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Sample records for inhibits hiv replication

  1. Novel Approaches to Inhibiting HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Catherine S.; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, and more than two-dozen antiretroviral drugs are available targeting several distinct steps in the viral replication cycle. However, resistance to these compounds emerges readily, even in the context of combination therapy. Drug toxicity, adverse drug-drug interactions, and accompanying poor patient adherence can also lead to treatment failure. These considerations make continued development of novel antiretroviral therapeutics necessary. In this article, we highlight a number of steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle that represent promising targets for drug discovery. These include lipid raft microdomains, the RNase H activity of the viral enzyme reverse transcriptase, uncoating of the viral core, host cell machinery involved in the integration of the viral DNA into host cell chromatin, virus assembly, maturation, and budding, and the functions of several viral accessory proteins. We discuss the relevant molecular and cell biology, and describe progress to date in developing inhibitors against these novel targets. PMID:19782103

  2. Novel approaches to inhibiting HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Catherine S; Freed, Eric O

    2010-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, and more than two-dozen antiretroviral drugs are available targeting several distinct steps in the viral replication cycle. However, resistance to these compounds emerges readily, even in the context of combination therapy. Drug toxicity, adverse drug-drug interactions, and accompanying poor patient adherence can also lead to treatment failure. These considerations make continued development of novel antiretroviral therapeutics necessary. In this article, we highlight a number of steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle that represent promising targets for drug discovery. These include lipid raft microdomains, the RNase H activity of the viral enzyme reverse transcriptase, uncoating of the viral core, host cell machinery involved in the integration of the viral DNA into host cell chromatin, virus assembly, maturation, and budding, and the functions of several viral accessory proteins. We discuss the relevant molecular and cell biology, and describe progress to date in developing inhibitors against these novel targets. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, Vol 85, issue 1, 2010. PMID:19782103

  3. A nucleolar localizing Rev binding element inhibits HIV replication

    PubMed Central

    Michienzi, Alessandro; De Angelis, Fernanda G; Bozzoni, Irene; Rossi, John J

    2006-01-01

    The Rev protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) facilitates the nuclear export of intron containing viral mRNAs allowing formation of infectious virions. Rev traffics through the nucleolus and shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Rev multimerization and interaction with the export protein CRM1 takes place in the nucleolus. To test the importance of Rev nucleolar trafficking in the HIV-1 replication cycle, we created a nucleolar localizing Rev Response Element (RRE) decoy and tested this for its anti-HIV activity. The RRE decoy provided marked inhibition of HIV-1 replication in both the CEM T-cell line and in primary CD34+ derived monocytes. These results demonstrate that titration of Rev in the nucleolus impairs HIV-1 replication and supports a functional role for Rev trafficking in this sub-cellular compartment. PMID:16712721

  4. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency. PMID:26994425

  5. Inhibition of HIV replication by pokeweed antiviral protein targeted to CD4+ cells by monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarling, Joyce M.; Moran, Patricia A.; Haffar, Omar; Sias, Joan; Richman, Douglas D.; Spina, Celsa A.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Kuebelbeck, Virginia; Ledbetter, Jeffrey A.; Uckun, Fatih M.

    1990-09-01

    FUNCTIONAL impairment and selective depletion of CD4+ T cells, the hallmark of AIDS, are at least partly caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) type 1 binding to the CD4 molecule and infecting CD4+ cells1,2. It may, therefore, be of therapeutic value to target an antiviral agent to CD4+ cells to prevent infection and to inhibit HIV-1 production in patients' CD4+ cells which contain proviral DNA3,4. We report here that HIV-1 replication in normal primary CD4+ T cells can be inhibited by pokeweed antiviral protein, a plant protein of relative molecular mass 30,000 (ref. 5), which inhibits replication of certain plant RNA viruses6-8, and of herpes simplex virus, poliovirus and influenza virus9-11. Targeting pokeweed antiviral protein to CD4+ T cells by conjugating it to monoclonal antibodies reactive with CDS, CD7 or CD4 expressed on CD4+ cells, increased its anti-HIV potency up to 1,000-fold. HIV-1 replication is inhibited at picomolar concentrations of conjugates of pokeweed antiviral protein and monoclonal antibodies, which do not inhibit proliferation of normal CD4+ T cells or CD4-dependent responses. These conjugates inhibit HIV-1 protein synthesis and also strongly inhibit HIV-1 production in activated CD4+ T cells from infected patients.

  6. Natural Plant Alkaloid (Emetine) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication by Interfering with Reverse Transcriptase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chaves Valadão, Ana Luiza; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Dias, Juliana Zanatta; Arantes, Pablo; Verli, Hugo; Tanuri, Amilcar; de Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2015-01-01

    Ipecac alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced in the medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha. Emetine is the main alkaloid of ipecac and one of the active compounds in syrup of Ipecac with emetic property. Here we evaluated emetine's potential as an antiviral agent against Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We performed in vitro Reverse Transcriptase (RT) Assay and Natural Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Activity Assay (NERT) to evaluate HIV RT inhibition. Emetine molecular docking on HIV-1 RT was also analyzed. Phenotypic assays were performed in non-lymphocytic and in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) with HIV-1 wild-type and HIV-harboring RT-resistant mutation to Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (M184V). Our results showed that HIV-1 RT was blocked in the presence of emetine in both models: in vitro reactions with isolated HIV-1 RT and intravirion, measured by NERT. Emetine revealed a strong potential of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in both cellular models, reaching 80% of reduction in HIV-1 infection, with low cytotoxic effect. Emetine also blocked HIV-1 infection of RT M184V mutant. These results suggest that emetine is able to penetrate in intact HIV particles, and bind and block reverse transcription reaction, suggesting that it can be used as anti-HIV microbicide. Taken together, our findings provide additional pharmacological information on the potential therapeutic effects of emetine. PMID:26111177

  7. Inhibiting early-stage events in HIV-1 replication by small-molecule targeting of the HIV-1 capsid.

    PubMed

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Madani, Navid; Mankowski, Marie K; Schön, Arne; Zentner, Isaac; Swaminathan, Gokul; Princiotto, Amy; Anthony, Kevin; Oza, Apara; Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Passic, Shendra R; Wang, Xiaozhao; Jones, David M; Stavale, Eric; Krebs, Fred C; Martín-García, Julio; Freire, Ernesto; Ptak, Roger G; Sodroski, Joseph; Cocklin, Simon; Smith, Amos B

    2012-08-01

    The HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein plays essential roles in both early and late stages of virl replication and has emerged as a novel drug target. We report hybrid structure-based virtual screening to identify small molecules with the potential to interact with the N-terminal domain (NTD) of HIV-1 CA and disrupt early, preintegration steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. The small molecule 4,4'-[dibenzo[b,d]furan-2,8-diylbis(5-phenyl-1H-imidazole-4,2-diyl)]dibenzoic acid (CK026), which had anti-HIV-1 activity in single- and multiple-round infections but failed to inhibit viral replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), was identified. Three analogues of CK026 with reduced size and better drug-like properties were synthesized and assessed. Compound I-XW-053 (4-(4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)benzoic acid) retained all of the antiviral activity of the parental compound and inhibited the replication of a diverse panel of primary HIV-1 isolates in PBMCs, while displaying no appreciable cytotoxicity. This antiviral activity was specific to HIV-1, as I-XW-053 displayed no effect on the replication of SIV or against a panel of nonretroviruses. Direct interaction of I-XW-053 was quantified with wild-type and mutant CA protein using surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Mutation of Ile37 and Arg173, which are required for interaction with compound I-XW-053, crippled the virus at an early, preintegration step. Using quantitative PCR, we demonstrated that treatment with I-XW-053 inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription in multiple cell types, indirectly pointing to dysfunction in the uncoating process. In summary, we have identified a CA-specific compound that targets and inhibits a novel region in the NTD-NTD interface, affects uncoating, and possesses broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity. PMID:22647699

  8. Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David N.; Li, Yonghua; Kumar, Rajnish; Burke, Sean A.; Dawson, Rodney; Hioe, Catarina E.; Borkowsky, William; Rom, William N.; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    While exploring the effects of aerosol IFN-γ treatment in HIV-1/tuberculosis co-infected patients, we observed A to G mutations in HIV-1 envelope sequences derived from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of aerosol IFN-γ-treated patients and induction of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) in the BAL cells. IFN-γ induced ADAR1 expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) but not T cells. ADAR1 siRNA knockdown induced HIV-1 expression in BAL cells of four HIV-1 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Similar results were obtained in MDM that were HIV-1 infected in vitro. Over-expression of ADAR1 in transformed macrophages inhibited HIV-1 viral replication but not viral transcription measured by nuclear run-on, suggesting that ADAR1 acts post-transcriptionally. The A to G hyper-mutation pattern observed in ADAR1 over-expressing cells in vitro was similar to that found in the lungs of HIV-1 infected patients treated with aerosol IFN-γ suggesting the model accurately represented alveolar macrophages. Together, these results indicate that ADAR1 restricts HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally in macrophages harboring HIV-1 provirus. ADAR1 may therefore contribute to viral latency in macrophages. PMID:25272020

  9. Characterization of a Peptide Domain within the GB Virus C NS5A Phosphoprotein that Inhibits HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jinhua; McLinden, James H.; Chang, Qing; Jordan, Emma L.; Stapleton, Jack T.

    2008-01-01

    Background GBV-C infection is associated with prolonged survival in HIV-infected people and GBV-C inhibits HIV replication in co-infection models. Expression of the GBV-C nonstructural phosphoprotein 5A (NS5A) decreases surface levels of the HIV co-receptor CXCR4, induces the release of SDF-1 and inhibits HIV replication in Jurkat CD4+ T cell lines. Methodology/Principal Findings Jurkat cell lines stably expressing NS5A protein and peptides were generated and HIV replication in these cell lines assessed. HIV replication was significantly inhibited in all cell lines expressing NS5A amino acids 152–165. Substitution of an either alanine or glycine for the serine at position 158 (S158A or S158G) resulted in a significant decrease in the HIV inhibitory effect. In contrast, substituting a phosphomimetic amino acid (glutamic acid; S158E) inhibited HIV as well as the parent peptide. HIV inhibition was associated with lower levels of surface expression of the HIV co-receptor CXCR4 and increased release of the CXCR4 ligand, SDF-1 compared to control cells. Incubation of CD4+ T cell lines with synthetic peptides containing amino acids 152–167 or the S158E mutant peptide prior to HIV infection resulted in HIV replication inhibition compared to control peptides. Conclusions/Significance Expression of GBV-C NS5A amino acids 152–165 are sufficient to inhibit HIV replication in vitro, and the serine at position 158 appears important for this effect through either phosphorylation or structural changes in this peptide. The addition of synthetic peptides containing 152–167 or the S158E substitution to Jurkat cells resulted in HIV replication inhibition in vitro. These data suggest that GBV-C peptides or a peptide mimetic may offer a novel, cellular-based approach to antiretroviral therapy. PMID:18596910

  10. Toxoplasma gondii inhibits R5 HIV-1 replication in human lymphoid tissues ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sassi, Atfa; Brichacek, Beda; Hieny, Sara; Yarovinsky, Felix; Golding, Hana; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Sher, Alan; Margolis, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Critical events of HIV-1 pathogenesis occur in lymphoid tissues where HIV-1 is typically accompanied by infections with other pathogens (HIV co-pathogens). Co-pathogens greatly affect the clinical course of the disease and the transmission of HIV. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is a common HIV co-pathogen associated with AIDS development. Here, we examined the interaction of T. gondii and HIV in coinfected human lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Both pathogens readily replicate in ex vivo infected blocks of human tonsillar tissue. Surprisingly, we found that live T. gondii preferentially inhibits R5 HIV-1 replication in coinfected tissues. This effect is reproduced by treatment of the tissue blocks with recombinant C-18, a T. gondii -encoded cyclophilin that binds to CCR5. These ex vivo findings raise the possibility that, in addition to being a co-factor in HIV disease, T. gondii may influence the outcome of viral infection by preferentially suppressing R5 variants. PMID:19671446

  11. Retroviral restriction factors TRIM5α: therapeutic strategy to inhibit HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Ge, Weiying; Zhan, Peng; De Clercq, Erik; Liu, Xinyong

    2011-01-01

    Tripartite motif protein 5-alpha (TRIM5α) is a cytoplasmic protein that efficiently recognizes the incoming capsid (CA) protein of retroviruses and potently inhibits virus infection in a species-specific manner. Through directly recognizing and interacting with HIV CA, TRIM5α is capable of disrupting the ordered process of viral uncoating, eventually interfering with HIV-1 reverse transcription and virus replication. TRIM5α protein contains four domains: RING domain, B-box 2 domain, coiled-coil domain, and B30.2 domain (SPRY) domain. All of the domains are necessary for efficient retrovirus restriction and the B30.2 domain has been shown to be the determinant of the specificity of restriction. Species-specific innate resistance against viral infections offers novel avenues for antiviral therapeutics. Various mutants of TRIM5α have been described which differently affect the HIV-1 reverse transcription process. This makes the establishment of new and improved models for HIV replication and AIDS pathogenesis by monitoring endogenous TRIM5α an attractive approach. TRIM5α-mediated restriction is modulated by the host protein Cyclophilin A (Cyp A) which could effectively interact with the CA of HIV-1. Here we will review the structure and roles of TRIM5α protein, the interaction between Cyp A and TRIM5α, as well as gene therapy strategies associated with TRIM5α to inhibit HIV-1 infection. PMID:21568899

  12. Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication by Balsamin, a Ribosome Inactivating Protein of Momordica balsamina

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zahra; Blanchet, Fabien P.; Mangeat, Bastien; Piguet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are endowed with several medicinal properties, including antiviral activity. We demonstrate here that the recently identified type I RIP from Momordica balsamina also possesses antiviral activity, as determined by viral growth curve assays and single-round infection experiments. Importantly, this activity is at play even as doses where the RIP has no cytotoxic effect. In addition, balsamin inhibits HIV-1 replication not only in T cell lines but also in human primary CD4+ T cells. This antiviral compound exerts its activity at a viral replicative step occurring later than reverse-transcription, most likely on viral protein translation, prior to viral budding and release. Finally, we demonstrate that balsamin antiviral activity is broad since it also impedes influenza virus replication. Altogether our results demonstrate that type I RIP can exert a potent anti-HIV-1 activity which paves the way for new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of viral infections. PMID:24040067

  13. Constitutively Active MAVS Inhibits HIV-1 Replication via Type I Interferon Secretion and Induction of HIV-1 Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M.; Issac, Biju; Guirado, Elizabeth; Stone, Geoffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon is known to inhibit HIV-1 replication through the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISG), including a number of HIV-1 restriction factors. To better understand interferon-mediated HIV-1 restriction, we constructed a constitutively active form of the RIG-I adapter protein MAVS. Constitutive MAVS was generated by fusion of full length MAVS to a truncated form of the Epstein Barr virus protein LMP1 (ΔLMP1). Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells contained high levels of type I interferons and inhibited HIV replication in both TZM-bl and primary human CD4+ T cells. Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells also inhibited replication of VSV-G pseudotyped single cycle SIV in TZM-bl cells, suggesting restriction was post-entry and common to both HIV and SIV. Gene array analysis of ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells and trans-activated CD4+ T cells showed significant upregulation of ISG, including previously characterized HIV restriction factors Viperin, Tetherin, MxB, and ISG56. Interferon blockade studies implicated interferon-beta in this response. In addition to direct viral inhibition, ΔLMP1-MAVS markedly enhanced secretion of IFN-β and IL-12p70 by dendritic cells and the activation and maturation of dendritic cells. Based on this immunostimulatory activity, an adenoviral vector (Ad5) expressing ΔLMP1-MAVS was tested as a molecular adjuvant in an HIV vaccine mouse model. Ad5-Gag antigen combined with Ad5-ΔLMP1-MAVS enhanced control of vaccinia-gag replication in a mouse challenge model, with 4/5 animals showing undetectable virus following challenge. Overall, ΔLMP1-MAVS is a promising reagent to inhibit HIV-1 replication in infected tissues and enhance vaccine-mediated immune responses, while avoiding toxicity associated with systemic type I interferon administration. PMID:26849062

  14. CRISPR-Cas9 Can Inhibit HIV-1 Replication but NHEJ Repair Facilitates Virus Escape

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 can be used for guide RNA (gRNA)-directed, sequence-specific cleavage of HIV proviral DNA in infected cells. We here demonstrate profound inhibition of HIV-1 replication by harnessing T cells with Cas9 and antiviral gRNAs. However, the virus rapidly and consistently escaped from this inhibition. Sequencing of the HIV-1 escape variants revealed nucleotide insertions, deletions, and substitutions around the Cas9/gRNA cleavage site that are typical for DNA repair by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. We thus demonstrate the potency of CRISPR-Cas9 as an antiviral approach, but any therapeutic strategy should consider the viral escape implications. PMID:26796669

  15. Stage-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 replication by antiretroviral drugs in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Daniel A; Sloan, Richard D; Kuhl, Björn D; Bar-Magen, Tamara; Schader, Susan M; Wainberg, Mark A

    2010-03-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown that the use of the HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitor raltegravir (RAL) results in drops in the viral load that are more rapid than those achieved by use of the reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor efavirenz. Previously, mathematical modeling of viral load decay that takes into account the stage of viral replication targeted by a drug has yielded data that closely approximate the clinical trial results. This model predicts greater inhibition of viral replication by drugs that act later in the viral replication cycle. In the present study, we have added drugs that target entry, reverse transcription, integration, or proteolytic processing to acutely infected cells and have shown modest viral inhibition by entry inhibitors, intermediate levels of inhibition by RT and IN inhibitors, and high levels of inhibition by protease inhibitors relative to the levels of growth for the no-drug controls. When dual or triple combinations of these drugs were added to acutely infected cells, we found that the levels of inhibition achieved by any given combination were comparable to those achieved by the latest-acting drug in the combination. In single-round infections in which the kinetics of reverse transcription and integration had been determined by quantitative PCR, addition of IN inhibitors at various times postinfection resulted in levels of inhibition equal to or greater than those achieved by addition of RT inhibitors. Collectively, our data provide in vitro evidence of the stage-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 by clinically relevant drugs. We discuss how stage-dependent inhibition helps to explain the unique viral load decay dynamics observed clinically with RAL. PMID:20038621

  16. HIV-1 RT-dependent DNAzyme expression inhibits HIV-1 replication without the emergence of escape viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Ryuichi; Hayafune, Masaaki; Habu, Yuichiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    DNAzymes are easier to prepare and less sensitive to chemical and enzymatic degradation than ribozymes; however, a DNA enzyme expression system has not yet been developed. In this study, we exploited the mechanism of HIV-1 reverse transcription (RT) in a DNA enzyme expression system. We constructed HIV-1 RT-dependent lentiviral DNAzyme expression vectors including the HIV-1 primer binding site, the DNA enzyme, and either a native tRNA (Lys-3), tRMDtRL, or one of two truncated tRNAs (Lys-3), tRMDΔARMtRL or tRMD3′-endtRL. Lentiviral vector-mediated DNAzyme expression showed high levels of inhibition of HIV-1 replication in SupT1 cells. We also demonstrated the usefulness of this approach in a long-term assay, in which we found that the DNAzymes prevented escape from inhibition of HIV. These results suggest that HIV-1 RT-dependent lentiviral vector-derived DNAzymes prevent the emergence of escape mutations. PMID:20833635

  17. LEDGINs inhibit late stage HIV-1 replication by modulating integrase multimerization in the virions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background LEDGINs are novel allosteric HIV integrase (IN) inhibitors that target the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 binding pocket of IN. They block HIV-1 integration by abrogating the interaction between LEDGF/p75 and IN as well as by allosterically inhibiting the catalytic activity of IN. Results Here we demonstrate that LEDGINs reduce the replication capacity of HIV particles produced in their presence. We systematically studied the molecular basis of this late effect of LEDGINs and demonstrate that HIV virions produced in their presence display a severe replication defect. Both the late effect and the previously described, early effect on integration contribute to LEDGIN antiviral activity as shown by time-of-addition, qPCR and infectivity assays. The late effect phenotype requires binding of LEDGINs to integrase without influencing proteolytic cleavage or production of viral particles. LEDGINs augment IN multimerization during virion assembly or in the released viral particles and severely hamper the infectivity of progeny virions. About 70% of the particles produced in LEDGIN-treated cells do not form a core or display aberrant empty cores with a mislocalized electron-dense ribonucleoprotein. The LEDGIN-treated virus displays defective reverse transcription and nuclear import steps in the target cells. The LEDGIN effect is possibly exerted at the level of the Pol precursor polyprotein. Conclusion Our results suggest that LEDGINs modulate IN multimerization in progeny virions and impair the formation of regular cores during the maturation step, resulting in a decreased infectivity of the viral particles in the target cells. LEDGINs thus profile as unique antivirals with combined early (integration) and late (IN assembly) effects on the HIV replication cycle. PMID:23721378

  18. Inhibition of HIV-1 virus replication using small soluble Tat peptides.

    PubMed

    Agbottah, Emmanuel; Zhang, Naigong; Dadgar, Shabnam; Pumfery, Anne; Wade, John D; Zeng, Chen; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2006-02-20

    Although the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to a significant reduction in AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, unfortunately, many patients discontinue their initial HAART regimen, resulting in development of viral resistance. During HIV infection, the viral activator Tat is needed for viral progeny formation, and the basic and core domains of Tat are the most conserved parts of the protein. Here, we show that a Tat 41/44 peptide from the core domain can inhibit HIV-1 gene expression and replication. The peptides are not toxic to cells and target the Cdk2/Cyclin E complex, inhibiting the phosphorylation of serine 5 of RNAPII. Using the Cdk2 X-ray crystallography structure, we found that the low-energy wild-type peptides could bind to the ATP binding pocket, whereas the mutant peptide bound to the Cdk2 interface. Finally, we show that these peptides do not allow loading of the catalytic domain of the cdk/cyclin complex onto the HIV-1 promoter in vivo. PMID:16289656

  19. Heat-Stable Molecule Derived from Streptococcus cristatus Induces APOBEC3 Expression and Inhibits HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qiujia; Kinlock, Ballington L.; Wang, Chenliang; Hildreth, James E. K.; Xie, Hua; Liu, Bindong

    2014-01-01

    Although most human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) cases worldwide are transmitted through mucosal surfaces, transmission through the oral mucosal surface is a rare event. More than 700 bacterial species have been detected in the oral cavity. Despite great efforts to discover oral inhibitors of HIV, little information is available concerning the anti-HIV activity of oral bacterial components. Here we show that a molecule from an oral commensal bacterium, Streptococcus cristatus CC5A can induce expression of APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F) and inhibit HIV-1 replication in THP-1 cells. We show by qRT-PCR that expression levels of A3G and A3F increase in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of a CC5A extract, as does A3G protein levels by Western blot assay. In addition, when the human monocytic cell line THP-1 was treated with CC5A extract, the replication of HIV-1 IIIB was significantly suppressed compared with IIIB replication in untreated THP-1 cells. Knock down of A3G expression in THP-1 cells compromised the ability of CC5A to inhibit HIV-1 IIIB infectivity. Furthermore, SupT1 cells infected with virus produced from CC5A extract-treated THP-1 cells replicated virus with a higher G to A hypermutation rate (a known consequence of A3G activity) than virus used from untreated THP-1 cells. This suggests that S. cristatus CC5A contains a molecule that induces A3G/F expression and thereby inhibits HIV replication. These findings might lead to the discovery of a novel anti-HIV/AIDS therapeutic. PMID:25165817

  20. Identification of flavopiridol analogues that selectively inhibit positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb) and block HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akbar; Ghosh, Animesh; Nathans, Robin S; Sharova, Natalia; O'Brien, Siobhan; Cao, Hong; Stevenson, Mario; Rana, Tariq M

    2009-08-17

    The positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb; CDK9/cyclin T1) regulates RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription of cellular and integrated viral genes. It is an essential cofactor for HIV-1 Tat transactivation, and selective inhibition of P-TEFb blocks HIV-1 replication without affecting cellular transcription; this indicates that P-TEFb could be a potential target for developing anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. Flavopiridol, a small molecule CDK inhibitor, blocks HIV-1 Tat transactivation and viral replication by inhibiting P-TEFb kinase activity, but it is highly cytotoxic. In the search for selective and less cytotoxic P-TEFb inhibitors, we prepared a series of flavopiridol analogues and evaluated their kinase inhibitory activity against P-TEFb and CDK2/cyclin A, and tested their cellular antiviral potency and cytotoxicity. We identified several analogues that selectively inhibit P-TEFb kinase activity in vitro and show antiviral potency comparable to that of flavopiridol, but with significantly reduced cytotoxicity. These compounds are valuable molecular probes for understanding P-TEFb-regulated cellular and HIV-1 gene transcription and provide potential anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:19603446

  1. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by Warscewiczia coccinea (Vahl) Kl. (Rubiaceae) ethanol extract.

    PubMed

    Quintero, A; Fabbro, R; Maillo, M; Barrios, M; Milano, M B; Fernández, A; Williams, B; Michelangeli, F; Rangel, H R; Pujol, F H

    2011-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to search for natural products capable of inhibiting hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication. The research design, methods and procedures included testing hydro-alcoholic extracts (n = 66) of 31 species from the Venezuelan Amazonian rain forest on the cell line HepG2 2.2.15, which constitutively produces HBV. The main outcomes and results were as follows: the species Euterpe precatoria, Jacaranda copaia, Jacaranda obtusifolia, Senna silvestris, Warscewiczia coccinea and Vochysia glaberrima exerted some degree of inhibition on HBV replication. The leaves of W. coccinea showed a significant antiviral activity: 80% inhibition with 100 µg mL⁻¹ of extract. This extract also exerted inhibition on covalently closed circular deoxyribonucleic acid (cccDNA) production and on HIV-1 replication in MT4 cells (more than 90% inhibition with 50 µg mL⁻¹ of extract). Initial fractionation using organic solvents of increasing polarity and water showed that the ethanol fraction was responsible for most of the antiviral inhibitory activities of both the viruses. It was concluded that Warscewiczia coccinea extract showed inhibition of HBV and HIV-1 replication. Bioassay-guided purification of this fraction may allow the isolation of an antiviral compound with inhibitory activity against both viruses. PMID:21827337

  2. The local environment orchestrates mucosal decidual macrophage differentiation and substantially inhibits HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    El Costa, H; Quillay, H; Marlin, R; Cannou, C; Duriez, M; Benjelloun, F; de Truchis, C; Rahmati, M; Ighil, J; Barré-Sinoussi, F; Nugeyre, M T; Menu, E

    2016-05-01

    Macrophages from the decidua basalis (dM), the main uterine mucosa during pregnancy, are weakly permissive to HIV-1 infection. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying this natural control. We show, by using freshly purified decidual macrophages and ex vivo human decidual explants, that the local decidual environment influences dM differentiation and naturally protects these cells from HIV-1 infection. Interferon (IFN)-γ, present in the decidual tissue, contributes to maintenance of the dM phenotype and restricts HIV-1 infection by mechanisms involving the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1. We also found that activation of Toll-like receptors 7 and 8 expressed by dM reinforces the low permissivity of dM to HIV-1 by restricting viral replication and inducing secretion of cytokines in the decidual environment, including IFN-γ, that shape dM plasticity. A major challenge for HIV-1 eradication is to control infection of tissue-resident macrophages in the female reproductive tract. Our findings provide clues to the development of novel strategies to prevent HIV-1 macrophage infection. PMID:26349662

  3. Pycnogenol, a procyanidin-rich extract from French maritime pine, inhibits intracellular replication of HIV-1 as well as its binding to host cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wu Yu; Tanaka, Ritsuko; Inagaki, Yoshio; Saitoh, Yasunori; Chang, Myint Oo; Amet, Tohti; Yamamoto, Norio; Yamaoka, Shoji; Yoshinaka, Yoshiyuki

    2008-07-01

    A procyanidin-rich extract from French maritime pine, Pycnogenol(R) (PYC), is known as an antioxidant that exerts a variety of physiological activities and is widely used in human beings. We report here that PYC inhibits not only human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) binding to host cells, but also its replication after entry in susceptible cells in vitro. Prominent biochemical alterations induced by PYC were the elevated expression of an intracellular antioxidant protein, manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), and the inhibition of phosphorylation of the ribosomal S6 protein. Interestingly, ectopic expression of Mn-SOD inhibited HIV-1 replication as well. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication associated with induced expression of Mn-SOD in cells treated with PYC suggests the potential of this natural antioxidant inducer as a new anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:18653969

  4. Celastrol Inhibits Tat-mediated Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Transcription and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vivek; Kodihalli, Ravindra C.; Chiaro, Chris; Cary, Daniele; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Henderson, Andrew J.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    Current drugs used for anti-retroviral therapy against HIV have a narrow spectrum of activity, and more often have associated toxicities and severe side effects in addition to developing resistance. Thus, there is a need to develop new therapeutic strategies against HIV/AIDS to complement the already existing ones. Surprisingly, Tat, an early virus encoded protein required for the efficient transcription of the HIV genome, has not been developed as a target for small molecular therapeutics. We have previously described the ability of an endogenous Michael acceptor electrophile (MAE), 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), to inhibit Tat-dependent transcription, by targeting its cysteine (Cys) rich domain. In an effort to identify other MAEs possessing inhibitory activity against HIV-1 Tat, we tested a collection of plant-derived compounds with electrophilic properties, including curcumin, rosmarinic acid, and gambogic acid, for their ability to inhibit Tat. Celastrol (Cel), a triterpenoid MAE isolated from T. wilfordii, exhibited the highest inhibitory activity against Tat. Using biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that Cel by covalently modifying the cysteine thiols inhibits Tat transactivation function. Using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, we show that alklylation of Tat brought about a change in the secondary structure of Tat, which inhibited the transcription elongation of the HIV proviral genome by effecting mechanisms other than Tat-TAR interaction. Our results demonstrate the underlying mechanism of anti-retroviral activity of the plant-derived MAEs, and suggest that Cel could serve as a lead compound to develop novel anti-viral therapeutics. PMID:21763500

  5. Stem cell gene therapy for HIV: strategies to inhibit viral entry and replication.

    PubMed

    DiGiusto, David L

    2015-03-01

    Since the demonstration of a cure of an HIV+ patient with an allogeneic stem cell transplant using naturally HIV-resistant cells, significant interest in creating similar autologous products has fueled the development of a variety of "cell engineering" approaches to stem cell therapy for HIV. Among the more well-studied strategies is the inhibition of viral entry through disruption of expression of viral co-receptors or through competitive inhibitors of viral fusion with the cell membrane. Preclinical evaluation of these approaches often starts in vitro but ultimately is tested in animal models prior to clinical implementation. In this review, we trace the development of several key approaches (meganucleases, short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and fusion inhibitors) to modification of hematopoietic stem cells designed to impart resistance to HIV to their T-cell and monocytic progeny. The basic evolution of technologies through in vitro and in vivo testing is discussed as well as the pros and cons of each approach and how the addition of postentry inhibitors may enhance the overall antiviral efficacy of these approaches. PMID:25578054

  6. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  7. A Cell Internalizing Antibody Targeting Capsid Protein (p24) Inhibits the Replication of HIV-1 in T Cells Lines and PBMCs: A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed A.; Teow, Sin-Yeang; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Choon, Tan Soo; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    There remains a need for newer therapeutic approaches to combat HIV/AIDS. Viral capsid protein p24 plays important roles in HIV pathogenesis. Peptides and small molecule inhibitors targeting p24 have shown to inhibit virus replication in treated cell. High specificity and biological stability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) make them an attractive contender for in vivo treatments. However, mAbs do not enter into cells, thus are restricted to target surface molecules. This also makes targeting intracellular HIV-1 p24 a challenge. A mAb specific to p24 that can internalize into the HIV-infected cells is hypothesized to inhibit the virus replication. We selected a mAb that has previously shown to inhibit p24 polymerization in an in vitro assay and chemically conjugated it with cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to generate cell internalizing anti-p24 mAbs. Out of 8 CPPs tested, κFGF-MTS -conjugated mAbs internalized T cells most efficiently. At nontoxic concentration, the κFGF-MTS-anti-p24-mAbs reduced the HIV-1 replication up to 73 and 49% in T-lymphocyte and PBMCs respectively. Marked inhibition of HIV-1 replication in relevant cells by κFGF-MTS-anti-p24-mAbs represents a viable strategy to target HIV proteins present inside the cells. PMID:26741963

  8. A Cell Internalizing Antibody Targeting Capsid Protein (p24) Inhibits the Replication of HIV-1 in T Cells Lines and PBMCs: A Proof of Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed A; Teow, Sin-Yeang; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Choon, Tan Soo; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    There remains a need for newer therapeutic approaches to combat HIV/AIDS. Viral capsid protein p24 plays important roles in HIV pathogenesis. Peptides and small molecule inhibitors targeting p24 have shown to inhibit virus replication in treated cell. High specificity and biological stability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) make them an attractive contender for in vivo treatments. However, mAbs do not enter into cells, thus are restricted to target surface molecules. This also makes targeting intracellular HIV-1 p24 a challenge. A mAb specific to p24 that can internalize into the HIV-infected cells is hypothesized to inhibit the virus replication. We selected a mAb that has previously shown to inhibit p24 polymerization in an in vitro assay and chemically conjugated it with cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to generate cell internalizing anti-p24 mAbs. Out of 8 CPPs tested, κFGF-MTS -conjugated mAbs internalized T cells most efficiently. At nontoxic concentration, the κFGF-MTS-anti-p24-mAbs reduced the HIV-1 replication up to 73 and 49% in T-lymphocyte and PBMCs respectively. Marked inhibition of HIV-1 replication in relevant cells by κFGF-MTS-anti-p24-mAbs represents a viable strategy to target HIV proteins present inside the cells. PMID:26741963

  9. Dual inhibition of HIV-1 replication by integrase-LEDGF allosteric inhibitors is predominant at the post-integration stage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background LEDGF/p75 (LEDGF) is the main cellular cofactor of HIV-1 integrase (IN). It acts as a tethering factor for IN, and targets the integration of HIV in actively transcribed gene regions of chromatin. A recently developed class of IN allosteric inhibitors can inhibit the LEDGF-IN interaction. Results We describe a new series of IN-LEDGF allosteric inhibitors, the most active of which is Mut101. We determined the crystal structure of Mut101 in complex with IN and showed that the compound binds to the LEDGF-binding pocket, promoting conformational changes of IN which explain at the atomic level the allosteric effect of the IN/LEDGF interaction inhibitor on IN functions. In vitro, Mut101 inhibited both IN-LEDGF interaction and IN strand transfer activity while enhancing IN-IN interaction. Time of addition experiments indicated that Mut101 behaved as an integration inhibitor. Mut101 was fully active on HIV-1 mutants resistant to INSTIs and other classes of anti-HIV drugs, indicative that this compound has a new mode of action. However, we found that Mut101 also displayed a more potent antiretroviral activity at a post-integration step. Infectivity of viral particles produced in presence of Mut101 was severely decreased. This latter effect also required the binding of the compound to the LEDGF-binding pocket. Conclusion Mut101 has dual anti-HIV-1 activity, at integration and post-integration steps of the viral replication cycle, by binding to a unique target on IN (the LEDGF-binding pocket). The post-integration block of HIV-1 replication in virus-producer cells is the mechanism by which Mut101 is most active as an antiretroviral. To explain this difference between Mut101 antiretroviral activity at integration and post-integration stages, we propose the following model: LEDGF is a nuclear, chromatin-bound protein that is absent in the cytoplasm. Therefore, LEDGF can outcompete compound binding to IN in the nucleus of target cells lowering its antiretroviral

  10. Optimization of a Class of Tryptophan Dendrimers That Inhibit HIV Replication Leads to a Selective, Specific, and Low-Nanomolar Inhibitor of Clinical Isolates of Enterovirus A71.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Sun, Liang; Martínez-Gualda, Belén; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Donckers, Kim; Quesada, Ernesto; Camarasa, María-José; Delang, Leen; San-Félix, Ana; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    Tryptophan dendrimers that inhibit HIV replication by binding to the HIV envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 have unexpectedly also proven to be potent, specific, and selective inhibitors of the replication of the unrelated enterovirus A71. Dendrimer 12, a consensus compound that was synthesized on the basis of the structure-activity relationship analysis of this series, is 3-fold more potent against the BrCr lab strain and, surprisingly, inhibits a large panel of clinical isolates in the low-nanomolar/high-picomolar range. PMID:27246775

  11. HIV-1 Replication in Langerhans and Interstitial Dendritic Cells Is Inhibited by Neutralizing and Fc-Mediated Inhibitory Antibodies ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Peressin, M.; Holl, V.; Schmidt, S.; Decoville, T.; Mirisky, D.; Lederle, A.; Delaporte, M.; Xu, K.; Aubertin, A. M.; Moog, C.

    2011-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) and interstitial dendritic cells (IDCs) may be among the first human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) targets after sexual transmission. We generated cells of these types by differentiation of purified CD34+ cord blood cells. After in vitro infection with R5-tropic strains, we obtained similar percentages of infected cells for both dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Moreover, LC infection was not increased by blockage of langerin by antilangerin. These results indicate that, under our experimental conditions, there was no evidence of any preference of HIV replication in LCs versus IDCs. The inhibitory activity of HIV-1-specific IgAs and IgGs against HIV-1 replication in LCs and IDCs was analyzed. We found that neutralizing antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection of both DC subsets. Interestingly, HIV-1 was inhibited more efficiently by the IgGs than the corresponding IgA, due to an Fcγ receptor-dependent mechanism. Moreover, nonneutralizing inhibitory IgGs were able to inhibit infection of both LCs and IDCs. These results underline the importance of HIV-1 inhibition by the binding of the Fc part of IgGs to Fcγ receptors and suggest that the induction of neutralizing and nonneutralizing inhibitory IgGs in addition to neutralizing IgAs at mucosal sites may contribute to protection against sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:21084491

  12. Dasatinib inhibits HIV-1 replication through the interference of SAMHD1 phosphorylation in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Mercedes; López-Huertas, María Rosa; García-Pérez, Javier; Climent, Núria; Descours, Benjamin; Ambrosioni, Juan; Mateos, Elena; Rodríguez-Mora, Sara; Rus-Bercial, Lucía; Benkirane, Monsef; Miró, José M; Plana, Montserrat; Alcamí, José; Coiras, Mayte

    2016-04-15

    Massive activation of infected CD4+ T cells during acute HIV-1 infection leads to reservoir seeding and T-cell destruction. During T-cell activation, the antiviral effect of the innate factor SAMHD1 is neutralized through phosphorylation at T592, allowing HIV-1 infection. Dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor currently used for treating chronic myeloid leukemia, has been described to control HIV-1 replication through its negative effect on T-cell proliferation and viral entry. We demonstrate that Dasatinib can actually interfere with SAMHD1 phosphorylation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, preserving its antiviral activity against HIV-1. Dasatinib prevented SAMHD1 phosphorylation in vitro and ex vivo, impairing HIV-1 reverse transcription and proviral integration. This was the major mechanism of action because the presence of Vpx, which degrades SAMHD1, in HIV-1 virions impeded the inhibitory effect of Dasatinib on HIV-1 replication. In fact, infection with VSV-pseudotyped HIV-1 virions and fusion of BlaM-Vpr-containing HIV-1 viruses with activated PBMCs in the presence of Dasatinib suggested that Dasatinib was not acting at fusion level. Finally, PBMCs from patients on chronic treatment with Dasatinib showed a lower level of SAMHD1 phosphorylation in response to activating stimuli and low susceptibility to HIV-1 infection ex vivo. Consequently, Dasatinib is a compound currently used in clinic that preserves the antiviral function of SAMHD1. Using Dasatinib as adjuvant of antiretroviral therapy during early primary HIV-1 infection would contribute to reduce viral replication and spread, prevent reservoir seeding, and preserve CD4 counts and CTL responses. These events would create a more favorable virologic and immunologic environment for future interventional studies aiming at HIV-1 eradication. PMID:26851491

  13. HIV Replication in CD4+ T Lymphocytes in the Presence and Absence of Follicular Dendritic Cells: Inhibition of Replication mediated by Alpha-1-Antitrypsin through Altered IκBα Ubiquitination1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xueyuan; Shapiro, Leland; Fellingham, Gilbert; Willardson, Barry M.; Burton, Gregory F.

