Science.gov

Sample records for initiate evaluation efforts

  1. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1982-09-01

    Report III, Volume 1 contains those specifications numbered A through J, as follows: General Specifications (A); Specifications for Pressure Vessels (C); Specifications for Tanks (D); Specifications for Exchangers (E); Specifications for Fired Heaters (F); Specifications for Pumps and Drivers (G); and Specifications for Instrumentation (J). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project, and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available to the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors. Report III, Volume 1 also contains the unique specifications prepared for Plants 8, 15, and 27. These specifications will be substantially reviewed during Phase I of the project, and modified as necessary for use during the engineering, procurement, and construction of this project.

  2. Qualitative Evaluation of Health Information Exchange Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Joan S.; Guappone, Kenneth P.

    2007-01-01

    Because most health information exchange (HIE) initiatives are as yet immature, formative evaluation is recommended so that what is learned through evaluation can be immediately applied to assist in HIE development efforts. Qualitative methods can be especially useful for formative evaluation because they can guide ongoing HIE growth while taking context into consideration. This paper describes important HIE-related research questions and outlines appropriate qualitative research techniques for addressing them. PMID:17904914

  3. Venture Capital Initiative: Ohio's School Improvement Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoo, Soonhwa; Loadman, William E.

    In 1994 the Ohio State Legislature established Venture Capital to support school restructuring. The Venture Capital school initiative is a concept borrowed from the business community in which the corporate entity provides risk capital to parts of the organization to stimulate creative ideas and to provide opportunities for local entities to try…

  4. Microdrill Initiative - Initial Market Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Spears & Associates, Inc

    2003-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a major research and development initiative to create a small, fast, inexpensive and environmentally friendly rig for drilling 5000 feet boreholes to investigate potential oil and gas reservoirs. DOE wishes to get input from petroleum industry operators, service companies and equipment suppliers on the operation and application of this coiled-tubing-based drilling unit. To that end, DOE has asked Spears & Associates, Inc. (SAI) to prepare a special state-of-the-market report and assist during a DOE-sponsored project-scoping workshop in Albuquerque near the end of April 2003. The scope of the project is four-fold: (1) Evaluate the history, status and future of demand for very small bore-hole drilling; (2) Measure the market for coiled tubing drilling and describe the state-of-the-art; (3) Identify companies and individuals who should have an interest in micro drilling and invite them to the DOE workshop; and (4) Participate in 3 concurrent workshop sessions, record and evaluate participant comments and report workshop conclusions.

  5. Climate data initiative: A geocuration effort to support climate resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Bugbee, Kaylin; Tilmes, Curt; Privette, Ana Pinheiro

    2016-03-01

    Curation is traditionally defined as the process of collecting and organizing information around a common subject matter or a topic of interest and typically occurs in museums, art galleries, and libraries. The task of organizing data around specific topics or themes is a vibrant and growing effort in the biological sciences but to date this effort has not been actively pursued in the Earth sciences. In this paper, we introduce the concept of geocuration and define it as the act of searching, selecting, and synthesizing Earth science data/metadata and information from across disciplines and repositories into a single, cohesive, and useful collection. We present the Climate Data Initiative (CDI) project as a prototypical example. The CDI project is a systematic effort to manually curate and share openly available climate data from various federal agencies. CDI is a broad multi-agency effort of the U.S. government and seeks to leverage the extensive existing federal climate-relevant data to stimulate innovation and private-sector entrepreneurship to support national climate-change preparedness. We describe the geocuration process used in the CDI project, lessons learned, and suggestions to improve similar geocuration efforts in the future.

