizing the TTSS and thereby Tir translocation. This blockage of EspA polymerization by CoilA or CoilB peptides, also inhibited the correct delivery of EspB and EspD as detected by immunoblotting. Interestingly, electron microscopy of bacteria incubated with the CoilA peptide showed a reduction of the length of EspA filaments. Conclusions Our data indicate that coiled-coil peptides can prevent the assembly and thus the functionality of the TTSS apparatus and suggest that these peptides could provide an attractive tool to block EPEC and EHEC pathogenesis. PMID:20140230

  20. Inhibition of chlamydial infection in the genital tract of female mice by topical application of a peptide deformylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Amit; Wang, Lingling; Li, Xiaojin; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Malatesta, Paul; Fan, Huizhou

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium responsible for a number of health problems, including sexually transmitted infection in humans. We recently discovered that C. trachomatis infection in cell culture is highly susceptible to inhibitors of peptide deformylase, an enzyme that removes the N-formyl group from newly synthesized polypeptides. In this study, one of the deformylase inhibitors, GM6001, was tested for potential antichlamydial activity using a murine genital C. muridarum infection model. Topical application of GM6001 significantly reduced C. muridarum loading in BALB/c mice that were vaginally infected with the pathogen. In striking contrast, growth of the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum is strongly resistant to the PDF inhibitor. GM6001 demonstrated no detectable toxicity against host cells. On the basis of these data and our previous observations, we conclude that further evaluation of PDF inhibitors for prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted chlamydial infection is warranted. PMID:17936604

  1. Molecular mechanism of viomycin inhibition of peptide elongation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Mikael; Borg, Anneli; Ehrenberg, Måns; Sanyal, Suparna

    2016-01-01

    Viomycin is a tuberactinomycin antibiotic essential for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. It inhibits bacterial protein synthesis by blocking elongation factor G (EF-G) catalyzed translocation of messenger RNA on the ribosome. Here we have clarified the molecular aspects of viomycin inhibition of the elongating ribosome using pre-steady-state kinetics. We found that the probability of ribosome inhibition by viomycin depends on competition between viomycin and EF-G for binding to the pretranslocation ribosome, and that stable viomycin binding requires an A-site bound tRNA. Once bound, viomycin stalls the ribosome in a pretranslocation state for a minimum of ∼45 s. This stalling time increases linearly with viomycin concentration. Viomycin inhibition also promotes futile cycles of GTP hydrolysis by EF-G. Finally, we have constructed a kinetic model for viomycin inhibition of EF-G catalyzed translocation, allowing for testable predictions of tuberactinomycin action in vivo and facilitating in-depth understanding of resistance development against this important class of antibiotics. PMID:26755601

  2. Inhibition of Growth and Gene Expression by PNA-peptide Conjugates in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Patenge, Nadja; Pappesch, Roberto; Krawack, Franziska; Walda, Claudia; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Jacob, Anette; Hain, Torsten; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    While Streptococcus pyogenes is consistently susceptible toward penicillin, therapeutic failure of penicillin treatment has been reported repeatedly and a considerable number of patients exhibit allergic reactions to this substance. At the same time, streptococcal resistance to alternative antibiotics, e.g., macrolides, has increased. Taken together, these facts demand the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, S. pyogenes growth was inhibited by application of peptide-conjugated antisense-peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) specific for the essential gyrase A gene (gyrA). Thereby, HIV-1 Tat peptide-coupled PNAs were more efficient inhibitors of streptococcal growth as compared with (KFF)3K-coupled PNAs. Peptide-anti-gyrA PNAs decreased the abundance of gyrA transcripts in S. pyogenes. Growth inhibition by antisense interference was enhanced by combination of peptide-coupled PNAs with protein-level inhibitors. Antimicrobial synergy could be detected with levofloxacin and novobiocin, targeting the gyrase enzyme, and with spectinomycin, impeding ribosomal function. The prospective application of carrier peptide-coupled antisense PNAs in S. pyogenes covers the use as an antimicrobial agent and the employment as a knock-down strategy for the investigation of virulence factor function. PMID:24193033

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika; E-mail: hiokada@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1{sub IIIB} infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.

  4. Insect antimicrobial peptides act synergistically to inhibit a trypanosome parasite.

    PubMed

    Marxer, Monika; Vollenweider, Vera; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2016-05-26

    The innate immune system provides protection from infection by producing essential effector molecules, such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that possess broad-spectrum activity. This is also the case for bumblebees, Bombus terrestris, when infected by the trypanosome, Crithidia bombi Furthermore, the expressed mixture of AMPs varies with host genetic background and infecting parasite strain (genotype). Here, we used the fact that clones of C. bombi can be cultivated and kept as strains in medium to test the effect of various combinations of AMPs on the growth rate of the parasite. In particular, we used pairwise combinations and a range of physiological concentrations of three AMPs, namely Abaecin, Defensin and Hymenoptaecin, synthetized from the respective genomic sequences. We found that these AMPs indeed suppress the growth of eight different strains of C. bombi, and that combinations of AMPs were typically more effective than the use of a single AMP alone. Furthermore, the most effective combinations were rarely those consisting of maximum concentrations. In addition, the AMP combination treatments revealed parasite strain specificity, such that strains varied in their sensitivity towards the same mixtures. Hence, variable expression of AMPs could be an alternative strategy to combat highly variable infections.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160603

  5. Inhibition of regulated cell death by cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Stefan; Dewitz, Christin; Fändrich, Fred; Kunzendorf, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Development of the means to efficiently and continuously renew missing and non-functional proteins in diseased cells remains a major goal in modern molecular medicine. While gene therapy has the potential to achieve this, substantial obstacles must be overcome before clinical application can be considered. A promising alternative approach is the direct delivery of non-permeant active biomolecules, such as oligonucleotides, peptides and proteins, to the affected cells with the purpose of ameliorating an advanced disease process. In addition to receptor-mediated endocytosis, cell-penetrating peptides are widely used as vectors for rapid translocation of conjugated molecules across cell membranes into intracellular compartments and the delivery of these therapeutic molecules is generally referred to as novel prospective protein therapy. As a broad coverage of the enormous amount of published data in this field is unrewarding, this review will provide a brief, focused overview of the technology and a summary of recent studies of the most commonly used protein transduction domains and their potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cellular damage and the prevention of regulated cell death. PMID:27048815

  6. A Cell-penetrating Peptide Suppresses Inflammation by Inhibiting NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu Fu; Xu, Xiang; Fan, Xia; Zhang, Chun; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Xi; Guo, Wei; Xing, Wei; Yu, Jian; Yan, Jing-Long; Liang, Hua-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a central regulator of immune response and a potential target for developing anti-inflammatory agents. Mechanistic studies suggest that compounds that directly inhibit NF-κB DNA binding may block inflammation and the associated tissue damage. Thus, we attempted to discover peptides that could interfere with NF-κB signaling based on a highly conserved DNA-binding domain found in all NF-κB members. One such small peptide, designated as anti-inflammatory peptide-6 (AIP6), was characterized in the current study. AIP6 directly interacted with p65 and displayed an intrinsic cell-penetrating property. This peptide demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, AIP6 inhibited the DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of the p65 NF-κB subunit as well as the production of inflammatory mediators in macrophages upon stimulation. Local administration of AIP6 significantly inhibited inflammation induced by zymosan in mice. Collectively, our results suggest that AIP6 is a promising lead peptide for the development of specific NF-κB inhibitors as potential anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:21556052

  7. Inhibition of dengue virus entry into target cells using synthetic antiviral peptides.

    PubMed

    Alhoot, Mohammed Abdelfatah; Rathinam, Alwin Kumar; Wang, Seok Mui; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of DENV as a human pathogen, there is no specific treatment or protective vaccine. Successful entry into the host cells is necessary for establishing the infection. Recently, the virus entry step has become an attractive therapeutic strategy because it represents a barrier to suppress the onset of the infection. Four putative antiviral peptides were designed to target domain III of DENV-2 E protein using BioMoDroid algorithm. Two peptides showed significant inhibition of DENV when simultaneously incubated as shown by plaque formation assay, RT-qPCR, and Western blot analysis. Both DET4 and DET2 showed significant inhibition of virus entry (84.6% and 40.6% respectively) using micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, the TEM images showed that the inhibitory peptides caused structural abnormalities and alteration of the arrangement of the viral E protein, which interferes with virus binding and entry. Inhibition of DENV entry during the initial stages of infection can potentially reduce the viremia in infected humans resulting in prevention of the progression of dengue fever to the severe life-threatening infection, reduce the infected vector numbers, and thus break the transmission cycle. Moreover these peptides though designed against the conserved region in DENV-2 would have the potential to be active against all the serotypes of dengue and might be considered as Hits to begin designing and developing of more potent analogous peptides that could constitute as promising therapeutic agents for attenuating dengue infection. PMID:23630436

  8. Inhibition of Vaccinia virus entry by a broad spectrum antiviral peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Altmann, S.E.; Jones, J.C.; Schultz-Cherry, S.; Brandt, C.R.

    2009-06-05

    Concerns about the possible use of Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, as a weapon for bioterrorism have led to renewed efforts to identify new antivirals against orthopoxviruses. We identified a peptide, EB, which inhibited infection by Vaccinia virus with an EC{sub 50} of 15 muM. A control peptide, EBX, identical in composition to EB but differing in sequence, was inactive (EC{sub 50} > 200 muM), indicating sequence specificity. The inhibition was reversed upon removal of the peptide, and EB treatment had no effect on the physical integrity of virus particles as determined by electron microscopy. Viral adsorption was unaffected by the presence of EB, and the addition of EB post-entry had no effect on viral titers or on early gene expression. The addition of EB post-adsorption resulted in the inhibition of beta-galactosidase expression from an early viral promoter with an EC{sub 50} of 45 muM. A significant reduction in virus entry was detected in the presence of the peptide when the number of viral cores released into the cytoplasm was quantified. Electron microscopy indicated that 88% of the virions remained on the surface of cells in the presence of EB, compared to 37% in the control (p < 0.001). EB also blocked fusion-from-within, suggesting that virus infection is inhibited at the fusion step. Analysis of EB derivatives suggested that peptide length may be important for the activity of EB. The EB peptide is, to our knowledge, the first known small molecule inhibitor of Vaccinia virus entry.

  9. Targeted Proapoptotic Peptides Depleting Adipose Stromal Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Florez, Fernando; Dadbin, Ali; Zhang, Tao; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-02-01

    Progression of many cancers is associated with tumor infiltration by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are MSC that serve as adipocyte progenitors and endothelium-supporting cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Clinical and animal model studies indicate that ASC mobilized from WAT are recruited by tumors. Direct evidence for ASC function in tumor microenvironment has been lacking due to unavailability of approaches to specifically inactivate these cells. Here, we investigate the effects of a proteolysis-resistant targeted hunter-killer peptide D-WAT composed of a cyclic domain CSWKYWFGEC homing to ASC and of a proapoptotic domain KLAKLAK2. Using mouse bone marrow transplantation models, we show that D-WAT treatment specifically depletes tumor stromal and perivascular cells without directly killing malignant cells or tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. In several mouse carcinoma models, targeted ASC cytoablation reduced tumor vascularity and cell proliferation resulting in hemorrhaging, necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. We also validated a D-WAT derivative with a proapoptotic domain KFAKFAK2 that was found to have an improved cytoablative activity. Our results for the first time demonstrate that ASC, recruited as a component of tumor microenvironment, support cancer progression. We propose that drugs targeting ASC can be developed as a combination therapy complementing conventional cancer treatments. PMID:26316391

  10. Inhibition of HIV-1 virus replication using small soluble Tat peptides.

    PubMed

    Agbottah, Emmanuel; Zhang, Naigong; Dadgar, Shabnam; Pumfery, Anne; Wade, John D; Zeng, Chen; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2006-02-20

    Although the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to a significant reduction in AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, unfortunately, many patients discontinue their initial HAART regimen, resulting in development of viral resistance. During HIV infection, the viral activator Tat is needed for viral progeny formation, and the basic and core domains of Tat are the most conserved parts of the protein. Here, we show that a Tat 41/44 peptide from the core domain can inhibit HIV-1 gene expression and replication. The peptides are not toxic to cells and target the Cdk2/Cyclin E complex, inhibiting the phosphorylation of serine 5 of RNAPII. Using the Cdk2 X-ray crystallography structure, we found that the low-energy wild-type peptides could bind to the ATP binding pocket, whereas the mutant peptide bound to the Cdk2 interface. Finally, we show that these peptides do not allow loading of the catalytic domain of the cdk/cyclin complex onto the HIV-1 promoter in vivo. PMID:16289656

  11. Tryptophan inhibits Proteus vulgaris TnaC leader peptide elongation, activating tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yang, Rui; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Expression of the tna operon of Escherichia coli and of Proteus vulgaris is induced by L-tryptophan. In E. coli, tryptophan action is dependent on the presence of several critical residues (underlined) in the newly synthesized TnaC leader peptide, WFNIDXXL/IXXXXP. These residues are conserved in TnaC of P. vulgaris and of other bacterial species. TnaC of P. vulgaris has one additional feature, distinguishing it from TnaC of E. coli; it contains two C-terminal lysine residues following the conserved proline residue. In the present study, we investigated L-tryptophan induction of the P. vulgaris tna operon, transferred on a plasmid into E. coli. Induction was shown to be L-tryptophan dependent; however, the range of induction was less than that observed for the E. coli tna operon. We compared the genetic organization of both operons and predicted similar folding patterns for their respective leader mRNA segments. However, additional analyses revealed that L-tryptophan action in the P. vulgaris tna operon involves inhibition of TnaC elongation, following addition of proline, rather than inhibition of leader peptide termination. Our findings also establish that the conserved residues in TnaC of P. vulgaris are essential for L-tryptophan induction, and for inhibition of peptide elongation. TnaC synthesis is thus an excellent model system for studies of regulation of both peptide termination and peptide elongation, and for studies of ribosome recognition of the features of a nascent peptide. PMID:19767424

  12. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  13. Cell-Peptide Specific Interaction Can Inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv Infection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Deisy Carolina; Ocampo, Marisol; Reyes, Cesar; Arévalo-Pinzón, Gabriela; Munoz, Marina; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2016-04-01

    Studying proteins from the M. tuberculosis H37Rv envelop is important for understanding host-pathogen interaction regarding bacterial infection and survival within a host; such knowledge is indispensable regarding studies aimed at developing drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis, a disease which continues to cause more than one million deaths worldwide every year. The present work presents a study of the Rv3705c protein which has been described as being an outer protein. Several servers and bioinformatics' tools were used for predicting its location on mycobacterial surface and a 3D model of the protein was obtained which was then compared to experimental circular dichroism results for its peptides. PCR assays were used for corroborating rv3705c gene presence and transcription in a laboratory strain and immunoblotting and electron microscopy were used for confirming protein localisation on cell envelop. Receptor-ligand assays revealed two peptides having high specific binding (HABPs); peptide 38485 ((121)DRAFHRVVDRTVGTSGQTTA(140)) bound to both cell lines used as infection target (U937 and A549 epithelial cell line-derived macrophages) and 38488 ((181)RLRENVLLQAKVTQSGNAGP(200)) bound to U937 cells. It was found that peptide 38485 provided significant inhibition regarding mycobacterial entry to both cell lines in in vitro assays. These results led to proposing peptide 38485 as one of the epitopes to be used in future studies aimed at characterising the immune response of functionally important synthetic peptides which could be included in developing a synthetic anti-tuberculosis vaccine. PMID:26375297

  14. Subunit disassembly and inhibition of TNFα by a semi-synthetic bicyclic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Luzi, Stefan; Kondo, Yasushi; Bernard, Elise; Stadler, Lukas K. J.; Vaysburd, Marina; Winter, Greg; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Macrocyclic peptides are potentially a source of powerful drugs, but their de novo discovery remains challenging. Here we describe the discovery of a high-affinity (Kd = 10 nM) peptide macrocycle (M21) against human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (hTNFα), a key drug target in the treatment of inflammatory disorders, directly from diverse semi-synthetic phage peptide repertoires. The bicyclic peptide M21 (ACPPCLWQVLC) comprises two loops covalently anchored to a 2,4,6-trimethyl-mesitylene core and upon binding induces disassembly of the trimeric TNFα cytokine into dimers and monomers. A 2.9 Å crystal structure of the M21/hTNFα complex reveals the peptide bound to a hTNFα dimer at a normally buried epitope in the trimer interface overlapping the binding site of a previously discovered small molecule ligand (SPD304), which also induces TNF trimer dissociation and synergizes with M21 in the inhibition of TNFα cytotoxicity. The discovery of M21 underlines the potential of semi-synthetic bicyclic peptides as ligands for the discovery of cryptic epitopes, some of which are poorly accessible to antibodies. PMID:25614525

  15. Schistosoma infection inhibits cellular immune responses to core HCV peptides.

    PubMed

    Farid, A; Al-Sherbiny, M; Osman, A; Mohamed, N; Saad, A; Shata, M T; Lee, D-H; Prince, A M; Strickland, G T

    2005-05-01

    Patients coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and the trematode, Schistosoma mansoni, have an increased incidence of viral persistence and accelerated fibrosis. To investigate immunological mechanisms responsible for this more aggressive natural history of HCV, the core HCV-specific T-cell responses were analysed in 44 donated blood units rejected because they had antibodies to HCV (anti-HCV). Half also had anti-S. mansoni antibodies, evidence of past or active infection. HCV-specific ELISPOT responses were examined using pools of 180 overlapping 9-mer peptides with offsets of one covering the core of HCV genotype 4a. Comparison of T-cell responses in blood units positive for both anti-HCV and anti-Schistosoma antibodies with blood units positive only for anti-HCV antibodies showed a significant decrease in core-specific T-cell IFN-gamma (505+/- 46 vs. 803 +/- 66 ISC/10(6) cells, P < 0.001), IL-4 (2 +/- 108 vs. 641 +/- 131 ISC/10(6) cells, P < 0.001), and IL-10 (159 +/- 105 vs. 466 +/- 407 ISC/10(6) cells, P < 0.002) responses. In contrast, there was no significant difference in cell-mediated immune response (CMI) to PHA mitogen between these two groups. Therefore, we concluded T cells from persons with anti-Schistosoma have reduced IFN-gamma, IL-4, and IL-10 secreting HCV-specific T-cell responses. This may explain why Schistosoma coinfection increases persistence and severity of HCV infection. PMID:15987342

  16. Inhibition of atrial natriuretic peptide-induced natriuresis by plasma hydrolysates containing pepsanurin.

    PubMed

    Borić, M P; Croxatto, H R; Albertini, R; Roblero, J S

    1992-02-01

    The specificity of antidiuretic actions of pepsanurin, a peptidic fraction obtained by pepsin hydrolysis of plasma, was studied in anesthetized rats and in isolated perfused rat kidneys. Pepsanurin was obtained from fresh dialyzed human plasma digested with pepsin (2,400 units/ml, 18 hours at 37 degrees C, pH 2.5), deproteinized (10 minutes at 80 degrees C), and centrifuged. In the rat, intraperitoneal injections of pepsanurin (0.5 ml/100 g body wt) significantly inhibited the effects of an intravenous bolus of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) (0.5 micrograms) on water, sodium, and potassium excretion without altering systemic blood pressure. In addition, pepsanurin abolished the peak in glomerular filtration rate and reduced the ANP-induced rise in fractional sodium excretion. Pepsanurin also inhibited the natriuretic effects of amiloride (10 micrograms/100 g body wt i.v.) without changing glomerular filtration rate, but it did not inhibit the potassium-retaining effect of amiloride. In contrast, pepsanurin had no effect on basal urinary excretion, and it did not affect the diuretic response induced by furosemide (doses of 25, 50, or 100 micrograms i.v.). Control peptidic hydrolysates prepared from human plasma preincubated 48 hours at 37 degrees C (PIPH), bovine albumin (BSAH), or human albumin did not inhibit ANP, amiloride, or furosemide. In perfused kidneys, pepsanurin significantly and reversibly reduced sodium and water excretion. Furthermore, pepsanurin, but not PIPH or BSAH, blocked the natriuretic and diuretic effects of ANP. These results support the existence of a specific plasma substrate able to release a peptide or peptides that counteract distal tubule diuresis and natriuresis by an intrarenal mechanism. PMID:1531208

  17. Mechanistic investigations of matrix metalloproteinase-8 inhibition by metal abstraction peptide.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jenifer K; McNiff, Michaela L; Ulapane, Sasanka B; Spencer, Paulette; Laurence, Jennifer S; Berrie, Cindy L

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism of matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) inhibition was investigated using ellipsometric measurements of the interaction of MMP-8 with a surface bound peptide inhibitor, tether-metal abstraction peptide (MAP), bound to self-assembled monolayer films. MMP-8 is a collagenase whose activity and dysregulation have been implicated in a number of disease states, including cancer metastasis, diabetic neuropathy, and degradation of biomedical reconstructions, including dental restorations. Regulation of activity of MMP-8 and other matrix metalloproteinases is thus a significant, but challenging, therapeutic target. Strong inhibition of MMP-8 activity has recently been achieved via the small metal binding peptide tether-MAP. Here, the authors elucidate the mechanism of this inhibition and demonstrate that it occurs through the direct interaction of the MAP Tag and the Zn(2+) binding site in the MMP-8 active site. This enhanced understanding of the mechanism of inhibition will allow the design of more potent inhibitors as well as assays important for monitoring critical MMP levels in disease states. PMID:27129919

  18. Peptides of Matrix Gla Protein Inhibit Nucleation and Growth of Hydroxyapatite and Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Goiko, Maria; Dierolf, Joshua; Gleberzon, Jared S.; Liao, Yinyin; Grohe, Bernd; Goldberg, Harvey A.; de Bruyn, John R.; Hunter, Graeme K.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated protein that has been shown to prevent the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in the walls of blood vessels. MGP is also expressed in kidney and may inhibit the formation of kidney stones, which mainly consist of another crystalline phase, calcium oxalate monohydrate. To determine the mechanism by which MGP prevents soft-tissue calcification, we have synthesized peptides corresponding to the phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated sequences of human MGP in both post-translationally modified and non-modified forms. The effects of these peptides on hydroxyapatite formation and calcium oxalate crystallization were quantified using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Peptides YGlapS (MGP1-14: YγEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YEpS (YEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YGlaS (YγESHESMESYELNP) and SK-Gla (MGP43-56: SKPVHγELNRγEACDD) inhibited formation of hydroxyapatite in order of potency YGlapS > YEpS > YGlaS > SK-Gla. The effects of YGlapS, YEpS and YGlaS on hydroxyapatite formation were on both crystal nucleation and growth; the effect of SK-Gla was on nucleation. YGlapS and YEpS significantly inhibited the growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, while simultaneously promoting the formation of calcium oxalate dihydrate. The effects of these phosphopeptides on calcium oxalate monohydrate formation were on growth of crystals rather than nucleation. We have shown that the use of dynamic light scattering allows inhibitors of hydroxyapatite nucleation and growth to be distinguished. We have also demonstrated for the first time that MGP peptides inhibit the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate. Based on the latter finding, we propose that MGP function not only to prevent blood-vessel calcification but also to inhibit stone formation in kidney. PMID:24265810

  19. Human mitochondrial peptide deformylase, a new anticancer target of actinonin-based antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mona D; She, Yuhong; Soskis, Michael J; Borella, Christopher P; Gardner, Jeffrey R; Hayes, Paula A; Dy, Benzon M; Heaney, Mark L; Philips, Mark R; Bornmann, William G; Sirotnak, Francis M; Scheinberg, David A

    2004-10-01

    Peptide deformylase activity was thought to be limited to ribosomal protein synthesis in prokaryotes, where new peptides are initiated with an N-formylated methionine. We describe here a new human peptide deformylase (Homo sapiens PDF, or HsPDF) that is localized to the mitochondria. HsPDF is capable of removing formyl groups from N-terminal methionines of newly synthesized mitochondrial proteins, an activity previously not thought to be necessary in mammalian cells. We show that actinonin, a peptidomimetic antibiotic that inhibits HsPDF, also inhibits the proliferation of 16 human cancer cell lines. We designed and synthesized 33 chemical analogs of actinonin; all of the molecules with potent activity against HsPDF also inhibited tumor cell growth, and vice versa, confirming target specificity. Small interfering RNA inhibition of HsPDF protein expression was also antiproliferative. Actinonin treatment of cells led to a tumor-specific mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ATP depletion in a time- and dose-dependent manner; removal of actinonin led to a recovery of the membrane potential consistent with indirect effects on the electron transport chain. In animal models, oral or parenteral actinonin was well tolerated and inhibited human prostate cancer and lung cancer growth. We conclude that HsPDF is a new human mitochondrial enzyme that may provide a novel selective target for anticancer therapy by use of actinonin-based antibiotics. PMID:15489958

  20. Human mitochondrial peptide deformylase, a new anticancer target of actinonin-based antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mona D.; She, Yuhong; Soskis, Michael J.; Borella, Christopher P.; Gardner, Jeffrey R.; Hayes, Paula A.; Dy, Benzon M.; Heaney, Mark L.; Philips, Mark R.; Bornmann, William G.; Sirotnak, Francis M.; Scheinberg, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Peptide deformylase activity was thought to be limited to ribosomal protein synthesis in prokaryotes, where new peptides are initiated with an N-formylated methionine. We describe here a new human peptide deformylase (Homo sapiens PDF, or HsPDF) that is localized to the mitochondria. HsPDF is capable of removing formyl groups from N-terminal methionines of newly synthesized mitochondrial proteins, an activity previously not thought to be necessary in mammalian cells. We show that actinonin, a peptidomimetic antibiotic that inhibits HsPDF, also inhibits the proliferation of 16 human cancer cell lines. We designed and synthesized 33 chemical analogs of actinonin; all of the molecules with potent activity against HsPDF also inhibited tumor cell growth, and vice versa, confirming target specificity. Small interfering RNA inhibition of HsPDF protein expression was also antiproliferative. Actinonin treatment of cells led to a tumor-specific mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ATP depletion in a time- and dose-dependent manner; removal of actinonin led to a recovery of the membrane potential consistent with indirect effects on the electron transport chain. In animal models, oral or parenteral actinonin was well tolerated and inhibited human prostate cancer and lung cancer growth. We conclude that HsPDF is a new human mitochondrial enzyme that may provide a novel selective target for anticancer therapy by use of actinonin-based antibiotics. PMID:15489958

  1. FKBPL and Peptide Derivatives: Novel Biological Agents That Inhibit Angiogenesis by a CD44-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Andrea; O’Rourke, Martin; Yakkundi, Anita; Worthington, Jenny; Hookham, Michelle; Bicknell, Roy; McCarthy, Helen O.; McClelland, Keeva; McCallum, Lynn; Dyer, Hayder; McKeen, Hayley; Waugh, David; Roberts, Jennifer; McGregor, Joanne; Cotton, Graham; James, Iain; Harrison, Timothy; Hirst, David G.; Robson, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Anti-angiogenic therapies can be an important adjunct to the management of many malignancies. Here we investigated a novel protein, FKBPL, and peptide derivative for their anti-angiogenic activity and mechanism of action. Experimental Design Recombinant FKBPL (rFKBPL) and its peptide derivative were assessed in a range of human microvascular endothelial cell (HMEC-1) assays in vitro. Their ability to inhibit proliferation, migration and Matrigel dependent tubule formation was determined. They were further evaluated in an ex-vivo rat model of neo-vascularisation and in two in vivo mouse models of angiogenesis; the sponge implantation and the intra-vital microscopy models. Anti-tumor efficacy was determined in two human tumor xenograft models grown in SCID mice. Finally, the dependence of peptide on CD44 was determined using a CD44 targeted siRNA approach or in cell lines of differing CD44 status. Results rFKBPL inhibited endothelial cell migration, tubule formation and microvessel formation in vitro and in vivo. The region responsible for FKBPL’s anti-angiogenic activity was identified and a 24 amino acid peptide (AD-01) spanning this sequence was synthesised. It was potently anti-angiogenic and inhibited growth in two human tumor xenograft models (DU145 and MDA-231) when administered systemically, either on its own, or in combination with docetaxel. The anti-angiogenic activity of FKBPL and AD-01 was dependent on the cell surface receptor CD44 and signalling downstream of this receptor promoted an anti-migratory phenotype. Conclusion FKBPL and its peptide derivative AD-01 have potent anti-angiogenic activity. Thus, these agents offer the potential of an attractive new approach to anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:21364036

  2. Tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptides inhibit HIV-1 infection via coreceptor mimicry.

    PubMed

    Cimbro, Raffaello; Peterson, Francis C; Liu, Qingbo; Guzzo, Christina; Zhang, Peng; Miao, Huiyi; Van Ryk, Donald; Ambroggio, Xavier; Hurt, Darrell E; De Gioia, Luca; Volkman, Brian F; Dolan, Michael A; Lusso, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is a post-translational modification that facilitates protein-protein interaction. Two sulfated tyrosines (Tys173 and Tys177) were recently identified within the second variable (V2) loop of the major HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and shown to contribute to stabilizing the intramolecular interaction between V2 and the third variable (V3) loop. Here, we report that tyrosine-sulfated peptides derived from V2 act as structural and functional mimics of the CCR5 N-terminus and potently block HIV-1 infection. Nuclear magnetic and surface plasmon resonance analyses indicate that a tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptide (pV2α-Tys) adopts a CCR5-like helical conformation and directly interacts with gp120 in a CD4-dependent fashion, competing with a CCR5 N-terminal peptide. Sulfated V2 mimics, but not their non-sulfated counterparts, inhibit HIV-1 entry and fusion by preventing coreceptor utilization, with the highly conserved C-terminal sulfotyrosine, Tys177, playing a dominant role. Unlike CCR5 N-terminal peptides, V2 mimics inhibit a broad range of HIV-1 strains irrespective of their coreceptor tropism, highlighting the overall structural conservation of the coreceptor-binding site in gp120. These results document the use of receptor mimicry by a retrovirus to occlude a key neutralization target site and provide leads for the design of therapeutic strategies against HIV-1. PMID:27389109

  3. Characterization of a Peptide Domain within the GB Virus C NS5A Phosphoprotein that Inhibits HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jinhua; McLinden, James H.; Chang, Qing; Jordan, Emma L.; Stapleton, Jack T.

    2008-01-01

    Background GBV-C infection is associated with prolonged survival in HIV-infected people and GBV-C inhibits HIV replication in co-infection models. Expression of the GBV-C nonstructural phosphoprotein 5A (NS5A) decreases surface levels of the HIV co-receptor CXCR4, induces the release of SDF-1 and inhibits HIV replication in Jurkat CD4+ T cell lines. Methodology/Principal Findings Jurkat cell lines stably expressing NS5A protein and peptides were generated and HIV replication in these cell lines assessed. HIV replication was significantly inhibited in all cell lines expressing NS5A amino acids 152–165. Substitution of an either alanine or glycine for the serine at position 158 (S158A or S158G) resulted in a significant decrease in the HIV inhibitory effect. In contrast, substituting a phosphomimetic amino acid (glutamic acid; S158E) inhibited HIV as well as the parent peptide. HIV inhibition was associated with lower levels of surface expression of the HIV co-receptor CXCR4 and increased release of the CXCR4 ligand, SDF-1 compared to control cells. Incubation of CD4+ T cell lines with synthetic peptides containing amino acids 152–167 or the S158E mutant peptide prior to HIV infection resulted in HIV replication inhibition compared to control peptides. Conclusions/Significance Expression of GBV-C NS5A amino acids 152–165 are sufficient to inhibit HIV replication in vitro, and the serine at position 158 appears important for this effect through either phosphorylation or structural changes in this peptide. The addition of synthetic peptides containing 152–167 or the S158E substitution to Jurkat cells resulted in HIV replication inhibition in vitro. These data suggest that GBV-C peptides or a peptide mimetic may offer a novel, cellular-based approach to antiretroviral therapy. PMID:18596910

  4. Inhibition of Influenza Virus Infection by a Novel Antiviral Peptide That Targets Viral Attachment to Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeremy C.; Turpin, Elizabeth A.; Bultmann, Hermann; Brandt, Curtis R.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2006-01-01

    Influenza A viruses continue to cause widespread morbidity and mortality. There is an added concern that the highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza A viruses, currently found throughout many parts of the world, represent a serious public health threat and may result in a pandemic. Intervention strategies to halt an influenza epidemic or pandemic are a high priority, with an emphasis on vaccines and antiviral drugs. In these studies, we demonstrate that a 20-amino-acid peptide (EB, for entry blocker) derived from the signal sequence of fibroblast growth factor 4 exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral activity against influenza viruses including the H5N1 subtype in vitro. The EB peptide was protective in vivo, even when administered postinfection. Mechanistically, the EB peptide inhibits the attachment to the cellular receptor, preventing infection. Further studies demonstrated that the EB peptide specifically binds to the viral hemagglutinin protein. This novel peptide has potential value as a reagent to study virus attachment and as a future therapeutic. PMID:17005658

  5. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and Aβ1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on Aβ1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins. PMID:26444976

  6. A class IIa peptide from Enterococcus mundtii inhibits bacteria associated with otitis media.

    PubMed

    Knoetze, H; Todorov, S D; Dicks, L M T

    2008-03-01

    Peptide ST4SA, produced by Enterococcus mundtii ST4SA, inhibits the growth of Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Gram-positive bacteria isolated from patients diagnosed with middle ear infections. The peptide adsorbed at a level of 94% to S. pneumoniae 40, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 25 and E. faecium HKLHS. Low concentrations of peptide ST4SA (51200 arbitrary units (AU)/mL) caused DNA and enzyme leakage from target cells, whilst 1638400AU/mL caused cell lysis. No decrease in antimicrobial activity was observed when tested on solid medium with human blood as base. Peptide ST4SA revealed a similar level of activity compared with tetracycline (30 microg), but much higher activity compared with nasal sprays, aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, lincosamides, macrolides, nitroimidazole, penicillin, quinolones, sulphonamides, chloramphenicol, furazolidone, fusidic acid, rifampicin, trimethoprim, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and vancomycin when tested in vitro. Peptide ST4SA dissipates the proton-motive force and may be used in the treatment of multidrug-resistant strains where antibiotics are excluded from cells by efflux pumps dependent on the membrane proton gradient. PMID:18155886

  7. Inhibition of pepsin by analogues of pepsinogen-(1-12)-peptide with substitutions in the 4-7 sequence region.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B M; Lewitt, M; Pham, C

    1983-01-01

    Derivatives of the 1-12 sequence of pig pepsinogen were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The three derivatives contain substitutions in the 4-7 region of the 1-12 sequence. Glycine was used to replace the hydrophobic residues -Val-Pro-Leu-Val- in pairs. After cleavage and purification, the synthetic peptides were compared with a synthetic peptide of the native sequence, prepared at the same time, with respect to their ability to inhibit the pepsin-catalysed clotting of milk. Inhibitory potency, determined from plots of percentage inhibition versus concentration of synthetic peptide, is inversely correlated with the substitution of glycine residues for the hydrophobic residues. Therefore the equilibrium inhibition of pepsin by these peptides is dominated by the hydrophobic nature of the 4-7 sequence region. PMID:6405735

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism. PMID:26807480

  9. Inhibition of peptide binding to DR molecules by a leupeptin-induced invariant chain fragment.

    PubMed

    Demotz, S; Danieli, C; Wallny, H J; Majdic, O

    1994-08-01

    Loading of peptides onto DR molecules was studied by characterizing precursors of the mature peptide-DR complexes expressed at the surface of B cells. Since invariant chain (Ii) prevents binding of peptides by DR molecules, it was speculated that analysis of complexes between DR heterodimers and proteolytic fragments of Ii offers the possibility to examine how DR molecules and peptides assemble. Using a procedure combining a two-step affinity chromatography and gel filtration, we isolated from leupeptin-treated B cells complexes between DR molecules and N-terminal Ii fragments previously called "leupeptin-induced polypeptides" (LIP; Blum and Cresswell, 1988, Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 85, 3975-3979). It was observed that the most prominent LIP fragment has a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 16 kDa. In addition, we show that this polypeptide species does not bear N-linked glycans, indicating that this fragment does not extend beyond residue 129 of Ii. Similarly to DR alpha beta heterodimers associated with the full length 33 and 35 kDa Ii forms, DR alpha beta heterodimers associated with LIP fragments are unstable in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at ambient temperature, whereas mature DR alpha beta heterodimers are resistant to dissociation with SDS. These results are indirect evidence that LIP-DR complexes are devoid of bound peptides. This possibility was supported by showing that LIP-DR complexes fail to bind a radioiodinated tetanus toxin peptide (125I-p2), while DR molecules, which are spontaneously released from complexes with LIP fragments, bind the labeled peptide. These results demonstrate that association with LIP fragments is sufficient to prevent binding of peptides by DR molecules. This notion was further documented by showing that binding of 125I-p2 on DR heterodimers is inhibited by preparations of LIP fragment. By contrast, a soluble recombinant fragment corresponding to the extracytoplasmic region of Ii did not block 125I-p2 binding. The results

  10. Resynthesis of reactive site peptide bond and temporary inhibition of Streptomyces metalloproteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Seeram, S S; Hiraga, K; Oda, K

    1997-10-01

    Streptomyces metalloproteinase inhibitor (SMPI) is a small proteinaceous inhibitor which inhibits metalloproteinases such as thermolysin (Ki =1.14 x 10(-10) M). When incubated with the enzyme, it is gradually hydrolyzed at the Cys64-Val65 peptide bond, which was identified as the reactive site by mutational analysis. To achieve a further understanding of the inhibition mechanism, we attempted to resynthesize the cleaved reactive site by using the enzyme catalytic action. The native inhibitor was resynthesized from the modified inhibitor (Ki =2.18 x 10(-8) M) by incubation with a catalytic amount of thermolysin under the same conditions as used for hydrolysis (pH 7.5, 25 degrees C), suggesting that SMPI follows the standard mechanism of inhibition of serine proteinase inhibitors. Temporary inhibition was observed when the native inhibitor and thermolysin were incubated at a 1:100 (mol/mol) enzyme-inhibitor ratio at 37 degrees C. SMPI showed temporary inhibition towards all the enzymes it inhibited. The inhibitory spectrum of SMPI was analyzed with various metalloproteinases based on the Ki values and limited proteolysis patterns. Pseudomonas elastase and Streptomyces griseus metalloproteinase II formed more stable complexes and showed much lower Ki values (approximately 2 pM) than thermolysin. In the limited proteolysis experiments weak inhibitors were degraded by the enzymes. SMPI did not inhibit almelysin, Streptomyces caespitosus neutral proteinase or matrix metalloproteinases. SMPI specifically inhibits metalloproteinases which are sensitive to phosphoramidon. PMID:9399583

  11. The molecular mechanism of fullerene-inhibited aggregation of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Luogang; Luo, Yin; Lin, Dongdong; Xi, Wenhui; Yang, Xinju; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of β-sheet formation has been considered as the primary therapeutic strategy for AD. Increasing data show that nanoparticles can retard or promote the fibrillation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides depending on the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, our replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations show that fullerene nanoparticle - C60 (with a fullerene : peptide molar ratio greater than 1 : 8) can dramatically prevent β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments further confirm the inhibitory effect of C60 on Aβ(16-22) fibrillation, in support of our REMD simulations. An important finding from our REMD simulations is that fullerene C180, albeit with the same number of carbon atoms as three C60 molecules (3C60) and smaller surface area than 3C60, displays an unexpected stronger inhibitory effect on the β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. A detailed analysis of the fullerene-peptide interaction reveals that the stronger inhibition of β-sheet formation by C180 results from the strong hydrophobic and aromatic-stacking interactions of the fullerene hexagonal rings with the Phe rings relative to the pentagonal rings. The strong interactions between the fullerene nanoparticles and Aβ(16-22) peptides significantly weaken the peptide-peptide interaction that is important for β-sheet formation, thus retarding Aβ(16-22) fibrillation. Overall, our studies reveal the significant role of fullerene hexagonal rings in the inhibition of Aβ(16-22) fibrillation and provide novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of

  12. Peptidoglycan Branched Stem Peptides Contribute to Streptococcus pneumoniae Virulence by Inhibiting Pneumolysin Release

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Neil G.; Narciso, Ana R.; Filipe, Sergio R.; Camilli, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) colonizes the human nasopharynx and is a significant pathogen worldwide. Pneumolysin (Ply) is a multi-functional, extracellular virulence factor produced by this organism that is critical for pathogenesis. Despite the absence of any apparent secretion or cell surface attachment motifs, Ply localizes to the cell envelope of actively growing cells. We sought to characterize the consequences of this surface localization. Through functional assays with whole cells and subcellular fractions, we determined that Ply activity and its release into the extracellular environment are inhibited by peptidoglycan (PG) structure. The ability of PG to inhibit Ply release was dependent on the stem peptide composition of this macromolecule, which was manipulated by mutation of the murMN operon that encodes proteins responsible for branched stem peptide synthesis. Additionally, removal of choline-binding proteins from the cell surface significantly reduced Ply release to levels observed in a mutant with a high proportion of branched stem peptides suggesting a link between this structural feature and surface-associated choline-binding proteins involved in PG metabolism. Of clinical relevance, we also demonstrate that a hyperactive, mosaic murMN allele associated with penicillin resistance causes decreased Ply release with concomitant increases in the amount of branched stem peptides. Finally, using a murMN deletion mutant, we observed that increased Ply release is detrimental to virulence during a murine model of pneumonia. Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for branched stem peptides in pneumococcal pathogenesis and demonstrate the importance of controlled Ply release during infection. These results highlight the importance of PG composition in pathogenesis and may have broad implications for the diverse PG structures observed in other bacterial pathogens. PMID:26114646

  13. The FGF-2-Derived Peptide FREG Inhibits Melanoma Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Maria S; Faraone, Debora; D'Arcangelo, Daniela; De Marchis, Francesco; Toietta, Gabriele; Ribatti, Domenico; Parazzoli, Alberto; Colombo, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Facchiano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Previous data report that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-derived peptide FREG potently inhibits FGF-2-dependent angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that FREG inhibits up to 70% in vitro growth and invasion/migration of smooth muscle and melanoma cells. Such inhibition is mediated by platelet-derived growth factor-receptor-α (PDGF-Rα); in fact, proliferation and migration were restored upon PDGF-Rα neutralization. Further experiments demonstrated that FREG interacts with PDGF-Rα both in vitro and in vivo and stimulates its phosphorylation. We have previously shown that overexpressing PDGF-Rα strongly inhibits melanoma growth in vivo; we, therefore, hypothesized that PDGF-Rα agonists may represent a novel tool to inhibit melanoma growth in vivo. To support this hypothesis, FREG was inoculated intravenously (i.v.) in a mouse melanoma model and markedly inhibited pulmonary metastases formation. Immunohistochemical analyses showed less proliferation, less angiogenesis, and more apoptosis in metastasized lungs upon FREG treatment, as compared to untreated controls. Finally, in preliminary acute toxicity studies, FREG showed no toxicity signs in healthy animals, and neither microscopic nor macroscopic toxicity at the liver, kidney, and lungs level. Altogether, these data indicate that FREG systemic treatment strongly inhibits melanoma metastases development and indicate for the first time that agonists of PDGF-Rα may control melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20924364

  14. A novel sea anemone peptide that inhibits acid-sensing ion channels.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Armando Alexei; Salceda, Emilio; Garateix, Anoland Georgina; Zaharenko, André Junqueira; Peigneur, Steve; López, Omar; Pons, Tirso; Richardson, Michael; Díaz, Maylín; Hernández, Yasnay; Ständker, Ludger; Tytgat, Jan; Soto, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    Sea anemones produce ion channels peptide toxins of pharmacological and biomedical interest. However, peptides acting on ligand-gated ion channels, including acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) toxins, remain poorly explored. PhcrTx1 is the first compound characterized from the sea anemone Phymanthus crucifer, and it constitutes a novel ASIC inhibitor. This peptide was purified by gel filtration, ion-exchange and reversed-phase chromatography followed by biological evaluation on ion channels of isolated rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons using patch clamp techniques. PhcrTx1 partially inhibited ASIC currents (IC50∼100 nM), and also voltage-gated K(+) currents but the effects on the peak and on the steady state currents were lower than 20% in DRG neurons, at concentrations in the micromolar range. No significant effect was observed on Na(+) voltage-gated currents in DRG neurons. The N-terminal sequencing yielded 32 amino acid residues, with a molecular mass of 3477 Da by mass spectrometry. No sequence identity to other sea anemone peptides was found. Interestingly, the bioinformatic analysis of Cys-pattern and secondary structure arrangement suggested that this peptide presents an Inhibitor Cystine Knot (ICK) scaffold, which has been found in other venomous organisms such as spider, scorpions and cone snails. Our results show that PhcrTx1 represents the first member of a new structural group of sea anemones toxins acting on ASIC and, with much lower potency, on Kv channels. Moreover, this is the first report of an ICK peptide in cnidarians, suggesting that the occurrence of this motif in venomous animals is more ancient than expected. PMID:23764262

  15. Advances in peptidic and peptidomimetic-based approaches to inhibit STAT signaling in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Szelag, Malgorzata; Wesoly, Joanna; Bluyssen, Hans A R

    2016-01-01

    STATs promote fundamental cellular processes, marking them as convergence points of many oncogenic and inflammatory pathways. Therefore, aberrant activation of STAT signaling is implicated in a plethora of human diseases, like cancer, inflammation and auto-immunity. Identification of STAT-specific inhibitors is the topic of great practical importance, and various inhibitory strategies are being pursued. An interesting approach includes peptides and peptide-like biopolymers, because they allow the manipulation of STAT signaling without the transfer of genetic material. Phosphopeptides and peptidomimetics directly target STATs by inhibiting dimerization. Despite that a large number of efficient peptide- based STAT3-specific inhibitors have been reported to date, none of them was able to meet the pharmacological requirements to serve as a potent anti-cancer drug. The existing limitations, like metabolic instability and poor cell permeability during in vivo tests, excluded these macromolecules from further clinical development. To overcome these liabilities, in the last five years many advances have been made to develop next generation STAT-specific inhibitors. Here we discuss the pitfalls of current STAT inhibitory strategies and review the progress on the development of peptide-like prodrugs directly targeting STATs. Novel strategies involve screening of high-complexity libraries of random peptides, as specific STAT3 or STAT5 DNA-binding inhibitors, to construct cell permeable peptide aptamers and aptides for cancer therapy. Another new direction is synthesis of negative dominant α-helical mimetics of the STAT3 N-domain, preventing oligomerization on DNA. Moreover, construction of phosphopeptide conjugates with molecules mediating cellular uptake offers new therapeutic possibilities in treatment of cancer, asthma and allergy. PMID:26521960

  16. Proline-Rich Peptide from the Coral Pathogen Vibrio shiloi That Inhibits Photosynthesis of Zooxanthellae

    PubMed Central

    Banin, Ehud; Khare, Sanjay K.; Naider, Fred; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2001-01-01

    The coral-bleaching bacterium Vibrio shiloi biosynthesizes and secretes an extracellular peptide, referred to as toxin P, which inhibits photosynthesis of coral symbiotic algae (zooxanthellae). Toxin P was produced during the stationary phase when the bacterium was grown on peptone or Casamino Acids media at 29°C. Glycerol inhibited the production of toxin P. Toxin P was purified to homogeneity, yielding the following 12-residue peptide: PYPVYAPPPVVP (molecular weight, 1,295.54). The structure of toxin P was confirmed by chemical synthesis. In the presence of 12.5 mM NH4Cl, pure natural or synthetic toxin P (10 μM) caused a 64% decrease in the photosynthetic quantum yield of zooxanthellae within 5 min. The inhibition was proportional to the toxin P concentration. Toxin P bound avidly to zooxanthellae, such that subsequent addition of NH4Cl resulted in rapid inhibition of photosynthesis. When zooxanthellae were incubated in the presence of NH4Cl and toxin P, there was a rapid decrease in the pH (pH 7.8 to 7.2) of the bulk liquid, suggesting that toxin P facilitates transport of NH3 into the cell. It is known that uptake of NH3 into cells can destroy the pH gradient and block photosynthesis. This mode of action of toxin P can help explain the mechanism of coral bleaching by V. shiloi. PMID:11282602

  17. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by a preS1-binding Peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ming; He, Yonggang; Wan, Yanmin; Bai, Weiya; Tao, Shuai; Ren, Yanqin; Zhang, Xinxin; Xu, Jianqing; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Junqi; Hu, Kanghong; Xie, Youhua

    2016-01-01

    Entry inhibitors are promising novel antivirals against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The existing potential entry inhibitors have targeted the cellular receptor(s). In this study, we aim to develop the first entry inhibitor that inhibits HBV infection via targeting viral particles. The preS1 segment of the large envelope glycoprotein of HBV is essential for virion attachment and infection. Previously, we obtained a preS1-binding short peptide B10 by screening a phage display peptide library using the N-terminal half of preS1 (residues 1 to 60, genotype C). We report here that by means of concatenation of B10, we identified a quadruple concatemer 4B10 that displayed a markedly increased preS1-binding activity. The main binding site of 4B10 in preS1 was mapped to the receptor binding enhancing region. 4B10 blocked HBV attachment to hepatic cells and inhibited HBV infection of primary human and tupaia hepatocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. The 4B10-mediated inhibition of HBV infection is specific as it did not inhibit the infection of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus or human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Moreover, 4B10 showed no binding activity to hepatic cells. In conclusion, we have identified 4B10 as a promising candidate for a novel class of HBV entry inhibitors. PMID:27384014

  18. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by a preS1-binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ming; He, Yonggang; Wan, Yanmin; Bai, Weiya; Tao, Shuai; Ren, Yanqin; Zhang, Xinxin; Xu, Jianqing; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Junqi; Hu, Kanghong; Xie, Youhua

    2016-01-01

    Entry inhibitors are promising novel antivirals against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The existing potential entry inhibitors have targeted the cellular receptor(s). In this study, we aim to develop the first entry inhibitor that inhibits HBV infection via targeting viral particles. The preS1 segment of the large envelope glycoprotein of HBV is essential for virion attachment and infection. Previously, we obtained a preS1-binding short peptide B10 by screening a phage display peptide library using the N-terminal half of preS1 (residues 1 to 60, genotype C). We report here that by means of concatenation of B10, we identified a quadruple concatemer 4B10 that displayed a markedly increased preS1-binding activity. The main binding site of 4B10 in preS1 was mapped to the receptor binding enhancing region. 4B10 blocked HBV attachment to hepatic cells and inhibited HBV infection of primary human and tupaia hepatocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. The 4B10-mediated inhibition of HBV infection is specific as it did not inhibit the infection of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus or human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Moreover, 4B10 showed no binding activity to hepatic cells. In conclusion, we have identified 4B10 as a promising candidate for a novel class of HBV entry inhibitors. PMID:27384014

  19. Identification of Equine Lactadherin-derived Peptides That Inhibit Rotavirus Infection via Integrin Receptor Competition*

    PubMed Central

    Civra, Andrea; Giuffrida, Maria Gabriella; Donalisio, Manuela; Napolitano, Lorenzo; Takada, Yoshikazu; Coulson, Barbara S.; Conti, Amedeo; Lembo, David

    2015-01-01

    Human rotavirus is the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and children under the age of 5 years in both developed and developing countries. Human lactadherin, a milk fat globule membrane glycoprotein, inhibits human rotavirus infection in vitro, whereas bovine lactadherin is not active. Moreover, it protects breastfed infants against symptomatic rotavirus infections. To explore the potential antiviral activity of lactadherin sourced by equines, we undertook a proteomic analysis of milk fat globule membrane proteins from donkey milk and elucidated its amino acid sequence. Alignment of the human, bovine, and donkey lactadherin sequences revealed the presence of an Asp-Gly-Glu (DGE) α2β1 integrin-binding motif in the N-terminal domain of donkey sequence only. Because integrin α2β1 plays a critical role during early steps of rotavirus host cell adhesion, we tested a minilibrary of donkey lactadherin-derived peptides containing DGE sequence for anti-rotavirus activity. A 20-amino acid peptide containing both DGE and RGD motifs (named pDGE-RGD) showed the greatest activity, and its mechanism of antiviral action was characterized; pDGE-RGD binds to integrin α2β1 by means of the DGE motif and inhibits rotavirus attachment to the cell surface. These findings suggest the potential anti-rotavirus activity of equine lactadherin and support the feasibility of developing an anti-rotavirus peptide that acts by hindering virus-receptor binding. PMID:25814665

  20. Inhibition by synthetic peptides from human IgG Fc of OKT4 binding and Fc receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Gaarde, W.A.; McClurg, M.R.; Hahn, G.S.; Plummer, J.M.