    2011-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) increase HIV replication and virus production in lymphocytes by increasing the activation of NF-κB in infected cells. Because alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) decreases HIV replication in PBMCs and monocytic cells and decreases NF-κB activity, we postulated that AAT might also block FDC-mediated HIV replication. Primary CD4+ T cells were infected with HIV and cultured with FDCs or their supernatant with or without AAT, and ensuing viral RNA and p24 production were monitored. NF-κB activation in the infected cells was also assessed. Virus production was increased in the presence of FDC supernatant but the addition of AAT at concentrations above 0.5 mg/ml inhibited virus replication. AAT blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p50/p65 despite an unexpected elevation in associated phosphorylated and ubiquitinated IκBα (Ub-IκBα). In the presence of AAT, degradation of cytoplasmic IκBα was dramatically inhibited compared to control cultures. AAT did not inhibit the proteasome; however, it altered the pattern of ubiquitination of IκBα. AAT decreased IκBα polyubiquitination linked through ubiquitin lysine residue 48 (K48) and increased ubiquitination linked through lysine residue 63 (K63). Moreover, K63 linked Ub-IκBα degradation was substantially slower than K48 linked Ub-IκBα in the presence of AAT, correlating altered ubiquitination with a prolonged IκBα half-life. Because AAT is naturally occurring and is available clinically, examination of its use as an inhibitory agent in HIV-infected subjects may be informative and lead to the development of similar agents that inhibit HIV replication using a novel mechanism. PMID:21263074

  14. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  15. Replication Competent Molecular Clones of HIV-1 Expressing Renilla Luciferase Facilitate the Analysis of Antibody Inhibition in PBMC

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Tara G.; Ding, Haitao; Yuan, Xing; Wei, Qing; Smith, Kendra S.; Conway, Joan A.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Brown, Bruce; Polonis, Victoria; West, John T.; Montefiori, David C.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Effective vaccine development for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will require assays that ascertain the capacity of vaccine immunogens to elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAb) to diverse HIV-1 strains. To facilitate NAb assessment in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based assays, we developed an assay-adaptable platform based on a Renilla luciferase (LucR) expressing HIV-1 proviral backbone. LucR was inserted into pNL4-3 DNA, preserving all viral open reading frames. The proviral genome was engineered to facilitate expression of diverse HIV-1 env sequences, allowing analysis in an isogenic background. The resulting Env-IMC-LucR viruses are infectious, and LucR is stably expressed over multiple replications in PBMC. HIV-1 neutralization, targeting TZM-bl cells, was highly correlative comparing virus (LucR) and cell (firefly luciferase) readouts. In PBMC, NAb activity can be analyzed either within a single or multiple cycles of replication. These results represent advancement toward a standardizable PBMC-based neutralization assay for assessing HIV-1 vaccine immunogen efficacy. PMID:20863545

  16. Efficient Inhibition of HIV Replication in the Gastrointestinal and Female Reproductive Tracts of Humanized BLT Mice by EFdA

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugasundaram, Uma; Kovarova, Martina; Ho, Phong T.; Schramm, Nathaniel; Wahl, Angela; Parniak, Michael A.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2016-01-01

    Background The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) in preclinical development exhibits improved safety and antiviral activity profiles with minimal drug resistance compared to approved NRTIs. However, the systemic antiviral efficacy of EFdA has not been fully evaluated. In this study, we utilized bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT) humanized mice to investigate the systemic effect of EFdA treatment on HIV replication and CD4+ T cell depletion in the peripheral blood (PB) and tissues. In particular, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the female reproductive tract (FRT) and gastrointestinal (GI) tract, major sites of transmission, viral replication, and CD4+ T cell depletion and where some current antiretroviral drugs have a sub-optimal effect. Results EFdA treatment resulted in reduction of HIV-RNA in PB to undetectable levels in the majority of treated mice by 3 weeks post-treatment. HIV-RNA levels in cervicovaginal lavage of EFdA-treated BLT mice also declined to undetectable levels demonstrating strong penetration of EFdA into the FRT. Our results also demonstrate a strong systemic suppression of HIV replication in all tissues analyzed. In particular, we observed more than a 2-log difference in HIV-RNA levels in the GI tract and FRT of EFdA-treated BLT mice compared to untreated HIV-infected control mice. In addition, HIV-RNA was also significantly lower in the lymph nodes, liver, lung, spleen of EFdA-treated BLT mice compared to untreated HIV-infected control mice. Furthermore, EFdA treatment prevented the depletion of CD4+ T cells in the PB, mucosal tissues and lymphoid tissues. Conclusion Our findings indicate that EFdA is highly effective in controlling viral replication and preserving CD4+ T cells in particular with high efficiency in the GI and FRT tract. Thus, EFdA represents a strong potential candidate for further development as a part of antiretroviral therapy regimens. PMID:27438728

  17. C-5-Modified Tetrahydropyrano-Tetrahydofuran-Derived Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Exert Potent Inhibition of the Replication of HIV-1 Variants Highly Resistant to Various PIs, including Darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Manabu; Hayashi, Hironori; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Takamatsu, Yuki; Aoki-Ogata, Hiromi; Nakamura, Teruya; Nakata, Hirotomo; Das, Debananda; Yamagata, Yuriko; Ghosh, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We identified three nonpeptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs), GRL-015, -085, and -097, containing tetrahydropyrano-tetrahydrofuran (Tp-THF) with a C-5 hydroxyl. The three compounds were potent against a wild-type laboratory HIV-1 strain (HIV-1WT), with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 3.0 to 49 nM, and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity, with 50% cytotoxic concentrations (CC50) for GRL-015, -085, and -097 of 80, >100, and >100 μM, respectively. All the three compounds potently inhibited the replication of highly PI-resistant HIV-1 variants selected with each of the currently available PIs and recombinant clinical HIV-1 isolates obtained from patients harboring multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants (HIVMDR). Importantly, darunavir (DRV) was >1,000 times less active against a highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant (HIV-1DRVRP51); the three compounds remained active against HIV-1DRVRP51 with only a 6.8- to 68-fold reduction. Moreover, the emergence of HIV-1 variants resistant to the three compounds was considerably delayed compared to the case of DRV. In particular, HIV-1 variants resistant to GRL-085 and -097 did not emerge even when two different highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variants were used as a starting population. In the structural analyses, Tp-THF of GRL-015, -085, and -097 showed strong hydrogen bond interactions with the backbone atoms of active-site amino acid residues (Asp29 and Asp30) of HIV-1 protease. A strong hydrogen bonding formation between the hydroxyl moiety of Tp-THF and a carbonyl oxygen atom of Gly48 was newly identified. The present findings indicate that the three compounds warrant further study as possible therapeutic agents for treating individuals harboring wild-type HIV and/or HIVMDR. IMPORTANCE Darunavir (DRV) inhibits the replication of most existing multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains and has a high genetic barrier. However, the emergence of highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 strains (HIVDRVR) has recently been observed in vivo and in

  18. Potent and selective inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and HIV-2 replication by a class of bicyclams interacting with a viral uncoating event.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E; Yamamoto, N; Pauwels, R; Baba, M; Schols, D; Nakashima, H; Balzarini, J; Debyser, Z; Murrer, B A; Schwartz, D

    1992-01-01

    A series of bicyclams have been shown to be potent and selective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The compounds are inhibitory to the replication of various HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains in various human T-cell systems, including peripheral blood lymphocytes, at 0.14-1.4 microM, without being toxic to the host cells at 2.2 mM. The bicyclam JM2763 is active against 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine; AZT)-resistant HIV-1 strains and acts additively with AZT. Mechanism of action studies revealed that the bicyclams (i.e., JM2763) interact with an early event of the retrovirus replicative cycle, which could be tentatively identified as a viral uncoating event. Images PMID:1608936

  19. Dual Role of Novel Ingenol Derivatives from Euphorbia tirucalli in HIV Replication: Inhibition of De Novo Infection and Activation of Viral LTR

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Celina M.; Price, Sarah L.; Shirk, Erin N.; Cunha, Rodrigo D.; Pianowski, Luiz F.; Clements, Janice E.; Tanuri, Amilcar; Gama, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection is not cleared by antiretroviral drugs due to the presence of latently infected cells that are not eliminated with current therapies and persist in the blood and organs of infected patients. New compounds to activate these latent reservoirs have been evaluated so that, along with HAART, they can be used to activate latent virus and eliminate the latently infected cells resulting in eradication of viral infection. Here we describe three novel diterpenes isolated from the sap of Euphorbia tirucalli, a tropical shrub. These molecules, identified as ingenols, were modified at carbon 3 and termed ingenol synthetic derivatives (ISD). They activated the HIV-LTR in reporter cell lines and human PBMCs with latent virus in concentrations as low as 10 nM. ISDs were also able to inhibit the replication of HIV-1 subtype B and C in MT-4 cells and human PBMCs at concentrations of EC50 0.02 and 0.09 µM respectively, which are comparable to the EC50 of some antiretroviral currently used in AIDS treatment. Control of viral replication may be caused by downregulation of surface CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4 observed after ISD treatment in vitro. These compounds appear to be less cytotoxic than other diterpenes such as PMA and prostratin, with effective dose versus toxic dose TI>400. Although the mechanisms of action of the three ISDs are primarily attributed to the PKC pathway, downregulation of surface receptors and stimulation of the viral LTR might be differentially modulated by different PKC isoforms. PMID:24827152

  20. Tetraspanin CD63 is a regulator of HIV-1 replication

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Enqing; Pan, Lei; Xie, Yonghong; Mu, Deguang; Liu, Wei; Jin, Faguang; Bai, Xuefan

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages and CD4+ T-cells are the major reservoirs for HIV-1 infection. CD63 is a tetraspanin transmembrane protein, which has been shown to play an essential role during HIV-1 replication in macrophages. In this study, we further confirm the requirement of CD63 in HIV-1 replication events in primary human CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and a CD4+ cell line. Most interestingly, we also show the evidences for the co-localization and internalization of CD63 and HIV-1 major receptor CD4 in primary human macrophages and CD4+ cell line by confocal microscopy and Co-Immunoprecipitation assay. Analysis revealed that CD63-depleted CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and a cell line showed significant decrease in HIV-1 production. Further analysis showed that CD63 down regulation reduced production of the early HIV protein Tat, and affected HIV protein Gag by CD63-Gag interaction. In agreement, CD63 silencing also inhibited production of the late protein p24. Furthermore, we revealed that CD63 silencing has no effect on HIV-1 replication with extensive viral challenge (MOI > 0.2). These findings suggest that CD63 plays a dual-role both in early and late HIV-1 life cycle with a range of HIV-1 infection (MOI < 0.2). PMID:25973004

  1. Conditionally replicating HIV and SIV variants.

    PubMed

    Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-05-01

    Conditionally replicating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) variants that can be switched on and off at will are attractive tools for HIV and SIV research. We constructed HIV and SIV variants in which the natural transcription control mechanism was replaced by the doxycycline (dox)-inducible Tet-On gene expression mechanism. These HIV-rtTA and SIV-rtTA variants are fully replication-competent, but replication is critically dependent on dox administration. We here describe how the dox-dependent virus variants may improve the safety of live-attenuated virus vaccines and how they can be used to study the immune responses that correlate with vaccine-induced protection. Furthermore, we review how these variants were initially designed and subsequently optimized by spontaneous viral evolution. These efforts yielded efficiently replicating and tightly dox-controlled HIV-rtTA and SIV-rtTA variants that replicate in a variety of cell and tissue culture systems, and in human immune system (HIS) mice and macaques, respectively. These viruses can be used as a tool in HIV and SIV biology studies and in vaccine research. We review how HIV-rtTA and SIV-rtTA were used to study the role of the viral TAR and Tat elements in virus replication. PMID:25982510

  2. LEDGF/p75-Independent HIV-1 Replication Demonstrates a Role for HRP-2 and Remains Sensitive to Inhibition by LEDGINs

    PubMed Central

    Schrijvers, Rik; De Rijck, Jan; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Adachi, Noritaka; Vets, Sofie; Ronen, Keshet; Christ, Frauke; Bushman, Frederic D.; Debyser, Zeger; Gijsbers, Rik

    2012-01-01

    Lens epithelium–derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is a cellular cofactor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) that interacts with IN through its IN binding domain (IBD) and tethers the viral pre-integration complex to the host cell chromatin. Here we report the generation of a human somatic LEDGF/p75 knockout cell line that allows the study of spreading HIV-1 infection in the absence of LEDGF/p75. By homologous recombination the exons encoding the LEDGF/p75 IBD (exons 11 to 14) were knocked out. In the absence of LEDGF/p75 replication of laboratory HIV-1 strains was severely delayed while clinical HIV-1 isolates were replication-defective. The residual replication was predominantly mediated by the Hepatoma-derived growth factor related protein 2 (HRP-2), the only cellular protein besides LEDGF/p75 that contains an IBD. Importantly, the recently described IN-LEDGF/p75 inhibitors (LEDGINs) remained active even in the absence of LEDGF/p75 by blocking the interaction with the IBD of HRP-2. These results further support the potential of LEDGINs as allosteric integrase inhibitors. PMID:22396646

  3. A novel class of anti-HIV agents with multiple copies of enfuvirtide enhances inhibition of viral replication and cellular transmission in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Hsing; Hinkula, Jorma; Loo, Meiyu; Falkeborn, Tina; Li, Rongxiu; Cardillo, Thomas M; Rossi, Edmund A; Goldenberg, David M; Wahren, Britta

    2012-01-01

    We constructed novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitors that may overcome the current limitations of enfuvirtide, the first such therapeutic in this class. The three prototypes generated by the Dock-and-Lock (DNL) technology to comprise four copies of enfuvirtide tethered site-specifically to the Fc end of different humanized monoclonal antibodies potently neutralize primary isolates (both R5-tropic and X4-tropic), as well as T-cell-adapted strains of HIV-1 in vitro. All three prototypes show EC(50) values in the subnanomolar range, which are 10- to 100-fold lower than enfuvirtide and attainable whether or not the constitutive antibody targets HIV-1. The potential of such conjugates to purge latently infected cells was also demonstrated in a cell-to-cell viral inhibition assay by measuring their efficacy to inhibit the spread of HIV-1(LAI) from infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to Jurkat T cells over a period of 30 days following viral activation with 100 nM SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid). The IgG-like half-life was not significantly different from that of the parental antibody, as shown by the mean serum concentration of one prototype in mice at 72 h. These encouraging results provide a rationale to develop further novel anti-HIV agents by coupling additional antibodies of interest with alternative HIV-inhibitors via recombinantly-produced, self-assembling, modules. PMID:22844444

  4. A Novel Class of Anti-HIV Agents with Multiple Copies of Enfuvirtide Enhances Inhibition of Viral Replication and Cellular Transmission In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chien-Hsing; Hinkula, Jorma; Loo, Meiyu; Falkeborn, Tina; Li, Rongxiu; Cardillo, Thomas M.; Rossi, Edmund A.; Goldenberg, David M.; Wahren, Britta

    2012-01-01

    We constructed novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitors that may overcome the current limitations of enfuvirtide, the first such therapeutic in this class. The three prototypes generated by the Dock-and-Lock (DNL) technology to comprise four copies of enfuvirtide tethered site-specifically to the Fc end of different humanized monoclonal antibodies potently neutralize primary isolates (both R5-tropic and X4-tropic), as well as T-cell-adapted strains of HIV-1 in vitro. All three prototypes show EC50 values in the subnanomolar range, which are 10- to 100-fold lower than enfuvirtide and attainable whether or not the constitutive antibody targets HIV-1. The potential of such conjugates to purge latently infected cells was also demonstrated in a cell-to-cell viral inhibition assay by measuring their efficacy to inhibit the spread of HIV-1LAI from infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to Jurkat T cells over a period of 30 days following viral activation with 100 nM SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid). The IgG-like half-life was not significantly different from that of the parental antibody, as shown by the mean serum concentration of one prototype in mice at 72 h. These encouraging results provide a rationale to develop further novel anti-HIV agents by coupling additional antibodies of interest with alternative HIV-inhibitors via recombinantly-produced, self-assembling, modules. PMID:22844444

  5. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  6. Mitigating hERG Inhibition: Design of Orally Bioavailable CCR5 Antagonists as Potent Inhibitors of R5 HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; Zhou, Yuanxi; Bourque, Elyse; McEachern, Ernest; Danthi, Sanjay; Langille, Jonathan; Harwig, Curtis; Veale, Duane; Carpenter, Bryon; Ba, Tuya; Bey, Michael; Baird, Ian; Wilson, Trevor; Metz, Markus; MacFarland, Ron; Mosi, Renee; Bodart, Veronique; Wong, Rebecca; Fricker, Simon; Huskens, Dana; Schols, Dominique

    2012-03-01

    A series of CCR5 antagonists representing the thiophene-3-yl-methyl ureas were designed that met the pharmacological criteria for HIV-1 inhibition and mitigated a human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) inhibition liability. Reducing lipophilicity was the main design criteria used to identify compounds that did not inhibit the hERG channel, but subtle structural modifications were also important. Interestingly, within this series, compounds with low hERG inhibition prolonged the action potential duration (APD) in dog Purkinje fibers, suggesting a mixed effect on cardiac ion channels. PMID:24900457

  7. APOBEC4 Enhances the Replication of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Henning; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Mühlebach, Michael D.; Schumann, Gerald G.; König, Renate; Cichutek, Klaus; Häussinger, Dieter; Münk, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC4 (A4) is a member of the AID/APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases. In this study we found a high mRNA expression of A4 in human testis. In contrast, there were only low levels of A4 mRNA detectable in 293T, HeLa, Jurkat or A3.01 cells. Ectopic expression of A4 in HeLa cells resulted in mostly cytoplasmic localization of the protein. To test whether A4 has antiviral activity similar to that of proteins of the APOBEC3 (A3) subfamily, A4 was co-expressed in 293T cells with wild type HIV-1 and HIV-1 luciferase reporter viruses. We found that A4 did not inhibit the replication of HIV-1 but instead enhanced the production of HIV-1 in a dose-dependent manner and seemed to act on the viral LTR. A4 did not show detectable cytidine deamination activity in vitro and weakly interacted with single-stranded DNA. The presence of A4 in virus producer cells enhanced HIV-1 replication by transiently transfected A4 or stably expressed A4 in HIV-susceptible cells. APOBEC4 was capable of similarly enhancing transcription from a broad spectrum of promoters, regardless of whether they were viral or mammalian. We hypothesize that A4 may have a natural role in modulating host promoters or endogenous LTR promoters. PMID:27249646

  8. Suppression of HIV Replication by Lymphoid Tissue CD8+ Cells Correlates with the Clinical State of HIV-Infected Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackbourn, David J.; Mackewicz, Carl E.; Barker, Edward; Hunt, Thomas K.; Herndier, Brian; Haase, Ashley T.; Levy, Jay A.

    1996-11-01

    Lymphoid tissues from asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals, as compared with symptomatic HIV-infected subjects, show limited histopathological changes and lower levels of HIV expression. In this report we correlate the control of HIV replication in lymph nodes to the non-cytolytic anti-HIV activity of lymphoid tissue CD8+ cells. Five subjects at different stages of HIV-related disease were studied and the ability of their CD8+ cells, isolated from both lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood, to inhibit HIV replication was compared. CD8+ cells from lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood of two HIV-infected long-term survivors suppressed HIV replication at a low CD8+:CD4+ cell ratio of 0.1. The CD8+ cells from the lymphoid tissue of a third asymptomatic subject suppressed HIV replication at a CD8+:CD4+ cell ratio of 0.25; the subject's peripheral blood CD8+ cells showed this antiviral response at a lower ratio of 0.05. The lymphoid tissue CD8+ cells from two AIDS patients were not able to suppress HIV replication, and the peripheral blood CD8+ cells of only one of them suppressed HIV replication. The plasma viremia, cellular HIV load as well as the extent of pathology and virus expression in the lymphoid tissue of the two long-term survivors, were reduced compared with these parameters in the three other subjects. The data suggest that the extent of anti-HIV activity by CD8+ cells from lymphoid tissue relative to peripheral blood correlates best with the clinical state measured by lymphoid tissue pathology and HIV burden in lymphoid tissues and blood. The results and further emphasis to the importance of this cellular immune response in controlling HIV pathogenesis.

  9. 5-azacytidine and 5-azadeoxycytidine inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, J; Walker, M C; Leclerc, J M; Lapointe, N; Beaulieu, R; Thibodeau, L

    1990-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents which affect the integration, stability, or inducibility of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) provirus would have considerable value in treating acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Two nucleoside analogs of cytosine, 5-azacytidine and 5-azadeoxycytidine, which seem to have such value because of their capabilities to affect both the stability and the methylation patterns of the nucleic acids into which they are incorporated, were tested for their ability to inhibit the replication of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) in human CEM T cells in vitro. 5-Azadeoxycytidine (1 microM) completely inhibited HIV replication in CEM cells, by the criteria of reduced viral antigen expression and decreased supernatant reverse transcriptase activity, with little toxicity for the treated cells. 5-azacytidine (1 microM) also inhibited HIV replication, but less effectively. When added 2 or more h after CEM cells were infected with HIV-1, both 5-azacytosine derivatives were less effective than they were when added at the time of infection. Even 2 h of exposure to 5-azadeoxycytidine was sufficient for inhibition of HIV replication. Although long exposure to either analog at concentrations of 1 microM would result in pronounced cellular cytotoxicity, the the fact that short exposures to the same dose of drug inhibit HIV replication but are not toxic for the cells implies that cellular toxicity itself is not an important mechanism of the antiviral action of the analogs. PMID:1691617

  10. Effect of transcription peptide inhibitors on HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Cardenas, Jessica; Easley, Rebecca; Wu, Weilin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Klase, Zak; Mendez, Susana; Zeng, Chen; Chen, Hao; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2008-07-01

    HIV-1 manipulates cellular machineries such as cyclin dependent kinases (cdks) and their cyclin elements, to stimulate virus production and maintain latent infection. Specifically, the HIV-1 viral protein Tat increases viral transcription by binding to the TAR promoter element. This binding event is mediated by the phosphorylation of Pol II by complexes such as cdk9/Cyclin T and cdk2/Cyclin E. Recent studies have shown that a Tat 41/44 peptide derivative prevents the loading of cdk2 onto the HIV-1 promoter, inhibiting gene expression and replication. Here we show that Tat peptide analogs computationally designed to dock at the cyclin binding site of cdk2 have the ability to bind to cdk2 and inhibit the association of cdk2 with the HIV promoter. Specifically, the peptide LAALS dissociated the complex and decreased kinase activity in vitro. We also describe our novel small animal model which utilizes humanized Rag2(-/-)gamma(c)(-/-) mice. This small peptide inhibitor induces a decrease in HIV-1 viral transcription in vitro and minimizes viral loads in vivo. PMID:18455747

  11. Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana; Jerebtsova, Marina; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Niu, Xiaomei; Charles, Sharroya; Richardson, Des R.; Ray, Patricio E.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Nekhai, Sergei

    2007-10-25

    HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics.

  12. Single-Cell and Single-Cycle Analysis of HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Mowgli; Zhang, Fengwen; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle are poorly documented. Viral replication dynamics are typically measured in populations of infected cells, but asynchrony that is introduced during the early steps of HIV-1 replication complicates the measurement of the progression of subsequent steps and can mask replication dynamics and their variation in individual infected cells. We established microscopy-based methods to dynamically measure HIV-1-encoded reporter gene and antiviral gene expression in individual infected cells. We coupled these measurements with conventional analyses to quantify delays in the HIV-1 replication cycle imposed by the biphasic nature of HIV-1 gene expression and by the assembly-inhibiting property of the matrix domain of Gag. We further related the dynamics of restriction factor (APOBEC3G) removal to the dynamics of HIV-1 replication in individual cells. These studies provide a timeline for key events in the HIV-1 replication cycle, and reveal that the interval between the onset of early and late HIV-1 gene expression is only ~3 h, but matrix causes a ~6-12 h delay in the generation of extracellular virions. Interestingly, matrix delays particle assembly to a time at which APOBEC3G has largely been removed from the cell. Thus, a need to prepare infected cells to be efficient producers of infectious HIV-1 may provide an impetus for programmed delays in HIV-1 virion genesis. Our findings also emphasize the significant heterogeneity in the length of the HIV-1 replication cycle in homogenous cell populations and suggest that a typical infected cell generates new virions for only a few hours at the end of a 48 h lifespan. Therefore, small changes in the lifespan of infected cells might have a large effect on viral yield in a single cycle and the overall clinical course in infected individuals. PMID:26086614

  13. Quantifying the Antiviral Effect of IFN on HIV-1 Replication in Cell Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Hiroki; Godinho-Santos, Ana; Rato, Sylvie; Vanwalscappel, Bénédicte; Clavel, François; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Iwami, Shingo; Mammano, Fabrizio

    2015-06-01

    Type-I interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of hundreds of cellular genes, some of which have direct antiviral activities. Although IFNs restrict different steps of HIV replication cycle, their dominant antiviral effect remains unclear. We first quantified the inhibition of HIV replication by IFN in tissue culture, using viruses with different tropism and growth kinetics. By combining experimental and mathematical analyses, we determined quantitative estimates for key parameters of HIV replication and inhibition, and demonstrate that IFN mainly inhibits de novo infection (33% and 47% for a X4- and a R5-strain, respectively), rather than virus production (15% and 6% for the X4 and R5 strains, respectively). This finding is in agreement with patient-derived data analyses.

  14. The IFITMs Inhibit Zika Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Savidis, George; Perreira, Jill M; Portmann, Jocelyn M; Meraner, Paul; Guo, Zhiru; Green, Sharone; Brass, Abraham L

    2016-06-14

    Zika virus has emerged as a severe health threat with a rapidly expanding range. The IFITM family of restriction factors inhibits the replication of a broad range of viruses, including the closely related flaviruses West Nile virus and dengue virus. Here, we show that IFITM1 and IFITM3 inhibit Zika virus infection early in the viral life cycle. Moreover, IFITM3 can prevent Zika-virus-induced cell death. These results suggest that strategies to boost the actions and/or levels of the IFITMs might be useful for inhibiting a broad range of emerging viruses. PMID:27268505

  15. The Janus kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib reduces HIV replication in human macrophages and ameliorates HIV encephalitis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Haile, Woldeab B; Gavegnano, Christina; Tao, Sijia; Jiang, Yong; Schinazi, Raymond F; Tyor, William R

    2016-08-01

    A hallmark of persistent HIV-1 infection in the central nervous system is increased activation of mononuclear phagocytes and surrounding astrogliosis, conferring persistent HIV-induced inflammation. This inflammation is believed to result in neuronal dysfunction and the clinical manifestations of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The Jak/STAT pathway is activated in macrophages/myeloid cells upon HIV-1 infection, modulating many pro-inflammatory pathways that result in HAND, thereby representing an attractive cellular target. Thus, the impact of ruxolitinib, a Janus Kinase (Jak) 1/2 inhibitor that is FDA approved for myelofibrosis and polycythemia vera, was assessed for its potential to inhibit HIV-1 replication in macrophages and HIV-induced activation in monocytes/macrophages in culture. In addition, a murine model of HIV encephalitis (HIVE) was used to assess the impact of ruxolitinib on histopathological features of HIVE, brain viral load, as well as its ability to penetrate the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Ruxolitinib was found to inhibit HIV-1 replication in macrophages, HIV-induced activation of monocytes (CD14/CD16) and macrophages (HLA-DR, CCR5, and CD163) without apparent toxicity. In vivo, systemically administered ruxolitinib was detected in the brain during HIVE in SCID mice and markedly inhibited astrogliosis. Together, these data indicate that ruxolitinib reduces HIV-induced activation and infiltration of monocytes/macrophages in vitro, reduces the replication of HIV in vitro, penetrates the BBB when systemically administered in mice and reduces astrogliosis in the brains of mice with HIVE. These data suggest that ruxolitinib will be useful as a novel therapeutic to treat humans with HAND. PMID:26851503

  16. Overexpression of the Replicative Helicase in Escherichia coli Inhibits Replication Initiation and Replication Fork Reloading

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, Jan-Gert; Myka, Kamila Katarzyna; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Replicative helicases play central roles in chromosome duplication and their assembly onto DNA is regulated via initiators and helicase loader proteins. The Escherichia coli replicative helicase DnaB and the helicase loader DnaC form a DnaB6–DnaC6 complex that is required for loading DnaB onto single-stranded DNA. Overexpression of dnaC inhibits replication by promoting continual rebinding of DnaC to DnaB and consequent prevention of helicase translocation. Here we show that overexpression of dnaB also inhibits growth and chromosome duplication. This inhibition is countered by co-overexpression of wild-type DnaC but not of a DnaC mutant that cannot interact with DnaB, indicating that a reduction in DnaB6–DnaC6 concentration is responsible for the phenotypes associated with elevated DnaB concentration. Partial defects in the oriC-specific initiator DnaA and in PriA-specific initiation away from oriC during replication repair sensitise cells to dnaB overexpression. Absence of the accessory replicative helicase Rep, resulting in increased replication blockage and thus increased reinitiation away from oriC, also exacerbates DnaB-induced defects. These findings indicate that elevated levels of helicase perturb replication initiation not only at origins of replication but also during fork repair at other sites on the chromosome. Thus, imbalances in levels of the replicative helicase and helicase loader can inhibit replication both via inhibition of DnaB6–DnaC6 complex formation with excess DnaB, as shown here, and promotion of formation of DnaB6–DnaC6 complexes with excess DnaC [Allen GC, Jr., Kornberg A. Fine balance in the regulation of DnaB helicase by DnaC protein in replication in Escherichia coli. J. Biol. Chem. 1991;266:22096–22101; Skarstad K, Wold S. The speed of the Escherichia coli fork in vivo depends on the DnaB:DnaC ratio. Mol. Microbiol. 1995;17:825–831]. Thus, there are two mechanisms by which an imbalance in the replicative helicase and its

  17. The critical role of p38 MAP kinase in T cell HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P. S.; Schmidtmayerova, H.; Dennis, J.; Dubrovsky, L.; Sherry, B.; Wang, H.; Bukrinsky, M.; Tracey, K. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Replication of HIV-1 in human T lymphocytes requires the activation of host cellular proteins. This study identifies p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) as one such kinase necessary for HIV-1 replication in T cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Primary human T lymphocytes were infected with the LAI strain of HIV-1 and Jurkat cells were infected with the RF strain of HIV-1. HIV replication was measured by reverse transcriptase activity. Cellular expression of endogenous p38 MAPK protein was analyzed using immunoprecipitation. Blockade of p38 MAPK expression was achieved using antisense oligonucleotides to p38 MAPK and the guanylhydrazone compound CNI-1493, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK activation. RESULTS: HIV-1 infection of both primary human T lymphocytes and a T cell line rapidly activated the cellular p38 MAPK pathway, which remained activated for the duration of the culture. Addition of phosphothioated antisense oligonucleotides to p38 MAPK specifically inhibited viral replication. Blockade of p38 MAPK activation by addition of CNI-1493 also inhibited HIV-1 viral replication of primary T lymphocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Stimulation of p38 MAPK activation did not occur with the addition of heat-inactivated virus, suggesting that viral internalization, and not just membrane binding, is necessary for p38 MAPK activation. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that activation of the p38 MAPK cascade is critical for HIV-1 replication in primary T lymphocytes, and that blockade of this signal transduction pathway may be a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:9205949

  18. Herpes simplex virus type-2 stimulates HIV-1 replication in cervical tissues: implications for HIV-1 transmission and efficacy of anti-HIV-1 microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Rollenhagen, C; Lathrop, M J; Macura, S L; Doncel, G F; Asin, S N

    2014-01-01

    Herpes Simplex virus Type-2 (HSV-2) increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition, yet the mechanism for this viral pathogen to regulate the susceptibility of the cervicovaginal mucosa to HIV-1 is virtually unknown. Using ex vivo human ectocervical tissue models, we report greater levels of HIV-1 reverse transcription, DNA integration, RNA expression, and virions release in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected tissues compared with HIV-1 only infected tissues (P<0.05). Enhanced HIV-1 replication was associated with increased CD4, CCR5, and CD38 transcription (P<0.05) and increased number of CD4+/CCR5+/CD38+ T cells in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected tissues compared with tissues infected with HIV-1 alone. Tenofovir (TFV) 1% gel, the leading microbicide candidate, demonstrated only partial protection against HIV-1, when applied vaginally before and after sexual intercourse. It is possible that mucosal inflammation, in particular that induced by HSV-2 infection, may have decreased TFV efficacy. HSV-2 upregulated the number of HIV-1-infected cells and elevated the concentration of TFV needed to decrease HIV-1 infection. Similarly, only high concentrations of TFV inhibited HSV-2 replication in HIV-1/HSV-2-infected tissues. Thus, HSV-2 co-infection and mucosal immune cell activation should be taken into consideration when designing preventative strategies for sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:24496317

  19. Dendritic Cell-Lymphocyte Cross Talk Downregulates Host Restriction Factor SAMHD1 and Stimulates HIV-1 Replication in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Biedma, Marina Elizabeth; Lederle, Alexandre; Peressin, Maryse; Lambotin, Mélanie; Proust, Alizé; Decoville, Thomas; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Géraldine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in dendritic cells (DCs) is restricted by SAMHD1. This factor is counteracted by the viral protein Vpx; Vpx is found in HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) from sooty mangabeys (SIVsm) or from macaques (SIVmac) but is absent from HIV-1. We previously observed that HIV-1 replication in immature DCs is stimulated by cocultivation with primary T and B lymphocytes, suggesting that HIV-1 restriction in DCs may be overcome under coculture conditions. Here, we aimed to decipher the mechanism of SAMHD1-mediated restriction in DC-lymphocyte coculture. We found that coculture with lymphocytes downregulated SAMHD1 expression and was associated with increased HIV-1 replication in DCs. Moreover, in infected DC-T lymphocyte cocultures, DCs acquired maturation status and secreted type 1 interferon (alpha interferon [IFN-α]). The blockade of DC-lymphocyte cross talk by anti-ICAM-1 antibody markedly inhibited the stimulation of HIV-1 replication and prevented the downregulation of SAMHD1 expression in cocultured DCs. These results demonstrate that, in contrast to purified DCs, cross talk with lymphocytes downregulates SAMHD1 expression in DCs, triggering HIV-1 replication and an antiviral immune response. Therefore, HIV-1 replication and immune sensing by DCs should be investigated in more physiologically relevant models of DC/lymphocyte coculture. IMPORTANCE SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 replication in dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we demonstrate that, in a coculture model of DCs and lymphocytes mimicking early mucosal HIV-1 infection, stimulation of HIV-1 replication in DCs is associated with downregulation of SAMHD1 expression and activation of innate immune sensing by DCs. We propose that DC-lymphocyte cross talk occurring in vivo modulates host restriction factor SAMHD1, promoting HIV-1 replication in cellular reservoirs and stimulating immune sensing. PMID:24574390

  20. TIM-family proteins inhibit HIV-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghua; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Fuller, Matthew S.; Rennert, Paul D.; Maury, Wendy; Johnson, Marc C.; Freed, Eric O.; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain (TIM) proteins play critical roles in viral infections. Herein, we report that the TIM-family proteins strongly inhibit HIV-1 release, resulting in diminished viral production and replication. Expression of TIM-1 causes HIV-1 Gag and mature viral particles to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Mutation of the phosphatidylserine (PS) binding sites of TIM-1 abolishes its ability to block HIV-1 release. TIM-1, but to a much lesser extent PS-binding deficient mutants, induces PS flipping onto the cell surface; TIM-1 is also found to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. Importantly, TIM-1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4-positive Jurkat cells, despite its capability of up-regulating CD4 and promoting HIV-1 entry. In addition to TIM-1, TIM-3 and TIM-4 also block the release of HIV-1, as well as that of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Ebola virus (EBOV); knockdown of TIM-3 in differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) enhances HIV-1 production. The inhibitory effects of TIM-family proteins on virus release are extended to other PS receptors, such as Axl and RAGE. Overall, our study uncovers a novel ability of TIM-family proteins to block the release of HIV-1 and other viruses by interaction with virion- and cell-associated PS. Our work provides new insights into a virus-cell interaction that is mediated by TIMs and PS receptors. PMID:25136083

  1. Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana; Jerebtsova, Marina; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Niu, Xiaomei; Charles, Sharroya; Richardson, Des R; Ray, Patricio E; Gordeuk, Victor R; Nekhai, Sergei

    2007-10-25

    HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics. PMID:17631934

  2. Thiazolides Elicit Anti-Viral Innate Immunity and Reduce HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Trabattoni, Daria; Gnudi, Federica; Ibba, Salomè V.; Saulle, Irma; Agostini, Simone; Masetti, Michela; Biasin, Mara; Rossignol, Jean-Francois; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Nitazoxanide (Alinia®, NTZ) and tizoxanide (TIZ), its active circulating metabolite, belong to a class of agents known as thiazolides (TZD) endowed with broad anti-infective activities. TIZ and RM-4848, the active metabolite of RM-5038, were shown to stimulate innate immunity in vitro. Because natural resistance to HIV-1 infection in HIV-exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals is suggested to be associated with strong innate immune responses, we verified whether TIZ and RM-4848 could reduce the in vitro infectiousness of HIV-1. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 20 healthy donors were infected in vitro with HIV-1BaL in the presence/absence of TIZ or RM4848. HIV-1 p24 were measured at different timepoints. The immunomodulatory abilities of TZD were evaluated by the expression of type I IFN pathway genes and the production of cytokines and chemokines. TZD drastically inhibited in vitro HIV-1 replication (>87%). This was associated with the activation of innate immune responses and with the up-regulation of several interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including those involved in cholesterol pathway, particularly the cholesterol-25 hydroxylase (CH25H). TZD inhibition of HIV-1 replication in vitro could be due to their ability to stimulate potent and multifaceted antiviral immune responses. These data warrant the exploration of TZD as preventive/therapeutic agent in HIV infection. PMID:27250526

  3. Thiazolides Elicit Anti-Viral Innate Immunity and Reduce HIV Replication.

    PubMed

    Trabattoni, Daria; Gnudi, Federica; Ibba, Salomè V; Saulle, Irma; Agostini, Simone; Masetti, Michela; Biasin, Mara; Rossignol, Jean-Francois; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Nitazoxanide (Alinia(®), NTZ) and tizoxanide (TIZ), its active circulating metabolite, belong to a class of agents known as thiazolides (TZD) endowed with broad anti-infective activities. TIZ and RM-4848, the active metabolite of RM-5038, were shown to stimulate innate immunity in vitro. Because natural resistance to HIV-1 infection in HIV-exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals is suggested to be associated with strong innate immune responses, we verified whether TIZ and RM-4848 could reduce the in vitro infectiousness of HIV-1. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 20 healthy donors were infected in vitro with HIV-1BaL in the presence/absence of TIZ or RM4848. HIV-1 p24 were measured at different timepoints. The immunomodulatory abilities of TZD were evaluated by the expression of type I IFN pathway genes and the production of cytokines and chemokines. TZD drastically inhibited in vitro HIV-1 replication (>87%). This was associated with the activation of innate immune responses and with the up-regulation of several interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including those involved in cholesterol pathway, particularly the cholesterol-25 hydroxylase (CH25H). TZD inhibition of HIV-1 replication in vitro could be due to their ability to stimulate potent and multifaceted antiviral immune responses. These data warrant the exploration of TZD as preventive/therapeutic agent in HIV infection. PMID:27250526

  4. Lipids and Membrane Microdomains in HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Abdul A.; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Several critical steps in the replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) – entry, assembly and budding – are complex processes that take place at the plasma membrane of the host cell. A growing body of data indicates that these early and late steps in HIV-1 replication take place in specialized plasma membrane microdomains, and that many of the viral and cellular components required for entry, assembly, and budding are concentrated in these microdomains. In particular, a number of studies have shown that cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched microdomains known as lipid rafts play important roles in multiple steps in the virus replication cycle. In this review, we provide an overview of what is currently known about the involvement of lipids and membrane microdomains in HIV-1 replication. PMID:19383519

  5. Productive Replication and Evolution of HIV-1 in Ferret Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Hind J.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Guevara, Rebekah; von Messling, Veronika; Peretz, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A rodent or other small animal model for HIV-1 has not been forthcoming, with the principal obstacles being species-specific restriction mechanisms and deficits in HIV-1 dependency factors. Some Carnivorans may harbor comparatively fewer impediments. For example, in contrast to mice, the domestic cat genome encodes essential nonreceptor HIV-1 dependency factors. All Feliformia species and at least one Caniformia species also lack a major lentiviral restriction mechanism (TRIM5α/TRIMCyp proteins). Here we investigated cells from two species in another carnivore family, the Mustelidae, for permissiveness to the HIV-1 life cycle. Mustela putorius furo (domesticated ferret) primary cells and cell lines did not restrict HIV-1, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), or N-tropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) postentry and supported late HIV-1 life cycle steps comparably to human cells. The ferret TRIM5α gene exon 8, which encodes the B30.2 domain, was found to be pseudogenized. Strikingly, ferret (but not mink) cells engineered to express human HIV-1 entry receptors supported productive spreading replication, amplification, and serial passage of wild-type HIV-1. Nevertheless, produced virions had relatively reduced infectivity and the virus accrued G→A hypermutations, consistent with APOBEC3 protein pressure. Ferret cell-passaged HIV-1 also evolved amino acid changes in the capsid cyclophilin A binding loop. We conclude that the genome of this carnivore can provide essential nonreceptor HIV-1 dependency factors and that ferret APOBEC3 proteins with activity against HIV-1 are likely. Even so, unlike in cat cells, HIV-1 can replicate in ferret cells without vif substitution. The virus evolves in this novel nonprimate cell adaptive landscape. We suggest that further characterization of HIV-1 adaptation in ferret cells and delineation of Mustelidae restriction factor repertoires are warranted, with a view to the potential for an HIV-1