  6. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report II. Breckinridge Project design basis

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The Breckinridge Project is a pioneer endeavor involving the engineering, construction, and operation of a commercial facility that will convert 23,000 tons per day of run-of-mine, high-sulfur coal into 50,000 barrels per day of liquid hydrocarbons equivalent to those produced from crude oil. The Initial Effort, now complete, was executed under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC05-80OR20717 between the Department of Energy and the Participants, Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc., and Airco Energy Company, Inc. The Initial Effort produced a preliminary design, capital estimate, and economic analysis of the commercial plant, as well as a plan for the design, construction, and operation of that plant. The extensive and rigorous attention given to environmental, socioeconomic, safety, and health considerations is indicative of the high priority these issues will continue to receive throughout the life of the project. The Breckinridge Energy Company, a partnership of several major corporations, is being formed to finance, own, and manage the Breckinridge Project. Report II is intended for the reader who is primarily interested in less detailed discussion of the coal liquefaction process and Breckinridge facility than presented in the eleven volumes of Reports IV and V. The overview section describes the project goals and briefly introduces the coal liquefaction process. The report continues with a discussion of the history of the project and the H-COAL process from its concept to the proposed commercialization technology. The report describes the site, the Breckinridge Facility, and concludes with a summary of the eleven reports that contain the deliverable documentation of the Initial Effort or Development Phase of the project.

  7. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  8. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VI. Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Report VI presents a comprehensive plan for the management of the Breckinridge Project. For the purpose of this report, the project work is divided into five major project phases: Development, Engineering, Procurement, Construction, and Operations. The results of the Development Phase (Initial Effort) of the project are discussed in Section 1.0. This phase of the project was performed under a Cooperative Agreement with US Department of Energy and has produced 43 volumes of documentation. Fifteen volumes contain information of proprietary nature for patented processes and are therefore classified as Limited Access; however, twenty-eight volumes are not classified and are suitable for public dissemination. This Project Management Plan is a volume of the unclassified documentation. The other twenty-seven volumes contain comprehensive data on technical, financial, and environmental aspects of the project. Each of the four remaining project phases is presented starting with the extensive planning that will be performed and continuing through to the execution and completion of each phase. The major roles of the Operator, Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (ASFI), and the Managing Contractor are defined. Although a contract has not yet been executed with a Managing Contractor, the procedures, controls, organization and management philosophy of Bechtel Petroleum, Inc., are presented in this report as being representative of those used by contractors in the business of performing the engineering, procurement, and construction of projects of this size and complexity. The organizational structures of the Operator and the Managing Contractor are described, with designation of key project team personnel by job description and organization charts. Provisions for cost, schedule, and material control are described.

  9. Are Evaluation Activities Worth the Effort?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert V.

    The casual approach to evaluation, the interface of evaluation and research, and various approaches subsumed within evaluation are addressed, and the dimensions that determine the worth of engaging in evaluation activities are examined. Additionally, a statement about the state-of-the-art in regard to the technology of conducting evaluation…

  10. Initial Ada components evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebes, Travis

    1989-01-01

    The SAIC has the responsibility for independent test and validation of the SSE. They have been using a mathematical functions library package implemented in Ada to test the SSE IV and V process. The library package consists of elementary mathematical functions and is both machine and accuracy independent. The SSE Ada components evaluation includes code complexity metrics based on Halstead's software science metrics and McCabe's measure of cyclomatic complexity. Halstead's metrics are based on the number of operators and operands on a logical unit of code and are compiled from the number of distinct operators, distinct operands, and total number of occurrences of operators and operands. These metrics give an indication of the physical size of a program in terms of operators and operands and are used diagnostically to point to potential problems. McCabe's Cyclomatic Complexity Metrics (CCM) are compiled from flow charts transformed to equivalent directed graphs. The CCM is a measure of the total number of linearly independent paths through the code's control structure. These metrics were computed for the Ada mathematical functions library using Software Automated Verification and Validation (SAVVAS), the SSE IV and V tool. A table with selected results was shown, indicating that most of these routines are of good quality. Thresholds for the Halstead measures indicate poor quality if the length metric exceeds 260 or difficulty is greater than 190. The McCabe CCM indicated a high quality of software products.

  11. The Plus 50 Initiative Evaluation: Initiative Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), with funding from The Atlantic Philanthropies, created the Plus 50 Initiative (2008-2012). This initiative was designed to build the capacity of community colleges nationwide to develop programming that engages the plus 50 learner. This report contains: (1) An overview of the Plus 50…

  12. Energy efficiency advocacy groups: A study of selected interactive efforts and independent initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M.; English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J.