    1986-03-05

    Synthetic peptides from the Fc region of human IgG were tested for the ability to inhibit IgG rosette formation, /sup 125/I-IgG binding to Fc receptors on lymphocytes, and expression of the T4 cell determinant. The Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides inhibited IgG rosette formation and competitively inhibited both /sup 125/I-IgG binding to Fc receptors and OKT4 binding to the T4 cell determinant. Peptides containing D-amino acids did not inhibit IgG rosettes, OKT4 binding or /sup 125/I-IgG binding. OKT4 binding to T4 on MNC was inhibited by heat aggregated IgG but not by monomeric IgG. OKT3, OKT8 and OKT11 binding to their determinants was not altered by Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides, aggregated IgG or monomeric IgG. These results suggest that T4 antigen, Fc receptor for IgG and the Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptide binding site are in close proximity on the cell surface and when occupied by their respective ligands may sterically hinder binding to other sites. Alternatively, Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides may indirectly regulate cell surface expression of T4 and/or Fc receptors for IgG. These Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides inhibit the MLR, inhibit antigen induced T cell proliferation and reverse animal models of autoimmune disease. The immunoregulatory activities of these peptides may be related to their selective action on T4 helper/inducer lymphocytes expressing Fc receptors.

  1. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J E; Urquiza, M; Curtidor, H; Rodriguez, L E; Ocampo, M; Torres, E; Guzman, F; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD) were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes. PMID:10904405

  2. Peptides derived from CXCL8 based on in silico analysis inhibit CXCL8 interactions with its receptor CXCR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Liou, Je-Wen; Chang, Chun-Chun; Chung, Yi; Lin, Lee-Fong; Hsu, Hao-Jen

    2015-12-01

    Chemokine CXCL8 is crucial for regulation of inflammatory and immune responses via activating its cognate receptor CXCR1. In this study, molecular docking and binding free energy calculations were combined to predict the initial binding event of CXCL8 to CXCR1 for peptide drug design. The simulations reveal that in the initial binding, the N-loop of CXCL8 interacts with the N-terminus of CXCR1, which is dominated by electrostatic interactions. The derived peptides from the binding region of CXCL8 are synthesized for further confirmation. Surface plasmon resonance analyses indicate that the CXCL8 derived peptide with 14 residues is able to bind to the receptor CXCR1 derived peptide with equilibrium KD of 252 μM while the peptide encompassing a CXCL8 K15A mutation hardly binds to CXCR1 derived peptide (KD = 1553 μM). The cell experiments show that the designed peptide inhibits CXCL8-induced and LPS-activated monocytes adhesion and transmigration. However, when the peptides were mutated on two lysine residues (K15 and K20), the inhibition effects were greatly reduced indicating these two amino acids are key residues for the initial binding of CXCL8 to CXCR1. This study demonstrates that in silico prediction based functional peptide design can be effective for developing anti-inflammation drugs.

  3. Peptides derived from CXCL8 based on in silico analysis inhibit CXCL8 interactions with its receptor CXCR1.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Liou, Je-Wen; Chang, Chun-Chun; Chung, Yi; Lin, Lee-Fong; Hsu, Hao-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine CXCL8 is crucial for regulation of inflammatory and immune responses via activating its cognate receptor CXCR1. In this study, molecular docking and binding free energy calculations were combined to predict the initial binding event of CXCL8 to CXCR1 for peptide drug design. The simulations reveal that in the initial binding, the N-loop of CXCL8 interacts with the N-terminus of CXCR1, which is dominated by electrostatic interactions. The derived peptides from the binding region of CXCL8 are synthesized for further confirmation. Surface plasmon resonance analyses indicate that the CXCL8 derived peptide with 14 residues is able to bind to the receptor CXCR1 derived peptide with equilibrium KD of 252 μM while the peptide encompassing a CXCL8 K15A mutation hardly binds to CXCR1 derived peptide (KD = 1553 μM). The cell experiments show that the designed peptide inhibits CXCL8-induced and LPS-activated monocytes adhesion and transmigration. However, when the peptides were mutated on two lysine residues (K15 and K20), the inhibition effects were greatly reduced indicating these two amino acids are key residues for the initial binding of CXCL8 to CXCR1. This study demonstrates that in silico prediction based functional peptide design can be effective for developing anti-inflammation drugs. PMID:26689258

  4. Peptides derived from CXCL8 based on in silico analysis inhibit CXCL8 interactions with its receptor CXCR1

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Liou, Je-Wen; Chang, Chun-Chun; Chung, Yi; Lin, Lee-Fong; Hsu, Hao-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine CXCL8 is crucial for regulation of inflammatory and immune responses via activating its cognate receptor CXCR1. In this study, molecular docking and binding free energy calculations were combined to predict the initial binding event of CXCL8 to CXCR1 for peptide drug design. The simulations reveal that in the initial binding, the N-loop of CXCL8 interacts with the N-terminus of CXCR1, which is dominated by electrostatic interactions. The derived peptides from the binding region of CXCL8 are synthesized for further confirmation. Surface plasmon resonance analyses indicate that the CXCL8 derived peptide with 14 residues is able to bind to the receptor CXCR1 derived peptide with equilibrium KD of 252 μM while the peptide encompassing a CXCL8 K15A mutation hardly binds to CXCR1 derived peptide (KD = 1553 μM). The cell experiments show that the designed peptide inhibits CXCL8-induced and LPS-activated monocytes adhesion and transmigration. However, when the peptides were mutated on two lysine residues (K15 and K20), the inhibition effects were greatly reduced indicating these two amino acids are key residues for the initial binding of CXCL8 to CXCR1. This study demonstrates that in silico prediction based functional peptide design can be effective for developing anti-inflammation drugs. PMID:26689258

  5. Inhibiting complex IL-17A and IL-17RA interactions with a linear peptide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shenping; Desharnais, Joel; Sahasrabudhe, Parag V.; Jin, Ping; Li, Wei; Oates, Bryan D.; Shanker, Suman; Banker, Mary Ellen; Chrunyk, Boris A.; Song, Xi; Feng, Xidong; Griffor, Matt; Jimenez, Judith; Chen, Gang; Tumelty, David; Bhat, Abhijit; Bradshaw, Curt W.; Woodnutt, Gary; Lappe, Rodney W.; Thorarensen, Atli; Qiu, Xiayang; Withka, Jane M.; Wood, Lauren D.

    2016-01-01

    IL-17A is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Monoclonal antibodies inhibiting IL-17A signaling have demonstrated remarkable efficacy, but an oral therapy is still lacking. A high affinity IL-17A peptide antagonist (HAP) of 15 residues was identified through phage-display screening followed by saturation mutagenesis optimization and amino acid substitutions. HAP binds specifically to IL-17A and inhibits the interaction of the cytokine with its receptor, IL-17RA. Tested in primary human cells, HAP blocked the production of multiple inflammatory cytokines. Crystal structure studies revealed that two HAP molecules bind to one IL-17A dimer symmetrically. The N-terminal portions of HAP form a β-strand that inserts between two IL-17A monomers while the C-terminal section forms an α helix that directly blocks IL-17RA from binding to the same region of IL-17A. This mode of inhibition suggests opportunities for developing peptide antagonists against this challenging target. PMID:27184415

  6. Inhibiting complex IL-17A and IL-17RA interactions with a linear peptide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shenping; Desharnais, Joel; Sahasrabudhe, Parag V; Jin, Ping; Li, Wei; Oates, Bryan D; Shanker, Suman; Banker, Mary Ellen; Chrunyk, Boris A; Song, Xi; Feng, Xidong; Griffor, Matt; Jimenez, Judith; Chen, Gang; Tumelty, David; Bhat, Abhijit; Bradshaw, Curt W; Woodnutt, Gary; Lappe, Rodney W; Thorarensen, Atli; Qiu, Xiayang; Withka, Jane M; Wood, Lauren D

    2016-01-01

    IL-17A is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Monoclonal antibodies inhibiting IL-17A signaling have demonstrated remarkable efficacy, but an oral therapy is still lacking. A high affinity IL-17A peptide antagonist (HAP) of 15 residues was identified through phage-display screening followed by saturation mutagenesis optimization and amino acid substitutions. HAP binds specifically to IL-17A and inhibits the interaction of the cytokine with its receptor, IL-17RA. Tested in primary human cells, HAP blocked the production of multiple inflammatory cytokines. Crystal structure studies revealed that two HAP molecules bind to one IL-17A dimer symmetrically. The N-terminal portions of HAP form a β-strand that inserts between two IL-17A monomers while the C-terminal section forms an α helix that directly blocks IL-17RA from binding to the same region of IL-17A. This mode of inhibition suggests opportunities for developing peptide antagonists against this challenging target. PMID:27184415

  7. Inhibition of mu and delta opioid receptor ligand binding by the peptide aldehyde protease inhibitor, leupeptin.

    PubMed

    Christoffers, Keith H; Khokhar, Arshia; Chaturvedi, Kirti; Howells, Richard D

    2002-04-15

    We reported recently that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in agonist-induced down regulation of mu and delta opioid receptors [J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001) 12345]. While evaluating the effects of various protease inhibitors on agonist-induced opioid receptor down regulation, we observed that while the peptide aldehyde, leupeptin (acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Arginal), did not affect agonist-induced down regulation, leupeptin at submillimolar concentrations directly inhibited radioligand binding to opioid receptors. In this study, the inhibitory activity of leupeptin on radioligand binding was characterized utilizing human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell lines expressing transfected mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. The rank order of potency for leupeptin inhibition of [3H]bremazocine binding to opioid receptors was mu > delta > kappa. In contrast to the effect of leupeptin, the peptide aldehyde proteasome inhibitor, MG 132 (carbobenzoxy-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucinal), had significantly less effect on bremazocine binding to mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. We propose that leupeptin inhibits ligand binding by reacting reversibly with essential sulfhydryl groups that are necessary for high-affinity ligand/receptor interactions. PMID:11853866

  8. Structural characterization of peptide-mediated inhibition of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Daep, Carlo Amorin; James, Deanna M; Lamont, Richard J; Demuth, Donald R

    2006-10-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen whose primary niche is the anaerobic environment of subgingival dental plaque, but initial colonization of the oral cavity is likely to occur on supragingival surfaces that already support robust biofilm communities. Our studies have shown that P. gingivalis adheres to Streptococcus gordonii through interaction of the minor fimbrial antigen Mfa1 with a specific region of the streptococcal SspB polypeptide (residues 1167 to 1193) designated BAR. We show that a synthetic peptide comprising the BAR sequence potently inhibits P. gingivalis adherence to S. gordonii (50% inhibitory concentration = 1.3 microM) and prevents the development of P. gingivalis biofilms. However, a retroinverso peptide that possessed the same side chain topology as that of BAR was inactive, suggesting that interactions of Mfa1 with the peptide backbone of BAR are important for binding. A conformationally constrained analog of BAR inhibited P. gingivalis adherence and biofilm formation but at a lower specific activity than that of BAR. Therefore, to further define the structural features of the Mfa1-BAR interaction, we functionally screened combinatorial libraries of BAR in which active site residues (Asn1182, Thr1184, and Val1185) were replaced with each of the 19 common amino acids. Peptides containing positively charged amino acids at position 1182 or hydrophobic residues at position 1185 bound P. gingivalis more efficiently than did control peptides containing Asn and Val at these positions, suggesting that electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions may contribute to Mfa1-SspB binding. In contrast, replacement of Pro or Gly at these positions was detrimental to adherence, suggesting that perturbation of the BAR secondary structure influences activity. The net effect of substitutions for Thr1184 was less pronounced either positively or negatively than that at the other sites. These results define physicochemical characteristics of the

  9. A Truncated Nef Peptide from SIVcpz Inhibits the Production of HIV-1 Infectious Progeny.

    PubMed

    Sabino Cunha, Marcela; Lima Sampaio, Thatiane; Peterlin, B Matija; Jesus da Costa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Nef proteins from all primate Lentiviruses, including the simian immunodeficiency virus of chimpanzees (SIVcpz), increase viral progeny infectivity. However, the function of Nef involved with the increase in viral infectivity is still not completely understood. Nonetheless, until now, studies investigating the functions of Nef from SIVcpz have been conducted in the context of the HIV-1 proviruses. In an attempt to investigate the role played by Nef during the replication cycle of an SIVcpz, a Nef-defective derivative was obtained from the SIVcpzWTGab2 clone by introducing a frame shift mutation at a unique restriction site within the nef sequence. This nef-deleted clone expresses an N-terminal 74-amino acid truncated peptide of Nef and was named SIVcpz-tNef. We found that the SIVcpz-tNef does not behave as a classic nef-deleted HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques SIVmac. Markedly, SIVcpz-tNef progeny from both Hek-293T and Molt producer cells were completely non-infectious. Moreover, the loss in infectivity of SIVcpz-tNef correlated with the inhibition of Gag and GagPol processing. A marked accumulation of Gag and very low levels of reverse transcriptase were detected in viral lysates. Furthermore, these observations were reproduced once the tNef peptide was expressed in trans both in SIVcpzΔNef and HIV-1WT expressing cells, demonstrating that the truncated peptide is a dominant negative for viral processing and infectivity for both SIVcpz and HIV-1. We demonstrated that the truncated Nef peptide binds to GagPol outside the protease region and by doing so probably blocks processing of both GagPol and Gag precursors at a very early stage. This study demonstrates for the first time that naturally-occurring Nef peptides can potently block lentiviral processing and infectivity. PMID:27399760

  10. A Truncated Nef Peptide from SIVcpz Inhibits the Production of HIV-1 Infectious Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Sabino Cunha, Marcela; Lima Sampaio, Thatiane; Peterlin, B. Matija; Jesus da Costa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Nef proteins from all primate Lentiviruses, including the simian immunodeficiency virus of chimpanzees (SIVcpz), increase viral progeny infectivity. However, the function of Nef involved with the increase in viral infectivity is still not completely understood. Nonetheless, until now, studies investigating the functions of Nef from SIVcpz have been conducted in the context of the HIV-1 proviruses. In an attempt to investigate the role played by Nef during the replication cycle of an SIVcpz, a Nef-defective derivative was obtained from the SIVcpzWTGab2 clone by introducing a frame shift mutation at a unique restriction site within the nef sequence. This nef-deleted clone expresses an N-terminal 74-amino acid truncated peptide of Nef and was named SIVcpz-tNef. We found that the SIVcpz-tNef does not behave as a classic nef-deleted HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques SIVmac. Markedly, SIVcpz-tNef progeny from both Hek-293T and Molt producer cells were completely non-infectious. Moreover, the loss in infectivity of SIVcpz-tNef correlated with the inhibition of Gag and GagPol processing. A marked accumulation of Gag and very low levels of reverse transcriptase were detected in viral lysates. Furthermore, these observations were reproduced once the tNef peptide was expressed in trans both in SIVcpzΔNef and HIV-1WT expressing cells, demonstrating that the truncated peptide is a dominant negative for viral processing and infectivity for both SIVcpz and HIV-1. We demonstrated that the truncated Nef peptide binds to GagPol outside the protease region and by doing so probably blocks processing of both GagPol and Gag precursors at a very early stage. This study demonstrates for the first time that naturally-occurring Nef peptides can potently block lentiviral processing and infectivity. PMID:27399760

  11. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with

  12. Inhibition of CFTR channels by a peptide toxin of scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Matthew D; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Cui, Guiying; Kubanek, Julia; McCarty, Nael A

    2004-11-01

    Peptide toxins have been valuable probes in efforts to identify amino acid residues that line the permeation pathway of cation-selective channels. However, no peptide toxins have been identified that interact with known anion-selective channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR channels are expressed in epithelial cells and are associated with several genetic disorders, including cystic fibrosis and polycystic kidney disease. Several organic inhibitors have been used to investigate the structure of the Cl- permeation pathway in CFTR. However, investigations of the wider cytoplasmic vestibule have been hindered by the lack of a high-affinity blocker that interacts with residues in this area. In this study we show that venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus reversibly inhibits CFTR, in a voltage-independent manner, by decreasing single-channel mean burst duration and open probability only when applied to the cytoplasmic surface of phosphorylated channels. Venom was able to decrease burst duration and open probability even when CFTR channels were locked open by treatment with either vanadate or adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imido)triphosphate, and block was strengthened on reduction of extracellular Cl- concentration, suggesting inhibition by a pore-block mechanism. Venom had no effect on ATP-dependent macroscopic opening rate in channels studied by inside-out macropatches. Interestingly, the inhibitory activity was abolished by proteinase treatment. We conclude that a peptide toxin contained in the scorpion venom inhibits CFTR channels by a pore-block mechanism; these experiments provide the first step toward isolation of the active component, which would be highly valuable as a probe for CFTR structure and function. PMID:15240343

  13. An opioid pancreatic peptide produces ileal muscle inhibition and naloxone-reversible analgesia.

    PubMed

    Kimball, C D; Iqbal, M; Huang, J T; Sutton, D

    1991-04-01

    The opioid activity of immunoreactive beta-endorphin-like peptide extracted from pork pancreas duplicates the effects of morphine and synthetic beta-endorphin when measured by inhibition of isolated guinea pig ileal muscle response to electro-stimulation in vitro and by morphine-like analgesia following intravenous injection in the mouse. These responses are reversed by the opiate antagonist naloxone, indicating that a potent opioid mu receptor binding ligand is present in pancreatic extract. These findings imply a pancreatic source of plasma immunoreactive beta-endorphin that may explain a number of physiological and behavioral effects generally attributed to hypophyseal beta-endorphin alone. PMID:1651521

  14. New Insights into the Mechanism of Alzheimer Amyloid-β Fibrillogenesis Inhibition by N-Methylated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Patricia; Griffin, Mary A.; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder associated with the abnormal self-assembly of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides into fibrillar species. N-methylated peptides homologous to the central hydrophobic core of the Aβ peptide are potent inhibitors of this aggregation process. In this work, we use fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions of the N-methylated peptide inhibitor Aβ16–20m (Ac-Lys16-(Me)Leu17-Val18-(Me)Phe19-Phe20-NH2) with a model protofilament consisting of Alzheimer Aβ16–22 peptides. Our simulations indicate that the inhibitor peptide can bind to the protofilament at four different sites: 1), at the edge of the protofilament; 2), on the exposed face of a protofilament layer; 3), between the protofilament layers; and 4), between the protofilament strands. The different binding scenarios suggest several mechanisms of fibrillogenesis inhibition: 1), fibril inhibition of longitudinal growth (in the direction of monomer deposition); 2), fibril inhibition of lateral growth (in the direction of protofilament assembly); and 3), fibril disassembly by strand removal and perturbation of the periodicity of the protofilament (disruption of fibril morphology). Our simulations suggest that the Aβ16-20m inhibitor can act on both prefibrillar species and mature fibers and that the specific mechanism of inhibition may depend on the structural nature of the Aβ aggregate. Disassembly of the fibril can be explained by a mechanism through which the inhibitor peptides bind to disaggregated or otherwise free Aβ16–22 peptides in solution, leading to a shift in the equilibrium from a fibrillar state to one dominated by inhibitor-bound Aβ16–22 peptides. PMID:17631541

  15. Formyl-Modified Polyaniline for the Catalytic Dehydration of Fructose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liangfang; Dai, Jinhang; Liu, Mingyang; Tang, Dianyong; Liu, Shuqing; Hu, Changwei

    2016-08-23

    We report an unprecedented solid organic-base catalyst, formyl-modified polyaniline (FS-PAN), for the dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) with a high yield of 90.4 mol %. We demonstrate that the nitrogen atoms incorporated between the phenyl rings in the backbone of the polyaniline chain contribute to the basicity of the catalyst. The grafting of electron-withdrawing formyl groups to the imine nitrogen atoms leads to a significant increase of basicity of the polymer catalyst owing to the greater localization of electrons at the amide nitrogen atom formed. A linear dependence of the yield of HMF on the grafting level of formyl groups in FS-PAN indicates that the amide acts as the active phase. A possible reaction mechanism for this organic-base-catalyzed dehydration reaction is proposed. The side-reaction of HMF rehydration is inhibited thoroughly, and the condensation of any reaction intermediates to undesirable oligomers is restrained by this base catalyst. This organic-base catalyst can be recycled completely without loss of activity. This research highlights the first application of a highly effective and stable solid base catalyst for the transformation of renewable carbohydrates into fine chemicals. PMID:27453215

  16. Interfacial adsorption of fibrinogen and its inhibition by RGD peptide: a combined physical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Johanna; Salacinski, Henryk J.; Mu, Qingshan; Seifalian, Alex M.; Peel, Louise; Freeman, Neville; Holt, Cathy M.; Lu, Jian R.

    2004-07-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide sequence is known as a cell recognition site for numerous adhesive proteins present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and in blood. Whilst surface immobilized RGD groups enhance cell attachment, RGD components present in solution can effectively inhibit cell attachment by competing with endogenous ligands for the same recognition site. In contrast to the widely reported binding to cell integrin, this study demonstrates a new RGD feature: its inhibitive effect on fibrinogen adsorption. Through a combined analysis of spectroscopic ellipsometry, neutron reflection and dual polarization interferometry, we show that the kinetic process of fibrinogen adsorption as a model pro-coagulant at the silica/solution interface and in the absence of any cells can be substantially reduced by the addition of RGD in solution and that the extent of the reduction is dependent on the relative concentration of RGD.

  17. Effective protein inhibition in intact mouse oocytes through peptide nanoparticle-mediated antibody transfection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruichao; Jin, Zhen; Gao, Leilei; Liu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Female meiosis is a fundamental area of study in reproductive medicine, and the mouse oocyte model of in vitro maturation (IVM) is most widely used to study female meiosis. To investigate the probable role(s) of an unknown protein in female meiosis, the method traditionally used involves microinjecting a specific antibody into mouse oocytes. Recently, in studies on somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated antibody transfection has become a popular tool because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, untill now no researchers have tried using this technique on mouse oocytes because the zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane) is usually thought or proved to be a tough barrier to macromolecules such as antibodies and proteins. Therefore, we attempted to introduce an antibody into mouse oocytes using a peptide nanoparticle. Here we show for the first time that with our optimized method, an antibody can be effectively delivered into mouse oocytes and inhibit its target protein with high specificity. We obtained significant results using small GTPase Arl2 as a test subject protein. We propose peptide nanoparticle-mediated antibody transfection to be a superior alternative to antibody microinjection for preliminary functional studies of unknown proteins in mouse oocytes. PMID:27114861

  18. A Peptide of Heparin Cofactor II Inhibits Endotoxin-Mediated Shock and Invasive Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kalle, Martina; Papareddy, Praveen; Kasetty, Gopinath; van der Plas, Mariena J. A.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock remain important medical problems with high mortality rates. Today's treatment is based mainly on using antibiotics to target the bacteria, without addressing the systemic inflammatory response, which is a major contributor to mortality in sepsis. Therefore, novel treatment options are urgently needed to counteract these complex sepsis pathologies. Heparin cofactor II (HCII) has recently been shown to be protective against Gram-negative infections. The antimicrobial effects were mapped to helices A and D of the molecule. Here we show that KYE28, a 28 amino acid long peptide representing helix D of HCII, is antimicrobial against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungus Candida albicans. Moreover, KYE28 binds to LPS and thereby reduces LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by decreasing NF-κB/AP-1 activation in vitro. In mouse models of LPS-induced shock, KYE28 significantly enhanced survival by dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Finally, in an invasive Pseudomonas infection model, the peptide inhibited bacterial growth and reduced the pro-inflammatory response, which lead to a significant reduction of mortality. In summary, the peptide KYE28, by simultaneously targeting bacteria and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses represents a novel therapeutic candidate for invasive infections. PMID:25047075

  19. The Antitumor Peptide CIGB-552 Increases COMMD1 and Inhibits Growth of Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Massó, Julio R.; Oliva Argüelles, Brizaida; Tejeda, Yelaine; Astrada, Soledad; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Delgado-Roche, Livan; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Vallespí, Maribel G.

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the peptide L-2 designed from an alanine scanning of the Limulus-derived LALF32-51 region is a potential candidate for the anticancer therapy and its cell-penetrating capacity is an associated useful property. By the modification in the primary structure of L-2, a second-generation peptide (CIGB-552) was developed. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cytotoxic activity remains partially unknown. In this study, it was shown that CIGB-552 increases the levels of COMMD1, a protein involved in copper homeostasis, sodium transport, and the NF-κB signaling pathway. We found that CIGB-552 induces ubiquitination of RelA and inhibits the antiapoptotic activity regulated by NF-κB, whereas the knockdown of COMMD1 blocks this effect. We also found that CIGB-552 decreases the antioxidant capacity and induces the peroxidation of proteins and lipids in the tumor cells. Altogether, this study provides new insights into the mechanism of action of the peptide CIGB-552, which could be relevant in the design of future anticancer therapies. PMID:23401744

  20. Designed α-sheet peptides inhibit amyloid formation by targeting toxic oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Hopping, Gene; Kellock, Jackson; Barnwal, Ravi Pratap; Law, Peter; Bryers, James; Varani, Gabriele; Caughey, Byron; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the toxic soluble-oligomeric form of different amyloid proteins share a common backbone conformation, but the amorphous nature of this oligomer prevents its structural characterization by experiment. Based on molecular dynamics simulations we proposed that toxic intermediates of different amyloid proteins adopt a common, nonstandard secondary structure, called α-sheet. Here we report the experimental characterization of peptides designed to be complementary to the α-sheet conformation observed in the simulations. We demonstrate inhibition of aggregation in two different amyloid systems, β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and transthyretin, by these designed α-sheet peptides. When immobilized the α-sheet designs preferentially bind species from solutions enriched in the toxic conformer compared with non-aggregated, nontoxic species or mature fibrils. The designs display characteristic spectroscopic signatures distinguishing them from conventional secondary structures, supporting α-sheet as a structure involved in the toxic oligomer stage of amyloid formation and paving the way for novel therapeutics and diagnostics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01681.001 PMID:25027691

  1. Simultaneous Inhibition of Key Growth Pathways in Melanoma Cells and Tumor Regression by a Designed Bidentate Constrained Helical Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Amlanjyoti; Mallick, Shampa; Ghosh, Piya; Maiti, Atanu; Ahmed, Israr; Bhattacharyya, Seemana; Mandal, Tapashi; Manna, Asit; Roy, Koushik; Singh, Sandeep; Nayak, Dipak Kumar; Wilder, Paul T.; Markowitz, Joseph; Weber, David J.; Ghosh, Mrinal K.; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Guha, Rajdeep; Konar, Aditya; Bandyopadhyay, Santu; Roy, Siddhartha

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are part of a large number of signaling networks and potential targets for drug development. However, discovering molecules that can specifically inhibit such interactions is a major challenge. S100B, a calcium-regulated protein, plays a crucial role in the proliferation of melanoma cells through protein-protein interactions. In this article, we report the design and development of a bidentate conformationally constrained peptide against dimeric S100B based on a natural tight binding peptide, TRTK-12. The helical conformation of the peptide was constrained by substitution of α-amino isobutyric acid----an amino acid having high helical propensity----in positions which do not interact with S100B. A branched bidentate version of the peptide, bound to S100B tightly with a dissociation constant of 8 nM. When conjugated to a cell penetrating peptide, it caused growth inhibition and rapid apoptosis in melanoma cells. The molecule exerts anti-proliferative action through simultaneous inhibition of key growth pathways including reactivation of wild-type p53 and inhibition of Akt and STAT-3 phosphorylation. The apoptosis induced by the bidentate constrained helix is caused by direct migration of p53 to mitochondria. At moderate intravenous dose, the peptide completely inhibits melanoma growth in a mouse model without any significant observable toxicity. The specificity was shown by lack of ability of a double mutant peptide to cause tumor regression at the same dose level. The methodology described here for direct protein-protein interaction inhibition may be effective for rapid development of inhibitors against relatively weak protein-protein interactions for de novo drug development. PMID:24839139

  2. Whey peptide Isoleucine-Tryptophan inhibits expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Kopaliani, Irakli; Martin, Melanie; Zatschler, Birgit; Müller, Bianca; Deussen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Aortic stiffness is an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases. Activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity leads to overproduction of angiotensin II (ANGII) from its precursor angiotensin I (ANGI). ANGII leads to overexpression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2), which is critically associated with pathophysiology of aortic stiffness. We previously reported that the whey peptide Isoleucine-Tryptophan (IW) acts as a potent ACE inhibitor. Herein, we critically elucidate the mechanism of action by which IW causes inhibition of expression and activity of MMP2 in aortic tissue. Effects of IW on expression and activity of MMP2 were assessed on endothelial and smooth muscle cells (ECs and SMCs) in vitro and ex vivo (isolated rat aorta). As controls we used the pharmaceutical ACE inhibitor - captopril and the ANGII type 1 receptor blocker - losartan. In vitro, both ANGII and ANGI stimulation significantly (P<0.01) increased expression of MMP2 assessed with western blot. Similarly, to captopril IW significantly (P<0.05) inhibited ANGI, but not ANGII mediated increase in expression of MMP2, while losartan also blocked effects of ANGII. Signaling pathways regulating MMP2 expression in ECs and SMCs were similarly inhibited after treatment with IW or captopril. In ECs IW significantly (P<0.05) inhibited JNK pathway, whereas in SMCs JAK2/STAT3 pathway, assessed with western blot. In vitro findings were fully consistent with results in isolated rat aorta ex vivo. Moreover, IW not only inhibited the MMP2 expression, but also its activation assessed with gelatin zymography. Our findings demonstrate that IW effectively inhibits expression and activation of MMP2 in rat aorta by decreasing local conversion of ANGI to ANGII. Thus, similar to pharmaceutical ACE inhibitor captopril the dipeptide IW may effectively inhibit ACE activity and prevent the age and hypertension

  3. Myostatin inhibition by a follistatin-derived peptide ameliorates the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy model mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, K

    2008-01-01

    Summary Gene-targeted therapies, such as adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)-mediated gene therapy and cell-mediated therapy using myogenic stem cells, are hopeful molecular strategies for muscular dystrophy. In addition, drug therapies based on the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy patients are desirable. Multidisciplinary approaches to drug design would offer promising therapeutic strategies. Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is predominantly produced by skeletal muscle and negatively regulates the growth and differentiation of cells of the skeletal muscle lineage. Myostatin inhibition would increase the skeletal muscle mass and prevent muscle degeneration, regardless of the type of muscular dystrophy. Myostatin inhibitors include myostatin antibodies, myostatin propeptide, follistatin and follistatin-related protein. Although follistatin possesses potent myostatin-inhibiting activity, it works as an efficient inhibitor of activins. Unlike myostatin, activins regulate the growth and differentiation of nearly all cell types, including cells of the gonads, pituitary gland and skeletal muscle. We have developed a myostatin-specific inhibitor derived from follistatin, designated FS I-I. Transgenic mice expressing this myostatin-inhibiting peptide under the control of a skeletal muscle-specific promoter showed increased skeletal muscle mass and strength. mdx mice were crossed with FS I-I transgenic mice and any improvement of the pathological signs was investigated. The resulting mdx/FS I-I mice exhibited increased skeletal muscle mass and reduced cell infiltration in muscles. Muscle strength was also recovered in mdx/FS I-I mice. Our data indicate that myostatin inhibition by this follistatin-derived peptide has therapeutic potential for muscular dystrophy. PMID:19108572

  4. Preliminary study on the inhibition of nuclear internalization of Tat peptides by conjugation with a receptor-specific peptide and fluorescent dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Duanwen; Liang, Kexiang; Ye, Yunpeng; Tetteh, Elizabeth; Achilefu, Samuel

    2006-02-01

    Numerous studies have shown that basic Tat peptide (48-57) internalized non-specifically in cells and localized in the nucleus. However, localization of imaging agents in cellular nucleus is not desirable because of the potential mutagenesis. When conjugated to the peptides that undergo receptor-mediated endocytosis, Tat peptide could target specific cells or pathologic tissue. We tested this hypothesis by incorporating a somatostatin receptor-avid peptide (octreotate, Oct) and two different fluorescent dyes, Cypate 2 (Cy2) and fluorescein 5'-carboxlic acid (5-FAM), into the Tat-peptide sequence. In addition to the Cy2 or 5-FAM-labeled Oct conjugated to Tat peptide (Tat) to produce Tat-Oct-Cypate2 or Tat-Oct-5-FAM, we also labeled the Tat the Tat peptide with these dyes (Tat-Cy2 and Tat-5-FAM) to serve as positive control. A somatostatin receptor-positive pancreatic tumor cell line, AR42J, was used to assess cell internalization. The results show that Tat-5-FAM and Tat-Cypate2 localized in both nucleus and cytoplasm of the cells. In contrast to Tat-Oct-Cypate2, which localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, Tat-Oct-5-FAM internalized in the cytoplasm but not in the nucleus of AR42J cells. The internalizations were inhibited by adding non-labeled corresponding peptides, suggesting that the endocytoses of each group of labeled and the corresponding unlabeled compounds occurred through a common pathway. Thus, fluorescent probes and endocytosis complex between octreotate and somatostatin receptors in cytoplasm could control nuclear internalization of Tat peptides.

  5. Inhibition of protein phosphorylation by synthetic peptides from the Fc region of human IgG during the mixed lymphocyte response

    SciTech Connect

    McClurg, M.R.; Hahn, G.S.; Plummer, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    Certain synthetic peptides derived from the Fc region of human IgG suppressed protein, RNA, and DNA synthesis during mixed lymphocyte reactions. Responder mononuclear cells were incubated with medium or agents that alter phosphorylation of cellular proteins before immunomodulatory Fc peptides and stimulator cells were added. Incubating cells with trifluoperazine which inhibits calcium binding to calmodulin and inhibits protein kinase C (PKC) increased inhibition of the MLR induced by Fc peptides. Conversely, incubating cells with dubutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP), calmodulin, 1,2-diolein, or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) abolished inhibition of the MLR induced by Fc peptides. Inhibition of the MLR by Fc ..gamma.. peptides was not affected when DBcAMP or PMA was added after peptide addition. The PKC activity of cell homogenates was decreased by 69% when Fc..gamma.. peptides were present during the MLR. The in vitro phosphorylation of histone Hl by partially purified PKC from lymphocytes was inhibited 74% in the presence of Fc..gamma.. peptides. These results indicate that suppression of the MLR induced by Fc..gamma.. peptides is dependent on inhibition of protein phosphorylation by kinases including protein kinase C. The inhibition of phosphorylation may be related to the ability of Fc..gamma.. peptides to reverse animal models of autoimmune disease.

  6. Selective inhibition by a synthetic hirudin peptide of fibrin-dependent thrombosis in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Cadroy, Y.; Hanson, S.R.; Harker, L.A. ); Maraganore, J.M. )

    1991-02-15

    To determine the importance of the thrombin substrate recognition exosite for fibrinogen binding in the formation of both arterial and venous thrombi the authors evaluated the antithrombotic effects of the tyrosine-sulfated dodecapeptide from residues 53-64 of hirudin (H peptide) in a nonhuman primate model. This peptide was studied because it inhibits thrombin cleavages of fibrinogen by simple competition without blocking enzyme catalytic-site function. When an exteriorized arteriovenous access shunt model was used in baboons (Papio anubis), thrombus formation was induced by placing a thrombogenic device made of (i) a segment of tubing coated covalently with type I collagen, which generated platelet-rich thrombi under arterial flow conditions, and (ii) two subsequent annular regions of flow expansion that produced fibrin-rich thrombi typically associated with venous valves and veins. Thrombus formation was quantified by measurements of {sup 111}In-labeled platelet and {sup 125}I-labeled fibrinogen deposition in both arterial-flow and venous-flow portions of the device. These finding suggest that, by competitive inhibition of fibrinogen binding to thrombin, fibrin-rich venous-type thrombus formation may be selectively prevented. This strategy may be therapeutically attractive for preserving normal platelet function when conventional anticoagulant therapy is contraindicated.

  7. Neutral endopeptidase inhibition and the natriuretic peptide system: an evolving strategy in cardiovascular therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mangiafico, Sarah; Costello-Boerrigter, Lisa C.; Andersen, Ingrid A.; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Burnett, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension and heart failure (HF) are common diseases that, despite advances in medical therapy, continue to be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, innovative therapeutic strategies are needed. Inhibition of the neutral endopeptidase (NEPinh) had been investigated as a potential novel therapeutic approach because of its ability to increase the plasma concentrations of the natriuretic peptides (NPs). Indeed, the NPs have potent natriuretic and vasodilator properties, inhibit the activity of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, lower sympathetic drive, and have antiproliferative and antihypertrophic effects. Such potentially beneficial effects can be theoretically achieved by the use of NEPinh. However, studies have shown that NEPinh alone does not result in clinically meaningful blood pressure-lowering actions. More recently, NEPinh has been used in combination with other cardiovascular agents, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and antagonists of the angiotensin receptor. Another future possible combination would be the use of NEPinh with NPs or their newly developed chimeric peptides. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the use and effects of NEPinh alone or in combination with other therapeutic agents for the treatment of human cardiovascular disease such as HF and hypertension. PMID:22942338

  8. Exploring monovalent and multivalent peptides for the inhibition of FBP21-tWW

    PubMed Central

    Bertazzon, Miriam; Marczynke, Michaela; Seitz, Oliver; Volkmer, Rudolf; Haag, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Summary The coupling of peptides to polyglycerol carriers represents an important route towards the multivalent display of protein ligands. In particular, the inhibition of low affinity intracellular protein–protein interactions can be addressed by this design. We have applied this strategy to develop binding partners for FBP21, a protein which is important for the splicing of pre-mRNA in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Firstly, by using phage display the optimized sequence WPPPPRVPR was derived which binds with K Ds of 80 μM and 150 µM to the individual WW domains and with a K D of 150 μM to the tandem-WW1–WW2 construct. Secondly, this sequence was coupled to a hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) that allowed for the multivalent display on the surface of the dendritic polymer. This novel multifunctional hPG-peptide conjugate displayed a K D of 17.6 µM which demonstrates that the new carrier provides a venue for the future inhibition of proline-rich sequence recognition by FBP21 during assembly of the spliceosome. PMID:26124874

  9. Exploring monovalent and multivalent peptides for the inhibition of FBP21-tWW.

    PubMed

    Henning, Lisa Maria; Bhatia, Sumati; Bertazzon, Miriam; Marczynke, Michaela; Seitz, Oliver; Volkmer, Rudolf; Haag, Rainer; Freund, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of peptides to polyglycerol carriers represents an important route towards the multivalent display of protein ligands. In particular, the inhibition of low affinity intracellular protein-protein interactions can be addressed by this design. We have applied this strategy to develop binding partners for FBP21, a protein which is important for the splicing of pre-mRNA in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Firstly, by using phage display the optimized sequence WPPPPRVPR was derived which binds with K Ds of 80 μM and 150 µM to the individual WW domains and with a K D of 150 μM to the tandem-WW1-WW2 construct. Secondly, this sequence was coupled to a hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) that allowed for the multivalent display on the surface of the dendritic polymer. This novel multifunctional hPG-peptide conjugate displayed a K D of 17.6 µM which demonstrates that the new carrier provides a venue for the future inhibition of proline-rich sequence recognition by FBP21 during assembly of the spliceosome. PMID:26124874

  10. Inhibition of the myostatin/Smad signaling pathway by short decorin-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    El Shafey, Nelly; Guesnon, Mickaël; Simon, Françoise; Deprez, Eric; Cosette, Jérémie; Stockholm, Daniel; Scherman, Daniel; Bigey, Pascal; Kichler, Antoine

    2016-02-15

    Myostatin, also known as growth differentiation factor 8, is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily that has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of the skeletal muscle mass. Indeed, while myostatin deletion or loss of function induces muscle hypertrophy, its overexpression or systemic administration causes muscle atrophy. Since myostatin blockade is effective in increasing skeletal muscle mass, myostatin inhibitors have been actively sought after. Decorin, a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family is a metalloprotein that was previously shown to bind and inactivate myostatin in a zinc-dependent manner. Furthermore, the myostatin-binding site has been shown to be located in the decorin N-terminal domain. In the present study, we investigated the anti-myostatin activity of short and soluble fragments of decorin. Our results indicate that the murine decorin peptides DCN48-71 and 42-65 are sufficient for inactivating myostatin in vitro. Moreover, we show that the interaction of mDCN48-71 to myostatin is strictly zinc-dependent. Binding of myostatin to activin type II receptor results in the phosphorylation of Smad2/3. Addition of the decorin peptide 48-71 decreased in a dose-dependent manner the myostatin-induced phosphorylation of Smad2 demonstrating thereby that the peptide inhibits the activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Finally, we found that mDCN48-71 displays a specificity towards myostatin, since it does not inhibit other members of the transforming growth factor-beta family. PMID:26844629

  11. Inhibition of Listeria locomotion by mosquito oostatic factor, a natural oligoproline peptide uncoupler of profilin action.

    PubMed

    Southwick, F S; Purich, D L

    1995-01-01

    Mosquito oostatic factor, a naturally occurring decapeptide (YDPAPPPPPP), strikingly resembles the primary structure of oligoproline-rich regions within the protein ActA, a bacterial surface protein required for Listeria motility in host cells. When microinjected into Listeria-infected PtK2 cells, the insect oostatic factor rapidly blocks Listeria-induced actin rocket tail assembly as well as intracellular locomotion of this pathogen. At intracellular concentrations of about 90 nM, transient inhibition of rocket tail formation and bacterial locomotion occurs, followed by full recovery of tail length and motility. However, at 0.9 microM oostatic factor, both processes are permanently arrested. Introduction of oostatic factor by microinjection also causes PtK2 peripheral membrane retraction in both Listeria-infected and uninfected cells. Epifluorescence microscopy with bodipy-phallacidin reveals that cells microinjected with the insect factor lose all actin stress fibers and accumulate F-actin in regions of membrane retraction. When the insect peptide is combined with profilin as an equimolar binary solution (1 microM [final concentration] each), intracellular addition fails to inhibit Listeria rocket-tail formation, fails to block intracellular bacterial movement, and no longer causes marked membrane retraction. The ability of profilin to neutralize the inhibitory action of oostatic factor is consistent with complex formation, and this finding suggests that profilin may interact directly with ActA peptide as well as a host cell peripheral membrane component to promote actin filament assembly by locally generating ATP-actin. Dispersal of profilin from such sites by oligoproline-rich peptide inhibitors suggests that profilin is directly involved in intracellular pathogen locomotion and reorganization of actin cytoskeleton of the host cell peripheral membrane. PMID:7806356

  12. Dynamic behavior of small heat shock protein inhibition on amyloid fibrillization of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Dong; Dong, Xiao; Deng, Wei; Lai, Luhua

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of small heat shock protein inhibition on fibril formation was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peptide SSTSAA with modified ends was used for amyloid fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRET signal was followed during the fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 inhibits fibril formation when introduced in the lag phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 slows down fibril formation when introduced after the lag phase. -- Abstract: Small heat shock proteins, a class of molecular chaperones, are reported to inhibit amyloid fibril formation in vitro, while the mechanism of inhibition remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which Mj HSP16.5 inhibits amyloid fibril formation of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A. A model peptide (dansyl-SSTSAA-W) was designed by introducing a pair of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes into the peptide, allowing for the monitoring of fibril formation by this experimental model. Mj HSP16.5 completely inhibited fibril formation of the model peptide at a molar ratio of 1:120. The dynamic process of fibril formation, revealed by FRET, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy, showed a lag phase of about 2 h followed by a fast growth period. The effect of Mj HSP16.5 on amyloid fibril formation was investigated by adding it into the incubation solution during different growth phases. Adding Mj HSP16.5 to the incubating peptide before or during the lag phase completely inhibited fibril formation. However, introducing Mj HSP16.5 after the lag phase only slowed down the fibril formation process by adhering to the already formed fibrils. These findings provide insight into the inhibitory roles of small heat shock proteins on amyloid fibril formation at the molecular level.

  13. Inhibition of A-type potassium current by the peptide toxin SNX-482.

    PubMed

    Kimm, Tilia; Bean, Bruce P

    2014-07-01

    SNX-482, a peptide toxin isolated from tarantula venom, has become widely used as an inhibitor of Cav2.3 voltage-gated calcium channels. Unexpectedly, we found that SNX-482 dramatically reduced the A-type potassium current in acutely dissociated dopamine neurons from mouse substantia nigra pars compacta. The inhibition persisted when calcium was replaced by cobalt, showing that it was not secondary to a reduction of calcium influx. Currents from cloned Kv4.3 channels expressed in HEK-293 cells were inhibited by SNX-482 with an IC50 of <3 nM, revealing substantially greater potency than for SNX-482 inhibition of Cav2.3 channels (IC50 20-60 nM). At sub-saturating concentrations, SNX-482 produced a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of activation of Kv4.3 channels and slowed activation kinetics. Similar effects were seen on gating of cloned Kv4.2 channels, but the inhibition was less pronounced and required higher toxin concentrations. These results reveal SNX-482 as the most potent inhibitor of Kv4.3 channels yet identified. Because of the effects on both Kv4.3 and Kv4.2 channels, caution is needed when interpreting the effects of SNX-482 on cells and circuits where these channels are present. PMID:25009251

  14. Inhibition of A-Type Potassium Current by the Peptide Toxin SNX-482

    PubMed Central

    Kimm, Tilia

    2014-01-01

    SNX-482, a peptide toxin isolated from tarantula venom, has become widely used as an inhibitor of Cav2.3 voltage-gated calcium channels. Unexpectedly, we found that SNX-482 dramatically reduced the A-type potassium current in acutely dissociated dopamine neurons from mouse substantia nigra pars compacta. The inhibition persisted when calcium was replaced by cobalt, showing that it was not secondary to a reduction of calcium influx. Currents from cloned Kv4.3 channels expressed in HEK-293 cells were inhibited by SNX-482 with an IC50 of <3 nm, revealing substantially greater potency than for SNX-482 inhibition of Cav2.3 channels (IC50 20–60 nm). At sub-saturating concentrations, SNX-482 produced a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of activation of Kv4.3 channels and slowed activation kinetics. Similar effects were seen on gating of cloned Kv4.2 channels, but the inhibition was less pronounced and required higher toxin concentrations. These results reveal SNX-482 as the most potent inhibitor of Kv4.3 channels yet identified. Because of the effects on both Kv4.3 and Kv4.2 channels, caution is needed when interpreting the effects of SNX-482 on cells and circuits where these channels are present. PMID:25009251

  15. A non-peptide NK1-receptor antagonist, RP 67580, inhibits neurogenic inflammation postsynaptically.

    PubMed

    Moussaoui, S M; Montier, F; Carruette, A; Blanchard, J C; Laduron, P M; Garret, C

    1993-05-01

    1. The non-peptide neurokinin NK1-receptor antagonist, RP 67580 (3aR, 7aR), a perhydroisoindolone derivative, powerfully reduced plasma extravasation in rat hind paw skin induced by local application of xylene (ID50 = 0.03 mg kg-1, i.v.) or capsaicin (ID50 = 0.06 mg kg-1, i.v.), or by i.v. injection of exogenous substance P (SP) or septide ([pGlu6,Pro9]SP(6-11)) (ID50 = 0.04-0.05 mg kg-1, i.v.). RP 67580 (1 mg kg-1, i.v.) also abolished capsaicin-induced nasal fluid hypersecretion (by 82 +/- 5%). These effects were found to be stereospecific, the enantiomer, RP 68651 (3aS, 7aS), being inactive at 1 mg kg-1, i.v. 2. In rats neonatally treated with capsaicin (50 mg kg-1, s.c.), plasma extravasation induced by SP was significantly increased (by 43 +/- 7%). RP 67580 (1 mg kg-1, i.v.) completely inhibited the SP-induced plasma extravasation in capsaicin neonatally treated-animals, as it did in control animals. This result suggests that RP 67580 acts at the postsynaptic level for the inhibition of plasma extravasation. 3. Opioid receptor agonists, mu-(morphine) and kappa-(PD-117302) at 10 mg kg-1, s.c., in contrast to NK1-receptor antagonists, did not inhibit plasma extravasation induced by exogenous SP. They were, however, partially effective against plasma extravasation induced by electrical nerve stimulation (74 +/- 4% and 48 +/- 9% inhibition at 10 mg kg-1, s.c. of morphine and PD-117302, respectively, compared to 90 +/- 3% inhibition obtained with RP 67580, 3 mg kg-1, s.c.). These results indicate the presynaptic action of opioid receptor agonists, in contrast to the postsynaptic action of NK1-receptor antagonists for the inhibition of plasma extravasation.4. Ligature of the saphenous nerve distal to the point of electrical stimulation, local application of lignocaine to the saphenous nerve, neonatal capsaicin pretreatment, and colchicine at very low doses(120 microg kg-1 day-1 given for 3 days) were found to prevent plasma extravasation elicited by electrical nerve

  16. Differential Inhibition of Signal Peptide Peptidase Family Members by Established γ-Secretase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Yong; Ladd, Gabriela Z.; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Jung, Joo In; Greenbaum, Doron; Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Golde, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    The signal peptide peptidases (SPPs) are biomedically important proteases implicated as therapeutic targets for hepatitis C (human SPP, (hSPP)), plasmodium (Plasmodium SPP (pSPP)), and B-cell immunomodulation and neoplasia (signal peptide peptidase like 2a, (SPPL2a)). To date, no drug-like, selective inhibitors have been reported. We use a recombinant substrate based on the amino-terminus of BRI2 fused to amyloid β 1-25 (Aβ1-25) (FBA) to develop facile, cost-effective SPP/SPPL protease assays. Co-transfection of expression plasmids expressing the FBA substrate with SPP/SPPLs were conducted to evaluate cleavage, which was monitored by ELISA, Western Blot and immunoprecipitation/MALDI-TOF Mass spectrometry (IP/MS). No cleavage is detected in the absence of SPP/SPPL overexpression. Multiple γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and (Z-LL)2 ketone differentially inhibited SPP/SPPL activity; for example, IC50 of LY-411,575 varied from 51±79 nM (on SPPL2a) to 5499±122 nM (on SPPL2b), while Compound E showed inhibition only on hSPP with IC50 of 1465±93 nM. Data generated were predictive of effects observed for endogenous SPPL2a cleavage of CD74 in a murine B-Cell line. Thus, it is possible to differentially inhibit SPP family members. These SPP/SPPL cleavage assays will expedite the search for selective inhibitors. The data also reinforce similarities between SPP family member cleavage and cleavage catalyzed by γ-secretase. PMID:26046535

  17. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc

    PubMed Central

    Barriga, Gonzalo P.; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L.; Bignon, Eduardo A.; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H.; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A.; Vidal, Simon E.; Tischler, Nicole D.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses

  18. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc.

    PubMed

    Barriga, Gonzalo P; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L; Bignon, Eduardo A; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A; Vidal, Simon E; Tischler, Nicole D

    2016-07-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses

  19. Inhibition of NF-kappa B activation by peptides targeting NF-kappa B essential modulator (nemo) oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Agou, Fabrice; Courtois, Gilles; Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Baleux, Françoise; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Traincard, François; Israël, Alain; Véron, Michel

    2004-12-24

    NF-kappa B essential modulator/IKK-gamma (NEMO/IKK-gamma) plays a key role in the activation of the NF-kappa B pathway in response to proinflammatory stimuli. Previous studies suggested that the signal-dependent activation of the IKK complex involves the trimerization of NEMO. The minimal oligomerization domain of this protein consists of two coiled-coil subdomains named Coiled-coil 2 (CC2) and leucine zipper (LZ) (Agou, F., Traincard, F., Vinolo, E., Courtois, G., Yamaoka, S., Israel, A., and Veron, M. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 27861-27869). To search for drugs inhibiting NF-kappa B activation, we have rationally designed cell-permeable peptides corresponding to the CC2 and LZ subdomains that mimic the contact areas between NEMO subunits. The peptides were tagged with the Antennapedia/Penetratin motif and delivered to cells prior to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Peptide transduction was monitored by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, and their effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-kappa B activation was quantified using an NF-kappa B-dependent beta-galactosidase assay in stably transfected pre-B 70Z/3 lymphocytes. We show that the peptides corresponding to the LZ and CC2 subdomains inhibit NF-kappa B activation with an IC(50) in the mum range. Control peptides, including mutated CC2 and LZ peptides and a heterologous coiled-coil peptide, had no inhibitory effect. The designed peptides are able to induce cell death in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells exhibiting constitutive NF-kappa B activity. Our results provide the "proof of concept" for a new and promising strategy for the inhibition of NF-kappa B pathway activation through targeting the oligomerization state of the NEMO protein. PMID:15466857

  20. Kinetics of the inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by pea protein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2005-11-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) catalyzes the phosphorylation of various cellular proteins and excessive activities have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various chronic diseases. We hypothesized that positively charged peptides can be produced through enzymatic hydrolysis of pea proteins; such peptides could then bind to negatively charged calmodulin (CaM) at a physiological pH level and inhibit CaMKII activity. Pea protein isolate was hydrolyzed with an alkaline protease (alcalase) and filtered through a 1000-mol wt cutoff membrane. The permeate, which contained low-molecular weight peptides, was used to isolate cationic peptides on an SP-Sepharose column by ion exchange chromatography. Separation of the permeate on the SP-Sepharose column yielded two fractions with net positive charges that were subsequently used for enzyme inhibition studies. Fraction I eluted earlier from the column and contained lower contents of lysine and arginine than Fraction II, which eluted later. Results show that both peptide fractions inhibited CaMKII activity mostly in a competitive manner, although kinetic data suggested that inhibition by Fraction II may be of the mixed type. Kinetic analysis (K(m) and K(i)) showed that affinity of peptides in Fraction II for CaM was more than that in Fraction I, which was directly correlated with the higher inhibitory properties of Fraction II against CaMKII. The results suggest that it may be possible to use pea protein-derived cationic peptides to modulate CaMKII activities. PMID:16111873

  1. Thiosemicarbazone modification of 3-acetyl coumarin inhibitspeptide aggregation and protect against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Dnyanesh S; Bapat, Archika M; Ramteke, Shefali N; Joshi, Bimba N; Roussel, Pascal; Tomas, Alain; Deschamps, Patrick; Kulkarni, Prasad P

    2016-10-01

    Aggregation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) is an important event in the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, among the available therapeutic approaches to fight with disease, inhibition of Aβ aggregation is widely studied and one of the promising approach for the development of treatments for Alzheimer's disease. Thiosemicarbazone compounds are known for their variety of biological activities. However, the potential of thiosemicarbazone compounds towards inhibition of Aβ peptide aggregation and the subsequent toxicity is little explored. Herein, we report synthesis and x-ray crystal structure of novel compound 3-acetyl coumarin thiosemicarbazone and its efficacy toward inhibition of Aβ(1-42) peptide aggregation. Our results indicate that 3-acetyl coumarin thiosemicarbazone inhibits Aβ(1-42) peptide aggregation up to 80% compared to the parent 3-acetyl coumarin which inhibits 52%. Further, 3-acetyl coumarin thiosemicarbazone provides neuroprotection against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cell line. These findings indicate that thiosemicarbazone modification renders 3-acetyl coumarin neuroprotective properties. PMID:26232353

  2. Injection of Cocaine-Amphetamine Regulated Transcript (CART) peptide into the nucleus accumbens does not inhibit caffeine-induced locomotor activity: Implications for CART peptide mechanism.