  6. Persistent HIV-1 replication maintains the tissue reservoir during therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Kim, Eun-Young; Archer, John; Pond, Sergei L. Kosakovsky; Chung, Yoon-Seok; Penugonda, Sudhir; Chipman, Jeffrey; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Malim, Michael H.; Rambaut, Andrew; Haase, Ashley T.; McLean, Angela R.; Wolinsky, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoid tissue is a key reservoir established by HIV-1 during acute infection. It is a site of viral production, storage of viral particles in immune complexes, and viral persistence. Whilst combinations of antiretroviral drugs usually suppress viral replication and reduce viral RNA to undetectable levels in blood, it is unclear whether treatment fully suppresses viral replication in lymphoid tissue reservoirs. Here we show that virus evolution and trafficking between tissue compartments continues in patients with undetectable levels of virus in their bloodstream. A spatial dynamic model of persistent viral replication and spread explains why the development of drug resistance is not a foregone conclusion under conditions where drug concentrations are insufficient to completely block virus replication. These data provide fresh insights into the evolutionary and infection dynamics of the virus population within the host, revealing that HIV-1 can continue to replicate and refill the viral reservoir despite potent antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26814962

  7. Persistent HIV-1 replication maintains the tissue reservoir during therapy.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Redondo, Ramon; Fryer, Helen R; Bedford, Trevor; Kim, Eun-Young; Archer, John; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Chung, Yoon-Seok; Penugonda, Sudhir; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Fletcher, Courtney V; Schacker, Timothy W; Malim, Michael H; Rambaut, Andrew; Haase, Ashley T; McLean, Angela R; Wolinsky, Steven M

    2016-02-01

    Lymphoid tissue is a key reservoir established by HIV-1 during acute infection. It is a site associated with viral production, storage of viral particles in immune complexes, and viral persistence. Although combinations of antiretroviral drugs usually suppress viral replication and reduce viral RNA to undetectable levels in blood, it is unclear whether treatment fully suppresses viral replication in lymphoid tissue reservoirs. Here we show that virus evolution and trafficking between tissue compartments continues in patients with undetectable levels of virus in their bloodstream. We present a spatial and dynamic model of persistent viral replication and spread that indicates why the development of drug resistance is not a foregone conclusion under conditions in which drug concentrations are insufficient to completely block virus replication. These data provide new insights into the evolutionary and infection dynamics of the virus population within the host, revealing that HIV-1 can continue to replicate and replenish the viral reservoir despite potent antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26814962

  8. Heroin inhibits HIV-restriction miRNAs and enhances HIV infection of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Tong-Cui; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Geller, Ellen B.; Adler, Martin W.; Peng, Jin-Song; Zhou, Wang; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Although opioids have been extensively studied for their impact on the immune system, limited information is available about the specific actions of opioids on intracellular antiviral innate immunity against HIV infection. Thus, we investigated whether heroin, one of the most abused drugs, inhibits the expression of intracellular HIV restriction microRNA (miRNA) and facilitates HIV replication in macrophages. Heroin treatment of macrophages enhanced HIV replication, which was associated with the downregulation of several HIV restriction miRNAs. These heroin-mediated actions on the miRNAs and HIV could be antagonized by naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the in vitro negative impact of heroin on HIV-associated miRNAs was confirmed by the in vivo observation that heroin addicts had significantly lower levels of macrophage-derived HIV restriction miRNAs than those in the control subjects. These in vitro and in vivo findings indicate that heroin use compromises intracellular anti-HIV innate immunity, providing a favorable microenvironment for HIV survival in the target cells. PMID:26583016

  9. [Structure and molecular mechanisms of infection and replication of HIV].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hironori; Ode, Hirotaka; Motomura, Kazushi; Yokoyama, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    Studies on molecular structure and mechanisms of replication of a pathogen are important from both scientific and clinical viewpoints. The replication study allows us to identify key molecules to regulate life cycle of the pathogen and to screen rationally anti-pathogen drugs. The structural study helps understand how the key molecules work at atomic levels and to design adequately the drugs. In this article, we review important findings on structural and replication studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We also summarize the latest methods for the structural study, mainly focusing on computational simulation technology (in silico analysis). Finally, we summarize briefly standard methods to study replication of viruses. PMID:19177750

  10. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Suppression of HIV Infectivity and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Tami; Lynch, Kevin; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R.; Tustin, Nancy B.; Lai, Jian Ping; Metzger, David S.; Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram would down regulate HIV infectivity and that the greatest effects would be seen in people with depression. Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathobiology of depression, and pharmacologic therapies for depression target this system. The 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous and immune systems. Depression has been associated with suppression of natural killer cells (NK) cells and CD8+ lymphocytes, key regulators of HIV infection. Methods Ex-vivo models for acute and chronic HIV infection were used to study the effects of citalopram on HIV viral infection and replication, in 48 depressed and non-depressed women. For both the acute and chronic infection models, HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was measured in the citalopram treatment condition and the control condition. Results The SSRI significantly downregulated the RT response in both the acute and chronic infection models. Specifically, citalopram significantly decreased the acute HIV infectivity of macrophages. Citalopram also significantly decreased HIV viral replication in the latently infected T-cell line and in the latently infected macrophage cell line. There was no difference in down-regulation by depression status. Conclusions These studies suggest that an SSRI enhances NK/CD8 non-cytolytic HIV suppression in HIV/AIDS and decreases HIV viral infectivity of macrophages, ex vivo, suggesting the need for in vivo studies to determine a potential role for agents targeting serotonin in the host defense against HIV. PMID:20947783

  11. Partial Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Type I Interferons: Impact of Cell-to-Cell Viral Transfer▿

    PubMed Central

    Vendrame, Daniela; Sourisseau, Marion; Perrin, Virginie; Schwartz, Olivier; Mammano, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN) inhibit several steps of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) replication cycle. Some HIV proteins, like Vif and Vpu, directly counteract IFN-induced restriction factors. Other mechanisms are expected to modulate the extent of IFN inhibition. Here, we studied the impact of IFN on various aspects of HIV replication in primary T lymphocytes. We confirm the potent effect of IFN on Gag p24 production in supernatants. Interestingly, IFN had a more limited effect on HIV spread, measured as the appearance of Gag-expressing cells. Primary isolates displayed similar differences in the inhibition of p24 release and virus spread. Virus emergence was the consequence of suboptimal inhibition of HIV replication and was not due to the selection of resistant variants. Cell-to-cell HIV transfer, a potent means of virus replication, was less sensitive to IFN than infection by cell-free virions. These results suggest that IFN are less active in cell cultures than initially thought. They help explain the incomplete protection by naturally secreted IFN during HIV infection and the unsatisfactory outcome of IFN treatment in HIV-infected patients. PMID:19706714

  12. Factors secreted by human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected cells can enhance or inhibit replication of HIV-1 in HTLV-I-uninfected cells: implications for in vivo coinfection with HTLV-I and HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Moriuchi, H; Moriuchi, M; Fauci, A S

    1998-05-18

    It remains controversial whether human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) coinfection leads to more rapid progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease in dually infected individuals. To investigate whether HTLV-I infection of certain cells can modulate HIV-1 infection of surrounding cells, primary CD4(+) T cells were treated with cell-free supernatants from HTLV-I-infected MT-2 cell cultures. The primary CD4+ T cells became resistant to macrophage (M)-tropic HIV-1 but highly susceptible to T cell (T)-tropic HIV-1. The CC chemokines RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, and MIP-1beta in the MT-2 cell supernatants were identified as the major suppressive factors for M-tropic HIV-1 as well as the enhancers of T-tropic HIV-1 infection, whereas soluble Tax protein increased susceptibility to both M- and T-tropic HIV-1. The effect of Tax or CC chemokines on T-tropic HIV-1 was mediated, at least in part, by increasing HIV Env-mediated fusogenicity. Our data suggest that the net effect of HTLV-I coinfection in HIV-infected individuals favors the transition from M- to T-tropic HIV phenotype, which is generally indicative of progressive HIV disease. PMID:9584147

  13. Macrophages sustain HIV replication in vivo independently of T cells.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Jenna B; Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Foster, John; Zakharova, Oksana; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Caro-Vegas, Carolina; Madden, Victoria; Sharpe, Garrett; Haase, Ashley T; Eron, Joseph J; Garcia, J Victor

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages have long been considered to contribute to HIV infection of the CNS; however, a recent study has contradicted this early work and suggests that myeloid cells are not an in vivo source of virus production. Here, we addressed the role of macrophages in HIV infection by first analyzing monocytes isolated from viremic patients and patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment. We were unable to find viral DNA or viral outgrowth in monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. To determine whether tissue macrophages are productively infected, we used 3 different but complementary humanized mouse models. Two of these models (bone marrow/liver/thymus [BLT] mice and T cell-only mice [ToM]) have been previously described, and the third model was generated by reconstituting immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells that were devoid of human T cells (myeloid-only mice [MoM]) to specifically evaluate HIV replication in this population. Using MoM, we demonstrated that macrophages can sustain HIV replication in the absence of T cells; HIV-infected macrophages are distributed in various tissues including the brain; replication-competent virus can be rescued ex vivo from infected macrophages; and infected macrophages can establish de novo infection. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophages represent a genuine target for HIV infection in vivo that can sustain and transmit infection. PMID:26950420

  14. Macrophages sustain HIV replication in vivo independently of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Foster, John; Zakharova, Oksana; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Caro-Vegas, Carolina; Sharpe, Garrett; Haase, Ashley T.; Eron, Joseph J.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have long been considered to contribute to HIV infection of the CNS; however, a recent study has contradicted this early work and suggests that myeloid cells are not an in vivo source of virus production. Here, we addressed the role of macrophages in HIV infection by first analyzing monocytes isolated from viremic patients and patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment. We were unable to find viral DNA or viral outgrowth in monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. To determine whether tissue macrophages are productively infected, we used 3 different but complementary humanized mouse models. Two of these models (bone marrow/liver/thymus [BLT] mice and T cell–only mice [ToM]) have been previously described, and the third model was generated by reconstituting immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells that were devoid of human T cells (myeloid-only mice [MoM]) to specifically evaluate HIV replication in this population. Using MoM, we demonstrated that macrophages can sustain HIV replication in the absence of T cells; HIV-infected macrophages are distributed in various tissues including the brain; replication-competent virus can be rescued ex vivo from infected macrophages; and infected macrophages can establish de novo infection. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophages represent a genuine target for HIV infection in vivo that can sustain and transmit infection. PMID:26950420

  15. HIV-1 Capsid-Cyclophilin Interactions Determine Nuclear Import Pathway, Integration Targeting and Replication Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Torsten; Ocwieja, Karen E.; Rasaiyaah, Jane; Price, Amanda J.; Brady, Troy L.; Roth, Shoshannah L.; Hué, Stéphane; Fletcher, Adam J.; Lee, KyeongEun; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Jenner, Richard G.; James, Leo C.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Towers, Greg J.

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses such as HIV-1 traverse nuclear pore complexes (NPC) and infect terminally differentiated non-dividing cells, but how they do this is unclear. The cytoplasmic NPC protein Nup358/RanBP2 was identified as an HIV-1 co-factor in previous studies. Here we report that HIV-1 capsid (CA) binds directly to the cyclophilin domain of Nup358/RanBP2. Fusion of the Nup358/RanBP2 cyclophilin (Cyp) domain to the tripartite motif of TRIM5 created a novel inhibitor of HIV-1 replication, consistent with an interaction in vivo. In contrast to CypA binding to HIV-1 CA, Nup358 binding is insensitive to inhibition with cyclosporine, allowing contributions from CypA and Nup358 to be distinguished. Inhibition of CypA reduced dependence on Nup358 and the nuclear basket protein Nup153, suggesting that CypA regulates the choice of the nuclear import machinery that is engaged by the virus. HIV-1 cyclophilin-binding mutants CA G89V and P90A favored integration in genomic regions with a higher density of transcription units and associated features than wild type virus. Integration preference of wild type virus in the presence of cyclosporine was similarly altered to regions of higher transcription density. In contrast, HIV-1 CA alterations in another patch on the capsid surface that render the virus less sensitive to Nup358 or TRN-SR2 depletion (CA N74D, N57A) resulted in integration in genomic regions sparse in transcription units. Both groups of CA mutants are impaired in replication in HeLa cells and human monocyte derived macrophages. Our findings link HIV-1 engagement of cyclophilins with both integration targeting and replication efficiency and provide insight into the conservation of viral cyclophilin recruitment. PMID:22174692

  16. Cocaine Enhances HIV-1 Replication in CD4+ T Cells by Down-Regulating MiR-125b

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Chinmay K.; Pandhare Dash, Jui; Mantri, Jyoti Velamarti; Dash, Chandravanu C. V.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine effects of cocaine on HIV-1 replication in primary CD4+ T cells. Cocaine a commonly used drug among HIV-1 positive individuals serves as a cofactor for HIV-1 infection and progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Accumulating evidence suggest that cocaine increases HIV-1 replication in cell cultures, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and animal models. Intriguingly, there are no studies on cocaine-induced alterations in HIV-1 replication in primary CD4+ T cells that serve as the main targets for HIV-1 replication in vivo. In this report, we demonstrate cocaine-induced enhancement of HIV-1 replication in primary CD4+ T cells isolated from human PBMCs. To decipher a potential mechanism, we examined whether cocaine targets the innate antiviral immunity of CD4+ T cells mediated by cellular microRNAs (miRNAs). This is because recently a network of anti-HIV miRNAs in CD4+ T cells is highlighted to suppress viral replication. Our genome wide miRNA expression analysis indicated downregulation of several anti-HIV miRNAs (miR-28, miR-125b, miR-150, miR-223, and miR-382) in cocaine treated CD4+ T cells. However, our real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed significant downregulation of miR-125b only. Our results illustrated that miR-125b knockdown enhances HIV-1 replication, whereas overexpression of miR-125b decreases HIV-1 replication in these cells. Therefore, we believe miR-125b is a key player for the cocaine induced enhancement of HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells. Since, miR-125b targets the 3′ UTR regions of HIV-1 transcripts and inhibits viral protein translation, our data suggest modulation of post entry steps of HIV-1 by cocaine. Given that a plethora of studies suggest that cocaine regulates HIV entry, our results implicate a potentially novel mechanism by which cocaine can increase viral replication in CD4+ T cells. PMID:23251514

  17. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Santiago; Batisse, Julien; Libre, Camille; Bernacchi, Serena; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication. PMID:25606970

  18. HIV-1 replication and the cellular eukaryotic translation apparatus.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Santiago; Batisse, Julien; Libre, Camille; Bernacchi, Serena; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication. PMID:25606970

  19. The dual action of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1 (PARP-1) inhibition in HIV-1 infection: HIV-1 LTR inhibition and diminution in Rho GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Rom, Slava; Reichenbach, Nancy L.; Dykstra, Holly; Persidsky, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Multifactorial mechanisms comprising countless cellular factors and virus-encoded transactivators regulate the transcription of HIV-1 (HIV). Since poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) regulates numerous genes through its interaction with various transcription factors, inhibition of PARP-1 has surfaced recently as a powerful anti-inflammatory tool. We suggest a novel tactic to diminish HIV replication via PARP-1 inhibition in an in vitro model system, exploiting human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). PARP-1 inhibition was capable to lessen HIV replication in MDM by 60–80% after 7 days infection. Tat, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are known triggers of the Long Terminal Repeat (LTR), which can switch virus replication. Tat overexpression in MDM transfected with an LTR reporter plasmid resulted in a 4.2-fold increase in LTR activation; PARP inhibition caused 70% reduction of LTR activity. LTR activity, which increased 3-fold after PMA or TNFα treatment, was reduced by PARP inhibition (by 85–95%). PARP inhibition in MDM exhibited 90% diminution in NFκB activity (known to mediate TNFα- and PMA-induced HIV LTR activation). Cytoskeleton rearrangements are important in effective HIV-1 infection. PARP inactivation reduced actin cytoskeleton rearrangements by affecting Rho GTPase machinery. These discoveries suggest that inactivation of PARP suppresses HIV replication in MDM by via attenuation of LTR activation, NFκB suppression and its effects on the cytoskeleton. PARP appears to be essential for HIV replication and its inhibition may provide an effective approach to management of HIV infection. PMID:26379653

  20. A post-entry role for CD63 in early HIV-1 replication

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guangyu; Dziuba, Natallia; Friedrich, Brian; Murray, James L.; Ferguson, Monique R.

    2011-04-10

    Macrophages and CD4{sup +} lymphocytes are the major reservoirs for HIV-1 infection. CD63 is a tetraspanin transmembrane protein, which has been shown to play an essential role during HIV-1 replication in macrophages. In this study, we further confirm the requirement of CD63 in early HIV-1 replication events in both macrophages and a CD4{sup +} cell line. Further analysis revealed that viral attachment and cell-cell fusion were unaffected by CD63 silencing. However, CD63-depleted macrophages showed a significant decrease in the initiation and completion of HIV-1 reverse transcription, affecting subsequent events of the HIV-1 life cycle. Integration of HIV-1 cDNA as well as the formation of 2-LTR circles was notably reduced. Reporter assays showed that CD63 down regulation reduced production of the early HIV protein Tat. In agreement, CD63 silencing also inhibited production of the late protein p24. These findings suggest that CD63 plays an early post-entry role prior to or at the reverse transcription step.

  1. Transcriptional Profiling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Replicating Ex vivo in Blood from HIV- and HIV+ Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhengyu; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Li, Hualin; Meng, Lu; Laal, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Hematogenous dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) occurs during both primary and reactivated tuberculosis (TB). Although hematogenous dissemination occurs in non-HIV TB patients, in ∼80% of these patients, TB manifests exclusively as pulmonary disease. In contrast, extrapulmonary, disseminated, and/or miliary TB is seen in 60–70% of HIV-infected TB patients, suggesting that hematogenous dissemination is likely more common in HIV+ patients. To understand M. tb adaptation to the blood environment during bacteremia, we have studied the transcriptome of M. tb replicating in human whole blood. To investigate if M. tb discriminates between the hematogenous environments of immunocompetent and immunodeficient individuals, we compared the M. tb transcriptional profiles during replication in blood from HIV- and HIV+ donors. Our results demonstrate that M. tb survives and replicates in blood from both HIV- and HIV+ donors and enhances its virulence/pathogenic potential in the hematogenous environment. The M. tb blood-specific transcriptome reflects suppression of dormancy, induction of cell-wall remodeling, alteration in mode of iron acquisition, potential evasion of immune surveillance, and enhanced expression of important virulence factors that drive active M. tb infection and dissemination. These changes are accentuated during bacterial replication in blood from HIV+ patients. Furthermore, the expression of ESAT-6, which participates in dissemination of M. tb from the lungs, is upregulated in M. tb growing in blood, especially during growth in blood from HIV+ patients. Preliminary experiments also demonstrate that ESAT-6 promotes HIV replication in U1 cells. These studies provide evidence, for the first time, that during bacteremia, M. tb can adapt to the blood environment by modifying its transcriptome in a manner indicative of an enhanced-virulence phenotype that favors active infection. Additionally, transcriptional modifications in HIV+ blood may

  2. Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Prevents HIV Rebound.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pheroze; Maidji, Ekaterina; Stoddart, Cheryl A

    2016-05-01

    HIV evades eradication because transcriptionally dormant proviral genomes persist in long-lived reservoirs of resting CD4(+) T cells and myeloid cells, which are the source of viral rebound after cessation of antiretroviral therapy. Dormant HIV genomes readily produce infectious virus upon cellular activation because host transcription factors activated specifically by cell stress and heat shock mediate full-length HIV transcription. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is overexpressed during heat shock and activates inducible cellular transcription factors. Here we show that heat shock accelerates HIV transcription through induction of Hsp90 activity, which activates essential HIV-specific cellular transcription factors (NF-κB, NFAT, and STAT5), and that inhibition of Hsp90 greatly reduces gene expression mediated by these factors. More importantly, we show that Hsp90 controls virus transcription in vivo by specific Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical development, tanespimycin (17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) and AUY922, which durably prevented viral rebound in HIV-infected humanized NOD scid IL-2Rγ(-/-) bone marrow-liver-thymus mice up to 11 weeks after treatment cessation. Despite the absence of rebound viremia, we were able to recover infectious HIV from PBMC with heat shock. Replication-competent virus was detected in spleen cells from these nonviremic Hsp90 inhibitor-treated mice, indicating the presence of a tissue reservoir of persistent infection. Our novel findings provide in vivo evidence that inhibition of Hsp90 activity prevents HIV gene expression in replication-competent cellular reservoirs that would typically cause rebound in plasma viremia after antiretroviral therapy cessation. Alternating or supplementing Hsp90 inhibitors with current antiretroviral therapy regimens could conceivably suppress rebound viremia from persistent HIV reservoirs. PMID:26957545

  3. Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Prevents HIV Rebound*

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pheroze; Maidji, Ekaterina; Stoddart, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    HIV evades eradication because transcriptionally dormant proviral genomes persist in long-lived reservoirs of resting CD4+ T cells and myeloid cells, which are the source of viral rebound after cessation of antiretroviral therapy. Dormant HIV genomes readily produce infectious virus upon cellular activation because host transcription factors activated specifically by cell stress and heat shock mediate full-length HIV transcription. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is overexpressed during heat shock and activates inducible cellular transcription factors. Here we show that heat shock accelerates HIV transcription through induction of Hsp90 activity, which activates essential HIV-specific cellular transcription factors (NF-κB, NFAT, and STAT5), and that inhibition of Hsp90 greatly reduces gene expression mediated by these factors. More importantly, we show that Hsp90 controls virus transcription in vivo by specific Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical development, tanespimycin (17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) and AUY922, which durably prevented viral rebound in HIV-infected humanized NOD scid IL-2Rγ−/− bone marrow-liver-thymus mice up to 11 weeks after treatment cessation. Despite the absence of rebound viremia, we were able to recover infectious HIV from PBMC with heat shock. Replication-competent virus was detected in spleen cells from these nonviremic Hsp90 inhibitor-treated mice, indicating the presence of a tissue reservoir of persistent infection. Our novel findings provide in vivo evidence that inhibition of Hsp90 activity prevents HIV gene expression in replication-competent cellular reservoirs that would typically cause rebound in plasma viremia after antiretroviral therapy cessation. Alternating or supplementing Hsp90 inhibitors with current antiretroviral therapy regimens could conceivably suppress rebound viremia from persistent HIV reservoirs. PMID:26957545

  4. Fangchinoline Inhibits Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by Interfering with gp160 Proteolytic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhitao; Lu, Yimei; Liao, Qingjiao; Wu, Yang; Chen, Xulin

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy has led to a significant reduction in the morbidity and mortality of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. However, the emergence of drug resistance has resulted in the failure of treatments in large numbers of patients and thus necessitates the development of new classes of anti-HIV drugs. In this study, more than 200 plant-derived small-molecule compounds were evaluated in a cell-based HIV-1 antiviral screen, resulting in the identification of a novel HIV-1 inhibitor (fangchinoline). Fangchinoline, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Radix Stephaniae tetrandrae, exhibited antiviral activity against HIV-1 laboratory strains NL4-3, LAI and BaL in MT-4 and PM1 cells with a 50% effective concentration ranging from 0.8 to 1.7 µM. Mechanism-of-action studies showed that fangchinoline did not exhibit measurable antiviral activity in TZM-b1 cells but did inhibit the production of infectious virions in HIV-1 cDNA transfected 293T cells, which suggests that the compound targets a late event in infection cycle. Furthermore, the antiviral effect of fangchinoline seems to be HIV-1 enve1ope-dependent, as the production of infectious HIV-1 particles packaged with a heterologous envelope, the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein, was unaffected by fangchinoline. Western blot analysis of HIV envelope proteins expressed in transfected 293T cells and in isolated virions showed that fangchinoline inhibited HIV-1 gp160 processing, resulting in reduced envelope glycoprotein incorporation into nascent virions. Collectively, our results demonstrate that fangchinoline inhibits HIV-1 replication by interfering with gp160 proteolytic processing. Fangchinoline may serve as a starting point for developing a new HIV-1 therapeutic approach. PMID:22720080

  5. Fangchinoline inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication by interfering with gp160 proteolytic processing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhitao; Lu, Yimei; Liao, Qingjiao; Wu, Yang; Chen, Xulin

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy has led to a significant reduction in the morbidity and mortality of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. However, the emergence of drug resistance has resulted in the failure of treatments in large numbers of patients and thus necessitates the development of new classes of anti-HIV drugs. In this study, more than 200 plant-derived small-molecule compounds were evaluated in a cell-based HIV-1 antiviral screen, resulting in the identification of a novel HIV-1 inhibitor (fangchinoline). Fangchinoline, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Radix Stephaniae tetrandrae, exhibited antiviral activity against HIV-1 laboratory strains NL4-3, LAI and BaL in MT-4 and PM1 cells with a 50% effective concentration ranging from 0.8 to 1.7 µM. Mechanism-of-action studies showed that fangchinoline did not exhibit measurable antiviral activity in TZM-b1 cells but did inhibit the production of infectious virions in HIV-1 cDNA transfected 293T cells, which suggests that the compound targets a late event in infection cycle. Furthermore, the antiviral effect of fangchinoline seems to be HIV-1 envelope-dependent, as the production of infectious HIV-1 particles packaged with a heterologous envelope, the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein, was unaffected by fangchinoline. Western blot analysis of HIV envelope proteins expressed in transfected 293T cells and in isolated virions showed that fangchinoline inhibited HIV-1 gp160 processing, resulting in reduced envelope glycoprotein incorporation into nascent virions. Collectively, our results demonstrate that fangchinoline inhibits HIV-1 replication by interfering with gp160 proteolytic processing. Fangchinoline may serve as a starting point for developing a new HIV-1 therapeutic approach. PMID:22720080

  6. Assessment of the antiviral capacity of primary natural killer cells by optimized in vitro quantification of HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    He, Xuan; Simoneau, Camille R; Granoff, Mitchell E; Lunemann, Sebastian; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Shao, Yiming; Altfeld, Marcus; Körner, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Despite a growing number of studies investigating the impact of natural killer (NK) cells on HIV-1 pathogenesis, the exact mechanism by which NK cells recognize HIV-1-infected cells and exert immunological pressure on HIV-1 remains unknown. Previously several groups including ours have introduced autologous HIV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells as suitable target cells to study NK-cell function in response to HIV-1 infection in vitro. Here, we re-evaluated and optimized a standardized in vitro assay that allows assessing the antiviral capacity of NK cells. This includes the implementation of HIV-1 RNA copy numbers as readout for NK-cell-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 replication and the investigation of inter-assay variation in comparison to previous methods, such as HIV-1 p24 Gag production and frequency of p24(+) CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we investigated the possibility to hasten the duration of the assay and provide concepts for downstream applications. Autologous CD4(+) T cells and NK cells were obtained from peripheral blood of HIV-negative healthy individuals and were separately enriched through negative selection. CD4(+) T cells were infected with the HIV-1 strain JR-CSF at an MOI of 0.01. Infected CD4(+) T cells were then co-cultured with primary NK cells at various effector:target ratios for up to 14days. Supernatants obtained from media exchanged at days 4, 7, 11 and 14 were used for quantification of HIV-1 p24 Gag and HIV-1 RNA copy numbers. In addition, frequency of infected CD4(+) T cells was determined by flow cytometric detection of intracellular p24 Gag. The assay displayed minimal inter-assay variation when utilizing viral RNA quantification or p24 Gag concentration for the assessment of viral replication. Viral RNA quantification was more rigorous to display magnitude and kinetics of NK-cell-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 replication, longitudinally and between tested individuals. The results of this study demonstrate that NK-cell-mediated inhibition of

  7. RNA interference directed to CDK2 inhibits HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Ammosova, Tatyana; Berro, Reem; Kashanchi, Fatah; Nekhai, Sergei

    2005-10-25

    We previously reported that cell cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) is required for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) Tat-dependent transcription in vitro. In the present study, CDK2-specific RNA interference in cultured HEK293T cells inhibited CDK2 expression and Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription from non-integrated HIV-1 promoter but not basal HIV-1 transcription or transcription from CMV or beta-actin promoters. Also, CDK2-specific RNA interference inhibited Tat-induced transcription from the integrated HIV-1 promoter in HeLa-CD4-LTR-beta-gal cells and potently blocked TNFalpha-induced HIV-1 viral replication in OM10.1 cells. CDK2-specific RNA interference did not have an effect on cell cycle progression, but it augmented TNFalpha-induced apoptosis of OM10.1 cells. Our results indicate that CDK2 participates in Tat-mediated HIV-1 transcription and may serve as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:16085226

  8. HIV-protease inhibitors block the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses at an early post-entry replication step

    SciTech Connect

    Federico, Maurizio

    2011-08-15

    The inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (PIs) have been designed to block the activity of the viral aspartyl-protease. However, it is now accepted that this family of inhibitors can also affect the activity of cell proteases. Since the replication of many virus species requires the activity of host cell proteases, investigating the effects of PIs on the life cycle of viruses other than HIV would be of interest. Here, the potent inhibition induced by saquinavir and nelfinavir on the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses is described. These are unrelated enveloped RNA viruses infecting target cells upon endocytosis and intracellular fusion. The PI-induced inhibition was apparently a consequence of a block at the level of the fusion between viral envelope and endosomal membranes. These findings would open the way towards the therapeutic use of PIs against enveloped RNA viruses other than HIV.

  9. ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Oehler, Hannah; Voigt, Andrea; Dalic, Denis; Freiwald, Anja; Serve, Hubert; Beli, Petra

    2016-02-01

    The slowing down or stalling of replication forks is commonly known as replication stress and arises from multiple causes such as DNA lesions, nucleotide depletion, RNA-DNA hybrids, and oncogene activation. The ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) plays an essential role in the cellular response to replication stress and inhibition of ATR has emerged as therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers that exhibit high levels of replication stress. However, the cellular signaling induced by replication stress and the substrate spectrum of ATR has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we employed quantitative MS-based proteomics to define the cellular signaling after nucleotide depletion-induced replication stress and replication fork collapse following ATR inhibition. We demonstrate that replication stress results in increased phosphorylation of a subset of proteins, many of which are involved in RNA splicing and transcription and have previously not been associated with the cellular replication stress response. Furthermore, our data reveal the ATR-dependent phosphorylation following replication stress and discover novel putative ATR target sites on MCM6, TOPBP1, RAD51AP1, and PSMD4. We establish that ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress and leads to the activation of the ATM-driven double-strand break repair signaling. PMID:26572502

  10. RPA inhibition increases replication stress and suppresses tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Glanzer, Jason G; Liu, Shengqin; Wang, Ling; Mosel, Adam; Peng, Aimin; Oakley, Greg G

    2014-09-15

    The ATR/Chk1 pathway is a critical surveillance network that maintains genomic integrity during DNA replication by stabilizing the replication forks during normal replication to avoid replication stress. One of the many differences between normal cells and cancer cells is the amount of replication stress that occurs during replication. Cancer cells with activated oncogenes generate increased levels of replication stress. This creates an increased dependency on the ATR/Chk1 pathway in cancer cells and opens up an opportunity to preferentially kill cancer cells by inhibiting this pathway. In support of this idea, we have identified a small molecule termed HAMNO ((1Z)-1-[(2-hydroxyanilino)methylidene]naphthalen-2-one), a novel protein interaction inhibitor of replication protein A (RPA), a protein involved in the ATR/Chk1 pathway. HAMNO selectively binds the N-terminal domain of RPA70, effectively inhibiting critical RPA protein interactions that rely on this domain. HAMNO inhibits both ATR autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of RPA32 Ser33 by ATR. By itself, HAMNO treatment creates DNA replication stress in cancer cells that are already experiencing replication stress, but not in normal cells, and it acts synergistically with etoposide to kill cancer cells in vitro and slow tumor growth in vivo. Thus, HAMNO illustrates how RPA inhibitors represent candidate therapeutics for cancer treatment, providing disease selectivity in cancer cells by targeting their differential response to replication stress. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5165-72. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25070753

  11. RPA Inhibition increases Replication Stress and Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Liu, Shengqin; Wang, Ling; Mosel, Adam; Peng, Aimin; Oakley, Greg G.

    2014-01-01

    The ATR/Chk1 pathway is a critical surveillance network that maintains genomic integrity during DNA replication by stabilizing the replication forks during normal replication to avoid replication stress. One of the many differences between normal cells and cancer cells is the amount of replication stress that occurs during replication. Cancer cells with activated oncogenes generate increased levels of replication stress. This creates an increased dependency on the ATR/Chk1 pathway in cancer cells and opens up an opportunity to preferentially kill cancer cells by inhibiting this pathway. In support of this idea, we have identified a small molecule termed HAMNO ((1Z)-1-[(2-hydroxyanilino)methylidene]naphthalen-2-one), a novel protein interaction inhibitor of replication protein A (RPA), a protein involved in the ATR/Chk1 pathway. HAMNO selectively binds the N-terminal domain of RPA70, effectively inhibiting critical RPA protein interactions which rely on this domain. HAMNO inhibits both ATR autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of RPA32 Ser33 by ATR. By itself, HAMNO treatment creates DNA replication stress in cancer cells that are already experiencing replication stress, but not in normal cells, and it acts synergistically with etoposide to kill cancer cells in vitro and slow tumor growth in vivo. Thus, HAMNO illustrates how RPA inhibitors represent candidate therapeutics for cancer treatment, providing disease selectivity in cancer cells by targeting their differential response to replication stress. PMID:25070753

  12. Evidence for Vpr-dependent HIV-1 Replication in Human CD4+ CEM.NKR T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vpr is exclusively expressed in primate lentiviruses and contributes to viral replication and disease progression in vivo. HIV-1 Vpr has two major activities in vitro: arrest of cell cycle in the G2 phase (G2 arrest), and enhancement of viral replication in macrophages. Previously, we reported a potent HIV-1 restriction in the human CD4+ CEM.NKR (NKR) T cells, where wild-type (WT) HIV-1 replication was inhibited by almost 1,000-fold. From the parental NKR cells, we isolated eight clones by limiting dilution. These clones showed three levels of resistance to the WT HIV-1 infection: non-permissive (NP), semi-permissive (SP), and permissive (P). Here, we compared the replication of WT, Vif-defective, Vpr-defective, and Vpu-defective viruses in these cells. Results Although both WT and Vpu-defective viruses could replicate in the permissive and semi-permissive clones, the replication of Vif-defective and Vpr-defective viruses was completely restricted. The expression of APOBEC3G (A3G) cytidine deaminase in NKR cells explains why Vif, but not Vpr, was required for HIV-1 replication. When the Vpr-defective virus life cycle was compared with the WT virus life cycle in the semi-permissive cells, it was found that the Vpr-defective virus could enter the cell and produce virions containing properly processed Gag and Env proteins, but these virions showed much less efficiency for reverse transcription during the next-round of infection. In addition, although viral replication was restricted in the non-permissive cells, treatment with arsenic trioxide (As2O3) could completely restore WT, but not Vpr-defective virus replication. Moreover, disruption of Vpr binding to its cofactor DCAF1 and/or induction of G2 arrest activity did not disrupt the Vpr activity in enhancing HIV-1 replication in NKR cells. Conclusions These results demonstrate that HIV-1 replication in NKR cells is Vpr-dependent. Vpr promotes HIV-1 replication from the 2nd cycle likely by overcoming a

  13. A study of the topoisomerase II activity in HIV-1 replication using the ferrocene derivatives as probes.

    PubMed

    Kondapi, Anand K; Satyanarayana, Nathamu; Saikrishna, A D

    2006-06-15

    Human Topoisomerase II is present in two isoforms, 170KDa alpha and 180KDa beta. Both the isoforms play a crucial role in maintenance of topological changes during DNA replication and recombination. It has been shown that Topoisomerase II activity is required for HIV-1 replication and the enzyme is phosphorylated during early time points of HIV-1 replication. In the present study, we have studied the molecular action of Topoisomerase II inhibitors, azalactone ferrocene (AzaFecp), Thiomorpholide amido methyl ferrocene (ThioFecp), and Ruthenium benzene amino pyridine (Ru(ben)Apy) on cell proliferation and also on various events of HIV-1 replication cycle. The Topoisomerase II beta over-expressing neuroblastoma cell line shows a higher sensitivity to these compounds compared to the Sup-T1 cell line. All the three Topoisomerase II inhibitors show significant anti-HIV activity at nanomolar concentrations against an Indian isolate of HIV-1(93IN101) in Sup-T1 cell line. An analysis of action of these compounds on proviral DNA synthesis at 5h of post-infection shows that they inhibit proviral DNA synthesis as well as the formation of pre-integration complexes completely. Further analysis, using polymerase chain reaction and western blot, showed that both the Topoisomerase II alpha and beta isoforms are present in the pre-integration complexes, suggesting their significant role in HIV-1 replication. PMID:16712776

  14. ADAR1 Facilitates HIV-1 Replication in Primary CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Hamme, John L.; Jansen, Machiel H.; van Dort, Karel A.; Vanderver, Adeline; Rice, Gillian I.; Crow, Yanick J.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike resting CD4+ T cells, activated CD4+T cells are highly susceptible to infection of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). HIV-1 infects T cells and macrophages without activating the nucleic acid sensors and the anti-viral type I interferon response. Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) is an RNA editing enzyme that displays antiviral activity against several RNA viruses. Mutations in ADAR1 cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutieères syndrome (AGS). This disease is characterized by an inappropriate activation of the interferon-stimulated gene response. Here we show that HIV-1 replication, in ADAR1-deficient CD4+T lymphocytes from AGS patients, is blocked at the level of protein translation. Furthermore, viral protein synthesis block is accompanied by an activation of interferon-stimulated genes. RNA silencing of ADAR1 in Jurkat cells also inhibited HIV-1 protein synthesis. Our data support that HIV-1 requires ADAR1 for efficient replication in human CD4+T cells. PMID:26629815

  15. Inhibition of virus DNA replication by artificial zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed

    Sera, Takashi

    2005-02-01

    Prevention of virus infections is a major objective in agriculture and human health. One attractive approach to the prevention is inhibition of virus replication. To demonstrate this concept in vivo, an artificial zinc finger protein (AZP) targeting the replication origin of the Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV), a model DNA virus, was created. In vitro DNA binding assays indicated that the AZP efficiently blocked binding of the viral replication protein (Rep), which initiates virus replication, to the replication origin. All of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the AZP showed phenotypes strongly resistant to virus infection, and 84% of the transgenic plants showed no symptom. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that BSCTV replication was completely suppressed in the transgenic plants. Since the mechanism of viral DNA replication is well conserved among plants and mammals, this approach could be applied not only to agricultural crop protection but also to the prevention of virus infections in humans. PMID:15681461

  16. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication by SDZ NIM 811, a nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporine analog.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenwirth, B; Billich, A; Datema, R; Donatsch, P; Hammerschmid, F; Harrison, R; Hiestand, P; Jaksche, H; Mayer, P; Peichl, P

    1994-01-01

    (Me-Ile-4)cyclosporin (SDZ NIM 811) is a 4-substituted cyclosporin which is devoid of immunosuppressive activity but retains full capacity for binding to cyclophilin and exhibits potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity. SDZ NIM 811 selectively inhibits HIV-1 replication in T4 lymphocyte cell lines, in a monocytic cell line, and in HeLa T4 cells. Furthermore, its antiviral activity against laboratory strains and against clinical isolates from geographically distinct regions in primary T4 lymphocytes and in primary monocytes (50% inhibitory concentration = 0.011 to 0.057 micrograms/ml) was demonstrated. SDZ NIM 811 does not inhibit proviral gene expression or virus-specific enzyme functions, either free or bound to cyclophilin. The compound does not influence CD4 expression or inhibit fusion between virus-infected and uninfected cells. SDZ NIM 811 was, however, found to block formation of infectious particles from chronically infected cells. Oral administration to mice, rats, dogs, and monkeys resulted in levels in blood considerably exceeding the drug concentration, which completely blocked virus replication in primary cells. SDZ NIM 811 caused changes of toxicity parameters in rats to a smaller degree than cyclosporine (formerly cyclosporin A). Thus, the potent and selective anti-HIV-1 activity of SDZ NIM 811 and its favorable pharmacokinetic behavior together with its lower nephrotoxicity than that of cyclosporine make this compound a promising candidate for development as an anti-HIV drug. PMID:7527198

  17. Suppression of HIV Replication by CD8+ Regulatory T-Cells in Elite Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Chen, Song; Lai, Chunhui; Lai, Mingyue; Fang, Hua; Dao, Hong; Kang, Jun; Fan, Jianhua; Guo, Weizhong; Fu, Linchun; Andrieu, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated in the Chinese macaque model that an oral vaccine made of inactivated SIV and Lactobacillus plantarum induced CD8+ regulatory T-cells, which suppressed the activation of SIV+CD4+ T-cells, prevented SIV replication, and protected macaques from SIV challenges. Here, we sought whether a similar population of CD8+ T-regs would induce the suppression of HIV replication in elite controllers (ECs), a small population (3‰) of HIV-infected patients with undetectable HIV replication. For that purpose, we investigated the in vitro antiviral activity of fresh CD8+ T-cells on HIV-infected CD4+ T-cells taken from 10 ECs. The 10 ECs had a classical genomic profile: all of them carried the KIR3DL1 gene and 9 carried at least 1 allele of HLA-B:Bw4-80Ile (i.e., with an isoleucine residue at position 80). In the nine HLA-B:Bw4-80Ile-positive patients, we demonstrated a strong viral suppression by KIR3DL1-expressing CD8+ T-cells that required cell-to-cell contact to switch off the activation signals in infected CD4+ T-cells. KIR3DL1-expressing CD8+ T-cells withdrawal and KIR3DL1 neutralization by a specific anti-killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) antibody inhibited the suppression of viral replication. Our findings provide the first evidence for an instrumental role of KIR-expressing CD8+ regulatory T-cells in the natural control of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27148256

  18. Suppression of HIV-1 replication by propolis and its immunoregulatory effect.

    PubMed

    Harish, Z; Rubinstein, A; Golodner, M; Elmaliah, M; Mizrachi, Y

    1997-01-01

    In the current study we show that propolis, a non-toxic natural bee-hive product, suppresses HIV-1 replication and modulates in vitro immune responses. CEM cells were treated with propolis at nontoxic concentrations prior to or following infection with HIV-1. Propolis abolished syncytium formation at 4.5 micrograms/ml and inhibited it at lower doses in a concentration-dependent manner. Propolis decreased p24 antigen production by as much as 90-100% in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, modulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) mitogenic responses upon the addition of propolis was noted, reducing the elevated responses to Concanavalin A (Con A) and enhancing suppressed mitogenic responses to pokeweed mitogen (PWM). In summary, propolis may constitute a non-toxic natural product with both anti HIV-1 and immunoregulatory effects. PMID:9309384

  19. Ebselen, a Small-Molecule Capsid Inhibitor of HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Thenin-Houssier, Suzie; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Pedro-Rosa, Laura; Brady, Angela; Richard, Audrey; Konnick, Briana; Opp, Silvana; Buffone, Cindy; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Kota, Smitha; Billack, Blase; Pietka-Ottlik, Magdalena; Tellinghuisen, Timothy; Choe, Hyeryun; Spicer, Timothy; Scampavia, Louis; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Kojetin, Douglas J; Valente, Susana T

    2016-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid plays crucial roles in HIV-1 replication and thus represents an excellent drug target. We developed a high-throughput screening method based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (HTS-TR-FRET) assay, using the C-terminal domain (CTD) of HIV-1 capsid to identify inhibitors of capsid dimerization. This assay was used to screen a library of pharmacologically active compounds, composed of 1,280in vivo-active drugs, and identified ebselen [2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one], an organoselenium compound, as an inhibitor of HIV-1 capsid CTD dimerization. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the direct interaction of ebselen with the HIV-1 capsid CTD and dimer dissociation when ebselen is in 2-fold molar excess. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed that ebselen covalently binds the HIV-1 capsid CTD, likely via a selenylsulfide linkage with Cys198 and Cys218. This compound presents anti-HIV activity in single and multiple rounds of infection in permissive cell lines as well as in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ebselen inhibits early viral postentry events of the HIV-1 life cycle by impairing the incoming capsid uncoating process. This compound also blocks infection of other retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus, but displays no inhibitory activity against hepatitis C and influenza viruses. This study reports the use of TR-FRET screening to successfully identify a novel capsid inhibitor, ebselen, validating HIV-1 capsid as a promising target for drug development. PMID:26810656

  20. Dimethyl fumarate, an immune modulator and inducer of the antioxidant response, suppresses HIV replication and macrophage-mediated neurotoxicity; a novel candidate for HIV-neuroprotection1

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Stephanie A.; Cook, Denise R.; Chi, Anthony W.S.; Vance, Patricia J.; Kolson, Lorraine L.; Wong, Bethany J.; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.; Kolson, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV infection promotes cognitive dysfunction and neurodegeneration through persistent inflammation and neurotoxin release from infected and/or activated macrophages/microglia. Furthermore, inflammation and immune activation within both the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery correlate with disease progression and morbidity in ART-treated individuals. Accordingly, drugs targeting these pathological processes in the CNS and systemic compartments are needed for effective, adjunctive therapy. Using our in vitro model of HIV-mediated neurotoxicity, in which HIV infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) release excitatory neurotoxins, we show that HIV infection dysregulates the macrophage antioxidant response and reduces levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, restoration of HO-1 expression in HIV-infected MDM reduces neurotoxin release without altering HIV replication. Given these novel observations, we have identified dimethyl fumarate (DMF), used to treat psoriasis and showing promising results in clinical trials for multiple sclerosis, as a potential neuroprotectant and HIV disease-modifying agent. DMF, an immune modulator and inducer of the antioxidant response, suppresses HIV replication and neurotoxin release. Two distinct mechanisms are proposed; inhibition of NF-κB nuclear translocation and signaling, which could contribute to the suppression of HIV replication, and induction of HO-1, which is associated with decreased neurotoxin release. Finally, we found that DMF attenuates CCL2-induced monocyte chemotaxis, suggesting that DMF could decrease recruitment of activated monocytes to the CNS in response to inflammatory mediators. We propose that dysregulation of the antioxidant response during HIV infection drives macrophage-mediated neurotoxicity and that DMF could serve as an adjunctive neuroprotectant and HIV disease modifier in ART-treated individuals. PMID:21976775

  1. Small-Molecule Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by Specific Targeting of the Final Step of Virion Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Yuan, Xiong; Dismuke, David; Forshey, Brett M.; Lundquist, Christopher; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Aiken, Christopher; Chen, Chin Ho

    2004-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of currently available human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapies, a continuing need exists for new drugs to treat HIV-1 infection. We investigated the mechanism by which 3-O-{3′,3′-dimethylsuccinyl}-betulinic acid (DSB) inhibits HIV-1 replication. DSB functions at a late stage of the virus life cycle but does not inhibit the HIV-1 protease in vitro or interfere with virus assembly or release. DSB specifically delays the cleavage of Gag between the capsid (CA) and p2, resulting in delayed formation of the mature viral core and reduced HIV-1 infectivity. Replication of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was resistant to DSB; however, a chimeric SIV carrying CA-p2 sequences from HIV-1 was inhibited by the drug, indicating that susceptibility to DSB maps to the CA-p2 region of the HIV-1 Gag protein. A single point mutation at the CA-p2 cleavage site of HIV-1 conferred strong resistance to DSB, confirming the target of the drug. HIV-1 strains that are resistant to a variety of protease inhibitors were sensitive to DSB. These findings indicate that DSB specifically protects the CA-p2 cleavage site from processing by the viral protease during virion maturation, thereby revealing a novel mechanism for pharmacologic inhibition of HIV-1 replication. PMID:14694123

  2. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Musser, Jeffrey M. B.; Heatley, J. Jill; Koinis, Anastasia V.; Suchodolski, Paulette F.; Guo, Jianhua; Escandon, Paulina; Tizard, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 μg/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture. PMID:26222794

  3. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Musser, Jeffrey M B; Heatley, J Jill; Koinis, Anastasia V; Suchodolski, Paulette F; Guo, Jianhua; Escandon, Paulina; Tizard, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 μg/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture. PMID:26222794

  4. New Approach for Inhibition of HIV Entry: Modifying CD4 Binding Sites by Thiolated Pyrimidine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kanizsai, Szilvia; Ongrádi, József; Aradi, János; Nagy, Károly

    2016-07-01

    Thiolated pyrimidine derivatives have been synthetized and their antiretroviral effect against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1IIIB) and HIV-1 chimeric pseudovirions have been quantitatively determined in cell-based viral infectivity assays including syncytium inhibition assay as well as a single-cycle viral infection assay on HeLaCD4-LTR/ß-gal cells. Pseudotype virions prepared bearing HIV-1 envelope preference for CCR5 coreceptor, CXCR4 coreceptor or for both, respectively, with a HIV-1 core containing luciferase reporter gene were able to infect susceptible cells but are replication defective so unable to replicate in the cells . Data indicate that thiolated pyrimidine derivatives inhibited effectively virally induced cell fusion in vitro as well as infectivity of primary HIV-1IIIB strain and HIV-1 pseudovirions using chemokine receptors CCR5 or CXCR4 or both for virus entry a dose dependent manner. Inhibition was selective, depended on the pseudovirus coreceptor preference. Our results suggest that some of these sulfur containing pyrimidines interact with redoxactive -SH groups required for successful HIV entry, including a redox active disulfide in the CD4 molecule as well as -SH groups in HIV viral envelope gp120. This mode of action is unique representing a new class of potential HIV entry inhibitors. PMID:26860867

  5. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  6. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  7. Autophagy induction targeting mTORC1 enhances Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication in HIV co-infected human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Anna-Maria; Andersson, Blanka; Lorell, Christoffer; Raffetseder, Johanna; Larsson, Marie; Blomgran, Robert

    2016-01-01

    To survive and replicate in macrophages Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has developed strategies to subvert host defence mechanisms, including autophagy. Autophagy induction has the potential to clear Mtb, but little is known about its effect during controlled tuberculosis and HIV co-infection. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex1 (mTORC1) inhibitors were used to induce autophagy in human macrophages pre-infected with HIV-1BaL and infected with a low dose of Mtb (co-infected), or single Mtb infected (single infected). The controlled Mtb infection was disrupted upon mTOR inhibition resulting in increased Mtb replication in a dose-dependent manner which was more pronounced during co-infection. The increased Mtb replication could be explained by the marked reduction in phagosome acidification upon mTOR inhibition. Autophagy stimulation targeting mTORC1 clearly induced a basal autophagy with flux that was unlinked to the subcellular environment of the Mtb vacuoles, which showed a concurrent suppression in acidification and maturation/flux. Overall our findings indicate that mTOR inhibition during Mtb or HIV/Mtb co-infection interferes with phagosomal maturation, thereby supporting mycobacterial growth during low-dose and controlled infection. Therefore pharmacological induction of autophagy through targeting of the canonical mTORC1-pathway should be handled with caution during controlled tuberculosis, since this could have serious consequences for patients with HIV/Mtb co-infection. PMID:27302320

  8. The miRNA miR-34a enhances HIV-1 replication by targeting PNUTS/PPP1R10, which negatively regulates HIV-1 transcriptional complex formation.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Richa; Arora, Sakshi; Ponia, Sanket S; Kumar, Binod; Maddika, Subbareddy; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2015-09-15

    HIV-1 relies heavily on the host cellular machinery for its replication. During infection, HIV-1 is known to modulate the host-cell miRNA profile. One of the miRNAs, miR-34a, is up-regulated by HIV-1 in T-cells as suggested by miRNA microarray studies. However, the functional consequences and the mechanism behind this phenomenon were not explored. The present study shows that HIV-1 enhances miR-34a in a time-dependent manner in T-cells. Our overexpression and knockdown-based experimental results suggest that miR-34a promotes HIV-1 replication in T-cells. Hence, there is a positive feedback loop between miR-34a and HIV-1 replication. We show that the mechanism of action of miR-34a in HIV-1 replication involves a cellular protein, the phosphatase 1 nuclear-targeting subunit (PNUTS). PNUTS expression levels decrease with the progression of HIV-1 infection in T-cells. Also, the overexpression of PNUTS potently inhibits HIV-1 replication in a dose-dependent manner. We report for the first time that PNUTS negatively regulates HIV-1 transcription by inhibiting the assembly of core components of the transcription elongation factor P-TEFb, i.e. cyclin T1 and CDK9. Thus, HIV-1 increases miR-34a expression in cells to overcome the inhibitory effect of PNUTS on HIV-1 transcription. So, the present study provides new mechanistic details with regard to our understanding of a complex interplay between miR-34a and the HIV-1 transcription machinery involving PNUTS. PMID:26188041

  9. Design and synthesis of pyridin-2-yloxymethylpiperidin-1-ylbutyl amide CCR5 antagonists that are potent inhibitors of M-tropic (R5) HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; Zhou, Yuanxi; Bourque, Elyse; Langille, Jonathan; Di Fluri, Maria; Bogucki, David; Yang, Wen; Li, Tongshuang; Wang, Letian; Nan, Susan; Baird, Ian; Metz, Markus; Darkes, Marilyn; Labrecque, Jean; Lau, Gloria; Fricker, Simon; Huskens, Dana; Schols, Dominique

    2011-04-15

    A novel series of CCR5 antagonists were identified based on the redesign of Schering C. An SAR was established based on inhibition of CCR5 (RANTES) binding and these compounds exhibited potent inhibition of R5 HIV-1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:21398122

  10. p53-Derived Host Restriction of HIV-1 Replication by Protein Kinase R-Mediated Tat Phosphorylation and Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Byeon, Se Eun; Jeong, Yideul; Lee, Jinjoo; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jinseu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor suppressor p53 has been suggested to be a host restriction factor against HIV-1 replication, but the detailed molecular mechanism has remained elusive for decades. Here, we demonstrate that p53-mediated HIV-1 suppression is attributed to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase (PKR)-mediated HIV-1 trans-activator (Tat) phosphorylation and inactivation. p53 silencing significantly enhanced HIV-1 replication in infected cells. Ectopic expression of p53 suppressed Tat activity, which was rescued by PKR silencing. In addition, ectopic expression of PKR abolished Tat activity in p53−/− and eIF2αCA cells. Finally, we found that HIV-1 infection activates p53, followed by the induction and activation of PKR. PKR directly interacted with HIV-1 Tat and phosphorylates the first exon of Tat exclusively at five Ser/Thr residues (T23, T40, S46, S62, and S68), which inhibits Tat-mediated provirus transcription in three critical steps: (i) phosphorylation near the arginine-rich motif (ARM) inhibits Tat translocation into the nucleus, (ii) accumulation of Tat phosphorylation abolishes Tat–Tat-responsive region (TAR) binding, and (iii) Tat phosphorylation at T23 and/or T40 obliterates the Tat-cyclin T1 interaction. These five Ser/Thr sites on Tat were highly conserved in HIV-1 strains prevalent in Europe and the United States. Taken together, our findings indicate that p53-derived host restriction of HIV-1 replication is likely attributable, at least in part, to a noncanonical p53/PKR/Tat phosphorylation and inactivation pathway in HIV-1 infection and AIDS pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE HIV-1-mediated disease progression to AIDS lasts for years to decades after primary infection. Host restriction and associated viral latency have been studied for several decades. p53 has been suggested as an important host restriction factor against HIV-1 replication. However, the detailed molecular mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, we found that the p53

  11. Synergistic inhibition of replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, including that of a zidovudine-resistant isolate, by zidovudine and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Eron, J J; Johnson, V A; Merrill, D P; Chou, T C; Hirsch, M S

    1992-01-01

    The combination of zidovudine (AZT) and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine synergistically inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vitro with AZT-sensitive and AZT-resistant clinical isolates and HIV-1IIIB. Synergy was determined by the median-effect principle and isobologram techniques. Cytotoxicity of the agents was not observed. Clinical trials are ongoing to define the combination's role in HIV-1 therapy. PMID:1324648

  12. Linker-Region Modified Derivatives of the Deoxyhypusine Synthase Inhibitor CNI-1493 Suppress HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Marcus; Kolodzik, Adrian; Windshügel, Björn; Krepstakies, Marcel; Priyadarshini, Poornima; Hartjen, Philip; van Lunzen, Jan; Rarey, Matthias; Hauber, Joachim; Meier, Chris

    2016-02-01

    The inhibition of cellular factors that are involved in viral replication may be an important alternative to the commonly used strategy of targeting viral enzymes. The guanylhydrazone CNI-1493, a potent inhibitor of the deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS), prevents the activation of the cellular factor eIF-5A and thereby suppresses HIV replication and a number of other diseases. Here, we report on the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of CNI-1493 analogues. The sebacoyl linker in CNI-1493 was replaced by different alkyl or aryl dicarboxylic acids. Most of the tested derivatives suppress HIV-1 replication efficiently in a dose-dependent manner without showing toxic side effects. The unexpected antiviral activity of the rigid derivatives point to a second binding mode as previously assumed for CNI-1493. Moreover, the chemical stability of CNI-1493 was analysed, showing a successive hydrolysis of the imino bonds. By molecular dynamics simulations, the behaviour of the parent CNI-1493 in solution and its interactions with DHS were investigated. PMID:26725082

  13. Sustained Elite Suppression of Replication Competent HIV-1 in a Patient Treated With Rituximab Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Stephanie; Dinoso, Jason B.; Marsh, Julia A.; DeZern, Amy E.; O’Connell, Karen A; Spivak, Adam M.; Alwood, Karla; Durand, Christine M.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Blankson, Joel N.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of elite control of HIV-1 replication is not fully understood. While immunosuppression due to rituximab based chemotherapy has been associated with increased replication of HBV, CMV, and HIV-1, control of replication-competent HIV-1 was maintained in an elite controller/suppressor treated with a regimen that included vincristine, cyclophosphamide, prednisone, four rounds of plasmapheresis and ten cycles of rituximab. The data suggests that de-novo antibody responses do not play a significant role in the control of viral replication in these patients. PMID:21550842

  14. The role of Vif oligomerization and RNA chaperone activity in HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago; Bernacchi, Serena; Sleiman, Dona; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Marquet, Roland; Tisné, Carine; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells that involve most natural HIV-1 target cells. Vif counteracts the packaging of two cellular cytidine deaminases named APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by diverse mechanisms including the recruitment of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasomal degradation of A3G/A3F, the inhibition of A3G mRNA translation or by a direct competition mechanism. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by participating in virus assembly and Gag processing, thus regulating the final stage of virion formation notably genomic RNA dimerization and by inhibiting the initiation of reverse transcription. Vif is a small pleiotropic protein with multiple domains, and recent studies highlighted the importance of Vif conformation and flexibility in counteracting A3G and in binding RNA. In this review, we will focus on the oligomerization and RNA chaperone properties of Vif and show that the intrinsic disordered nature of some Vif domains could play an important role in virus assembly and replication. Experimental evidence demonstrating the RNA chaperone activity of Vif will be presented. PMID:22728817

  15. Control of HIV-1 replication in vitro by vaccine-induced human CD8+ T cells through conserved subdominant Pol epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tina; Borthwick, Nicola J.; Gilmour, Jill; Hayes, Peter; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Objective The specificity of CD8+ T cells is critical for early control of founder/transmitted and reactivated HIV-1. To tackle HIV-1 variability and escape, we designed vaccine immunogen HIVconsv assembled from 14 highly conserved regions of mainly Gag and Pol proteins. When administered to HIV-1-negative human volunteers in trial HIV-CORE 002, HIVconsv vaccines elicited CD8+ effector T cells which inhibited replication of up to 8 HIV-1 isolates in autologous CD4+ cells. This inhibition correlated with interferon-γ production in response to Gag and Pol peptide pools, but direct evidence of the inhibitory specificity was missing. Here, we aimed to define through recognition of which epitopes these effectors inhibit HIV-1 replication. Design CD8+ T-cells from the 3 broadest HIV-1 inhibitors out of 23 vaccine recipients were expanded in culture by Gag or Pol peptide restimulation and tested in viral inhibition assay (VIA) using HIV-1 clade B and A isolates. Methods Frozen PBMCs were expanded first using peptide pools from Gag or Pol conserved regions and tested on HIV-1-infected cells in VIA or by individual peptides for their effector functions. Single peptide specificities responsible for inhibition of HIV-1 replication were then confirmed by single-peptide expanded effectors tested on HIV-1-infected cells. Results We formally demonstrated that the vaccine-elicited inhibitory human CD8+ T cells recognized conserved epitopes of both Pol and Gag proteins. We defined 7 minimum epitopes, of which 3 were novel, presumably naturally subdominant. The effectors were oligofunctional producing several cytokines and chemokines and killing peptide-pulsed target cells. Conclusions These results implicate the use of functionally conserved regions of Pol in addition to the widely used Gag for T-cell vaccine design. Proportion of volunteers developing these effectors and their frequency in circulating PBMC are separate issues, which can be addressed, if needed, by more efficient

  16. Discovery of Novel Small-Molecule HIV-1 Replication Inhibitors That Stabilize Capsid Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Titolo, Steve; Lemke, Christopher T.; Goudreau, Nathalie; Mercier, Jean-François; Wardrop, Elizabeth; Shah, Vaibhav B.; von Schwedler, Uta K.; Langelier, Charles; Banik, Soma S. R.; Aiken, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of novel antiretroviral agents is required to provide alternative treatment options for HIV-1-infected patients. The screening of a phenotypic cell-based viral replication assay led to the identification of a novel class of 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazol-6-one (pyrrolopyrazolone) HIV-1 inhibitors, exemplified by two compounds: BI-1 and BI-2. These compounds inhibited early postentry stages of viral replication at a step(s) following reverse transcription but prior to 2 long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circle formation, suggesting that they may block nuclear targeting of the preintegration complex. Selection of viruses resistant to BI-2 revealed that substitutions at residues A105 and T107 within the capsid (CA) amino-terminal domain (CANTD) conferred high-level resistance to both compounds, implicating CA as the antiviral target. Direct binding of BI-1 and/or BI-2 to CANTD was demonstrated using isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift titration analyses. A high-resolution crystal structure of the BI-1:CANTD complex revealed that the inhibitor bound within a recently identified inhibitor binding pocket (CANTD site 2) between CA helices 4, 5, and 7, on the surface of the CANTD, that also corresponds to the binding site for the host factor CPSF-6. The functional consequences of BI-1 and BI-2 binding differ from previously characterized inhibitors that bind the same site since the BI compounds did not inhibit reverse transcription but stabilized preassembled CA complexes. Hence, this new class of antiviral compounds binds CA and may inhibit viral replication by stabilizing the viral capsid. PMID:23817385

  17. Discovery of novel small-molecule HIV-1 replication inhibitors that stabilize capsid complexes.

    PubMed

    Lamorte, Louie; Titolo, Steve; Lemke, Christopher T; Goudreau, Nathalie; Mercier, Jean-François; Wardrop, Elizabeth; Shah, Vaibhav B; von Schwedler, Uta K; Langelier, Charles; Banik, Soma S R; Aiken, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I; Mason, Stephen W

    2013-10-01

    The identification of novel antiretroviral agents is required to provide alternative treatment options for HIV-1-infected patients. The screening of a phenotypic cell-based viral replication assay led to the identification of a novel class of 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazol-6-one (pyrrolopyrazolone) HIV-1 inhibitors, exemplified by two compounds: BI-1 and BI-2. These compounds inhibited early postentry stages of viral replication at a step(s) following reverse transcription but prior to 2 long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circle formation, suggesting that they may block nuclear targeting of the preintegration complex. Selection of viruses resistant to BI-2 revealed that substitutions at residues A105 and T107 within the capsid (CA) amino-terminal domain (CANTD) conferred high-level resistance to both compounds, implicating CA as the antiviral target. Direct binding of BI-1 and/or BI-2 to CANTD was demonstrated using isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift titration analyses. A high-resolution crystal structure of the BI-1:CANTD complex revealed that the inhibitor bound within a recently identified inhibitor binding pocket (CANTD site 2) between CA helices 4, 5, and 7, on the surface of the CANTD, that also corresponds to the binding site for the host factor CPSF-6. The functional consequences of BI-1 and BI-2 binding differ from previously characterized inhibitors that bind the same site since the BI compounds did not inhibit reverse transcription but stabilized preassembled CA complexes. Hence, this new class of antiviral compounds binds CA and may inhibit viral replication by stabilizing the viral capsid. PMID:23817385

  18. Concurrent chemotherapy inhibits Herpes simplex virus 1 replication and oncolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kulu, Yakup; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Donahue, James M.; Kasuya, Hideki; Cusack, James C.; Choi, Enid W.; Kuruppu, Darshini K.; Fuchs, Bryan C.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) replication in cancer cells leads to their destruction (viral oncolysis) and has been under investigation as an experimental cancer therapy in clinical trials as single agents, and as combinations with chemotherapy. Cellular responses to chemotherapy modulate viral replication, but these interactions are poorly understood. To investigate the effect of chemotherapy on HSV-1 oncolysis, viral replication in cells exposed to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), irinotecan (CPT-11), methotrexate (MTX) or a cytokine (TNF-α) was examined. Exposure of colon and pancreatic cancer cells to 5-FU, CPT-11, or MTX in vitro significantly antagonizes both HSV-1 replication and lytic oncolysis. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation is required for efficient viral replication, and experimental inhibition of this response with an IκBα dominant-negative repressor significantly antagonizes HSV-1 replication. Nonetheless cells exposed to 5-FU, CPT-11, TNF-α or HSV-1 activate NF-κB. Cells exposed to MTX do not activate NF-κB, suggesting a possible role for NF-κB inhibition in the decreased viral replication observed following exposure to MTX. The role of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF-2α) dephosphorylation was examined; HSV-1 mediated eIF-2α dephosphorylation proceeds normally in HT29 cells exposed to 5-FU-, CPT-11-, or MTX. This report demonstrates that cellular responses to chemotherapeutic agents provide an unfavorable environment for HSV-1-mediated oncolysis, and these observations are relevant to the design of both preclinical and clinical studies of HSV-1 oncolysis. PMID:23348635

  19. HIV-1 Gag shares a signature motif with annexin (Anx7), which is required for virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, M.; Cartas, M.; Rizvi, T. A.; Singh, S. P.; Serio, D.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Pollard, H. B.; Srinivasan, A.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical analyses of the Gag protein of HIV-1 indicate a crucial role for this protein in several functions related to viral replication, including viral assembly. It has been suggested that Gag may fulfill some of the functions by recruiting host cellular protein(s). In our effort to identify structural and functional homologies between Gag and cellular cytoskeletal and secretory proteins involved in transport, we observed that HIV-1 Gag contains a unique PGQM motif in the capsid region. This motif was initially noted in the regulatory domain of synexin the membrane fusion protein of Xenopus laevis. To evaluate the functional significance of the highly conserved PGQM motif, we introduced alanine (A) in place of individual residues of the PGQM and deleted the motif altogether in a Gag expression plasmid and in an HIV-1 proviral DNA. The proviral DNA containing mutations in the PGQM motif showed altered expression, assembly, and release of viral particles in comparison to parental (NL4-3) DNA. When tested in multiple- and single-round replication assays, the mutant viruses exhibited distinct replication phenotypes; the viruses containing the A for the G and Q residues failed to replicate, whereas A in place of the P and M residues did not inhibit viral replication. Deletion of the tetrapeptide also resulted in the inhibition of replication. These results suggest that the PGQM motif may play an important role in the infection process of HIV-1 by facilitating protein–protein interactions between viral and/or viral and cellular proteins. PMID:10077575

  20. Potent and selective inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by 5-ethyl-6-phenylthiouracil derivatives through their interaction with the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Baba, M; De Clercq, E; Tanaka, H; Ubasawa, M; Takashima, H; Sekiya, K; Nitta, I; Umezu, K; Nakashima, H; Mori, S

    1991-01-01

    In the search for 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT) derivatives, we have found several 5-ethyl-6-(phenylthio)uracil analogues to be highly potent and selective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1. 1-Benzyloxymethyl-5-ethyl-6-phenylthiouracil, the most potent congener of the series, inhibits HIV-1 replication in a variety of cell systems, including peripheral blood lymphocytes, at a concentration of 1.5-7.0 nM, which is lower by a factor of 10(3) than the 50% antivirally effective concentration of the parent compound HEPT. The 5-ethyl-6-(phenylthio)uracil analogues, like HEPT itself, do not inhibit HIV-2 replication but do inhibit replication of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-resistant mutants of HIV-1. 1-Benzyloxy-methyl-5-ethyl-6-phenylthiouracil and its congeners are targeted at the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). They do not inhibit HIV-2 RT. They do not need to be metabolized to exert their inhibitory effect on HIV-1 RT. Yet this inhibitory effect is competitive with the natural substrate dTTP. The HEPT derivatives represent a group of RT inhibitors with a unique mode of interaction with HIV-1 RT. PMID:1706522

  1. Hydroxylated Tropolones Inhibit Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Blocking Viral Ribonuclease H Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Gaofeng; Lomonosova, Elena; Cheng, Xiaohong; Moran, Eileen A.; Meyers, Marvin J.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Thomas, Craig J.; Jiang, Jian-kang; Meck, Christine; Hirsch, Danielle R.; D'Erasmo, Michael P.; Suyabatmaz, Duygu M.; Murelli, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major human pathogen despite the development of both antiviral drugs and a vaccine, in part because the current therapies do not suppress HBV replication far enough to eradicate the virus. Here, we screened 51 troponoid compounds for their ability to suppress HBV RNaseH activity and HBV replication based on the activities of α-hydroxytropolones against HIV RNaseH, with the goal of determining whether the tropolone pharmacophore may be a promising scaffold for anti-HBV drug development. Thirteen compounds inhibited HBV RNaseH, with the best 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) being 2.3 μM. Similar inhibition patterns were observed against HBV genotype D and C RNaseHs, implying limited genotype specificity. Six of 10 compounds tested against HBV replication in culture suppressed replication via blocking of viral RNaseH activity, with the best 50% effective concentration (EC50) being 0.34 μM. Eighteen compounds inhibited recombinant human RNaseH1, and moderate cytotoxicity was observed for all compounds (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50] = 25 to 79 μM). Therapeutic indexes ranged from 3.8 to 94. Efficient inhibition required an intact α-hydroxytropolone moiety plus one or more short appendages on the tropolone ring, but a wide variety of constituents were permissible. These data indicate that troponoids and specifically α-hydroxytropolones are promising lead candidates for development as anti-HBV drugs, providing that toxicity can be minimized. Potential anti-RNaseH drugs are envisioned to be employed in combination with the existing nucleos(t)ide analogs to suppress HBV replication far enough to block genomic maintenance, with the goal of eradicating infection. PMID:25451058

  2. Hydroxylated tropolones inhibit hepatitis B virus replication by blocking viral ribonuclease H activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gaofeng; Lomonosova, Elena; Cheng, Xiaohong; Moran, Eileen A; Meyers, Marvin J; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Thomas, Craig J; Jiang, Jian-kang; Meck, Christine; Hirsch, Danielle R; D'Erasmo, Michael P; Suyabatmaz, Duygu M; Murelli, Ryan P; Tavis, John E

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major human pathogen despite the development of both antiviral drugs and a vaccine, in part because the current therapies do not suppress HBV replication far enough to eradicate the virus. Here, we screened 51 troponoid compounds for their ability to suppress HBV RNaseH activity and HBV replication based on the activities of α-hydroxytropolones against HIV RNaseH, with the goal of determining whether the tropolone pharmacophore may be a promising scaffold for anti-HBV drug development. Thirteen compounds inhibited HBV RNaseH, with the best 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) being 2.3 μM. Similar inhibition patterns were observed against HBV genotype D and C RNaseHs, implying limited genotype specificity. Six of 10 compounds tested against HBV replication in culture suppressed replication via blocking of viral RNaseH activity, with the best 50% effective concentration (EC50) being 0.34 μM. Eighteen compounds inhibited recombinant human RNaseH1, and moderate cytotoxicity was observed for all compounds (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50]=25 to 79 μM). Therapeutic indexes ranged from 3.8 to 94. Efficient inhibition required an intact α-hydroxytropolone moiety plus one or more short appendages on the tropolone ring, but a wide variety of constituents were permissible. These data indicate that troponoids and specifically α-hydroxytropolones are promising lead candidates for development as anti-HBV drugs, providing that toxicity can be minimized. Potential anti-RNaseH drugs are envisioned to be employed in combination with the existing nucleos(t)ide analogs to suppress HBV replication far enough to block genomic maintenance, with the goal of eradicating infection. PMID:25451058

  3. Function of ubiquitin (Ub) specific protease 15 (USP15) in HIV-1 replication and viral protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Pyeon, Dohun; Timani, Khalid Amine; Gulraiz, Fahad; He, Johnny J; Park, In-Woo

    2016-09-01

    HIV-1 Nef is necessary and may be sufficient for HIV-1-associated AIDS pathogenicity, in that knockout of Nef alone can protect HIV-infected patients from AIDS. We therefore investigated the feasibility of physical knockout of Nef, using the host ubiquitin proteasome system in HIV-1-infected cells. Our co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that Nef interacted with ubiquitin specific protease 15 (USP15), and that USP15, which is known to stabilize cellular proteins, degraded Nef. Nef could also cause decay of USP15, although Nef-mediated degradation of USP15 was weaker than USP15-mediated Nef degradation. Direct interaction between Nef and USP15 was essential for the observed reciprocal decay of the proteins. Further, USP15 degraded not only Nef but also HIV-1 structural protein, Gag, thereby substantially inhibiting HIV-1 replication. However, Gag did not degrade USP15, indicating that the Nef and USP15 complex, in distinction to other viral proteins, play an integral role in coordinating viral protein degradation and hence HIV-1 replication. Moreover, Nef and USP15 globally suppressed ubiquitylation of cellular proteins, indicating that these proteins are major determinants for the stability of cellular as well as viral proteins. Taken together, these data indicate that Nef and USP15 are vital in regulating degradation of viral and cellular proteins and thus HIV-1 replication, and specific degradation of viral, not cellular proteins, by USP15 points to USP15 as a candidate therapeutic agent to combat AIDS by eliminating viral proteins from the infected cells via USP15-mediated proteosomal degradation. PMID:27460547

  4. Further Evidence that Human Endogenous Retrovirus K102 is a Replication Competent Foamy Virus that may Antagonize HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Laderoute, Marian P.; Larocque, Louise J.; Giulivi, Antonio; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the research were to determine if a foamy effect on macrophages was due to human endogenous retrovirus K102 (HERV-K102) replication, and to further address its potential significance in HIV-1 infection. Methods: An RT-PCR HERV-K HML-2 pol method was used to screen the unknown HERV, and isolated bands were sent for sequencing. Confirmation of RNA expression was performed by a real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) pol ddCt method. Rabbit antibodies to Env peptides were used to assess expression by immunohistology and processing of Env by western blots. A qPCR pol ddCt method to ascertain genomic copy number was performed on genomic DNA isolated from plasma comparing HIV-1 exposed seronegative (HESN) commercial sex workers (CSW) to normal controls and contrasted with HIV-1 patients. Results: HERV-K102 expression, particle production and replication were associated with foamy macrophage generation in the cultures of cord blood mononuclear cells under permissive conditions. A five-fold increased HERV-K102 pol genomic copy number was found in the HESN cohort over normal which was not found in HIV-1 positive patients (p=0.0005). Conclusions: This work extends the evidence that HERV-K102 has foamy virus attributes, is replication competent, and is capable of high replication rate in vivo and in vitro. This may be the first characterization of a replication-competent, foamy-like virus of humans. High particle production inferred by increased integration in the HESN cohort over HIV-1 patients raises the issue of the clinical importance of HERV-K102 particle production as an early protective innate immune response against HIV-1 replication. PMID:26793281

  5. 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid inhibits rotavirus replication in culture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Glycyrrhizin (GA) and primary metabolite 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA) are pharmacologically active components of the medicinal licorice root, and both have been shown to have antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. Although these properties are well established, the mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this study, GA and GRA were tested for the ability to inhibit rotavirus replication in cell culture, toward a long term goal of discovering natural compounds that may complement existing vaccines. Methods Epithelial cells were treated with GA or GRA various times pre- or post-infection and virus yields were measured by immunofluorescent focus assay. Levels of viral proteins VP2, VP6, and NSP2 in GRA treated cells were measured by immunoblot to determine if there was an effect of GRA treatment on the accumulation of viral protein. Results GRA treatment reduced rotavirus yields by 99% when added to infected cultures post-- virus adsorption, whereas virus yields in GA treated cultures were similar to mock treated controls. Time of addition experiments indicated that GRA-mediated replication inhibition likely occurs at a step or steps subsequent to virus entry. The amounts of VP2, VP6 and NSP2 were substantially reduced when GRA was added to cultures up to two hours post-entry. Conclusions GRA, but not GA, has significant antiviral activity against rotavirus replication in vitro, and studies to determine whether GRA attenuates rotavirus replication in vivo are underway. PMID:22616823

  6. Caffeine inhibits hepatitis C virus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Batista, Mariana N; Carneiro, Bruno M; Braga, Ana Cláudia S; Rahal, Paula

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis C is considered the major cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Conventional treatment is not effective against some hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes; therefore, new treatments are needed. Coffee and, more recently, caffeine, have been found to have a beneficial effect in several disorders of the liver, including those manifesting abnormal liver biochemistry, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Caffeine acts directly by delaying fibrosis, thereby improving the function of liver cellular pathways and interfering with pathways used by the HCV replication cycle. In the current study, the direct relationship between caffeine and viral replication was evaluated. The Huh-7.5 cell line was used for transient infections with FL-J6/JFH-5'C19Rluc2AUbi and to establish a cell line stably expressing SGR-Feo JFH-1. Caffeine efficiently inhibited HCV replication in a dose-dependent manner at non-cytotoxic concentrations and demonstrated an IC50 value of 0.7263 mM after 48 h of incubation. These data demonstrate that caffeine may be an important new agent for anti-HCV therapies due to its efficient inhibition of HCV replication at non-toxic concentrations. PMID:25491197

  7. Effects of L- and D-REKR amino acid-containing peptides on HIV and SIV envelope glycoprotein precursor maturation and HIV and SIV replication.