    PubMed

    Job, Martin O

    2016-09-01

    Much evidence suggests that intra-nucleus accumbens (NAc) CART peptide (CART 55-102) injection inhibits locomotor activity (LMA) when there is an increase in the release and activity of dopamine (DA) in the NAc. However, this hypothesis has not been fully tested. One way to examine this is to determine if there is a lack of effect of intra-NAc CART peptide on LMA that does not involve increases in DA release in the NAc. Several studies have suggested that caffeine-induced LMA does not involve extracellular DA release in the NAc core. Therefore, in this study, we have examined the effect of injections of CART peptide (2.5μg) into the NAc core on the locomotor effects of caffeine in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Several LMA relevant doses of caffeine were used (0, 10, 20mg/kg i.p.), and an inverted U response curve was found as expected. We determined, in the same animals, that intra-NAc CART peptide had no effect on caffeine-induced LMA whereas it blunted cocaine-mediated LMA, as shown by other reports. We also extended a previous observation in mice by showing that at a LMA activating dose of caffeine there is no alteration of CART peptide levels in the NAc of rats. Our study supports the hypothesis that the inhibitory effects of CART peptide in the NAc may be exerted only under conditions of increased extracellular DA release and activity in this region. Our results also suggest that intra-NAc CART 55-102 does not generally inhibit increases in LMA due to all drugs, but has a more specific inhibitory effect on dopaminergic neurotransmission. PMID:27168116

  3. Calcium currents and peptide release from neurohypophysial terminals are inhibited by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Wang, X M; Dayanithi, G; Lemos, J R; Nordmann, J J; Treistman, S N

    1991-11-01

    The effects of EtOH on peptide release and on high-threshold, voltage-activated calcium (Ca++) channels were examined in acutely dissociated rat neurohypophysial terminals. These terminals release the peptide hormones, arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin. Release of AVP from isolated intact neurohypophyses, induced by either electrical stimulation or elevated potassium, was inhibited by clinically relevant concentrations of EtOH. "Whole-cell" patch-clamp recording methods were used to study the effects of EtOH on voltage-activated Ca++ currents (ICa) in the peptidergic nerve terminals. Amplitudes of both fast-inactivating ICa and long-lasting ICa were reduced in EtOH, and the reduction in ICa did not result from a shift in its current-voltage or steady-state inactivation relationships. Only the fast-inactivating component recovered after removal of EtOH. The effects of EtOH on ICa could not be attributed to changes in osmolarity. In contrast to ICa, the fast, transient K+ current was insensitive to EtOH. These results suggest that EtOH-induced reduction of ICa in the peptidergic nerve terminals produces a decrease in AVP release, resulting in lowered plasma AVP levels. PMID:1941619

  4. Small stress molecules inhibit aggregation and neurotoxicity of prion peptide 106-126

    SciTech Connect

    Kanapathipillai, Mathumai; Ku, Sook Hee; Girigoswami, Koyeli; Park, Chan Beum

    2008-01-25

    In prion diseases, the posttranslational modification of host-encoded prion protein PrP{sup c} yields a high {beta}-sheet content modified protein PrP{sup sc}, which further polymerizes into amyloid fibrils. PrP106-126 initiates the conformational changes leading to the conversion of PrP{sup c} to PrP{sup sc}. Molecules that can defunctionalize such peptides can serve as a potential tool in combating prion diseases. In microorganisms during stressed conditions, small stress molecules (SSMs) are formed to prevent protein denaturation and maintain protein stability and function. The effect of such SSMs on PrP106-126 amyloid formation is explored in the present study using turbidity, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cellular toxicity assay. Turbidity and AFM studies clearly depict that the SSMs-ectoine and mannosylglyceramide (MGA) inhibit the PrP106-126 aggregation. Our study also connotes that ectoine and MGA offer strong resistance to prion peptide-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma cells, concluding that such molecules can be potential inhibitors of prion aggregation and toxicity.

  5. Structural insight into the inhibition of tubulin by vinca domain peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Anthony; Marchand, Matthieu; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Knossow, Marcel; Gigant, Benoît

    2008-11-01

    The tubulin vinca domain is the target of widely different microtubule inhibitors that interfere with the binding of vinblastine. Although all these ligands inhibit the hydrolysis of GTP, they affect nucleotide exchange to variable extents. The structures of two vinca domain antimitotic peptides--phomopsin A and soblidotin (a dolastatin 10 analogue)--bound to tubulin in a complex with a stathmin-like domain show that their sites partly overlap with that of vinblastine and extend the definition of the vinca domain. The structural data, together with the biochemical results from the ligands we studied, highlight two main contributors in nucleotide exchange: the flexibility of the tubulin subunits' arrangement at their interfaces and the residues in the carboxy-terminal part of the beta-tubulin H6-H7 loop. The structures also highlight common features of the mechanisms by which vinca domain ligands favour curved tubulin assemblies and destabilize microtubules. PMID:18787557

  6. Inhibition of amyloid fiber assembly by both BiP and its target peptide.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D. P.; Raffen, R.; Vogen, S.; Williamson, E.; Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2000-10-01

    Immunoglobulin light chain (LC) normally is a soluble, secreted protein, but some LC assemble into ordered fibrils whose deposition in tissues results in amyloidosis and organ failure. Here we reconstitute fibril formation in vitro and show that preformed fibrils can nucleate polymerization of soluble LC. This prion-like behavior has important physiological implications, since somatic mutations generate multiple related LC sequences. Furthermore, we demonstrate that fibril formation in vitro and aggregation of whole LC within cells are inhibited by BiP and by a synthetic peptide that is identical to a major LC binding site for BiP. We propose that LC form fibrils via an interprotein loop swap and that the underlying conformational change should be amenable to drug therapy.

  7. Efficient inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a synthetic peptide blocking S100A4-methionine aminopeptidase 2 interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Takenaga, Keizo; Asagiri, Masataka; Nakano, Kazumi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Endo, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The prometastatic calcium-binding protein, S100A4, is expressed in endothelial cells, and its downregulation markedly suppresses tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft cancer model. Given that endothelial S100A4 can be a molecular target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, we addressed here whether synthetic peptide capable of blocking S100A4-effector protein interaction could be a novel antiangiogenic agent. To examine this hypothesis, we focused on the S100A4-binding domain of methionine aminopeptidase 2, an effector protein, which plays a role in endothelial cell growth. Overexpression of the domain in mouse endothelial MSS31 cells reduced DNA synthesis, and the corresponding synthetic peptide (named NBD) indeed interacted with S100A4 and inhibited capillary formation in vitro and new blood vessel formation in vivo. Intriguingly, a single intra-tumor administration of the NBD peptide in human prostate cancer xenografts significantly reduced vascularity, resulting in tumor regression. Mechanistically, the NBD peptide enhanced assembly of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments along with Ser1943 phosphorylation, stimulated formation of focal adhesions without phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, and provoked G1/S arrest of the cell cycle. Altogether, the NBD peptide is a potent inhibitor for tumor angiogenesis, and is the first example of an anticancer peptide drug developed on the basis of an endothelial S100A4-targeted strategy. PMID:26029719

  8. Efficient inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a synthetic peptide blocking S100A4-methionine aminopeptidase 2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Takenaga, Keizo; Asagiri, Masataka; Nakano, Kazumi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Endo, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The prometastatic calcium-binding protein, S100A4, is expressed in endothelial cells, and its downregulation markedly suppresses tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft cancer model. Given that endothelial S100A4 can be a molecular target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, we addressed here whether synthetic peptide capable of blocking S100A4-effector protein interaction could be a novel antiangiogenic agent. To examine this hypothesis, we focused on the S100A4-binding domain of methionine aminopeptidase 2, an effector protein, which plays a role in endothelial cell growth. Overexpression of the domain in mouse endothelial MSS31 cells reduced DNA synthesis, and the corresponding synthetic peptide (named NBD) indeed interacted with S100A4 and inhibited capillary formation in vitro and new blood vessel formation in vivo. Intriguingly, a single intra-tumor administration of the NBD peptide in human prostate cancer xenografts significantly reduced vascularity, resulting in tumor regression. Mechanistically, the NBD peptide enhanced assembly of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments along with Ser1943 phosphorylation, stimulated formation of focal adhesions without phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, and provoked G1/S arrest of the cell cycle. Altogether, the NBD peptide is a potent inhibitor for tumor angiogenesis, and is the first example of an anticancer peptide drug developed on the basis of an endothelial S100A4-targeted strategy. PMID:26029719

  9. Inhibition of Cu-amyloid-β by using bifunctional peptides with β-sheet breaker and chelator moieties.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Madeleine; Canning, Anne; Chiha, Sabri; Bouquerel, Pierre; Pedersen, Jeppe Trudslev; Østergaard, Jesper; Cuvillier, Olivier; Sasaki, Isabelle; Hureau, Christelle; Faller, Peter

    2012-04-16

    Breaking the mold: Inhibition of toxic amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates and disruption of Cu-Aβ with subsequent redox-silencing of Cu have been considered promising strategies against Alzheimer's disease. The design and proof of concept of simple peptides containing a Cu-chelating/redox-silencing unit and an Aβ-aggregation inhibition unit (β-sheet breaker) is described (see scheme). PMID:22422637

  10. Small Peptides Blocking Inhibition of Factor Xa and Tissue Factor-Factor VIIa by Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI)*

    PubMed Central

    Dockal, Michael; Hartmann, Rudolf; Fries, Markus; Thomassen, M. Christella L. G. D.; Heinzmann, Alexandra; Ehrlich, Hartmut; Rosing, Jan; Osterkamp, Frank; Polakowski, Thomas; Reineke, Ulrich; Griessner, Andreas; Brandstetter, Hans; Scheiflinger, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor that inhibits activated factor X (FXa) via a slow-tight binding mechanism and tissue factor-activated FVII (TF-FVIIa) via formation of a quaternary FXa-TFPI-TF-FVIIa complex. Inhibition of TFPI enhances coagulation in hemophilia models. Using a library approach, we selected and subsequently optimized peptides that bind TFPI and block its anticoagulant activity. One peptide (termed compound 3), bound with high affinity to the Kunitz-1 (K1) domain of TFPI (Kd ∼1 nm). We solved the crystal structure of this peptide in complex with the K1 of TFPI at 2.55-Å resolution. The structure of compound 3 can be segmented into a N-terminal anchor; an Ω-shaped loop; an intermediate segment; a tight glycine-loop; and a C-terminal α-helix that is anchored to K1 at its reactive center loop and two-stranded β-sheet. The contact surface has an overall hydrophobic character with some charged hot spots. In a model system, compound 3 blocked FXa inhibition by TFPI (EC50 = 11 nm) and inhibition of TF-FVIIa-catalyzed FX activation by TFPI (EC50 = 2 nm). The peptide prevented transition from the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex, but did not affect formation of the loose FXa-TFPI complex. The K1 domain of TFPI binds and inhibits FVIIa and the K2 domain similarly inhibits FXa. Because compound 3 binds to K1, our data show that K1 is not only important for FVIIa inhibition but also for FXa inhibition, i.e. for the transition of the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex. This mode of action translates into normalization of coagulation of hemophilia plasmas. Compound 3 thus bears potential to prevent bleeding in hemophilia patients. PMID:24275667

  11. A VEGFR1 antagonistic peptide inhibits tumor growth and metastasis through VEGFR1-PI3K-AKT signaling pathway inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zheng; Zhao, Chuanke; Wang, Lixin; Cao, Xiaodan; Li, Jian; Huang, Ruijing; Lao, Qiaocong; Yu, Hangping; Li, Yanna; Du, Haiyan; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is central to the growth of cancers and VEGFR-1/Flt-1 plays an important role during the neovascularization under pathological conditions. We previously founded a VEGFR1 antagonistic peptide, F56, by screening the phage peptide library. We showed that DHFR-F56 chimeric protein displayed anti-tumor activity and inhibited angiogenesis, however the anti-tumor activity of monomeric F56 and the mechanism remain unclear. In this study, we found that the F56 didn’t affect VEGF-A induced endothelial cell proliferation, but reduced migration and tube formation of endothelial cells. F56 also inhibited the sprout of rat aortic endothelial cells, the angiogenesis of chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane as well as the generation of subintestinal vein vessels (SIV) in zebrafish embryos. We found that F56 inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR1, as well as the phosphorylation of the downstream of PI3K-AKT axis. However, F56 had no effect on the phosphorylation of VEGFR2. Correlating with these effects, F56 inhibited xenograft growth of HT-29 and MGC-823 cells in BALB/c nude mice, and significantly suppressed the lung metastasis of B16 cells in C57BL/6 mice. Our study demonstrated that monomeric peptide F56 had a significant anti-tumor activity by inhibiting angiogenesis, and laid the foundation for its clinical application. PMID:26693066

  12. Effective Inhibition of Cellular ROS Production by MXCXXC-Type Peptides: Potential Therapeutic Applications in Copper-Homeostasis Disorders.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Michal S; Tshuva, Edit Y

    2016-06-27

    Cyclic and acyclic peptides with sequences derived from metallochaperone binding sites, but differing at position 2, were analyzed for their inhibitory reactivity towards cellular ROS (reactive oxygen species) formation and catalytic activity towards oxidation with H2 O2 , in comparison with three commercial drugs clinically employed in chelation therapy for Wilson's disease. Acyclic peptides were more effective inhibitors than the cyclic ones, with one leading peptide with threonine at position 2 systematically showing the highest efficiency in reducing cellular ROS levels and in inhibiting Cu oxidation. This peptide was more effective than all commercial drugs in all aspects analyzed, and showed no toxicity towards human colon HT-29 cancer cells at concentrations 10-100 times higher than the IC50 of the commercial drugs, corroborating its high medicinal potential. PMID:27124086

  13. Identification and Evaluation of Cryoprotective Peptides from Chicken Collagen: Ice-Growth Inhibition Activity Compared to That of Type I Antifreeze Proteins in Sucrose Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Lihui; Betti, Mirko

    2016-06-29

    The ability of chicken collagen peptides to inhibit the growth of ice crystals was evaluated and compared to that of fish antifreeze proteins (AFPs). This ice inhibition activity was assessed using a polarized microscope by measuring ice crystal dimensions in a sucrose model system with and without collagen peptides after seven thermal cycles. The system was stabilized at -25 °C and cycled between -16 and -12 °C. Five candidate peptides with ice inhibition activity were identified using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry and were then synthesized. Their ice inhibition capacity was compared to that of type I AFPs in a 23% sucrose model system. Specific collagen peptides with certain amino acid sequences reduced the extent of ice growth by approximately 70% at a relatively low concentration (1 mg/mL). These results suggest that specific collagen peptides may act in a noncolligative manner, inhibiting ice crystal growth like type I AFPs, but less efficiently. PMID:27293017

  14. Angiotensin II-stimulated secretion of arginine vasopressin is inhibited by atrial natriuretic peptide in humans.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Toshiyoshi; Miyamoto, Takenori

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the effect of the intravenous infusion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the response of plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels to intravenous infusion of angiotensin II (ANG II) in healthy individuals. Intravenous infusion of ANP (10 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) slightly but significantly decreased plasma AVP levels, while intravenous infusion of ANG II (10 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) resulted in slightly increased plasma AVP levels. ANG II infused significant elevations in arterial blood pressure and central venous pressure (CVP). Because the elevation in blood pressure could have potentially inhibited AVP secretion via baroreceptor reflexes, the effect of ANG II on blood pressure was attenuated by the simultaneous infusion of nitroprusside. ANG II alone produced a remarkable increase in plasma AVP levels when infused with nitroprusside, whereas the simultaneous ANP intravenous infusion (10 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) abolished the increase in plasma AVP levels induced by ANG II when blood pressure elevation was attenuated by nitroprusside. Thus, ANG II increased AVP secretion and ANP inhibited not only basal AVP secretion but also ANG II-stimulated AVP secretion in humans. These findings support the hypothesis that circulating ANP modulates AVP secretion, in part, by antagonizing the action of circulating ANG II. PMID:21123762

  15. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  16. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  17. Inhibition of Hepatitis E Virus Replication by Peptide-Conjugated Morpholino Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yuchen; Ma, Zexu; Kannan, Harilakshmi; Stein, David A.; Iversen, Patrick I.; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a cause of hepatitis in humans worldwide and has been associated with a mortality rate of up to 30% in pregnant women. Recently, persistent and chronic HEV infections have been recognized as a serious clinical problem, especially in immunocompromised individuals. To date, there are no FDA-approved HEV-specific antiviral drugs. In this study, we evaluated antisense peptide-conjugated morpholino oligomers (PPMO) designed against HEV genomic sequences as potential HEV-specific antiviral compounds. Two genetically-distinct strains of human HEV, genotype 1 Sar55 and genotype 3 Kernow-C1, isolated from patients with acute and chronic hepatitis, respectively, were used to evaluate inhibition of viral replication by PPMO in liver cells. The anti-HEV PPMO produced a significant reduction in the levels of HEV RNA and capsid protein, indicating effective inhibition of HEV replication. PPMO HP1, which targets a highly conserved sequence in the start site region of ORF1, was also effective against the genotype 3 Kernow-C1 strain in stably-infected HepG2/C3A liver cells. The antiviral activity observed was specific, dose-responsive and potent, suggesting that further exploration of PPMO HP1 as a potential HEV-specific antiviral agent is warranted. PMID:26086884

  18. Inhibition of serotonin release by bombesin-like peptides in rat hypothalamus in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Saporito, M.S.; Warwick, R.O. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the activity of bombesin (BN), neuromedin-C (NM-C) and neuromedin-B (NM-B) on serotonin (5-HT) release and reuptake in rat hypothalamus (HYP) in vitro. BN and NM-C but not NM-B decreased K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release from superfused HYP slices by 25%. Bacitracin, a nonspecific peptidase inhibitor, reversed the inhibitory effect of BN on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Phosphoramidon (PAN, 10 /mu/M) an endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor, abolished the inhibitory effect of BN, but not NM-C, on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. The peptidyl dipeptidase A inhibitor enalaprilat (ENP, 10 /mu/M), enhanced both BN and NM-C inhibition of /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Bestatin (BST, 10 /mu/M) had no effect on BN or NM-C inhibitory activity on /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Neither BN, NM-C nor NM-B affected reuptake of /sup 3/H-5-HT into HYP synaptosomes alone or in combination with any of the peptidase inhibitors, nor did these peptides alter the ability of fluoxetine to inhibit /sup 3/H-5-HT uptake.

  19. Analgesic-antitumor peptide inhibits proliferation and migration of SHG-44 human malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youlong; Cai, Xueting; Ye, Tingmei; Huo, Jiege; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Shuangquan; Cao, Peng

    2011-09-01

    Malignant gliomas, the most common subtype of primary brain tumors, are characterized by high proliferation, great invasion, and neurological destruction and considered to be the deadliest of human cancers. Analgesic-antitumor peptide (AGAP), one of scorpion toxic polypeptides, has been shown to have antitumor activity. Here, we show that recombinant AGAP (rAGAP) not only inhibits the proliferation of gliomas cell SHG-44 and rat glioma cell C6, but also suppresses the migration of SHG-44 cells during wound healing. To explain these phenomena, we find that rAGAP leads to cell cycle of SHG-44 arrested in G1 phase accompanied by suppressing G1 cell cycle regulatory proteins CDK2, CDK6, and p-RB by means of the down-regulated protein expression of p-AKT. Meanwhile, rAGAP significantly decreases the production of NF-κB, BCL-2, p-p38, p-c-Jun, and p-Erk1/2 and further suppresses the activation of VEGF and MMP-9 in SHG-44 cells. These findings suggest rAGAP inhibit proliferation and migration of SHG-44 cells by arresting cell cycle and interfering p-AKT, NF-κB, BCL-2, and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:21538480

  20. The connexin43 mimetic peptide Gap19 inhibits hemichannels without altering gap junctional communication in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Abudara, Verónica; Bechberger, John; Freitas-Andrade, Moises; De Bock, Marijke; Wang, Nan; Bultynck, Geert; Naus, Christian C.; Leybaert, Luc; Giaume, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In the brain, astrocytes represent the cellular population that expresses the highest amount of connexins (Cxs). This family of membrane proteins is the molecular constituent of gap junction channels and hemichannels that provide pathways for direct cytoplasm-to-cytoplasm and inside-out exchange, respectively. Both types of Cx channels are permeable to ions and small signaling molecules allowing astrocytes to establish dynamic interactions with neurons. So far, most pharmacological approaches currently available do not distinguish between these two channel functions, stressing the need to develop new specific molecular tools. In astrocytes two major Cxs are expressed, Cx43 and Cx30, and there is now evidence indicating that at least Cx43 operates as a gap junction channel as well as a hemichannel in these cells. Based on studies in primary cultures as well as in acute hippocampal slices, we report here that Gap19, a nonapeptide derived from the cytoplasmic loop of Cx43, inhibits astroglial Cx43 hemichannels in a dose-dependent manner, without affecting gap junction channels. This peptide, which not only selectively inhibits hemichannels but is also specific for Cx43, can be delivered in vivo in mice as TAT-Gap19, and displays penetration into the brain parenchyma. As a result, Gap19 combined with other tools opens up new avenues to decipher the role of Cx43 hemichannels in interactions between astrocytes and neurons in physiological as well as pathological situations. PMID:25374505

  1. Staphylococcus aureus formyl-methionyl transferase mutants demonstrate reduced virulence factor production and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; Demarsh, Peter; Aubart, Kelly; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection. PMID:23571548

  2. Staphylococcus aureus Formyl-Methionyl Transferase Mutants Demonstrate Reduced Virulence Factor Production and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; DeMarsh, Peter; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection. PMID:23571548

  3. Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide Inhibits Chemokine Production by Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Stohl, Lori L.; Zhou, Xi; Ding, Wanhong; Granstein, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether the sensory neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) inhibits release of chemokines by dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Dermal blood vessels are associated with nerves containing CGRP, suggesting that CGRP-containing nerves may regulate cutaneous inflammation through effects on vessels. We examined CGRP effects on stimulated chemokine production by a human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) and primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (pHDMECs). HMEC-1 cells and pHDMECs expressed mRNA for components of the CGRP and adrenomedullin receptors and CGRP inhibited LPS-induced production of the chemokines CXCL8, CCL2, and CXCL1 by both HMEC-1 cells and pHDMECs. The receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)1/calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL)-specific antagonists CGRP8-37 and BIBN4096BS, blocked this effect of CGRP in a dose-dependent manner. CGRP prevented LPS-induced IκBα degradation and NF-κB binding to the promoters of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CCL2 in HMEC-1 cells and Bay 11-7085, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation, suppressed LPS-induced production of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CCL2. Thus, the NF-κB pathway appears to be involved in CGRP-mediated suppression of chemokine production. Accordingly, CGRP treatment of LPS-stimulated HMEC-1 cells inhibited their ability to chemoattract human neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Elucidation of this pathway may suggest new avenues for therapeutic manipulation of cutaneous inflammation. PMID:21334428

  4. Inhibition of ClC-2 chloride channels by a peptide component or components of scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C H; Fields, D M; Olivetti, P R; Fuller, M D; Zhang, Z R; Kubanek, J; McCarty, N A

    2005-11-01

    ClC chloride channels play essential roles in membrane excitability and maintenance of osmotic balance. Despite the recent crystallization of two bacterial ClC-like proteins, the gating mechanism for these channels remains unclear. In this study we tested scorpion venom for the presence of novel peptide inhibitors of ClC channels, which might be useful tools for dissecting the mechanisms underlying ClC channel gating. Recently, it has been shown that a peptide component of venom from the scorpion L. quinquestriatus hebraeus inhibits the CFTR chloride channel from the intracellular side. Using two-electrode voltage clamp we studied the effect of scorpion venom on ClC-0, -1, and -2, and found both dose- and voltage-dependent inhibition only of ClC-2. Comparison of voltage-dependence of inhibition by venom to that of known pore blockers revealed opposite voltage dependencies, suggesting different mechanisms of inhibition. Kinetic data show that venom induced slower activation kinetics compared to pre-venom records, suggesting that the active component(s) of venom may function as a gating modifier at ClC-2. Trypsinization abolished the inhibitory activity of venom, suggesting that the component(s) of scorpion venom that inhibits ClC-2 is a peptide. PMID:16596447

  5. Inhibiting bladder tumor growth with a cell penetrating R11 peptide derived from the p53 C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Kaijie; Ding, Chen; Sun, Kangwei; Guan, Zhenfeng; Wang, Xinyang; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; He, Dalin; Fan, Jinhai

    2015-11-10

    Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) is the most common malignancy of the urinary tract, nearly half of which contains a mutation in TP53 gene. Hence, therapeutic approach by restoring functional p53 protein in cancer cells will be beneficial. Recent studies have demonstrated the inhibition of cancer cell growth by p53 reactivation using a peptide derived from the p53 C-terminus (p53C). However, the outcome of reactivating p53 in controlling bladder cancer development is limited by its efficiency and specificity of peptide delivery, especially in metastatic animal models. Herein, we report that the cell penetrating peptide (polyarginine, R11)-conjugated p53C can exhibit a preferential uptake and growth inhibit of UCB cells expressing either mutant or wild-type TP53 by the activation of p53-dependent pathway. R11-p53C peptide treatment of preclinical orthotopic and metastatic bladder cancer models significantly decreased the tumor burden and increased the lifespan without a significant cytotoxicity. Based on these results, we believe that R11-p53C peptide has therapeutic potential for primary and metastatic bladder cancer, and R11-mediated transduction may be a useful strategy for the therapeutic delivery of large tumor suppressor molecules to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26462022

  6. Virtual Screening of Peptide and Peptidomimetic Fragments Targeted to Inhibit Bacterial Dithiol Oxidase DsbA.

    PubMed

    Duprez, Wilko; Bachu, Prabhakar; Stoermer, Martin J; Tay, Stephanie; McMahon, Róisín M; Fairlie, David P; Martin, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial drugs with novel scaffolds and new mechanisms of action are desperately needed to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. The periplasmic oxidative folding system in Gram-negative bacteria represents a possible target for anti-virulence antibacterials. By targeting virulence rather than viability, development of resistance and side effects (through killing host native microbiota) might be minimized. Here, we undertook the design of peptidomimetic inhibitors targeting the interaction between the two key enzymes of oxidative folding, DsbA and DsbB, with the ultimate goal of preventing virulence factor assembly. Structures of DsbB--or peptides--complexed with DsbA revealed key interactions with the DsbA active site cysteine, and with a hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site. The present work aimed to discover peptidomimetics that target the hydrophobic groove to generate non-covalent DsbA inhibitors. The previously reported structure of a Proteus mirabilis DsbA active site cysteine mutant, in a non-covalent complex with the heptapeptide PWATCDS, was used as an in silico template for virtual screening of a peptidomimetic fragment library. The highest scoring fragment compound and nine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for DsbA binding and inhibition. These experiments discovered peptidomimetic fragments with inhibitory activity at millimolar concentrations. Although only weakly potent relative to larger covalent peptide inhibitors that interact through the active site cysteine, these fragments offer new opportunities as templates to build non-covalent inhibitors. The results suggest that non-covalent peptidomimetics may need to interact with sites beyond the hydrophobic groove in order to produce potent DsbA inhibitors. PMID:26225423

  7. Virtual Screening of Peptide and Peptidomimetic Fragments Targeted to Inhibit Bacterial Dithiol Oxidase DsbA

    PubMed Central

    Stoermer, Martin J.; Tay, Stephanie; McMahon, Róisín M.; Fairlie, David P.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial drugs with novel scaffolds and new mechanisms of action are desperately needed to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. The periplasmic oxidative folding system in Gram-negative bacteria represents a possible target for anti-virulence antibacterials. By targeting virulence rather than viability, development of resistance and side effects (through killing host native microbiota) might be minimized. Here, we undertook the design of peptidomimetic inhibitors targeting the interaction between the two key enzymes of oxidative folding, DsbA and DsbB, with the ultimate goal of preventing virulence factor assembly. Structures of DsbB - or peptides - complexed with DsbA revealed key interactions with the DsbA active site cysteine, and with a hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site. The present work aimed to discover peptidomimetics that target the hydrophobic groove to generate non-covalent DsbA inhibitors. The previously reported structure of a Proteus mirabilis DsbA active site cysteine mutant, in a non-covalent complex with the heptapeptide PWATCDS, was used as an in silico template for virtual screening of a peptidomimetic fragment library. The highest scoring fragment compound and nine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for DsbA binding and inhibition. These experiments discovered peptidomimetic fragments with inhibitory activity at millimolar concentrations. Although only weakly potent relative to larger covalent peptide inhibitors that interact through the active site cysteine, these fragments offer new opportunities as templates to build non-covalent inhibitors. The results suggest that non-covalent peptidomimetics may need to interact with sites beyond the hydrophobic groove in order to produce potent DsbA inhibitors. PMID:26225423

  8. Peptides Composed of Alternating L- and D-Amino Acids Inhibit Amyloidogenesis in Three Distinct Amyloid Systems Independent of Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kellock, Jackson; Hopping, Gene; Caughey, Byron; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-06-01

    There is now substantial evidence that soluble oligomers are primary toxic agents in amyloid diseases. The development of an antibody recognizing the toxic soluble oligomeric forms of different and unrelated amyloid species suggests a common conformational intermediate during amyloidogenesis. We previously observed a common occurrence of a novel secondary structure element, which we call α-sheet, in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of various amyloidogenic proteins, and we hypothesized that the toxic conformer is composed of α-sheet structure. As such, α-sheet may represent a conformational signature of the misfolded intermediates of amyloidogenesis and a potential unique binding target for peptide inhibitors. Recently, we reported the design and characterization of a novel hairpin peptide (α1 or AP90) that adopts stable α-sheet structure and inhibits the aggregation of the β-Amyloid Peptide Aβ42 and transthyretin. AP90 is a 23-residue hairpin peptide featuring alternating D- and L-amino acids with favorable conformational propensities for α-sheet formation, and a designed turn. For this study, we reverse engineered AP90 to identify which of its design features is most responsible for conferring α-sheet stability and inhibitory activity. We present experimental characterization (CD and FTIR) of seven peptides designed to accomplish this. In addition, we measured their ability to inhibit aggregation in three unrelated amyloid species: Aβ42, transthyretin, and human islet amylin polypeptide. We found that a hairpin peptide featuring alternating L- and D-amino acids, independent of sequence, is sufficient for conferring α-sheet structure and inhibition of aggregation. Additionally, we show a correlation between α-sheet structural stability and inhibitory activity. PMID:27012425

  9. Inhibition of Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) Infections by a Novel Antiviral Peptide Derived from EV-71 Capsid Protein VP1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chee Wah; Chan, Yoke Fun; Sim, Kooi Mow; Tan, Eng Lee; Poh, Chit Laa

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). In recent years, EV-71 infections were reported to cause high fatalities and severe neurological complications in Asia. Currently, no effective antiviral or vaccine is available to treat or prevent EV-71 infection. In this study, we have discovered a synthetic peptide which could be developed as a potential antiviral for inhibition of EV-71. Ninety five synthetic peptides (15-mers) overlapping the entire EV-71 capsid protein, VP1, were chemically synthesized and tested for antiviral properties against EV-71 in human Rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells. One peptide, SP40, was found to significantly reduce cytopathic effects of all representative EV-71 strains from genotypes A, B and C tested, with IC50 values ranging from 6–9.3 µM in RD cells. The in vitro inhibitory effect of SP40 exhibited a dose dependent concentration corresponding to a decrease in infectious viral particles, total viral RNA and the levels of VP1 protein. The antiviral activity of SP40 peptide was not restricted to a specific cell line as inhibition of EV-71 was observed in RD, HeLa, HT-29 and Vero cells. Besides inhibition of EV-71, it also had antiviral activities against CV-A16 and poliovirus type 1 in cell culture. Mechanism of action studies suggested that the SP40 peptide was not virucidal but was able to block viral attachment to the RD cells. Substitutions of arginine and lysine residues with alanine in the SP40 peptide at positions R3A, R4A, K5A and R13A were found to significantly decrease antiviral activities, implying the importance of positively charged amino acids for the antiviral activities. The data demonstrated the potential and feasibility of SP40 as a broad spectrum antiviral agent against EV-71. PMID:22563456

  10. A novel recombinant slow-release TNF α-derived peptide effectively inhibits tumor growth and angiogensis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Zhao, Shaojun; Shen, Shutao; Fang, Shixiong; Ye, Zulu; Shi, Zhi; Hong, An

    2015-01-01

    RMP16, a recombinant TNF α-derived polypeptide comprising a specific human serum albumin (HSA)-binding 7-mer peptide identified by phage display screening (WQRPSSW), a cleavage peptide for Factor Xa (IEGR), and a 20-amino acid bioactive peptide P16 (TNF α segment including amino acid residues 75-94), was prepared by gene-engineering technology. RMP16 showed prolonged half-life, 13.11 hours in mice (half-lives of P16 and TNF α are 5.77 and 29.0 minutes, respectively), and obviously higher receptor selectivity for TNFRI than TNF α. RMP16 had significant inhibition effects for multiple tumor cells, especially prostate cancer Du145 cells, and human vascular endothelial cells but not for human mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells. RMP16 can more effectively induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation for DU145 cells than P16 and TNF α via the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. In nude mice with transplanted tumor of DU145 cells, RMP16 significantly induced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor tissues but causing less side effects, and tumor inhibitory rate reached nearly 80%, furthermore, RMP16 can potently inhibit tumor angiogenesis and neovascularization. These findings suggest that RMP16 may represent a promising long-lasting antitumor therapeutic peptide with less TNF α-induced toxicity. PMID:26337231

  11. A novel recombinant slow-release TNF α-derived peptide effectively inhibits tumor growth and angiogensis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhao, Shaojun; Shen, Shutao; Fang, Shixiong; Ye, Zulu; Shi, Zhi; Hong, An

    2015-01-01

    RMP16, a recombinant TNF α-derived polypeptide comprising a specific human serum albumin (HSA)-binding 7-mer peptide identified by phage display screening (WQRPSSW), a cleavage peptide for Factor Xa (IEGR), and a 20-amino acid bioactive peptide P16 (TNF α segment including amino acid residues 75–94), was prepared by gene-engineering technology. RMP16 showed prolonged half-life, 13.11 hours in mice (half-lives of P16 and TNF α are 5.77 and 29.0 minutes, respectively), and obviously higher receptor selectivity for TNFRI than TNF α. RMP16 had significant inhibition effects for multiple tumor cells, especially prostate cancer Du145 cells, and human vascular endothelial cells but not for human mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells. RMP16 can more effectively induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation for DU145 cells than P16 and TNF α via the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. In nude mice with transplanted tumor of DU145 cells, RMP16 significantly induced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor tissues but causing less side effects, and tumor inhibitory rate reached nearly 80%, furthermore, RMP16 can potently inhibit tumor angiogenesis and neovascularization. These findings suggest that RMP16 may represent a promising long-lasting antitumor therapeutic peptide with less TNF α-induced toxicity. PMID:26337231

  12. A bifunctional sea anemone peptide with Kunitz type protease and potassium channel inhibiting properties.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Billen, Bert; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Debaveye, Sarah; Béress, László; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-07-01

    Sea anemone venom is a known source of interesting bioactive compounds, including peptide toxins which are invaluable tools for studying structure and function of voltage-gated potassium channels. APEKTx1 is a novel peptide isolated from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima, containing 63 amino acids cross-linked by 3 disulfide bridges. Sequence alignment reveals that APEKTx1 is a new member of the type 2 sea anemone peptides targeting voltage-gated potassium channels (K(V)s), which also include the kalicludines from Anemonia sulcata. Similar to the kalicludines, APEKTx1 shares structural homology with both the basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a very potent Kunitz-type protease inhibitor, and dendrotoxins which are powerful blockers of voltage-gated potassium channels. In this study, APEKTx1 has been subjected to a screening on a wide range of 23 ion channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes: 13 cloned voltage-gated potassium channels (K(V)1.1-K(V)1.6, K(V)1.1 triple mutant, K(V)2.1, K(V)3.1, K(V)4.2, K(V)4.3, hERG, the insect channel Shaker IR), 2 cloned hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-sensitive cation non-selective channels (HCN1 and HCN2) and 8 cloned voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)1.2-Na(V)1.8 and the insect channel DmNa(V)1). Our data show that APEKTx1 selectively blocks K(V)1.1 channels in a very potent manner with an IC(50) value of 0.9nM. Furthermore, we compared the trypsin inhibitory activity of this toxin with BPTI. APEKTx1 inhibits trypsin with a dissociation constant of 124nM. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that APEKTx1 has the unique feature to combine the dual functionality of a potent and selective blocker of K(V)1.1 channels with that of a competitive inhibitor of trypsin. PMID:21477583

  13. Peptide 19-2.5 inhibits heparan sulfate-triggered inflammation in murine cardiomyocytes stimulated with human sepsis serum.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lukas; Schmitz, Susanne; De Santis, Rebecca; Doemming, Sabine; Haase, Hajo; Hoeger, Janine; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; Marx, Gernot; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction in sepsis has been linked to inflammation caused by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as well as by host danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). These include soluble heparan sulfate (HS), which triggers the devastating consequences of the pro-inflammatory cascades in severe sepsis and septic shock. Thus, there is increasing interest in the development of anti-infective agents, with effectiveness against both PAMPs and DAMPs. We hypothesized that a synthetic antimicrobial peptide (peptide 19-2.5) inhibits inflammatory response in murine cardiomyocytes (HL-1 cells) stimulated with PAMPs, DAMPs or serum from patients with septic shock by reduction and/or neutralization of soluble HS. In the current study, our data indicate that the treatment with peptide 19-2.5 decreases the inflammatory response in HL-1 cells stimulated with either PAMPs or DAMPs. Furthermore, our work shows that soluble HS in serum from patients with Gram-negative or Gram-positive septic shock induces a strong pro-inflammatory response in HL-1 cells, which can be effectively blocked by peptide 19-2.5. Based on these findings, peptide 19-2.5 is a novel anti-inflammatory agent interacting with both PAMPs and DAMPs, suggesting peptide 19-2.5 may have the potential for further development as a broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory agent in sepsis-induced myocardial inflammation and dysfunction. PMID:26024383

  14. Engineering D-Amino Acid Containing Collagen Like Peptide at the Cleavage Site of Clostridium histolyticum Collagenase for Its Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Punitha; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Unni Nair, Balachandran

    2015-01-01

    Collagenase is an important enzyme which plays an important role in degradation of collagen in wound healing, cancer metastasis and even in embryonic development. However, the mechanism of this degradation has not yet been completely understood. In the field of biomedical and protein engineering, the design and development of new peptide based materials is of main concern. In the present work an attempt has been made to study the effect of DAla in collagen like peptide (imino-poor region of type I collagen) on the structure and stability of peptide against enzyme hydrolysis. Effect of replacement of DAla in the collagen like peptide has been studied using circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD). Our findings suggest that, DAla substitution leads to conformational changes in the secondary structure and favours the formation of polyproline II conformation than its L-counterpart in the imino-poor region of collagen like peptides. Change in the chirality of alanine at the cleavage site of collagenase in the imino-poor region inhibits collagenolytic activity. This may find application in design of peptides and peptidomimics for enzyme-substrate interaction, specifically with reference to collagen and other extra cellular matrix proteins. PMID:25973613

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaves a C-terminal peptide from human thrombin that inhibits host inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Mariena J. A.; Bhongir, Ravi K. V.; Kjellström, Sven; Siller, Helena; Kasetty, Gopinath; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known for its immune evasive abilities amongst others by degradation of a large variety of host proteins. Here we show that digestion of thrombin by P. aeruginosa elastase leads to the release of the C-terminal thrombin-derived peptide FYT21, which inhibits pro-inflammatory responses to several pathogen-associated molecular patterns in vitro and in vivo by preventing toll-like receptor dimerization and subsequent activation of down-stream signalling pathways. Thus, P. aeruginosa ‘hijacks' an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide-based mechanism, thereby enabling modulation and circumvention of host responses. PMID:27181065

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaves a C-terminal peptide from human thrombin that inhibits host inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Kjellström, Sven; Siller, Helena; Kasetty, Gopinath; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known for its immune evasive abilities amongst others by degradation of a large variety of host proteins. Here we show that digestion of thrombin by P. aeruginosa elastase leads to the release of the C-terminal thrombin-derived peptide FYT21, which inhibits pro-inflammatory responses to several pathogen-associated molecular patterns in vitro and in vivo by preventing toll-like receptor dimerization and subsequent activation of down-stream signalling pathways. Thus, P. aeruginosa 'hijacks' an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide-based mechanism, thereby enabling modulation and circumvention of host responses. PMID:27181065

  17. Chlorella 11-Peptide Inhibits the Production of Macrophage-Induced Adhesion Molecules and Reduces Endothelin-1 Expression and Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Mei Fen; Chen, Lih Chi; Cherng, Jong Yuh

    2013-01-01

    The inflammation process in large vessels involves the up-regulation of vascular adhesion molecules such as endothelial cell selectin (E-selectin), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) which are also known as the markers of atherosclerosis. We have reported that Chlorella 11-peptide exhibited effective anti-inflammatory effects. This peptide with an amino sequence Val-Glu-Cys-Tyr-Gly-Pro-Asn-Arg-Pro-Gln-Phe was further examined for its potential in preventing atherosclerosis in this study. In particular, the roles of Chlorella 11-peptide in lowering the production of vascular adhesion molecules, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) and expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) from endothelia (SVEC4-10 cells) were studied. The production of E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in SVEC4-10 cells was measured with ELISA. The mRNA expression of ET-1 was analyzed by RT-PCR and agarose gel. Results showed that Chlorella 11-peptide significantly suppressed the levels of E-selectin, ICAM, VCAM, MCP-1 as well as ET-1 gene expression. The inhibition of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 production by Chlorella 11-peptide was reversed in the presence of protein kinase A inhibitor (H89) which suggests that the cAMP pathway was involved in the inhibitory cause of the peptide. In addition, this peptide was shown to reduce the extent of increased intercellular permeability induced by combination of 50% of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 cells medium and 50% normal SEVC cell culture medium (referred to as 50% RAW-conditioned medium). These data demonstrate that Chlorella 11-peptide is a promising biomolecule in preventing chronic inflammatory-related vascular diseases. PMID:24129228

  18. Mo polyoxometalate nanoclusters capable of inhibiting the aggregation of Aβ-peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qingchang; Yang, Licong; Zheng, Chuping; Zheng, Wenjing; Zhang, Jingnan; Zhou, Yunshan; Liu, Jie

    2014-05-01

    A neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is aggregation of a forty-residue peptide known as amyloid beta forty (Aβ40). While past work has indicated that blocking Aβ40 aggregation could be an effective strategy for the treatment of AD, developing therapies with this goal has been met with limited success. Polyoxometalates (POMs) have been previously investigated for their anti-viral and anti-tumoral properties and we report here that three representative POM nanoclusters have been synthesized for use against Aβ40 aggregation. Through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, turbidity, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we found that all three POM complexes can significantly inhibit both natural Aβ40 self-aggregation and metal-ion induced Aβ40 aggregation. We also evaluated the protective effect of POM complexes on Aβ40-induced neurotoxicity in cultured PC12 cells and found that treatment with POM complexes can elevate cell viability, decrease levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, and stabilize mitochondrial membrane potential. These findings indicate that all three representative POM complexes are capable of inhibiting Aβ40 aggregation and subsequent neurotoxicity. While a complete mechanistic understanding remains to be elucidated, the synthesized POM complexes may work through a synergistic interaction with metal ions and Aβ40. These data indicate that POM complexes have high therapeutic potential for use against one of the primary neuropathological features of AD.A neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is aggregation of a forty-residue peptide known as amyloid beta forty (Aβ40). While past work has indicated that blocking Aβ40 aggregation could be an effective strategy for the treatment of AD, developing therapies with this goal has been met with limited success. Polyoxometalates (POMs) have been previously investigated for their anti-viral and anti-tumoral properties

  19. Combined Oral Administration of Bovine Collagen Peptides with Calcium Citrate Inhibits Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, JunLi; Wang, YiHu; Song, ShuJun; Wang, XiJie; Qin, YaYa; Si, ShaoYan; Guo, YanChuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Collagen peptides (CPs) and calcium citrate are commonly used as bone health supplements for treating osteoporosis. However, it remains unknown whether the combination of oral bovine CPs with calcium citrate is more effective than administration of either agent alone. Methods Forty 12-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8) for once-daily intragastric administration of different treatments for 3 months at 3 months after ovariectomy (OVX) as follows: sham + vehicle; OVX + vehicle; OVX + 750 mg/kg CP; OVX + CP-calcium citrate (75 mg/kg); OVX + calcium citrate (75 mg/kg). After euthanasia, the femurs were removed and analyzed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computed tomography, and serum samples were analyzed for bone metabolic markers. Results OVX rats supplemented with CPs or CP-calcium citrate showed osteoprotective effects, with reductions in the OVX-induced decreases in their femoral bone mineral density. Moreover, CP-calcium citrate prevented trabecular bone loss, improved the microarchitecture of the distal femur, and significantly inhibited bone loss with increased bone volume, connectivity density, and trabecular number compared with OVX control rats. CP or CP-calcium citrate administration significantly increased serum procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide levels and reduced serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide of type I collagen levels. Conclusions Our data indicate that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate inhibits bone loss in OVX rats. The present findings suggest that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate is a promising alternative for reducing bone loss in osteopenic postmenopausal women. PMID:26258559

  20. Endogenous inhibition of hippocampal LTD and depotentiation by vasoactive intestinal peptide VPAC1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Reis, Diana; Aidil-Carvalho, Maria de Fatima; Ribeiro, Joaquim A

    2014-11-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), an important modulator of hippocampal synaptic transmission, influences exploration and hippocampal-dependent learning in rodents. Homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) and depotentiation are two plasticity phenomena implicated in learning of behavior flexibility and spatial novelty detection. In this study, we investigated the influence of endogenous VIP on LTD and depotentiation induced by low-frequency stimulation (1 Hz, 900 pulses) of the hippocampal CA1 area in vitro in juvenile and young adult rats, respectively. LTD and depotentiation were enhanced by the VIP receptor antagonist Ac-Tyr(1) , D-Phe(2) GRF (1-29), and the selective VPAC1 receptor antagonist, PG 97-269, but not the selective VPAC2 receptor antagonist, PG 99-465. This action was mimicked by an anti-VIP antibody, suggesting that VIP, and not pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), is the endogenous mediator of these effects. Selective inhibition of PAC1 receptors with PACAP (6-38) enhanced depotentiation, but not LTD. VPAC1 receptor blockade also revealed LTD in young adult rats, an effect abolished by the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, evidencing an involvement of GABAergic transmission. We conclude that inhibition of LTD and depotentiation by endogenous VIP occurs through VPAC1 receptor-mediated mechanisms and suggest that disinhibition of pyramidal cell dendrites is the most likely physiological mechanism underlying this effect. As such, VPAC1 receptor ligands may be considered promising pharmacological targets for treatment of cognitive dysfunction in diseases involving altered GABAergic circuits and pathological saturation of LTP/LTD like Down's syndrome and temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:24935659

  1. Differential substrate specificity and kinetic behavior of Escherichia coli YfdW and Oxalobacter formigenes formyl coenzyme A transferase.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Cory G; Berthold, Catrine L; Gruez, Arnaud; Jónsson, Stefán; Lindqvist, Ylva; Cambillau, Christian; Richards, Nigel G J

    2008-04-01

    The yfdXWUVE operon appears to encode proteins that enhance the ability of Escherichia coli MG1655 to survive under acidic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenotypic behavior remain to be elucidated, findings from structural genomic studies have shown that the structure of YfdW, the protein encoded by the yfdW gene, is homologous to that of the enzyme that mediates oxalate catabolism in the obligate anaerobe Oxalobacter formigenes, O. formigenes formyl coenzyme A transferase (FRC). We now report the first detailed examination of the steady-state kinetic behavior and substrate specificity of recombinant, wild-type YfdW. Our studies confirm that YfdW is a formyl coenzyme A (formyl-CoA) transferase, and YfdW appears to be more stringent than the corresponding enzyme (FRC) in Oxalobacter in employing formyl-CoA and oxalate as substrates. We also report the effects of replacing Trp-48 in the FRC active site with the glutamine residue that occupies an equivalent position in the E. coli protein. The results of these experiments show that Trp-48 precludes oxalate binding to a site that mediates substrate inhibition for YfdW. In addition, the replacement of Trp-48 by Gln-48 yields an FRC variant for which oxalate-dependent substrate inhibition is modified to resemble that seen for YfdW. Our findings illustrate the utility of structural homology in assigning enzyme function and raise the question of whether oxalate catabolism takes place in E. coli upon the up-regulation of the yfdXWUVE operon under acidic conditions. PMID:18245280

  2. Chemotaxis of horse polymorphonuclear leukocytes to N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Zinkl, J G; Brown, P D

    1982-04-01

    Horse polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) isolated from horse blood by sedimentation and isotonic lysis and having about 25% accompanying lymphocytes were as effective at chemotaxis as nearly pure PMN isolated by density gradient techniques. N-Formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP), used as a representative of the formylmethionyl peptides (produced by prokaryocytic organisms), was effective as a chemoattractant only at the high concentration of 10(-4) M. When serum was preincubated with FMLP at concentrations as low as 10(-8) M, the serum attracted horse PMN. This activity was not generated when heat-inactivated (56 to 60 C for 30 minutes) serum was used. A combination of FMLP and zymosan was no more effective than zymosan alone in generating serum chemoattractants. The results of this study indicate that the FMLP is a weak chemoattractant for horse PMN, but that FMLP has the capability similar to that of zymosan to activate complement to produce PMN chemoattractants. PMID:7073083

  3. IKK NBD peptide inhibits LPS induced pulmonary inflammation and alters sphingolipid metabolism in a murine model.

    PubMed

    von Bismarck, Philipp; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Herzberg, Mona; Uhlig, Ulrike; Schütze, Stefan; Lucius, Ralph; Krause, Martin F

    2012-06-01

    Airway epithelial NF-κB is a key regulator of host defence in bacterial infections and has recently evolved as a target for therapeutical approaches. Evidence is accumulating that ceramide, generated by acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase), and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1-P) are important mediators in host defence as well as in pathologic processes of acute lung injury. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary sphingolipid metabolism in bacterial infections of the lung. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of NF-κB on sphingolipid metabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. In a murine acute lung injury model with intranasal Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS we investigated TNF-α, KC (murine IL-8), IL-6, MCP-1 and neutrophilic infiltration next to aSMase activity and ceramide and S1-P lung tissue concentrations. Airway epithelial NF-κB was inhibited by topically applied IKK NBD, a cell penetrating NEMO binding peptide. This treatment resulted in significantly reduced inflammation and suppression of aSMase activity along with decreased ceramide and S1-P tissue concentrations down to levels observed in healthy animals. In conclusion our results confirm that changes in sphingolipid metabolim due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS inhalation are regulated by NF-κB translocation. This confirms the critical role of airway epithelial NF-κB pathway for the inflammatory response to bacterial pathogens and underlines the impact of sphingolipids in inflammatory host defence mechanisms. PMID:22469869

  4. Serpin-15 from Bombyx mori inhibits prophenoloxidase activation and expression of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongran; Wang, Lei; Yang, Liu; Qian, Cen; Wei, Guoqing; Dai, Lishang; Li, Jun; Zhu, Baojian; Liu, Chaoliang

    2015-07-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (SPIs) play a key role in physiological responses by controlling protease activities. In this study, we studied the biochemical functions of serpin-15, an SPI, from Bombyx mori (Bmserpin-15). Recombinant Bmserpin-15 was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and used to raise rabbit anti-Bmserpin-15 polyclonal antibodies. Bmserpin-15 mRNA and protein expression was detected in all tested tissues, particularly in the fat body and silk gland. After challenge with four different microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Beauveria bassiana, Micrococcus luteus and B. mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus), the expressions of Bmserpin-15 mRNA and protein were induced significantly, particularly by B. bassiana and M. luteus. Recombinant Bmserpin-15 inhibited prophenoloxidase activation, but did not affect phenoloxidase activity, in B. mori hemolymph. Injection of recombinant Bmserpin-15 into B. mori larvae reduced significantly the transcript levels of antimicrobial peptides in fat body. Our results suggested that Bmserpin-15 plays an important role in the innate immunity of B. mori. PMID:25720980

  5. Farnesoid X receptor inhibits glucagon-like peptide-1 production by enteroendocrine L cells.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Mohamed-Sami; Daoudi, Mehdi; Prawitt, Janne; Ducastel, Sarah; Touche, Véronique; Sayin, Sama I; Perino, Alessia; Brighton, Cheryl A; Sebti, Yasmine; Kluza, Jérôme; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Hélène; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Dorchies, Emilie; Baud, Grégory; Spinelli, Valeria; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Caron, Sandrine; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Caiazzo, Robert; Reimann, Frank; Marchetti, Philippe; Lefebvre, Philippe; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Gribble, Fiona M; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pattou, François; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Lestavel, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are signalling molecules, which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex bile acids in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here, we show that FXR activation in L cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycaemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes. PMID:26134028

  6. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Production by Enteroendocrine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    TRABELSI, Mohamed-Sami; DAOUDI, Mehdi; PRAWITT, Janne; DUCASTEL, Sarah; TOUCHE, Véronique; SAYIN, Sama I.; PERINO, Alessia; BRIGHTON, Cheryl A.; SEBTI, Yasmine; KLUZA, Jérôme; BRIAND, Olivier; DEHONDT, Hélène; VALLEZ, Emmanuelle; DORCHIES, Emilie; BAUD, Grégory; SPINELLI, Valeria; HENNUYER, Nathalie; CARON, Sandrine; BANTUBUNGI, Kadiombo; CAIAZZO, Robert; REIMANN, Frank; MARCHETTI, Philippe; LEFEBVRE, Philippe; BÄCKHED, Fredrik; GRIBBLE, Fiona M.; SCHOONJANS, Kristina; PATTOU, François; TAILLEUX, Anne; STAELS, Bart; LESTAVEL, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) are signalling molecules which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex BA in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L-cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L-cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here we show that FXR activation in L-cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR-deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes. PMID:26134028

  7. Cell-permeable Carboxyl-terminal p27Kip1 Peptide Exhibits Anti-tumor Activity by Inhibiting Pim-1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Daisuke; Takami, Miho; Yoshikawa, Seiko; Katayama, Ryohei; Sato, Shigeo; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Umehara, Takashi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fujita, Naoya

    2011-01-01

    The incidence and death rate of prostate cancer is increasing rapidly. In addition, the low sensitivity of prostate cancer to chemotherapy makes it difficult to treat this condition. The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1 plays an important role in cell cycle progression and apoptosis inhibition, resulting in prostate tumorigenesis. Therefore, Pim-1 inhibition has been expected to be an attractive target for developing new anti-cancer drugs. However, no small compounds targeting Pim-1 have progressed to clinical use because of their lack of specificity. Here, we have reported a new cell-permeable Pim-1 inhibitory p27Kip1 peptide that could interfere with the binding of Pim-1 to its substrates and act as an anti-cancer drug. The peptide could bind to Pim-1 and inhibit phosphorylation of endogenous p27Kip1 and Bad by Pim-1. Treatment of prostate cancer with the peptide induces G1 arrest and subsequently apoptosis in vitro. However, the peptide showed almost no growth inhibitory or apoptosis-inducing effects in normal cells. The peptide could inhibit tumor growth in in vivo prostate cancer xenograft models. Moreover, the peptide treatment could overcome resistance to taxol, one of the first line chemotherapeutic agents for prostate cancer, and a combination of the peptide with taxol synergistically inhibited prostate cancer growth in vivo. These results indicate that a Pim-1 inhibitory p27Kip1 peptide could be developed as an anti-cancer drug against prostate cancer. PMID:21062737

  8. α-Helix-peptides comprising the human nuclear receptor ERRγ competitively provoke inhibition of functional homomeric dimerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohui; Nishimura, Hirokazu; Fujiyama, Akina; Matsushima, Ayami; Shimohigashi, Miki; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a constitutively active nuclear receptor functioning as a transcription factor. ERRγ binds to a single half site designated as ERRE that has only a single DNA-binding motif. However, with regard to the subunit structure, it remains a matter of controversy whether ERRγ binds as a monomer or dimer. Because the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of ERRγ was in a homodimer form in its X-ray crystal structure, the peptide fragments present in the dimer interfaces would perturb or destabilize the dimer structure by inhibiting the mutual interaction among ERRγ molecules. Thus, to demonstrate the essential homodimer structure of ERRγ, we utilized the peptides corresponding to the α-helix peptides 7 (H7), H9, and H10/11 in order to test such inhibitor activity. These selections were done based on a structural analysis of the X-ray crystal structures of ERRγ-LBD, which forms a head-to-head dimer structure. Peptides were evaluated by means of a luciferase reporter gene assay, in which ERRγ exhibited a high constitutive activity with no ligand. When the peptide was expressed in the HeLa cells together with ERRγ, these peptides clearly showed a concentration-dependent activity inhibition, indicating that ERRγ is indeed homodimerized as required for DNA transcription activity. The present results strongly suggest that human nuclear receptor ERRγ functions as a genuine homomeric dimer with symmetrical dimeric interface regions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 547-554, 2016. PMID:26662629

  9. A TLR4-interacting peptide inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated inflammatory responses, migration and invasion of colon cancer SW480 cells

    PubMed Central

    Rakhesh, Madhusoodhanan; Cate, Moriasi; Vijay, Ramani; Shrikant, Anant; Shanjana, Awasthi

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a major risk factor for carcinogenesis in patients affected by chronic colitis, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression from chronic inflammation to cancer are not completely understood. Activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-NFκB signaling axis is associated with inflammation. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of TLR4-NFκB signaling might help in limiting inflammatory responses and inflammation-induced oncogenesis. In this work, we studied the effects of a TLR4-interacting surfactant protein A-derived (SPA4) peptide on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TLR4-NFκB signaling and cancer progression. We first characterized this peptide for its ability to bind the TLR4 ligand-LPS and for physico-chemical characteristics. Inflammation was induced by challenging the colon cancer SW480 cells with Escherichia coli LPS. Cells were then treated with varying amounts of the SPA4 peptide. Changes in the expression of TLR4, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, in intracellular NFκB-related signal transducers (IKBα, p65, phosphorylated IKBα, phosphorylated p65, RelB, COX-2) as well as in the transcriptional activity of NFκB were studied by immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting and NFκB reporter assay, respectively. Simultaneously, the effects on LPS-induced cell migration and invasion were determined. We found that the SPA4 peptide does not bind to LPS. Rather, its binding to TLR4 inhibits the LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65, production of IL-1β and IL-6, activity of NFκB, migration and invasion of SW480 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that the inhibition of TLR4-NFκB signaling by a TLR4-binding peptide may help for the treatment of chronic inflammation and prevention of inflammation-induced cancer in patients with colitis. PMID:23264896

  10. Synthesis of peptide and pseudopeptide amides inhibiting the proliferation of small cell and epithelial types of lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nyéki, O; Rill, A; Schon, I; Orosz, A; Schrett, J; Bartha, L; Nagy, J

    1998-12-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines produce and secrete various peptide hormones, e.g. bombesin (BN)/gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) like peptides that are proposed to function as their autocrine growth factors. To inhibit the proliferative effect of these hormones we have synthesized short chain BN[7-14]-analogues replacing the C-terminal peptide bond by a methylene-amino (-CH2NH-) unit and introducing D-Phe or D-Ser into position 12. As several substance P (SP) analogues were found to inhibit the growth of SCLC cells, some short chain SP-analogues have been synthesized. (Pseudo)octapeptides were synthesized in solution, by fragment condensation using the DCC/HOPfp method. Fragments and SP-analogues were synthesized stepwise using pentafluorophenyl esters. The resistance to hydrolysis of the reduced peptide bond made permitted exact quantification of the Leupsi(CH2NH)Leu pseudopeptide in hydrolysates. The binding ability of both types of peptides to BN-receptors on Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblast cells and their antiproliferative effect on NCI-H69 human SCLC cell line have been tested and compared with a short chain SP-antagonist pHOPA-D-Trp-Phe-D-Trp-Leu-Leu-NH2 (R) previously described as a potent inhibitor of SCLC proliferation. While BN-analogues showed weak activity in inhibition of proliferation of SCLC cells, SP-analogues 6: D-MePhe-D-Trp-Phe-D-Trp-Leu(psi)(CH2NH)-Leu-NH2 and 7: D-MePhe-DTrp-Phe-D-Trp-Leu-MPA, in spite of greatly diminished affinity towards the BN-receptor, inhibited SCLC proliferation more effectively than R (6: IC50 = 2 microM, 7: IC50 = 5 microM and R: IC50 = 10 microM). Moreover, 6 inhibited the respiratory activity of SK-MES 1 epithelial type of lung carcinoma cells in proliferating but not in the quiescent state, suggesting that the antiproliferative effect of these compounds is not due to simple cytotoxicity. These short chain analogues of SP might be promising candidates as therapeutic agents in the treatment of SCLC. PMID:9927255

  11. State-dependent inhibition of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channels by a novel peptide toxin.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Matthew D; Thompson, Christopher H; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Freeman, Cody S; Schay, Eszter; Szakács, Gergely; Bakos, Eva; Sarkadi, Balázs; McMaster, Denis; French, Robert J; Pohl, Jan; Kubanek, Julia; McCarty, Nael A

    2007-12-28

    Peptide toxins from animal venom have been used for many years for the identification and study of cation-permeable ion channels. However, no peptide toxins have been identified that interact with known anion-selective channels, including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the protein defective in cystic fibrosis and a member of the ABC transporter superfamily. Here, we describe the identification and initial characterization of a novel 3.7-kDa peptide toxin, GaTx1, which is a potent and reversible inhibitor of CFTR, acting from the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Thus, GaTx1 is the first peptide toxin identified that inhibits a chloride channel of known molecular identity. GaTx1 exhibited high specificity, showing no effect on a panel of nine transport proteins, including Cl(-) and K(+) channels, and ABC transporters. GaTx1-mediated inhibition of CFTR channel activity is strongly state-dependent; both potency and efficacy are reduced under conditions of elevated [ATP], suggesting that GaTx1 may function as a non-competitive inhibitor of ATP-dependent channel gating. This tool will allow the application of new quantitative approaches to study CFTR structure and function, particularly with respect to the conformational changes that underlie transitions between open and closed states. PMID:17951250

  12. Thermo-Controlled in Situ Phase Transition of Polymer-Peptides on Cell Surfaces for High-Performance Proliferative Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Sheng-Lin; Wang, Yi; Lin, Yao-Xin; An, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yang; Li, Li-Li; Wang, Lei; Wang, Hao

    2016-07-13

    We herein report a thermocontrolled strategy for realizing in situ conformational transition of polymer-peptide conjugates at cell surfaces to manipulate and monitor HER2 receptor clustering, which finally result in effective breast cancer cell proliferation inhibition. Functional paring motifs (HBP) are covalently linked to a synthetic thermoresponsive polymer PNIPAAm to incorporate temperature control properties to HER2 targeting peptide. At 40 °C, the PNIPAAm polymers collapse and act as a "shield" to block the aggregation of HBP. Upon cooling to 35 °C, polymers are in their extended state and HBP are expose in aqueous and aggregate subsequently with enhanced fluorescence, allowing for promoting and in situ monitoring of receptor clustering. Ultimately, HER2 receptor clustering leads to cytoplasmic domain phosphorylation, which further results in effective cancer cell proliferation inhibition. We envision that this useful approach has the potential to be applied for molecule-targeted tumor therapy. PMID:27348260

  13. Synthetic peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein inhibits growth of human breast cancer: investigation of the pharmacophore and synthesis optimization.

    PubMed

    DeFreest, L A; Mesfin, F B; Joseph, L; McLeod, D J; Stallmer, A; Reddy, S; Balulad, S S; Jacobson, H I; Andersen, T T; Bennett, J A

    2004-05-01

    Asynthetic peptide that inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) human breast cancers, growing as xenografts in mice, has been reported. The cyclic 9-mer peptide, cyclo[EMTOVNOGQ], is derived from alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a safe, naturally occurring human protein produced during pregnancy, which itself has anti-estrogenic and anti-breast cancer activity. To determine the pharmacophore of the peptide, a series of analogs was prepared using solid-phase peptide synthesis. Analogs were screened in a 1-day bioassay, which assessed their ability to inhibit the estrogen-stimulated growth of uterus in immature mice. Deletion of glutamic acid, Glu1, abolished activity of the peptide, but glutamine (Gln) or asparagine (Asn) could be substituted for Glu1 without loss of activity. Methionine (Met2) was replaced with lysine (Lys) or tyrosine (Tyr) with retention of activity. Substitution of Lys for Met2 in the cyclic molecule resulted in a compound with activity comparable with the Met2-containing cyclic molecule, but with a greater than twofold increase in purity and corresponding increase in yield. This Lys analog demonstrated anti-breast cancer activity equivalent to that of the original Met-containing peptide. Therefore, Met2 is not essential for biologic activity and substitution of Lys is synthetically advantageous. Threonine (Thr3) is a nonessential site, and can be substituted with serine (Ser), valine (Val), or alanine (Ala) without significant loss of activity. Hydroxyproline (Hyp), substituted in place of the naturally occurring prolines (Pro4, Pro7), allowed retention of activity and increased stability of the peptide during storage. Replacement of the first Pro (Pro4) with Ser maintains the activity of the peptide, but substitution of Ser for the second Pro (Pro7) abolishes the activity of the peptide. This suggests that the imino acid at residue 7 is important for conformation of the peptide, and the backbone atoms are part of the pharmacophore, but

  14. Identification of a Small Peptide That Inhibits PCSK9 Protein Binding to the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingnan; Eigenbrot, Charles; Zhou, Lijuan; Shia, Steven; Li, Wei; Quan, Clifford; Tom, Jeffrey; Moran, Paul; Di Lello, Paola; Skelton, Nicholas J.; Kong-Beltran, Monica; Peterson, Andrew; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) is a negative regulator of the hepatic LDL receptor, and clinical studies with PCSK9-inhibiting antibodies have demonstrated strong LDL-c-lowering effects. Here we screened phage-displayed peptide libraries and identified the 13-amino acid linear peptide Pep2-8 as the smallest PCSK9 inhibitor with a clearly defined mechanism of inhibition that has been described. Pep2-8 bound to PCSK9 with a KD of 0.7 μm but did not bind to other proprotein convertases. It fully restored LDL receptor surface levels and LDL particle uptake in PCSK9-treated HepG2 cells. The crystal structure of Pep2-8 bound to C-terminally truncated PCSK9 at 1.85 Å resolution showed that the peptide adopted a strand-turn-helix conformation, which is remarkably similar to its solution structure determined by NMR. Consistent with the functional binding site identified by an Ala scan of PCSK9, the structural Pep2-8 contact region of about 400 Å2 largely overlapped with that contacted by the EGF(A) domain of the LDL receptor, suggesting a competitive inhibition mechanism. Consistent with this, Pep2-8 inhibited LDL receptor and EGF(A) domain binding to PCSK9 with IC50 values of 0.8 and 0.4 μm, respectively. Remarkably, Pep2-8 mimicked secondary structural elements of the EGF(A) domain that interact with PCSK9, notably the β-strand and a discontinuous short α-helix, and it engaged in the same β-sheet hydrogen bonds as EGF(A) does. Although Pep2-8 itself may not be amenable to therapeutic applications, this study demonstrates the feasibility of developing peptidic inhibitors to functionally relevant sites on PCSK9. PMID:24225950

  15. A novel nanoparticle containing neuritin peptide with grp170 induces a CTL response to inhibit tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bangqing; Shen, Hanchao; Su, Tonggang; Lin, Li; Chen, Ting; Yang, Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Malignant glioma is among the most challenging of all cancers to treat successfully. Despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, current treatment regimens have only a marginal impact on patient survival. In this study, we constructed a novel nanoparticle containing neuritin peptide with grp170. The nanoparticle could elicit a neuritin-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to lyse glioma cells in vitro. In addition, the nanoparticle could inhibit tumor growth and improve the lifespan of tumor-bearing mice in vivo. Taken together, the results demonstrated that the nanoparticle can inhibit tumor growth and represents a promising therapy for glioma. PMID:26290143

  16. Peptide nucleic acids targeting β-globin mRNAs selectively inhibit hemoglobin production in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Giulia; Gemmo, Chiara; Fabbri, Enrica; Manicardi, Alex; Accardo, Igea; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Finotti, Alessia; Breveglieri, Giulia; Salvatori, Francesca; Borgatti, Monica; Lampronti, Ilaria; Bresciani, Alberto; Altamura, Sergio; Corradini, Roberto; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of hemoglobinopathies, amending altered hemoglobins and/or globins produced in excess is an important part of therapeutic strategies and the selective inhibition of globin production may be clinically beneficial. Therefore the development of drug-based methods for the selective inhibition of globin accumulation is required. In this study, we employed peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to alter globin gene expression. The main conclusion of the present study was that PNAs designed to target adult murine β-globin mRNA inhibit hemoglobin accumulation and erythroid differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells with high efficiency and fair selectivity. No major effects were observed on cell proliferation. Our study supports the concept that PNAs may be used to target mRNAs that, similar to globin mRNAs, are expressed at very high levels in differentiating erythroid cells. Our data suggest that PNAs inhibit the excess production of globins involved in the pathophysiology of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:25405921

  17. A novel Omp25-binding peptide screened by phage display can inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junbo; Guo, Fei; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Chuangfu; Liu, Ruitian; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanzhi; Yin, Shuanghong; Li, Zhiqiang

    2014-06-01

    Brucellosis is a globally distributed zoonotic disease affecting animals and humans, and current antibiotic and vaccine strategies are not optimal. The surface-exposed protein Omp25 is involved in Brucella virulence and plays an important role in Brucella pathogenesis during infection, suggesting that Omp25 could be a useful target for selecting potential therapeutic molecules to inhibit Brucella pathogenesis. In this study, we identified, we believe for the first time, peptides that bind specifically to the Omp25 protein of pathogens, using a phage panning technique, After four rounds of panning, 42 plaques of eluted phages were subjected to pyrosequencing. Four phage clones that bound better than the other clones were selected following confirmation by ELISA and affinity constant determination. The peptides selected could significantly inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) internalization and intracellular growth in RAW264.7 macrophages, and significantly induce secretion of TNF-α and IL-12 in peptide- and S2308-treated cells. Any observed peptide (OP11, OP27, OP35 or OP40) could significantly inhibit S2308 infection in BALB/c mice. Moreover, the peptide OP11 was the best candidate peptide for inhibiting S2308 infection in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that peptide OP11 has potential for exploitation as a peptide drug in resisting S2308 infection. PMID:24722798

  18. Inhibition of discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated lung cancer cells progression by gold nanoparticle-aptamer-assisted delivery of peptides containing transmembrane-juxtamembrane 1/2 domain

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daehwan; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Lee, Kangseok; Bae, Jeehyeon; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2015-08-21

    The delivery of biologically functional peptides into mammalian cells can be a direct and effective method for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen-induced receptor tyrosine kinase recently identified as a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. In this study, we report that peptides containing the functional domain of DDR2 can be efficiently delivered into lung malignant cancer cells via a gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system. Peptide delivery resulted in the abrogation of DDR2 activation triggered by collagen. Moreover, the peptide delivered by the AuNP-Apt system inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion mediated by DDR2 activation. Thus, these results suggest that peptide loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates can be used for the development of peptide-based biomedical applications for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancer. - Highlights: • TM-JM1/2 peptides are efficiently delivered into cells by AuNP-Apt-conjugates. • TM-JM1/2 peptides loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates inhibit DDR2 activation. • Inhibition of DDR2 activation by TM-JM1/2 peptides decreases tumor progression.

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides from Amphibian Skin Potently Inhibit Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Transfer of Virus from Dendritic Cells to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    VanCompernolle, Scott E.; Taylor, R. Jeffery; Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Jiang, Jiyang; Youree, Bryan E.; Bowie, John H.; Tyler, Michael J.; Conlon, J. Michael; Wade, David; Aiken, Christopher; Dermody, Terence S.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Rollins-Smith, Louise A.; Unutmaz, Derya

    2005-01-01

    Topical antimicrobicides hold great promise in reducing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. Amphibian skin provides a rich source of broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides including some that have antiviral activity. We tested 14 peptides derived from diverse amphibian species for the capacity to inhibit HIV infection. Three peptides (caerin 1.1, caerin 1.9, and maculatin 1.1) completely inhibited HIV infection of T cells within minutes of exposure to virus at concentrations that were not toxic to target cells. These peptides also suppressed infection by murine leukemia virus but not by reovirus, a structurally unrelated nonenveloped virus. Preincubation with peptides prevented viral fusion to target cells and disrupted the HIV envelope. Remarkably, these amphibian peptides also were highly effective in inhibiting the transfer of HIV by dendritic cells (DCs) to T cells, even when DCs were transiently exposed to peptides 8 h after virus capture. These data suggest that amphibian-derived peptides can access DC-sequestered HIV and destroy the virus before it can be transferred to T cells. Thus, amphibian-derived antimicrobial peptides show promise as topical inhibitors of mucosal HIV transmission and provide novel tools to understand the complex biology of HIV capture by DCs. PMID:16140737

  20. Bax inhibiting peptide reduces apoptosis in neonatal rat hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng-Ya; Cui, Kai-Jie; Yu, Mao-Min; Zhang, Hui; Peng, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) has been reported to induce apoptosis in neonates. We, therefore, analyzed the ability of Bax-inhibiting peptide (BIP) to provide neuroprotective effects during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). Seven-day-old wistar rat pups (n = 198) were randomly divided into a sham-operated group (Group S, n = 18), saline group (Group C, n = 90) and BIP group (Group B, n = 90). Pathological changes in the cerebral tissues of rat pups were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, TUNEL and Western blot. The expression of cytochrome c and caspase-3 was determined using western blot technique. Rat pups demonstrated neurobehavioral alteration in Groups C and B. TUNEL-positive cells in the left hippocampus were significantly increased in Group C and Group B after HIBD (P < 0.01) when compared with Group S. There was a marked reduction in TUNEL positive cells in subgroups B1 through B4 when compared with the respective subgroups C1 through C5. Compared with Group S, the expression of caspase-3 and cytochrome c was significantly increased in Groups C and B (P < 0.01). The difference in expression of caspase-3 and cytochrome c between subgroups B1 through B4 and C1 through C4 was significant (P < 0.01). In conclusions, the neuro-protective effect of BIP was due to a reduction of nerve cell apoptosis in our neonatal HIE rat model. We propose that BIP has potential as a neuro-protective drug in neonatal HIE cases. PMID:26823794

  1. Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus gD and Lymphotoxin-α Binding to HveA by Peptide Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Sarrias, Maria Rosa; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Rooney, Isabelle; Spruce, Lynn; Kay, Brian K.; Montgomery, Rebecca I.; Spear, Patricia G.; Ware, Carl F.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Lambris, John D.

    1999-01-01

    The herpesvirus entry mediator A (HveA) is a recently characterized member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family that mediates the entry of most herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strains into mammalian cells. Studies on the interaction of HSV-1 with HveA have shown that of all the viral proteins involved in uptake, only gD has been shown to bind directly to HveA, and this binding mediates viral entry into cells. In addition to gD binding to HveA, the latter has been shown to interact with proteins of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor family, lymphotoxin-α (LT-α), and a membrane-associated protein referred to as LIGHT. To study the relationship between HveA, its natural ligands, and the viral proteins involved in HSV entry into cells, we have screened two phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for peptide ligands of a recombinant form of HveA. Affinity selection experiments yielded two peptide ligands, BP-1 and BP-2, which could block the interaction between gD and HveA. Of the two peptides, only BP-2 inhibited HSV entry into CHO cells transfected with an HveA-expressing plasmid. When we analyzed these peptides for the ability to interfere with HveA binding to its natural ligand LT-α, we found that BP-1 inhibited the interaction of cellular LT-α with HveA. Thus, we have dissected the sites of interaction between the cell receptor, its natural ligand LT-α and gD, the virus-specific protein involved in HSV entry into cells. PMID:10364318

  2. Proteome-wide analysis of the amino terminal status of Escherichia coli proteins at the steady-state and upon deformylation inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bienvenut, Willy V; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry

    2015-07-01

    A proteome wide analysis was performed in Escherichia coli to identify the impact on protein N-termini of actinonin, an antibiotic specifically inhibiting peptide deformylase (PDF). A strategy and tool suite (SILProNaQ) was employed to provide large-scale quantitation of N-terminal modifications. In control conditions, more than 1000 unique N-termini were identified with 56% showing initiator methionine removal. Additional modifications corresponded to partial or complete Nα-acetylation (10%) and N-formyl retention (5%). Among the proteins undergoing these N-terminal modifications, 140 unique N-termini from translocated membrane proteins were highlighted. The very early time-course impact of actinonin was followed after addition of bacteriostatic concentrations of the drug. Under these conditions, 26% of all proteins did not undergo deformylation any longer after 10 min, a value reaching more than 60% of all characterized proteins after 40 min of treatment. The N-formylation ratio measured on individual proteins increased with the same trend. Upon early PDF inhibition, two major categories of proteins retained their N-formyl group: a large number of inner membrane proteins and many proteins involved in protein synthesis including factors assisting the nascent chains in early cotranslational events. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001979, PXD002012 and PXD001983 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001979, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002012 and http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001983). PMID:26017780

  3. Evidence That Bacteriophage λ Kil Peptide Inhibits Bacterial Cell Division by Disrupting FtsZ Protofilaments and Sequestering Protein Subunits.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M; Alfonso, Carlos; Margolin, William; Zorrilla, Silvia; Rivas, Germán

    2015-08-14

    The effects of Kil peptide from bacteriophage λ on the assembly of Escherichia coli FtsZ into one subunit thick protofilaments were studied using combined biophysical and biochemical methods. Kil peptide has recently been identified as the factor from bacteriophage λ responsible for the inhibition of bacterial cell division during lytic cycle, targeting FtsZ polymerization. Here, we show that this antagonist blocks FtsZ assembly into GTP-dependent protofilaments, producing a wide distribution of smaller oligomers compared with the average size of the intact protofilaments. The shortening of FtsZ protofilaments by Kil is detectable at concentrations of the peptide in the low micromolar range, the mid-point of the inhibition being close to its apparent affinity for GDP-bound FtsZ. This antagonist not only interferes with FtsZ assembly but also reverses the polymerization reaction. The negative regulation by Kil significantly reduces the GTPase activity of FtsZ protofilaments, and FtsZ polymers assembled in guanosine-5'-[(α,β)-methyleno]triphosphate are considerably less sensitive to Kil. Our results suggest that, at high concentrations, Kil may use an inhibition mechanism involving the sequestration of FtsZ subunits, similar to that described for other inhibitors like the SOS response protein SulA or the moonlighting enzyme OpgH. This mechanism is different from those employed by the division site selection antagonists MinC and SlmA. This work provides new insight into the inhibition of FtsZ assembly by phages, considered potential tools against bacterial infection. PMID:26124275

  4. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Julia A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Pallera, Haree K.; Kumar, Parvathi S.; Mauriello, Clifford T.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Phelps, Cody A.; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M.; Pascal, Stephen M.; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M.; Lattanzio, Frank A.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  5. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julia A; Hair, Pamela S; Pallera, Haree K; Kumar, Parvathi S; Mauriello, Clifford T; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Phelps, Cody A; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M; Pascal, Stephen M; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M; Lattanzio, Frank A; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  6. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A: design, inhibition, cocrystal structures, structure-activity relationship and pharmacophore modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar G.; Swaminathan S.; Kumaran, D.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2012-05-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The seven serotypes (A-G) of the botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of the disease botulism, block neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. Using a structure-based drug-design approach, a number of peptide inhibitors were designed and their inhibitory activity against botulinum serotype A (BoNT/A) protease was determined. The most potent peptide, RRGF, inhibited BoNT/A protease with an IC{sub 50} of 0.9 {micro}M and a K{sub i} of 358 nM. High-resolution crystal structures of various peptide inhibitors in complex with the BoNT/A protease domain were also determined. Based on the inhibitory activities and the atomic interactions deduced from the cocrystal structures, the structure-activity relationship was analyzed and a pharmacophore model was developed. Unlike the currently available models, this pharmacophore model is based on a number of enzyme-inhibitor peptide cocrystal structures and improved the existing models significantly, incorporating new features.

  7. Single residue deletions along the length of the influenza HA fusion peptide lead to inhibition of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, William A.; Thoennes, Sudha; Bradley, Konrad C.; Galloway, Summer E.; Talekar, Ganesh R.; Cummings, Sandra F.; Vareckova, Eva; Russell, Rupert J.; Steinhauer, David A.

    2009-11-25

    A panel of eight single amino acid deletion mutants was generated within the first 24 residues of the fusion peptide domain of the of the hemagglutinin (HA) of A/Aichi/2/68 influenza A virus (H3N2 subtype). The mutant HAs were analyzed for folding, cell surface transport, cleavage activation, capacity to undergo acid-induced conformational changes, and membrane fusion activity. We found that the mutant DELTAF24, at the C-terminal end of the fusion peptide, was expressed in a non-native conformation, whereas all other deletion mutants were transported to the cell surface and could be cleaved into HA1 and HA2 to activate membrane fusion potential. Furthermore, upon acidification these cleaved HAs were able to undergo the characteristic structural rearrangements that are required for fusion. Despite this, all mutants were inhibited for fusion activity based on two separate assays. The results indicate that the mutant fusion peptide domains associate with target membranes in a non-functional fashion, and suggest that structural features along the length of the fusion peptide are likely to be relevant for optimal membrane fusion activity.

  8. Elastin peptides prepared from piscine and mammalian elastic tissues inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation and stimulate migration and proliferation of human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Eri; Ura, Megumi; Nakaba, Misako; Maeda, Iori; Okamoto, Kouji

    2010-11-01

    We obtained pure elastin peptides from bovine ligamentum nuchae, porcine aorta, and bonito bulbus arteriosus. The inhibitory activity of these elastin peptides on platelet aggregation induced by collagen and the migratory and proliferative responsivenesses of human skin fibroblasts to these elastin peptides were examined. All of bonito, bovine, and porcine elastin peptides found to inhibit platelet aggregation, but bonito elastin peptides showed a higher inhibitory activity than bovine and porcine elastin peptides did. All elastin peptides enhanced the proliferation of fibroblasts 3.5- to 4.5-fold at a concentration of 10 µg/ml. Bovine and porcine elastin peptides stimulated the migration of fibroblasts, with the optimal response occurring at 10(-1) µg/ml, while maximal response was at 10(2) µg/ml for bonito elastin peptides. Furthermore, pretreatment of fibroblasts by lactose depressed their ability to migrate in response to all elastin peptides, suggesting the involvement of elastin receptor in cell response. These results suggest that both mammalian and piscine elastin peptides can be applied as useful biomaterials in which elasticity, antithrombotic property, and the enhancement of cell migration and proliferation are required. PMID:20853312

  9. Copper-dependent inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by Abeta(1-42) requires reduced methionine at residue 35 of the Abeta peptide.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Peter J; Barnham, Kevin J; Duce, James A; Blake, Rachel E; Masters, Colin L; Trounce, Ian A

    2006-10-01

    By altering key amino acid residues of the Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloid-beta peptide, we investigated the mechanism through which amyloid-beta inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1). Native amyloid-beta inhibited cytochrome oxidase by up to 65%, and the level of inhibition was determined by the period of amyloid-beta ageing before the cytochrome oxidase assay. Substituting tyrosine-10 with alanine did not affect maximal enzyme inhibition, but the altered peptide required a longer period of ageing. By contrast, oxidizing the sulfur of methionine-35 to a sulfoxide, or substituting methionine-35 with valine, completely abrogated the peptide's inhibitory potential towards cytochrome oxidase. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the loss of inhibitory potential towards cytochrome oxidase with the methionine-35-altered peptides did not correlate with a substantially different distribution of amyloid-beta oligomeric species. Although the amyloid-beta-mediated inhibition of cytochrome oxidase was completely dependent on the presence of divalent Cu2+, it was not supported by monovalent Cu+, and experiments with catalase and H2O2 indicated that the mechanism of cytochrome oxidase inhibition does not involve amyloid-beta-mediated H2O2 production. We propose that amyloid-beta-mediated inhibition of cytochrome oxidase is dependent on the peptide's capacity to bind, then reduce Cu2+, and that it may involve the formation of a redox active amyloid-beta-methionine radical. PMID:16987248

  10. GLYCOLALDEHYDE FORMATION VIA THE DIMERIZATION OF THE FORMYL RADICAL

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Paul M.; Viti, Serena; Slater, Ben; Raza, Zamaan; Brown, Wendy A.; Burke, Daren J.

    2013-11-10

    Glycolaldehyde, the simplest monosaccharide sugar, has recently been detected in low- and high-mass star-forming cores. Following our previous investigation into glycolaldehyde formation, we now consider a further mechanism for the formation of glycolaldehyde that involves the dimerization of the formyl radical, HCO. Quantum mechanical investigation of the HCO dimerization process upon an ice surface is predicted to be barrierless and therefore fast. In an astrophysical context, we show that this mechanism can be very efficient in star-forming cores. It is limited by the availability of the formyl radical, but models suggest that only very small amounts of CO are required to be converted to HCO to meet the observational constraints.

  11. Michael addition of dehydroalanine-containing MAPK peptides to catalytic lysine inhibits the activity of phosphothreonine lyase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Ru; Huang, Juan; Liang, Qiujin; Guo, Yanmin; Bian, Weixiang; Luo, Lingfei; Li, Hongtao

    2015-11-30

    The phosphothreonine lyases OspF and SpvC irreversibly inactivate host dual-phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) [pThr-X-pTyr motif] through β-elimination. We found that dual-phosphorylated (pSer-X-pTyr) MAPK substrate peptides and their resulting catalytic products cross-link to OspF and SpvC. Mass spectrometry results revealed that these linkages form between lysine, which acts as a general base, and dehydroalanine (Dha) on catalytic products. The nucleophilic addition efficiency is dependent on the K136 residue being in a deprotonated state. Peptide cross-linking inhibits the activity of SpvC and blocks the inactivation of MAPK signaling by SpvC. Small compounds mimicking these sequences may act as phosphothreonine lyase inhibitors. PMID:26519561

  12. PDZ1 inhibitor peptide protects neurons against ischemia via inhibiting GluK2-PSD-95-module-mediated Fas signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Hui; Yan, Jing-Zhi; Yang, Guo; Chen, Li; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Hong, Xi-Ping; Wu, Shi-Liang; Hou, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, GuangYi

    2016-04-15

    Respecting the selective inhibition of peptides on protein-protein interactions, they might become potent methods in ischemic stroke therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of PDZ1 inhibitor peptide on ischemic neuron apoptosis and the relative mechanism. Results showed that PDZ1 inhibitor peptide, which significantly disrupted GluK2-PSD-95 interaction, efficiently protected neuron from ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis. Further, PDZ1 inhibited FasL expression, DISC assembly and activation of Caspase 8, Bid, Caspase 9 and Caspase 3 after global brain ischemia. Based on our previous report that GluK2-PSD-95 pathway increased FasL expression after global brain ischemia, the neuron protection effect of PDZ1 inhibitor peptide was considered to be achieved by disrupting GluK2-PSD-95 interaction and subsequently inhibiting FasL expression and Fas apoptosis pathway. PMID:26892027

  13. A carboxylated Zn-phthalocyanine inhibits fibril formation of Alzheimer's amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Shatera; Sheikh, Abdullah M; Yano, Shozo; Ikeue, Takafumi; Handa, Makoto; Nagai, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ), a 39-42 amino acid peptide derived from amyloid precursor protein, is deposited as fibrils in Alzheimer's disease brains, and is considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of the disease. We have investigated the effects of a water-soluble Zn-phthalocyanine, ZnPc(COONa)₈, a macrocyclic compound with near-infrared optical properties, on Aβ fibril formation in vitro. A thioflavin T fluorescence assay showed that ZnPc(COONa)₈ significantly inhibited Aβ fibril formation, increasing the lag time and dose-dependently decreasing the plateau level of fibril formation. Moreover, it destabilized pre-formed Aβ fibrils, resulting in an increase in low-molecular-weight species. After fibril formation in the presence of ZnPc(COONa)₈, immunoprecipitation of Aβ₁₋₄₂ using Aβ-specific antibody followed by near-infrared scanning demonstrated binding of ZnPc(COONa)₈ to Aβ₁₋₄₂. A study using the hydrophobic fluorescent probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid showed that ZnPc(COONa)8 decreased the hydrophobicity during Aβ₁₋₄₂ fibril formation. CD spectroscopy showed an increase in the α helix structure and a decrease in the β sheet structure of Aβ₁₋₄₀ in fibril-forming buffer containing ZnPc(COONa)₈. SDS/PAGE and a dot-blot immunoassay showed that ZnPc(COONa)₈ delayed the disappearance of low-molecular-weight species and the appearance of higher-molecular-weight oligomeric species of Aβ₁₋₄₂. A cell viability assay showed that ZnPc(COONa)₈ was not toxic to a neuronal cell line (A1), but instead protected A1 cells against Aβ₁₋₄₂-induced toxicity. Overall, our results indicate that ZnPc(COONa)₈ binds to Aβ and decreases the hydrophobicity, and this change is unfavorable for Aβ oligomerization and fibril formation. PMID:25404240

  14. Specific Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase by Helical Peptides Corresponding to the Subunit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digard, Paul; Williams, Kevin P.; Hensley, Preston; Brooks, Ian S.; Dahl, Charles E.; Coen, Donald M.

    1995-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase consists of two subunits-a catalytic subunit and an accessory subunit, UL42, that increases processivity. Mutations affecting the extreme C terminus of the catalytic subunit specifically disrupt subunit interactions and ablate virus replication, suggesting that new antiviral drugs could be rationally designed to interfere with polymerase heterodimerization. To aid design, we performed circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation studies, which revealed that a 36-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of the catalytic subunit folds into a monomeric structure with partial α-helical character. CD studies of shorter peptides were consistent with a model where two separate regions of α-helix interact to form a hairpin-like structure. The 36-residue peptide and a shorter peptide corresponding to the C-terminal 18 residues blocked UL42-dependent long-chain DNA synthesis at concentrations that had no effect on synthesis by the catalytic subunit alone or by calf thymus DNA polymerase δ and its processivity factor. These peptides, therefore, represent a class of specific inhibitors of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase that act by blocking accessory-subunit-dependent synthesis. These peptides or their structures may form the basis for the synthesis of clinically effective drugs.

  15. Inhibition of p53-dependent transcription by BOX-I phospho-peptide mimetics that bind to p300

    PubMed Central

    Dornan, David; Hupp, Ted R.

    2001-01-01

    The N-terminal BOX-I domain of p53 containing a docking site for the negative regulator MDM2 and the positive effector p300, harbours two recently identified phosphorylation sites at Thr18 or Ser20 whose affect on p300 is undefined. Biochemical assays demonstrate that although MDM2 binding is inhibited by these phosphorylations, p300 binding is strikingly stabilized by Thr18 or Ser20 phosphorylation. Introducing EGFP-BOX-I domain peptides with an aspartate substitution at Thr18 or Ser20 induced a significant inhibition of endogenous p53-dependent transcription in cycling cells, in irradiated cells, as well as in cells transiently co-transfected with p300 and p53. In contrast an EGFP-wild-type BOX-I domain peptide stimulated p53 activity via inhibition of MDM2 protein binding. These results suggest that phosphorylation of p53 at Thr18 or Ser20 can activate p53 by stabilizing the p300–p53 complex and also identify a class of small molecular weight ligands capable of selective discrimination between MDM2- and p300-dependent activities. PMID:11258706

  16. Inhibition of p53-dependent transcription by BOX-I phospho-peptide mimetics that bind to p300.

    PubMed

    Dornan, D; Hupp, T R

    2001-02-01

    The N-terminal BOX-I domain of p53 containing a docking site for the negative regulator MDM2 and the positive effector p300, harbours two recently identified phosphorylation sites at Thr18 or Ser20O whose affect on p300 is undefined. Biochemical assays demonstrate that although MDM2 binding is inhibited by these phosphorylations, p300 binding is strikingly stabilized by Thr18 or Ser20 phosphorylation. Introducing EGFP-BOX-I domain peptides with an aspartate substitution at Thr18 or Ser20 induced a significant inhibition of endogenous p53-dependent transcription in cycling cells, in irradiated cells, as well as in cells transiently co-transfected with p300 and p53. In contrast an EGFP-wild-type BOX-I domain peptide stimulated p53 activity via inhibition of MDM2 protein binding. These results suggest that phosphorylation of p53 at Thr18 or Ser20 can activate p53 by stabilizing the p300-p53 complex and also identify a class of small molecular weight ligands capable of selective discrimination between MDM2- and p300-dependent activities. PMID:11258706

  17. Recombinant vascular basement-membrane-derived multifunctional peptide inhibits angiogenesis and growth of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, You-Hua; Cao, Jian-Guo; Xiang, Hong-Lin; Xia, Hong; Qin, Yong; Huang, A-Ji; Xiao, Di; Xu, Fang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities of recombinant vascular basement membrane-derived multifunctional peptide (rVBMDMP) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: HepG2, Bel-7402, Hep-3B, HUVE-12 and L-02 cell lines were cultured in vitro and the inhibitory effect of rVBMDMP on proliferation of cells was detected by MTT assay. The in vivo antitumor efficacy of rVBMDMP on HCC was assessed by HepG2 xenografts in nude mice. Distribution of rVBMDMP, mechanism by which the growth of HepG2 xenografts is inhibited, and microvessel area were observed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and CD31 immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: MTT assay showed that rVBMDMP markedly inhibited the proliferation of human HCC (HepG2, Bel-7402, Hep-3B) cells and human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE-12) cells in a dose-dependent manner, with little effect on the growth of L-02 cells. When the IC50 was 4.68, 7.65, 8.96, 11.65 and 64.82 μmol/L, respectively, the potency of rVBMDMP to HepG2 cells was similar to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with an IC50 of 4.59 μmol/L. The selective index of cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells of rVBMDMP was 13.8 (64.82/4.68), which was higher than that of 5-FU [SI was 1.9 (8.94/4.59)]. The VEGF-targeted recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab (100 mg/L) did not affect the proliferation of HepG2, Bel-7402, Hep-3B and L-02 cells, but the growth inhibitory rate of bevacizumab (100 mg/L) to HUVE-12 cells was 87.6% ± 8.2%. Alternis diebus intraperitoneal injection of rVBMDMP suppressed the growth of HepG2 xenografts in a dose-dependent manner. rVBMDMP (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) decreased the tumor weight by 12.6%, 55.9% and 79.7%, respectively, compared with the vehicle control. Immunohistochemical staining of rVBMDMP showed that the positive area rates (2.2% ± 0.73%, 4.5% ± 1.3% and 11.5% ± 3.8%) in rVBMDMP treated group (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) were significantly higher than that (0.13% ± 0.04%) in the control group (P < 0.01). The positive

  18. Identification of the sAPRIL Binding Peptide and Its Growth Inhibition Effects in the Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Li, Jing; He, Mei-rong

    2015-01-01

    Background A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) super family. It binds to its specific receptors and is involved in multiple processes during tumorigenesis and tumor cells proliferation. High levels of APRIL expression are closely correlated to the growth, metastasis, and 5-FU drug resistance of colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to identify a specific APRIL binding peptide (BP) able to block APRIL activity that could be used as a potential treatment for colorectal cancer. Methods A phage display library was used to identify peptides that bound selectively to soluble recombinant human APRIL (sAPRIL). The peptides with the highest binding affinity for sAPRIL were identified using ELISA. The effects of sAPRIL-BP on cell proliferation and cell cycle/apoptosis in vitro were evaluated using the CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. An in vivo mouse model of colorectal cancer was used to determine the anti-tumor efficacy of the sAPRIL-BP. Results Three candidate peptides were characterized from eight phage clones with high binding affinity for sAPRIL. The peptide with the highest affinity was selected for further characterization. The identified sAPRIL-BP suppressed tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in LOVO cells in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo in a mouse colorectal challenge model, the sAPRIL-BP reduced the growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice by inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis intratumorally. Moreover, in an in vivo metastasis model, sAPRIL-BP reduced liver metastasis of colorectal cancer cells. Conclusions sAPRIL-BP significantly suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo and might be a candidate for treating colorectal cancers that express high levels of APRIL. PMID:25826583

  19. Enhanced targeted anticancer effects and inhibition of tumor metastasis by the TMTP1 compound peptide TMTP1-TAT-NBD.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ronghua; Xi, Ling; Luo, Danfeng; Ma, Xiangyi; Yang, Wanhua; Xi, Yandong; Wang, Hongyan; Qian, Ming; Fan, Liangsheng; Xia, Xi; Li, Kezheng; Wang, Daowen; Zhou, Jianfeng; Meng, Li; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding

    2012-08-10

    Micromolecular agents that block tumor development and metastasis hold great promise as cancer-targeted therapies. Tumor molecular targeted peptide 1 (TMTP1) was previously shown to target primary tumors and metastatic foci specifically. In this study, a group of composite peptides were incorporated to TMPT1. The NF-κB essential modulator-binding domain (NBD), and the trans-activator of transcription (TAT) peptide, were synthesized to enhance the targeted anti-tumor effects of TMTP1. TMTP1-NBD did not exhibit strong affinity to tumor cells as we had expected. Conjugating TAT with TMTP1-NBD ameliorated the poor hydrophilicity and negative charge of TMTP1-NBD. Therefore TMTP1-TAT-NBD displayed strong affinity and anti-tumor effects as we expected in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation as well as apoptosis was observed in TMTP1-TAT-NBD treated PC-3M-1E8 cells. The downstream signaling pathways including AKT, GSK-3β, IκBα and NF-κB activity were verified to decrease by TMTP1-TAT-NBD. The pharmacokinetics and distribution of TMTP1-TAT-NBD in MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice model provided some evidence for safety of the composite peptide, which showed the fluorescence of the peptide peaked in the tumor 6h after injection, with little fluorescence detected in normal organs except for very weak fluorescence in kidney. In conclusion, TMTP1-TAT-NBD may be a promising targeted anti-tumor agent for primary tumor and metastatic foci, which enhances the anticancer effects through inhibiting the AKT/GSK-3β/NF-κB pathway comparing with TMTP1. PMID:22580115

  20. Inhibition of cytochalasin-primed neutrophils by hyperosmolarity.

    PubMed

    Giambelluca, Miriam S; Gende, Oscar A

    2008-10-01

    Experimental and clinical investigations using hyperosmotic solutions for resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock demonstrated modulation of the inflammatory response. Decreased postinjury hyperinflammation has been attributed to a reduction in neutrophil-mediated tissue damage. This study shows that cytoskeletal disruption with cytochalasinB did not reverse or prevent the inhibitory effect of an osmolarity increase on the neutrophil cytotoxic response to a formyl peptide. In cytochalasin-primed neutrophils, the hyperosmolarity-dependent inhibition promptly reversed after returning to iso-osmotic levels. Paradoxically, an increase in osmolarity after stimulation produced an increase in the release of reactive oxygen species to the extracellular medium. The inhibitory effect of hyperosmotic NaCl can be reproduced by solutions of similar osmolarity containing N-methyl glucamine or sucrose, but solutions containing mannitol allowed an almost complete response to N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine. The effects on the release of reactive oxygen species to the extracellular media found with the OxyBURST-bovine serum albumin assay correlated with the changes of the intracellular calcium signal, indicating that the inhibition by hyperosmolarity occurs near the receptor level. PMID:18277949

  1. Opioid Peptides Inhibit Excitatory But Not Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in the Rat Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Kirsteen N.; Kalyuzhny, Alexander E.; Travagli, R. Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Opioid peptides produce gastrointestinal inhibition and increase feeding when applied to the brainstem. The present studies were designed to determine the actions of opioid peptides on synaptic transmission within the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) and the localization of μ-opioid receptors. Whole-cell recordings were made from identified gastrointestinal-projecting DMV neurons in thin brainstem slices of the rat. Electrical stimulation of the nucleus of the tractus solitarius evoked EPSCs and IPSCs. In all neurons tested, methionine (Met)-enkephalin (0.003–30 μm) inhibited the peak amplitude of the EPSCs. The effect was prevented by naloxone (1 μm) as well as by naloxonazine (0.2 μm). An increase in the ratio of the evoked paired pulses indicated that the inhibition was attributable to actions at presynaptic receptors. This presynaptic inhibitory action was mimicked by [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (0.1 μm) and the analgesic dipeptide kyotorphin (10 μm) but not by cyclic[d-Pen2, d-Pen5]-enkephalin (1 μm) and trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate (1 μm). In contrast, the amplitude of evoked IPSCs was not altered either by Met-enkephalin or by any of the opioid receptor-selective agonists. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that nerve terminals apposing DMV neurons showed immunoreactivity to μ-opioid receptors colocalized with glutamate immunoreactivity but not glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactivity. These results suggest that within the DMV, μ-opioid receptors are present on the nerve terminals of excitatory but not inhibitory inputs to GI motoneurons. Such specificity may imply that the central inhibitory action of opioid peptides on gastrointestinal function targets selected pathways. PMID:11943802

  2. A novel leptin antagonist peptide inhibits breast cancer growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Stefania; Leggio, Antonella; Barone, Ines; De Marco, Rosaria; Gelsomino, Luca; Campana, Antonella; Malivindi, Rocco; Panza, Salvatore; Giordano, Cinzia; Liguori, Alessia; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Liguori, Angelo; Andò, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    The role of the obesity cytokine leptin in breast cancer progression has raised interest in interfering with leptin's actions as a valuable therapeutic strategy. Leptin interacts with its receptor through three different binding sites: I–III. Site I is crucial for the formation of an active leptin–leptin receptor complex and in its subsequent activation. Amino acids 39-42 (Leu-Asp-Phe-Ile- LDFI) were shown to contribute to leptin binding site I and their mutations in alanine resulted in muteins acting as typical antagonists. We synthesized a small peptide based on the wild-type sequence of leptin binding site I (LDFI) and evaluated its efficacy in antagonizing leptin actions in breast cancer using in vitro and in vivo experimental models. The peptide LDFI abolished the leptin-induced anchorage-dependent and -independent growth as well as the migration of ERα-positive (MCF-7) and -negative (SKBR3) breast cancer cells. These results were well correlated with a reduction in the phosphorylation levels of leptin downstream effectors, as JAK2/STAT3/AKT/MAPK. Importantly, the peptide LDFI reversed the leptin-mediated up-regulation of its gene expression, as an additional mechanism able to enhance the peptide antagonistic activity. The described effects were specific for leptin signalling, since the developed peptide was not able to antagonize the other growth factors' actions on signalling activation, proliferation and migration. Finally, we showed that the LDFI pegylated peptide markedly reduced breast tumour growth in xenograft models. The unmodified peptide LDFI acting as a full leptin antagonist could become an attractive option for breast cancer treatment, especially in obese women. PMID:25721149

  3. A nerve growth factor peptide retards seizure development and inhibits neuronal sprouting in a rat model of epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, K; Van der Zee, C E; Ross, G M; Chapman, C A; Stanisz, J; Riopelle, R J; Racine, R J; Fahnestock, M

    1995-01-01

    Kindling, an animal model of epilepsy wherein seizures are induced by subcortical electrical stimulation, results in the upregulation of neurotrophin mRNA and protein in the adult rat forebrain and causes mossy fiber sprouting in the hippocampus. Intraventricular infusion of a synthetic peptide mimic of a nerve growth factor domain that interferes with the binding of neurotrophins to their receptors resulted in significant retardation of kindling and inhibition of mossy fiber sprouting. These findings suggest a critical role for neurotrophins in both kindling and kindling-induced synaptic reorganization. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7568161

  4. Potent inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatase by phosphotyrosine-mimic containing cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, M; Roller, P P; Chen, L; Zhang, Z Y; Ye, B; Burke, T R

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to derive potent and bioavailable protein-tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors, we have previously reported hexameric peptides based on the epidermal growth factor receptor sequence EGFR988-993 (Asp-Ala-Asp-Glu-Xxx-Leu, where Xxx = Tyr), in which the tyrosyl residue has been replaced by the non-hydrolyzable phosphotyrosyl mimics phosphonomethylphenylalanine (Pmp), difluorophosphonomethylphenylalanine (F2Pmp) and O-malonyltyrosine (OMT). Inhibitory potencies (IC50 values) of these peptides against the tyrosine phosphatase PTP IB were 200, 0.2 and 10 microM, respectively. Since cellular penetration of peptides containing highly charged phosphonate residues is compromised, and good bioreversible protection strategies for the F2Pmp residue have not yet been reported, the OMT residue is of particular interest in that it affords potential new prodrug approaches. In the current study we have prepared cyclized versions of the OMT-containing EGFR988-993 peptide in order to increase its proteolytic stability and restrain conformational flexibility. Three different cyclic analogues were synthesized. Two of these were cyclized through the peptide backbone ('head to tail') using in one case a single glycine spacer (heptamer peptide) and in the second instance, two glycines (octamer peptide). In a PTPI-based assay the cyclic heptamer experienced a two-fold loss of potency (Ki = 25.2 +/- 3.9 microM) relative to the linear hexamer parent (Ki = 13 +/- 0.9 microM), while the cyclic octamer demonstrated a live-fold increase in potency (Ki = 2.60 +/- 0.11 microM). The third peptide was cyclized by means of a sulfide bridge between the side chain of a C-terminally added cysteine residue and the beta-carbon of a N-terminal acetyl residue. Although the overall size of this ring was identical to that exhibited by the preceding backbone-cyclized octamer, it displayed a three-fold enhancement in potency (Ki = 0.73 +/- 0.03 microM). The structural basis for the observed results are

  5. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by plasmid expressed alphaMSH peptide.