    PubMed Central

    Bahbouhi, Bouchaib; Chazal, Nathalie; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Chiva, Cristina; Kogan, Marcelo; Albericio, Fernando; Giralt, Ernest; Bahraoui, Elmostafa

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the capacity of synthetic l- and d-peptides encompassing the HIV-1(BRU) gp160 REKR cleavage site to interfere with HIV and simian immuno-deficiency virus (SIV) replication and maturation of the envelope glycoprotein (Env) precursors. To facilitate their penetration into cells, a decanoyl (dec) group was added at the N-terminus. The sequences synthesized included dec5d or dec5l (decREKRV), dec9d or dec9l (decRVVQREKRV) and dec14d or dec14l (TKAKRRVVQREKRV). The peptide dec14d was also prepared with a chloromethane (cmk) group as C-terminus. Because l-peptides exhibit significant cytotoxicity starting at 35 microM, further characterization was conducted mostly with d-peptides, which exhibited no cytotoxicity at concentrations higher than 70 microM. The data show that only dec14d and dec14dcmk could inhibit HIV-1(BRU), HIV-2(ROD) and SIV(mac251) replication and their syncytium-inducing capacities. Whereas peptides dec5d and dec9d were inactive, dec14dcmk was at least twice as active as peptide dec14d. At the molecular level, our data show a direct correlation between anti-viral activity and the ability of the peptides to interfere with maturation of the Env precursors. Furthermore, we show that when tested in vitro the dec14d peptide inhibited PC7 with an inhibition constant K(i)=4.6 microM, whereas the peptide dec14l preferentially inhibited furin with a K(i)=28 microM. The fact that PC7 and furin are the major prohormone convertases reported to be expressed in T4 lymphocytes, the principal cell targets of HIV, suggests that they are involved in the maturation of HIV and SIV Env precursors. PMID:12071862

  8. Osteopontin enhances HIV replication and is increased in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Tanzeem; Adams, Robert; Nerle, Sujata; Kamara, Masiray; Eger, Caitlin; Marder, Karen; Cohen, Bruce; Schifitto, Giovanni; McArthur, Justin C.; Sacktor, Ned; Pardo, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite effective and widely available suppressive anti-HIV therapy, the prevalence of mild neurocognitive dysfunction continues to increase. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is a multifactorial disease with sustained central nervous system inflammation and immune activation as prominent features. Inflammatory macrophages, HIV-infected and uninfected, play a central role in the development of HIV dementia. There is a critical need to identify biomarkers and to better understand the molecular mechanisms leading to cognitive dysfunction in HAND. In this regard, we identified through a subtractive hybridization strategy osteopontin (OPN, SPP1, gene) an inflammatory marker, as an upregulated gene in HIV-infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages. Knockdown of OPN in primary macrophages resulted in a threefold decrease in HIV-1 replication. Ectopic expression of OPN in the TZM-bl cell line significantly enhanced HIV infectivity and replication. A significant increase in the degradation of the NF-κB inhibitor, IκBα and an increase in the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio of NF-κB were found in HIV-infected cells expressing OPN compared to controls. Moreover, mutation of the NF-κB binding domain in the HIV-LTR abrogated enhanced promoter activity stimulated by OPN. Interestingly, compared to cerebrospinal fluid from normal and multiple sclerosis controls, OPN levels were significantly higher in HIV-infected individuals both with and without neurocognitive disorder. OPN levels were highest in HIV-infected individuals with moderate to severe cognitive impairment. Moreover, OPN was significantly elevated in brain tissue from HIV-infected individuals with cognitive disorder versus those without impairment. Collectively, these data suggest that OPN stimulates HIV-1 replication and that high levels of OPN are present in the CNS compartment of HIV-infected individuals, reflecting ongoing inflammatory processes at this site despite anti-HIV therapy. PMID

  9. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Coxiella burnetii Replication and Parasitophorous Vacuole Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Dale; Barrows, Lorraine F.; Lindstrom, Nicole M.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a recognized cytotoxic effector against facultative and obligate intracellular bacteria. This study examined the effect of nitric oxide produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) up-regulated in response to cytokine stimulation, or by a synthetic nitric oxide donor, on replication of obligately intracellular Coxiella burnetii in murine L-929 cells. Immunoblotting and nitrite assays revealed that C. burnetii infection of L-929 cells augments expression of iNOS up-regulated in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Infection in the absence of cytokine stimulation did not result in demonstrable up-regulation of iNOS expression or in increased nitrite production. Nitrite production by cytokine-treated cells was significantly inhibited by the iNOS inhibitor S-methylisothiourea (SMT). Treatment of infected cells with IFN-γ and TNF-α or the synthetic nitric oxide donor 2,2′-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (DETA/NONOate) had a bacteriostatic effect on C. burnetii replication. Inhibition of replication was reversed upon addition of SMT to the culture medium of cytokine-treated cells. Microscopic analysis of infected cells revealed that nitric oxide (either cytokine induced or donor derived) inhibited formation of the mature (large) parasitophorous vacuole that is characteristic of C. burnetii infection of host cells. Instead, exposure of infected cells to nitric oxide resulted in the formation of multiple small, acidic vacuoles usually containing one C. burnetii cell. Removal of nitrosative stress resulted in the coalescence of small vacuoles to form a large vacuole harboring multiple C. burnetii cells. These experiments demonstrate that nitric oxide reversibly inhibits replication of C. burnetii and formation of the parasitophorous vacuole. PMID:12183564

  10. HIV Vpr protein upregulates microRNA-122 expression and stimulates hepatitis C virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Milin; Xiao, Xinqiang; He, Yan; Jiang, Yongfang; Zhang, Min; Peng, Feng; Tian, Yi; Xu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection is characterized by higher serum HCV RNA loads compared with HCV mono-infection. However, the relationship between HIV and HCV replication remains to be clarified. HIV Vpr has been shown to play an essential role in HIV replication. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of Vpr in HCV replication and pathogenesis. We therefore used the genotype 2a full-length HCV strain JFH1 infection system and the genotype 1b full-length HCV replicon OR6 cell line to analyse the effects of Vpr on HCV replication. We found that Vpr promoted HCV 5′ UTR activity, HCV RNA replication and HCV protein expression in two HCV infection cell models. Additionally, lymphocyte-produced Vpr significantly induced HCV 5′ UTR activity and HCV replication in hepatocytes. We also found that Vpr upregulated the expression of miR-122 by stimulating its promoter activity. Furthermore, an miR-122 inhibitor suppressed the Vpr-mediated enhancement of both HCV 5′ UTR activity and HCV replication. In summary, our results revealed that the Vpr-upregulated expression of miR-122 is closely related to the stimulation of HCV 5′ UTR activity and HCV replication by Vpr, providing new evidence for how HIV interacts with HCV during HIV/HCV co-infection. PMID:25920531

  11. Signal transduction induced by apoptotic cells inhibits HIV transcription in monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gekonge, Bethsebah N; Schiralli, Gillian; Schlegel, Robert A; Henderson, Andrew J

    2006-10-01

    The primary targets of HIV are CD4(+) T cells and macrophages. HIV infection is associated with an increase in apoptosis of infected and uninfected CD4(+) T cells, and these infected cells undergo apoptosis and produce HIV virions with phosphatidylserine (PS) on their surface. During phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, macrophages, using an array of receptors, are able to perceive various surface changes on apoptotic cells. The engagement of phagocytic receptors by ligands on the apoptotic cell surface results in the activation of signaling cascades, which facilitate engulfment. In this study, we examined how PS associated with virions and apoptotic cells influences HIV replication. We demonstrate that virus-associated PS is required for HIV infection of macrophages at a step prior to integration but following strong-stop, indicating that PS-initiated signals alter the establishment of HIV provirus. Conversely, apoptotic cells inhibited HIV transcription in infected macrophages, although this ability to suppress transcription was independent of PS. Furthermore, we show that ELMO, a key signaling molecule that participates in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, inhibited HIV transcription; however, knocking down endogenous ELMO expression in infected U937 cells rescued HIV transcription when these cells were coincubated with apoptotic targets. Taken together, these data show that apoptotic cells and the signals, which they initiate upon recognition by macrophages, influence the successful establishment of HIV infection and provirus transcription. PMID:16885500

  12. Elevated levels of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients and in HIV-1-infected cell cultures: a relevant role on viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Regis, Eduardo G.; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Morgado, Mariza M.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Bou-Habib, Dumith C.

    2011-01-01

    The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and infectious diseases, however its role in HIV-1 infection is unknown. Here we show that HIV-1-infected patients present elevated plasma levels of MIF, that HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) release a greater amount of MIF, and that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 induces MIF secretion from uninfected PBMCs. The HIV-1 replication in PBMCs declines when these cells were treated with anti-MIF antibodies, or when treated with the ABC-transporter inhibitor probenecid, which also inhibited MIF secretion. The addition of recombinant MIF (rhMIF) to HIV-1-infected PBMCs enhances viral replication of CCR5- or CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 isolates. Using a T CD4+ cell lineage containing an HIV long terminal repeats (LTR)-Luciferase construct, we detected that rhMIF promotes transcription from HIV-1 LTR. Our results show that HIV-1 induces MIF secretion and suggest that MIF influences the HIV-1 biology through activation of HIV-1 LTR. PMID:20085845

  13. In Vitro Reactivation of Replication-Competent and Infectious HIV-1 by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Banga, Riddhima; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Cavassini, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The existence of long-lived HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells is thought to be the primary obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. In the search for novel therapeutic approaches that may reverse HIV-1 latency, inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACis) have been tested to reactivate HIV-1 replication with the objective of rendering HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In the present study, we evaluated the efficiency of HDACis to reactivate HIV-1 replication from resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. We demonstrate that following prolonged/repeated treatment of resting memory CD4 T cells with HDACis, HIV-1 replication may be induced from primary resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. More importantly, we demonstrate that HIV-1 reactivated in the cell cultures was not only replication competent but also infectious. Interestingly, givinostat, an HDACi that has not been investigated in clinical trials, was more efficient than vorinostat, panobinostat, and romidepsin in reversing HIV-1 latency in vitro. Taken together, these results support further evaluation of givinostat as a latency-reversing agent (LRA) in aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. IMPORTANCE The major barrier to HIV cure is the existence of long-lived latently HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells. Latently HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells are transcriptionally silent and are therefore not targeted by conventional antiretroviral therapy (ART) or the immune system. In this context, one strategy to target latently infected cells is based on pharmacological molecules that may force the virus to replicate and would therefore render HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In this context, we developed an

  14. Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by the tricyclic coumarin GUT-70 through the modification of membrane fluidity

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Kouki; Hattori, Shinichiro; Kariya, Ryusho; Komizu, Yuji; Kudo, Eriko; Goto, Hiroki; Taura, Manabu; Ueoka, Ryuichi; Kimura, Shinya; Okada, Seiji

    2015-02-13

    Membrane fusion between host cells and HIV-1 is the initial step in HIV-1 infection, and plasma membrane fluidity strongly influences infectivity. In the present study, we demonstrated that GUT-70, a natural product derived from Calophyllum brasiliense, stabilized plasma membrane fluidity, inhibited HIV-1 entry, and down-regulated the expression of CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4. Since GUT-70 also had an inhibitory effect on viral replication through the inhibition of NF-κB, it is expected to be used as a dual functional and viral mutation resistant reagent. Thus, these unique properties of GUT-70 enable the development of novel therapeutic agents against HIV-1 infection.

  15. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the LEDGF/p75 Binding Site of Integrase Block HIV Replication and Modulate Integrase Multimerization

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Frauke; Shaw, Stephen; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Desimmie, Belete A.; Marchand, Arnaud; Butler, Scott; Smets, Wim; Chaltin, Patrick; Westby, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the HIV integrase (HIV IN) is a clinically validated approach for designing novel anti-HIV therapies. We have previously described the discovery of a novel class of integration inhibitors, 2-(quinolin-3-yl)acetic acid derivatives, blocking HIV replication at a low micromolar concentration through binding in the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV integrase, hence referred to as LEDGINs. Here we report the detailed characterization of their mode of action. The design of novel and more potent analogues with nanomolar activity enabled full virological evaluation and a profound mechanistic study. As allosteric inhibitors, LEDGINs bind to the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket in integrase, thereby blocking the interaction with LEDGF/p75 and interfering indirectly with the catalytic activity of integrase. Detailed mechanism-of-action studies reveal that the allosteric mode of inhibition is likely caused by an effect on HIV-1 integrase oligomerization. The multimodal inhibition by LEDGINs results in a block in HIV integration and in a replication deficiency of progeny virus. The allosteric nature of LEDGINs leads to synergy in combination with the clinically approved active site HIV IN strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) raltegravir, and cross-resistance profiling proves the distinct mode of action of LEDGINs and INSTIs. The allosteric nature of inhibition and compatibility with INSTIs underline an interest in further (clinical) development of LEDGINs. PMID:22664975

  16. A CI-Independent Form of Replicative Inhibition: Turn Off of Early Replication of Bacteriophage Lambda

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sidney; Horbay, Monique A.; Hayes, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Several earlier studies have described an unusual exclusion phenotype exhibited by cells with plasmids carrying a portion of the replication region of phage lambda. Cells exhibiting this inhibition phenotype (IP) prevent the plating of homo-immune and hybrid hetero-immune lambdoid phages. We have attempted to define aspects of IP, and show that it is directed to repλ phages. IP was observed in cells with plasmids containing a λ DNA fragment including oop, encoding a short OOP micro RNA, and part of the lambda origin of replication, oriλ, defined by iteron sequences ITN1-4 and an adjacent high AT-rich sequence. Transcription of the intact oop sequence from its promoter, pO is required for IP, as are iterons ITN3–4, but not the high AT-rich portion of oriλ. The results suggest that IP silencing is directed to theta mode replication initiation from an infecting repλ genome, or an induced repλ prophage. Phage mutations suppressing IP, i.e., Sip, map within, or adjacent to cro or in O, or both. Our results for plasmid based IP suggest the hypothesis that there is a natural mechanism for silencing early theta-mode replication initiation, i.e. the buildup of λ genomes with oop+ oriλ+ sequence. PMID:22590552

  17. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription and replication by DNA sequence-selective plant lignans.

    PubMed

    Gnabre, J N; Brady, J N; Clanton, D J; Ito, Y; Dittmer, J; Bates, R B; Huang, R C

    1995-11-21

    A plant lignan, 3'-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (3'-O-methyl NDGA, denoted Malachi 4:5-6 or Mal.4; molecular weigth 316), was isolated from Larrea tridentata and found to be able to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Tat-regulated transactivation in vivo, induce protection of lymphoblastoid CEM-SS cells from HIV (strain IIIB) killing, and suppress the replication of five HIV-1 strains (WM, MN, VS, JR-CSF, and IIIB) in mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, all in a dose-dependent manner. Mal.4 inhibits both basal transcription and Tat-regulated transactivation in vitro. The target of Mal.4 has been localized to nucleotides -87 to -40 of the HIV long terminal repeat. Mal.4 directly and specifically interferes with the binding of Sp1 to Sp1 sites in the HIV long terminal repeat. By inhibiting proviral expression, Mal.4 may be able to interrupt the life cycles of both wild-type and reverse transcriptase or protease mutant viruses in HIV-infected patients. PMID:7479972

  18. Potent Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by an Intracellular Anti-Rev Single-Chain Antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lingxun; Bagasra, Omar; Laughlin, Mark A.; Oakes, Joseph W.; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    1994-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has a complex life cycle, which has made it a difficult target for conventional therapeutic modalities. A single-chain antibody moiety, directed against the HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which rescues unspliced viral RNA from the nucleus of infected cells, has now been developed. This anti-Rev single-chain construct (SFv) consists of both light and heavy chain variable regions of an anti-Rev monoclonal antibody, which, when expressed intracellularly within human cells, potently inhibits HIV-1 replication. This intracellular SFv molecule is demonstrated to specifically antagonize Rev function. Thus, intracellular SFv expression, against a retroviral regulatory protein, may be useful as a gene therapeutic approach to combat HIV-1 infections.

  19. Methamphetamine inhibits Toll-like receptor 9-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cen, Ping; Ye, Li; Su, Qi-Jian; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Lin, Xin-Qin; Liang, Hao; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2013-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is one of the key sensors that recognize viral infection/replication in the host cells. Studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine (METH) dysregulated host cell innate immunity and facilitated HIV infection of macrophages. In this study, we present new evidence that METH suppressed TLR9-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages. Activation of TLR9 by its agonist CpG-ODN 2216 inhibits HIV replication, which was demonstrated by increased expression of TLR9, interferon (IFN)-α, IFN regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and myxovirus resistance gene A (MxA) in macrophages. However, METH treatment of macrophages greatly compromised the TLR9 signaling-mediated anti-HIV effect and inhibited the expression of TLR9 downstream signaling factors. Dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonists (SCH23390) could block METH-mediated inhibition of anti-HIV activity of TLR9 signaling. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of the METH action showed that METH treatment selectively down-regulated the expression of TLR9 on macrophages, whereas it had little effect on the expression of other TLRs. Collectively, our results provide further evidence that METH suppresses host cell innate immunity against HIV infection by down-regulating TLR9 expression and its signaling-mediated antiviral effect in macrophages. PMID:23751096

  20. Targeting of mTOR catalytic site inhibits multiple steps of the HIV-1 lifecycle and suppresses HIV-1 viremia in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Alonso; Le, Nhut; Gartenhaus, Ronald B; Sausville, Edward; Medina-Moreno, Sandra; Zapata, Juan C; Davis, Charles; Gallo, Robert C; Redfield, Robert R

    2015-07-28

    HIV necessitates host factors for successful completion of its life cycle. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase that forms two complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. Rapamycin is an allosteric inhibitor of mTOR that selectively inhibits mTORC1. Rapamycin interferes with viral entry of CCR5 (R5)-tropic HIV and with basal transcription of the HIV LTR, potently inhibiting replication of R5 HIV but not CXCR4 (X4)-tropic HIV in primary cells. The recently developed ATP-competitive mTOR kinase inhibitors (TOR-KIs) inhibit both mTORC1 and mTORC2. Using INK128 as a prototype TOR-KI, we demonstrate potent inhibition of both R5 and X4 HIV in primary lymphocytes (EC50 < 50 nM), in the absence of toxicity. INK128 inhibited R5 HIV entry by reducing CCR5 levels. INK128 also inhibited both basal and induced transcription of HIV genes, consistent with inhibition of mTORC2, whose activity is critical for phosphorylation of PKC isoforms and, in turn, induction of NF-κB. INK128 enhanced the antiviral potency of the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc, and had favorable antiviral interactions with HIV inhibitors of reverse transcriptase, integrase and protease. In humanized mice, INK128 decreased plasma HIV RNA by >2 log10 units and partially restored CD4/CD8 cell ratios. Targeting of cellular mTOR with INK128 (and perhaps others TOR-KIs) provides a potential strategy to inhibit HIV, especially in patients with drug resistant HIV strains. PMID:26170311

  1. Interleukin-12 inhibits hepatitis B virus replication in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, V J; Guidotti, L G; Chisari, F V

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a heterodimeric cytokine produced by antigen-presenting cells that has the ability to induce gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) secretion by T and natural killer cells and to generate normal Th1 responses. These properties suggest that IL-12 may play an important role in the immune response to many viruses, including hepatitis B virus (HBV). Recently, we have shown that HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes inhibit HBV replication in the livers of transgenic mice by a noncytolytic process that is mediated in part by IFN-gamma. In the current study, we demonstrated that the same antiviral response can be initiated by recombinant murine IL-12 and we showed that the antiviral effect of IL-12 extends to extrahepatic sites such as the kidney. Southern blot analyses revealed the complete disappearance of HBV replicative intermediates from liver and kidney tissues at IL-12 doses that induce little or no inflammation in these tissues. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the disappearance of cytoplasmic hepatitis B core antigen from both tissues after IL-12 treatment, suggesting that IL-12 either prevents the assembly or triggers the degradation of the nucleocapsid particles within which HBV replication occurs. Importantly, we demonstrated that although IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IFN-alpha/beta mRNA are induced in the liver and kidney after IL-12 administration, the antiviral effect of IL-12 is mediated principally by its ability to induce IFN-gamma production in this model. These results suggest that IL-12, through its ability to induce IFN-gamma, probably plays an important role in the antiviral immune response to HBV during natural infection. Further, since relatively nontoxic doses of recombinant IL-12 profoundly inhibit HBV replication in the liver and extrahepatic sites in this model, IL-12 may have therapeutic value as an antiviral agent for the treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:9060687

  2. Robust Suppression of HIV Replication by Intracellularly Expressed Reverse Transcriptase Aptamers Is Independent of Ribozyme Processing

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Margaret J; Sharma, Tarun K; Whatley, Angela S; Landon, Linda A; Tempesta, Michael A; Johnson, Marc C; Burke, Donald H

    2012-01-01

    RNA aptamers that bind human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) also inhibit viral replication, making them attractive as therapeutic candidates and potential tools for dissecting viral pathogenesis. However, it is not well understood how aptamer-expression context and cellular RNA pathways govern aptamer accumulation and net antiviral bioactivity. Using a previously-described expression cassette in which aptamers were flanked by two “minimal core” hammerhead ribozymes, we observed only weak suppression of pseudotyped HIV. To evaluate the importance of the minimal ribozymes, we replaced them with extended, tertiary-stabilized hammerhead ribozymes with enhanced self-cleavage activity, in addition to noncleaving ribozymes with active site mutations. Both the active and inactive versions of the extended hammerhead ribozymes increased inhibition of pseudotyped virus, indicating that processing is not necessary for bioactivity. Clonal stable cell lines expressing aptamers from these modified constructs strongly suppressed infectious virus, and were more effective than minimal ribozymes at high viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Tertiary stabilization greatly increased aptamer accumulation in viral and subcellular compartments, again regardless of self-cleavage capability. We therefore propose that the increased accumulation is responsible for increased suppression, that the bioactive form of the aptamer is one of the uncleaved or partially cleaved transcripts, and that tertiary stabilization increases transcript stability by reducing exonuclease degradation. PMID:22948672

  3. In silico design, synthesis, and screening of novel deoxyhypusine synthase inhibitors targeting HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Marcus; Kolodzik, Adrian; Pfaff, Katharina; Priyadarshini, Poornima; Krepstakies, Marcel; Hauber, Joachim; Rarey, Matthias; Meier, Chris

    2014-05-01

    The human enzyme deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) is an important host cell factor that participates in the post-translational hypusine modification of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A). Hypusine-modified eIF-5A plays a role in a number of diseases, including HIV infection/AIDS. Thus, DHS represents a novel and attractive drug target. So far, four crystal structures are available, and various substances have been tested for inhibition of human DHS. Among these inhibitors, N-1-guanyl-1,7-diaminoheptane (GC7) has been co-crystallized in the active site of DHS. However, despite its potency, GC7 is not selective enough to be used in drug applications. Therefore, new compounds that target DHS are needed. Herein we report the in silico design, chemical synthesis, and biological evaluation of new DHS inhibitors. One of these inhibitors showed dose-dependent inhibition of DHS in vitro, as well as suppression of HIV replication in cell cultures. Furthermore, the compound exhibited no cytotoxic effects at active concentrations. Thus, this designed compound demonstrated proof of principle and represents a promising starting point for the development of new drug candidates to specifically interfere with DHS activity. PMID:24616161

  4. Phosphodiesterase 8a Supports HIV-1 Replication in Macrophages at the Level of Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Booiman, Thijs; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; van Dort, Karel A.; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-1 infected macrophages play a key role in HIV-1 infection. Even during anti-retroviral treatment, macrophages keep producing virus due to suboptimal tissue penetration and reduced efficacy of antiretrovirals. It is therefore of major importance to understand which host factors are involved in HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Previously, we have shown that genetic polymorphisms in phosphodiesterase 8a (PDE8A) are strongly associated with HIV-1 replication in these cells. Here we analyzed the mechanism and regulation of PDE8A in HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Results PDE8A mRNA expression strongly increases upon differentiation of monocytes into macrophages, which corresponds to the increased susceptibility of mature macrophages to HIV-1. In parallel, expression of microRNA miR-145-5p, predicted to target PDE8A mRNA, strongly decreased. The interaction of miR-145-5p with the 3′ UTR of PDE8A mRNA could be experimentally validated, suggesting that indeed miR-145-5p can regulate PDE8A expression levels. Knockdown of PDE8A in macrophages resulted in a decrease in total HIV-1 replication and proviral DNA levels. These observations confirm that PDE8A regulates HIV-1 replication in macrophages and that this effect is mediated through early steps in the viral replication cycle. Conclusions PDE8A is highly expressed in macrophages, and its expression is regulated by miR-145-5p. Our findings strongly suggest that PDE8A supports HIV-1 replication in macrophages and that this effect is mediated at the level of reverse transcription. PMID:25295610

  5. Inhibition of highly productive HIV-1 infection in T cells, primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes by Sargassum fusiforme

    PubMed Central

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Li, Wen; Cotter, Robin; Klein, Michael T; Roberge, Emily; Yu, Er K; Clark, Bruce; Veille, Jean-Claude; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Y-W; Canki, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Background The high rate of HIV-1 mutation and increasing resistance to currently available antiretroviral (ART) therapies highlight the need for new antiviral agents. Products derived from natural sources have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication during various stages of the virus life cycle, and therefore represent a potential source of novel therapeutic agents. To expand our arsenal of therapeutics against HIV-1 infection, we investigated aqueous extract from Sargassum fusiforme (S. fusiforme) for ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection in the periphery, in T cells and human macrophages, and for ability to inhibit in the central nervous system (CNS), in microglia and astrocytes. Results S. fusiforme extract blocked HIV-1 infection and replication by over 90% in T cells, human macrophages and microglia, and it also inhibited pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3) infection in human astrocytes by over 70%. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5)-tropic HIV-1, was dose dependant and long lasting, did not inhibit cell growth or viability, was not toxic to cells, and was comparable to inhibition by the nucleoside analogue 2', 3'-didoxycytidine (ddC). S. fusiforme treatment blocked direct cell-to-cell infection spread. To investigate at which point of the virus life cycle this inhibition occurs, we infected T cells and CD4-negative primary human astrocytes with HIV-1 pseudotyped with envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), which bypasses the HIV receptor requirements. Infection by pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3) was also inhibited in a dose dependant manner, although up to 57% less, as compared to inhibition of native NL4-3, indicating post-entry interferences. Conclusion This is the first report demonstrating S. fusiforme to be a potent inhibitor of highly productive HIV-1 infection and replication in T cells, in primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes. Results with VSV/NL4-3 infection, suggest inhibition of both entry and

  6. Replication of HIV-1 deleted Nef mutants in chronically immune activated human T cells.

    PubMed

    Shapira-Nahor, Orit; Maayan, Shlomo; Peden, Keith W C; Rabinowitz, Ruth; Schlesinger, Michael; Alian, Akram; Panet, Amos

    2002-11-10

    Lymphocytes (PBMC) obtained from blood of HIV-sera negative Ethiopian immigrants (ETH) were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection in vitro with no need for stimulation by mitogens. As the HIV nef gene product has been shown to enhance viral replication in stimulated primary lymphocytes, we investigated in this work the role of Nef in viral replication in the ETH cells. Lymphocytes obtained from ETH individuals supported high replication of wild-type HIV-1 and low but significant replication level of the two deleted Nef mutants (encode truncated Nef proteins consisting only of either the first 35 or the first 86 amino acids of Nef). In contrast, no replication was observed in nonactivated cells obtained from non-ETH individuals. After activation of the PBMC from ETH individuals with PHA, replication of both wild-type strains and the two deleted Nef mutant viruses further increased. The CD4(+) T cells of ETH individuals exhibited elevated levels of the surface activation markers CD45RO and HLA-DR, compared with T cells derived from non-ETH group. Likewise, expression of the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 on these cells was higher in the ETH group than in the non-ETH group. Replication of HIV-1 wild-type and the isogenic-deleted Nef mutants was significantly correlated with the proportion of ETH cells expressing CD45RO and the chemokine receptors. This study suggests that HIV-1 may respond differently to several activation states characteristic of T cells. One activation state, defined by chronically activated lymphocytes from ETH individuals, is permissive to the wild-type HIV-1 and, to a lesser degree, to the Nef mutants. Further activation of these cells by exogenous stimuli enhances replication of the virus. Our results support the notion that Nef enhances the basal level of T cell activation and consequently, viral replication. PMID:12482665

  7. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    SciTech Connect

    Di Nunzio, Francesca; Fricke, Thomas; Miccio, Annarita; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio; Souque, Philippe; Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco; Mavilio, Fulvio; Charneau, Pierre; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-05-25

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites.

  8. Design and synthesis of pyridin-2-ylmethylaminopiperidin-1-ylbutyl amide CCR5 antagonists that are potent inhibitors of M-tropic (R5) HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; Zhou, Yuanxi; Bourque, Elyse; McEachern, Ernest; Langille, Jonathan; Harwig, Curtis; Veale, Duane; Yang, Wen; Li, Tongshong; Zhu, Yongbao; Bey, Michael; Baird, Ian; Sartori, Michael; Metz, Markus; Mosi, Renee; Nelson, Kim; Bodart, Veronique; Wong, Rebecca; Fricker, Simon; Mac Farland, Ron; Huskens, Dana; Schols, Dominique

    2011-12-01

    A series of CCR5 antagonists were optimized for potent inhibition of R5 HIV-1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Compounds that met acceptable ADME criteria, selectivity, human plasma protein binding, potency shift in the presence of α-glycoprotein were evaluated in rat and dog pharmacokinetics. PMID:22033460

  9. Drug targeting of HIV-1 RNA.DNA hybrid structures: thermodynamics of recognition and impact on reverse transcriptase-mediated ribonuclease H activity and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsai-Kun; Barbieri, Christopher M; Lin, Hsin-Chin; Rabson, Arnold B; Yang, Gengcheng; Fan, Yupeng; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A; Pilch, Daniel S

    2004-08-01

    RNA degradation via the ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) is a critical component of the reverse transcription process. In this connection, mutations of RT that inactivate RNase H activity result in noninfectious virus particles. Thus, interfering with the RNase H activity of RT represents a potential vehicle for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Here, we demonstrate an approach for inhibiting the RNase H activity of HIV-1 RT by targeting its RNA.DNA hybrid substrates. Specifically, we show that the binding of the 4,5-disubstituted 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides, neomycin, paromomycin, and ribostamycin, to two different chimeric RNA-DNA duplexes, which mimic two distinct intermediates in the reverse transcription process, inhibits specific RT-mediated RNase H cleavage, with this inhibition being competitive in nature. UV melting and isothermal titration calorimetry studies reveal a correlation between the relative binding affinities of the three drugs for each of the chimeric RNA-DNA host duplexes and the relative extents to which the drugs inhibit RT-mediated RNase H cleavage of the duplexes. Significantly, this correlation also extends to the relative efficacies with which the drugs inhibit HIV-1 replication. In the aggregate, our results highlight a potential strategy for AIDS chemotherapy that should not be compromised by the unusual genetic diversity of HIV-1. PMID:15274628

  10. Vaccine-elicited Human T Cells Recognizing Conserved Protein Regions Inhibit HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Borthwick, Nicola; Ahmed, Tina; Ondondo, Beatrice; Hayes, Peter; Rose, Annie; Ebrahimsa, Umar; Hayton, Emma-Jo; Black, Antony; Bridgeman, Anne; Rosario, Maximillian; Hill, Adrian VS; Berrie, Eleanor; Moyle, Sarah; Frahm, Nicole; Cox, Josephine; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Gilmour, Jill; McMichael, Andrew J; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Virus diversity and escape from immune responses are the biggest challenges to the development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1. We hypothesized that T-cell vaccines targeting the most conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome, which are common to most variants and bear fitness costs when mutated, will generate effectors that efficiently recognize and kill virus-infected cells early enough after transmission to potentially impact on HIV-1 replication and will do so more efficiently than whole protein-based T-cell vaccines. Here, we describe the first-ever administration of conserved immunogen vaccines vectored using prime-boost regimens of DNA, simian adenovirus and modified vaccinia virus Ankara to uninfected UK volunteers. The vaccine induced high levels of effector T cells that recognized virus-infected autologous CD4+ cells and inhibited HIV-1 replication by up to 5.79 log10. The virus inhibition was mediated by both Gag- and Pol- specific effector CD8+ T cells targeting epitopes that are typically subdominant in natural infection. These results provide proof of concept for using a vaccine to target T cells at conserved epitopes, showing that these T cells can control HIV-1 replication in vitro. PMID:24166483

  11. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition enhances oncolytic viral replication in glioma.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Wang, Pin-Yi; Nguyen, Tran; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Kasai, Kazue; Okemoto, Kazuo; Otsuki, Akihiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Fernandez, Soledad; Goins, William F; Grandi, Paola; Glorioso, Joseph C; Lawler, Sean; Cripe, Timothy P; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy, which uses genetically engineered tumor-targeting viruses, is being increasingly used in cancer clinical trials due to the direct cytolytic effects of this treatment that appear to provoke a robust immune response against the tumor. As OVs enter tumor cells, intrinsic host defenses have the potential to hinder viral replication and spread within the tumor mass. In this report, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in tumor cells appears to alter the trafficking of post-entry OVs from the nucleus toward lysosomes. In glioma cell lines and glioma-stem-like cells, HDAC6 inhibition (HDAC6i) by either pharmacologic or genetic means substantially increased replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). Moreover, HDAC6i increased shuttling of post-entry oHSV to the nucleus. In addition, electron microscopic analysis revealed that post-entry oHSVs are preferentially taken up into glioma cells through the endosomal pathway rather than via fusion at the cell surface. Together, these findings illustrate a mechanism of glioma cell defense against an incoming infection by oHSV and identify possible approaches to enhance oHSV replication and subsequent lysis of tumor cells. PMID:26524593

  12. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition enhances oncolytic viral replication in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Kaufmann, Johanna K.; Wang, Pin-Yi; Nguyen, Tran; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Kasai, Kazue; Okemoto, Kazuo; Otsuki, Akihiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Fernandez, Soledad; Goins, William F.; Grandi, Paola; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Lawler, Sean; Cripe, Timothy P.; Chiocca, E. Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy, which uses genetically engineered tumor-targeting viruses, is being increasingly used in cancer clinical trials due to the direct cytolytic effects of this treatment that appear to provoke a robust immune response against the tumor. As OVs enter tumor cells, intrinsic host defenses have the potential to hinder viral replication and spread within the tumor mass. In this report, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in tumor cells appears to alter the trafficking of post-entry OVs from the nucleus toward lysosomes. In glioma cell lines and glioma-stem–like cells, HDAC6 inhibition (HDAC6i) by either pharmacologic or genetic means substantially increased replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). Moreover, HDAC6i increased shuttling of post-entry oHSV to the nucleus. In addition, electron microscopic analysis revealed that post-entry oHSVs are preferentially taken up into glioma cells through the endosomal pathway rather than via fusion at the cell surface. Together, these findings illustrate a mechanism of glioma cell defense against an incoming infection by oHSV and identify possible approaches to enhance oHSV replication and subsequent lysis of tumor cells. PMID:26524593

  13. Inhibition of HIV derived lentiviral production by TAR RNA binding domain of TAT protein

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Michael Y; Zhang, Jiying; He, Yukai

    2005-01-01

    Background A critical step in the production of new HIV virions involves the TAT protein binding to the TAR element. The TAT protein contains in close proximity its TAR RNA binding domain and protein transduction domain (PTD). The PTD domain of TAT has been identified as being instrumental in the protein's ability to cross mammalian cell and nuclear membranes. All together, this information led us to form the hypothesis that a protein containing the TAR RNA binding domain could compete with the native full length TAT protein and effectively block the TAR RNA binding site in transduced HIV infected cells. Results We synthesized a short peptide named Tat-P, which contained the TAR RNA binding and PTD domains to examine whether the peptide has the potential of inhibiting TAT dependent HIV replication. We investigated the inhibiting effects of Tat-P in vitro using a HIV derived lentiviral vector model. We found that the TAT PTD domain not only efficiently transduced test cells, but also effectively inhibited the production of lentiviral particles in a TAT dependent manner. These results were also supported by data derived from the TAT activated LTR-luciferase expression model and RNA binding assays. Conclusion Tat-P may become part of a category of anti-HIV drugs that competes with full length TAT proteins to inhibit HIV replication. In addition, this study indicates that the HIV derived lentiviral vector system is a safe and reliable screening method for anti-HIV drugs, especially for those targeting the interaction of TAT and TAR RNAs. PMID:16293193

  14. Human milk mucin inhibits rotavirus replication and prevents experimental gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Yolken, R H; Peterson, J A; Vonderfecht, S L; Fouts, E T; Midthun, K; Newburg, D S

    1992-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal infections due to rotaviruses and other enteric pathogens are major causes of morbidity and mortality in infants and young children throughout the world. Breast-feeding can reduce the rate of serious gastroenteritis in infants; however, the degrees of protection offered against rotavirus infection vary in different populations. The mechanisms associated with milk-mediated protection against viral gastroenteritis have not been fully elucidated. We have isolated a macromolecular component of human milk that inhibits the replication of rotaviruses in tissue culture and prevents the development of gastroenteritis in an animal model system. Purification of the component indicates that the antiviral activity is associated with an acidic fraction (pI = 4.0-4.6), which is free of detectable immunoglobulins. Furthermore, high levels of antiviral activity are associated with an affinity-purified complex of human milk mucin. Deglycosylation of the mucin complex results in the loss of antiviral activity. Further purification indicated that rotavirus specifically binds to the milk mucin complex as well as to the 46-kD glycoprotein component of the complex. Binding to the 46-kD component was substantially reduced after chemical hydrolysis of sialic acid. We have documented that human milk mucin can bind to rotavirus and inhibit viral replication in vitro and in vivo. Variations in milk mucin glycoproteins may be associated with different levels of protection against infection with gastrointestinal pathogens. Images PMID:1331178

  15. Productive Replication of vif-Chimeric HIV-1 in Feline Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Melissa A.; Hu, Chunling; Saenz, Dyana T.; Fadel, Hind J.; Sims, Olivia; Peretz, Mary; Poeschla, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    Nonprimate animal models of HIV-1 infection are prevented by missing cellular cofactors and by antiviral actions of species-specific host defense factors. These blocks are profound in rodents but may be less abundant in certain Carnivora. Here, we enabled productive, spreading replication and passage of HIV-1 in feline cells. Feline fibroblasts, T-cell lines, and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells supported early and late HIV-1 life cycle phases in a manner equivalent to that of human cells, except that produced virions had low infectivity. Stable expression of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif-green fluorescent protein (GFP) in HIV-1 entry receptor-complemented feline (CrFK) cells enabled robust spreading HIV-1 replication. FIV Vif colocalized with feline APOBEC3 (fA3) proteins, targeted them for degradation, and prevented G→A hypermutation of the HIV-1 cDNA by fA3CH and fA3H. HIV-1 Vif was inactive against fA3s as expected and even paradoxically augmented restriction in some assays. In an interesting contrast, simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac Vif had substantial anti-fA3 activities, which were complete against fA3CH and partial against fA3H. Moreover, both primate lentiviral Vifs colocalized with fA3s and could be pulled down from cell lysates by fA3CH. HIV-1 molecular clones that encode FIV Vif or SIVmac Vif (HIV-1VF and HIV-1VS) were then constructed. These viruses replicated productively in HIV-1 receptor-expressing CrFK cells and could be passaged serially to uninfected cells. Thus, with the exception of entry receptors, the cat genome can supply the dependency factors needed by HIV-1, and a main restriction can be countered by vif chimerism. The results raise the possibility that the domestic cat could yield an animal model of HIV-1 infection. PMID:20463079

  16. Curcumin Inhibits Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Senina, Svetlana; Lundberg, Lindsay; Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Das, Ravi; Baer, Alan; Bethel, Laura; Turell, Michael; Hartman, Amy Lynn; Das, Bhaskar; Bailey, Charles; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus that is classified as a select agent, an emerging infectious virus, and an agricultural pathogen. Understanding RVFV-host interactions is imperative to the design of novel therapeutics. Here, we report that an infection by the MP-12 strain of RVFV induces phosphorylation of the p65 component of the NFκB cascade. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of p65 (serine 536) involves phosphorylation of IκBα and occurs through the classical NFκB cascade. A unique, low molecular weight complex of the IKK-β subunit can be observed in MP-12-infected cells, which we have labeled IKK-β2. The IKK-β2 complex retains kinase activity and phosphorylates an IκBα substrate. Inhibition of the IKK complex using inhibitors impairs viral replication, thus alluding to the requirement of an active IKK complex to the viral life cycle. Curcumin strongly down-regulates levels of extracellular infectious virus. Our data demonstrated that curcumin binds to and inhibits kinase activity of the IKK-β2 complex in infected cells. Curcumin partially exerts its inhibitory influence on RVFV replication by interfering with IKK-β2-mediated phosphorylation of the viral protein NSs and by altering the cell cycle of treated cells. Curcumin also demonstrated efficacy against ZH501, the fully virulent version of RVFV. Curcumin treatment down-regulated viral replication in the liver of infected animals. Our data point to the possibility that RVFV infection may result in the generation of novel versions of host components (such as IKK-β2) that, by virtue of altered protein interaction and function, qualify as unique therapeutic targets. PMID:22847000

  17. Gene therapeutic approaches to inhibit hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Gebbing, Maren; Bergmann, Thorsten; Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections remain to present a major global health problem. The infection can be associated with acute symptomatic or asymptomatic hepatitis which can cause chronic inflammation of the liver and over years this can lead to cirrhosis and the development of hepatocellular carcinomas. Currently available therapeutics for chronically infected individuals aim at reducing viral replication and to slow down or stop the progression of the disease. Therefore, novel treatment options are needed to efficiently combat and eradicate this disease. Here we provide a state of the art overview of gene therapeutic approaches to inhibit HBV replication. We discuss non-viral and viral approaches which were explored to deliver therapeutic nucleic acids aiming at reducing HBV replication. Types of delivered therapeutic nucleic acids which were studied since many years include antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and antisense RNA, ribozymes and DNAzymes, RNA interference, and external guide sequences. More recently designer nucleases gained increased attention and were exploited to destroy the HBV genome. In addition we mention other strategies to reduce HBV replication based on delivery of DNA encoding dominant negative mutants and DNA vaccination. In combination with available cell culture and animal models for HBV infection, in vitro and in vivo studies can be performed to test efficacy of gene therapeutic approaches. Recent progress but also challenges will be specified and future perspectives will be discussed. This is an exciting time to explore such approaches because recent successes of gene therapeutic strategies in the clinic to treat genetic diseases raise hope to find alternative treatment options for patients chronically infected with HBV. PMID:25729471

  18. Quantitation of Replication-Competent HIV-1 in Populations of Resting CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Sarabia, Natalia; Bateson, Rosalie E.; Dahl, Noelle P.; Crooks, Amanda M.; Kuruc, JoAnn D.; Margolis, David M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Central memory (TCM) CD4+ T cells are the principal reservoir of latent HIV-1 infection that persists despite durable, successful antiretroviral therapy (ART). In a study that measured HIV DNA in 17 patients and replication-competent HIV in 4 patients, pools of resting and activated transitional memory (TTM) CD4+ T cells were found to be a reservoir for HIV infection. As defective viruses account for the majority of integrated HIV DNA and do not reflect the actual frequency of latent, replication-competent proviral infection, we assessed the specific contribution of resting TTM cells to latent HIV infection. We measured the frequency of replication-competent HIV in purified resting memory cell subpopulations by a limiting-dilution, quantitative viral outgrowth assay (QVOA). HIV was routinely detected within the resting central memory compartment but was infrequently detected within the resting TTM compartment. These observations suggest that prolonged ART may limit persistent latent infection in the TTM compartment. Our results confirm the importance of latent infection within the TCM compartment and again focus attention on these cells as the most important latent viral reservoir. While proliferation may drive expansion of detectable viral genomes in cells, the frequency of replication-competent HIV must be carefully assessed. Latent infection appears to wane within the transitional memory compartment in patients who have sustained successful viral suppression via ART or were treated very early in infection. IMPORTANCE Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has led to a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. However, HIV integrates into the genome of CD4+ T cells, generating pools of long-lived cells that are reservoirs of latent HIV. Two main subsets of CD4+ T cells, central memory and transitional memory cells, were reported to be major reservoirs of HIV infection. However, this study primarily measured the HIV DNA content

  19. Drug 9AA reactivates p21/Waf1 and Inhibits HIV-1 progeny formation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weilin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Pedati, Caitlin; Zweier, Lynnsey; Castro, Iris; Klase, Zachary; Dowd, Cynthia S; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Bukrinsky, Michael; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2008-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the p53 pathway plays an important role in HIV-1 infection. Previous work from our lab has established a model demonstrating how p53 could become inactivated in HIV-1 infected cells through binding to Tat. Subsequently, p53 was inactivated and lost its ability to transactivate its downstream target gene p21/waf1. P21/waf1 is a well-known cdk inhibitor (CKI) that can lead to cell cycle arrest upon DNA damage. Most recently, the p21/waf1 function was further investigated as a molecular barrier for HIV-1 infection of stem cells. Therefore, we reason that the restoration of the p53 and p21/waf1 pathways could be a possible theraputical arsenal for combating HIV-1 infection. In this current study, we show that a small chemical molecule, 9-aminoacridine (9AA) at low concentrations, could efficiently reactivate p53 pathway and thereby restoring the p21/waf1 function. Further, we show that the 9AA could significantly inhibit virus replication in activated PBMCs, likely through a mechanism of inhibiting the viral replication machinery. A mechanism study reveals that the phosphorylated p53ser15 may be dissociated from binding to HIV-1 Tat protein, thereby activating the p21/waf1 gene. Finally, we also show that the 9AA-activated p21/waf1 is recruited to HIV-1 preintegration complex, through a mechanism yet to be elucidated. PMID:18348731

  20. Proteomic analyses associate cystatin B with restricted HIV-1 replication in placental macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Luciano-Montalvo, Claribel; Ciborowski, Pawel; Duan, Fenghai; Gendelman, Howard E.; Meléndez, Loyda M.