    PubMed

    Etemad-Moghadam, Bijan; Chen, Hongmin; Yin, Peng; Aziz, Nazneen; Hedley, Mary Lynne

    2002-04-01

    Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (alphaMSH) is a neuroimmunomodulatory peptide with remarkable anti-inflammatory properties. Daily or twice daily administration of the peptide reduces the symptoms of several inflammatory animal disease models and the peptide has demonstrated safety in human trials. Unfortunately, the pharmacokinetics of peptide delivery are not favorable from the pharmaceutical perspective. For this reason, plasmid-based vectors were created that constitutively express the immunomodulatory peptide. The fusion constructs encode the 13 amino acids of alphaMSH in frame with the first domain of serum albumin, separated by a linker and furin cleavage sites. The fusion proteins were expressed and processed in human fetal kidney (293) cells. Supernatant from B16/F10 cells transfected with the constructs stimulated secretion of melanin from melanocytes. Furthermore, transfected cytoskeletal muscle (Sol8) cells secreted bioactive alphaMSH that reduced NF-kappaB-mediated transcriptional activation of a luciferase reporter gene. The activity of these vectors provides tools and the impetus for testing the constructs in several animal models of chronic inflammation. PMID:11960637

  6. Inhibition of Hepatocyte Apoptosis: An Important Mechanism of Corn Peptides Attenuating Liver Injury Induced by Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhili; Hou, Tao; Shi, Wen; Liu, Weiwei; He, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of mixed corn peptides and synthetic pentapeptide (QLLPF) on hepatocyte apoptosis induced by ethanol were investigated in vivo. QLLPF, was previously characterized from corn protein hydrolysis, which had been shown to exert good facilitating alcohol metabolism activity. Mice were pre-treated with the mixed corn peptides and the pentapeptide for 1 week and then treated with ethanol. After treatment of three weeks, the biochemical indices and the key ethanol metabolizing enzymes, the serum TNF-α, liver TGF-β1 concentrations and the protein expressions related to apoptosis were determined. We found that the Bcl-2, Bax and cytochrome c expressions in the intrinsic pathway and the Fas, FasL and NF-κB expressions in the extrinsic pathway together with higher TNF-α and TGF-β1 concentrations were reversed compared with the model group by both the mixed corn peptides and the pentapeptide. The activation of caspase3 was also suppressed. Additionally, apoptosis was further confirmed with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and the TUNEL assay demonstrated peptides suppressed hepatocyte apoptosis. Our results suggest that apoptosis induced by ethanol is alleviated in response to the treatment of corn peptides, potentially due to reversing the related protein expression. PMID:26378531

  7. Sea anemone peptide with uncommon β-hairpin structure inhibits acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) and reveals analgesic activity.

    PubMed

    Osmakov, Dmitry I; Kozlov, Sergey A; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Koshelev, Sergey G; Sanamyan, Nadezhda P; Sanamyan, Karen E; Dyachenko, Igor A; Bondarenko, Dmitry A; Murashev, Arkadii N; Mineev, Konstantin S; Arseniev, Alexander S; Grishin, Eugene V

    2013-08-01

    Three novel peptides were isolated from the venom of the sea anemone Urticina grebelnyi. All of them are 29 amino acid peptides cross-linked by two disulfide bridges, with a primary structure similar to other sea anemone peptides belonging to structural group 9a. The structure of the gene encoding the shared precursor protein of the identified peptides was determined. One peptide, π-AnmTX Ugr 9a-1 (short name Ugr 9-1), produced a reversible inhibition effect on both the transient and the sustained current of human ASIC3 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. It completely blocked the transient component (IC50 10 ± 0.6 μM) and partially (48 ± 2%) inhibited the amplitude of the sustained component (IC50 1.44 ± 0.19 μM). Using in vivo tests in mice, Ugr 9-1 significantly reversed inflammatory and acid-induced pain. The other two novel peptides, AnmTX Ugr 9a-2 (Ugr 9-2) and AnmTX Ugr 9a-3 (Ugr 9-3), did not inhibit the ASIC3 current. NMR spectroscopy revealed that Ugr 9-1 has an uncommon spatial structure, stabilized by two S-S bridges, with three classical β-turns and twisted β-hairpin without interstrand disulfide bonds. This is a novel peptide spatial structure that we propose to name boundless β-hairpin. PMID:23801332

  8. Sea Anemone Peptide with Uncommon β-Hairpin Structure Inhibits Acid-sensing Ion Channel 3 (ASIC3) and Reveals Analgesic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Osmakov, Dmitry I.; Kozlov, Sergey A.; Andreev, Yaroslav A.; Koshelev, Sergey G.; Sanamyan, Nadezhda P.; Sanamyan, Karen E.; Dyachenko, Igor A.; Bondarenko, Dmitry A.; Murashev, Arkadii N.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Arseniev, Alexander S.; Grishin, Eugene V.

    2013-01-01

    Three novel peptides were isolated from the venom of the sea anemone Urticina grebelnyi. All of them are 29 amino acid peptides cross-linked by two disulfide bridges, with a primary structure similar to other sea anemone peptides belonging to structural group 9a. The structure of the gene encoding the shared precursor protein of the identified peptides was determined. One peptide, π-AnmTX Ugr 9a-1 (short name Ugr 9-1), produced a reversible inhibition effect on both the transient and the sustained current of human ASIC3 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. It completely blocked the transient component (IC50 10 ± 0.6 μm) and partially (48 ± 2%) inhibited the amplitude of the sustained component (IC50 1.44 ± 0.19 μm). Using in vivo tests in mice, Ugr 9-1 significantly reversed inflammatory and acid-induced pain. The other two novel peptides, AnmTX Ugr 9a-2 (Ugr 9-2) and AnmTX Ugr 9a-3 (Ugr 9-3), did not inhibit the ASIC3 current. NMR spectroscopy revealed that Ugr 9-1 has an uncommon spatial structure, stabilized by two S-S bridges, with three classical β-turns and twisted β-hairpin without interstrand disulfide bonds. This is a novel peptide spatial structure that we propose to name boundless β-hairpin. PMID:23801332

  9. A Cationic Peptide, TAT-Cd0, Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Ocular Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Gilbert G.; Larsen, Inna V.; Gauger, Joshua; Carballo, Erica; Stern, Rebecca; Brummel, Rachel; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To test the in vivo activity of a peptide derived from the protein transducing domain of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Tat protein, TAT-Cd0, in a murine herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) keratitis model. Methods. The efficacy of TAT-Cd0 was assessed in a postinfection treatment model with different concentrations (1 mg/mL, 0.1 mg/mL, 0.01 mg/mL) of the peptide in one of four delivery vehicles: artificial tears, PBS, methylcellulose, and aquaphor cream. Treatment began within 4 or 24 hours postinfection. Viral titers in the tear film were determined by plaque assay. Results. TAT-Cd0 reduced the severity of keratitis in all of the delivery vehicles tested when treatment started, 4 hours postinfection. Peptide in the tears or PBS delivery vehicle had the most significant reduction in disease severity and delayed the onset of vascularization and stromal keratitis. The percentage of mice presenting with disease was also significantly reduced and viral titers were reduced by 1 log at 24 hours postinfection in mice treated with 1 mg/mL TAT-Cd0, suggesting that inhibiting replication early is sufficient to achieve clinical effects. Lower concentrations were not effective and delaying treatment by 24 hours was also not effective. Conclusions. This study shows that TAT-Cd0 is an effective antiviral against HSV-1 strain KOS when applied shortly postinfection and that aqueous-based formulations are more suitable. PMID:23341013

  10. A2T and A2V Aβ peptides exhibit different aggregation kinetics, primary nucleation, morphology, structure, and LTP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brian; Sorci, Mirco; Rosenthal, Joseph; Lippens, Jennifer; Isaacson, David; Das, Payel; Fabris, Daniele; Li, Shaomin; Belfort, Georges

    2016-04-01

    The histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the aggregation and accumulation of the amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) into misfolded oligomers and fibrils. Here we examine the biophysical properties of a protective Aβ variant against AD, A2T, and a causative mutation, A2T, along with the wild type (WT) peptide. The main finding here is that the A2V native monomer is more stable than both A2T and WT, and this manifests itself in different biophysical behaviors: the kinetics of aggregation, the initial monomer conversion to an aggregation prone state (primary nucleation), the abundances of oligomers, and extended conformations. Aggregation reaction modeling of the conversion kinetics from native monomers to fibrils predicts the enhanced stability of the A2V monomer, while ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry measures this directly confirming earlier predictions. Additionally, unique morphologies of the A2T aggregates are observed using atomic force microscopy, providing a basis for the reduction in long term potentiation inhibition of hippocampal cells for A2T compared with A2V and the wild type (WT) peptide. The stability difference of the A2V monomer and the difference in aggregate morphology for A2T (both compared with WT) are offered as alternate explanations for their pathological effects. Proteins 2016; 84:488-500. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26799157

  11. A new class of synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptides inhibits influenza A virus replication by blocking cellular attachment.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Schneider, Carola; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; Reimer, Rudolph; Gabriel, Gülsah

    2014-04-01

    Influenza A viruses are a continuous threat to human health as illustrated by the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Since circulating influenza virus strains become increasingly resistant against currently available drugs, the development of novel antivirals is urgently needed. Here, we have evaluated a recently described new class of broad-spectrum antiviral peptides (synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptides; SALPs) for their potential to inhibit influenza virus replication in vitro and in vivo. We found that particularly SALP PEP 19-2.5 shows high binding affinities for the influenza virus receptor molecule, N-Acetylneuraminic acid, leading to impaired viral attachment and cellular entry. As a result, replication of several influenza virus subtypes (H7N7, H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1) was strongly reduced. Furthermore, mice co-treated with PEP 19-2.5 were protected against an otherwise 100% lethal H7N7 influenza virus infection. These findings show that SALPs exhibit antiviral activity against influenza viruses by blocking virus attachment and entry into host cells. Thus, SALPs present a new class of broad-spectrum antiviral peptides for further development for influenza virus therapy. PMID:24486207

  12. ML-18 is a non-peptide bombesin receptor subtype-3 antagonist which inhibits lung cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Mantey, Samuel A; Moreno, Paola; Nakamura, Taichi; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-02-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype (BRS)-3 is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) for the bombesin (BB)-family of peptides. BRS-3 is an orphan GPCR and little is known of its physiological role due to the lack of specific agonists and antagonists. PD168368 is a nonpeptide antagonist for the neuromedin B (NMB) receptor (R) whereas PD176252 is a nonpeptide antagonist for the gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) R and NMBR but not BRS-3. Here nonpeptide analogs of PD176252 e.g. the S-enantiomer ML-18, and the R-enantiomer, EMY-98, were investigated as BRS-3 antagonists using lung cancer cells. ML-18 and EMY-98 inhibited specific (125)I-BA1 (DTyr-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-βAla-His-Phe-Nle-NH2)BB(6-14) binding to NCI-H1299 lung cancer cells stably transfected with BRS-3 with IC50 values of 4.8 and >100μM, respectively. In contrast, ML-18 bound with lower affinity to the GRPR and NMBR with IC50 values of 16 and >100μM, respectively. ML-18 (16μM), but not its enantiomer EMY-98, inhibited the ability of 10nM BA1 to elevate cytosolic Ca(2+) in a reversible manner using lung cancer cells loaded with FURA2-AM. ML-18 (16μM), but not EMY-98, inhibited the ability of 100nM BA1 to cause tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR and ERK in lung cancer cells. ML-18 but not EMY-98 inhibited the proliferation of lung cancer cells. The results indicate that ML-18 is a nonpeptide BRS-3 antagonist that should serve as a template to improve potency and selectivity. PMID:25554218

  13. [Peptide-deformylase inhibitors, a new class of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, Luc

    2002-11-30

    PEPTIDE-DEFORMYLASE: During protein synthesis in bacteria, a transformylase coding the fmt gene provides a formyl group on methionine before binding to the ARNm-ARNt complex. This tormylated methionine initiates the protein synthesis. The adjunction of an amino acid to the peptide chain leads to a peptide associated with a formylated methionine. The final stage requires a metallo-enzyme, peptide deformylase, which releases the peptide and regenerates the methionin. PEPTIDE-DEFORMYLASE INHIBITORS (PDF): Often rejected by the efflux pumps of Gram negative bacteria, PDF inhibitors are administered in the form of pro-drugs, capable of acting even in the bacteria that have lost their transformylase gene. TWO PRODUCTS: These are VCR 4887 developed by Versicor and Novartis and BB 83698 developed by British Biotechnology Genesoft. They are presently in the process of clinical predevelopment. They represent an important innovation and widen the range of new antibiotic classes. PMID:12497724

  14. Systemic transduction of p16INK4A antitumor peptide inhibits the growth of MBT-2 mouse bladder tumor cell line grafts.

    PubMed

    Shimazui, Toru; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Miyazaki, Jun; Kojima, Takahiro; Inai, Hiromu; Ando, Satoshi; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Uchida, Kazuhiko; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-02-01

    p16(INK4a) (p16), a key molecule in bladder tumor development, inhibits the activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and maintains the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in its active hypophosphorylated state. Following the finding that the p16 antitumor peptide dramatically inhibits the growth of aggressive leukemia/lymphoma through the restoration of p16 function using the Wr-T peptide transporter system, in this study, we developed a systemic therapy using mouse‑p16 peptide (m‑p16) in subcutaneous p16‑null mouse bladder tumors. In vitro analysis showed that the growth of p16‑null bladder tumor cells and the hyperphosphorylation of their pRbs were inhibited by p16 transduction in a concentration‑dependent manner. In an animal model, p16‑null MBT‑2 cells were injected subcutaneously into KSN/SKC nude mice. The systemic delivery of the m‑p16 peptide using Wr‑T by cardiac injection significantly inhibited the growth of solid MBT‑2 tumors compared with the control phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS) injection. Histological examination by TUNEL staining revealed that apoptosis was increased and pRb phosphorylation was inhibited. Thus, the systemic peptide delivery of p16 restores the hypophosphorylation of pRb and may be a useful tool for the treatment of bladder tumors. PMID:23292502

  15. ECL1i, d(LGTFLKC), a novel, small peptide that specifically inhibits CCL2-dependent migration.

    PubMed

    Auvynet, Constance; Baudesson de Chanville, Camille; Hermand, Patricia; Dorgham, Karim; Piesse, Christophe; Pouchy, Charlotte; Carlier, Ludovic; Poupel, Lucie; Barthélémy, Sandrine; Felouzis, Virginie; Lacombe, Claire; Sagan, Sandrine; Salomon, Benoit; Deterre, Philippe; Sennlaub, Florian; Combadière, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    CC chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) is a key molecule in inflammatory diseases and is an obvious drug target for the treatment of inflammation. A number of nonpeptidic, competitive CCR2 antagonists have been developed, but none has yet been approved for clinical use. Our aim was to identify a short peptide that showed allosteric antagonism against human and mouse CCR2. On the basis of sequence analysis and 3-dimensional modeling, we identified an original 7-d-amino acid peptidic CCR2 inhibitor that we have called extracellular loop 1 inverso (ECL1i), d(LGTFLKC). In vitro, ECL1i selectively and potently inhibits CC chemokine ligand type 2 (CCL2)-triggered chemotaxis (IC50, 2 µM) but no other conventional CCL2-associated events. We used the classic competitive CCR2 antagonist, BMS22 {2-[(isopropylaminocarbonyl)amino]-N-[2-[[cis-2-[[4-(methylthio)benzoyl]amino]cyclohexyl]amino]-2-oxoethyl]-5-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide}, as positive control and inhibited CCL2-dependent chemotaxis with an IC50 of 18 nM. As negative control, we used a peptide with the same composition as ECL1i, but in a different sequence, d(FKLTLCG). In vivo, ECL1i (4 mg/kg) interfered with CCR2-positive cell recruitment and attenuated disease progression in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. This study establishes ECL1i as the first allosteric inhibitor of CCR2 with functional selectivity. ECL1i is a promising new agent in therapeutic development, and it may, by its selective effect, increase our understanding of CCR2 signaling pathways and functions.-Auvynet, C., Baudesson de Chanville, C., Hermand, P., Dorgham, K., Piesse, C., Pouchy, C., Carlier, L., Poupel, L., Barthélémy, S., Felouzis, V., Lacombe, C., Sagan, S., Salomon, B., Deterre, P., Sennlaub, F., Combadière, C. ECL1i, d(LGTFLKC), a novel, small peptide that specifically inhibits CCL2-dependent migration. PMID:26979087

  16. Inhibition of HIV-1 reactivation by a telomerase-derived peptide in a HSP90-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide vaccine designed to induce T-cell immunity to telomerase, GV1001, has been shown to modulate cellular signaling pathways and confer a direct anti-cancer effect through the interaction with heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and 70. Here, we have found that GV1001 can modulate transactivation protein-mediated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. GV1001 treatment resulted in significant suppression of HIV-1 replication and rescue of infected cells from death by HIV-1. Transactivation of HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR) was inhibited by GV1001, indicating that GV1001 suppressed the transcription from proviral HIV DNA. The anti-HIV-1 activity of GV1001 was completely abrogated by an HSP90-neutralizing antibody, indicating that the antiviral activity depends on HSP90. Further mechanistic studies revealed that GV1001 suppresses basal NF-κB activation, which is required for HIV-1 LTR transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. Inhibition of LTR transactivation by GV1001 suggests its potential to suppress HIV-1 reactivation from latency. Indeed, PMA-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latent infected cells was suppressed by GV1001. The results suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001, a peptide proven to be safe for human use, as an anti-HIV-1 agent to suppress the reactivation from latently infected cells. PMID:27363520

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 reactivation by a telomerase-derived peptide in a HSP90-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide vaccine designed to induce T-cell immunity to telomerase, GV1001, has been shown to modulate cellular signaling pathways and confer a direct anti-cancer effect through the interaction with heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and 70. Here, we have found that GV1001 can modulate transactivation protein-mediated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. GV1001 treatment resulted in significant suppression of HIV-1 replication and rescue of infected cells from death by HIV-1. Transactivation of HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR) was inhibited by GV1001, indicating that GV1001 suppressed the transcription from proviral HIV DNA. The anti-HIV-1 activity of GV1001 was completely abrogated by an HSP90-neutralizing antibody, indicating that the antiviral activity depends on HSP90. Further mechanistic studies revealed that GV1001 suppresses basal NF-κB activation, which is required for HIV-1 LTR transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. Inhibition of LTR transactivation by GV1001 suggests its potential to suppress HIV-1 reactivation from latency. Indeed, PMA-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latent infected cells was suppressed by GV1001. The results suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001, a peptide proven to be safe for human use, as an anti-HIV-1 agent to suppress the reactivation from latently infected cells. PMID:27363520

  18. Peptide inhibitors of C3 activation as a novel strategy of complement inhibition for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Huang, Yijun; Reis, Edimara S.; Chen, Hui; Ricci, Patrizia; Lin, Zhuoer; Pascariello, Caterina; Raia, Maddalena; Sica, Michela; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Pane, Fabrizio; Lupu, Florea; Notaro, Rosario; Resuello, Ranillo R. G.; DeAngelis, Robert A.; Lambris, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis due to the lack of CD55 and CD59 on affected erythrocytes. The anti-C5 antibody eculizumab has proven clinically effective, but uncontrolled C3 activation due to CD55 absence may result in opsonization of erythrocytes, possibly leading to clinically meaningful extravascular hemolysis. We investigated the effect of the peptidic C3 inhibitor, compstatin Cp40, and its long-acting form (polyethylene glycol [PEG]-Cp40) on hemolysis and opsonization of PNH erythrocytes in an established in vitro system. Both compounds demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of hemolysis with IC50 ∼4 µM and full inhibition at 6 µM. Protective levels of either Cp40 or PEG-Cp40 also efficiently prevented deposition of C3 fragments on PNH erythrocytes. We further explored the potential of both inhibitors for systemic administration and performed pharmacokinetic evaluation in nonhuman primates. A single intravenous injection of PEG-Cp40 resulted in a prolonged elimination half-life of >5 days but may potentially affect the plasma levels of C3. Despite faster elimination kinetics, saturating inhibitor concentration could be reached with unmodified Cp40 through repetitive subcutaneous administration. In conclusion, peptide inhibitors of C3 activation effectively prevent hemolysis and C3 opsonization of PNH erythrocytes, and are excellent, and potentially cost-effective, candidates for further clinical investigation. PMID:24497537

  19. Peptide inhibition of p22phox and Rubicon interaction as a therapeutic strategy for septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Ram; Koh, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Yun, Jin-Seung; Jang, Kiseok; Lee, Joo-Youn; Jung, Jae U; Yang, Chul-Su

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome that complicates severe infection and is characterized by the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), is a life threatening disease characterized by inflammation of the entire body. Upon microbial infection, p22phox-gp91phox NADPH oxidase (NOX) complexes produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are critical for the elimination of invading microbes. However, excess production of ROS represents a key element in the cascade of deleterious processes in sepsis. We have previously reported direct crosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis machineries by demonstrating that the Rubicon protein interacts with p22phox upon microbial infection, facilitating phagosomal trafficking of the p22phox-gp91phox NOX complex to induce a ROS burst, inflammatory cytokine production, and thereby, potent anti-microbial activities. Here, we showed N8 peptide, an N-terminal 8-amino acid peptide derived from p22phox, was sufficient for Rubicon interaction and thus, capable of robustly blocking the Rubicon-p22phox interaction and profoundly suppressing ROS and inflammatory cytokine production. Consequently, treatment with the Tat-N8 peptide or a N8 peptide-mimetic small-molecule dramatically reduced the mortality associated with Cecal-Ligation-and-Puncture-induced polymicrobial sepsis in mice. This study demonstrates a new anti-sepsis therapeutic strategy by blocking the crosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis innate immunity machineries, representing a potential paradigm shift for urgently needed therapeutic intervention against this life-threatening SIRS. PMID:27267627

  20. Transgenic tobacco expressing a modified spider peptide inhibits the growth of plant pathogens and insect larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene encoding lycotoxin I, an amphipathic pore-forming peptide, was modified to increase oral toxicity to insects. One of the most active modified genes was then constitutively expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and transformants were evaluated for insect and disease resistance. Pathogenic...

  1. A PCNA-Derived Cell Permeable Peptide Selectively Inhibits Neuroblastoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Long; Smith, Shanna; Li, Caroline; Hickey, Robert J.; Stark, Jeremy M.; Fields, Gregg B.; Lang, Walter H.; Sandoval, John A.; Malkas, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), through its interaction with various proteins involved in DNA synthesis, cell cycle regulation, and DNA repair, plays a central role in maintaining genome stability. We previously reported a novel cancer associated PCNA isoform (dubbed caPCNA), which was significantly expressed in a broad range of cancer cells and tumor tissues, but not in non-malignant cells. We found that the caPCNA-specific antigenic site lies between L126 and Y133, a region within the interconnector domain of PCNA that is known to be a major binding site for many of PCNA's interacting proteins. We hypothesized that therapeutic agents targeting protein-protein interactions mediated through this region may confer differential toxicity to normal and malignant cells. To test this hypothesis, we designed a cell permeable peptide containing the PCNA L126-Y133 sequence. Here, we report that this peptide selectively kills human neuroblastoma cells, especially those with MYCN gene amplification, with much less toxicity to non-malignant human cells. Mechanistically, the peptide is able to block PCNA interactions in cancer cells. It interferes with DNA synthesis and homologous recombination-mediated double-stranded DNA break repair, resulting in S-phase arrest, accumulation of DNA damage, and enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin. These results demonstrate conceptually the utility of this peptide for treating neuroblastomas, particularly, the unfavorable MYCN-amplified tumors. PMID:24728180

  2. CopA3 peptide prevents ultraviolet-induced inhibition of type-I procollagen and induction of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Kim, Han-Hyuk; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Jung, Hyun-Gug; Yu, Jae-Myo; Lee, Eun-Su; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kim, Dong-In; An, Bong-Jeun

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) exposure is well-known to induce premature aging, which is mediated by matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity. A 9-mer peptide, CopA3 (CopA3) was synthesized from a natural peptide, coprisin, which is isolated from the dung beetle Copris tripartitus. As part of our continuing search for novel bioactive natural products, CopA3 was investigated for its in vitro anti-skin photoaging activity. UV-induced inhibition of type-I procollagen and induction of MMP-1 were partially prevented in human skin fibroblasts by CopA3 peptide in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 25 μM, CopA3 nearly completely inhibited MMP-1 expression. These results suggest that CopA3, an insect peptide, is a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of skin aging. PMID:24853614

  3. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-10-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1 or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1 or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. endothelium | natriuretic peptide receptor type C | atherosclerosis | thrombosis

  4. Specific inhibition of the translocation of a subset of Escherichia coli TAT substrates by the TorA signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Chanal, Angélique; Santini, Claire-Lise; Wu, Long-Fei

    2003-03-28

    The SufI protein and the trimethylamine N-oxide reductase (TorA) are the two best-characterized prototype proteins exported by the Escherichia coli TAT system. Whereas SufI does not contain cofactors, TorA is a molybdo-enzyme and the acquisition of the molybdo-cofactor is a prerequisite for its translocation. The overproduction of each protein leads to the saturation of its translocation, but it was unknown if the overproduction of one substrate could saturate the TAT apparatus and block thus the translocation of other TAT substrates. Here, we showed that the overproduction of SufI saturated only its own translocation, but had no effect of the translocation of TorA and other TAT substrate analyzed. To dissect the saturation mechanism of TorA translocation, we shortened by about one-third of the TorA protein and removed nine consensus molybdo-cofactor-binding ligands. Like SufI, the truncated TorA (TorA502) did not contain cofactor and would not compete with the full length TorA for molybdo-cofactor acquisition. The overproduction of TorA502 completely inhibited the export of the full length TorA and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, but had no effect on the translocation of SufI, nitrate-induced formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase-2. Importantly, deletion of the twin-arginine signal peptide of TorA502 abolished the inhibitory effect. Moreover, the overproduction of the TorA signal peptide fused to the green fluorescence protein (GFP) was sufficient to block the TorA translocation. These results demonstrated that the twin-arginine signal peptide of the TorA protein specifically inhibits the translocation of a subset of TAT substrates, probably at the step of their targeting to the TAT apparatus. PMID:12634052

  5. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite–erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that rhoptry proteins play an important role in binding to erythrocyte surface receptors, among which is the PfRhopH3 protein, which triggers important immune responses in patients from endemic regions. It has also been reported that anti-RhopH3 antibodies inhibit in vitro invasion of erythrocytes, further supporting its direct involvement in erythrocyte invasion processes. In this study, PfRhopH3 consecutive peptides were synthesized and tested in erythrocyte binding assays for identifying those regions mediating binding to erythrocytes. Fourteen PfRhopH3 peptides presenting high specific binding activity were found, whose bindings were saturable and presented nanomolar dissociation constants. These high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were characterized by having α-helical structural elements, as determined by circular dichroism, and having receptors of a possible sialic acid-dependent and/or glycoprotein-dependent nature, as evidenced in enzyme-treated erythrocyte binding assays and further corroborated by cross-linking assay results. Furthermore, these HABPs inhibited merozoite in vitro invasion of normal erythrocytes at 200 μM by up to 60% and 90%, suggesting that some RhopH3 protein regions are involved in the P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion. PMID:18593818

  6. Micrococcin P1, a naturally occurring macrocyclic peptide inhibiting hepatitis C virus entry in a pan-genotypic manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungeun; Yang, Jaewon; Park, Sanghyun; Jo, Eunji; Kim, Hee-Young; Bae, Yong-Soo; Windisch, Marc P

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered a major public health concern worldwide. Despite recent advances in curing chronic hepatitis C, unmet medical needs still remain, especially due to the high economic burden of therapies. Accordingly, our study aimed to identify affordable novel HCV inhibitors by screening of natural product compound libraries. We identified micrococcin P1, a macrocyclic peptide antibiotic, inhibiting HCV entry in a pan-genotypic manner with an EC50 range of 0.1-0.5 μM. Micrococcin P1 interfered with HCV entry at an attachment step. Furthermore, micrococcin P1 efficiently inhibited HCV spread by blocking cell-free infection as well as cell-to-cell transmission, without affecting the secretion of infectious virions. Interestingly, the putative molecular target of micrococcin P1 is glycoprotein E2 (IIe-630-Thr), as revealed by selection for viral drug resistance. In addition, micrococcin P1 inhibited sofosbuvir-resistant HCV strains and showed synergy in combination with selected HCV drugs, suggesting an alternative treatment paradigm for patients. In conclusion, we identified micrococcin P1 as specifically inhibiting entry of all HCV genotypes and demonstrated that micrococcin P1 potentially could add value to therapies in combination with current HCV interventions. PMID:27387825

  7. Potent inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by a novel C1q-binding peptide derived from the human astrovirus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Gronemus, Jenny Q; Hair, Pamela S; Crawford, Katrina B; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2010-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratories has demonstrated that purified, recombinant human astrovirus coat protein (HAstV CP) binds C1q and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. Analysis of the 787 amino acid CP molecule revealed that residues 79-139 share limited sequence homology with human neutrophil defensin-1 (HNP-1), a molecule previously demonstrated to bind C1q and MBL, inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. A 30 amino acid peptide derived from this region of the CP molecule competitively inhibited the binding of wild-type CP to C1q. The parent peptide and various derivatives were subsequently assayed for C1q binding, inhibition of C1 and C4 activation as well as suppression of complement activation in hemolytic assays. The parent peptide and several derivatives inhibited complement activation in these functional assays to varying degrees. One peptide derivative in particular (E23A) displayed superior inhibition of complement activation in multiple assays of classical complement pathway activation. Further analysis revealed homology to a plant defensin allowing development of a proposed structural model for E23A. Based upon these findings, we hypothesize that further rationale optimization of E23A may result in a promising therapeutic inhibitor for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in which dysregulated activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:20728940

  8. Antisecretory Factor Peptide AF-16 Inhibits the Secreted Autotransporter Toxin-Stimulated Transcellular and Paracellular Passages of Fluid in Cultured Human Enterocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Both the endogenous antisecretory factor (AF) protein and peptide AF-16, which has a sequence that matches that of the active N-terminal region of AF, inhibit the increase in the epithelial transport of fluid and electrolytes induced by bacterial toxins in animal and ex vivo models. We conducted a study to investigate the inhibitory effect of peptide AF-16 against the increase of transcellular passage and paracellular permeability promoted by the secreted autotransporter toxin (Sat) in a cultured cellular model of the human intestinal epithelial barrier. Peptide AF-16 produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the Sat-induced increase in the formation of fluid domes, in the mucosal-to-serosal passage of d-[1-14C]mannitol, and in the rearrangements in the distribution and protein expression of the tight junction (TJ)-associated proteins ZO-1 and occludin in cultured human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. In addition, we show that peptide AF-16 also inhibits the cholera toxin-induced increase of transcellular passage and the Clostridium difficile toxin-induced effects on paracellular permeability and TJ protein organization in Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. Treatment of cell monolayers by the lipid raft disorganizer methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished the inhibitory activity of peptide AF-16 at the transcellular passage level and did not modify the effect of the peptide at the paracellular level. PMID:25534938

  9. Antisecretory factor peptide AF-16 inhibits the secreted autotransporter toxin-stimulated transcellular and paracellular passages of fluid in cultured human enterocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Valérie; Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2015-03-01

    Both the endogenous antisecretory factor (AF) protein and peptide AF-16, which has a sequence that matches that of the active N-terminal region of AF, inhibit the increase in the epithelial transport of fluid and electrolytes induced by bacterial toxins in animal and ex vivo models. We conducted a study to investigate the inhibitory effect of peptide AF-16 against the increase of transcellular passage and paracellular permeability promoted by the secreted autotransporter toxin (Sat) in a cultured cellular model of the human intestinal epithelial barrier. Peptide AF-16 produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the Sat-induced increase in the formation of fluid domes, in the mucosal-to-serosal passage of D-[1-(14)C]mannitol, and in the rearrangements in the distribution and protein expression of the tight junction (TJ)-associated proteins ZO-1 and occludin in cultured human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. In addition, we show that peptide AF-16 also inhibits the cholera toxin-induced increase of transcellular passage and the Clostridium difficile toxin-induced effects on paracellular permeability and TJ protein organization in Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. Treatment of cell monolayers by the lipid raft disorganizer methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished the inhibitory activity of peptide AF-16 at the transcellular passage level and did not modify the effect of the peptide at the paracellular level. PMID:25534938

  10. Radio detection of interstellar DCO/+/. [deuterated formyl ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Snyder, L. E.; Lovas, F. J.; Buhl, D.

    1976-01-01

    The J = 1-0 transition of the deuterated formyl ion, DCO(+), has been detected in emission from NGC 2264 and DR 21(OH) and from the cool dust cloud L134. Estimates for the column-density ratios of H(C-13)O(+) to DCO(+) are given for NGC 2264 and DR 21(OH); lower limits for the ratios are given for five other clouds. The DCO(+) detection in L134 provides unique observational evidence in support of chemical fractionation. The L134 results also suggest that the dust clouds may act as repositories for primordial deuterium.

  11. Antibiotic and antimicrobial peptide combinations: synergistic inhibition of Pseudomonas fluorescens and antibiotic-resistant variants.

    PubMed

    Naghmouchi, Karim; Le Lay, Christophe; Baah, John; Drider, Djamel

    2012-02-01

    Variants resistant to penicillin G (RvP), streptomycin (RvS), lincomycin (RvL) and rifampicin (RvR) were developed from a colistin-sensitive isolate of Pseudomonas fluorescens LRC-R73 (P. fluorescens). Cell fatty acid composition, K(+) efflux and sensitivity to antimicrobial peptides (nisin Z, pediocin PA-1/AcH and colistin) alone or combined with antibiotics were determined. P. fluorescens was highly sensitive to kanamycin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol at minimal inhibitory concentrations of 0.366, 0.305 and 0.732 μg/ml respectively. P. fluorescens, RvP, RvS, RvL and RvR were resistant to nisin Z and pediocin PA-1/AcH at concentrations ≥100 μg/ml but sensitive to colistin at 0.076, 0.043, 0.344, 0.344 and 0.258 μg/ml respectively. A synergistic inhibitory effect (FICI ≤0.5) was observed when resistant variants were treated with peptide/antibiotic combinations. No significant effect on K(+) efflux from the resistant variants in the presence of antibiotics or peptides alone or combined was observed. The proportion of C16:0 was significantly higher in antibiotic-resistant variants than in the parent strain, accounting for 32.3%, 46.49%, 43.3%, 40.1% and 44.1% of the total fatty acids in P. fluorescens, RvP, RvS, RvL and RvR respectively. Combination of antibiotics with antimicrobial peptides could allow reduced use of antibiotics in medical applications and could help slow the emergence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics. PMID:22172555

  12. Role of N-terminal protein formylation in central metabolic processes in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial protein biosynthesis usually depends on a formylated methionyl start tRNA but Staphylococcus aureus is viable in the absence of Fmt, the tRNAMet formyl transferase. fmt mutants exhibit reduced growth rates indicating that the function of certain proteins depends on formylated N-termini but it has remained unclear, which cellular processes are abrogated by the lack of formylation. Results In order to elucidate how global metabolic processes are affected by the absence of formylated proteins the exometabolome of an S. aureus fmt mutant was compared with that of the parental strain and the transcription of corresponding enzymes was analyzed to identify possible regulatory changes. The mutant consumed glucose and other carbon sources slower than the wild type. While the turnover of several metabolites remained unaltered fmt inactivation led to increases pyruvate release and, concomitantly, reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. In parallel, the release of the pyruvate-derived metabolites lactate, acetoin, and alanine was reduced. The anaerobic degradation of arginine was also reduced in the fmt mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Moreover, the lack of formylated proteins caused increased susceptibility to the antibiotics trimethoprim and sulamethoxazole suggesting that folic acid-dependant pathways were perturbed in the mutant. Conclusions These data indicate that formylated proteins are crucial for specific bacterial metabolic processes and they may help to understand why it has remained important during bacterial evolution to initiate protein biosynthesis with a formylated tRNAMet. PMID:23320528

  13. A Heparan Sulfate-Binding Cell Penetrating Peptide for Tumor Targeting and Migration Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Chang, Pei-Lin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2015-01-01

    As heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are known as co-receptors to interact with numerous growth factors and then modulate downstream biological activities, overexpression of HS/HSPG on cell surface acts as an increasingly reliable prognostic factor in tumor progression. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short-chain peptides developed as functionalized vectors for delivery approaches of impermeable agents. On cell surface negatively charged HS provides the initial attachment of basic CPPs by electrostatic interaction, leading to multiple cellular effects. Here a functional peptide (CPPecp) has been identified from critical HS binding region in hRNase3, a unique RNase family member with in vitro antitumor activity. In this study we analyze a set of HS-binding CPPs derived from natural proteins including CPPecp. In addition to cellular binding and internalization, CPPecp demonstrated multiple functions including strong binding activity to tumor cell surface with higher HS expression, significant inhibitory effects on cancer cell migration, and suppression of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, different from conventional highly basic CPPs, CPPecp facilitated magnetic nanoparticle to selectively target tumor site in vivo. Therefore, CPPecp could engage its capacity to be developed as biomaterials for diagnostic imaging agent, therapeutic supplement, or functionalized vector for drug delivery. PMID:26064887

  14. New Compstatin Peptides Containing N-Terminal Extensions and Non-Natural Amino Acids Exhibit Potent Complement Inhibition and Improved Solubility Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Compstatin peptides are complement inhibitors that bind and inhibit cleavage of complement C3. Peptide binding is enhanced by hydrophobic interactions; however, poor solubility promotes aggregation in aqueous environments. We have designed new compstatin peptides derived from the W4A9 sequence (Ac-ICVWQDWGAHRCT-NH2, cyclized between C2 and C12), based on structural, computational, and experimental studies. Furthermore, we developed and utilized a computational framework for the design of peptides containing non-natural amino acids. These new compstatin peptides contain polar N-terminal extensions and non-natural amino acid substitutions at positions 4 and 9. Peptides with α-modified non-natural alanine analogs at position 9, as well as peptides containing only N-terminal polar extensions, exhibited similar activity compared to W4A9, as quantified via ELISA, hemolytic, and cell-based assays, and showed improved solubility, as measured by UV absorbance and reverse-phase HPLC experiments. Because of their potency and solubility, these peptides are promising candidates for therapeutic development in numerous complement-mediated diseases. PMID:25494040

  15. Inhibition of HIV-1 Env-Mediated Cell-Cell Fusion by Lectins, Peptide T-20, and Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Michael; Konopka, Krystyna; Balzarini, Jan; Düzgüneş, Nejat

    2011-01-01

    Background: Broadly cross-reactive, neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, including 2F5, 2G12, 4E10 and IgG1 b12, can inhibit HIV-1 infection in vitro at very low concentrations. We examined the ability of these antibodies to inhibit cell-cell fusion between Clone69TRevEnv cells induced to express the viral envelope proteins, gp120/gp41 (Env), and highly CD4-positive SupT1 cells. The cells were loaded with green and red-orange cytoplasmic fluorophores, and fusion was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Results: Cell-cell fusion was inhibited completely by the carbohydrate binding proteins (CBPs), Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) agglutinin (HHA), and Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) agglutinin (GNA), and by the peptide, T-20, at relatively low concentrations. Anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 antibodies, at concentrations much higher than those required for neutralization, were not particularly effective in inhibiting fusion. Monoclonal antibodies b12, m14 IgG and 2G12 had moderate inhibitory activity; the IC50 of 2G12 was about 80 µg/ml. Antibodies 4E10 and 2F5 had no inhibitory activity at the concentrations tested. Conclusions: These observations raise concerns about the ability of neutralizing antibodies to inhibit the spread of viral genetic material from infected cells to uninfected cells via cell-cell fusion. The interaction of gp120/gp41 with cell membrane CD4 may be different in cell-cell and virus-cell membrane fusion reactions, and may explain the differential effects of antibodies in these two systems. The fluorescence assay described here may be useful in high throughput screening of potential HIV fusion inhibitors. PMID:21660189

  16. MEPE-Derived ASARM Peptide Inhibits Odontogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells and Impairs Mineralization in Tooth Models of X-Linked Hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Khaddam, Mayssam; Naji, Jiar; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Baroukh, Brigitte; Letourneur, Franck; Lesieur, Julie; Decup, Franck; Le Denmat, Dominique; Nicoletti, Antonino; Poliard, Anne; Rowe, Peter S.; Huet, Eric; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Linglart, Agnès; McKee, Marc D.; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome) cause X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), a disorder having severe bone and tooth dentin mineralization defects. The absence of functional PHEX leads to abnormal accumulation of ASARM (acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif) peptide − a substrate for PHEX and a strong inhibitor of mineralization − derived from MEPE (matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein) and other matrix proteins. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide accumulates in tooth dentin of XLH patients where it may impair dentinogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ASARM peptides in vitro and in vivo on odontoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. Dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) were seeded into a 3D collagen scaffold, and induced towards odontogenic differentiation. Cultures were treated with synthetic ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated) derived from the human MEPE sequence. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide inhibited SHED differentiation in vitro, with no mineralized nodule formation, decreased odontoblast marker expression, and upregulated MEPE expression. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide implanted in a rat molar pulp injury model impaired reparative dentin formation and mineralization, with increased MEPE immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, using complementary models to study tooth dentin defects observed in XLH, we demonstrate that the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits both odontogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization, while increasing MEPE expression. These results contribute to a partial mechanistic explanation of XLH pathogenesis: direct inhibition of mineralization by ASARM peptide leads to the mineralization defects in XLH teeth. This process appears to be positively reinforced by the increased MEPE expression induced by ASARM. The MEPE-ASARM system can therefore be considered as a potential therapeutic

  17. Generation of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV-inhibiting peptides from β-lactoglobulin secreted by Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Shigemori, Suguru; Oshiro, Kazushi; Wang, Pengfei; Yamamoto, Yoshinari; Wang, Yeqin; Sato, Takashi; Uyeno, Yutaka; Shimosato, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) prepared using gastrointestinal proteases strongly inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity in vitro. In this study, we developed a BLG-secreting Lactococcus lactis strain as a delivery vehicle and in situ expression system. Interestingly, trypsin-digested recombinant BLG from L. lactis inhibited DPP-IV activity, suggesting that BLG-secreting L. lactis may be useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25157356

  18. A novel cell-penetrating peptide suppresses breast tumorigenesis by inhibiting β-catenin/LEF-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tsung-Hua; Hsu, Chia-Yi; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Liang, Shih-Shin; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Kuo, Po-Lin; Long, Cheng-Yu; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The inhibition of β-catenin/LEF-1 signaling is an emerging strategy in cancer therapy. However, clinical targeted treatment of the β-catenin/LEF-1 complex remains relatively ineffective. Therefore, development of specific molecular targets is a key approach for identifying new cancer therapeutics. Thus, we attempted to synthesize a peptide (TAT-NLS-BLBD-6) that could interfere with the interaction of β-catenin and LEF-1 at nuclei in human breast cancer cells. TAT-NLS-BLBD-6 directly interacted with β-catenin and inhibited breast cancer cell growth, invasion, migration, and colony formation as well as increased arrest of sub-G1 phase and apoptosis; it also suppressed breast tumor growth in nude mouse and zebrafish xenotransplantation models, showed no signs of toxicity, and did not affect body weight. Furthermore, the human global gene expression profiles and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software showed that the TAT-NLS-BLBD-6 downstream target genes were associated with the HER-2 and IL-9 signaling pathways. TAT-NLS-BLBD-6 commonly down-regulated 27 candidate genes in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which are concurrent with Wnt downstream target genes in human breast cancer. Our study suggests that TAT-NLS-BLBD-6 is a promising drug candidate for the development of effective therapeutics specific for Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibition. PMID:26750754

  19. Peptides in pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysates from commercially available soy products that inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dia, Vermont P; Bringe, Neal A; de Mejia, Elvira G

    2014-01-01

    The potential of pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysates, from different foods, to inhibit inflammation using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages as an in vitro model was evaluated. Eight different products were digested sequentially with pepsin and pancreatin and were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory properties. Hydrolysates from strawberry-banana soymilk (SBH), mixed berry soymilk (MXH) and vanilla soymilk (SVMH) inhibited the production of nitric oxide (27.9%, 16.4% and 28.6%, respectively), interleukin-1β (26.3%, 39.5% and 21.6%, respectively) and tumour necrosis factor-α (50.2%, 47.5% and 33.3%, respectively). In addition, SBH, MXH and SVMH inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory enzymes: inducible nitric oxide synthase (66.7%, 65.1% and 88.0%, respectively) and cyclooxygenase-2 (62.0%, 69.9% and 40.6%, respectively). Bioactive peptides (RQRK and VIK) were generated. In conclusion, soymilk products can potentially be used to maintain health under inflammatory stress. PMID:24444957

  20. Atrial natriuretic peptide(31-67) inhibits Na+ transport in rabbit inner medullary collecting duct cells. Role of prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, M E; Brady, H R; Otuechere, G; Brenner, B M; Zeidel, M L

    1992-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)(31-67), a portion of the atrial peptide prohormone, circulates in humans, and its plasma level varies with atrial pressure. Like the more widely studied carboxy-terminal fragment ANP(99-126), ANP(31-67) stimulates natriuresis and diuresis. We examined the mechanism of this natriuresis by measuring the effects of ANP(31-67) on Na+ transport in cells of the rabbit inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD). ANP(31-67) (10(-8) M) caused a 26 +/- 4% inhibition of oxygen consumption (QO2); half-maximal inhibition occurred at 10(-11) M, suggesting a physiologic effect. This effect was not additive with either ouabain or amiloride, suggesting that it reflected inhibition of Na+ transport-dependent QO2. ANP(31-67) reduced the amphotericin-induced stimulation of QO2 consistent with inhibition by this peptide of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. In addition, ANP(31-67) reduced ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake under Vmax conditions. Several lines of evidence indicated that PGE2, a known endogenous IMCD Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase inhibitor, mediates pump inhibition by ANP(31-67). Thus, ANP(31-67) inhibits Na+ transport by inhibiting the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase of IMCD cells, an effect mediated by the generation of PGE2. PMID:1533229

  1. A proapoptotic peptide conjugated to penetratin selectively inhibits tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Alves, Isabel D; Carré, Manon; Montero, Marie-Pierre; Castano, Sabine; Lecomte, Sophie; Marquant, Rodrigue; Lecorché, Pascaline; Burlina, Fabienne; Schatz, Christophe; Sagan, Sandrine; Chassaing, Gérard; Braguer, Diane; Lavielle, Solange

    2014-08-01

    The peptide KLA (acetyl-(KLAKLAK)2-NH2), which is rather non toxic for eukaryotic cell lines, becomes active when coupled to the cell penetrating peptide, penetratin (Pen), by a disulfide bridge. Remarkably, the conjugate KLA-Pen is cytotoxic, at low micromolar concentrations, against a panel of seven human tumor cell lines of various tissue origins, including cells resistant to conventional chemotherapy agents but not to normal human cell lines. Live microscopy on cells possessing fluorescent labeled mitochondria shows that in tumor cells, KLA-Pen had a strong impact on mitochondria tubular organization instantly resulting in their aggregation, while the unconjugated KLA and pen peptides had no effect. But, mitochondria in various normal cells were not affected by KLA-Pen. The interaction with membrane models of KLA-Pen, KLA and penetratin were studied using dynamic light scattering, calorimetry, plasmon resonance, circular dichroism and ATR-FTIR to unveil the mode of action of the conjugate. To understand the selectivity of the conjugate towards tumor cell lines and its action on mitochondria, lipid model systems composed of zwitterionic lipids were used as mimics of normal cell membranes and anionic lipids as mimics of tumor cell and mitochondria membrane. A very distinct mode of interaction with the two model systems was observed. KLA-Pen may exert its deleterious and selective action on cancer cells by the formation of pores with an oblique membrane orientation and establishment of important hydrophobic interactions. These results suggest that KLA-Pen could be a lead compound for the design of cancer therapeutics. PMID:24796502

  2. Inhibition of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication by an E1-Derived p80/UAF1-Binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G.