    2013-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MP; monocytes, tissue macrophages, and dendritic cells) are reservoirs, vehicles of dissemination, and targets for persistent HIV infection. However, not all MP populations equally support viral growth. Such differential replication is typified by the greater ability of placental macrophages (PM), as compared with monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), to restrict viral replication. Since cytosolic protein patterns can differentiate macrophage subtypes, we used a proteomics approach consisting of surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF), tandem mass spectrometry, and Western blots to identify differences between uninfected and HIV infected PM and MDM protein profiles linked to viral growth. We performed the first proteome analysis of PM in the molecular range of 5 to 20 kDa. Importantly, we found that a SELDI-TOF protein peak with an m/z of 11100, which was significantly lower in uninfected and HIV infected PM than MDM, was identified as cystatin B (CSTB). Studies of siRNA against CSTB treatment in MDM associated its expression with HIV replication. These data demonstrate that low molecular weight placental macrophage cytosolic proteins are differentially expressed in HIV infected PM and MDM and identify a potential role for CSTB in HIV replication. This work also serves to elucidate a mechanism by which the placenta protects the fetus from HIV transmission. PMID:18951626

  1. Silibinin Inhibits HIV-1 Infection by Reducing Cellular Activation and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Janela; Lovelace, Erica S.; Elahi, Shokrollah; Maurice, Nicholas J.; Wagoner, Jessica; Dragavon, Joan; Mittler, John E.; Kraft, Zane; Stamatatos, Leonidis; Horton, Helen; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Coombs, Robert W.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) block hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL), a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects. PMID:22848626

  2. Quantitative Comparison of HTLV-1 and HIV-1 Cell-to-Cell Infection with New Replication Dependent Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Mazurov, Dmitriy; Ilinskaya, Anna; Heidecker, Gisela; Lloyd, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an efficient method to quantify cell-to-cell infection with single-cycle, replication dependent reporter vectors. This system was used to examine the mechanisms of infection with HTLV-1 and HIV-1 vectors in lymphocyte cell lines. Effector cells transfected with reporter vector, packaging vector, and Env expression plasmid produced virus-like particles that transduced reporter gene activity into cocultured target cells with zero background. Reporter gene expression was detected exclusively in target cells and required an Env-expression plasmid and a viral packaging vector, which provided essential structural and enzymatic proteins for virus replication. Cell-cell fusion did not contribute to infection, as reporter protein was rarely detected in syncytia. Coculture of transfected Jurkat T cells and target Raji/CD4 B cells enhanced HIV-1 infection two fold and HTLV-1 infection ten thousand fold in comparison with cell-free infection of Raji/CD4 cells. Agents that interfere with actin and tubulin polymerization strongly inhibited HTLV-1 and modestly decreased HIV-1 cell-to-cell infection, an indication that cytoskeletal remodeling was more important for HTLV-1 transmission. Time course studies showed that HTLV-1 transmission occurred very rapidly after cell mixing, whereas slower kinetics of HIV-1 coculture infection implies a different mechanism of infectious transmission. HTLV-1 Tax was demonstrated to play an important role in altering cell-cell interactions that enhance virus infection and replication. Interestingly, superantigen-induced synapses between Jurkat cells and Raji/CD4 cells did not enhance infection for either HTLV-1 or HIV-1. In general, the dependence on cell-to-cell infection was determined by the virus, the effector and target cell types, and by the nature of the cell-cell interaction. PMID:20195464

  3. Ginkgolic acid inhibits HIV protease activity and HIV infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jian-Ming; Yan, Shaoyu; Jamaluddin, Saha; Weakley, Sarah M.; Liang, Zhengdong; Siwak, Edward B.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Several HIV protease mutations, which are resistant to clinical HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), have been identified. There is a great need for second-generation PIs with different chemical structures and/or with an alternative mode of inhibition. Ginkgolic acid is a natural herbal substance and a major component of the lipid fraction in the nutshells of the Ginkgo biloba tree. The objective of this study was to determine whether ginkgolic acid could inhibit HIV protease activity in a cell free system and HIV infection in human cells. Material/Methods Purified ginkgolic acid and recombinant HIV-1 HXB2 KIIA protease were used for the HIV protease activity assay. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used for HIV infection (HIV-1SF162 virus), determined by a p24gag ELISA. Cytotoxicity was also determined. Results Ginkgolic acid (31.2 μg/ml) inhibited HIV protease activity by 60%, compared with the negative control, and the effect was concentration-dependent. In addition, ginkgolic acid treatment (50 and 100 μg/ml) effectively inhibited the HIV infection at day 7 in a concentration-dependent manner. Ginkgolic acid at a concentration of up to 150 μg/ml demonstrated very limited cytotoxicity. Conclusions Ginkgolic acid effectively inhibits HIV protease activity in a cell free system and HIV infection in PBMCs without significant cytotoxicity. Ginkgolic acid may inhibit HIV protease through different mechanisms than current FDA-approved HIV PI drugs. These properties of ginkgolic acid make it a promising therapy for HIV infection, especially as the clinical problem of viral resistance to HIV PIs continues to grow. PMID:22847190

  4. HIV prevention with male prostitutes and patrons of hustler bars: replication of an HIV preventive intervention.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Klotz, D; Eckholdt, H M

    1998-02-01

    The core objectives of this study were to document the process by which a community-based organization replicated and adapted an experimentally developed intervention to its own use and to explore the effectiveness of that HIV prevention program for male prostitutes and other patrons in New York City "hustler" bars. The intervention model employed was based on previous research with gay men (Kelly, St. Lawrence, Diaz, et al., 1991; Kelly, St. Lawrence, Stevenson, et al., 1992) and inspired by diffusion of innovation theory (Rogers, 1995). The effects of the current intervention were assessed on a sample of 1,741 male prostitutes and bar patrons. Analyses indicated significant reductions in paid, unprotected sexual intercourse and oral sex following the intervention. Analyses further indicated that the data were partially consistent with the program's model, which specified that norms were the putative mediator of behavior change in the intervention. Also, the intervention's effects varied by bar and by participants' race/ethnicity. Data support the utility of the intervention model for an urban sample of men at high risk for HIV infection. The importance of exploring the mechanisms that underlie the intervention is discussed. PMID:9574500

  5. HIV-1 Vpr increases HCV replication through VprBP in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yanling; Huang, Fang; Yuan, Ting; Sun, Binlian; Yang, Rongge

    2016-09-01

    Coinfection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurs at a high frequency, in which HIV shows a promotion of HCV-derived liver diseases. However, the mechanism of how this occurs is not well understood. Our previous work has demonstrated that the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr enhances HCV RNA replication in cell culture. Because Vpr performs most of its functions through host protein VprBP (DCAF1), the role of VprBP in the regulation of HCV by Vpr was investigated in this study. We found that the Vpr mutant Q65R, which is deficient in VprBP binding, could not enhance HCV replication. Furthermore, Vpr-mediated enhancement of HCV replication was severely diminished in VprBP knockdown cells. In addition, an inhibitor of Cullin RING E3 ligases, MLN4924, impaired the function of Vpr during HCV replication. Together, these results suggest that Vpr promotes HCV replication in a VprBP-dependent manner, and that the activity of Cullin RING E3 ligases is essential to this process. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that HIV-1 Vpr makes the cellular environment more suitable for HCV replication, which might relate with the host ubiquitination system. PMID:27460548

  6. Extract of Scutellaria baicalensis inhibits dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Scutellaria baicalensis (S. baicalensis) is one of the traditional Chinese medicinal herbs that have been shown to possess many health benefits. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro antiviral activity of aqueous extract of the roots of S. baicalensis against all the four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. Methods Aqueous extract of S. baicalensis was prepared by microwave energy steam evaporation method (MEGHE™), and the anti-dengue virus replication activity was evaluated using the foci forming unit reduction assay (FFURA) in Vero cells. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was used to determine the actual dengue virus RNA copy number. The presence of baicalein, a flavonoid known to inhibit dengue virus replication was determined by mass spectrometry. Results The IC50 values for the S. baicalensis extract on Vero cells following DENV adsorption ranged from 86.59 to 95.19 μg/mL for the different DENV serotypes. The IC50 values decreased to 56.02 to 77.41 μg/mL when cells were treated with the extract at the time of virus adsorption for the different DENV serotypes. The extract showed potent direct virucidal activity against extracellular infectious virus particles with IC50 that ranged from 74.33 to 95.83 μg/mL for all DENV serotypes. Weak prophylactic effects with IC50 values that ranged from 269.9 to 369.8 μg/mL were noticed when the cells were pre-treated 2 hours prior to virus inoculation. The concentration of baicalein in the S. baicalensis extract was ~1% (1.03 μg/gm dried extract). Conclusions Our study demonstrates the in vitro anti-dengue virus replication property of S. baicalensis against all the four DENV serotypes investigated. The extract reduced DENV infectivity and replication in Vero cells. The extract was rich in baicalein, and could be considered for potential development of anti-DENV therapeutics. PMID:23627436

  7. Nuclear Factor 90(NF90) targeted to TAR RNA inhibits transcriptional activation of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Agbottah, Emmanuel T; Traviss, Christine; McArdle, James; Karki, Sambhav; St Laurent, Georges C; Kumar, Ajit

    2007-01-01

    Background Examination of host cell-based inhibitors of HIV-1 transcription may be important for attenuating viral replication. We describe properties of a cellular double-stranded RNA binding protein with intrinsic affinity for HIV-1 TAR RNA that interferes with Tat/TAR interaction and inhibits viral gene expression. Results Utilizing TAR affinity fractionation, North-Western blotting, and mobility-shift assays, we show that the C-terminal variant of nuclear factor 90 (NF90ctv) with strong affinity for the TAR RNA, competes with Tat/TAR interaction in vitro. Analysis of the effect of NF90ctv-TAR RNA interaction in vivo showed significant inhibition of Tat-transactivation of HIV-1 LTR in cells expressing NF90ctv, as well as changes in histone H3 lysine-4 and lysine-9 methylation of HIV chromatin that are consistent with the epigenetic changes in transcriptionally repressed gene. Conclusion Structural integrity of the TAR element is crucial in HIV-1 gene expression. Our results show that perturbation Tat/TAR RNA interaction by the dsRNA binding protein is sufficient to inhibit transcriptional activation of HIV-1. PMID:17565699

  8. Broad HIV Epitope Specificity and Viral Inhibition Induced by Multigenic HIV-1 Adenovirus Subtype 35 Vector Vaccine in Healthy Uninfected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kopycinski, Jakub; Hayes, Peter; Ashraf, Ambreen; Cheeseman, Hannah; Lala, Francesco; Czyzewska-Khan, Justyna; Spentzou, Aggeliki; Gill, Dilbinder K.; Keefer, Michael C.; Excler, Jean-Louis; Fast, Patricia; Cox, Josephine; Gilmour, Jill

    2014-01-01

    A correlation between in vivo and in vitro virus control mediated by CD8+ T-cell populations has been demonstrated by CD8 T-cell-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 and SIV replication in vitro in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from infected humans and non-human primates (NHPs), respectively. Here, the breadth and specificity of T-cell responses induced following vaccination with replication-defective adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35) vectors containing a fusion protein of Gag, reverse transcriptase (RT), Integrase (Int) and Nef (Ad35-GRIN) and Env (Ad35-ENV), derived from HIV-1 subtype A isolates, was assessed in 25 individuals. The vaccine induced responses to a median of 4 epitopes per vaccinee. We correlated the CD8 responses to conserved vs. variable regions with the ability to inhibit a panel of 7 HIV-1 isolates representing multiple clades in a virus inhibition assay (VIA). The results indicate that targeting immunodominant responses to highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome may result in an increased ability to inhibit multiple clades of HIV-1 in vitro. The data further validate the use of the VIA to screen and select future HIV vaccine candidates. Moreover, our data suggest that future T cell-focused vaccine design should aim to induce immunodominant responses to highly conserved regions of the virus. PMID:24609066

  9. Broad HIV epitope specificity and viral inhibition induced by multigenic HIV-1 adenovirus subtype 35 vector vaccine in healthy uninfected adults.

    PubMed

    Kopycinski, Jakub; Hayes, Peter; Ashraf, Ambreen; Cheeseman, Hannah; Lala, Francesco; Czyzewska-Khan, Justyna; Spentzou, Aggeliki; Gill, Dilbinder K; Keefer, Michael C; Excler, Jean-Louis; Fast, Patricia; Cox, Josephine; Gilmour, Jill

    2014-01-01

    A correlation between in vivo and in vitro virus control mediated by CD8+ T-cell populations has been demonstrated by CD8 T-cell-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 and SIV replication in vitro in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from infected humans and non-human primates (NHPs), respectively. Here, the breadth and specificity of T-cell responses induced following vaccination with replication-defective adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35) vectors containing a fusion protein of Gag, reverse transcriptase (RT), Integrase (Int) and Nef (Ad35-GRIN) and Env (Ad35-ENV), derived from HIV-1 subtype A isolates, was assessed in 25 individuals. The vaccine induced responses to a median of 4 epitopes per vaccinee. We correlated the CD8 responses to conserved vs. variable regions with the ability to inhibit a panel of 7 HIV-1 isolates representing multiple clades in a virus inhibition assay (VIA). The results indicate that targeting immunodominant responses to highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome may result in an increased ability to inhibit multiple clades of HIV-1 in vitro. The data further validate the use of the VIA to screen and select future HIV vaccine candidates. Moreover, our data suggest that future T cell-focused vaccine design should aim to induce immunodominant responses to highly conserved regions of the virus. PMID:24609066

  10. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1

  11. Potent and highly selective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibition by a series of alpha-anilinophenylacetamide derivatives targeted at HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, R; Andries, K; Debyser, Z; Van Daele, P; Schols, D; Stoffels, P; De Vreese, K; Woestenborghs, R; Vandamme, A M; Janssen, C G

    1993-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of a large chemical library of pharmacologically acceptable prototype compounds in a high-capacity, cellular-based screening system has led to the discovery of another family of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibitors. Through optimization of a lead compound, several alpha-anilinophenylacetamide (alpha-APA) derivatives have been identified that inhibit the replication of several HIV-1 strains (IIIB/LAI, RF, NDK, MN, HE) in a variety of host cell types at concentrations that are 10,000- to 100,000-fold lower than their cytotoxic concentrations. The IC50 of the alpha-APA derivative R 89439 for HIV-1 cytopathicity in MT-4 cells was 13 nM. The median 90% inhibitory concentration (IC90) in a variety of host cells was 50-100 nM. Although these alpha-APA derivatives are active against a tetrahydroimidazo [4,5,1-jk][1,4]benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione-(TIBO)-resistant HIV-1 strain, they do not inhibit replication of HIV-2 (strains ROD and EHO) or simian immunodeficiency virus (strains Mac251, mndGB1, and agm3). An HIV-1 strain containing the Tyr181-->Cys mutation in the reverse transcriptase region displayed reduced sensitivity. alpha-APA derivative R 89439 inhibited virion and recombinant reverse transcriptase of HIV-1 but did not inhibit that of HIV-2. Reverse transcriptase inhibition depended upon the template/primer used. The relatively uncomplicated synthesis of R 89439, its potent anti-HIV-1 activity, and its favorable pharmacokinetic profile make R 89439 a good candidate for clinical studies. PMID:7680476

  12. Suramin inhibits chikungunya virus replication through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Albulescu, Irina C; van Hoolwerff, Marcella; Wolters, Laura A; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Nastruzzi, Claudio; Yang, Shih Chi; Tsay, Shwu-Chen; Hwu, Jih Ru; Snijder, Eric J; van Hemert, Martijn J

    2015-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes severe and often persistent arthritis. In recent years, millions of people have been infected with this virus for which registered antivirals are still lacking. Using our recently established in vitro assay, we discovered that the approved anti-parasitic drug suramin inhibits CHIKV RNA synthesis (IC50 of ∼5μM). The compound inhibited replication of various CHIKV isolates in cell culture with an EC50 of ∼80μM (CC50>5mM) and was also active against Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus. In vitro studies hinted that suramin interferes with (re)initiation of RNA synthesis, whereas time-of-addition studies suggested it to also interfere with a post-attachment early step in infection, possibly entry. CHIKV (nsP4) mutants resistant against favipiravir or ribavirin, which target the viral RNA polymerase, did not exhibit cross-resistance to suramin, suggesting a different mode of action. The assessment of the activity of a variety of suramin-related compounds in cell culture and the in vitro assay for RNA synthesis provided more insight into the moieties required for antiviral activity. The antiviral effect of suramin-containing liposomes was also analyzed. Its approved status makes it worthwhile to explore the use of suramin to prevent and/or treat CHIKV infections. PMID:26112648

  13. Transcription elongation regulator 1 (TCERG1) regulates competent RNA polymerase II-mediated elongation of HIV-1 transcription and facilitates efficient viral replication

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Control of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) release from pausing has been proposed as a checkpoint mechanism to ensure optimal RNAPII activity, especially in large, highly regulated genes. HIV-1 gene expression is highly regulated at the level of elongation, which includes transcriptional pausing that is mediated by both viral and cellular factors. Here, we present evidence for a specific role of the elongation-related factor TCERG1 in regulating the extent of HIV-1 elongation and viral replication in vivo. Results We show that TCERG1 depletion diminishes the basal and viral Tat-activated transcription from the HIV-1 LTR. In support of a role for an elongation mechanism in the transcriptional control of HIV-1, we found that TCERG1 modifies the levels of pre-mRNAs generated at distal regions of HIV-1. Most importantly, TCERG1 directly affects the elongation rate of RNAPII transcription in vivo. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that TCERG1 regulates HIV-1 transcription by increasing the rate of RNAPII elongation through the phosphorylation of serine 2 within the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII and suggest a mechanism for the involvement of TCERG1 in relieving pausing. Finally, we show that TCERG1 is required for HIV-1 replication. Conclusions Our study reveals that TCERG1 regulates HIV-1 transcriptional elongation by increasing the elongation rate of RNAPII and phosphorylation of Ser 2 within the CTD. Based on our data, we propose a general mechanism for TCERG1 acting on genes that are regulated at the level of elongation by increasing the rate of RNAPII transcription through the phosphorylation of Ser2. In the case of HIV-1, our evidence provides the basis for further investigation of TCERG1 as a potential therapeutic target for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication PMID:24165037

  14. The Competitive Interplay between Allosteric HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor BI/D and LEDGF/p75 during the Early Stage of HIV-1 Replication Adversely Affects Inhibitor Potency.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Serrao, Erik; Hoyte, Ashley; Larue, Ross C; Slaughter, Alison; Sharma, Amit; Plumb, Matthew R; Kessl, Jacques J; Fuchs, James R; Bushman, Frederic D; Engelman, Alan N; Griffin, Patrick R; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-05-20

    Allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (ALLINIs) have recently emerged as a promising class of antiretroviral agents and are currently in clinical trials. In infected cells, ALLINIs potently inhibit viral replication by impairing virus particle maturation but surprisingly exhibit a reduced EC50 for inhibiting HIV-1 integration in target cells. To better understand the reduced antiviral activity of ALLINIs during the early stage of HIV-1 replication, we investigated the competitive interplay between a potent representative ALLINI, BI/D, and LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 integrase. While the principal binding sites of BI/D and LEDGF/p75 overlap at the integrase catalytic core domain dimer interface, we show that the inhibitor and the cellular cofactor induce markedly different multimerization patterns of full-length integrase. LEDGF/p75 stabilizes an integrase tetramer through the additional interactions with the integrase N-terminal domain, whereas BI/D induces protein-protein interactions in C-terminal segments that lead to aberrant, higher-order integrase multimerization. We demonstrate that LEDGF/p75 binds HIV-1 integrase with significantly higher affinity than BI/D and that the cellular protein is able to reverse the inhibitor induced aberrant, higher-order integrase multimerization in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Consistent with these observations, alterations of the cellular levels of LEDGF/p75 markedly affected BI/D EC50 values during the early steps of HIV-1 replication. Furthermore, genome-wide sequencing of HIV-1 integration sites in infected cells demonstrate that LEDGF/p75-dependent integration site selection is adversely affected by BI/D treatment. Taken together, our studies elucidate structural and mechanistic details of the interplay between LEDGF/p75 and BI/D during the early stage of HIV-1 replication. PMID:26910179

  15. A Motif Unique to the Human Dead-Box Protein DDX3 Is Important for Nucleic Acid Binding, ATP Hydrolysis, RNA/DNA Unwinding and HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Di Cicco, Giulia; Dietrich, Ursula; Maga, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins are enzymes endowed with nucleic acid-dependent ATPase, RNA translocase and unwinding activities. The human DEAD-box protein DDX3 has been shown to play important roles in tumor proliferation and viral infections. In particular, DDX3 has been identified as an essential cofactor for HIV-1 replication. Here we characterized a set of DDX3 mutants biochemically with respect to nucleic acid binding, ATPase and helicase activity. In particular, we addressed the functional role of a unique insertion between motifs I and Ia of DDX3 and provide evidence for its implication in nucleic acid binding and HIV-1 replication. We show that human DDX3 lacking this domain binds HIV-1 RNA with lower affinity. Furthermore, a specific peptide ligand for this insertion selected by phage display interferes with HIV-1 replication after transduction into HelaP4 cells. Besides broadening our understanding of the structure-function relationships of this important protein, our results identify a specific domain of DDX3 which may be suited as target for antiviral drugs designed to inhibit cellular cofactors for HIV-1 replication. PMID:21589879

  16. Comparative Fitness of Multi-Dideoxynucleoside-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) in an In Vitro Competitive HIV-1 Replication Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kosalaraksa, Pope; Kavlick, Mark F.; Maroun, Victor; Le, Richard; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    1999-01-01

    We examined whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fitness was altered upon the acquisition of a set or subset of five mutations (A62V, V75I, F77L, F116Y, and Q151M) in the pol gene, which confers resistance to multiple dideoxynucleosides (MDR), as well as the zidovudine resistance-associated mutation T215Y, using a competitive HIV-1 replication assay in a setting of an HXB2D genetic background. Target H9 cells were exposed to a 50:50 mixture of paired infectious molecular clones, and HIV-1 in the culture supernatant was transmitted to new cultures every 7 to 10 days. The polymerase-encoding region of the virus was sequenced at various time points, and the relative proportion of the two viral populations was determined. In the absence of drugs, the comparative order for replicative fitness was HIV-162/75/77/116/151 > HIV-177/116/151 > HIV-1151 > wild-type HIV-1 (HIV-1wt) > HIV-175/77/116/151 > HIV-1151/215 > HIV-1215. In the presence of zidovudine or didanosine, the order was HIV-162/75/77/116/151 > HIV-177/116/151 > HIV-175/77/116/151 > HIV-1151 > HIV-1215. HIV-1215S(TCC), a putative intermediate infectious clone for HIV-1215, replicated comparably to HIV-1wt, while two putative intermediates for HIV-1151 [HIV-1151L(CTG) and HIV-1151K(AAG)] replicated much less efficiently than HIV-1wt and HIV-1151, suggesting that for HIV-1151 to develop, two base substitutions are likely to occur concurrently or within a short interval. These data may illustrate the molecular basis by which HIV-1151 emerges much less frequently than HIV-1215. The present data also demonstrate that several MDR HIV-1 variants are more fit than HIV-1wt in the absence of drugs and that resistance-associated mutations and drug pressure are critical variates for HIV-1 fitness. PMID:10364282

  17. HIV-1 Adapts To Replicate in Cells Expressing Common Marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Oliva, Alberto; Finzi, Andrés; Haim, Hillel; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that a major block to HIV-1 replication in common marmosets operates at the level of viral entry and that this block can be overcome by adaptation of the virus in tissue-cultured cells. However, our current studies indicate that HIV-1 encounters additional postentry blocks in common marmoset peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Here, we show that the common marmoset APOBEC3G (A3G) and BST2 proteins block HIV-1 in cell cultures. Using a directed-evolution method that takes advantage of the natural ability of HIV-1 to mutate during replication, we have been able to overcome these blocks in tissue-cultured cells. In the adapted viruses, specific changes were observed in gag, vif, env, and nef. The contribution of these changes to virus replication in the presence of the A3G and BST2 restriction factors was studied. We found that certain amino acid changes in Vif and Env that arise during adaptation to marmoset A3G and BST2 allow the virus to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors. The changes in Vif reduce expression levels and encapsidation of marmoset APOBEC3G, while the changes in Env increase viral fitness and discretely favor cell-to-cell transmission of the virus, allowing viral escape from these restriction factors. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 can infect only humans and chimpanzees. The main reason for this narrow tropism is the presence in many species of dominant-acting factors, known as restriction factors, that block viral replication in a species-specific way. We have been exploring the blocks to HIV-1 in common marmosets, with the ultimate goal of developing a new animal model of HIV-1 infection in these monkeys. In this study, we observed that common marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2, two known restriction factors, are able to block HIV-1 in cell cultures. We have adapted HIV-1 to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors and have characterized the mechanisms of escape. These studies can help in the

  18. Curcumin inhibits the replication of enterovirus 71 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying; Lin, Lexun; Chen, Yang; Wu, Shuo; Si, Xiaoning; Wu, Heng; Zhai, Xia; Wang, Yan; Tong, Lei; Pan, Bo; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Tianying; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2014-08-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main causative pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in children. The epidemic of HFMD has been a public health problem in Asia-Pacific region for decades, and no vaccine and effective antiviral medicine are available. Curcumin has been used as a traditional medicine for centuries to treat a diversity of disorders including viral infections. In this study, we demonstrated that curcumin showed potent antiviral effect again EV71. In Vero cells infected with EV71, the addition of curcumin significantly suppressed the synthesis of viral RNA, the expression of viral protein, and the overall production of viral progeny. Similar with the previous reports, curcumin reduced the production of ROS induced by viral infection. However, the antioxidant property of curcumin did not contribute to its antiviral activity, since N-acetyl-l-cysteine, the potent antioxidant failed to suppress viral replication. This study also showed that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was activated by either viral infection or curcumin treatment, but the activated ERK did not interfere with the antiviral effect of curcumin, indicating ERK is not involved in the antiviral mechanism of curcumin. Unlike the previous reports that curcumin inhibited protein degradation through ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), we found that curcumin had no impact on UPS in control cells. However, curcumin did reduce the activity of proteasomes which was increased by viral infection. In addition, the accumulation of the short-lived proteins, p53 and p21, was increased by the treatment of curcumin in EV71-infected cells. We further probed the antiviral mechanism of curcumin by examining the expression of GBF1 and PI4KB, both of which are required for the formation of viral replication complex. We found that curcumin significantly reduced the level of both proteins. Moreover, the decreased expression of either GBF1 or PI4KB by the application of siRNAs was sufficient

  19. Curcumin inhibits the replication of enterovirus 71 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ying; Lin, Lexun; Chen, Yang; Wu, Shuo; Si, Xiaoning; Wu, Heng; Zhai, Xia; Wang, Yan; Tong, Lei; Pan, Bo; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Tianying; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2014-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main causative pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in children. The epidemic of HFMD has been a public health problem in Asia-Pacific region for decades, and no vaccine and effective antiviral medicine are available. Curcumin has been used as a traditional medicine for centuries to treat a diversity of disorders including viral infections. In this study, we demonstrated that curcumin showed potent antiviral effect again EV71. In Vero cells infected with EV71, the addition of curcumin significantly suppressed the synthesis of viral RNA, the expression of viral protein, and the overall production of viral progeny. Similar with the previous reports, curcumin reduced the production of ROS induced by viral infection. However, the antioxidant property of curcumin did not contribute to its antiviral activity, since N-acetyl-l-cysteine, the potent antioxidant failed to suppress viral replication. This study also showed that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was activated by either viral infection or curcumin treatment, but the activated ERK did not interfere with the antiviral effect of curcumin, indicating ERK is not involved in the antiviral mechanism of curcumin. Unlike the previous reports that curcumin inhibited protein degradation through ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), we found that curcumin had no impact on UPS in control cells. However, curcumin did reduce the activity of proteasomes which was increased by viral infection. In addition, the accumulation of the short-lived proteins, p53 and p21, was increased by the treatment of curcumin in EV71-infected cells. We further probed the antiviral mechanism of curcumin by examining the expression of GBF1 and PI4KB, both of which are required for the formation of viral replication complex. We found that curcumin significantly reduced the level of both proteins. Moreover, the decreased expression of either GBF1 or PI4KB by the application of siRNAs was

  20. Modeling HIV-1 Latency in Primary T Cells Using a Replication-Competent Virus.

    PubMed

    Martins, Laura J; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Spivak, Adam M; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Novis, Camille L; DePaula-Silva, Ana Beatriz; Malatinkova, Eva; Typsteen, Wim; Bosque, Alberto; Vanderkerckhove, Linos; Planelles, Vicente

    2016-02-01

    HIV-1 latently infected cells in vivo can be found in extremely low frequencies. Therefore, in vitro cell culture models have been used extensively for the study of HIV-1 latency. Often, these in vitro systems utilize defective viruses. Defective viruses allow for synchronized infections and circumvent the use of antiretrovirals. In addition, replication-defective viruses cause minimal cytopathicity because they fail to spread and usually do not encode env or accessory genes. On the other hand, replication-competent viruses encode all or most viral genes and better recapitulate the nuances of the viral replication cycle. The study of latency with replication-competent viruses requires the use of antiretroviral drugs in culture, and this mirrors the use of antiretroviral treatment (ART) in vivo. We describe a model that utilizes cultured central memory CD4(+) T cells and replication-competent HIV-1. This method generates latently infected cells that can be reactivated using latency reversing agents in the presence of antiretroviral drugs. We also describe a method for the removal of productively infected cells prior to viral reactivation, which takes advantage of the downregulation of CD4 by HIV-1, and the use of a GFP-encoding virus for increased throughput. PMID:26171776

  1. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import via Vpr-Importin {alpha} interactions as a novel HIV-1 therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nonaka, Mizuho; Hashimoto, Yoshie; Matsuda, Go; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsuyama, Megumi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Kato, Shingo; Aida, Yoko

    2009-03-20

    The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. One such target is the interaction between Vpr, one of the accessory gene products of HIV-1 and Importin {alpha}, which is crucial, not only for the nuclear import of Vpr, but also for HIV-1 replication in macrophages. We have identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses Vpr-Importin {alpha} interaction, thereby inhibiting HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner. Analysis by real-time PCR demonstrated that hematoxylin specifically inhibited nuclear import step of pre-integration complex. Thus, hematoxylin is a new anti-HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-Importin {alpha} interaction, suggesting that a specific inhibitor of the interaction between viral protein and the cellular factor may provide a new strategy for HIV-1 therapy.

  2. How HIV-1 Takes Advantage of the Cytoskeleton during Replication and Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Martin; Nikolic, Damjan S.; Piguet, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infects T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells and can manipulate their cytoskeleton structures at multiple steps during its replication cycle. Based on pharmacological and genetic targeting of cytoskeleton modulators, new imaging approaches and primary cell culture models, important roles for actin and microtubules during entry and cell-to-cell transfer have been established. Virological synapses and actin-containing membrane extensions can mediate HIV-1 transfer from dendritic cells or macrophage cells to T cells and between T cells. We will review the role of the cytoskeleton in HIV-1 entry, cellular trafficking and cell-to-cell transfer between primary cells. PMID:21994805

  3. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits Exposure to HIV-1 Replication and Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA Levels in Infants.

    PubMed

    McManus, Margaret; Mick, Eric; Hudson, Richard; Mofenson, Lynne M; Sullivan, John L; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to measure HIV-1 persistence following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in infants and children. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) HIV-1 DNA was quantified prior to and after 1 year of cART in 30 children, stratified by time of initiation (early, age <3 months, ET; late, age >3 months-2 years, LT). Pre-therapy PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels correlated with pre-therapy plasma HIV-1 levels (r = 0.59, p<0.001), remaining statistically significant (p = 0.002) after adjustment for prior perinatal antiretroviral exposure and age at cART initiation. PBMC HIV-1 DNA declined significantly after 1 year of cART (Overall: -0.91±0.08 log10 copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; ET: -1.04±0.11 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; LT: -0.74 ±0.13 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001) but rates of decline did not differ significantly between ET and LT. HIV-1 replication exposure over the first 12 months of cART, estimated as area-under-the-curve (AUC) of circulating plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, was significantly associated with PBMC HIV-1 DNA at one year (r = 0.51, p = 0.004). In 21 children with sustained virologic suppression after 1 year of cART, PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels continued to decline between years 1 and 4 (slope -0.21 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC per year); decline slopes did not differ significantly between ET and LT. PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 year and 4 years of cART correlated with age at cART initiation (1 year: p = 0.04; 4 years: p = 0.03) and age at virologic control (1 and 4 years, p = 0.02). Altogether, these data indicate that reducing exposure to HIV-1 replication and younger age at cART initiation are associated with lower HIV-1 DNA levels at and after one year of age, supporting the concept that HIV-1 diagnosis and cART initiation in infants should occur as early as possible. PMID:27104621

  4. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits Exposure to HIV-1 Replication and Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA Levels in Infants

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Margaret; Mick, Eric; Hudson, Richard; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Sullivan, John L.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to measure HIV-1 persistence following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in infants and children. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) HIV-1 DNA was quantified prior to and after 1 year of cART in 30 children, stratified by time of initiation (early, age <3 months, ET; late, age >3 months-2 years, LT). Pre-therapy PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels correlated with pre-therapy plasma HIV-1 levels (r = 0.59, p<0.001), remaining statistically significant (p = 0.002) after adjustment for prior perinatal antiretroviral exposure and age at cART initiation. PBMC HIV-1 DNA declined significantly after 1 year of cART (Overall: -0.91±0.08 log10 copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; ET: -1.04±0.11 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; LT: -0.74 ±0.13 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001) but rates of decline did not differ significantly between ET and LT. HIV-1 replication exposure over the first 12 months of cART, estimated as area-under-the-curve (AUC) of circulating plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, was significantly associated with PBMC HIV-1 DNA at one year (r = 0.51, p = 0.004). In 21 children with sustained virologic suppression after 1 year of cART, PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels continued to decline between years 1 and 4 (slope -0.21 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC per year); decline slopes did not differ significantly between ET and LT. PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 year and 4 years of cART correlated with age at cART initiation (1 year: p = 0.04; 4 years: p = 0.03) and age at virologic control (1 and 4 years, p = 0.02). Altogether, these data indicate that reducing exposure to HIV-1 replication and younger age at cART initiation are associated with lower HIV-1 DNA levels at and after one year of age, supporting the concept that HIV-1 diagnosis and cART initiation in infants should occur as early as possible. PMID:27104621

  5. Broad HIV-1 inhibition in vitro by vaccine-elicited CD8(+) T cells in African adults.

    PubMed

    Mutua, Gaudensia; Farah, Bashir; Langat, Robert; Indangasi, Jackton; Ogola, Simon; Onsembe, Brian; Kopycinski, Jakub T; Hayes, Peter; Borthwick, Nicola J; Ashraf, Ambreen; Dally, Len; Barin, Burc; Tillander, Annika; Gilmour, Jill; De Bont, Jan; Crook, Alison; Hannaman, Drew; Cox, Josephine H; Anzala, Omu; Fast, Patricia E; Reilly, Marie; Chinyenze, Kundai; Jaoko, Walter; Hanke, Tomáš; Hiv-Core 004 Study Group, The

    2016-01-01

    We are developing a pan-clade HIV-1 T-cell vaccine HIVconsv, which could complement Env vaccines for prophylaxis and be a key to HIV cure. Our strategy focuses vaccine-elicited effector T-cells on functionally and structurally conserved regions (not full-length proteins and not only epitopes) of the HIV-1 proteome, which are common to most global variants and which, if mutated, cause a replicative fitness loss. Our first clinical trial in low risk HIV-1-negative adults in Oxford demonstrated the principle that naturally mostly subdominant epitopes, when taken out of the context of full-length proteins/virus and delivered by potent regimens involving combinations of simian adenovirus and poxvirus modified vaccinia virus Ankara, can induce robust CD8(+) T cells of broad specificities and functions capable of inhibiting in vitro HIV-1 replication. Here and for the first time, we tested this strategy in low risk HIV-1-negative adults in Africa. We showed that the vaccines were well tolerated and induced high frequencies of broadly HIVconsv-specific plurifunctional T cells, which inhibited in vitro viruses from four major clades A, B, C, and D. Because sub-Saharan Africa is globally the region most affected by HIV-1/AIDS, trial HIV-CORE 004 represents an important stage in the path toward efficacy evaluation of this highly rational and promising vaccine strategy. PMID:27617268

  6. Broad HIV-1 inhibition in vitro by vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cells in African adults

    PubMed Central

    Mutua, Gaudensia; Farah, Bashir; Langat, Robert; Indangasi, Jackton; Ogola, Simon; Onsembe, Brian; Kopycinski, Jakub T; Hayes, Peter; Borthwick, Nicola J; Ashraf, Ambreen; Dally, Len; Barin, Burc; Tillander, Annika; Gilmour, Jill; De Bont, Jan; Crook, Alison; Hannaman, Drew; Cox, Josephine H; Anzala, Omu; Fast, Patricia E; Reilly, Marie; Chinyenze, Kundai; Jaoko, Walter; Hanke, Tomáš; HIV-CORE 004 study group, the

    2016-01-01

    We are developing a pan-clade HIV-1 T-cell vaccine HIVconsv, which could complement Env vaccines for prophylaxis and be a key to HIV cure. Our strategy focuses vaccine-elicited effector T-cells on functionally and structurally conserved regions (not full-length proteins and not only epitopes) of the HIV-1 proteome, which are common to most global variants and which, if mutated, cause a replicative fitness loss. Our first clinical trial in low risk HIV-1-negative adults in Oxford demonstrated the principle that naturally mostly subdominant epitopes, when taken out of the context of full-length proteins/virus and delivered by potent regimens involving combinations of simian adenovirus and poxvirus modified vaccinia virus Ankara, can induce robust CD8+ T cells of broad specificities and functions capable of inhibiting in vitro HIV-1 replication. Here and for the first time, we tested this strategy in low risk HIV-1-negative adults in Africa. We showed that the vaccines were well tolerated and induced high frequencies of broadly HIVconsv-specific plurifunctional T cells, which inhibited in vitro viruses from four major clades A, B, C, and D. Because sub-Saharan Africa is globally the region most affected by HIV-1/AIDS, trial HIV-CORE 004 represents an important stage in the path toward efficacy evaluation of this highly rational and promising vaccine strategy. PMID:27617268

  7. A Computational Model of Inhibition of HIV-1 by Interferon-Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Edward P.; Letham, Benjamin; Rudin, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 interferons such as interferon-alpha (IFNα) inhibit replication of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) by upregulating the expression of genes that interfere with specific steps in the viral life cycle. This pathway thus represents a potential target for immune-based therapies that can alter the dynamics of host-virus interactions to benefit the host. To obtain a deeper mechanistic understanding of how IFNα impacts spreading HIV-1 infection, we modeled the interaction of HIV-1 with CD4 T cells and IFNα as a dynamical system. This model was then tested using experimental data from a cell culture model of spreading HIV-1 infection. We found that a model in which IFNα induces reversible cellular states that block both early and late stages of HIV-1 infection, combined with a saturating rate of conversion to these states, was able to successfully fit the experimental dataset. Sensitivity analysis showed that the potency of inhibition by IFNα was particularly dependent on specific network parameters and rate constants. This model will be useful for designing new therapies targeting the IFNα network in HIV-1-infected individuals, as well as potentially serving as a template for understanding the interaction of IFNα with other viruses. PMID:27010978

  8. A Computational Model of Inhibition of HIV-1 by Interferon-Alpha.

    PubMed

    Browne, Edward P; Letham, Benjamin; Rudin, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 interferons such as interferon-alpha (IFNα) inhibit replication of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) by upregulating the expression of genes that interfere with specific steps in the viral life cycle. This pathway thus represents a potential target for immune-based therapies that can alter the dynamics of host-virus interactions to benefit the host. To obtain a deeper mechanistic understanding of how IFNα impacts spreading HIV-1 infection, we modeled the interaction of HIV-1 with CD4 T cells and IFNα as a dynamical system. This model was then tested using experimental data from a cell culture model of spreading HIV-1 infection. We found that a model in which IFNα induces reversible cellular states that block both early and late stages of HIV-1 infection, combined with a saturating rate of conversion to these states, was able to successfully fit the experimental dataset. Sensitivity analysis showed that the potency of inhibition by IFNα was particularly dependent on specific network parameters and rate constants. This model will be useful for designing new therapies targeting the IFNα network in HIV-1-infected individuals, as well as potentially serving as a template for understanding the interaction of IFNα with other viruses. PMID:27010978

  9. RANTES and MCP-3 inhibit the replication of T-cell-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains (SF-2, MN, and HE).

    PubMed Central

    Schols, D; Proost, P; Van Damme, J; De Clercq, E

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the C-C chemokines RANTES (regulation upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted) and MCP-3 (monocyte chemotactic protein 3) on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) activated in vitro with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) were investigated. The following T-cell line-tropic (T-tropic) HIV strains were tested: HIV type 1 (HIV-1) SF-2, HIV-1 IIIB, HIV-1 MN, HIV-1 NDK, HIV-1 HE, HIV-1 NL4-3, HIV-2 ROD, and HIV-2 EHO. The strain most sensitive to the antiviral effects of RANTES and MCP-3 appeared to be HIV-1 SF-2. A 50% inhibitory concentration for HIV-1 SF-2 of 4 ng of RANTES per ml was obtained, and that of MCP-3 was about 1 ng/ml. However, MCP-3 was inactive at 100 ng/ml. Other HIV-1 strains, such as MN and HE, were less sensitive to the antiviral effects of RANTES and MCP-3, whereas all the other HIV strains tested were insensitive. Although the ratio of CD3+ CD4+ to CD3+ CD8+ T cells was the same in HIV-infected PBMC cultures treated or untreated with the chemokines, RANTES and MCP-3 interfered with the binding of monoclonal antibody (MAb) OKT4 to the CD4 receptor on T cells but not with the binding of MAb OKT4A. Therefore, RANTES and MCP-3 not only interfere with the HIV-induced fusion process but also have some modulating effect on the CD4 cell receptor. The chemokines did not affect HIV-1 binding to PHA-stimulated PBMC. Taken together, our observations point to the important role that both RANTES and MCP-3 may play in inhibiting HIV-1 replication of certain T-tropic strains in primary PBMC cultures. This may have important implications for immunotherapeutic strategies designed to slow down disease progression in AIDS. PMID:9311806

  10. Inhibition of HIV-1 reactivation by a telomerase-derived peptide in a HSP90-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide vaccine designed to induce T-cell immunity to telomerase, GV1001, has been shown to modulate cellular signaling pathways and confer a direct anti-cancer effect through the interaction with heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and 70. Here, we have found that GV1001 can modulate transactivation protein-mediated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. GV1001 treatment resulted in significant suppression of HIV-1 replication and rescue of infected cells from death by HIV-1. Transactivation of HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR) was inhibited by GV1001, indicating that GV1001 suppressed the transcription from proviral HIV DNA. The anti-HIV-1 activity of GV1001 was completely abrogated by an HSP90-neutralizing antibody, indicating that the antiviral activity depends on HSP90. Further mechanistic studies revealed that GV1001 suppresses basal NF-κB activation, which is required for HIV-1 LTR transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. Inhibition of LTR transactivation by GV1001 suggests its potential to suppress HIV-1 reactivation from latency. Indeed, PMA-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latent infected cells was suppressed by GV1001. The results suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001, a peptide proven to be safe for human use, as an anti-HIV-1 agent to suppress the reactivation from latently infected cells. PMID:27363520

  11. Antibody-Mediated Fcγ Receptor-Based Mechanisms of HIV Inhibition: Recent Findings and New Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Holl, Vincent; Peressin, Maryse; Moog, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic is one of the most devastating pandemics worldwide. Today, the major route of infection by HIV is sexual transmission. One of the most promising strategies for vaccination against HIV sexual infection is the development of a mucosal vaccine, which should be able to induce strong local and systemic protective immunity. It is believed that both humoral and cellular immune responses are needed for inducing a sterilizing protection against HIV. Recently, passive administration of monoclonal neutralizing antibodies in macaques infected by vaginal challenge demonstrated a crucial role of FcγRs in the protection afforded by these antibodies. This questioned about the role of innate and adaptive immune functions, including ADCC, ADCVI, phagocytosis of opsonized HIV particles and the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, in the mechanism of HIV inhibition in vivo. Other monoclonal antibodies - non-neutralizing inhibitory antibodies - which recognize immunogenic epitopes, have been shown to display potent FcγRs-dependent inhibition of HIV replication in vitro. The potential role of these antibodies in protection against sexual transmission of HIV and their biological relevance for the development of an HIV vaccine therefore need to be determined. This review highlights the potential role of FcγRs-mediated innate and adaptive immune functions in the mechanism of HIV protection. PMID:21994593

  12. Inhibition of HIV-1 reactivation by a telomerase-derived peptide in a HSP90-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide vaccine designed to induce T-cell immunity to telomerase, GV1001, has been shown to modulate cellular signaling pathways and confer a direct anti-cancer effect through the interaction with heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and 70. Here, we have found that GV1001 can modulate transactivation protein-mediated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. GV1001 treatment resulted in significant suppression of HIV-1 replication and rescue of infected cells from death by HIV-1. Transactivation of HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR) was inhibited by GV1001, indicating that GV1001 suppressed the transcription from proviral HIV DNA. The anti-HIV-1 activity of GV1001 was completely abrogated by an HSP90-neutralizing antibody, indicating that the antiviral activity depends on HSP90. Further mechanistic studies revealed that GV1001 suppresses basal NF-κB activation, which is required for HIV-1 LTR transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. Inhibition of LTR transactivation by GV1001 suggests its potential to suppress HIV-1 reactivation from latency. Indeed, PMA-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latent infected cells was suppressed by GV1001. The results suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001, a peptide proven to be safe for human use, as an anti-HIV-1 agent to suppress the reactivation from latently infected cells. PMID:27363520

  13. Inhibition of two temporal phases of HIV-1 transfer from primary Langerhans cells to T cells: the role of langerin.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Najla; Lai, Joey; Botting, Rachel A; Mercier, Sarah K; Harman, Andrew N; Kim, Min; Turville, Stuart; Center, Rob J; Domagala, Teresa; Gorry, Paul R; Olbourne, Norman; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2014-09-01

    Epidermal Langerhans cells (eLCs) uniquely express the C-type lectin receptor langerin in addition to the HIV entry receptors CD4 and CCR5. They are among the first target cells to encounter HIV in the anogenital stratified squamous mucosa during sexual transmission. Previous reports on the mechanism of HIV transfer to T cells and the role of langerin have been contradictory. In this study, we examined HIV replication and langerin-mediated viral transfer by authentic immature eLCs and model Mutz-3 LCs. eLCs were productively infected with HIV, whereas Mutz-3 LCs were not susceptible because of a lack of CCR5 expression. Two successive phases of HIV viral transfer to T cells via cave/vesicular trafficking and de novo replication were observed with eLCs as previously described in monocyte-derived or blood dendritic cells, but only first phase transfer was observed with Mutz-3 LCs. Langerin was expressed as trimers after cross-linking on the cell surface of Mutz-3 LCs and in this form preferentially bound HIV envelope protein gp140 and whole HIV particles via the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). Both phases of HIV transfer from eLCs to T cells were inhibited when eLCs were pretreated with a mAb to langerin CRD or when HIV was pretreated with a soluble langerin trimeric extracellular domain or by a CRD homolog. However, the langerin homolog did not inhibit direct HIV infection of T cells. These two novel soluble langerin inhibitors could be developed to prevent HIV uptake, infection, and subsequent transfer to T cells during early stages of infection. PMID:25070850

  14. Replicating a Teen HIV/STD Preventive Intervention in a Multicultural City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Diane M.; Hoppe, Marilyn J.; Wells, Elizabeth A.; Beadnell, Blair A.; Wilsdon, Anthony; Higa, Darrel; Gillmore, Mary Rogers; Casey, Erin A.

    2007-01-01

    Although there are now several adolescent HIV and STD preventive interventions of demonstrated efficacy in the literature, little is understood about the portability of these interventions. This study replicated Stanton's Focus on Kids intervention, developed for inner city African American adolescents, in a different population, transferring it…

  15. Replicating Impact of a Primary School HIV Prevention Programme: Primary School Action for Better Health, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maticka-Tyndale, E.; Mungwete, R.; Jayeoba, O.

    2014-01-01

    School-based programmes to combat the spread of HIV have been demonstrated to be effective over the short-term when delivered on a small scale. The question addressed here is whether results obtained with small-scale delivery are replicable in large-scale roll-out. Primary School Action for Better Health (PSABH), a programme to train teachers to…

  16. LEDGIN-mediated Inhibition of Integrase-LEDGF/p75 Interaction Reduces Reactivation of Residual Latent HIV.

    PubMed

    Vranckx, Lenard S; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Saleh, Suha; Boll, Annegret; Vansant, Gerlinde; Schrijvers, Rik; Weydert, Caroline; Battivelli, Emilie; Verdin, Eric; Cereseto, Anna; Christ, Frauke; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2016-06-01

    Persistence of latent, replication-competent Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) provirus is the main impediment towards a cure for HIV/AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Therefore, different therapeutic strategies to eliminate the viral reservoirs are currently being explored. We here propose a novel strategy to reduce the replicating HIV reservoir during primary HIV infection by means of drug-induced retargeting of HIV integration. A novel class of integration inhibitors, referred to as LEDGINs, inhibit the interaction between HIV integrase and the LEDGF/p75 host cofactor, the main determinant of lentiviral integration site selection. We show for the first time that LEDGF/p75 depletion hampers HIV-1 reactivation in cell culture. Next we demonstrate that LEDGINs relocate and retarget HIV integration resulting in a HIV reservoir that is refractory to reactivation by different latency-reversing agents. Taken together, these results support the potential of integrase inhibitors that modulate integration site targeting to reduce the likeliness of viral rebound. PMID:27428435

  17. Stimulation of HIV-1 Replication in Immature Dendritic Cells in Contact with Primary CD4 T or B Lymphocytes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Holl, Vincent; Xu, Ke; Peressin, Maryse; Lederle, Alexandre; Biedma, Marina Elizabeth; Delaporte, Maryse; Decoville, Thomas; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Géraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Moog, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Sexual transmission is the major route of HIV-1 infection worldwide. Dendritic cells (DCs) from the mucosal layers are considered to be the initial targets of HIV-1 and probably play a crucial role in HIV-1 transmission. We investigated the role of cell-to-cell contact between HIV-1-exposed immature DCs and various lymphocyte subsets in the stimulation of HIV-1 replication. We found that HIV-1 replication and production in DCs were substantially enhanced by the coculture of DCs with primary CD4 T or nonpermissive B lymphocytes but not with primary activated CD8 T lymphocytes or human transformed CD4 T lymphocytes. Most of the new virions released by cocultures of HIV-1-exposed immature DCs and primary B lymphocytes expressed the DC-specific marker CD1a and were infectious for both immature DCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Cocultured DCs thus produced large numbers of infectious viral particles under these experimental conditions. The soluble factors present in the supernatants of the cocultures were not sufficient to enhance HIV-1 replication in DCs, for which cell-to-cell contact was required. The neutralizing monoclonal antibody IgG1b12 and polyclonal anti-HIV-1 sera efficiently blocked HIV-1 transfer to CD4 T lymphocytes but did not prevent the increase in viral replication in DCs. Neutralizing antibodies thus proved to be more efficient at blocking HIV-1 transfer than previously thought. Our findings show that HIV-1 exploits DC-lymphocyte cross talk to upregulate replication within the DC reservoir. We provide evidence for a novel mechanism that may facilitate HIV-1 replication and transmission. This mechanism may favor HIV-1 pathogenesis, immune evasion, and persistence. PMID:20147388

  18. Interaction between Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Is Required for Reverse Transcription during HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tekeste, Shewit S.; Wilkinson, Thomas A.; Weiner, Ethan M.; Xu, Xiaowen; Miller, Jennifer T.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Clubb, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication requires reverse transcription of its RNA genome into a double-stranded cDNA copy, which is then integrated into the host cell chromosome. The essential steps of reverse transcription and integration are catalyzed by the viral enzymes reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN), respectively. In vitro, HIV-1 RT can bind with IN, and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of IN is necessary and sufficient for this binding. To better define the RT-IN interaction, we performed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiments to map a binding surface on the IN CTD in the presence of RT prebound to a duplex DNA construct that mimics the primer-binding site in the HIV-1 genome. To determine the biological significance of the RT-IN interaction during viral replication, we used the NMR chemical shift mapping information as a guide to introduce single amino acid substitutions of nine different residues on the putative RT-binding surface in the IN CTD. We found that six viral clones bearing such IN substitutions (R231E, W243E, G247E, A248E, V250E, and I251E) were noninfectious. Further analyses of the replication-defective IN mutants indicated that the block in replication took place specifically during early reverse transcription. The recombinant INs purified from these mutants, though retaining enzymatic activities, had diminished ability to bind RT in a cosedimentation assay. The results indicate that the RT-IN interaction is functionally relevant during the reverse transcription step of the HIV-1 life cycle. IMPORTANCE To establish a productive infection, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) needs to reverse transcribe its RNA genome to create a double-stranded DNA copy and then integrate this viral DNA genome into the chromosome of the host cell. These two essential steps are catalyzed by the HIV-1 enzymes reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN), respectively. We have shown previously that IN

  19. Inhibition of the HIV Rev transactivator : a new target for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Heguy, A

    1997-01-01

    The viral transactivator Rev is essential for HIV replication, since it allows the nuclear export of unspliced and partially spliced viral mRNAs that encode the structural proteins. Rev is an RNA binding protein that interacts with a highly structured RNA element, the RRE, found within the envelope sequences. This viral protein also interacts with cellular proteins, termed nucleoporins, and acts as an adaptor between the viral mRNAs and the cellular nuclear export machinery. Both interactions are specific, and required for Rev function. Because of its crucial role in the HIV replication cycle, and its novel mechanism of action, Rev represents an ideal target for therapeutic intervention. This review describes the efforts towards Rev inhibition. Gene therapy approaches, including the expression of trans-dominant mutants and RNA decoys, as well as antisense therapies and small molecule inhibitors of Rev-RRE binding or Rev interaction with the cellular machinery will be discussed PMID:9206979

  20. Stem-loop binding protein is a multifaceted cellular regulator of HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Tucker, Lynne D; Asara, John M; Cheruiyot, Collins K; Lu, Huafei; Wu, Zhijin J; Newstein, Michael C; Dooner, Mark S; Friedman, Jennifer; Lally, Michelle A; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2016-08-01

    A rare subset of HIV-1-infected individuals is able to maintain plasma viral load (VL) at low levels without antiretroviral treatment. Identifying the mechanisms underlying this atypical response to infection may lead to therapeutic advances for treating HIV-1. Here, we developed a proteomic analysis to compare peripheral blood cell proteomes in 20 HIV-1-infected individuals who maintained either high or low VL with the aim of identifying host factors that impact HIV-1 replication. We determined that the levels of multiple histone proteins were markedly decreased in cohorts of individuals with high VL. This reduction was correlated with lower levels of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which is known to control histone metabolism. Depletion of cellular SLBP increased promoter engagement with the chromatin structures of the host gene high mobility group protein A1 (HMGA1) and viral long terminal repeat (LTR), which led to higher levels of HIV-1 genomic integration and proviral transcription. Further, we determined that TNF-α regulates expression of SLBP and observed that plasma TNF-α levels in HIV-1-infected individuals correlated directly with VL levels and inversely with cellular SLBP levels. Our findings identify SLBP as a potentially important cellular regulator of HIV-1, thereby establishing a link between histone metabolism, inflammation, and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27454292

  1. SRR-SB3, a disulfide-containing macrolide that inhibits a late stage of the replicative cycle of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Witvrouw, M; Balzarini, J; Pannecouque, C; Jhaumeer-Laulloo, S; Esté, J A; Schols, D; Cherepanov, P; Schmit, J C; Debyser, Z; Vandamme, A M; Desmyter, J; Ramadas, S R; de Clercq, E

    1997-01-01

    From a series of macrocyclic diamides possessing the disulfide linkage, only SRR-SB3, a compound that complexes with zinc, was found to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1; strain IIIB) replication at a concentration of 1.8 to 6.5 micrograms/ml in MT-4, CEM, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. SRR-SB3 was toxic to MT-4 cells at a concentration of 15.9 micrograms/ml, resulting in a selectivity index of 9 in these cells. This macrolide was also effective against various other HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates and HIV-1 strains resistant to protease inhibitors and nucleoside and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. It was also active against various HIV-2 strains, simian immunodeficiency virus (strain MAC251), and Moloney murine sarcoma virus, but not against viruses other than retroviruses. In addition, the compound was found to inhibit chronic HIV-1 infections in vitro. The compound in combination with other antiviral agents, such as zidovudine, zalcitabine, and stavudine, showed an effect that was between additive and synergistic. Time-of-addition experiments indicated that SRR-SB3 acts at a late stage of the HIV-1 replicative cycle. PMID:9021177

  2. Rapid Transient Production in Plants by Replicating and Non-Replicating Vectors Yields High Quality Functional Anti-HIV Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Sainsbury, Frank; Sack, Markus; Stadlmann, Johannes; Quendler, Heribert; Fischer, Rainer; Lomonossoff, George P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The capacity of plants and plant cells to produce large amounts of recombinant protein has been well established. Due to advantages in terms of speed and yield, attention has recently turned towards the use of transient expression systems, including viral vectors, to produce proteins of pharmaceutical interest in plants. However, the effects of such high level expression from viral vectors and concomitant effects on host cells may affect the quality of the recombinant product. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess the quality of antibodies transiently expressed to high levels in plants, we have expressed and characterised the human anti-HIV monoclonal antibody, 2G12, using both replicating and non-replicating systems based on deleted versions of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) RNA-2. The highest yield (approximately 100 mg/kg wet weight leaf tissue) of affinity purified 2G12 was obtained when the non-replicating CPMV-HT system was used and the antibody was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Glycan analysis by mass-spectrometry showed that the glycosylation pattern was determined exclusively by whether the antibody was retained in the ER and did not depend on whether a replicating or non-replicating system was used. Characterisation of the binding and neutralisation properties of all the purified 2G12 variants from plants showed that these were generally similar to those of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell-produced 2G12. Conclusions Overall, the results demonstrate that replicating and non-replicating CPMV-based vectors are able to direct the production of a recombinant IgG similar in activity to the CHO-produced control. Thus, a complex recombinant protein was produced with no apparent effect on its biochemical properties using either high-level expression or viral replication. The speed with which a recombinant pharmaceutical with excellent biochemical characteristics can be produced transiently in plants makes CPMV-based expression vectors

  3. HIV-1 Dynamics and Coreceptor Usage in Maraviroc-Treated Patients with Ongoing Replication

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, S.; Bellecave, P.; Marcelin, A. G.; Soulie, C.; Descamps, D.; Calvez, V.; Harrigan, P. R.; Fleury, H.; Izopet, J.; Masquelier, B.

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that HIV-1 evolution under maraviroc (MVC) pressure can lead to the selection of either X4-tropic variants and/or R5-tropic, MVC-resistant isolates. However, the viral dynamics of HIV-1 variants in patients with virological failure (VF) on MVC-containing regimens remain poorly studied. Here, we investigated the V3 loop evolution of HIV-1 on MVC in relation to coreceptor usage and the nature of HIV-1 quasispecies before MVC therapy using bulk population sequences and ultradeep sequencing. The majority of patients had no detectable minority X4 variant at baseline. The evolution of tropism was followed up until VF and showed three possibilities for viral evolution in these patients: emergence of preexisting X4 variants, de novo selection of R5 variants presenting V3 loop mutations, or replication of R5 variants without selection of known mutations. PMID:23208718

  4. HIV-1 dynamics and coreceptor usage in Maraviroc-treated patients with ongoing replication.

    PubMed

    Recordon-Pinson, P; Raymond, S; Bellecave, P; Marcelin, A G; Soulie, C; Descamps, D; Calvez, V; Harrigan, P R; Fleury, H; Izopet, J; Masquelier, B

    2013-02-01

    There is evidence that HIV-1 evolution under maraviroc (MVC) pressure can lead to the selection of either X4-tropic variants and/or R5-tropic, MVC-resistant isolates. However, the viral dynamics of HIV-1 variants in patients with virological failure (VF) on MVC-containing regimens remain poorly studied. Here, we investigated the V3 loop evolution of HIV-1 on MVC in relation to coreceptor usage and the nature of HIV-1 quasispecies before MVC therapy using bulk population sequences and ultradeep sequencing. The majority of patients had no detectable minority X4 variant at baseline. The evolution of tropism was followed up until VF and showed three possibilities for viral evolution in these patients: emergence of preexisting X4 variants, de novo selection of R5 variants presenting V3 loop mutations, or replication of R5 variants without selection of known mutations. PMID:23208718

  5. Inhibition of HIV-1 by curcumin A, a novel curcumin analog

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Namita; Kulkarni, Amol A; Lin, Xionghao; McLean, Charlee; Ammosova, Tatiana; Ivanov, Andrey; Hipolito, Maria; Nekhai, Sergei; Nwulia, Evaristus

    2015-01-01

    Despite the remarkable success of combination antiretroviral therapy at curtailing HIV progression, emergence of drug-resistant viruses, chronic low-grade inflammation, and adverse effects of combination antiretroviral therapy treatments, including metabolic disorders collectively present the impetus for development of newer and safer antiretroviral drugs. Curcumin, a phytochemical compound, was previously reported to have some in vitro anti-HIV and anti-inflammatory activities, but poor bioavailability has limited its clinical utility. To circumvent the bioavailability problem, we derivatized curcumin to sustain retro-aldol decomposition at physiological pH. The lead compound derived, curcumin A, showed increased stability, especially in murine serum where it was stable for up to 25 hours, as compared to curcumin that only had a half-life of 10 hours. Both curcumin and curcumin A showed similar inhibition of one round of HIV-1 infection in cultured lymphoblastoid (also called CEM) T cells (IC50=0.7 μM). But in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, curcumin A inhibited HIV-1 more potently (IC50=2 μM) compared to curcumin (IC50=12 μM). Analysis of specific steps of HIV-1 replication showed that curcumin A inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription, but had no effect on HIV-1 long terminal repeat basal or Tat-induced transcription, or NF-κB-driven transcription at low concentrations that affected reverse transcription. Finally, we showed curcumin A induced expression of HO-1 and decreased cell cycle progression of T cells. Our findings thus indicate that altering the core structure of curcumin could yield more stable compounds with potent antiretroviral and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26366056

  6. Inhibition of HIV-1 by curcumin A, a novel curcumin analog.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Namita; Kulkarni, Amol A; Lin, Xionghao; McLean, Charlee; Ammosova, Tatiana; Ivanov, Andrey; Hipolito, Maria; Nekhai, Sergei; Nwulia, Evaristus

    2015-01-01

    Despite the remarkable success of combination antiretroviral therapy at curtailing HIV progression, emergence of drug-resistant viruses, chronic low-grade inflammation, and adverse effects of combination antiretroviral therapy treatments, including metabolic disorders collectively present the impetus for development of newer and safer antiretroviral drugs. Curcumin, a phytochemical compound, was previously reported to have some in vitro anti-HIV and anti-inflammatory activities, but poor bioavailability has limited its clinical utility. To circumvent the bioavailability problem, we derivatized curcumin to sustain retro-aldol decomposition at physiological pH. The lead compound derived, curcumin A, showed increased stability, especially in murine serum where it was stable for up to 25 hours, as compared to curcumin that only had a half-life of 10 hours. Both curcumin and curcumin A showed similar inhibition of one round of HIV-1 infection in cultured lymphoblastoid (also called CEM) T cells (IC50=0.7 μM). But in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, curcumin A inhibited HIV-1 more potently (IC50=2 μM) compared to curcumin (IC50=12 μM). Analysis of specific steps of HIV-1 replication showed that curcumin A inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription, but had no effect on HIV-1 long terminal repeat basal or Tat-induced transcription, or NF-κB-driven transcription at low concentrations that affected reverse transcription. Finally, we showed curcumin A induced expression of HO-1 and decreased cell cycle progression of T cells. Our findings thus indicate that altering the core structure of curcumin could yield more stable compounds with potent antiretroviral and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26366056

  7. Discovery of novel small molecule orally bioavailable C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 antagonists that are potent inhibitors of T-tropic (X4) HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Skerlj, Renato T; Bridger, Gary J; Kaller, Al; McEachern, Ernest J; Crawford, Jason B; Zhou, Yuanxi; Atsma, Bem; Langille, Jonathon; Nan, Susan; Veale, Duane; Wilson, Trevor; Harwig, Curtis; Hatse, Sigrid; Princen, Katrien; De Clercq, Erik; Schols, Dominique

    2010-04-22

    The redesign of azamacrocyclic CXCR4 chemokine receptor antagonists resulted in the discovery of novel, small molecule, orally bioavailable compounds that retained T-tropic (CXCR4 using, X4) anti-HIV-1 activity. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) was determined on the basis of the inhibition of replication of X4 HIV-1 NL4.3 in MT-4 cells. As a result of lead optimization, we identified (S)-N'-((1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)methyl)-N'-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinolin-8-yl)butane-1,4-diamine (AMD070) 2 as a potent and selective antagonist of CXCR4 with an IC(50) value of 13 nM in a CXCR4 125I-SDF inhibition binding assay. Compound 2 inhibited the replication of T-tropic HIV-1 (NL4.3 strain) in MT-4 cells and PBMCs with an IC(50) of 2 and 26 nM, respectively, while remaining noncytotoxic to cells at concentrations exceeding 23 microM. The pharmacokinetics of 2 was evaluated in rat and dog, and good oral bioavailability was observed in both species. This compound represents the first small molecule orally bioavailable CXCR4 antagonist that was developed for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:20297846

  8. HIV-1 Nef Is Transferred from Expressing T Cells to Hepatocytic Cells through Conduits and Enhances HCV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Park, In-Woo; Fan, Yan; Luo, Xiaoyu; Ryou, Myoung-Gwi; Liu, Jinfeng; Green, Linden; He, Johnny J.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection enhances HCV replication and as a consequence accelerates HCV-mediated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the precise molecular mechanism by which this takes place is currently unknown. Our data showed that infectious HIV-1 failed to replicate in human hepatocytic cell lines. No discernible virus replication was observed, even when the cell lines transfected with HIV-1 proviral DNA were co-cultured with Jurkat T cells, indicating that the problem of liver deterioration in the co-infected patient is not due to the replication of HIV-1 in the hepatocytes of the HCV infected host. Instead, HIV-1 Nef protein was transferred from nef-expressing T cells to hepatocytic cells through conduits, wherein up to 16% (average 10%) of the cells harbored the transferred Nef, when the hepatocytic cells were co-cultured with nef-expressing Jurkat cells for 24 h. Further, Nef altered the size and numbers of lipid droplets (LD), and consistently up-regulated HCV replication by 1.5∼2.5 fold in the target subgenomic replicon cells, which is remarkable in relation to the initially indolent viral replication. Nef also dramatically augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and enhanced ethanol-mediated up-regulation of HCV replication so as to accelerate HCC. Taken together, these data indicate that HIV-1 Nef is a critical element in accelerating progression of liver pathogenesis via enhancing HCV replication and coordinating modulation of key intra- and extra-cellular molecules for liver decay. PMID:24911518

  9. The Cellular Thioredoxin-1/Thioredoxin Reductase-1 Driven Oxidoreduction Represents a Chemotherapeutic Target for HIV-1 Entry Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Curbo, Sophie; Pannecouque, Christophe; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Engman, Lars; Lundberg, Mathias; Balzarini, Jan; Karlsson, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background The entry of HIV into its host cell is an interesting target for chemotherapeutic intervention in the life-cycle of the virus. During entry, reduction of disulfide bridges in the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 by cellular oxidoreductases is crucial. The cellular thioredoxin reductase-1 plays an important role in this oxidoreduction process by recycling electrons to thioredoxin-1. Therefore, thioredoxin reductase-1 inhibitors may inhibit gp120 reduction during HIV-1 entry. In this present study, tellurium-based thioredoxin reductase-1 inhibitors were investigated as potential inhibitors of HIV entry. Results The organotellurium compounds inhibited HIV-1 and HIV-2 replication in cell culture at low micromolar concentrations by targeting an early event in the viral infection cycle. Time-of-drug-addition studies pointed to virus entry as the drug target, more specifically: the organotellurium compound TE-2 showed a profile similar or close to that of the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide (T-20). Surface plasmon resonance-based interaction studies revealed that the compounds do not directly interact with the HIV envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41, nor with soluble CD4, but instead, dose-dependently bind to thioredoxin reductase-1. By inhibiting the thioredoxin-1/thioredoxin reductase-1-directed oxidoreduction of gp120, the organotellurium compounds prevent conformational changes in the viral glycoprotein which are necessary during viral entry. Conclusion Our findings revealed that thioredoxin-1/thioredoxin reductase-1 acts as a cellular target for the inhibition of HIV entry. PMID:26816344

  10. Molecular signatures of T-cell inhibition in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cellular immune responses play a crucial role in the control of viral replication in HIV-infected individuals. However, the virus succeeds in exploiting the immune system to its advantage and therefore, the host ultimately fails to control the virus leading to development of terminal AIDS. The virus adopts numerous evasion mechanisms to hijack the host immune system. We and others recently described the expression of inhibitory molecules on T cells as a contributing factor for suboptimal T-cell responses in HIV infection both in vitro and in vivo. The expression of these molecules that negatively impacts the normal functions of the host immune armory and the underlying signaling pathways associated with their enhanced expression need to be discussed. Targets to restrain the expression of these molecular markers of immune inhibition is likely to contribute to development of therapeutic interventions that augment the functionality of host immune cells leading to improved immune control of HIV infection. In this review, we focus on the functions of inhibitory molecules that are expressed or secreted following HIV infection such as BTLA, CTLA-4, CD160, IDO, KLRG1, LAG-3, LILRB1, PD-1, TRAIL, TIM-3, and regulatory cytokines, and highlight their significance in immune inhibition. We also highlight the ensemble of transcriptional factors such as BATF, BLIMP-1/PRDM1, FoxP3, DTX1 and molecular pathways that facilitate the recruitment and differentiation of suppressor T cells in response to HIV infection. PMID:23514593

  11. Synthesis and Inhibiting Activity of Some 4-Hydroxycoumarin Derivatives on HIV-1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Stanchev, Stancho; Jensen, Frank; Hinkov, Anton; Atanasov, Vasil; Genova-Kalou, Petia; Argirova, Radka; Manolov, Ilia

    2011-01-01

    Six novel 4-hydroxycoumarin derivatives were rationally synthesized, verified, and characterized by molecular docking using crystal HIV-1 protease. Molecular docking studies predicted antiprotease activity of (7) and (10). The most significant functional groups, responsible for the interaction with HIV-1 protease by hydrogen bonds formation are pyran oxygen, atom, lactone carbonyl oxygen and one of the hydroxyl groups. The newly synthesized compounds were biologically tested in MT-4 cells for inhibiting HIV-1 replication, exploring the protection of cells from the cytopathic effect of HIV measured by cell survival in MTT test. One derivative −7 showed 76–78% inhibition of virus infectivity with IC50 = 0.01 nM, much less than the maximal nontoxic concentration (1 mM). Antiprotease activity of 7 in two different concentrations was detected to be 25%. Nevertheless, the results of study of (7) encourage using it as a pharmacophore for further synthesis and evaluation of anti-HIV activity. PMID:22389842

  12. Signaling through Toll-like receptors triggers HIV-1 replication in latently infected mast cells.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, J Bruce; Little, Dawn M; Villinger, Francois; Ellis, Jane E; Ansari, Aftab A

    2004-04-01

    Evidence that human progenitor mast cells are susceptible to infection with CCR5-tropic strains of HIV-1 and that circulating HIV-1-infected FcepsilonRIalpha(+) cells with a similar progenitor phenotype have been isolated from AIDS patients has led to speculation that mast cells may serve as a potential reservoir for infectious HIV-1. In this study, progenitor mast cells, developed in vitro from CD34(+) cord blood stem cells, were experimentally infected with the CCR5-tropic strain HIV-1Bal after 28 days in culture as they reached their HIV-1-susceptible progenitor stage. HIV-1 p24 Ag levels were readily detectable by day 7 postinfection (PI), peaked at 2-3 wk PI as mature (tryptase/chymase-positive) HIV-1 infection-resistant mast cells emerged, and then steadily declined to below detectable limits by 10 wk PI, at which point integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA was confirmed by PCR quantitation in ( approximately 34% of) latently infected mast cells. Stimulation by ligands for Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, or TLR9 significantly enhanced viral replication in a dose- and time-dependent manner in both HIV-1-infected progenitor and latently infected mature mast cells, without promoting degranulation, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, or dysregulation of TLR agonist-induced cytokine production in infected mast cells. Limiting dilution analysis of TLR activated, latently infected mature mast cells indicated that one in four was capable of establishing productive infections in A301 sentinel cells. Taken together, these results indicate that mast cells may serve both as a viral reservoir and as a model for studying mechanisms of postintegration latency in HIV infection. PMID:15034054

  13. Development of replication-competent viral vectors for HIV vaccine delivery

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Christopher L.; Picker, Louis J.; King, C. Richter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Briefly describe some of the replication-competent (RC) vectors being investigated for development of candidate HIV vaccines focusing primarily on technologies that have advanced to testing in macaques or have entered clinical trials. Recent findings RC viral vectors have advanced to the stage were decisions can be made regarding future development of HIV vaccines. The viruses being used as RC vector platforms vary considerably, and their unique attributes make it possible to test multiple vaccine design concepts and also mimic various aspects of an HIV infection. RC viral vectors encoding SIV or HIV proteins can be used to safely immunize macaques, and in some cases, there is evidence of significant vaccine efficacy in challenge protection studies. Several live HIV vaccine vectors are in clinical trials to evaluate immunogenicity, safety, the effect of mucosal delivery, and potential effects of pre-existing immunity. Summary A variety of DNA and RNA viruses are being used to develop RC viral vectors for HIV vaccine delivery. Multiple viral vector platforms have proven to be safe and immunogenic with evidence of efficacy in macaques. Some of the more advanced HIV vaccine prototypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, measles virus, and Sendai virus are in clinical trials. PMID:23925000

  14. HIV-1 Induced Nuclear Factor I-B (NF-IB) Expression Negatively Regulates HIV-1 Replication through Interaction with the Long Terminal Repeat Region

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Sai Vikram; Veerasamy, Ravichandran; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Biswas, Santanu; Devadas, Krishnakumar; Hewlett, Indira

    2015-01-01

    Background: Retroviruses rely on host factors for cell entry, replication, transcription, and other major steps during their life cycle. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) is well known for utilizing a plethora of strategies to evade the host immune response, including the establishment of latent infection within a subpopulation of susceptible cells. HIV-1 also manipulates cellular factors in latently infected cells and persists for long periods of time, despite the presence of successful highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Results: In this study we demonstrate that Nuclear Factor-IB (NF-IB) is induced during HIV-1 infection and its expression negatively impacts viral replication. During HIV-1 infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and the T cell line, Jurkat or during induction of virus replication in latently infected cells, ACH2 and J1.1, we observed a time-dependent alteration in NF-IB expression pattern that correlated with HIV-1 viral expression. Using the Chip assay, we observed an association of NF-IB with the long terminal repeat region of HIV-1 (LTR) (-386 to -453 nt), and this association negatively correlated with HIV-1 transcription. Furthermore, knock-down of NF-IB levels in J1.1 cells resulted in an increase of HIV-1 levels. Knock-down of NF-IB levels in J-Lat-Tat-GFP (A1), (a Jurkat cell GFP reporter model for latent HIV-1 infection) resulted in an increase in GFP levels, indicating a potential negative regulatory role of NF-IB in HIV-1 replication. Conclusion: Overall, our results suggest that NF-IB may play a role in intrinsic antiretroviral defenses against HIV-1. These observations may offer new insights into the correlation of the latently infected host cell types and HIV-1, and help to define new therapeutic approaches for triggering the switch from latency to active replication thereby eliminating HIV-1 latent infection. PMID:25664610

  15. Optimized Replicating Renilla Luciferase Reporter HIV-1 Utilizing Novel Internal Ribosome Entry Site Elements for Native Nef Expression and Function.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Michael O; Jones, Jennifer J; Miglietta, Riccardo; Ding, Haitao; Bakshi, Rakesh K; Edmonds, Tara G; Kappes, John C; Ochsenbauer, Christina

    2015-12-01

    We previously developed replication-competent reporter HIV-1 (referred to herein as LucR.T2A reporter viruses), utilizing a "ribosome skipping" T2A peptide strategy to link Renilla luciferase (LucR) with Nef expression. The demonstrated utility for HIV-1 vaccine and transmission study applications included measurement of neutralizing antibody (NAb) activity in vaccine sera, improved cell-mediated virus inhibition assays, such as T cell-mediated virus inhibition and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays, and humanized mouse models. Herein, we extend our prior work and introduce reporter virus technology for applications that require fully functional Nef. We demonstrate that in CD4(+) T cells productively infected with LucR.T2A reporter viruses, T2A peptide-driven Nef expression and function, such as down-regulation of surface CD4 and MHC-I, were impaired. We overcame this limitation of LucR.T2A reporter viruses and achieved physiological Nef expression and function by engineering novel LucR reporter HIV-1 comprising 11 different internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements chosen for size and relative activity. A range of Nef expression was observed in 293T cells transfected with the different LucR.IRES reporter virus constructs. Iteratively, we identified IRES reporter genomes that expressed Nef closest to physiological levels and produced virus with infectivity, titers, and replication kinetics similar to nonreporter viruses. Our results demonstrated that LucR reporter activity was stable over multiple replication cycles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Furthermore, we analyzed Nef functionality, i.e., down-modulation of MHC-I and CD4, following infection of T cell lines and PBMCs. Unlike LucR.T2A reporter virus, one of the redesigned LucR.IRES reporter viruses [containing the modified encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) 6ATR IRES element, "6ATRi"] demonstrated Nef expression and function similar to parental "nonreporter" virus

  16. Modulation of HCV Replication After Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in HCV/HIV Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Guedj, Jeremie; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Blackard, Jason T.; Rouster, Susan D.; Castro, Mario; Feinberg, Judith; Sterling, Richard K.; Goodman, Zachary; Aronow, Bruce J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Coinfection results in increased HCV replication and more rapid rates of liver disease progression. The effect of HIV combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on HCV replication has not been studied in depth. To address this issue, we enrolled a small cohort of HCV/HIV coinfected patients into a cART initiation trial, and used dynamic modeling combined with evaluation of immune responses and microarray profiles to determine how effective treatment of HIV affects HCV. Treatment with cART resulted in HCV flare and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increase (2× or more increase from baseline) in a subset of treated patients. Subjects with evidence of hepatic injury (increased ALT) were more likely to have HCV-specific immune responses directed against HCV epitopes. Over time, HCV viral loads declined. Reproducible and biologically important gene expression changes occurred in patients who underwent successful cART, particularly with respect to downregulation of genes with known antiviral roles. Our findings suggest that the effective suppression of HIV by cART initiates a cascade of early and late events in treated patients with HCV. Early events involving downregulation of interferon-stimulated genes may lead to transiently increased viral replication and hepatic injury. At later time points, HCV viral load declines to levels comparable to those seen in the setting of HCV monoinfection. These findings support early antiretroviral therapy in those with HCV/HIV coinfection. PMID:25101888

  17. Slower uncoating is associated with impaired replicative capability of simian-tropic HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Kono, Ken; Takeda, Eri; Tsutsui, Hiromi; Kuroishi, Ayumu; Hulme, Amy E; Hope, Thomas J; Nakayama, Emi E; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) productively infects only humans and chimpanzees, but not Old World monkeys, such as rhesus and cynomolgus (CM) monkeys. To establish a monkey model of HIV-1/AIDS, several HIV-1 derivatives have been constructed. We previously generated a simian-tropic HIV-1 that replicates efficiently in CM cells. This virus encodes a capsid protein (CA) with SIVmac239-derived loops between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5) and between α-helices 6 and 7 (L6/7), along with the entire vif from SIVmac239 (NL-4/5S6/7SvifS). These SIVmac239-derived sequences were expected to protect the virus from HIV-1 restriction factors in monkey cells. However, the replicative capability of NL-4/5S6/7SvifS in human cells was severely impaired. By long-term cultivation of human CEM-SS cells infected with NL-4/5S6/7SvifS, we succeeded in partially rescuing the impaired replicative capability of the virus in human cells. This adapted virus encoded a G-to-E substitution at the 116(th) position of the CA (NL-4/5SG116E6/7SvifS). In the work described here, we explored the mechanism by which the replicative capability of NL-4/5S6/7SvifS was impaired in human cells. Quantitative analysis (by real-time PCR) of viral DNA synthesis from infected cells revealed that NL-4/5S6/7SvifS had a major defect in nuclear entry. Mutations in CA are known to affect viral core stability and result in deleterious effects in HIV-1 infection; therefore, we measured the kinetics of uncoating of these viruses. The uncoating of NL-4/5S6/7SvifS was significantly slower than that of wild type HIV-1 (WT), whereas the uncoating of NL-4/5SG116E6/7SvifS was similar to that of WT. Our results suggested that the lower replicative capability of NL-4/5S6/7SvifS in human cells was, at least in part, due to the slower uncoating of this virus. PMID:23967315

  18. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.