    2012-01-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target. PMID:22278251

  3. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by an E1-derived p80/UAF1-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Archambault, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target. PMID:22278251

  4. Random peptide mixtures inhibit and eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Stern, Tal; Zelinger, Einat; Hayouka, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a biofilm-forming pathogen that can cause serious health complications in humans, ranging from minor to life-threatening infections. The challenge of successfully combating biofilms requires the discovery of compounds with a novel mode of action. We have recently developed sequence-random hydrophobic-cationic peptides that display a broad antibacterial activity. In the current study we show that our novel compounds are capable of controlling and managing MRSA biofilms and might be used as lead biofilm inhibitor candidates for further studies. PMID:27161246

  5. Antibacterial peptide nisin: a potential role in the inhibition of oral pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Ni, Longxing; Ling, Junqi

    2014-10-01

    Although the antimicrobial peptide nisin has been extensively studied in the food industry for decades, its application in the oral cavity remains to develop and evaluate its feasibility in treating oral common diseases. Nisin is an odorless, colorless, tasteless substance with low toxicity and with antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacteria. These biologic properties may establish its use in promising products for oral diseases. This article summarizes the antibacterial efficiency of nisin against pathogenic bacteria related to dental caries and root canal infection and discusses the combination of nisin and common oral drugs. PMID:25088158

  6. Cell-Permeable Peptide Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 Inhibits Chronic Inflammatory Pain Behaviors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Feng; Su, Qingning; Johns, Roger A.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions can lead to persistent debilitating pain, and the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) has been shown to play an important role in the processing of inflammatory pain. Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), a scaffolding protein, has been identified to interact with NMDARs at neuronal synapses of the central nervous system. However, the role of these interactions in the central sensitization of nociceptive processing has not been defined. In the present study, we investigated the effect of disrupting NMDAR/PSD-95 interactions on chronic inflammatory pain behaviors. We constructed a fusion peptide, Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2, comprising the second PDZ domain of PSD-95, to disrupt specificallyNMDARs/PSD-95 protein interactions. Western blot analysis showed that Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 intraperitoneally injected into mice was delivered intracellularly into neurons in the central nervous system. By in vitro and in vivo binding assays, we found that the Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 dose-dependently inhibited the interactions between NMDARs and PSD-95. Furthermore, behavioral testing showed that mice given Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 exhibited significantly reduced complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain behaviors compared to the vehicle-treated group. Our results indicate that by disrupting NMDAR/PSD-95 protein interactions, the cell-permeable fusion peptide Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 provides a new target and approach for chronic inflammatory pain therapy. PMID:18781143

  7. A potential therapeutic peptide-based neutralizer that potently inhibits Shiga toxin 2 in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Tu, Wei; Liu, Yuenan; Zhou, Peng; Cai, Kun; Li, Zhan; Liu, Xiong; Ning, Nianzhi; Huang, Jie; Wang, Shenghan; Huang, Jian; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) is a major virulence factor in infections with Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), which can cause serious clinical complications in humans, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Recently, we screened and identified two peptide-based Stx2 neutralizers, TF-1 and WA-8, which specifically and directly bind to Stx2. Computer simulations suggested that the majority of TF-1 or WA-8 binds tightly at the receptor-binding site 3 of Stx2. The two peptides also effectively inhibited the cytotoxic activity of Stx2 by blocking the binding of Stx2 to target cells. TF-1 exhibits remarkable therapeutic potency in both mice and rat toxicity models. In mice toxicity models, TF-1 provided full protection when mice were injected with 5 LD50 of Stx2. In rat toxicity models, TF-1 reduced fatal tissue damage and completely protected rats from the lethal challenges of Stx2. In these rats, TF-1 significantly decreased the concentration of Stx2 in blood and diminished tissue distribution levels of Stx2. Furthermore, TF-1 effectively protected rats from the pathological effects caused by Stx2, especially in the kidney, thymus, adrenal gland, and lung. Taken together, these results indicate that TF-1 is a promising therapeutic agent against the pathogenicity of Stx2. PMID:26903273

  8. A potential therapeutic peptide-based neutralizer that potently inhibits Shiga toxin 2 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Tu, Wei; Liu, Yuenan; Zhou, Peng; Cai, Kun; Li, Zhan; Liu, Xiong; Ning, Nianzhi; Huang, Jie; Wang, Shenghan; Huang, Jian; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) is a major virulence factor in infections with Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), which can cause serious clinical complications in humans, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Recently, we screened and identified two peptide-based Stx2 neutralizers, TF-1 and WA-8, which specifically and directly bind to Stx2. Computer simulations suggested that the majority of TF-1 or WA-8 binds tightly at the receptor-binding site 3 of Stx2. The two peptides also effectively inhibited the cytotoxic activity of Stx2 by blocking the binding of Stx2 to target cells. TF-1 exhibits remarkable therapeutic potency in both mice and rat toxicity models. In mice toxicity models, TF-1 provided full protection when mice were injected with 5 LD50 of Stx2. In rat toxicity models, TF-1 reduced fatal tissue damage and completely protected rats from the lethal challenges of Stx2. In these rats, TF-1 significantly decreased the concentration of Stx2 in blood and diminished tissue distribution levels of Stx2. Furthermore, TF-1 effectively protected rats from the pathological effects caused by Stx2, especially in the kidney, thymus, adrenal gland, and lung. Taken together, these results indicate that TF-1 is a promising therapeutic agent against the pathogenicity of Stx2. PMID:26903273

  9. Tryptic amaranth glutelin digests induce endothelial nitric oxide production through inhibition of ACE: antihypertensive role of amaranth peptides.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, A P Barba; Montoya, A Barba; Martínez-Cuevas, Pedro; Hernández-Ledesma, B; León-Galván, M F; De León-Rodríguez, A; González, C

    2010-09-15

    Amaranth seed proteins have a better balance of essential amino acids than cereals and legumes. In addition, the tryptic hydrolysis of amaranth proteins generates, among other peptides, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory (ACEi) peptides. ACE converts angiotensin I (Ang I) into Ang II, but is also responsible for the degradation of bradykinin (BK). In contrast to Ang II, BK stimulates vasodilation modulated through endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production. The aim of the present study was to characterize the ACEi activity of amaranth trypsin-digested glutelins (TDGs) and their ability to induce endothelial NO production. An IC(50) value of 200microgml(-1) was measured for TDG inhibition of ACE. TDGs stimulated endothelial NO production in coronary endothelial cells (CEC) by 52% compared to control. The effects of TDGs were comparable to those of BK and Captopril, both used as positive controls of NO production. Consistent with these effects, TDGs induced, in a dose-dependent manner, endothelial NO-dependent vasodilation in isolated rat aortic rings. These results suggest that TDGs induce endothelial NO production and consequent vasodilation through their ACEi activity. Amaranth TDGs have a high potential as a nutraceutical food in prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Further molecular, cellular and physiological studies are currently under way and the results may contribute to a better understanding and control of cardiovascular disorders. PMID:20435155

  10. Specific interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein-derived peptides and target cells inhibits mycobacterial entry in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vanegas, Magnolia; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis (TB) continues being one of the diseases having the greatest mortality rates around the world, 8.7 million cases having been reported in 2011. An efficient vaccine against TB having a great impact on public health is an urgent need. Usually, selecting antigens for vaccines has been based on proteins having immunogenic properties for patients suffering TB and having had promising results in mice and non-human primates. Our approach has been based on a functional approach involving the pathogen–host interaction in the search for antigens to be included in designing an efficient, minimal, subunit-based anti-tuberculosis vaccine. This means that Mycobacterium tuberculosis has mainly been involved in studies and that lipoproteins represent an important kind of protein on the cell envelope which can also contribute towards this pathogen's virulence. This study has assessed the expression of four lipoproteins from M. tuberculosis H37Rv, i.e. Rv1411c (LprG), Rv1911c (LppC), Rv2270 (LppN) and Rv3763 (LpqH), and the possible biological activity of peptides derived from these. Five peptides were found for these proteins which had high specific binding to both alveolar A549 epithelial cells and U937 monocyte-derived macrophages which were able to significantly inhibit mycobacterial entry to these cells in vitro. PMID:25041568

  11. Folic Acid Inhibits Amyloid β-Peptide Production through Modulating DNA Methyltransferase Activity in N2a-APP Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Jiang, Mingyue; Zhao, Shijing; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xumei; Wilson, John X.; Huang, Guowei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease resulting in progressive dementia, and is a principal cause of dementia among older adults. Folate acts through one-carbon metabolism to support the methylation of multiple substrates. We hypothesized that folic acid supplementation modulates DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and may alter amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) production in AD. Mouse Neuro-2a cells expressing human APP695 were incubated with folic acid (2.8–40 μmol/L), and with or without zebularine (the DNMT inhibitor). DNMT activity, cell viability, Aβ and DNMTs expression were then examined. The results showed that folic acid stimulated DNMT gene and protein expression, and DNMT activity. Furthermore, folic acid decreased Aβ protein production, whereas inhibition of DNMT activity by zebularine increased Aβ production. The results indicate that folic acid induces methylation potential-dependent DNMT enzymes, thereby attenuating Aβ production. PMID:26492244

  12. Folic Acid Inhibits Amyloid β-Peptide Production through Modulating DNA Methyltransferase Activity in N2a-APP Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Jiang, Mingyue; Zhao, Shijing; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xumei; Wilson, John X; Huang, Guowei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease resulting in progressive dementia, and is a principal cause of dementia among older adults. Folate acts through one-carbon metabolism to support the methylation of multiple substrates. We hypothesized that folic acid supplementation modulates DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and may alter amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) production in AD. Mouse Neuro-2a cells expressing human APP695 were incubated with folic acid (2.8-40 μmol/L), and with or without zebularine (the DNMT inhibitor). DNMT activity, cell viability, Aβ and DNMTs expression were then examined. The results showed that folic acid stimulated DNMT gene and protein expression, and DNMT activity. Furthermore, folic acid decreased Aβ protein production, whereas inhibition of DNMT activity by zebularine increased Aβ production. The results indicate that folic acid induces methylation potential-dependent DNMT enzymes, thereby attenuating Aβ production. PMID:26492244

  13. Inhibition of phagocytosis and lysosomal acidification suppresses neurotoxic prion peptide-induced NALP3 inflammasome activation in BV2 microglia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fushan; Yang, Yang; Kouadir, Mohammed; Fu, Yongyao; Yang, Lifeng; Zhou, Xiangmei; Yin, Xiaomin; Zhao, Deming

    2013-07-15

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein. In a previous study, we showed that neurotoxic prion peptide (PrP106-126) induced NALP3 inflammasome activation in mouse primary and immortalized microglia. In the present work, we examined the relevance of phagocytosis and lysosomal acidification to the activation of the NALP3 inflammasome in PrP106-126-stimulated microglia. Our results showed that the inhibition of phagocytosis or lysosomal acidification significantly reduced IL-1β and IL-18 production, downregulated NALP3 and ASC expression, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory factors. We concluded that phagocytosis and lysosomal acidification are necessary for PrP106-126-induced NALP3 activation in BV2 cells. PMID:23680490

  14. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection and syncytium formation in human cells by V3 loop synthetic peptides from gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Nehete, P N; Arlinghaus, R B; Sastry, K J

    1993-01-01

    Because V3 loop-specific antibodies have been shown to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of human cells and because specific mutations in the V3 loop render the virus ineffective for infection and syncytium formation, we tested the anti-HIV effects of V3 loop peptides from different HIV-1 strains. We obtained evidence that V3 loop synthetic peptides of 8 to 15 amino acids at nanogram concentrations efficiently blocked HIV-1 IIIB infection of several human T-cell lines and of freshly prepared normal human T cells. More importantly, syncytium formation by three different primary clinical HIV isolates was inhibited by the V3 loop peptide from HIV-1 IIIB at a concentration of 1 micrograms/ml. Concentrations of V3 peptides up to 50 micrograms/ml were not toxic to any of the human cells studied. Additionally, V3 peptides incubated in normal human serum or plasma exhibited biological and physical stability for up to 24 h. Taken together, these results suggest that the V3 loop peptides have medical utility as therapeutic reagents to either prevent HIV-1 infection in humans or reduce the spread of virus infection in HIV-infected individuals. These findings are especially significant because a number of reports in the literature indicate that the V3 loop region in gp120 plays an important role in the initial stages of HIV-1 infection of cells. Images PMID:7692087

  15. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    PubMed Central

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-01-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1β or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1β or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. PMID:16179391

  16. Activity and biophysical inhibition resistance of a novel synthetic lung surfactant containing Super-Mini-B DATK peptide

    PubMed Central

    Notter, Robert H.; Wang, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives. This study examines the surface activity, resistance to biophysical inhibition, and pulmonary efficacy of a synthetic lung surfactant containing glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB) DATK, a novel and stable molecular mimic of lung surfactant protein (SP)-B. The objective of the work is to test whether S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant has favorable biophysical and physiological activity for future use in treating surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury. Methods. The structure of S-MB DATK peptide was analyzed by homology modeling and by FTIR spectroscopy. The in vitro surface activity and inhibition resistance of synthetic S-MB DATK surfactant was assessed in the presence and absence of albumin, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), and free fatty acids (palmitoleic and oleic acid). Adsorption and dynamic surface tension lowering were measured with a stirred subphase dish apparatus and a pulsating bubble surfactometer (20 cycles/min, 50% area compression, 37 °C). In vivo pulmonary activity of S-MB DATK surfactant was measured in ventilated rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by repeated lung lavages that resulted in arterial PO2 values <100 mmHg. Results. S-MB DATK surfactant had very high surface activity in all assessments. The preparation adsorbed rapidly to surface pressures of 46–48 mN/m at 37 °C (low equilibrium surface tensions of 22–24 mN/m), and reduced surface tension to <1 mN/m under dynamic compression on the pulsating bubble surfactometer. S-MB DATK surfactant showed a significant ability to resist inhibition by serum albumin, C16:0 lyso-PC, and free fatty acids, but surfactant inhibition was mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration. S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant quickly improved arterial oxygenation and lung compliance after intratracheal instillation to ventilated rabbits with severe surfactant deficiency. Conclusions. S-MB DATK is an active mimic of native SP

  17. Activity and biophysical inhibition resistance of a novel synthetic lung surfactant containing Super-Mini-B DATK peptide.

    PubMed

    Notter, Robert H; Wang, Zhengdong; Walther, Frans J

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives. This study examines the surface activity, resistance to biophysical inhibition, and pulmonary efficacy of a synthetic lung surfactant containing glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB) DATK, a novel and stable molecular mimic of lung surfactant protein (SP)-B. The objective of the work is to test whether S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant has favorable biophysical and physiological activity for future use in treating surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury. Methods. The structure of S-MB DATK peptide was analyzed by homology modeling and by FTIR spectroscopy. The in vitro surface activity and inhibition resistance of synthetic S-MB DATK surfactant was assessed in the presence and absence of albumin, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), and free fatty acids (palmitoleic and oleic acid). Adsorption and dynamic surface tension lowering were measured with a stirred subphase dish apparatus and a pulsating bubble surfactometer (20 cycles/min, 50% area compression, 37 °C). In vivo pulmonary activity of S-MB DATK surfactant was measured in ventilated rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by repeated lung lavages that resulted in arterial PO2 values <100 mmHg. Results. S-MB DATK surfactant had very high surface activity in all assessments. The preparation adsorbed rapidly to surface pressures of 46-48 mN/m at 37 °C (low equilibrium surface tensions of 22-24 mN/m), and reduced surface tension to <1 mN/m under dynamic compression on the pulsating bubble surfactometer. S-MB DATK surfactant showed a significant ability to resist inhibition by serum albumin, C16:0 lyso-PC, and free fatty acids, but surfactant inhibition was mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration. S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant quickly improved arterial oxygenation and lung compliance after intratracheal instillation to ventilated rabbits with severe surfactant deficiency. Conclusions. S-MB DATK is an active mimic of native SP

  18. Primary structure of the 175K Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding antigen and identification of a peptide which elicits antibodies that inhibit malaria merozoite invasion.

    PubMed

    Sim, B K; Orlandi, P A; Haynes, J D; Klotz, F W; Carter, J M; Camus, D; Zegans, M E; Chulay, J D

    1990-11-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum gene encoding erythrocyte binding antigen-175 (EBA-175), a putative receptor for red cell invasion (Camus, D., and T. J. Hadley. 1985. Science (Wash. DC). 230:553-556.), has been isolated and characterized. DNA sequencing demonstrated a single open reading frame encoding a translation product of 1,435 amino acid residues. Peptides corresponding to regions on the deduced amino acid sequence predicted to be B cell epitopes were assessed for immunogenicity. Immunization of mice and rabbits with EBA-peptide 4, a synthetic peptide encompassing amino acid residues 1,062-1,103, produced antibodies that recognized P. falciparum merozoites in an indirect fluorescent antibody assay. When compared to sera from rabbits immunized with the same adjuvant and carrier protein, sera from rabbits immunized with EBA-peptide 4 inhibited merozoite invasion of erythrocytes in vitro by 80% at a 1:5 dilution. Furthermore, these sera inhibited the binding of purified, authentic EBA-175 to erythrocytes, suggesting that their activity in inhibiting merozoite invasion of erythrocytes is mediated by blocking the binding of EBA-175 to erythrocytes. Since the nucleotide sequence of EBA-peptide 4 is conserved among seven strains of P. falciparum from throughout the world (Sim, B. K. L. 1990. Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 41:293-296.), these data identify a region of the protein that should be a focus of vaccine development efforts. PMID:2229177

  19. A cyclic peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein inhibits the proliferative effects of the epidermal growth factor and estradiol in MCF7 cells.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristian; Antileo, Elmer; Epuñán, Maráa José; Pino, Ana María; Valladares, Luis Emilio; Sierralta, Walter Daniel

    2008-06-01

    A cyclic peptide derived from the active domain of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF7 cells stimulated with the epidermal growth factor (EGF) or estradiol (E2). The action of these three agents on cell growth was independent of the presence of calf serum in the culture medium. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic peptide interfered markedly with the regulation of MAPK by activated c-erbB2. The cyclic peptide showed no effect on the E2-stimulated release of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 nor on the shedding of heparin-binding EGF into the culture medium. We propose that the AFP-derived cyclic peptide represents a valuable novel antiproliferative agent for treating breast cancer. PMID:18497971

  20. Inhibition of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Function: A Promising Strategy for Treating Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine. Serum levels of CGRP, which are elevated during a migraine attack, have been reported to return to normal with alleviation of pain. In addition, CGRP administration has been shown to cause a migraine-like headache in susceptible individuals. Importantly, CGRP receptors are found on many cell types within the trigeminovascular system that are thought to play important roles in controlling inflammatory and nociceptive processes. Based on these findings, it was proposed that blockage of CGRP receptor function and, hence, the physiological effects of CGRP would be effective in aborting a migraine attack. This review will summarize key preclinical data that support the therapeutic potential of using CGRP receptor antagonists or molecules that bind CGRP within the context of current neurovascular theories on migraine pathology. PMID:18808507

  1. Protein matrices for improved wound healing: elastase inhibition by a synthetic peptide model.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Pêgo, Ana Paula; Henriques, Lara; Lamghari, Meriem; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2010-09-13

    The unique properties of silk fibroin were combined with keratin to develop new wound-dressing materials. Silk fibroin/keratin (SF/K) films were prepared to reduce high levels of elastase found on chronic wounds. This improved biological function was achieved by the incorporation of a small peptide synthesized based on the reactive-site loop of the Bowman-Birk Inhibitor (BBI) protein. In vitro degradation and release were evaluated using porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) solution as a model of wound exudate. It was found that biological degradation and release rate are highly dependent on film composition. Furthermore, the level of PPE activity can be tuned by changing the film composition, thus showing an innovative way of controlling the elastase-antielastase imbalance found on chronic wounds. PMID:20690591

  2. Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibition by Heterotrimeric Triple-Helical Peptide Transition State Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Manishabrata; Stawikowska, Roma; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Fields, Gregg B.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in numerous pathologies. An overall lack of selectivity has rendered active site targeted MMP inhibitors problematic. The present study describes MMP inhibitors that function by binding both secondary binding sites (exosites) and the active site. Heterotrimeric triple-helical peptide transition-state analog inhibitors (THPIs) were assembled utilizing click chemistry. Three different heterotrimers were constructed, allowing for the inhibitory phosphinate moiety to be present uniquely in the leading, middle, or trailing strand of the triple-helix. All heterotrimeric constructs had sufficient thermally stability to warrant analysis as inhibitors. The heterotrimeric THPIs were effective against MMP-13 and MT1-MMP, with Ki spanning 100–400 nM. Unlike homotrimeric THPIs, the heterotrimeric THPIs offered complete selectivity between MT1-MMP and MMP-1. Exosite-based approaches are providing inhibitors with desired MMP selectivities. PMID:25766890

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of peptide deformylase (PDF) from Bacillus cereus in ligand-free and actinonin-bound forms

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon Kyu; Moon, Jin Ho; Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong

    2005-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) from B. cereus has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in ligand-free and actinonin-bound forms. Diffraction data have been collected from these crystals to 1.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. In bacteria, protein expression initiates with an N-formyl group and this needs to be removed in order to ensure proper bacterial growth. These formylation and deformylation processes are unique to eubacteria; therefore, inhibition of these would provide a novel antibacterial therapy. Deformylation is carried out by peptide deformylase (PDF). PDF from Bacillus cereus, one of the major pathogenic bacteria, was cloned into expression plasmid pET-28a (Novagen), overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified to high quality. Crystals have been obtained of both ligand-free PDF and PDF to which actinonin, a highly potent naturally occurring inhibitor, is bound. Both crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.72, b = 44.04, c = 85.19 Å and a = 41.31, b = 44.56, c = 84.47 Å, respectively. Diffraction data were collected to 1.7 Å resolution for the inhibitor-free crystals and to 2.0 Å resolution for the actinonin-bound crystals.

  4. A membrane penetrating peptide aptamer inhibits STAT3 function and suppresses the growth of STAT3 addicted tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Borghouts, Corina; Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Weiss, Astrid; Mack, Laura; Lucks, Peter; Groner, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by the aberrant activation of signaling pathways governing proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, migration and immune evasion. These processes are partially regulated by the transcription factor STAT3. This factor is inappropriately activated in diverse tumor types. Since tumor cells can become dependent on its persistent activation, STAT3 is a favorable drug target. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the recombinant STAT3 inhibitor, rS3-PA. This inhibitor is based on a 20 amino acid peptide which specifically interacts with the dimerization domain of STAT3. It is integrated into a thioredoxin scaffold and fused to a protein transduction domain. Protein gel blot and immunofluorescence analyses showed that rS3-PA is efficiently taken up by cells via an endocytosis independent mechanism. Intracellularly, it reduces the phosphorylation of STAT3 and enhances its degradation. This leads to the downregulation of STAT3 target gene expression on the mRNA and protein levels. Subsequently, tumor cell proliferation, survival and migration and the induction of angiogenesis are inhibited. In contrast, normal cells remain unaffected. Systemic administration of rS3-PA at doses of 7.5 mg/kg reduced P-STAT3 levels and significantly inhibited tumor growth up to 35% in a glioblastoma xenograft mouse model. PMID:24058750

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibition prevents the impairing effects of hippocampal gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonism on memory consolidation and extinction.

    PubMed

    Petry, Fernanda S; Dornelles, Arethuza S; Lichtenfels, Martina; Valiati, Fernanda E; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Parent, Marise B; Roesler, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    Hippocampal gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) regulate memory formation and extinction, and disturbances in GRPR signaling may contribute to cognitive impairment associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Histone acetylation is an important epigenetic mechanism that regulates gene expression involved in memory formation, and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) rescue memory deficits in several models. The present study determined whether inhibiting histone deacetylation would prevent memory impairments produced by GRPR blockade in the hippocampus. Male Wistar rats were given an intrahippocampal infusion of saline (SAL) or the HDACi sodium butyrate (NaB) shortly before inhibitory avoidance (IA) training, followed by an infusion of either SAL or the selective GRPR antagonist RC-3095 immediately after training. In a second experiment, the infusions were administered before and after a retention test trial that served as extinction training. As expected, RC-3095 significantly impaired consolidation and extinction of IA memory. More importantly, pretraining administration of NaB, at a dose that had no effect when given alone, prevented the effects of RC-3095. In addition, the combination of NaB and RC-3095 increased hippocampal levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These findings indicate that HDAC inhibition can protect against memory impairment caused by GRPR blockade. PMID:27025446

  6. Experimental and theoretical study of 4-formyl pyrrole derived aroylhydrazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Poonam; Singh, R. N.

    2015-03-01

    Two new 4-formyl pyrrole derived aroylhydrazones (3a, b) from ethyl 4-formyl-3,5-dimetyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate and aroylhydrazides (3,5-dinitrobenzohydrazide/2-hydrazinocarbonyl-N-phenyl-acetamide) have been synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques 1H NMR, Mass, UV-Visible and FT-IR. The calculated thermodynamic parameters show that the formation of 3a as spontaneous, whereas 3b as non-spontaneous. TD-DFT has been used to calculate the absorption wavelengths, oscillator strength (f) and the nature of electronic excitations. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been carried out to explore the various conjugative and hyperconjugative interactions and their second order stabilization energy (E(2)) within monomer and its dimer. The dimer formation of 3a, 3b due to result of intermolecular hydrogen bonding N1sbnd H30⋯O84, N1sbnd H28⋯O60 is obvious in 1H NMR, NBO and FT-IR as down field chemical shifts, n(O84) → σ∗(N1sbnd H30), n(O60) → σ∗(N1sbnd H28) interactions, vibrational red shifts, respectively. To determine the strength and nature of hydrogen bonding, topological parameters at bond critical points (BCP) have been analyzed by 'Quantum theory of Atoms in molecules' (QTAIM) in detail. The global electrophilicity index (ω) has been calculated to determine the relative electrophilic strength of molecules. The local reactivity descriptors analyses such as Fukui functions (fk+, fk-), local softnesses (sk+, sk-) and electrophilicity indices (ωk+, ωk-) have been performed to determine the reactive sites within molecules. The first hyperpolarizabilities (β0) of 3a, b have been computed to evaluate the non-linear optical (NLO) response of the investigated molecules.

  7. Intestinal Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 1 Inhibition Enhances Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in Normal and Diabetic Rodents.

    PubMed

    Oguma, Takahiro; Nakayama, Keiko; Kuriyama, Chiaki; Matsushita, Yasuaki; Yoshida, Kumiko; Hikida, Kumiko; Obokata, Naoyuki; Tsuda-Tsukimoto, Minoru; Saito, Akira; Arakawa, Kenji; Ueta, Kiichiro; Shiotani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    The sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 1 plays a major role in glucose absorption and incretin hormone release in the gastrointestinal tract; however, the impact of SGLT1 inhibition on plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels in vivo is controversial. We analyzed the effects of SGLT1 inhibitors on GLP-1 secretion in normoglycemic and hyperglycemic rodents using phloridzin, CGMI [3-(4-cyclopropylphenylmethyl)-1-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-4-methylindole], and canagliflozin. These compounds are SGLT2 inhibitors with moderate SGLT1 inhibitory activity, and their IC50 values against rat SGLT1 and mouse SGLT1 were 609 and 760 nM for phloridzin, 39.4 and 41.5 nM for CGMI, and 555 and 613 nM for canagliflozin, respectively. Oral administration of these inhibitors markedly enhanced and prolonged the glucose-induced plasma active GLP-1 (aGLP-1) increase in combination treatment with sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor, in normoglycemic mice and rats. CGMI, the most potent SGLT1 inhibitor among them, enhanced glucose-induced, but not fat-induced, plasma aGLP-1 increase at a lower dose compared with canagliflozin. Both CGMI and canagliflozin delayed intestinal glucose absorption after oral administration in normoglycemic rats. The combined treatment of canagliflozin and a DPP4 inhibitor increased plasma aGLP-1 levels and improved glucose tolerance compared with single treatment in both 8- and 13-week-old Zucker diabetic fatty rats. These results suggest that transient inhibition of intestinal SGLT1 promotes GLP-1 secretion by delaying glucose absorption and that concomitant inhibition of intestinal SGLT1 and DPP4 is a novel therapeutic option for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26105952

  8. Mambalgin-1 Pain-relieving Peptide, Stepwise Solid-phase Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Functional Domain for Acid-sensing Ion Channel 1a Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mourier, Gilles; Salinas, Miguel; Kessler, Pascal; Stura, Enrico A; Leblanc, Mathieu; Tepshi, Livia; Besson, Thomas; Diochot, Sylvie; Baron, Anne; Douguet, Dominique; Lingueglia, Eric; Servent, Denis

    2016-02-01

    Mambalgins are peptides isolated from mamba venom that specifically inhibit a set of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) to relieve pain. We show here the first full stepwise solid phase peptide synthesis of mambalgin-1 and confirm the biological activity of the synthetic toxin both in vitro and in vivo. We also report the determination of its three-dimensional crystal structure showing differences with previously described NMR structures. Finally, the functional domain by which the toxin inhibits ASIC1a channels was identified in its loop II and more precisely in the face containing Phe-27, Leu-32, and Leu-34 residues. Moreover, proximity between Leu-32 in mambalgin-1 and Phe-350 in rASIC1a was proposed from double mutant cycle analysis. These data provide information on the structure and on the pharmacophore for ASIC channel inhibition by mambalgins that could have therapeutic value against pain and probably other neurological disorders. PMID:26680001

  9. Cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide inhibits fibroblast migration via P2X7 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Shohei; Matsui, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Haruyo; Yamashita, Tomomi; Mohri, Tomomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Fibrosis is one of the most common pathological alterations in heart failure, and fibroblast migration is an essential process in the development of cardiac fibrosis. Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a model of inflammatory heart disease characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration followed by healing without residual fibrosis. However, the precise mechanisms mediating termination of inflammation and nonfibrotic healing remain to be elucidated. Microarray analysis of hearts from model mice at multiple time points after EAM induction identified several secreted proteins upregulated during nonfibrotic healing, including the anti-inflammatory cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP). Treatment with LL-37, a human homolog of CAMP, activated MAP kinases in fibroblasts but not in cardiomyocytes, indicating that fibroblasts were the target of CAMP activity. In addition, LL-37 decreased fibroblast migration in the in vitro scratch assay. P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), a well-known receptor for LL-37, was involved in LL-37 mediated biological effect on cardiac fibroblasts. Stimulation of BzATP, a P2X7R agonist, activated MAPK in fibroblasts, whereas the P2X7R antagonist, BBG, as well as P2X7R deletion abolished both LL-37-mediated MAPK activation and LL-37-induced reduction in fibroblast migration. These results strongly suggest that CAMP upregulation during myocarditis prevents myocardial fibrosis by restricting fibroblast migration via activation of the P2X7R-MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:23867818

  10. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide inhibits amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Bound Aβ(1–40) features a β-hairpin comprising residues 17–36, providing the first high-resolution structure of Aβ in β conformation. The positions of the secondary structure elements strongly resemble those observed for fibrillar Aβ. ZAβ3 stabilizes the β-sheet by extending it intermolecularly and by burying both of the mostly nonpolar faces of the Aβ hairpin within a large hydrophobic tunnel-like cavity. Consequently, ZAβ3 acts as a stoichiometric inhibitor of Aβ fibrillation. The selected Aβ conformation allows us to suggest a structural mechanism for amyloid formation based on soluble oligomeric hairpin intermediates. PMID:18375754

  11. Small Molecule Inhibited Parathyroid Hormone Mediated cAMP Response by N–Terminal Peptide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Baumann, Monika; Balbach, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Ligand binding to certain classes of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) stimulates the rapid synthesis of cAMP through G protein. Human parathyroid hormone (PTH), a member of class B GPCRs, binds to its receptor via its N–terminal domain, thereby activating the pathway to this secondary messenger inside cells. Presently, GPCRs are the target of many pharmaceuticals however, these drugs target only a small fraction of structurally known GPCRs (about 10%). Coordination complexes are gaining interest due to their wide applications in the medicinal field. In the present studies we explored the potential of a coordination complex of Zn(II) and anthracenyl–terpyridine as a modulator of the parathyroid hormone response. Preferential interactions at the N–terminal domain of the peptide hormone were manifested by suppressed cAMP generation inside the cells. These observations contribute a regulatory component to the current GPCR–cAMP paradigm, where not the receptor itself, but the activating hormone is a target. To our knowledge, this is the first report about a coordination complex modulating GPCR activity at the level of deactivating its agonist. Developing such molecules might help in the control of pathogenic PTH function such as hyperparathyroidism, where control of excess hormonal activity is essentially required. PMID:26932583

  12. The targeted delivery of the c-Src peptide complexed with schizophyllan to macrophages inhibits polymicrobial sepsis and ulcerative colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Ram; Hwang, Jangsun; Koh, Hyun-Jung; Jang, Kiseok; Lee, Jong-Dae; Choi, Jonghoon; Yang, Chul-Su

    2016-05-01

    Hyper-inflammatory responses triggered by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to a variety of diseases, including sepsis and colitis. However, the regulators of this process remain poorly defined. In this study, we demonstrate that c-Src is a negative regulator of cellular ROS generation through its binding to p47phox. This molecule also competitively inhibits the NADPH oxidase complex (NOX) assembly. Furthermore, we developed the schizophyllan (SPG)-c-Src SH3 peptide, which is a β-1,3-glucan conjugated c-Src SH3-derived peptide composed of amino acids 91-108 and 121-140 of c-Src. The SPG-SH3 peptide has a significant therapeutic effect on mouse ROS-mediated inflammatory disease models, cecal-ligation-puncture-induced sepsis, and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis. It does so by inhibiting the NOX subunit assembly and proinflammatory mediator production. Therefore, the SPG-SH3 peptide is a potential therapeutic agent for ROS-associated lethal inflammatory diseases. Our findings provide clues for the development of new peptide-base drugs that will target p47phox. PMID:26946401

  13. Amaranth lunasin-like peptide internalizes into the cell nucleus and inhibits chemical carcinogen-induced transformation of NIH-3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Cervantes, Enrique; Jeong, Hyung Jin; León-Galván, Fabiola; Barrera-Pacheco, Alberto; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio; González de Mejia, Elvira; de Lumen, Ben O; Barba de la Rosa, Ana P

    2010-09-01

    Because an unbalanced diet is an important risk factor for several illnesses, interest has increased in finding novel health-promoting foods. Amaranth produces seeds that not only have substantial nutritional properties but that also contain phytochemical compounds as rutin and nicotiflorin and peptides with antihypertensive and anticarcinogenic activities. We report that a cancer-preventive peptide in amaranth has activities similar to those of soybean lunasin. The amaranth lunasin-like peptide, however, requires less time than the soybean lunasin to internalize into the nucleus of NIH-3T3 cells, and inhibits histone acetylation (H(3) and H(4) in a 70 and 77%, respectively). The amaranth lunasin-like peptide inhibited the transformation of NIH-3T3 cells to cancerous foci. The open reading frame (ORF) of amaranth lunasin corresponds to a bifunctional inhibitor/lipid-transfer protein (LTP). LTPs are a family of proteins that in plants are implicated in different functions, albeit all linked to developmental processes and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. Our results open new intriguing questions about the function of lunasin in plants and support that amaranth is a food alternative containing natural peptides with health-promoting benefits. PMID:20599579

  14. Inhibition of β-amyloid1-40 Peptide Aggregation and Neurotoxicity by Citrate

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Hoon; Kim, Young-Jin; Son, Il Hong

    2009-01-01

    The accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates is a characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Furthermore, these aggregates have neurotoxic effects on cells, and thus, molecules that inhibit Aβ aggregate formation could be valuable therapeutics for AD. It is well known that aggregation of Aβ depends on its hydrophobicity, and thus, in order to increase the hydrophilicity of Aβ, we considered using citrate, an anionic surfactant with three carboxylic acid groups. We hypothesized that citrate could reduce hydrophobicity and increase hydrophilicity of Aβ1-40 molecules via hydrophilic/electrostatic interactions. We found that citrate significantly inhibited Aβ1-40 aggregation and significantly protected SH-SY5Y cell line against Aβ1-40 aggregates-induced neurotoxicity. In details, we examined the effects of citrate on Aβ1-40 aggregation and on Aβ1-40 aggregates-induced cytotoxicity, cell viability, and apoptosis. Th-T assays showed that citrate significantly inhibited Aβ1-40 aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner (Th-T intensity: from 91.3% in 0.01 mM citrate to 82.1% in 1.0 mM citrate vs. 100.0% in Aβ1-40 alone). In cytotoxicity and viability assays, citrate reduced the toxicity of Aβ1-40 in a concentration-dependent manner, in which the cytotoxicity decreased from 107.5 to 102.3% as compared with Aβ1-40 aggregates alone treated cells (127.3%) and the cell viability increased from 84.6 to 93.8% as compared with the Aβ1-40 aggregates alone treated cells (65.3%). Furthermore, Hoechst 33342 staining showed that citrate (1.0 mM) suppressed Aβ1-40 aggregates-induced apoptosis in the cells. This study suggests that citrate can inhibit Aβ1-40 aggregation and protect neurons from the apoptotic effects of Aβ1-40 aggregates. Accordingly, our findings suggest that citrate administration should be viewed as a novel neuroprotective strategy for AD. PMID:19885010

  15. Mucosal delivery of allergen peptides expressed by Lactococcus lactis inhibit allergic responses in a BALB/c mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ai, Chunqing; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Ding, Junrong; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Tian, Fengwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is considered to be the only curative treatment of allergy, but its safety is always affected by immunologic properties and quality of allergen. Recombinant allergen derivative could be a potential therapeutic strategy, but clinical studies showed that macromolecular derivatives could not avoid T cell-mediated side effects. In this study, five Der p2-derived peptides (DPs) containing major T cell epitopes of Der p2 were first artificially synthesized. Compared with Der p2 macromolecular derivative DM, these DPs not only fully eliminated IgE-binding capacity but also reduced T cells reactivity, suggesting these DPs could be better therapeutic molecules. For their application in vivo, Lactococcus lactis was engineered to express these DPs, and their protective effects were evaluated in BALB/c mice models. Western blot showed that all DPs could be produced in the recombinant strains. Mucosal delivery of these strains could inhibit Der p2-induced allergic responses in Der p2-sensitized mice, characterized by a reduction in specific IgE antibody and lung inflammatory responses. These protective effects were associated with an increase of specific IgG2a in serum and regulatory T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. On the whole, the suppressive effect induced by the DP mixture could be better than single DP, but a bit weaker than DM. These DPs could be promising candidate molecules for active vaccination and induction of tolerance, and thus promote the development of non-allergenic peptide in the treatment and prevention of allergy. PMID:26621801

  16. Antimicrobial peptides and endotoxin inhibit cytokine and nitric oxide release but amplify respiratory burst response in human and murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zughaier, Susu M.; Shafer, William M.; Stephens, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), in addition to their antibacterial properties, are also chemotactic and signalling molecules that connect the innate and adaptive immune responses. The role of AMP [α defensins, LL-37, a cathepsin G-derived peptide (CG117-136), protegrins (PG-1), polymyxin B (PMX) and LLP1] in modulating the respiratory burst response in human and murine macrophages in the presence of bacterial endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipooligosaccharide (LOS)] was investigated. AMP were found to neutralize endotoxin induction of nitric oxide and TNFα release in macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, macrophages primed overnight with AMP and LOS or LPS significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) release compared with cells primed with endotoxin or AMP alone, while no responses were seen in unprimed cells. This enhanced ROS release by macrophages was seen in all cell lines including those obtained from C3H/HeJ (TLR4−/−) mice. Similar effects were also seen when AMP and endotoxin were added directly with zymosan to trigger phagocytosis and the respiratory burst in unprimed RAW 264.7 and C3H/HeJ macrophages. Amplification of ROS release was also demonstrated in a cell-free system of xanthine and xanthine oxidase. Although AMP inhibited cytokine and nitric oxide induction by endotoxin in a TLR4-dependent manner, AMP and endotoxin amplified ROS release in a TLR4-independent manner possibly by exerting a prolonged catalytic effect on the ROS generating enzymes such as the NADPH-oxidase complex. PMID:16098213

  17. Targeting inhibition of Foxp3 by a CD28 2'-Fluro oligonucleotide aptamer conjugated to P60-peptide enhances active cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Teresa; Soldevilla, Mario Martínez; Casares, Noelia; Villanueva, Helena; Bendandi, Maurizio; Lasarte, Juan Jose; Pastor, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    The specific inhibition of Treg function has long been a major technical challenge in cancer immunotherapy. So far no single cell-surface marker has been identified that could be used to distinguish Treg cells from other lymphocytes. The only available specific marker mostly expressed in Treg is Foxp3, which is an intracellular transcription factor. A targeting molecule able to penetrate the membrane and inhibit Foxp3 within the cell is needed. P60-peptide is able to do that, but due to lack of target specificity, the doses are extremely high. In this study we have shown as a proof of concept that P60 Foxp3 inhibitor peptide can be conjugated with a CD28 targeting aptamer to deliver the peptide to CD28-expressing cells. The AptCD28-P60 construct is a clinically feasible reagent that improves the efficacy of the unconjugated P60 peptide very significantly. This approach was used to inhibit Treg function in a vaccination context, and it has shown a significant improvement in the induced immune response, entailing a lower tumor load in an antigen-specific cancer vaccine protocol. PMID:26999456

  18. Three-dimensional Structure of the EphB2 Receptor in Complex with an Antagonistic Peptide Reveals a Novel Mode of Inhibition ***

    PubMed Central

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Brooun, Alexei; Recht, Michael I.; Nicola, George; Davis, Leila K.; Abagyan, Ruben; Widmer, Hans; Pasquale, Elena B.; Kuhn, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases has been implicated in tumorigenesis as well as pathological forms of angio-genesis. Understanding how to modulate the interaction of Eph receptors with their ephrin ligands is therefore of critical interest for the development of therapeutics to treat cancer. Previous work identified a set of 12-mer peptides that displayed moderate binding affinity but high selectivity for the EphB2 receptor. The SNEW antagonistic peptide inhibited the interaction of EphB2 with ephrinB2, with an IC50 of ~15 μm. To gain a better molecular understanding of how to inhibit Eph/ephrin binding, we determined the crystal structure of the EphB2 receptor in complex with the SNEW peptide to 2.3-Å resolution. The peptide binds in the hydrophobic ligand-binding cleft of the EphB2 receptor, thus competing with the ephrin ligand for receptor binding. However, the binding interactions of the SNEW peptide are markedly different from those described for the TNYLRAW peptide, which binds to the ligand-binding cleft of EphB4, indicating a novel mode of antagonism. Nevertheless, we identified a conserved structural motif present in all known receptor/ligand interfaces, which may serve as a scaffold for the development of therapeutic leads. The EphB2-SNEW complex crystallized as a homodimer, and the residues involved in the dimerization interface are similar to those implicated in mediating tetramerization of EphB2-ephrinB2 complexes. The structure of EphB2 in complex with the SNEW peptide reveals novel binding determinants that could serve as starting points in the development of compounds that modulate Eph receptor/ephrin interactions and biological activities. PMID:17897949

  19. Role of atrial natriuretic peptide in mediating the blood pressure-independent natriuresis elicited by systemic inhibition of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Leszek; Kuczeriszka, Marta; Castillo, Alexander; Majid, Dewan S; Navar, L Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    While it is clearly recognized that increased intrarenal nitric oxide (NO) levels elicit natriuresis, confounding data showing that systemic nitric oxide synthase inhibition (NOSi) also increases sodium excretion (UNaV) poses a conundrum. This response has been attributed to the associated increases in arterial pressure (AP); however, the increases in AP and in UNaV are temporally dissociated. The changes in regional renal haemodynamics induced by NOSi could also contribute to the alterations of UNaV. To evaluate the roles of AP and non-AP mechanisms mediating the natriuresis, N ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) was infused i.v. at doses ranging from 5 to 50 μg/kg/min in anaesthetized rats. UNaV, perfusion of the cortex (cortical blood flow, CBF) and medulla (medullary blood flow, MBF) with laser-Doppler flowmetry and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured. UNaV increased from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 1.6 ± 0.1 μmol/kg/min (P < 0.05) with the lower nonpressor doses. With the higher doses, AP increased from 116 ± 4 to 122 ± 4 mmHg and UNaV increased from 1.1 ± 0.3 to 3.3 ± 0.7 μmol/min/g (P < 0.002). UNaV increased similarly in a group where renal AP was maintained at baseline levels. The associated reductions in CBF (17 ± 5 and 38 ± 5 %) and MBF (27 ± 6 and 52 ± 6 %) would be expected to attenuate rather than contribute to the natriuresis. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentrations increased significantly following NOSi. Anantin, a natriuretic peptide receptor-A blocker, prevented or reversed the L-NAME-induced natriuresis without altering the L-NAME-induced changes in AP or CBF. The results indicate that increased ANP and related natriuretic peptides mediate the AP-independent natriuresis, at least partly, elicited by systemic L-NAME infusion and help resolve the conundrum of natriuresis during systemic NOSi. PMID:24953240

  20. Inhibition of Adhesion of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to HEp-2 Cells by Binding of a Novel Peptide to EspB Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Duoyun; Chen, Zhong; Cheng, Hang; Zheng, Jin-Xin; Pan, Wei-Guang; Yang, Wei-Zhi; Yu, Zhi-Jian; Deng, Qi-Wen

    2016-09-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries. The translocator EspB is a key virulence factor in the process of the attaching and effacing effect of EPEC and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of the bacteria. In this study, we aimed to select the peptides binding to EspB protein by phage display library and further investigate whether these peptides can decrease the extent of invasion and virulence of EPEC on host cells by targeting to EspB protein. The expression and purification of EspB protein from E. coli was demonstrated by Western blotting. The Ph.D. 12-mer peptide phage display library was used to screen the candidate peptides binding specifically to EspB protein. Furthermore, the affinity of these candidate peptides bound to EspB was identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Moreover, we investigated whether these screened peptides could decrease the adherence ratio of EPEC to HEp-2 cells with increasing concentration. Successful purification of EspB protein from pET21b-EspB-transformed E. coli was identified by Western blotting. Then, the candidate peptides including phages 6, 7, 8, and 12 were screened by the Ph.D. 12-mer peptide phage display library and ELISA test demonstrated that their affinity binding to EspB protein was high compared with the control. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic peptide-6 (YFPYSHTSPRQP) significantly decreased the adherence ratio of EPEC to HEp-2 cells with increasing concentration (P < 0.01). Peptide-6 (100 µg/mL) could lead to a 40 % decrease in the adherence ratio of EPEC to HEp-2 cells compared with control (P < 0.01). However, the other three peptides at different concentrations showed only a slight ability to block the adherence of EPEC to host cells. Our data provided a potential strategy to inhibit the adhesion of EPEC to epithelial cells by a candidate peptide targeted toward EspB protein. PMID:27246497

  1. Structural insight into the inhibition of tubulin by vinca domain peptide ligands

    PubMed Central

    Cormier, Anthony; Marchand, Matthieu; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Knossow, Marcel; Gigant, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    The tubulin vinca domain is the target of widely different microtubule inhibitors that interfere with the binding of vinblastine. Although all these ligands inhibit the hydrolysis of GTP, they affect nucleotide exchange to variable extents. The structures of two vinca domain antimitotic peptides—phomopsin A and soblidotin (a dolastatin 10 analogue)—bound to tubulin in a complex with a stathmin-like domain show that their sites partly overlap with that of vinblastine and extend the definition of the vinca domain. The structural data, together with the biochemical results from the ligands we studied, highlight two main contributors in nucleotide exchange: the flexibility of the tubulin subunits' arrangement at their interfaces and the residues in the carboxy-terminal part of the β-tubulin H6–H7 loop. The structures also highlight common features of the mechanisms by which vinca domain ligands favour curved tubulin assemblies and destabilize microtubules. PMID:18787557

  2. Flupirtine inhibits calcitonin-gene related peptide release from rat brainstem in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tringali, Giuseppe; Greco, Maria Cristina; Capuano, Alessandro; Guerriero, Giuseppe; Currò, Diego; Navarra, Pierluigi

    2012-01-11

    We have previously shown that the nonopioid analgesic flupirtine possesses analgesic activity in the orofacial formalin test in vivo in the rat. However, this paradigm does not allow to distinguish between central and peripheral site of action of the drug. In this study we used a recently characterized in vitro model, consisting in acute rat brainstem explants, to investigate whether flupirtine analgesia may be, at least in part, attributed to interference with neurotransmission between the first and the second order neurons of the trigeminal system, occurring within the brainstem. We used acute rat brainstem explants; CGRP released into the incubation medium was taken as a marker of CGRP release from central terminals of trigeminal ganglion afferent neurons within the brainstem. CGRP levels were measured by radioimmunoassay under basal conditions or in the presence of flupirtine, alone or with putative antagonist XE-991. We found that flupirtine inhibits in a concentration-dependent manner both basal and capsaicin-stimulated CGRP release from rat brainstem. This effect is mimicked by the flupirtine analogue retigabine, and is counteracted by the Kv7 blocker XE-991. These findings provide in vitro evidence that the analgesic activity of flupirtine may be related to interference with pain neurotransmission at the brainstem level. Pharmacological data suggests that such effect is related to opening of Kv7 channels on first-order neuronal nerve ending, and the subsequent inhibition of neurotransmitter release, since the effect is mimicked by the Kv7 opener retigabine and is counteracted by the Kv7 blocker XE-991. PMID:22155095

  3. The N-methylated peptide SEN304 powerfully inhibits Aβ(1-42) toxicity by perturbing oligomer formation.

    PubMed

    Amijee, Hozefa; Bate, Clive; Williams, Alun; Virdee, Jasmeet; Jeggo, Ross; Spanswick, David; Scopes, David I C; Treherne, J Mark; Mazzitelli, Sonia; Chawner, Ross; Eyers, Claire E; Doig, Andrew J

    2012-10-23

    Oligomeric forms of β-amyloid (Aβ) have potent neurotoxic activity and are the primary cause of neuronal injury and cell death in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Compounds that perturb oligomer formation or structure may therefore be therapeutic for AD. We previously reported that d-[(chGly)-(Tyr)-(chGly)-(chGly)-(mLeu)]-NH(2) (SEN304) is able to inhibit Aβ aggregation and toxicity, shown primarily by thioflavin T fluorescence and MTT (Kokkoni, N. et al. (2006) N-Methylated peptide inhibitors of β-amyloid aggregation and toxicity. Optimisation of inhibitor structure. Biochemistry 45, 9906-9918). Here we extensively characterize how SEN304 affects Aβ(1-42) aggregation and toxicity, using biophysical assays (thioflavin T, circular dichroism, SDS-PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, surface plasmon resonance, traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, ELISA), toxicity assays in cell culture (MTT and lactate dehydrogenase in human SH-SHY5Y cells, mouse neuronal cell death and synaptophysin) and long-term potentiation in a rat hippocampal brain slice. These data, with dose response curves, show that SEN304 is a powerful inhibitor of Aβ(1-42) toxicity, particularly effective at preventing Aβ inhibition of long-term potentiation. It can bind directly to Aβ(1-42), delay β-sheet formation and promote aggregation of toxic oligomers into a nontoxic form, with a different morphology that cannot bind thioflavin T. SEN304 appears to work by inducing aggregation, and hence removal, of Aβ oligomers. It is therefore a promising lead compound for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23025847

  4. Naphthoquinone-Tryptophan Hybrid Inhibits Aggregation of the Tau-Derived Peptide PHF6 and Reduces Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Frenkel-Pinter, Moran; Tal, Sharon; Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Abu-Hussien, Malak; Alyagor, Idan; Eisenbaum, Tal; Gazit, Ehud; Segal, Daniel

    2016-01-20

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), are a group of disorders characterized neuropathologically by intracellular toxic accumulations of abnormal protein aggregates formed by misfolding of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Since protein self-assembly appears to be an initial key step in the pathology of this group of diseases, intervening in this process can be both a prophylactic measure and a means for modifying the course of the disease for therapeutic purposes. We and others have shown that aromatic small molecules can be effective inhibitors of aggregation of various protein assemblies, by binding to the aromatic core in aggregation-prone motifs and preventing their self-assembly. Specifically, we have designed a series of small aromatic naphthoquinone-tryptophan hybrid molecules as candidate aggregation inhibitors of β -sheet based assembly and demonstrated their efficacy toward inhibiting aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide, another culprit of AD, as well as of various other aggregative proteins involved in other protein misfolding diseases. Here we tested whether a leading naphthoquinone-tryptophan hybrid molecule, namely NQTrp, can be repurposed as an inhibitor of the aggregation of the tau protein in vitro and in vivo. We show that the molecule inhibits the in vitro assembly of PHF6, the aggregation-prone fragment of tau protein, reduces hyperphosphorylated tau deposits and ameliorates tauopathy-related behavioral defect in an established transgenic Drosophila model expressing human tau. We suggest that NQTrp, or optimized versions of it, could act as novel disease modifying drugs for AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26836184

  5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis through cAMP/PKA signaling in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Machado, Juliano; Manfredi, Leandro H; Silveira, Wilian A; Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Lustrino, Danilo; Zanon, Neusa M; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C

    2016-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide released by motor neuron in skeletal muscle and modulates the neuromuscular transmission by induction of synthesis and insertion of acetylcholine receptor on postsynaptic muscle membrane; however, its role in skeletal muscle protein metabolism remains unclear. We examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of CGRP on protein breakdown and signaling pathways in control skeletal muscles and muscles following denervation (DEN) in rats. In isolated muscles, CGRP (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) reduced basal and DEN-induced activation of overall proteolysis in a concentration-dependent manner. The in vitro anti-proteolytic effect of CGRP was completely abolished by CGRP8-37, a CGRP receptor antagonist. CGRP down-regulated the lysosomal proteolysis, the mRNA levels of LC3b, Gabarapl1 and cathepsin L and the protein content of LC3-II in control and denervated muscles. In parallel, CGRP elevated cAMP levels, stimulated PKA/CREB signaling and increased Foxo1 phosphorylation in both conditions. In denervated muscles and starved C2C12 cells, Rp-8-Br-cAMPs or PKI, two PKA inhibitors, completely abolished the inhibitory effect of CGRP on Foxo1, 3 and 4 and LC3 lipidation. A single injection of CGRP (100 μg kg(-1)) in denervated rats increased the phosphorylation levels of CREB and Akt, inhibited Foxo transcriptional activity, the LC3 lipidation as well as the mRNA levels of LC3b and cathepsin L, two bona fide targets of Foxo. This study shows for the first time that CGRP exerts a direct inhibitory action on autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in control and denervated skeletal muscle by recruiting cAMP/PKA signaling, effects that are related to inhibition of Foxo activity and LC3 lipidation. PMID:26718975

  6. Inhibition of /sup 125/I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cells by the peptides related to bacterial cell wall mucopeptide precursors: quantitative structure-activity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.H.; Martin, Y.; Otis, E.; Mao, J.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of N-Ac amino acids, N-Ac dipeptides, and N-Ac tripeptides in inhibition of /sup 125/I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cell wall have been developed to probe the details of the binding between ristocetin and N-acetylated peptides. The correlation equations indicate that (1) the binding is stronger for peptides in which the side chain of the C-terminal amino acid has a large molar refractivity (MR) value, (2) the binding is weaker for peptides with polar than for those with nonpolar C-terminal side chains, (3) the N-terminal amino acid in N-Ac dipeptides contributes 12 times that of the C-terminal amino acid to binding affinity, and (4) the interactions between ristocetin and the N-terminal amino acid of N-acetyl tripeptides appear to be much weaker than those with the first two amino acids.

  7. Substance P antagonist also inhibits specific binding and mitogenic effects of vasopressin and bombesin-related peptides in Swiss 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary, I.; Rozengurt, E.

    1986-05-29

    While vasopressin and peptides of the bombesin family bind to different receptors in quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells, the antagonist (D-Arg/sup 1/,D-Pro/sup 2/,D-Trp/sup 7,9/,Leu/sup 11/) substance P blocks the specific binding of both (/sup 3/H) vasopressin and /sup 125/I-gastrin-releasing peptide to these cells. In addition, the antagonist inhibits the mobilization of Ca/sup 2 +/ and induction of DNA synthesis by vasopressin. These results indicate that (D-Arg/sup 1/,D-Pro,D-Trp/sup 7,9/,Leu/sup 11/) substance P has the ability to interact with the receptors for three structurally unrelated peptide hormones.

  8. A Shrimp C-type Lectin Inhibits Proliferation of the Hemolymph Microbiota by Maintaining the Expression of Antimicrobial Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Xu, Ji-Dong; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Vasta, Gerardo Raul; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Some aquatic invertebrates such as shrimp contain low albeit stable numbers of bacteria in the circulating hemolymph. The proliferation of this hemolymph microbiota in such a nutrient-rich environment is tightly controlled in healthy animals, but the mechanisms responsible had remained elusive. In the present study, we report a C-type lectin (MjHeCL) from the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) that participates in restraining the hemolymph microbiota. Although the expression of MjHeCL did not seem to be modulated by bacterial challenge, the down-regulation of its expression by RNA interference led to proliferation of the hemolymph microbiota, ultimately resulting in shrimp death. This phenotype was rescued by the injection of recombinant MjHeCL, which restored the healthy status of the knockdown shrimp. A mechanistic analysis revealed that MjHeCL inhibited bacterial proliferation by modulating the expression of antimicrobial peptides. The key function of MjHeCL in the shrimp immune homeostasis might be related to its broader recognition spectrum of the hemolymph microbiota components than other lectins. Our study demonstrates the role of MjHeCL in maintaining the healthy status of shrimp and provides new insight into the biological significance of C-type lectins, a diversified and abundant lectin family in invertebrate species. PMID:24619414

  9. A cyclized peptide derived from alpha fetoprotein inhibits the proliferation of ER-positive canine mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristian Gabriel; Pino, Ana María; Sierralta, Walter Daniel

    2009-06-01

    The effects of estradiol (E2) and of an AFP-derived cyclized peptide (cP) on the proliferation of primary cultures of cancer cells isolated from spontaneous canine mammary tumors were studied. The cellular response to E2 and cP was related to the expression of estradiol receptor (isoforms alpha and beta). In ER-positive cells, 2 nM estradiol increased cell proliferation and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2; 2 microg/ml cP inhibited all these effects. Estradiol also increased HER2 immunoreactivity in ER-positive cells, an effect that was reverted to its basal values by cP. Estradiol stimulated in these cells the release of MMP2 and MMP9 and the shedding of HB-EGF, effects that the cP did not affect. ER-negative cells were refractory to estradiol or cP. All canine mammary tumor cells in culture responded to treatments analogously to human mammary cancer cells. Our results support the proposal of cP as a new, potentially effective therapeutic agent for the management of mammary cancer. PMID:19424616

  10. Inhibition of Octreotide Acylation Inside PLGA Microspheres by Derivatization of the Amines of the Peptide with a Self-Immolative Protecting Group.

    PubMed

    Shirangi, Mehrnoosh; Najafi, Marzieh; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Kok, Robbert Jan; Hennink, Wim E; van Nostrum, Cornelus F

    2016-03-16

    Acylation of biopharmaceuticals such as peptides has been identified as a major obstacle for the successful development of PLGA controlled release formulations. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to inhibit peptide acylation in poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) formulations by reversibly and temporarily blocking the amine groups of a model peptide (octreotide) with a self-immolative protecting group (SIP), O-4-nitrophenyl-O'-4-acetoxybenzyl carbonate. The octreotide with two self-immolative protecting groups (OctdiSIP) on the N-terminus and lysine side chain was synthesized by reaction of the peptide with O-4-nitrophenyl-O'-4-acetoxybenzyl carbonate, purified by preparative RP-HPLC and characterized by mass spectrometry. Degradation studies of OctdiSIP in aqueous solutions of different pH values showed that protected octreotide was stable at low pH (pH 5) whereas the protecting group was eliminated at physiological pH, especially in the presence of an esterase, to generate native octreotide. OctdiSIP encapsulated in PLGA microspheres, prepared using a double emulsion solvent evaporation method, showed substantial inhibition of acylation as compared to the unprotected octreotide: 52.5% of unprotected octreotide was acylated after 50 days incubation of microspheres in PBS pH 7.4 at 37 °C, whereas OctdiSIP showed only 5.0% acylation in the same time frame. In conclusion, the incorporation of self-immolative protection groups provides a viable approach for inhibition of acylation of peptides in PLGA delivery systems. PMID:26726953

  11. Peripheral Administration of a Long-Acting Peptide Oxytocin Receptor Agonist Inhibits Fear-Induced Freezing.

    PubMed

    Modi, Meera E; Majchrzak, Mark J; Fonseca, Kari R; Doran, Angela; Osgood, Sarah; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle; Feyfant, Eric; McInnes, Heather; Darvari, Ramin; Buhl, Derek L; Kablaoui, Natasha M

    2016-08-01

    Oxytocin (OT) modulates the expression of social and emotional behaviors and consequently has been proposed as a pharmacologic treatment of psychiatric diseases, including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia; however, endogenous OT has a short half-life in plasma and poor permeability across the blood-brain barrier. Recent efforts have focused on the development of novel drug delivery methods to enhance brain penetration, but few efforts have aimed at improving its half-life. To explore the behavioral efficacy of an OT analog with enhanced plasma stability, we developed PF-06655075 (PF1), a novel non-brain-penetrant OT receptor agonist with increased selectivity for the OT receptor and significantly increased pharmacokinetic stability. PF-06478939 was generated with only increased stability to disambiguate changes to selectivity versus stability. The efficacy of these compounds in evoking behavioral effects was tested in a conditioned fear paradigm. Both central and peripheral administration of PF1 inhibited freezing in response to a conditioned fear stimulus. Peripheral administration of PF1 resulted in a sustained level of plasma concentrations for greater than 20 hours but no detectable accumulation in brain tissue, suggesting that plasma or cerebrospinal fluid exposure was sufficient to evoke behavioral effects. Behavioral efficacy of peripherally administered OT receptor agonists on conditioned fear response opens the door to potential peripheral mechanisms in other behavioral paradigms, whether they are mediated by direct peripheral activation or feed-forward responses. Compound PF1 is freely available as a tool compound to further explore the role of peripheral OT in behavioral response. PMID:27217590

  12. Peripheral Administration of a Long-Acting Peptide Oxytocin Receptor Agonist Inhibits Fear-Induced Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Meera E.; Majchrzak, Mark J.; Fonseca, Kari R.; Doran, Angela; Osgood, Sarah; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle; Feyfant, Eric; McInnes, Heather; Darvari, Ramin; Buhl, Derek L.

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) modulates the expression of social and emotional behaviors and consequently has been proposed as a pharmacologic treatment of psychiatric diseases, including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia; however, endogenous OT has a short half-life in plasma and poor permeability across the blood-brain barrier. Recent efforts have focused on the development of novel drug delivery methods to enhance brain penetration, but few efforts have aimed at improving its half-life. To explore the behavioral efficacy of an OT analog with enhanced plasma stability, we developed PF-06655075 (PF1), a novel non–brain-penetrant OT receptor agonist with increased selectivity for the OT receptor and significantly increased pharmacokinetic stability. PF-06478939 was generated with only increased stability to disambiguate changes to selectivity versus stability. The efficacy of these compounds in evoking behavioral effects was tested in a conditioned fear paradigm. Both central and peripheral administration of PF1 inhibited freezing in response to a conditioned fear stimulus. Peripheral administration of PF1 resulted in a sustained level of plasma concentrations for greater than 20 hours but no detectable accumulation in brain tissue, suggesting that plasma or cerebrospinal fluid exposure was sufficient to evoke behavioral effects. Behavioral efficacy of peripherally administered OT receptor agonists on conditioned fear response opens the door to potential peripheral mechanisms in other behavioral paradigms, whether they are mediated by direct peripheral activation or feed-forward responses. Compound PF1 is freely available as a tool compound to further explore the role of peripheral OT in behavioral response. PMID:27217590

  13. Synthesis, cellular uptake and HIV-1 Tat-dependent trans-activation inhibition activity of oligonucleotide analogues disulphide-conjugated to cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Turner, John J.; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Gait, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Oligonucleotides composed of 2′-O-methyl and locked nucleic acid residues complementary to HIV-1 trans-activation responsive element TAR block Tat-dependent trans-activation in a HeLa cell assay when delivered by cationic lipids. We describe an improved procedure for synthesis and purification under highly denaturing conditions of 5′-disulphide-linked conjugates of 3′-fluorescein labelled oligonucleotides with a range of cell-penetrating peptides and investigate their abilities to enter HeLa cells and block trans-activation. Free uptake of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide conjugates to Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9F2 was observed in cytosolic compartments of HeLa cells. Uptake of the Tat conjugate was enhanced by N-terminal addition of four Lys or Arg residues or a second Tat peptide. None of the conjugates entered the nucleus or inhibited trans-activation when freely delivered, but inhibition was obtained in the presence of cationic lipids. Nuclear exclusion was seen for free delivery of Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9 conjugates of 16mer phosphorothioate OMe oligonucleotide. Uptake into human fibroblast cytosolic compartments was seen for Tat, Penetratin, R9F2 and Transportan conjugates. Large enhancements of HeLa cell uptake into cytosolic compartments were seen when free Tat peptide was added to Tat conjugate of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide or Penetratin peptide to Penetratin conjugate of the same oligonucleotide. PMID:15640444

  14. Peptide-based inhibition of NF-κB rescues diaphragm muscle contractile dysfunction in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer M; Kline, William; Canan, Benjamin D; Ricca, Daniel J; Kaspar, Brian; Delfín, Dawn A; DiRienzo, Kelly; Clemens, Paula R; Robbins, Paul D; Baldwin, Albert S; Flood, Pat; Kaumaya, Pravin; Freitas, Michael; Kornegay, Joe N; Mendell, Jerry R; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A; Guttridge, Denis C; Janssen, Paul M L

    2011-01-01

    Deterioration of diaphragm function is one of the prominent factors that contributes to the susceptibility of serious respiratory infections and development of respiratory failure in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). The NF-κB signaling pathway has been implicated as a contributing factor of dystrophic pathology, making it a potential therapeutic target. Previously, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB via a small NEMO Binding Domain (NBD) peptide was beneficial for reducing pathological features of mdx mice. Now, we stringently test the effectiveness and clinical potential of NBD by treating mdx mice with various formulations of NBD and use diaphragm function as our primary outcome criteria. We found that administering DMSO-soluble NBD rescued 78% of the contractile deficit between mdx and wild-type (WT) diaphragm. Interestingly, synthesis of a GLP NBD peptide as an acetate salt permitted its solubility in water, but as a negative consequence, also greatly attenuated functional efficacy. However, replacing the acetic acid counterion of the NBD peptide with trifluoroacetic acid retained the peptide's water solubility and significantly restored mdx diaphragm contractile function and improved histopathological indices of disease in both diaphragm and limb muscle. Together, these results support the feasibility of using a mass-produced, water-soluble NBD peptide for clinical use. PMID:21267511

  15. A 24-Residue Peptide (p5), Derived from p35, the Cdk5 Neuronal Activator, Specifically Inhibits Cdk5-p25 Hyperactivity and Tau Hyperphosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ya-Li; Amin, Niranjana D.; Hu, Ya-Fang; Rudrabhatla, Parvathi; Shukla, Varsha; Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Kesavapany, Sashi; Grant, Philip; Albers, Wayne; Pant, Harish C.

    2010-01-01

    The activity of Cdk5-p35 is tightly regulated in the developing and mature nervous system. Stress-induced cleavage of the activator p35 to p25 and a p10 N-terminal domain induces deregulated Cdk5 hyperactivity and perikaryal aggregations of hyperphosphorylated Tau and neurofilaments, pathogenic hallmarks in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, respectively. Previously, we identified a 125-residue truncated fragment of p35 called CIP that effectively and specifically inhibited Cdk5-p25 activity and Tau hyperphosphorylation induced by Aβ peptides in vitro, in HEK293 cells, and in neuronal cells. Although these results offer a possible therapeutic approach to those neurodegenerative diseases assumed to derive from Cdk5-p25 hyperactivity and/or Aβ induced pathology, CIP is too large for successful therapeutic regimens. To identify a smaller, more effective peptide, in this study we prepared a 24-residue peptide, p5, spanning CIP residues Lys245–Ala277. p5 more effectively inhibited Cdk5-p25 activity than did CIP in vitro. In neuron cells, p5 inhibited deregulated Cdk5-p25 activity but had no effect on the activity of endogenous Cdk5-p35 or on any related endogenous cyclin-dependent kinases in HEK293 cells. Specificity of p5 inhibition in cortical neurons may depend on the p10 domain in p35, which is absent in p25. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that p5 reduced Aβ(1–42)-induced Tau hyperphosphorylation and apoptosis in cortical neurons. These results suggest that p5 peptide may be a unique and useful candidate for therapeutic studies of certain neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20720012

  16. Increased efflux of amyloid-β peptides through the blood-brain barrier by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor inhibition reduces pathological phenotypes in mouse models of brain amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Paganetti, Paolo; Antoniello, Katia; Devraj, Kavi; Toni, Nicolas; Kieran, Dairin; Madani, Rime; Pihlgren, Maria; Adolfsson, Oskar; Froestl, Wolfgang; Schrattenholz, André; Liebner, Stefan; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Cirrito, John R; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of toxic amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in the brain may drive the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders could result from treatments regulating Aβ homeostasis. Examples are the inhibition of production, misfolding, and accumulation of Aβ or the enhancement of its clearance. Here we show that oral treatment with ACI-91 (Pirenzepine) dose-dependently reduced brain Aβ burden in AβPPPS1, hAβPPSL, and AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. A possible mechanism of action of ACI-91 may occur through selective inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) on endothelial cells of brain microvessels and enhanced Aβ peptide clearance across the blood-brain barrier. One month treatment with ACI-91 increased the clearance of intrathecally-injected Aβ in plaque-bearing mice. ACI-91 also accelerated the clearance of brain-injected Aβ in blood and peripheral tissues by favoring its urinal excretion. A single oral dose of ACI-91 reduced the half-life of interstitial Aβ peptide in pre-plaque mhAβPP/PS1d mice. By extending our studies to an in vitro model, we showed that muscarinic AChR inhibition by ACI-91 and Darifenacin augmented the capacity of differentiated endothelial monolayers for active transport of Aβ peptide. Finally, ACI-91 was found to consistently affect, in vitro and in vivo, the expression of endothelial cell genes involved in Aβ transport across the Blood Brain Brain (BBB). Thus increased Aβ clearance through the BBB may contribute to reduced Aβ burden and associated phenotypes. Inhibition of muscarinic AChR restricted to the periphery may present a therapeutic advantage as it avoids adverse central cholinergic effects. PMID:24072071

  17. Identification of the peptide derived from S1 domain that inhibits type I and type II feline infectious peritonitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Doki, Tomoyoshi; Takano, Tomomi; Koyama, Yusuke; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2015-06-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) can cause a lethal disease in cats, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). A therapeutic drug that is effective against FIP has not yet been developed. Peptides based on viral protein amino acid sequences have recently been attracting attention as new antiviral drugs. In the present study, we synthesized 30 overlapping peptides based on the amino acid sequence of the S1 domain of the type I FIPV strain KU-2 S protein, and investigated their inhibitory effects on FIPV infection. To evaluate the inhibitory effects on type I FIPV infection of these peptides, we investigated a method to increase the infection efficiency of poorly replicative type I FIPV. The efficiency of type I FIPV infection was increased by diluting the virus with medium containing a polycation. Of the 30 peptides, I-S1-8 (S461-S480), I-S1-9 (S471-S490), I-S1-10 (S481-S500), I-S1-16 (S541-S560), and I-S1-22 (S601-S620) significantly decreased the infectivity of FIPV strain KU-2 while I-S1-9 and I-S1-16 exhibited marked inhibitory effects on FIPV infection. The inhibitory effects on FIPV infection of these 2 peptides on other type I and type II FIPV strains, feline herpesvirus (FHV), and feline calicivirus (FCV) were also examined. These 2 peptides specifically inhibited type I and type II FIPV, but did FHV or FCV infection. In conclusion, the possibility of peptides derived from the S protein of type I FIPV strain KU-2 as anti-FIPV agents effective not only for type I, but also type II FIPV was demonstrated in vitro. PMID:25896976

  18. [STUDIES IN VITRO INHIBITION OF THE ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME-I, HYPOTENSIVE AND ANTIHYPERTENSIVE EFFECTS OF PEPTIDE FRACTIONS OF V. UNGUICULATA].

    PubMed

    Cú-Cañetas, Trinidad; Betancur Ancona, David; Gallegos Tintoré, Santiago; Sandoval Peraza, Mukthar; Chel Guerrero, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme I (ACE-I) in vitro and in vivo from peptide fractions by enzymatic hydrolysis of the Vigna unguiculata protein concentrate was evaluated. Hydrolysis was done with Pepsin-Pancreatin and Flavourzima in two separate systems. The resulting hidrolysates were ultrafiltrated to obtain fractions with different molecular weight. The fractions with better inhibition Flavourzima were size > 1 kDa (> 1 kDa-F) and < 1 kDa (< 1 kDa-F), with an IC50 of 1222.84 and 1098.6 μg/ml respectively. Pepsin-Pancreatin fraction. PMID:26545668

  19. Synergistic inhibition of the lethal fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis: the combined effect of symbiotic bacterial metabolites and antimicrobial peptides of the frog Rana muscosa.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jillian M; Ramsey, Jeremy P; Blackman, Alison L; Nichols, A Elizabeth; Minbiole, Kevin P C; Harris, Reid N

    2012-08-01

    A powerful mechanism for protection against disease in animals is synergy between metabolites present in the natural microbiota of the host and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the host. We studied this method of protection in amphibians in regard to the lethal disease chytridiomycosis, which is caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). In this study, we show that the AMPs of Rana muscosa, as well as the metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) from Pseudomonas fluorescens, a bacterial species normally found on the skin of R. muscosa, were inhibitory to the growth of Bd in vitro. When both AMPs and 2,4-DAPG were used in growth inhibition assays, they worked synergistically to inhibit the growth of Bd. This synergy resulted in reduced minimum concentrations necessary for inhibition by either 2,4-DAPG or AMPs. This inhibitory concentration of AMPs did not inhibit the growth of a P. fluorescens strain that produced 2,4-DAPG in vitro, although its growth was inhibited at higher peptide concentrations. These data suggest that the AMPs secreted onto frog skin and the metabolites secreted by the resident beneficial bacteria may work synergistically to enhance protection against Bd infection on amphibian skin. These results may aid conservation efforts to augment amphibian skins' resistance to chytridiomycosis by introducing anti-Bd bacterial species that work synergistically with amphibian AMPs. PMID:22914957

  20. Calcineurin Regulates Homologous Desensitization of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A and Inhibits ANP-Induced Testosterone Production in MA-10 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Henesy, Michelle B.; Britain, Andrea L.; Zhu, Bing; Amable, Lauren; Honkanen, Richard E.; Corbin, Jackie D.; Francis, Sharron H.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    Receptor desensitization is a ubiquitous regulatory mechanism that defines the activatable pool of receptors, and thus, the ability of cells to respond to environmental stimuli. In recent years, the molecular mechanisms controlling the desensitization of a variety of receptors have been established. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that underlie desensitization of natriuretic peptide receptors, including natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A). Here we report that calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B, PP2B, PPP3C) regulates homologous desensitization of NPR-A in murine Leydig tumor (MA-10) cells. We demonstrate that both pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin activity and siRNA-mediated suppression of calcineurin expression potentiate atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-induced cGMP synthesis. Treatment of MA-10 cells with inhibitors of other phosphoprotein phosphatases had little or no effect on ANP-induced cGMP accumulation. In addition, overexpression of calcineurin blunts ANP-induced cGMP synthesis. We also present data indicating that the inhibition of calcineurin potentiates ANP-induced testosterone production. To better understand the contribution of calcineurin in the regulation of NPR-A activity, we examined the kinetics of ANP-induced cGMP signals. We observed transient ANP-induced cGMP signals, even in the presence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Inhibition of both calcineurin and phosphodiesterase dramatically slowed the decay in the response. These observations are consistent with a model in which calcineurin mediated dephosphorylation and desensitization of NPR-A is associated with significant inhibition of cGMP synthesis. PDE activity hydrolyzes cGMP, thus lowering intracellular cGMP toward the basal level. Taken together, these data suggest that calcineurin plays a previously unrecognized role in the desensitization of NPR-A and, thereby, inhibits ANP-mediated increases in testosterone production. PMID:22876290

  1. Inhibition of CD4+ T lymphocyte binding to fibronectin and immune-cell accumulation in inflammatory sites by non-peptidic mimetics of Arg-Gly-Asp.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Greenspoon, N; Mekori, Y A; Hadari, R; Alon, R; Kapustina, G; Lider, O

    1994-02-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion motif has been demonstrated in various studies to play a pivotal role in leucocyte and platelet interactions with plasma and extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. The recognition of the RGD sequence is mediated by heterodimeric receptors designated integrins of the beta 1 subfamily, expressed on distinct cell types, including T lymphocytes. We have recently shown that flexible non-peptidic mimetics of RGD, in which the two ionic side groups were separated by a linear spacer of 11 atoms, bound specifically to the platelet integrin alpha 11b beta 3, and inhibited T cell-mediated immune responses. The present study was designed to (i) further characterize the structural requirements for RGD interactions with CD4+ T cells, and (ii) examine the mechanisms by which the RGD mimetics interfere with immune cell reactivity in vivo. We now report that freezing the conformational degrees of freedom in the spacer chain, which fixes the relative orientation of the guanidinium and carboxylate side groups in a favourable manner, results in a higher level of inhibition of T cell binding to immobilized fibronectin, an RGD-containing ECM glycoprotein. In vivo, treatment of mice with relatively low doses of the RGD mimetics, but not the RGD peptide, inhibited the elicitation of an adoptively transferred DTH reaction. This inhibition was achieved by direct impairment of the ability of antigen-primed lymph node cells to migrate and accumulate in inflammatory sites. Hence, we suggest that the design and production of non-peptidic mimetics of RGD offers a novel approach to study defined parameters related to the structure-function requirements of small adhesion epitopes. Furthermore, this approach could be used therapeutically to inhibit pathological processes which depend on RGD recognition. PMID:7905794

  2. Velvet antler peptide prevents pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis via transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihong; Mi, Yang; Guan, Hongya; Xu, Yan; Mei, Yingwu

    2016-07-15

    Velvet antlers (VAs) are commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine and invigorant and contain many functional components for health promotion. The velvet antler peptide sVAP32 is one of active components in VAs; based on structural study, the sVAP32 interacts with TGF-β1 receptors and disrupts the TGF-β1 pathway. We hypothesized that sVAP32 prevents cardiac fibrosis from pressure overload by blocking TGF-β1 signaling. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or a sham operation. After one month, rats received either sVAP32 (15mg/kg/day) or vehicle for an additional one month. TAC surgery induced significant cardiac dysfunction, fibroblast activation and fibrosis; these effects were improved by treatment with sVAP32. In the heart tissue, TAC remarkably increased the expression of TGF-β1 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), reactive oxygen species levels, and the phosphorylation levels of Smad2/3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). SVAP32 inhibited the increases in reactive oxygen species levels, CTGF expression and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and ERK1/2, but not TGF-β1 expression. In cultured cardiac fibroblasts, angiotensin II (Ang II) had similar effects compared to TAC surgery, such as increases in α-SMA-positive cardiac fibroblasts and collagen synthesis. SVAP32 eliminated these effects by disrupting TGF-β1 binding to its receptors and blocking Ang II/TGF-β1 downstream signaling. These results demonstrated that sVAP32 has anti-fibrotic effects by blocking the TGF-β1 pathway in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:27108788

  3. Annexin A1 mimetic peptide controls the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of silica particles in mice

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, P G; Ferreira, T P T; Arantes, A C S; Ciambarella, B T; Cordeiro, R S B; Flower, R J; Perretti, M; Martins, M A; Silva, P M R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endogenous glucocorticoids are pro-resolving mediators, an example of which is the endogenous glucocorticoid-regulated protein annexin A1 (ANXA1). Because silicosis is an occupational lung disease characterized by unabated inflammation and fibrosis, in this study we tested the therapeutic properties of the N-terminal ANXA1-derived peptide annexin 1-(2-26) (Ac2-26) on experimental silicosis. Experimental Approach Swiss-Webster mice were administered silica particles intranasally and were subsequently treated with intranasal peptide Ac2-26 (200 μg per mouse) or dexamethasone (25 μg per mouse) for 7 days, starting 6 h post-challenge. Ac2-26 abolished the leukocyte infiltration, collagen deposition, granuloma formation and generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines evoked by silica; these variables were only partially inhibited by dexamethasone. Key Results A clear exacerbation of the silica-induced pathological changes was observed in ANXA1 knockout mice as compared with their wild-type (WT) littermate controls. Incubation of lung fibroblasts from WT mice with Ac2-26 in vitro reduced IL-13 or TGF-β-induced production of CCL2 (MCP-1) and collagen, but this peptide did not affect the production of CCL2 (MCP-1) by stimulated fibroblasts from formyl peptide receptor type 1 (FPR1) knockout mice. Ac2-26 also inhibited the production of CCL2 (MCP-1) from fibroblasts of FPR2 knockout mice. Conclusions and Implications Collectively, our findings reveal novel protective properties of the ANXA1 derived peptide Ac2-26 on the inflammatory and fibrotic responses induced by silica, and suggest that ANXA1 mimetic agents might be a promising strategy as innovative anti-fibrotic approaches for the treatment of silicosis. PMID:25659822

  4. Brain RVD-haemopressin, a haemoglobin-derived peptide, inhibits bombesin-induced central activation of adrenomedullary outflow in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Takahiro; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Nakamura, Kumiko; Taniuchi, Keisuke; Dimitriadis, Fotios; Yokotani, Kunihiko; Saito, Motoaki

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Haemopressin and RVD-haemopressin, derived from the haemoglobin α-chain, are bioactive peptides found in brain and are ligands for cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Activation of brain CB1 receptors inhibited the secretion of adrenal catecholamines (noradrenaline and adrenaline) induced by i.c.v. bombesin in the rat. Here, we investigated the effects of two haemoglobin-derived peptides on this bombesin-induced response EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Anaesthetised male Wistar rats were pretreated with either haemoglobin-derived peptide, given i.c.v., 30 min before i.c.v. bombesin and plasma catecholamines were subsequently measured electrochemically after HPLC. Direct effects of bombesin on secretion of adrenal catecholamines were examined using bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Furthermore, activation of haemoglobin α-positive spinally projecting neurons in the rat hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, a regulatory centre of central adrenomedullary outflow) after i.c.v. bombesin was assessed by immunohistochemical techniques. KEY RESULTS Bombesin given i.c.v. dose-dependently elevated plasma catecholamines whereas incubation with bombesin had no effect on spontaneous and nicotine-induced secretion of catecholamines from chromaffin cells. The bombesin-induced increase in catecholamines was inhibited by pretreatment with i.c.v. RVD-haemopressin (CB1 receptor agonist) but not after pretreatment with haemopressin (CB1 receptor inverse agonist). Bombesin activated haemoglobin α-positive spinally projecting neurons in the PVN. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The haemoglobin-derived peptide RVD-haemopressin in the brain plays an inhibitory role in bombesin-induced activation of central adrenomedullary outflow via brain CB1 receptors in the rat. These findings provide basic information for the therapeutic use of haemoglobin-derived peptides in the modulation of central adrenomedullary outflow. PMID:24138638

  5. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Tahir; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Kumar C, Selvaa; Pasi, Achhelal; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb)-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL) and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV). Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25915507

  6. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Tahir; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Kumar, Selvaa C; Pasi, Achhelal; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb)-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL) and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV). Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25915507

  7. T-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Derived V3 Loop Peptides Directly Bind to CXCR-4 and Inhibit T-Tropic HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakaida, Hitoshi; Hori, Toshiyuki; Yonezawa, Akihito; Sato, Akihiko; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Yoshie, Osamu; Hattori, Toshio; Uchiyama, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    Certain types of chemokine receptors have been identified as coreceptors for HIV-1 infection. The process of viral entry is initiated by the interaction between an envelope protein gp120 of HIV-1, CD4, and one of the relevant coreceptors. To understand the precise mechanism of the Env-mediated fusion and entry of HIV-1, we examined whether the V3 region of gp120 of T-cell line tropic (T-tropic) virus directly interacts with the coreceptor, CXCR-4, by using five synthetic V3 peptides: two cyclized V3 peptides (V3-BH10 and V3-ELI) which correspond to the V3 regions of the T-tropic HIV-1 IIIB and HIV-1 ELI strains, respectively, a linear V3 peptide (CTR36) corresponding to that of HIV-1 IIIB strain; and cyclized V3 peptides corresponding to that of the macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) HIV-1 ADA strain (V3-ADA) or the dualtropic HIV-1 89.6 strain (V3-89.6). FACScan analysis with a CXCR-4+ human B-cell line, JY, showed that V3-BH10, V3-ELI, and V3-89.6 but not CTR36 or V3-ADA blocked the binding of IVR7, an anti-CXCR-4 monoclonal antibody (MAb), to CXCR-4 with different magnitudes in a dose-dependent manner, while none of the V3 peptides influenced binding of an anti-CD19 MAb at all. Next, the effects of the V3 peptides on SDF-1β-induced transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ were investigated. Three V3 peptides (V3-BH10, V3-ELI, and V3-89.6) prevented Ca2+ mobilization. Furthermore, the three peptides inhibited infection by T-tropic HIV-1 in a dose-dependent manner as revealed by an MTT assay and a reverse transcriptase assay, while the other peptides had no effects. These results present direct evidence that the V3 loop of gp120 of T-tropic HIV-1 can interact with its coreceptor CXCR-4 independently of the V1/V2 regions of gp120 or cellular CD4. PMID:9811711

  8. Development of a high-affinity peptide that prevents phospholemman (PLM) inhibition of the sodium/calcium exchanger 1 (NCX1).

    PubMed

    Wanichawan, Pimthanya; Hodne, Kjetil; Hafver, Tandekile Lubelwana; Lunde, Marianne; Martinsen, Marita; Louch, William Edward; Sejersted, Ole Mathias; Carlson, Cathrine Rein

    2016-08-01

    NCX1 (Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger 1) is an important regulator of intracellular Ca(2+) and a potential therapeutic target for brain ischaemia and for diastolic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. PLM (phospholemman), a substrate for protein kinases A and C, has been suggested to regulate NCX1 activity. However, although several studies have demonstrated that binding of phosphorylated PLM (pSer(68)-PLM) leads to NCX1 inhibition, other studies have failed to demonstrate a functional interaction of these proteins. In the present study, we aimed to analyse the biological function of the pSer(68)-PLM-NCX1 interaction by developing high-affinity blocking peptides. PLM was observed to co-fractionate and co-immunoprecipitate with NCX1 in rat left ventricle, and in co-transfected HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. For the first time, the NCX1-PLM interaction was also demonstrated in the brain. PLM binding sites on NCX1 were mapped to two regions by peptide array assays, containing the previously reported PASKT and QKHPD motifs. Conversely, the two NCX1 regions bound identical sequences in the cytoplasmic domain of PLM, suggesting that NCX1-PASKT and NCX1-QKHPD might bind to each PLM monomer. Using two-dimensional peptide arrays of the native NCX1 sequence KHPDKEIEQLIELANYQVLS revealed that double substitution of tyrosine for positions 1 and 4 (K1Y and D4Y) enhanced pSer(68)-PLM binding 8-fold. The optimized peptide blocked binding of NCX1-PASKT and NCX1-QKHPD to PLM and reversed PLM(S68D) inhibition of NCX1 activity (both forward and reverse mode) in HEK-293 cells. Altogether our data indicate that PLM interacts directly with NCX1 and inhibits NCX1 activity when phosphorylated at Ser(68). PMID:27247424

  9. Development of a high-affinity peptide that prevents phospholemman (PLM) inhibition of the sodium/calcium exchanger 1 (NCX1)

    PubMed Central

    Wanichawan, Pimthanya; Hodne, Kjetil; Hafver, Tandekile Lubelwana; Lunde, Marianne; Martinsen, Marita; Louch, William Edward; Sejersted, Ole Mathias; Carlson, Cathrine Rein

    2016-01-01

    NCX1 (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger 1) is an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ and a potential therapeutic target for brain ischaemia and for diastolic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. PLM (phospholemman), a substrate for protein kinases A and C, has been suggested to regulate NCX1 activity. However, although several studies have demonstrated that binding of phosphorylated PLM (pSer68-PLM) leads to NCX1 inhibition, other studies have failed to demonstrate a functional interaction of these proteins. In the present study, we aimed to analyse the biological function of the pSer68-PLM–NCX1 interaction by developing high-affinity blocking peptides. PLM was observed to co-fractionate and co-immunoprecipitate with NCX1 in rat left ventricle, and in co-transfected HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. For the first time, the NCX1–PLM interaction was also demonstrated in the brain. PLM binding sites on NCX1 were mapped to two regions by peptide array assays, containing the previously reported PASKT and QKHPD motifs. Conversely, the two NCX1 regions bound identical sequences in the cytoplasmic domain of PLM, suggesting that NCX1-PASKT and NCX1-QKHPD might bind to each PLM monomer. Using two-dimensional peptide arrays of the native NCX1 sequence KHPDKEIEQLIELANYQVLS revealed that double substitution of tyrosine for positions 1 and 4 (K1Y and D4Y) enhanced pSer68-PLM binding 8-fold. The optimized peptide blocked binding of NCX1-PASKT and NCX1-QKHPD to PLM and reversed PLM(S68D) inhibition of NCX1 activity (both forward and reverse mode) in HEK-293 cells. Altogether our data indicate that PLM interacts directly with NCX1 and inhibits NCX1 activity when phosphorylated at Ser68. PMID:27247424

  10. Arabidopsis 10-Formyl Tetrahydrofolate Deformylases Are Essential for Photorespiration[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Collakova, Eva; Goyer, Aymeric; Naponelli, Valeria; Krassovskaya, Inga; Gregory, Jesse F.; Hanson, Andrew D.; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2008-01-01

    In prokaryotes, PurU (10-formyl tetrahydrofolate [THF] deformylase) metabolizes 10-formyl THF to formate and THF for purine and Gly biosyntheses. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains two putative purU genes, At4g17360 and At5g47435. Knocking out these genes simultaneously results in plants that are smaller and paler than the wild type. These double knockout (dKO) mutant plants show a 70-fold increase in Gly levels and accumulate elevated levels of 5- and 10-formyl THF. Embryo development in dKO mutants arrests between heart and early bent cotyledon stages. Mature seeds are shriveled, accumulate low amounts of lipids, and fail to germinate. However, the dKO mutant is only conditionally lethal and is rescued by growth under nonphotorespiratory conditions. In addition, culturing dKO siliques in the presence of sucrose restores normal embryo development and seed viability, suggesting that the seed and embryo development phenotypes are a result of a maternal effect. Our findings are consistent with the involvement of At4g17360 and At5g47435 proteins in photorespiration, which is to prevent excessive accumulation of 5-formyl THF, a potent inhibitor of the Gly decarboxylase/Ser hydroxymethyltransferase complex. Supporting this role, deletion of the At2g38660 gene that encodes the bifunctional 5,10-methylene THF dehydrogenase/5,10-methenyl THF cyclohydrolase that acts upstream of 5-formyl THF formation restored the wild-type phenotype in dKO plants. PMID:18628352

  11. A novel FGFR3-binding peptide inhibits FGFR3 signaling and reverses the lethal phenotype of mice mimicking human thanatophoric dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Min; Yu, Ying; Qi, Huabing; Xie, Yangli; Su, Nan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Tan, Qiaoyan; Luo, Fengtao; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Quan; Du, Xiaolan; Xian, Cory J.; Liu, Peng; Huang, Haiyang; Shen, Yue; Deng, Chu-Xia; Chen, Di; Chen, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR3) lead to several types of human skeletal dysplasia syndromes including achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia and thanatophoric dysplasia (TD). Currently, there are no effective treatments for these skeletal dysplasia diseases. In this study, we screened, using FGFR3 as a bait, a random 12-peptide phage library and obtained 23 positive clones that share identical amino acid sequences (VSPPLTLGQLLS), named as peptide P3. This peptide had high binding specificity to the extracellular domain of FGFR3. P3 inhibited tyrosine kinase activity of FGFR3 and its typical downstream molecules, extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase. P3 also promoted proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of cultured ATDC5 chondrogenic cells. In addition, P3 alleviated the bone growth retardation in bone rudiments from mice mimicking human thanatophoric dysplasia type II (TDII). Finally, P3 reversed the neonatal lethality of TDII mice. Thus, this study identifies a novel inhibitory peptide for FGFR3 signaling, which may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of FGFR3-related skeletal dysplasia. PMID:23014564

  12. Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation of human amylin by N-alkylated amino acid and alpha-hydroxy acid residue containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Rijkers, Dirk T S; Höppener, Jo W M; Posthuma, George; Lips, Cornelis J M; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2002-09-16

    Amyloid deposits are formed as a result of uncontrolled aggregation of (poly)peptides or proteins. Today several diseases are known, for example Alzheimer's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mad cow disease, in which amyloid formation is involved. Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of beta-pleated sheets and here a general method is described to introduce molecular mutations in order to achieve disruption of beta-sheet formation. Eight backbone-modified amylin derivatives, an amyloidogenic peptide involved in maturity onset diabetes, were synthesized. Their beta-sheet forming properties were studied by IR spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Modification of a crucial amide NH by an alkyl chain led to a complete loss of the beta-sheet forming capacity of amylin. The resulting molecular mutated amylin derivative could be used to break the beta-sheet thus retarding beta-sheet formation of unmodified amylin. Moreover, it was found that the replacement of this amide bond by an ester moiety suppressed fibrillogenesis significantly. Introduction of N-alkylated amino acids and/or ester functionalities-leading to depsipeptides-into amyloidogenic peptides opens new avenues towards novel peptidic beta-sheet breakers for inhibition of beta-amyloid aggregation. PMID:12298020

  13. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Responses by Essential Oil of Artemisia kotuchovii and Its Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V.; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A.; Kotukhov, Yuriy A.; Danilova, Alevtina N.; Özek, Temel; Başer, K. Hüsnü Can; Quinn, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers+leaves and stems of Artemisia kotuchovii Kupr. (AKEOf+l and AKEOstm, respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The primary components of the oils were estragole, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimenes, methyl eugenol, limonene, spathulenol, β-pinene, myrcene, and (E)-methyl cinnamate. Seventy four constituents were present at concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0%, and 34 compounds were identified in trace (<0.1%) amounts in one or both plant components. Screening of the essential oils for biological activity showed that AKEOstm, but not AKEOf+l, inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils. Selected pure constituents, representing >96% of the AKEOstm composition, were also tested in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with N-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). We found that one component, 6-methyl-3,5-heptadien-2-one (MHDO), inhibited fMLF- and interleukin 8 (IL-8)-stimulated Ca2+ flux, fMLF-induced chemotaxis, and PMA-induced ROS production in human neutrophils. MHDO also inhibited fMLF-induced Ca2+ flux in FPR1-HL60 cells. These results suggest that MHDO may be effective in modulating some innate immune responses, possibly by an inhibition of neutrophil migration and ROS production. PMID:25959257

  14. 5-Formyl-2-furylboronic acid as a versatile bifunctional reagent for the synthesis of pi-extended heteroarylfuran systems.

    PubMed

    Parry, Paul R; Bryce, Martin R; Tarbit, Brian

    2003-05-01

    5-Formyl-2-furylboronic acid reacts cleanly with a range of heteroaryl bromides under Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling conditions to produce 2-formyl-5-heteroarylfuran derivatives. Subsequent Wittig olefination reactions afford pi-conjugated alkene-pyridyl-furan derivatives. PMID:12926269

  15. Investigation the Possibility of Using Peptides with a Helical Repeating Pattern of Hydro-Phobic and Hydrophilic Residues to Inhibit IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Guoying; Chen, Shu; Yang, Yuedong; Cummins, Scott F.; Zhan, Jian; Li, Zhixiu; Zhu, Bin; Mounsey, Kate; Walton, Shelley; Wei, Ming Q.; Wang, Yuejian; Zhou, Yaoqi; Wang, Tianfang; Liu, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of IL-10 signalling clears chronic viral and bacterial infections. Immunization together with blockade of IL-10 signalling or relatively low level of IL-10 further enhances viral and bacterial clearance. IL-10 functions through binding to interleukin 10 receptor (IL-10R). Here we showed that peptides P1 and P2 with the hydrophobic and hydrophilic pattern of the IL10R-binding helix in IL-10 could bind with either IL-10R1 or IL-10, and inhibit inflammatory signals with long duration and negligible cytotoxicity in vitro. Furthermore, P2 can enhance antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice induced by the vaccine based on a long peptide of protein E7 in a human papillomavirus type 16. PMID:27100390

  16. Novel Compstatin Family Peptides Inhibit Complement Activation by Drusen-Like Deposits in Human Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gorham, Ronald D.; Forest, David L.; Tamamis, Phanourios; de Victoria, Aliana López; Kraszni, Márta; Kieslich, Chris A.; Banna, Christopher D.; Bellows-Peterson, Meghan L.; Larive, Cynthia K.; Floudas, Christodoulos A.; Archontis, Georgios; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    We have used a novel human retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cell-based model that mimics drusen biogenesis and the pathobiology of age-related macular degeneration to evaluate the efficacy of newly designed peptide inhibitors of the complement system. The peptides belong to the compstatin family and, compared to existing compstatin analogs, have been optimized to promote binding to their target, complement protein C3, and to enhance solubility by improving their polarity/hydrophobicity ratios. Based on analysis of molecular dynamics simulation data of peptide-C3 complexes, novel binding features were designed by introducing intermolecular salt bridge-forming arginines at the N-terminus and at position -1 of N-terminal dipeptide extensions. Our study demonstrates that the RPE cell assay has discriminatory capability for measuring the efficacy and potency of inhibitory peptides in a macular disease environment. PMID:23954241

  17. Microinjection of CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide into the nucleus accumbens inhibits the cocaine-induced upregulation of dopamine receptors and locomotor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qinghua; Sun, Xi; Liu, Ziyong; Yang, Jianghua; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hu, Zhenzhen

    2014-09-01

    Repeated exposure to addictive drugs enhances dopamine receptor (DR) signaling and the ultimate phosphorylation of the cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). These effects are known to contribute to the expression of behavioral sensitization. CART peptides are neuropeptides that modulate drug reward and reinforcement. The present experiments investigated the effects of CART 55-102 microinjection into the NAcc on (1) the phosphorylation of CREB, (2) cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling and (3) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylated kinase signaling. Here, we show that repeated microinjections into the NAcc of CART 55-102 peptides (1.0 or 2.5μg, 0.5μl/side) attenuates cocaine-induced enhancements of D1R, D2R and D3R phosphorylation in this sites. Furthermore, the microinjection of CART 55-102 followed by repeated injections of cocaine (15mg/kg) dose-dependently blocked the enhancement of cAMP levels, PKA activity and pERK and pCREB levels on the fifth day of cocaine administration. The cocaine-induced locomotor activity and behavioral sensitization in rats were also inhibited by the 5-day-microinjection of CART peptides. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of CREB by cocaine in the NAcc was blocked by the CART 55-102 peptide via the inhibition of D1R and D2R stimulation, D3R phosphorylation, cAMP/PKA signaling and ERK phosphorylated kinase signaling. These effects may have played a compensatory inhibitory role in the behavioral sensitization of rats that received microinjections of CART 55-102. PMID:24953280

  18. OMP Peptides Activate the DegS Stress-Sensor Protease by a Relief of Inhibition Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; MIT

    2010-03-19

    In the E. coli periplasm, C-terminal peptides of misfolded outer-membrane porins (OMPs) bind to the PDZ domains of the trimeric DegS protease, triggering cleavage of a transmembrane regulator and transcriptional activation of stress genes. We show that an active-site DegS mutation partially bypasses the requirement for peptide activation and acts synergistically with mutations that disrupt contacts between the protease and PDZ domains. Biochemical results support an allosteric model, in which these mutations, active-site modification, and peptide/substrate binding act in concert to stabilize proteolytically active DegS. Cocrystal structures of DegS in complex with different OMP peptides reveal activation of the protease domain with varied conformations of the PDZ domain and without specific contacts from the bound OMP peptide. Taken together, these results indicate that the binding of OMP peptides activates proteolysis principally by relieving inhibitory contacts between the PDZ domain and the protease domain of DegS.

  19. Synthesis, conformational and theoretical studies of 1,n-di(2-formyl-4-phenylazophenoxy)alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachander, R.; Manimekalai, A.

    2016-01-01

    1,n-di(2-Formyl-4-phenylazophenoxy)alkanes 1 and 2 and 1,3-di(2-formyl-4-phenylazophenoxymethyl)benzene 3 were synthesis and characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectral studies. The stable conformations of 1-3 were predicted theoretically and selected geometrical parameters were derived from optimized structures. The molecular parameters of HOMO-LUMO energies, polarizability, hyperpolarizability, natural bond orbital (NBO), atom in molecule (AIM) analysis and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces were determined by the density functional theory (DFT) method and analysed.

  20. Topical administration of a suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) mimetic peptide inhibits ocular inflammation and mitigates ocular pathology during mouse uveitis.

    PubMed

    He, Chang; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Sun, Lin; Mahdi, Rashid M; Larkin, Joseph; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2015-08-01

    Uveitis is a diverse group of potentially sight-threatening intraocular inflammatory diseases and pathology derives from sustained production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the optical axis. Although topical or systemic steroids are effective therapies, their adverse effects preclude prolonged usage and are impetus for seeking alternative immunosuppressive agents, particularly for patients with refractory uveitis. In this study, we synthesized a 16 amino acid membrane-penetrating lipophilic suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 peptide (SOCS1-KIR) that inhibits JAK/STAT signaling pathways and show that it suppresses and ameliorates experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), the mouse model of human uveitis. Fundus images, histological and optical coherence tomography analysis of eyes showed significant suppression of clinical disease, with average clinical score of 0.5 compared to 2.0 observed in control mice treated with scrambled peptide. We further show that SOCS1-KIR conferred protection from ocular pathology by inhibiting the expansion of pathogenic Th17 cells and inhibiting trafficking of inflammatory cells into the neuroretina during EAU. Dark-adapted scotopic and photopic electroretinograms further reveal that SOCS1-KIR prevented decrement of retinal function, underscoring potential neuroprotective effects of SOCS1-KIR in uveitis. Importantly, SOCS1-KIR is non-toxic, suggesting that topical administration of SOCS1-Mimetics can be exploited as a non-invasive treatment for uveitis and for limiting cytokine-mediated pathology in other ocular inflammatory diseases including scleritis. PMID:26094775

  1. Pyrrhocoricin, a proline-rich antimicrobial peptide derived from insect, inhibits the translation process in the cell-free Escherichia coli protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Akihito; Kondo, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Shun; Ishiyama, Yohei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that pyrrhocoricin, a proline-rich antimicrobial peptide (PrAMP), killed sensitive species in a dose-dependent manner by specifically binding to DnaK. Here, on the basis of the finding that DnaK-deficient Escherichia coli strains are susceptible to PrAMPs, we used pyrrhocoricin to investigate internal targets other than DnaK. Using conventional antibiotics (bleomycin, streptomycin, and fosfomycin) that have known modes of action, first, we validated the availability of an assay using a cell-free rapid translation system (RTS), which is an in vitro protein synthesis system based on E. coli lysate, for evaluating inhibition of protein synthesis. We found that, similarly to bleomycin and streptomycin, pyrrhocoricin inhibited GFP synthesis in RTS in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, blockage of transcription and translation steps in RTS was individually estimated using RT-PCR after gene expression to determine mRNA products and using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the amounts of GFP expressed from purified mRNA, respectively. The results demonstrated that this inhibition of GFP synthesis by pyrrhocoricin did not occur at the transcription step but rather at the translation step, in a manner similar to that of GFP synthesis by streptomycin, an inhibitor of the translation step by causing misreading of tRNA. These results suggest that RTS is a powerful assay system for determining if antimicrobial peptides inhibit protein synthesis and its transcription and/or translation steps. This is the first study to have shown that pyrrhocoricin inhibited protein synthesis by specifically repressing the translation step. PMID:26472128

  2. Immunosuppression by Co-stimulatory Molecules: Inhibition of CD2-CD48/CD58 Interaction by Peptides from CD2 to Suppress Progression of Collagen-induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya; Kanthala, Shanthi; Latendresse, John; Taneja, Veena; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2013-01-01

    Targeting co-stimulatory molecules to modulate the immune response has been shown to have useful therapeutic effects for autoimmune diseases. Among the co-stimulatory molecules, CD2 and CD58 are very important in the early stages of generation of an immune response. Our goal was to utilize CD2-derived peptides to modulate protein-protein interactions between CD2 and CD58, thereby modulating the immune response. Several peptides were designed based on the structure of the CD58 binding domain of CD2 protein. Among the CD2-derived peptides, peptide 6 from the F and C β-strand region of CD2 protein exhibited inhibition of cell-cell adhesion in the nanomolar concentration range. Peptide 6 was evaluated for its ability to bind to CD58 in Caco-2 cells and to CD48 in T cells from rodents. A molecular model was proposed for binding a peptide to CD58 and CD48 using docking studies. Furthermore, in vivo studies were carried out to evaluate the therapeutic ability of the peptide to modulate the immune response in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. In vivo studies indicated that peptide 6 was able to suppress the progression of CIA. Evaluation of the antigenicity of peptides in CIA and transgenic animal models indicated that this peptide is not immunogenic. PMID:23530775

  3. Genetic Selection of Peptide Aptamers That Interact and Inhibit Both Small Protein B and Alternative Ribosome-Rescue Factor A of Aeromonas veronii C4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Yong; Wang, Dan; Tang, Yanqiong; Tang, Hongqian; Song, Haichao; Sun, Qun; Zhang, Yueling; Liu, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas veronii is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, which infects a variety of animals and results in mass mortality. The stalled-ribosome rescues are reported to ensure viability and virulence under stress conditions, of which primarily include trans-translation and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA) in A. veronii. For identification of specific peptides that interact and inhibit the stalled-ribosome rescues, peptide aptamer library (pTRG-SN-peptides) was constructed using pTRG as vector and Staphylococcus aureus nuclease (SN) as scaffold protein, in which 16 random amino acids were introduced to form an exposed surface loop. In the meantime both Small Protein B (SmpB) which acts as one of the key components in trans-translation, and ArfA were inserted to pBT to constitute pBT-SmpB and pBT-ArfA, respectively. The peptide aptamer PA-2 was selected from pTRG-SN-peptides by bacterial two-hybrid system (B2H) employing pBT-SmpB or pBT-ArfA as baits. The conserved sites G133K134 and D138K139R140 of C-terminal SmpB were identified by interacting with N-terminal SN, and concurrently the residue K62 of ArfA was recognized by interacting with the surface loop of the specific peptide aptamer PA-2. The expression plasmids pN-SN or pN-PA-2, which combined the duplication origin of pRE112 with the neokanamycin promoter expressing SN or PA-2, were created and transformed into A. veronii C4, separately. The engineered A. veronii C4 which endowing SN or PA-2 expression impaired growth capabilities under stress conditions including temperatures, sucrose, glucose, potassium chloride (KCl) and antibiotics, and the stress-related genes rpoS and nhaP were down-regulated significantly by Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) when treating in 2.0% KCl. Thus, the engineered A. veronii C4 conferring PA-2 expression might be potentially attenuated vaccine, and also the peptide aptamer PA-2 could develop as anti-microbial drugs targeted to the ribosome rescued factors in A

  4. Genetic Selection of Peptide Aptamers That Interact and Inhibit Both Small Protein B and Alternative Ribosome-Rescue Factor A of Aeromonas veronii C4

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Yong; Wang, Dan; Tang, Yanqiong; Tang, Hongqian; Song, Haichao; Sun, Qun; Zhang, Yueling; Liu, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas veronii is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, which infects a variety of animals and results in mass mortality. The stalled-ribosome rescues are reported to ensure viability and virulence under stress conditions, of which primarily include trans-translation and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA) in A. veronii. For identification of specific peptides that interact and inhibit the stalled-ribosome rescues, peptide aptamer library (pTRG-SN-peptides) was constructed using pTRG as vector and Staphylococcus aureus nuclease (SN) as scaffold protein, in which 16 random amino acids were introduced to form an exposed surface loop. In the meantime both Small Protein B (SmpB) which acts as one of the key components in trans-translation, and ArfA were inserted to pBT to constitute pBT-SmpB and pBT-ArfA, respectively. The peptide aptamer PA-2 was selected from pTRG-SN-peptides by bacterial two-hybrid system (B2H) employing pBT-SmpB or pBT-ArfA as baits. The conserved sites G133K134 and D138K139R140 of C-terminal SmpB were identified by interacting with N-terminal SN, and concurrently the residue K62 of ArfA was recognized by interacting with the surface loop of the specific peptide aptamer PA-2. The expression plasmids pN-SN or pN-PA-2, which combined the duplication origin of pRE112 with the neokanamycin promoter expressing SN or PA-2, were created and transformed into A. veronii C4, separately. The engineered A. veronii C4 which endowing SN or PA-2 expression impaired growth capabilities under stress conditions including temperatures, sucrose, glucose, potassium chloride (KCl) and antibiotics, and the stress-related genes rpoS and nhaP were down-regulated significantly by Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) when treating in 2.0% KCl. Thus, the engineered A. veronii C4 conferring PA-2 expression might be potentially attenuated vaccine, and also the peptide aptamer PA-2 could develop as anti-microbial drugs targeted to the ribosome rescued factors in A

  5. Anti-Biofilm and Immunomodulatory Activities of Peptides That Inhibit Biofilms Formed by Pathogens Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Mansour, Sarah C.; Wang, Zhejun; Jiang, Lucy; Breidenstein, Elena B.M.; Elliott, Melissa; Reffuveille, Fany; Speert, David P.; Reckseidler-Zenteno, Shauna L.; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Hancock, Robert E.W.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients often acquire chronic respiratory tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species. In the CF lung, these bacteria grow as multicellular aggregates termed biofilms. Biofilms demonstrate increased (adaptive) resistance to conventional antibiotics, and there are currently no available biofilm-specific therapies. Using plastic adherent, hydroxyapatite and flow cell biofilm models coupled with confocal and scanning electron microscopy, it was demonstrated that an anti-biofilm peptide 1018 prevented biofilm formation, eradicated mature biofilms and killed biofilms formed by a wide range of P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia clinical isolates. New peptide derivatives were designed that, compared to their parent peptide 1018, showed similar or decreased anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa biofilms, but increased activity against biofilms formed by the Gram-positive bacterium methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, some of these new peptide derivatives retained the immunomodulatory activity of 1018 since they induced the production of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and suppressed lipopolysaccharide-mediated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and were non-toxic towards these cells. Peptide 1018 and its derivatives provide promising leads for the treatment of chronic biofilm infections and hyperinflammatory lung disease in CF patients. PMID:26221537

  6. Interactions of Brf1 peptides with the tetratricopeptide repeat-containing subunit of TFIIIC inhibit and promote preinitiation complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yanling; Moir, Robyn D; Willis, Ian M

    2006-08-01

    The binding of Brf1 to the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing transcription factor IIIC (TFIIIC) subunit (Tfc4) represents a rate-limiting step in the ordered assembly of the RNA polymerase III initiation factor TFIIIB. Tfc4 contains multiple binding sites for Brf1 within its amino terminus and adjacent TPR arrays, but the access of Brf1 to these sites is limited by autoinhibition. Moreover, the Brf1 binding sites in Tfc4 overlap with sites important for the subsequent recruitment of another TFIIIB subunit, Bdp1, implying that repositioning of Brf1 is required after its initial interaction with Tfc4. As a starting point for dissecting the steps in TFIIIC-directed assembly of TFIIIB, we conducted yeast two-hybrid screens of Brf1 peptide libraries against different TPR-containing Tfc4 fragments. Short, biochemically active peptides were identified in three distinct regions of Brf1. Two peptides defined conserved but distal regions of Brf1 that participate in stable binding of Brf1 to TFIIIC-DNA. Remarkably, a third peptide that binds specifically to TPR6-9 of Tfc4 was found to promote the formation of both TFIIIC-DNA and Brf1-TFIIIC-DNA complexes and to reduce the mobility of these complexes in native gels. The data are consistent with this peptide causing a conformational change in TFIIIC that overcomes Tfc4 autoinhibition of Brf1 binding and suggest a structural model for the Brf1-Tfc4 interaction. PMID:16880507

  7. Interactions of Brf1 Peptides with the Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing Subunit of TFIIIC Inhibit and Promote Preinitiation Complex Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yanling; Moir, Robyn D.; Willis, Ian M.