  19. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNAmore » transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.« less

  20. AR-12 Inhibits Multiple Chaperones Concomitant With Stimulating Autophagosome Formation Collectively Preventing Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L; Ecroyd, Heath; Tritsch, Sarah R; Bavari, Sina; Reid, St Patrick; Proniuk, Stefan; Zukiwski, Alexander; Jacob, Abraham; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Giovannoni, Federico; García, Cybele C; Damonte, Elsa; González-Gallego, Javier; Tuñón, María J; Dent, Paul

    2016-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated that AR-12 (OSU-03012) reduces the function and ATPase activities of multiple HSP90 and HSP70 family chaperones. Combined knock down of chaperones or AR-12 treatment acted to reduce the expression of virus receptors and essential glucosidase proteins. Combined knock down of chaperones or AR-12 treatment inactivated mTOR and elevated ATG13 S318 phosphorylation concomitant with inducing an endoplasmic reticulum stress response that in an eIF2α-dependent fashion increased Beclin1 and LC3 expression and autophagosome formation. Over-expression of chaperones prevented the reduction in receptor/glucosidase expression, mTOR inactivation, the ER stress response, and autophagosome formation. AR-12 reduced the reproduction of viruses including Mumps, Influenza, Measles, Junín, Rubella, HIV (wild type and protease resistant), and Ebola, an effect replicated by knock down of multiple chaperone proteins. AR-12-stimulated the co-localization of Influenza, EBV and HIV virus proteins with LC3 in autophagosomes and reduced viral protein association with the chaperones HSP90, HSP70, and GRP78. Knock down of Beclin1 suppressed drug-induced autophagosome formation and reduced the anti-viral protection afforded by AR-12. In an animal model of hemorrhagic fever virus, a transient exposure of animals to low doses of AR-12 doubled animal survival from ∼30% to ∼60% and suppressed liver damage as measured by ATL, GGT and LDH release. Thus through inhibition of chaperone protein functions; reducing the production, stability and processing of viral proteins; and stimulating autophagosome formation/viral protein degradation, AR-12 acts as a broad-specificity anti-viral drug in vitro and in vivo. We argue future patient studies with AR-12 are warranted. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2286-2302, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27187154

  1. Novel Neuroprotective GSK-3β Inhibitor Restricts Tat-Mediated HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Guendel, Irene; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Sampey, Gavin C.; Senina, Svetlana; Shultz, Leonard; Narayanan, Aarthi; Chen, Hao; Lepene, Benjamin; Zeng, Chen

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of new antiretroviral therapies targeting transcription of early viral proteins in postintegrated HIV-1 can aid in overcoming current therapy limitations. Using high-throughput screening assays, we have previously described a novel Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcriptional inhibitor named 6-bromoindirubin-3′-oxime (6BIO). The screening of 6BIO derivatives yielded unique compounds that show potent inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. We have identified a second-generation derivative called 18BIOder as an inhibitor of HIV-1 Tat-dependent transcription in TZM-bl cells and a potent inhibitor of GSK-3β kinase in vitro. Structurally, 18BIOder is half the molecular weight and structure of its parental compound, 6BIO. More importantly, we also have found a different GSK-3β complex present only in HIV-1-infected cells. 18BIOder preferentially inhibits this novel kinase complex from infected cells at nanomolar concentrations. Finally, we observed that neuronal cultures treated with Tat protein are protected from Tat-mediated cytotoxicity when treated with 18BIOder. Overall, our data suggest that HIV-1 Tat-dependent transcription is sensitive to small-molecule inhibition of GSK-3β. PMID:24227837

  2. Inhibition of topoisomerase II by ICRF-193 prevents efficient replication of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Hammarsten, O; Yao, X; Elias, P

    1996-01-01

    Cellular topoisomerase II is specifically inactivated by the drug ICRF-193. This compound turns topoisomerase II into a closed clamp that is unable to cleave DNA. We have investigated the effects of this inhibitor on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1. We show that ICRF-193 at low multiplicities of infection dramatically inhibits viral DNA synthesis and the production of infectious virus. The inhibition is less efficient at high multiplicities of infection. In addition, inhibition of viral DNA synthesis was observed only when ICRF-193 was present during the first 4 h of the infectious cycle. The transient replication of plasmids containing a herpes simplex virus type 1 origin of DNA replication, oriS, was affected by ICRF-193 in the same way. In contrast, neither cellular DNA synthesis nor replication of plasmids containing a simian virus 40 origin of DNA replication was inhibited. The observed effect on herpes simplex virus DNA replication was not caused by a decreased transcription of replication genes inasmuch as the levels of UL8, UL9, UL29, and UL30 rmRNAs were unaffected by the drug. These results suggest that topoisomerase II plays a vital role during the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA. We speculate that topoisomerase II is involved in the decatenation of newly synthesized daughter molecules. PMID:8676478

  3. Nuclear Envelope Protein SUN2 Promotes Cyclophilin-A-Dependent Steps of HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lahaye, Xavier; Satoh, Takeshi; Gentili, Matteo; Cerboni, Silvia; Silvin, Aymeric; Conrad, Cécile; Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Rodriguez, Elisa C.; Guichou, Jean-François; Bosquet, Nathalie; Piel, Matthieu; Le Grand, Roger; King, Megan C.; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Manel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the early phase of replication, HIV reverse transcribes its RNA and crosses the nuclear envelope while escaping host antiviral defenses. The host factor Cyclophilin A (CypA) is essential for these steps and binds the HIV capsid; however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains elusive. Here, we identify related capsid mutants in HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIVmac that are restricted by CypA. This antiviral restriction of mutated viruses is conserved across species and prevents nuclear import of the viral cDNA. Importantly, the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN2 is required for the antiviral activity of CypA. We show that wild-type HIV exploits SUN2 in primary CD4+ T cells as an essential host factor that is required for the positive effects of CypA on reverse transcription and infection. Altogether, these results establish essential CypA-dependent functions of SUN2 in HIV infection at the nuclear envelope. PMID:27149839

  4. HIV-1 cellular and tissue replication patterns in infected humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Araínga, Mariluz; Su, Hang; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice have emerged as a testing platform for HIV-1 pathobiology by reflecting natural human disease processes. Their use to study HIV-1 biology, virology, immunology, pathogenesis and therapeutic development has served as a robust alternative to more-well developed animal models for HIV/AIDS. A critical component in reflecting such human pathobiology rests in defining the tissue and cellular sites for HIV-1 infection. To this end, we examined the tissue sites for viral infection in bone marrow, blood, spleens, liver, gut, brain, kidney and lungs of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell engrafted virus-infected NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and sorted from species mixtures defined as CD34+ lineage negative progenitor cells, CD14+CD16+ monocyte-macrophages and central, stem cell and effector memory T cells. The cell distribution and viral life cycle were found dependent on the tissue compartment and time of infection. Cell subsets contained HIV-1 total and integrated DNA as well as multi-spliced and unspliced RNA in divergent proportions. The data support the idea that humanized mice can provide a means to examine the multifaceted sites of HIV-1 replication including, but not limited to progenitor cells and monocyte-macrophages previously possible only in macaques and human. PMID:26996968

  5. Salicylic Acid Inhibits the Replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus by Directly Targeting a Host Component in the Replication Complex.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaoying; Sasvari, Zsuzsanna; Gonzalez, Paulina Alatriste; Friso, Giulia; Rowland, Elden; Liu, Xiao-Min; van Wijk, Klaas J; Nagy, Peter D; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-04-01

    Although the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) plays a central role in signaling resistance to viral infection, the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. Identification and characterization of SA's direct targets have been shown to be an effective strategy for dissecting the complex SA-mediated defense signaling network. In search of additional SA targets, we previously developed two sensitive approaches that utilize SA analogs in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology to identify and evaluate candidate SA-binding proteins (SABPs) from Arabidopsis. Using these approaches, we have now identified several members of the Arabidopsis glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) protein family, including two chloroplast-localized and two cytosolic isoforms, as SABPs. Cytosolic GAPDH is a well-known glycolytic enzyme; it also is an important host factor involved in the replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a single-stranded RNA virus. Using a yeast cell-free extract, an in vivo yeast replication system, and plant protoplasts, we demonstrate that SA inhibits TBSV replication. SA does so by inhibiting the binding of cytosolic GAPDH to the negative (-)RNA strand of TBSV. Thus, this study reveals a novel molecular mechanism through which SA regulates virus replication. PMID:25584724

  6. HIV-1 TAT Inhibits Microglial Phagocytosis of Aβ Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Brian; Zhou, Yuyan; Hou, Huayan; Rrapo, Elona; Fernandez, Francisco; Tan, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated dementia (HAD) is a subcortical neuropsychiatric syndrome that has increased in prevalence in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Several studies demonstrated increased amyloidosis in brains of HIV patients and suggested that there may be a significant number of long-term HIV survivors with co-morbid Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the future. We show HIV-1 Tat protein inhibits microglial uptake of Aβ1-42 peptide, a process that is enhanced by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and rescued by the STAT1 inhibitor (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). It is hypothesized that reduced Aβ uptake occurs through IFN-γ mediated STAT1 activation. This process promotes a switch from a phagocytic to an antigen presenting phenotype in microglia through activation of class II transactivator (CIITA). Additionally, we show that HIV-1 Tat significantly disrupts apolipoprotein-3 (Apo-E3) promoted microglial Aβ uptake. As Tat has been shown to directly interact with the low density lipoprotein (LRP) receptor and thus inhibit the uptake of its ligands including apolipoprotein E4 (Apo-E4) and Aβ peptide in neurons, we further hypothesize that a similar inhibition of LRP may occur in microglia. Future studies will be required to fully characterize the mechanisms underlying IFN-γ enhancement of HIV-1 Tats disruption of microglial phagocytosis of Aβ and Apo-E3. PMID:18784813

  7. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of some [Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor]-C5'-linker-[Integrase Inhibitor] heterodimers as inhibitors of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Sugeac, Elena; Fossey, Christine; Ladurée, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2004-12-01

    Selected for their expected ability to inhibit HIV replication, a series of eight heterodimers containing a Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NRTI) and an Integrase Inhibitor (INI), bound by a linker, were designed and synthesized. For the NRTIs, d4U, d2U and d4T were chosen. For the INIs, 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (6) and 4-(3,5-dibenzyloxyphenyl)-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (9) (belonging to the beta-diketo acids class) were chosen. The conjugation of the two different inhibitors (NRTI and INI) was performed using an amino acid (glycine or beta-alanine) as a cleavable linker. PMID:15662954

  8. Copper inhibits the HIV-1 protease by both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Karlstroem, A.R.; Levine, R.L. )

    1991-03-11

    The protease encoded by HIV-1 is essential for the processing of the viral polyproteins encoded by the gag and pol genes into mature viral proteins. Mutation or deletion of the protease gene blocks replication of the virus, making the protease an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The authors found that the HIV-1 protease is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of Cu{sup 2+}. Protease was 50% inhibited by exposure to 5 {mu}M copper for 5 min while exposure to 25 {mu}M caused complete inhibition. This inhibition was not oxygen-dependent and was not reversed by treatment with EDTA, presumably due to the slow off-rate of copper from the protease. Consistent with this interpretation, enzyme activity was recovered after denaturation and refolding of the copper exposed protease. Titration of the inactivated enzyme with Ellman's reagent demonstrated a loss of one of the two sulfhydryl groups present in the molecule, suggesting that copper inhibition was mediated through binding to a cysteine. This was confirmed in studies with a chemically synthesize, mutant protease in which the two cysteine residues were replaced by {alpha}-amino butyrate: The mutant protease was not inhibited by copper. However, both the wild-type and mutant protease were inactivated when exposed to copper, oxygen, and dithiothreitol. This inactivation required oxygen. Thus, the protease can also be inactivated by metal catalyzed oxidation (MCO), a presumably irreversible covalent modification.

  9. Blocking CXCL9 Decreases HIV-1 Replication and Enhances the Activity of Prophylactic Antiretrovirals in Human Cervical Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Macura, Sherrill L.; Lathrop, Melissa J.; Gui, Jiang; Doncel, Gustavo F.; Rollenhagen, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The interferon-gamma–induced chemokine CXCL9 is expressed in a wide range of inflammatory conditions including those affecting the female genital tract. CXCL9 promotes immune cell recruitment, activation, and proliferation. The role of CXCL9 in modulating HIV-1 infection of cervicovaginal tissues, a main portal of viral entry, however, has not been established. We report a link between CXCL9 and HIV-1 replication in human cervical tissues and propose CXCL9 as a potential target to enhance the anti–HIV-1 activity of prophylactic antiretrovirals. Design: Using ex vivo infection of human cervical tissues as a model of mucosal HIV-1 acquisition, we described the effect of CXCL9 neutralization on HIV-1 gene expression and mucosal CD4+ T-cell activation. The anti-HIV-1 activity of tenofovir, the leading mucosal pre-exposure prophylactic microbicide, alone or in combination with CXCL9 neutralization was also studied. Methods: HIV-1 replication was evaluated by p24 ELISA. HIV-1 DNA and RNA, and CD4, CCR5, and CD38 transcription were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Frequency of activated cervical CD4+ T cells was quantified using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Results: Antibody blocking of CXCL9 reduced HIV-1 replication by decreasing mucosal CD4+ T-cell activation. CXCL9 neutralization in combination with suboptimal concentrations of tenofovir, possibly present in the cervicovaginal tissues of women using the drug inconsistently, demonstrated an earlier and greater decrease in HIV-1 replication compared with tissues treated with tenofovir alone. Conclusions: CXCL9 neutralization reduces HIV-1 replication and may be an effective target to enhance the efficacy of prophylactic antiretrovirals. PMID:26545124

  10. Inhibition of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Lescar, J.; Brynda, J.; Rezacova, P.; Stouracova, R.; Riottot, M. M.; Chitarra, V.; Fabry, M.; Horejsi, M.; Sedlacek, J.; Bentley, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody 1696, directed against the HIV-1 protease, displays strong inhibitory effects toward the catalytic activity of the enzyme of both the HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates. This antibody cross-reacts with peptides that include the N-terminus of the enzyme, a region that is well conserved in sequence among different viral strains and which, furthermore, is crucial for homodimerization to the active enzymatic form. This observation, as well as antigen-binding studies in the presence of an active site inhibitor, suggest that 1696 inhibits the HIV protease by destabilizing its active homodimeric form. To characterize further how the antibody 1696 inhibits the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases, we have solved the crystal structure of its Fab fragment by molecular replacement and refined it at 3.0 A resolution. The antigen binding site has a deep cavity at its center, which is lined mainly by acidic and hydrophobic residues, and is large enough to accommodate several antigen residues. The structure of the Fab 1696 could form a starting basis for the design of alternative HIV protease-inhibiting molecules of broad specificity. PMID:10631984

  11. Saikosaponin A inhibits influenza A virus replication and lung immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaqin; Ling, Fangfang; Xiao, Kun; Li, Qian; Li, Bin; Lu, Chunni; Qi, Wenbao; Zeng, Zhenling; Liao, Ming; Liu, Yahong; Chen, Weisan

    2015-01-01

    Fatal influenza outcomes result from a combination of rapid virus replication and collateral lung tissue damage caused by exaggerated pro-inflammatory host immune cell responses. There are few therapeutic agents that target both biological processes for the attenuation of influenza-induced lung pathology. We show that Saikosaponin A, a bioactive triterpene saponin with previouslyestablished anti-inflammatory effects, demonstrates both in vitro and in vivo anti-viral activity against influenza A virus infections. Saikosaponin A attenuated the replication of three different influenza A virus strains, including a highly pathogenic H5N1 strain, in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells. This anti-viral activity occurred through both downregulation of NF-κB signaling and caspase 3-dependent virus ribonucleoprotein nuclear export as demonstrated by NF-κB subunit p65 and influenza virus nucleoprotein nuclear translocation studies in influenza virus infected A549 cells. Critically, Saikosaponin A also attenuated viral replication, aberrant pro-inflammatory cytokine production and lung histopathology in the widely established H1N1 PR8 model of influenza A virus lethality in C57BL/6 mice. Flow cytometry studies of mouse bronchoalveolar lavage cells revealed that SSa exerted immunomodulatory effects through a selective attenuation of lung neutrophil and monocyte recruitment during the early peak of the innate immune response to PR8 infection. Altogether, our results indicate that Saikosaponin A possesses novel therapeutic potential for the treatment of pathological influenza virus infections. PMID:26637810

  12. Saikosaponin A inhibits influenza A virus replication and lung immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianxin; Duan, Mubing; Zhao, Yaqin; Ling, Fangfang; Xiao, Kun; Li, Qian; Li, Bin; Lu, Chunni; Qi, Wenbao; Zeng, Zhenling; Liao, Ming; Liu, Yahong; Chen, Weisan

    2015-12-15

    Fatal influenza outcomes result from a combination of rapid virus replication and collateral lung tissue damage caused by exaggerated pro-inflammatory host immune cell responses. There are few therapeutic agents that target both biological processes for the attenuation of influenza-induced lung pathology. We show that Saikosaponin A, a bioactive triterpene saponin with previouslyestablished anti-inflammatory effects, demonstrates both in vitro and in vivo anti-viral activity against influenza A virus infections. Saikosaponin A attenuated the replication of three different influenza A virus strains, including a highly pathogenic H5N1 strain, in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells. This anti-viral activity occurred through both downregulation of NF-κB signaling and caspase 3-dependent virus ribonucleoprotein nuclear export as demonstrated by NF-κB subunit p65 and influenza virus nucleoprotein nuclear translocation studies in influenza virus infected A549 cells. Critically, Saikosaponin A also attenuated viral replication, aberrant pro-inflammatory cytokine production and lung histopathology in the widely established H1N1 PR8 model of influenza A virus lethality in C57BL/6 mice. Flow cytometry studies of mouse bronchoalveolar lavage cells revealed that SSa exerted immunomodulatory effects through a selective attenuation of lung neutrophil and monocyte recruitment during the early peak of the innate immune response to PR8 infection. Altogether, our results indicate that Saikosaponin A possesses novel therapeutic potential for the treatment of pathological influenza virus infections. PMID:26637810

  13. Inhibition of Tulane Virus Replication in vitro with RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qiang; Wei, Chao; Xia, Ming; Jiang, Xi

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), a conserved mechanism triggered by small interfering RNA (siRNA), has been used for suppressing gene expression through RNA degradation. The replication of caliciviruses (CVs) with RNAi was studied using the Tulane virus (TV) as a model. Five siRNAs targeting the non-structural, the major (VP1) and minor (VP2) structural genes of the TV were developed and the viruses were quantified using qPCR and TCID50 assay. Treatment of the cells with siRNA 4 hours before viral inoculation significantly reduced viral titer by up to 2.6 logs and dramatically decreased viral RNA copy numbers and viral titers 48 hours post infection in four of the five siRNAs studied. The results were confirmed by Western blot, in which the major structural protein VP1 was markedly reduced in both the cells and the culture medium. Two small protein bands of the S and P domains of the viral capsid protein were also detected in the cell lysates, although their role in viral replication remains unknown. Since the TV shares many biological properties with human noroviruses (NoVs), the successful demonstration of RNAi in TV replication would provide valuable information in control of acute gastroenteritis caused by human NoVs. PMID:23154881

  14. HIV-1 Protease: Structure, Dynamics and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Ishima, R.; Torchia, D.A.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV-1 protease is synthesized as part of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein. It is responsible for its own release from the precursor and the processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into the mature structural and functional proteins required for virus maturation. Because of its indispensable role, the mature HIV-1 protease dimer has proven to be a successful target for the development of antiviral agents. In the last 5 years, a major emphasis in protease research has been to improve inhibitor design and treatment regimens.

  15. ITRACONAZOLE INHIBITS ENTEROVIRUS REPLICATION BY TARGETING THE OXYSTEROL-BINDING PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Strating, Jeroen R.P.M.; van der Linden, Lonneke; Albulescu, Lucian; Bigay, Joëlle; Arita, Minetaro; Delang, Leen; Leyssen, Pieter; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Lanke, Kjerstin H.W.; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Ulferts, Rachel; Drin, Guillaume; Schlinck, Nina; Wubbolts, Richard W.; Sever, Navdar; Head, Sarah A.; Liu, Jun O.; Beachy, Philip A.; De Matteis, Maria A.; Shair, Matthew D.; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Itraconazole (ITZ) is a well-known antifungal agent that also has anti-cancer activity. In this study, we identified ITZ as a broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses (e.g. poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus-71, rhinovirus). We demonstrate that ITZ inhibits viral RNA replication by targeting oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and OSBP-related protein 4 (ORP4). Consistently, OSW-1, a specific OSBP/ORP4 antagonist, also inhibits enterovirus replication. Knockdown of OSBP inhibits virus replication whereas overexpression of OSBP or ORP4 counteracts the antiviral effects of ITZ and OSW-1. ITZ binds OSBP and inhibits its function, i.e. shuttling of cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate between membranes, thereby likely perturbing the virus-induced membrane alterations essential for viral replication organelle formation. ITZ also inhibits hepatitis C virus replication, which also relies on OSBP. Together, these data implicate OSBP/ORP4 as novel molecular targets of ITZ and point to an essential role of OSBP/ORP4-mediated lipid exchange in virus replication that can be targeted by antiviral drugs. PMID:25640182

  16. ACTG 5197: A Placebo Controlled Trial of Immunization of HIV-1 Infected Persons with a Replication Deficient Ad5 Vaccine Expressing the HIV-1 Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Schooley, Robert T.; Spritzler, John; Wang, Hongying; Lederman, Michael M.; Havlir, Diane; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Pollard, Richard; Battaglia, Cathy; Robertson, Michael; Mehrotra, Devan; Casimiro, Danilo; Cox, Kara; Schock, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV-1 specific cellular immunity contributes to control of HIV-1 replication. HIV-1 infected volunteers on antiretroviral therapy received a replication defective Ad5 HIV-1 gag vaccine in a randomized, blinded therapeutic vaccination study. Methods HIV-1-infected vaccine or placebo recipients underwent a 16-wk analytical treatment interruption (ATI). The log10 HIV-1 RNA at the ATI set point and time averaged area under the curve (TA-AUC) served as co-primary endpoints. Immune responses were measured by intracellular cytokine staining and CFSE dye dilution. Results Vaccine benefit trends were seen for both primary endpoints, but did not reach a pre-specified p ≤ 0.025 level of significance. The estimated shift in TA-AUC and set point were 0.24 (unadjusted p=0.04) and 0.26 (unadjusted p=0.07) log10 copies lower in the vaccine than in the placebo arm. HIV-1 gag-specific CD4+ interferon-γ producing cells were an immunologic correlate of viral control. Conclusion The vaccine was generally safe and well tolerated. Despite a trend favoring viral suppression among vaccine recipients, differences in HIV-1 RNA levels did not meet the pre-specified level of significance. Induction of HIV-1 gag-specific CD4 cells correlated with control of viral replication in vivo. Future immunogenicity studies should require a substantially higher immunogenicity threshold before an ATI is contemplated. PMID:20662716

  17. A small molecule compound IMB-LA inhibits HIV-1 infection by preventing viral Vpu from antagonizing the host restriction factor BST-2

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Zeyun; Ding, Jiwei; Zhang, Quan; Zhao, Jianyuan; Ma, Ling; Yu, Haisheng; Liu, Zhenlong; Shan, Guangzhi; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jinming; Wei, Tao; Zhang, Liguo; Guo, Fei; Liang, Chen; Cen, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Human BST-2 inhibits HIV-1 replication by tethering nascent virions to the cell surface. HIV-1 codes Vpu that counteracts BST-2 by down-regulating this restriction factor from the cell surface. This important function makes Vpu a potential therapeutic target. Yet, no agents have been reported to block Vpu from antagonizing BST-2. In this study, we report a small molecule compound IMB-LA that abrogates the function of Vpu and thereby strongly suppresses HIV-1 replication by sensitizing the virus to BST-2 restriction. Further studies revealed that IMB-LA specifically inhibits Vpu-mediated degradation of BST-2 and restores the expression of BST-2 at the cell surface. Although IMB-LA does not prevent Vpu from interacting with BST-2 or β-TrCP2-containing ubiquitin E3 ligase, sorting of BST-2 into lysosomes in Vpu-expressing cells is blocked by IMB-LA. Most importantly, HIV-1 release and infection is inhibited by IMB-LA only in BST-2-expressing cells. In summary, results herein demonstrated that IMB-LA could specifically inhibit the degradation of BST-2 induced by Vpu, and impair HIV-1 replication in a BST-2 dependent manner, suggesting the feasibility of utilizing small molecule compounds to disable the antagonist function of Vpu and thereby expose HIV-1 to the restriction by BST-2. PMID:26669976

  18. Active replication of HIV-1 at the lymphoepithelial surface of the tonsil.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, S. S.; Tenner-Racz, K.; Racz, P.; Wenig, B. M.; Hansen, C. H.; Heffner, D.; Nelson, A. M.; Pope, M.; Steinman, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Cells that are infected with HIV-1 were visualized at the mucosal surface of the nasopharyngeal and palatine tonsils in 14 specimens from patients with CD4+ T-cell counts of 200 to 900/microliter and 2- to 10-year histories of HIV-1 infection. Most of the cells with intracellular HIV-1 protein were small but multinucleated. The majority of these syncytia could be double labeled for HIV-1 RNA and a dendritic cell marker S100. In the palatine tonsil, the infected cells were not found in the stratified squamous epithelium that is adjacent to the pharynx. Instead, the S100+ infected syncytia were localized to the surface of tonsil invaginations or crypts. This mucosa, termed lymphoepithelium, contains antigen-transporting M cells that lie above regions where S100+ dendritic cells are juxtaposed with CD4+ lymphocytes. Likewise, infected cells were found in lymphoepithelium and not respiratory epithelium of nasopharyngeal tonsils or adenoids. We propose that lymphoepithelia, the histological term that describes the specialized regions where antigens access mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, are sites where HIV-1 replication can be enhanced in syncytia derived from dendritic cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9212735

  19. Ribozyme-mediated inhibition of HIV 1 suggests nucleolar trafficking of HIV-1 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Michienzi, Alessandro; Cagnon, Laurence; Bahner, Ingrid; Rossi, John J.

    2000-01-01

    The HIV regulatory proteins Tat and Rev have a nucleolar localization property in human cells. However, no functional role has been attributed to this localization. Recently it has been demonstrated that expression of Rev induces nucleolar relocalization of some protein factors involved in Rev export. Because the function of Rev is to bind HIV RNA and facilitate transport of singly spliced and unspliced RNA to the cytoplasm, it is likely that the nucleolus plays a critical role in HIV-1 RNA export. As a test for trafficking of HIV-1 RNAs into the nucleolus, a hammerhead ribozyme that specifically cleaves HIV-1 RNA was inserted into the body of the U16 small nucleolar RNA, resulting in accumulation of the ribozyme within the nucleoli of human cells. HeLa CD4+ and T cells expressing this nucleolar localized ribozyme exhibit dramatically suppressed HIV-1 replication. The results presented here suggest a trafficking of HIV-1 RNA through the nucleoli of human cells, thus posing a different paradigm for lentiviral RNA processing. PMID:10922055

  20. HIV-1-inhibiting activity of the essential oil of Ridolfia segetum and Oenanthe crocata.

    PubMed

    Bicchi, Carlo; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Ballero, Mauro; Sanna, Cinzia; Matteodo, Maura; Esposito, Francesca; Zinzula, Luca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2009-10-01

    The essential oils of Ridolfia segetum (L.) Moris and Oenanthe crocata L. (Apiaceae), collected in Sardinia (Italy), have been assayed for two enzyme-associated activities of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT): RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (RDDP) activity and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity. In biochemical assays, the essential oils inhibited HIV-1 RT RDDP activity in a dose-dependent manner, while they were inactive towards RNase H activity. Furthermore, the oils were cytotoxic towards K (562) cell replication. GC-MS analysis of the essential oils obtained by steam distillation of the aerial parts showed that the main components of R. segetum were alpha-phellandrene, alpha-terpinolene, beta-phellandrene, and dillapiol and those of O. crocata were sabinene, TRANS-beta-ocimene, CIS-beta-ocimene, and beta-pinene. PMID:19347799

  1. APOBEC3G inhibits HIV-1 RNA elongation by inactivating the viral trans-activation response element.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-07-29

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. dC-to-dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defense against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. We further show that free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3'+5' ends is sufficient for A3G deamination. These results identify A3G as an efficient mutator and that deamination of (-)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:24859335

  2. APOBEC3G Inhibits HIV-1 RNA Elongation by Inactivating the Viral Trans-Activation Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA (vDNA) is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient HIV-1 replication. dC to dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defence against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. Finally, we show that free ssDNA termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3′+5′ ends is sufficient for A3G deamination, identifying A3G as an efficient mutator, and that deamination of (−)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:24859335

  3. Astragalus polysaccharides inhibits PCV2 replication by inhibiting oxidative stress and blocking NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hongxia; Gan, Fang; Zhang, Zheqian; Hu, Junfa; Chen, Xingxiang; Huang, Kehe

    2015-11-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary causative agent of porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD). Astragalus polysaccharide (APS), as one kind of biological macromolecule extracted from Astragalus, has antiviral activities. This study was undertaken to explore the effect of APS on PCV2 replication in vitro and the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that adding APS before PCV2 infection decreased significantly PCV2 DNA copies, the number of infected cells, MDA level, ROS level and NF-κB activation in PK15 cells and increased significantly GSH contents and SOD activity compared to control without APS. Oxidative stress induced by BSO could eliminate the effect of PCV2 replication inhibition by APS. LPS, as a NF-κB activator, could attenuate the effect of PCV2 replication inhibition by APS. BAY 11-7082, as a NF-κB inhibitor, could increase the effect of PCV2 replication inhibition by APS. In conclusion, APS inhibits PCV2 replication by decreasing oxidative stress and the activation of NF-κB signaling pathway, which suggests that APS might be employed for the prevention of PCV2 infection. PMID:26226456

  4. Dextran Sulfate Suppression of Viruses in the HIV Family: Inhibition of Virion Binding to CD4+ Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Looney, David J.; Kuno, Sachiko; Ueno, Ryuji; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Broder, Samuel

    1988-04-01

    The first step in the infection of human T lymphocytes by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is attachment to the target cell receptor, the CD4 antigen. This step may be vulnerable to attack by antibodies, chemicals, or small peptides. Dextran sulfate (molecular weight approximately 8000), which has been given to patients as an anticoagulant or antilipemic agent for more than two decades, was found to block the binding of virions to various target T lymphocytes, inhibit syncytia formation, and exert a potent inhibitory effect against HIV-1 in vitro at concentrations that may be clinically attainable in human beings. This drug also suppressed the replication of HIV-2 in vitro. These observations could have theoretical and clinical implications in the strategy to develop drugs against HIV types 1 and 2.

  5. Activation domains of transcription factors mediate replication dependent transcription from a minimal HIV-1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R D; Lee, B A; Jackson, S P; Proudfoot, N J

    1996-01-01

    Transcription from a minimal HIV-1 promoter containing the three Sp1 binding sites and TATA box can be activated without Tat by template DNA replication. Here we show that this activation can also be mediated by recombinant GAL4 fusion proteins containing the activation domains of Sp1, VP16 or CTF (or by full-length GAL4) targeted to the HIV-1 promoter by replacing the Sp1 sites with five GAL4 binding sites. Thus Sp1 is not unique in its ability to mediate replication activated transcription, although the degree of processivity elicited by the different activators varied significantly from strongly processive (GAL4-VP16) to relatively non-processive (GAL4-Sp1 or -CTF). Processive GAL4-VP16-activated transcription, but not efficient initiation, required multiple GAL4 binding sites. In the presence of Tat, transcription with GAL4-SP1 and GAL4-CTF was further activated (principally at the level of processivity) but GAL4-VP16-potentiated transcription was only slightly stimulated. The Tat-dependent switch from non-processive to fully processive transcription was particularly marked for GAL4-Sp1, an effect which may be relevant to the selection of Sp1 binding sites by the HIV-1 promoter. PMID:8604293

  6. Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection Increases Apoptosis and HIV-1 Replication in HIV-1 Infected Jurkat Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Tan, Jiying; Biswas, Santanu; Zhao, Jiangqin; Devadas, Krishnakumar; Ye, Zhiping; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infection has a significant impact on public health, since it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It is not well-known whether influenza virus infection affects cell death and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication in HIV-1-infected patients. Using a lymphoma cell line, Jurkat, we examined the in vitro effects of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1) infection on cell death and HIV-1 RNA production in infected cells. We found that pH1N1 infection increased apoptotic cell death through Fas and Bax-mediated pathways in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells. Infection with pH1N1 virus could promote HIV-1 RNA production by activating host transcription factors including nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-ĸB), nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways and T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-related pathways. The replication of HIV-1 latent infection could be reactivated by pH1N1 infection through TCR and apoptotic pathways. These data indicate that HIV-1 replication can be activated by pH1N1 virus in HIV-1-infected cells resulting in induction of cell death through apoptotic pathways. PMID:26848681

  7. Enhanced inhibition of parvovirus B19 replication by cidofovir in extendedly exposed erythroid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Bonvicini, Francesca; Bua, Gloria; Manaresi, Elisabetta; Gallinella, Giorgio

    2016-07-15

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) commonly induces self-limiting infections but can also cause severe clinical manifestations in patients with underlying haematological disorders or with immune system deficits. Currently, therapeutic options for B19V entirely rely on symptomatic and supportive treatments since a specific antiviral therapy is not yet available. Recently a first step in the research for active compounds inhibiting B19V replication has allowed identifying the acyclic nucleoside phosphonate cidofovir (CDV). Herein, the effect of CDV against B19V replication was characterized in human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) cultured and infected following different experimental approaches to replicate in vitro the infection of an expanding erythroid cell population in the bone marrow. B19V replication was selectively inhibited both in infected EPCs extendedly exposed to CDV 500μM (viral inhibition 82%) and in serially infected EPCs cultures with passage of the virus progeny, constantly under drug exposure (viral inhibition 99%). In addition, a potent inhibitory effect against B19V (viral inhibition 92%) was assessed in a short-term infection of EPCs treated with CDV 500μM 1day before viral infection. In the evaluated experimental conditions, the enhanced effect of CDV against B19V might be ascribed both to the increased intracellular drug concentration achieved by extended exposure, and to a progressive reduction in efficiency of the replicative process within treated EPCs population. PMID:27071853

  8. A Symmetric Region of the HIV-1 Integrase Dimerization Interface Is Essential for Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Thys, Wannes; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an important target for contemporary antiretroviral drug design research. Historically, efforts at inactivating the enzyme have focused upon blocking its active site. However, it has become apparent that new classes of allosteric inhibitors will be necessary to advance the antiretroviral field in light of the emergence of viral strains resistant to contemporary clinically used IN drugs. In this study we have characterized the importance of a close network of IN residues, distant from the active site, as important for the obligatory multimerization of the enzyme and viral replication as a whole. Specifically, we have determined that the configuration of six residues within a highly symmetrical region at the IN dimerization interface, composed of a four-tiered aromatic interaction flanked by two salt bridges, significantly contributes to proper HIV-1 replication. Additionally, we have utilized a quantitative luminescence assay to examine IN oligomerization and have determined that there is a very low tolerance for amino acid substitutions along this region. Even conservative residue substitutions negatively impacted IN multimerization, resulting in an inactive viral enzyme and a non-replicative virus. We have shown that there is a very low tolerance for amino acid variation at the symmetrical dimeric interface region characterized in this study, and therefore drugs designed to target the amino acid network detailed here could be expected to yield a significantly reduced number of drug-resistant escape mutations compared to contemporary clinically-evaluated antiretrovirals. PMID:23028829

  9. Germinal Center T Follicular Helper Cells Are Highly Permissive to HIV-1 and Alter Their Phenotype during Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Stephanie L; Pham, Michael N; Folkvord, Joy M; Arends, Tessa; Miller, Shannon M; Miles, Brodie; Meditz, Amie L; McCarter, Martin; Levy, David N; Connick, Elizabeth

    2016-03-15

    HIV-1 replication is concentrated within CD4(+) T cells in B cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues during asymptomatic disease. Limited data suggest that a subset of T follicular helper cells (TFH) within germinal centers (GC) is highly permissive to HIV-1. Whether GC TFH are the major HIV-1 virus-producing cells in vivo has not been established. In this study, we investigated TFH permissivity to HIV-1 ex vivo by spinoculating and culturing tonsil cells with HIV-1 GFP reporter viruses. Using flow cytometry, higher percentages of GC TFH (CXCR5(high)PD-1(high)) and CXCR5(+)programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)(low) cells were GFP(+) than non-GC TFH (CXCR5(+)PD-1(intermediate)) or extrafollicular (EF) (CXCR5(-)) cells. When sorted prior to spinoculation, however, GC TFH were substantially more permissive than CXCR5(+)PD-1(low) or EF cells, suggesting that many GC TFH transition to a CXCR5(+)PD-1(low) phenotype during productive infection. In situ hybridization on inguinal lymph node sections from untreated HIV-1-infected individuals without AIDS revealed higher frequencies of HIV-1 RNA(+) cells in GC than non-GC regions of follicle or EF regions. Superinfection of HIV-1-infected individuals' lymph node cells with GFP reporter virus confirmed the permissivity of follicular cells ex vivo. Lymph node immunostaining revealed 96% of CXCR5(+)CD4(+) cells were located in follicles. Within sorted lymph node cells from four HIV-infected individuals, CXCR5(+) subsets harbored 11-66-fold more HIV-1 RNA than CXCR5(-) subsets, as determined by RT PCR. Thus, GC TFH are highly permissive to HIV-1, but downregulate PD-1 and, to a lesser extent, CXCR5 during HIV-1 replication. These data further implicate GC TFH as the major HIV-1-producing cells in chronic asymptomatic HIV-1 infection. PMID:26873986

  10. Inhibition of tomato yellow leaf curl virus replication by artificial zinc-finger proteins.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Koshino-Kimura, Yoshihiro; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we designed an artificial zinc-finger protein (AZP) for blocking a replication protein (Rep) of beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) from binding to its replication origin and demonstrated that transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the AZP are completely resistant to the virus infection. Here we applied the AZP technology to tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) infective to an important agricultural crop, tomato. We designed an AZP binding to the direct repeat to block the TYLCV Rep binding and confirmed in gel shift assays that the designed AZP has a higher affinity to the replication origin than that of Rep. Furthermore, we demonstrated in competitive binding assays that the AZP effectively inhibited the Rep binding in vitro. We discuss properties of the AZP for inhibition of TYLCV replication in detail. PMID:18029770