    2006-01-01

    The binding of Brf1 to the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing transcription factor IIIC (TFIIIC) subunit (Tfc4) represents a rate-limiting step in the ordered assembly of the RNA polymerase III initiation factor TFIIIB. Tfc4 contains multiple binding sites for Brf1 within its amino terminus and adjacent TPR arrays, but the access of Brf1 to these sites is limited by autoinhibition. Moreover, the Brf1 binding sites in Tfc4 overlap with sites important for the subsequent recruitment of another TFIIIB subunit, Bdp1, implying that repositioning of Brf1 is required after its initial interaction with Tfc4. As a starting point for dissecting the steps in TFIIIC-directed assembly of TFIIIB, we conducted yeast two-hybrid screens of Brf1 peptide libraries against different TPR-containing Tfc4 fragments. Short, biochemically active peptides were identified in three distinct regions of Brf1. Two peptides defined conserved but distal regions of Brf1 that participate in stable binding of Brf1 to TFIIIC-DNA. Remarkably, a third peptide that binds specifically to TPR6-9 of Tfc4 was found to promote the formation of both TFIIIC-DNA and Brf1-TFIIIC-DNA complexes and to reduce the mobility of these complexes in native gels. The data are consistent with this peptide causing a conformational change in TFIIIC that overcomes Tfc4 autoinhibition of Brf1 binding and suggest a structural model for the Brf1-Tfc4 interaction. PMID:16880507

  8. Evidence for Inhibition of Lysozyme Amyloid Fibrillization by Peptide Fragments from Human Lysozyme: A Combined Spectroscopy, Microscopy, and Docking Study.

    PubMed

    Kar, Rajiv K; Gazova, Zuzana; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Mroue, Kamal H; Ghosh, Anirban; Zhang, Ruiyan; Ulicna, Katarina; Siebert, Hans-Christian; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-06-13

    Degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and prion diseases, as well as type II diabetes, have a pathogenesis associated with protein misfolding, which routes with amyloid formation. Recent strategies for designing small-molecule and polypeptide antiamyloid inhibitors are mainly based on mature fibril structures containing cross β-sheet structures. In the present study, we have tackled the hypothesis that the rational design of antiamyloid agents that can target native proteins might offer advantageous prospect to design effective therapeutics. Lysozyme amyloid fibrillization was treated with three different peptide fragments derived from lysozyme protein sequence R(107)-R(115). Using low-resolution spectroscopic, high-resolution NMR, and STD NMR-restrained docking methods such as HADDOCK, we have found that these peptide fragments have the capability to affect lysozyme fibril formation. The present study implicates the prospect that these peptides can also be tested against other amyloid-prone proteins to develop novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27116396

  9. Inhibition of human megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro by platelet factor 4 (PF4) and a synthetic COOH-terminal PF4 peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Gewirtz, A M; Calabretta, B; Rucinski, B; Niewiarowski, S; Xu, W Y

    1989-01-01

    We report that highly purified human platelet factor 4 (PF4) inhibits human megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro. At greater than or equal to 25 micrograms/ml, PF4 inhibited megakaryocyte colony formation approximately 80% in unstimulated cultures, and approximately 58% in cultures containing recombinant human IL 3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Because PF4 (25 micrograms/ml) had no effect on either myeloid or erythroid colony formation lineage specificity of this effect was suggested. A synthetic COOH-terminal PF4 peptide of 24, but not 13 residues, also inhibited megakaryocyte colony formation, whereas a synthetic 18-residue beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) peptide and native beta-TG had no such effect when assayed at similar concentrations. The mechanism of PF4-mediated inhibition was investigated. First, we enumerated total cell number, and examined cell maturation in control colonies (n = 200) and colonies (n = 100) that arose in PF4-containing cultures. Total cells per colony did not differ dramatically in the two groups (6.1 +/- 3.0 vs. 4.2 +/- 1.6, respectively), but the numbers of mature large cells per colony was significantly decreased in the presence of PF4 when compared with controls (1.6 +/- 1.5 vs. 3.9 +/- 2.3; P less than 0.001). Second, by using the human leukemia cell line HEL as a model for primitive megakaryocytic cells, we studied the effect of PF4 on cell doubling time, on the expression of both growth-regulated (H3, p53, c-myc,and c-myb), and non-growth-regulated (beta 2-microglobulin) genes. At high concentrations of native PF4 (50 micrograms/ml), no effect on cell doubling time, or H3 or p53 expression was discerned. In contrast, c-myc and c-myb were both upregulated. These results suggested the PF4 inhibited colony formation by impeding cell maturation, as opposed to cell proliferation, perhaps by inducing expression of c-myc and c-myb. The ability of PF4 to inhibit a normal cell maturation function was then tested

  10. The Tachykinin Peptide Neurokinin B Binds Copper Forming an Unusual [CuII(NKB)2] Complex and Inhibits Copper Uptake into 1321N1 Astrocytoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) is a member of the tachykinin family of neuropeptides that have neuroinflammatory, neuroimmunological, and neuroprotective functions. In a neuroprotective role, tachykinins can help protect cells against the neurotoxic processes observed in Alzheimer’s disease. A change in copper homeostasis is a clear feature of Alzheimer’s disease, and the dysregulation may be a contributory factor in toxicity. Copper has recently been shown to interact with neurokinin A and neuropeptide γ and can lead to generation of reactive oxygen species and peptide degradation, which suggests that copper may have a place in tachykinin function and potentially misfunction. To explore this, we have utilized a range of spectroscopic techniques to show that NKB, but not substance P, can bind CuII in an unusual [CuII(NKB)2] neutral complex that utilizes two N-terminal amine and two imidazole nitrogen ligands (from each molecule of NKB) and the binding substantially alters the structure of the peptide. Using 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, we show that copper can enter the cells and subsequently open plasma membrane calcium channels but when bound to neurokinin B copper ion uptake is inhibited. This data suggests a novel role for neurokinin B in protecting cells against copper-induced calcium changes and implicates the peptide in synaptic copper homeostasis. PMID:23875773

  11. Peptide-Mediated Interference of PB2-eIF4G1 Interaction Inhibits Influenza A Viruses' Replication in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Chu, Hin; Ye, Jiahui; Hu, Meng; Singh, Kailash; Chow, Billy K C; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-07-01

    Influenza viruses are obligate parasites that hijack the host cellular system. Previous results have shown that the influenza virus PB2 subunit confers a dependence of host eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-γ 1 (eIF4G1) for viral mRNA translation. Here, we demonstrated that peptide-mediated interference of the PB2-eIF4G1 interaction inhibited virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Remarkably, intranasal administration of the peptide provided 100% protection against lethal challenges of influenza A viruses in BALB/c mice, including H1N1, H5N1, and H7N9 influenza virus subtypes. Mapping of the PB2 protein indicated that the eIF4G1 binding sites resided within the PB2 cap-binding domain. Virtual docking analysis suggested that the inhibitory peptide associated with the conserved amino acid residues that were essential to PB2 cap-binding activity. Overall, our results identified the PB2-eIF4G1 interactive site as a druggable target for influenza therapeutics. PMID:27626099

  12. A new peptide (Ruviprase) purified from the venom of Daboia russelii russelii shows potent anticoagulant activity via non-enzymatic inhibition of thrombin and factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Rupamoni; Kumar, Ashok; Bose, Biplab; Panda, Dulal; Saikia, Debashree; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2014-10-01

    Compounds showing dual inhibition of thrombin and factor Xa (FXa) are the subject of great interest owing to their broader specificity for effective anticoagulation therapy against cardiovascular disorders. This is the first report on the functional characterization and assessment of therapeutic potential of a 4423.6 Da inhibitory peptide (Ruviprase) purified from Daboia russelii russelii venom. The secondary structure of Ruviprase is composed of α-helices (61.9%) and random coils (38.1%). The partial N-terminal sequence (E(1)-V(2)-X(3)-W(4)-W(5)-W(6)-A(7)-Q(8)-L(9)-S(10)) of Ruviprase demonstrated significant similarity (80.0%) with an internal sequence of apoptosis-stimulating protein reported from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah and Python bivittatus; albeit Ruviprase did not show sequence similarity with existing thrombin/FXa inhibitors, suggesting its uniqueness. Ruviprase demonstrated a potent in vitro anticoagulant property and inhibited both thrombin and FXa following slow binding kinetics. Ruviprase inhibited thrombin by binding to its active site via an uncompetitive mechanism with a Ki value and dissociation constant (KD) of 0.42 μM and 0.46 μM, respectively. Conversely, Ruviprase demonstrated mixed inhibition (Ki = 0.16 μM) of FXa towards its physiological substrate prothrombin. Furthermore, the biological properties of Ruviprase could not be neutralized by commercial polyvalent or monovalent antivenom. Ruviprase at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg was non-toxic and showed potent in vivo anticoagulant activity after 6 h of intraperitoneal treatment in mice. Because of the potent anticoagulant property as well as non-toxic nature of Ruviprase, the possible application of the peptide as an antithrombotic agent for combating thrombosis-associated ailments appears promising. PMID:25038567

  13. Methanofuran (carbon dioxide reduction factor), a formyl carrier in methane production from carbon dioxide in Methanobacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, J.A.; Rinehart, K.L. Jr.; Wolfe, R.S.

    1985-02-12

    Methanofuran (carbon dioxide reduction factor) became labeled when incubated in cell extracts of Methanobacterium under hydrogen and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ in the absence of methanopterin. Proton NMR spectroscopy revealed that a formyl group was bound to the primary amine of methanofuran. (/sup 14/C)Formylmethanofuran was enzymically converted to /sup 14/CH/sub 4/ in the presence of CH/sub 3/-S-CoM (2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonic acid), hydrogen, and methanopterin, establishing the formyl moiety as an intermediate in methanogenesis. In the absence of methanopterin, a substantial portion of the formyl label was oxidized to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ rather than reduced to /sup 14/CH/sub 4/, consistent with a model in which the C1 intermediate is first bound to methanofuran and then to methanopterin, during its reduction. When CH/sub 3/-S-CoM was replaced by HS-CoM (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid), most of the formyl label was oxidized to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, indicating that methyl group reduction by the CH/sub 3/-S-CoM methylreductase is required for the conversion of formylmethanofuran to methane.

  14. Protein kinase C betaII peptide inhibitor exerts cardioprotective effects in rat cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Omiyi, Didi; Brue, Richard J; Taormina, Philip; Harvey, Margaret; Atkinson, Norrell; Young, Lindon H

    2005-08-01

    Ischemia followed by reperfusion (I/R) in the presence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) results in a marked cardiac contractile dysfunction. A cell-permeable protein kinase C (PKC) betaII peptide inhibitor was used to test the hypothesis that PKC betaII inhibition could attenuate PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction by suppression of superoxide production from PMNs and increase NO release from vascular endothelium. The effects of the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor were examined in isolated ischemic (20 min) and reperfused (45 min) rat hearts with PMNs. The PKC betaII inhibitor (10 microM; n = 7) significantly attenuated PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction compared with I/R hearts (n = 9) receiving PMNs alone in left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximal rate of LVDP (+dP/dt(max)) cardiac function indices (p < 0.01). The PKC betaII inhibitor at 10 microM significantly increased endothelial NO release from a basal value of 1.85 +/- 0.18 pmol NO/mg tissue to 3.49 +/- 0.62 pmol NO/mg tissue from rat aorta. It also significantly inhibited superoxide release (i.e., absorbance) from N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine-stimulated rat PMNs from 0.13 +/- 0.01 to 0.02 +/- 0.004 (p < 0.01) at 10 microM. Histological analysis of the left ventricle of representative rat hearts from each group showed that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor-treated hearts experienced a marked reduction in PMN vascular adherence and infiltration into the postreperfused cardiac tissue compared with I/R + PMN hearts (p < 0.01). These results suggest that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor attenuates PMN-induced post-I/R cardiac contractile dysfunction by increasing endothelial NO release and by inhibiting superoxide release from PMNs. PMID:15878997

  15. Inefficient constitutive inhibition of P2X3 receptors by brain natriuretic peptide system contributes to sensitization of trigeminal sensory neurons in a genetic mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Marchenkova, Anna; Vilotti, Sandra; Ntamati, Niels; van den Maagdenberg, Arn MJM

    2016-01-01

    Background On trigeminal ganglion neurons, pain-sensing P2X3 receptors are constitutively inhibited by brain natriuretic peptide via its natriuretic peptide receptor-A. This inhibition is associated with increased P2X3 serine phosphorylation and receptor redistribution to non-lipid raft membrane compartments. The natriuretic peptide receptor-A antagonist anantin reverses these effects. We studied whether P2X3 inhibition is dysfunctional in a genetic familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 model produced by introduction of the human pathogenic R192Q missense mutation into the mouse CACNA1A gene (knock-in phenotype). This model faithfully replicates several properties of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1, with gain-of-function of CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels, raised levels of the algogenic peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide, and enhanced activity of P2X3 receptors in trigeminal ganglia. Results In knock-in neurons, anantin did not affect P2X3 receptor activity, membrane distribution, or serine phosphorylation level, implying ineffective inhibition by the constitutive brain natriuretic peptide/natriuretic peptide receptor-A pathway. However, expression and functional properties of this pathway remained intact together with its ability to downregulate TRPV1 channels. Reversing the familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 phenotype with the CaV2.1-specific antagonist, ω-agatoxin IVA restored P2X3 activity to wild-type level and enabled the potentiating effects of anantin again. After blocking calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors, P2X3 receptors exhibited wild-type properties and were again potentiated by anantin. Conclusions P2X3 receptors on mouse trigeminal ganglion neurons are subjected to contrasting modulation by inhibitory brain natriuretic peptide and facilitatory calcitonin gene-related peptide that both operate via complex intracellular signaling. In the familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 migraine model, the action of calcitonin gene-related peptide appears to

  16. Inhibition of lethal inflammatory responses through the targeting of membrane-associated Toll-like receptor 4 signaling complexes with a Smad6-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn Sook; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Su Myung; Kim, Sang-Doo; Kim, Jun Hwan; Lee, Jae Young; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Mamura, Mizuko; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Seong-Jin; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Seok Hee

    2015-05-01

    We have previously reported that Smad6, one of the inhibitory Smads of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling by disrupting the Pellino-1-mediated TLR4 signaling complex. Here, we developed Smaducin-6, a novel membrane-tethered palmitic acid-conjugated Smad6-derived peptide composed of amino acids 422-441 of Smad6. Smaducin-6 interacted with Pellino-1, located in the inner membrane, thereby disrupting the formation of IRAK1-, RIP1-, IKKε-mediated TLR4 signaling complexes. Systemic administration of Smaducin-6 showed a significant therapeutic effect on mouse TLR4-mediated inflammatory disease models, cecal-ligation-puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis, and lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia, by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine production and apoptosis while enhancing neutrophil migration and bacterial clearance. Our findings provide clues to develop new peptide-based drugs to target Pellino-1 protein in TLR4 signaling pathway for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:25766838

  17. The Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptide, rhodostomin, inhibits in vitro cell adhesion to extracellular matrices and platelet aggregation caused by saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, H. S.; Yang, R. S.; Huang, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    Saos-2 cells, derived from a primary human osteosarcoma, caused dose-dependent platelet aggregation in heparinised human platelet-rich plasma. Saos-2 tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) was completely inhibited by hirudin but unaffected by apyrase. The cell suspension shortened the plasma recalcification times of normal, factor VIII-deficient and factor IX-deficient human plasmas in a dose-dependent manner. However, the cell suspension did not affect the recalcification time of factor VII-deficient plasma. Moreover, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against human tissue factor completely abolished TCIPA. Flow cytometric analysis using anti-integrin MAbs as the primary binding ligands demonstrated that the integrin receptors alpha v beta 3, alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1 were present of Saos-2 cells, which might mediate tumour cell adhesion to extracellular matrix. Rhodostomin, an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing snake venom peptide which antagonises the binding of fibrinogen to platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, prevented Saos-2 TCIPA as well as tumour cell adhesion to vitronectin, fibronectin and collagen type I. Likewise, the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) showed a similar effect. On a molar basis, rhodostomin was about 18,000 and 1000 times, respectively, more potent than GRGDS in inhibiting TCIPA and tumour cell adhesion. PMID:7841039

  18. Light-regulated stapled peptides to inhibit protein-protein interactions involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nevola, Laura; Martín-Quirós, Andrés; Eckelt, Kay; Camarero, Núria; Tosi, Sébastien; Llobet, Artur; Giralt, Ernest; Gorostiza, Pau

    2013-07-22

    Control of membrane traffic: Photoswitchable inhibitors of protein-protein interactions were applied to photoregulate clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in living cells. Traffic light (TL) peptides acting as "stop" and "go" signals for membrane traffic can be used to dissect the role of CME in receptor internalization and in cell growth, division, and differentiation. PMID:23775788

  19. A peptide that inhibits function of Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate (MARCKS) reduces lung cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C-H; Thai, P; Yoneda, K; Adler, KB; Yang, P-C; Wu, R

    2015-01-01

    Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate (MARCKS), a substrate of protein kinase C, is a key regulatory molecule controlling mucus granule secretion by airway epithelial cells as well as directed migration of leukocytes, stem cells and fibroblasts. Phosphorylation of MARKCS may be involved in these responses. However, the functionality of MARCKS and its related phosphorylation in lung cancer malignancy have not been characterized. This study demonstrated elevated levels of MARCKS and phospho-MARCKS in highly invasive lung cancer cell lines and lung cancer specimens from non-small-cell lung cancer patients. siRNA knockdown of MARCKS expression in these highly invasive lung cancer cell lines reduced cell migration and suppressed PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase)/Akt phosphorylation and Slug level. Interestingly, treatment with a peptide identical to the MARCKS N-terminus sequence (the MANS peptide) impaired cell migration in vitro and also the metastatic potential of invasive lung cancer cells in vivo. Mechanistically, MANS peptide treatment resulted in a coordination of increase of E-cadherin expression, suppression of MARCKS phosphorylation and AKT/Slug signalling pathway but not the expression of total MARCKS. These results indicate a crucial role for MARCKS, specifically its phosphorylated form, in potentiating lung cancer cell migration/metastasis and suggest a potential use of MARCKS-related peptides in the treatment of lung cancer metastasis. PMID:23955080

  20. Inhibition on JAK-STAT3 Signaling Transduction Cascade Is Taken by Bioactive Peptide Alpha-S2 Casein Protein from Goat Ethawah Breed Milk

    PubMed Central

    Rohmah, Rista Nikmatu; Hardiyanti, Ferlany; Fatchiyah, Fatchiyah

    2015-01-01

    Background: RA is a systemic inflammatory disease that causes developing comorbidity conditions. This condition can cause by overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokine. In a previous study, we have found bioactive peptide CSN1S2 from Ethawah goat milk for anti-inflammatory for repair the ileum destruction. However, the signaling transduction cascade of bioactive peptides inhibits inflammation still not clear yet. Therefore, we analyzed the signaling transduction cascade via JAK-STAT3 pathway by in vivo and in silico. Methods: The ileum was isolated DNA and amplification with specific primer. The sequence was analyzed using the Sanger sequencing method. Modeling 3D-structure was predicted by SWISS-MODEL and virtual interaction was analyzed by docking system using Pymol and Discovery Studio 4.0 software. Results: This study showed that STAT3 has target gene 480bp. The normal group and normal treating- CSN1S2 of goat milk have similarity from gene bank. Whereas, RA group had transversion mutation that the purine change into pyrimidine even cause frameshift mutation. Interestingly, after treating with the CSN1S2 protein of goat milk shows reverse to the normal acid sequence group. Based on in silico study, from eight peptides, only three peptides of CSN1S2 protein, which carried by PePT1 to enter the small intestine. The fragments are PepT1-41-NMAIHPR-47; PepT1-182-KISQYYQK-189 and PepT1-214-TNAIPYVR-221. We have found just one bioactive peptide of f182-KISQYYQK-189 is able bind to STAT3. The energy binding of f182-KISQYYQK-189 and RA-STAT3 amino acid, it was Σ = -402.43 kJ/mol and the energy binding of f182-KISQYYQK-189 and RAS-STAT3 amino acid is decreasing into Σ = -407.09 kJ/mol. Conclusion: This study suggested that the fragment 182-KISQYYQK-189 peptides from Ethawah goat milk may act as an anti-inflammatory agent via JAK-STAT3 signal transduction cascade at the cellular level. PMID:26483598

  1. Ammonia inhibits the C-type natriuretic peptide-dependent cyclic GMP synthesis and calcium accumulation in a rat brain endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Konopacka, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena; Albrecht, Jan

    2008-05-01

    Recently we reported a decrease of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-dependent, natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP (cGMP) synthesis in a non-neuronal compartment of cerebral cortical slices of hyperammonemic rats [Zielińska, M., Fresko, I., Konopacka, A., Felipo, V., Albrecht, J., 2007. Hyperammonemia inhibits the natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP synthesis in the astrocytic compartment of rat cerebral cortex slices. Neurotoxicology 28, 1260-1263]. Here we accounted for the possible involvement of cerebral capillary endothelial cells in this response by measuring the effect of ammonia on the CNP-mediated cGMP formation and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) accumulation in a rat cerebral endothelial cell line (RBE-4). We first established that stimulation of cGMP synthesis in RBE-4 cells was coupled to protein kinase G (PKG)-mediated Ca2+ influx from the medium which was inhibited by an L-type channel blocker nimodipine. Ammonia treatment (1h, 5mM NH4Cl) evoked a substantial decrease of CNP-stimulated cGMP synthesis which was related to a decreased binding of CNP to NPR2 receptors, and depressed the CNP-dependent [Ca2+]i accumulation in these cells. Ammonia also abolished the CNP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation in the absence of Na+. In cells incubated with ammonia in the absence of Ca2+ a slight CNP-dependent increase of [Ca2+]i was observed, most likely representing Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Depression of CNP-dependent cGMP-mediated [Ca2+]i accumulation may contribute to cerebral vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with hyperammonemia or hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:18222015

  2. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yusaku; Kodama, Eiichi N; Nabika, Ryota; Oishi, Shinya; Ohara, Shinichiro; Sato, Masatoki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Fujii, Nobutaka; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV) infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain) and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain) viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model. PMID:27612283

  3. The soybean-derived peptide lunasin inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation by suppressing phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Elizabeth J.; Devapatla, Bharat; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Davis, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    Lunasin, a soybean bioactive peptide, has both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. The aim of this study was to determine the chemotherapeutic potential of lunasin against human lung cancer. Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells with highly purified soybean-derived lunasin caused limited, cell-line specific anti-proliferative effects on anchorage-dependent growth whereas two normal bronchial epithelial cell lines were unaffected. Lunasin's antiproliferative effects were potentiated upon utilization of anchorage-independent conditions. Furthermore, NSCLC cell lines that were unaffected by lunasin in anchorage-dependent assays exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition in colony formation or colony size. Mouse xenograft studies revealed that 30 mg lunasin/kg body weight per day decreased NSCLC H1299 tumor volume by 63.0% at day 32. Mechanistic studies using cultured NSCLC H661 cells showed that lunasin inhibited cell cycle progression at the G1/S phase interface without inducing apoptosis. Immunoblot analyses of key cell-cycle proteins demonstrated that lunasin altered the expression of the G1 specific cyclin-dependent kinase complex components, increased levels of p27Kip1, reduced levels of phosphorylated Akt, and ultimately inhibited the sequential phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (RB). These results establish for the first time that lunasin can inhibit NSCLC proliferation by suppressing cell-cycle dependent phosphorylation of RB. PMID:25609198

  4. Cyclic GMP-mediated inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channel activity by human natriuretic peptide in rabbit heart cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tohse, N; Nakaya, H; Takeda, Y; Kanno, M

    1995-01-01

    1. Effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the L-type Ca2+ channels were examined in rabbit isolated ventricular cells by use of whole-cell and cell-attached configurations of the patch clamp methods. ANP produced a concentration-dependent decrease (10-100 nM) in amplitude of a basal Ca2+ channel current. 2. The inactive ANP (methionine-oxidized ANP, 30 nM) failed to decrease the current. 3. 8-Bromo-cyclic GMP (300 microM), a potent activator of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), produced the same effects on the basal Ca2+ channel current as those produced by ANP. The cyclic GMP-induced inhibition of the Ca2+ channel current was still evoked in the presence of 1-isobutyl-3-methyl-xanthine, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase. ANP failed to produce inhibition of the Ca2+ channel current in the presence of 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. 4. In the single channel recording, ANP and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP also inhibited the activities of the L-type Ca2+ channels. Both agents decreased the open probability (NPo) without affecting the unit amplitude. 5. The present results suggest that ANP inhibits the cardiac L-type Ca2+ channel activity through the intracellular production of cyclic GMP and then activation of PKG. PMID:7540093

  5. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal peptides inhibit platelet adherence to arterial subendothelium at high wall shear rates. An effect dissociable from interference with adhesive protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J B; Kramer, W S; McKeown, L P; Williams, S B; Gralnick, H R

    1990-01-01

    Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal (GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV) peptides inhibit fibrinogen, fibronectin (Fn), vitronectin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) binding to the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (GP IIb-IIIa). GP IIb-IIIa, vWF, and Fn are essential for normal platelet adherence to subendothelium. We added peptides to normal citrated whole blood before perfusion over human umbilical artery subendothelium and evaluated platelet adherence morphometrically at high (2,600 s-1) and low (800 s-1) wall shear rates. We also examined the effects of the peptides on platelet adhesion to collagen in a static system. At the high wall shear rate, RGDS and GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV caused dose-dependent reduction in the surface coverage with spread and adherent platelets. Amino acid transposition and conservative substitutions of RGD peptides and the AGDV peptide significantly inhibited platelet adherence at 2,600 s-1. By contrast, the modified RGD peptides and AGDV do not affect adhesive protein binding to platelets. None of the native or modified RGD- or fibrinogen gamma-chain peptides significantly inhibited either platelet adherence to subendothelium at 800 s-1 or platelet adhesion to collagen. Our findings demonstrate that peptides that interfere with adhesive protein binding to GP IIb-IIIa inhibit platelet adherence to vascular subendothelium with flowing blood only at high wall shear rates. Platelet adherence to subendothelium at high wall shear rates appears to be mediated by different recognition specificities from those required for fluid-phase adhesive protein binding or static platelet adhesion. PMID:2243140

  6. Effects of membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids on opiate peptide inhibition of basal and prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in intact N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M G; Moak, C M; Rao, B G

    1987-12-01

    The effects of membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on opiate peptide-mediated inhibition of basal and prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP formation were examined in intact N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. Addition of opiate peptides such as methionine 5-enkephalin (metEnk) to control cultures and to cultures that had been supplemented for 48 hr with 50 microM linoleic acid resulted in dose-dependent decreases in cAMP formation; these decreases were blocked by naloxone. Maximum inhibition of basal cyclase activity was 50-55% in both control and PUFA-enriched cells; however, half-maximal inhibition required ten times more metEnk in supplemented cultures than in controls. This is consistent with our observation that the affinity of binding of [tyrosyl-3',5'-3H(N)](2-D-alanine-5-D-leucine)enkephalin ([3H]DADLE) to intact PUFA-enriched cells was lower than that to control cells. Receptor density was not modified as a result of supplementation. Addition of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) to the cells produced rapid dose-dependent increases in cAMP formation. Maximum responses were higher in PUFA-enriched than in control cells (1924 and 972 pmol cAMP formed/mg protein respectively). Also, the apparent value for EC50 for PGE1 was consistently lower in supplemented cultures. MetEnk reduced PGE1-stimulated cAMP formation by 45-55% in both control and supplemented cells, and values for IC50 were similar (approximately 30 nM) in both. In the presence of the opiate peptide, values for EC50 for PGE1 were similar in control and PUFA-enriched cultures (0.07 and 0.09 microM respectively). The data from these studies suggest that membrane PUFA increase the efficiency of coupling of receptors that stimulate cAMP formation and decrease the efficiency of those that mediate inhibition. PMID:2825714

  7. Rapid glucocorticoid inhibition of vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced cyclic AMP accumulation and prolactin release in rat pituitary cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rotsztejn, W H; Dussaillant, M; Nobou, F; Rosselin, G

    1981-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) stimulates both adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and prolactin release in normal rat pituitary cells in culture. cAMP accumulation is significant (P less than 0.01) at VIP concentrations as low as 1 nM and reaches a maximum with 0.1 microM. Addition of dexamethasone as early as 15 min before VIP inhibits VIP stimulation of both cAMP production and PRL secretion. The rapid inhibition is dose-dependent: it appears at doses as low as 0.01 pM and is complete at 1 pM dexamethasone. Increasing concentrations of dexamethasone induce a noncompetitive type of inhibition, as shown by the decrease in Vmax with no change in the apparent Km for VIP. Cycloheximide (1 mM) counteracts the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VIP-induced cAMP production, which suggests the involvement of a rapid protein synthesis mechanism. Ru-26988, a specific glucocorticoid devoid of any mineralocorticoid activity and which does not bind to intracellular transcortin-like component, also produces an inhibition of VIP-induced cAMP accumulation. Corticosterone also inhibits VIP-induced cAMP production but at concentrations higher than those of dexamethasone. In contrast, aldosterone, progesterone, estradiol, and testosterone have no effect. These results demonstrate that, in normal rat pituitary cells in culture, glucocorticoids at physiological concentrations rapidly inhibit the cAMP production and prolactin release induced by VIP by acting through specific glucocorticoid receptors. PMID:6278481

  8. Peptide deformylase inhibitors as potent antimycobacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Teo, Jeanette W P; Thayalan, Pamela; Beer, David; Yap, Amelia S L; Nanjundappa, Mahesh; Ngew, Xinyi; Duraiswamy, Jeyaraj; Liung, Sarah; Dartois, Veronique; Schreiber, Mark; Hasan, Samiul; Cynamon, Michael; Ryder, Neil S; Yang, Xia; Weidmann, Beat; Bracken, Kathryn; Dick, Thomas; Mukherjee, Kakoli

    2006-11-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the hydrolytic removal of the N-terminal formyl group from nascent proteins. This is an essential step in bacterial protein synthesis, making PDF an attractive target for antibacterial drug development. Essentiality of the def gene, encoding PDF from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was demonstrated through genetic knockout experiments with Mycobacterium bovis BCG. PDF from M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv was cloned, expressed, and purified as an N-terminal histidine-tagged recombinant protein in Escherichia coli. A novel class of PDF inhibitors (PDF-I), the N-alkyl urea hydroxamic acids, were synthesized and evaluated for their activities against the M. tuberculosis PDF enzyme as well as their antimycobacterial effects. Several compounds from the new class had 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of <100 nM. Some of the PDF-I displayed antibacterial activity against M. tuberculosis, including MDR strains with MIC90 values of <1 microM. Pharmacokinetic studies of potential leads showed that the compounds were orally bioavailable. Spontaneous resistance towards these inhibitors arose at a frequency of < or =5 x 10(-7) in M. bovis BCG. DNA sequence analysis of several spontaneous PDF-I-resistant mutants revealed that half of the mutants had acquired point mutations in their formyl methyltransferase gene (fmt), which formylated Met-tRNA. The results from this study validate M. tuberculosis PDF as a drug target and suggest that this class of compounds have the potential to be developed as novel antimycobacterial agents. PMID:16966397

  9. DevR (DosR) mimetic peptides impair transcriptional regulation and survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under hypoxia by inhibiting the autokinase activity of DevS sensor kinase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Two-component systems have emerged as compelling targets for antibacterial drug design for a number of reasons including the distinct histidine phosphorylation property of their constituent sensor kinases. The DevR-DevS/DosT two component system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) is essential for survival under hypoxia, a stress associated with dormancy development in vivo. In the present study a combinatorial peptide phage display library was screened for DevS histidine kinase interacting peptides with the aim of isolating inhibitors of DevR-DevS signaling. Results DevS binding peptides were identified from a phage display library after three rounds of panning using DevS as bait. The peptides showed sequence similarity with conserved residues in the N-terminal domain of DevR and suggested that they may represent interacting surfaces between DevS and DevR. Two DevR mimetic peptides were found to specifically inhibit DevR-dependent transcriptional activity and restrict the hypoxic survival of M. tb. The mechanism of peptide action is majorly attributed to an inhibition of DevS autokinase activity. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that DevR mimetic peptides impede DevS activation and that intercepting DevS activation at an early step in the signaling cascade impairs M. tb survival in a hypoxia persistence model. PMID:25048654

  10. Aloe arborescens Extract Protects IMR-32 Cells against Alzheimer Amyloid Beta Peptide via Inhibition of Radical Peroxide Production.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Maria Elisabetta; Tringali, Giuseppe; Triggiani, Doriana; Giardina, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Aloe arborescens is commonly used as a pharmaceutical ingredient for its effect in burn treatment and ability to increase skin wound healing properties. Besides, it is well known to have beneficial phytotherapeutic, anticancer, and radio-protective properties. In this study, we first provided evidence that A. arborescens extract protects IMR32, a neuroblastoma human cellular line, from toxicity induced by beta amyloid, the peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease. In particular, pretreatment with A. arborescens maintains an elevated cell viability and exerts a protective effect on mitochondrial functionality, as evidenced by oxygen consumption experiments. The protective mechanism exerted by A. arborescens seems be related to lowering of oxidative potential of the cells, as demonstrated by the ROS measurement compared with the results obtained in the presence of amyloid beta (1-42) peptide alone. Based on these preliminary observations we suggest that use ofA. arborescens extract could be developed as agents for the management of AD. PMID:26749845

  11. Stoichiometric inhibition of amyloid beta-protein aggregation with peptides containing alternating alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Marcus A; Aucoin, Jed P; Fu, Yanwen; McCarley, Robin L; Hammer, Robert P

    2006-03-22

    We have prepared two peptides based on the hydrophobic core (Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe) of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) that contain alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids at alternating positions, but differ in the positioning of the oligolysine chain (AMY-1, C-terminus; AMY-2, N-terminus). We have studied the effects of AMY-1 and AMY-2 on the aggregation of Abeta and find that, at stoichiometric concentrations, both peptides completely stop Abeta fibril growth. Equimolar mixtures of AMY-1 and Abeta form only globular aggregates as imaged by scanning force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These samples show no signs of protofibrillar or fibrillar material even after prolonged periods of time (4.5 months). Also, 10 mol % of AMY-1 prevents Abeta self-assembly for long periods of time; aged samples (4.5 months) show only a few protofibrillar or fibrillar aggregates. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of equimolar mixtures of AMY-1 and Abeta show that the secondary structure of the mixture changes over time and progresses to a predominantly beta-sheet structure, which is consistent with the design of these inhibitors preferring a sheet-like conformation. Changing the position of the charged tail on the peptide, AMY-2 interacts with Abeta differently in that equimolar mixtures form large ( approximately 1 mum) globular aggregates which do not progress to fibrils, but precipitate out of solution. The differences in the aggregation mediated by the two peptides is discussed in terms of a model where the inhibitors act as cosurfactants that interfere with the native ability of Abeta to self-assemble by disrupting hydrophobic interactions either at the C-terminus or N-terminus of Abeta. PMID:16536517

  12. Inhibition of IgA1 proteinases from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Hemophilus influenzae by peptide prolyl boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, W W; Plaut, A G; Flentke, G R; Lynch, M; Kettner, C A

    1990-03-01

    The alpha-aminoboronic acid analog of proline has been synthesized and incorporated into a number of peptides as the COOH-terminal residue. These peptide prolyl boronic acids are potent inhibitors of both the type 1 and type 2 IgA proteinases from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Hemophilus influenzae, but not of the functionally similar IgA proteinase from Streptococcus sanguis. The best inhibitors synthesized thus far have Ki values in the nanomolar range (4.0 to 60 nM). These results indicate that the N. gonorrhoeae and the H. influenzae enzymes belong to the serine protease family of proteolytic enzymes while that from S. sanguis does not. As a group, the IgA proteinases have been noted for their remarkable specificity; thus, the peptide prolyl boronic acids reported here are the first small synthetic molecules to exhibit a relatively high affinity for the active site of an IgA proteinase and are therefore the first to yield some insight into the active site structure and specificity requirements of these enzymes. PMID:2105953

  13. Structures of proline-rich peptides bound to the ribosome reveal a common mechanism of protein synthesis inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Matthieu G.; Roy, Raktim N.; Lomakin, Ivan B.; Florin, Tanja; Mankin, Alexander S.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    With bacterial resistance becoming a serious threat to global public health, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have become a promising area of focus in antibiotic research. AMPs are derived from a diverse range of species, from prokaryotes to humans, with a mechanism of action that often involves disruption of the bacterial cell membrane. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) are instead actively transported inside the bacterial cell where they bind and inactivate specific targets. Recently, it was reported that some PrAMPs, such as Bac71–35, oncocins and apidaecins, bind and inactivate the bacterial ribosome. Here we report the crystal structures of Bac71–35, Pyrrhocoricin, Metalnikowin and two oncocin derivatives, bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. Each of the PrAMPs blocks the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome by simultaneously occupying three well characterized antibiotic-binding sites and interferes with the initiation step of translation, thereby revealing a common mechanism of action used by these PrAMPs to inactivate protein synthesis. Our study expands the repertoire of PrAMPs and provides a framework for designing new-generation therapeutics. PMID:26809677

  14. Silibinin inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity and amyloid β peptide aggregation: a dual-target drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Duan, Songwei; Guan, Xiaoyin; Lin, Runxuan; Liu, Xincheng; Yan, Ying; Lin, Ruibang; Zhang, Tianqi; Chen, Xueman; Huang, Jiaqi; Sun, Xicui; Li, Qingqing; Fang, Shaoliang; Xu, Jun; Yao, Zhibin; Gu, Huaiyu

    2015-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) peptide aggregation and cholinergic neurodegeneration. Therefore, in this paper, we examined silibinin, a flavonoid extracted from Silybum marianum, to determine its potential as a dual inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and Aβ peptide aggregation for AD treatment. To achieve this, we used molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations to examine the affinity of silibinin with Aβ and AChE in silico. Next, we used circular dichroism and transmission electron microscopy to study the anti-Aβ aggregation capability of silibinin in vitro. Moreover, a Morris Water Maze test, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunohistochemistry, 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine double labeling, and a gene gun experiment were performed on silibinin-treated APP/PS1 transgenic mice. In molecular dynamics simulations, silibinin interacted with Aβ and AChE to form different stable complexes. After the administration of silibinin, AChE activity and Aβ aggregations were down-regulated, and the quantity of AChE also decreased. In addition, silibinin-treated APP/PS1 transgenic mice had greater scores in the Morris Water Maze. Moreover, silibinin could increase the number of newly generated microglia, astrocytes, neurons, and neuronal precursor cells. Taken together, these data suggest that silibinin could act as a dual inhibitor of AChE and Aβ peptide aggregation, therefore suggesting a therapeutic strategy for AD treatment. PMID:25771396

  15. Structures of proline-rich peptides bound to the ribosome reveal a common mechanism of protein synthesis inhibition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gagnon, Matthieu G.; Roy, Raktim N.; Lomakin, Ivan B.; Florin, Tanja; Mankin, Alexander S.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2016-01-24

    Here, with bacterial resistance becoming a serious threat to global public health, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have become a promising area of focus in antibiotic research. AMPs are derived from a diverse range of species, from prokaryotes to humans, with a mechanism of action that often involves disruption of the bacterial cell membrane. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) are instead actively transported inside the bacterial cell where they bind and inactivate specific targets. Recently, it was reported that some PrAMPs, such as Bac71–35, oncocins and apidaecins, bind and inactivate the bacterial ribosome. Here we report the crystal structures of Bac71–35, Pyrrhocoricin, Metalnikowinmore » and two oncocin derivatives, bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. Each of the PrAMPs blocks the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome by simultaneously occupying three well characterized antibioticbinding sites and interferes with the initiation step of translation, thereby revealing a common mechanism of action used by these PrAMPs to inactivate protein synthesis. Our study expands the repertoire of PrAMPs and provides a framework for designing new-generation therapeutics.« less

  16. The atypical cannabinoid O-1602 protects against experimental colitis and inhibits neutrophil recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Schicho, Rudolf; Bashashati, Mohammad; Bawa, Misha; McHugh, Douglas; Saur, Dieter; Hu, Huang-Ming; Zimmer, Andreas; Lutz, Beat; Mackie, Ken; Bradshaw, Heather B.; McCafferty, Donna-Marie; Sharkey, Keith A.; Storr, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background Cannabinoids are known to reduce intestinal inflammation. Atypical cannabinoids produce pharmacological effects via unidentified targets. We were interested whether the atypical cannabinoid O-1602, reportedly an agonist of the putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55, reduces disease severity of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in C57BL/6N and CD1 mice. Methods DSS (2.5% and 4%) was supplied in drinking water for one week while TNBS (4 mg) was applied as a single intrarectal bolus. Results Both treatments caused severe colitis. Injection of O-1602 (5 mg/kg i.p.) significantly reduced macroscopic and histological colitis scores, and myeloperoxidase activity. The protective effect was still present in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) double knockout mice and mice lacking the GPR55 gene. To investigate a potential mechanism underlying the protection by O-1602 we performed neutrophil chemotactic assays. O-1602 concentration-dependently inhibited migration of murine neutrophils to keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and the N-formyl-peptide receptor ligand WKYMVm. The inhibitory effect of O-1602 was preserved in neutrophils from CB1/CB2 double knockout and GPR55 knockout mice. No differences were seen in locomotor activity between O-1602-treated and control mice indicating lack of central sedation by this compound. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that O-1602 is protective against experimentally induced colitis and inhibits neutrophil recruitment independently of CB1, CB2 and GPR55 receptors. Thus, atypical cannabinoids represent a novel class of therapeutics that may be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:21744421

  17. Chronic treatment with the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY-411,575 inhibits beta-amyloid peptide production and alters lymphopoiesis and intestinal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gwendolyn T; Manfra, Denise; Poulet, Frederique M; Zhang, Qi; Josien, Hubert; Bara, Thomas; Engstrom, Laura; Pinzon-Ortiz, Maria; Fine, Jay S; Lee, Hu-Jung J; Zhang, Lili; Higgins, Guy A; Parker, Eric M

    2004-03-26

    Inhibition of gamma-secretase, one of the enzymes responsible for the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) to produce the pathogenic beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides, is an attractive approach to the treatment of Alzheimer disease. In addition to APP, however, several other gamma-secretase substrates have been identified (e.g. Notch), and altered processing of these substrates by gamma-secretase inhibitors could lead to unintended biological consequences. To study the in vivo consequences of gamma-secretase inhibition, the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY-411,575 was administered to C57BL/6 and TgCRND8 APP transgenic mice for 15 days. Although most tissues were unaffected, doses of LY-411,575 that inhibited Abeta production had marked effects on lymphocyte development and on the intestine. LY-411,575 decreased overall thymic cellularity and impaired intrathymic differentiation at the CD4(-)CD8(-)CD44(+)CD25(+) precursor stage. No effects on peripheral T cell populations were noted following LY-411,575 treatment, but evidence for the altered maturation of peripheral B cells was observed. In the intestine, LY-411,575 treatment increased goblet cell number and drastically altered tissue morphology. These effects of LY-411,575 were not seen in mice that were administered LY-D, a diastereoisomer of LY-411,575, which is a very weak gamma-secretase inhibitor. These studies show that inhibition of gamma-secretase has the expected benefit of reducing Abeta in a murine model of Alzheimer disease but has potentially undesirable biological effects as well, most likely because of the inhibition of Notch processing. PMID:14709552

  18. Peptides present in the non-digestible fraction of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) inhibit the angiotensin-I converting enzyme by interacting with its catalytic cavity independent of their antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; González de Mejía, Elvira; Mendoza, Sandra; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory potential and the antioxidant capacity of pure synthesized peptides (GLTSK, LSGNK, GEGSGA, MPACGSS and MTEEY) originally identified in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans (P. vulgaris L.) that had previously demonstrated antiproliferative activity against human colorectal cancer cells. The five peptides were able to inhibit ACE with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values ranging from 65.4 (GLTSK) to 191.5 μM (MPACGSS). The combination of GLTSK and MTEEY increased the ACE inhibition by 30% compared to equieffective doses of the single peptides. According to molecular docking analysis, the five peptides had lower estimated free energy values (-6.47 to -9.34 kcal mol(-1)) when they interacted with the catalytic site of ACE than that of the substrate hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (-5.41 kcal mol(-1)), thus inhibiting the enzymatic activity. According to molecular docking analysis, the five peptides interacted with four (His353, Ala354, Glu411 and Tyr523) out of 6 catalytic residues. Moreover, MPACGSS had the highest antioxidant activity according to Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) (421.58 μmol FeSO4 mg(-1)), Fe(2+) chelation (2.01 μmol Na2EDTA mg(-1)) assays, and also in DPPH (748.39 μmol Trolox per mg of dry peptide) and ABTS (561.42 μmol Trolox mg(-1)) radical scavenging assays. The results support the hypothesis that peptides present in the non-digestible fraction of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) may exert their physiological benefits independent of their antioxidant capacity, by ACE inhibition through interaction with its catalytic cavity. PMID:25881860

  19. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits opioid withdrawal-induced pain sensitization in rats by down-regulation of spinal calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in the spine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Yu; Wu, Zhi-Yuan; Bian, Jin-Song

    2014-09-01

    Hyperalgesia often occurs in opioid-induced withdrawal syndrome. In the present study, we found that three hourly injections of DAMGO (a μ-opioid receptor agonist) followed by naloxone administration at the fourth hour significantly decreased rat paw nociceptive threshold, indicating the induction of withdrawal hyperalgesia. Application of NaHS (a hydrogen sulfide donor) together with each injection of DAMGO attenuated naloxone-precipitated withdrawal hyperalgesia. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that NaHS significantly reversed the gene and protein expression of up-regulated spinal calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in naloxone-treated animals. NaHS also inhibited naloxone-induced cAMP rebound and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in rat spinal cord. In SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, NaHS inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production and adenylate cyclase (AC) activity. Moreover, NaHS pre-treatment suppressed naloxone-stimulated activation of protein kinase C (PKC) α, Raf-1, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in rat spinal cord. Our data suggest that H2S prevents the development of opioid withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia via suppression of synthesis of CGRP in spine through inhibition of AC/cAMP and PKC/Raf-1/ERK pathways. PMID:24824948

  20. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist or N-acetylcysteine combined with omeprazol protect against mitochondrial complex II inhibition in a rat model of gastritis.

    PubMed

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Petronilho, Fabricia C; Araújo, João H; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Daufenbach, Juliana F; Cardoso, Mariane R; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2011-03-01

    The pathophysiology of gastritis involves an imbalance between gastric acid attack and mucosal defence. In addition, the gastric mucosal injury results in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Several studies have shown the association of mitochondrial disorders with gastrointestinal dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activity in the stomach of rats with gastritis induced by indomethacin (IDM) and treated with omeprazole (OM), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) antagonist RC-3095. Adult male Wistar rats were pre-treated for 7 days with OM, NAC, RC-3095, combination of OM plus RC-3095, OM plus NAC and water (control). The animals were then submitted to fasting for 24 hr; IDM was administered. The rats were killed 6 hr later, and the stomachs were used for evaluation of macroscopic damage and respiratory chain activity. Our results showed that complex I and IV activities were not affected by administration of IDM. On the other hand, complex II and III activities were inhibited. In addition, OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC did not reverse complex II activity inhibition. However, the complex III activity inhibition was reversed only with the combined use of OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC. Our results are in agreement with previous studies indicating mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal tract disease and we suggest that GRPR antagonism might be a novel therapeutic strategy in gastritis. PMID:21138529

  1. Efficient in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 gag reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) at minimal ratios of PNA/RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Koppelhus, U; Zachar, V; Nielsen, P E; Liu, X; Eugen-Olsen, J; Ebbesen, P

    1997-01-01

    We have tested the inhibitory potential of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) on in vitro reverse transcription of the HIV-1 gag gene. PNA was designed to target different regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and the effect on reverse transcription by HIV-1, MMLV and AMV reverse transcriptases (RTs) was investigated. We found that a bis-PNA (parallel antisense 10mer linked to antiparallel antisense 10mer) was superior to both the parallel antisense 10mer and antiparallel antisense 10mer in inhibiting reverse transcription of the gene, thus indicating triplex formation at the target sequence. A complete arrest of reverse transcription was obtained at approximately 6-fold molar excess of the bis-PNA with respect to the gag RNA. At this molar ratio we found no effect on in vitro translation of gag RNA. A 15mer duplex-forming PNA was also found to inhibit reverse transcription at very low molar ratios of PNA/ gag RNA. Specificity of the inhibition of reverse transcription by PNA was confirmed by RNA sequencing, which revealed that all tested RTs were stopped by the PNA/RNA complex at the predicted site. We propose that the effect of PNA is exclusively due to steric hindrance, as we found no signs of RNA degradation that would indicate PNA-mediated RNase H activation of the tested RTs. In conclusion, PNA appears to have a potential to become a specific and efficient inhibitor of reverse transcription in vivo , provided sufficient intracellular levels are achievable. PMID:9153317

  2. The Macrocyclic Peptide Antibiotic Micrococcin P1 Is Secreted by the Food-Borne Bacterium Staphylococcus equorum WS 2733 and Inhibits Listeria monocytogenes on Soft Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Carnio, Markus C.; Höltzel, Alexandra; Rudolf, Melanie; Henle, Thomas; Jung, Günther; Scherer, Siegfried

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococcus equorum WS 2733 was found to produce a substance exhibiting a bacteriostatic effect on a variety of gram-positive bacteria. The metabolite was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and semipreparative reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the high purity of the compound and revealed a molecular mass of 1,143 Da. By two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy the substance was identified as micrococcin P1 which is a macrocyclic peptide antibiotic that has not yet been reported for the genus Staphylococcus. A total of 95 out of 95 Listeria strains and 130 out of 135 other gram-positive bacteria were inhibited by this substance, while none of 37 gram-negative bacteria were affected. The antilisterial potential of this food-grade strain as a prote