    1994-03-01

    Non-utility groups participate in a myriad of activities--initiated by themselves and others--aimed at influencing the policies and actions of utilities and their regulators related to Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) and Demand-Side Management (DSM). Some of these activities are not directed toward a particular regulatory body or utility but are designed to influence public knowledge and acceptance of IRP and DSM. Other activities involve interaction with a particular utility or regulatory body. The traditional forum for this interaction is an adversarial debate (i.e., litigation or regulatory intervention) over the merits of a utility`s plan or proposed action. However, an increasingly common forum is one in which non-utility groups and utilities cooperatively develop plans, policies, and/or programs. Arrangements of this type are referred to in this report as ``interactive efforts``. This report presents the findings derived from ten case studies of energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAG) activities to influence the use of cost-effective DSM and to promote IRP; nine of these ten cases involve some form of interactive effort and all of them also include other EEAG activities. The goal of this research is not to measure the success of individual activities of the various groups, but to glean from a collective examination of their activities an understanding of the efficacy of various types of interactive efforts and other EEAG activities and of the contextual and procedural factors that influence their outcomes.

  13. Consumer Involvement in Evaluation and Quality Assurance Efforts: Review of Current Efforts in the Field of Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashline, Melissa

    This review of the professional and programmatic literature in the field of developmental disabilities focuses on ways in which individuals with developmental disabilities and their families are becoming increasingly involved in program evaluation and quality assurance efforts. Three major movements are having an impact on this activity: state and…

  14. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory: Developing Our Human Capital FY2015

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Rebecca S.; Hawkins Erpenbeck, Heather

    2015-10-13

    This report documents the accomplishments of the Safeguards HCD Fiscal Year 2015 (FY15) Project Work Plan, highlighting LANL’s work as well as the accomplishments of our NGSI-sponsored students, graduate and postdoctoral fellows, and mid-career professionals during this past year. While fiscal year 2015 has been a year of transition in the Human Capital Development area for LANL, we are working to revitalize our efforts to promote and develop Human Capital in Safeguards and Non-proliferation and are looking forward to implementing new initiatives in the coming fiscal year and continuing to transition the knowledge of staff who have been on assignment at IAEA and Headquarters to improve our support to HCD.

  15. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report XI, Volume V. Critical review of the design basis. [Critical review

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Report XI, Technical Audit, is a compendium of research material used during the Initial Effort in making engineering comparisons and decisions. Volumes 4 and 5 of Report XI present those studies which provide a Critical Review of the Design Basis. The Critical Review Report, prepared by Intercontinental Econergy Associates, Inc., summarizes findings from an extensive review of the data base for the H-Coal process design. Volume 4 presents this review and assessment, and includes supporting material; specifically, Design Data Tabulation (Appendix A), Process Flow Sheets (Appendix B), and References (Appendix C). Volume 5 is a continuation of the references of Appendix C. Studies of a proprietary nature are noted and referenced, but are not included in these volumes. They are included in the Limited Access versions of these reports and may be reviewed by properly cleared personnel in the offices of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.

  16. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report XI, Volume IV. Critical review of the design basis. [Critical review

    SciTech Connect

    1981-05-01

    Report XI, Technical Audit, is a compendium of research material used during the Initial Effort in making engineering comparisons and decisions. Volumes 4 and 5 of Report XI present those studies which provide a Critical Review of the Design Basis. The Critical Review Report, prepared by Intercontinental Econergy Associates, Inc., summarizes findings from an extensive review of the data base for the H-Coal process design. Volume 4 presents this review and assessment, and includes supporting material; specifically, Design Data Tabulation (Appendix A), Process Flow Sheets (Appendix B), and References (Appendix C). Volume 5 is a continuation of the references of Appendix C. Studies of a proprietary nature are noted and referenced, but are not included in these volumes. They are included in the Limited Access versions of these reports and may be reviewed by properly cleared personnel in the offices of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.

  17. Implications for Evaluating Multi-Component, Complex Prevention Initiatives: Taking Guidance from the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felix, Erika; Furlong, Michael; Sharkey, Jill; Osher, David

    2007-01-01

    The Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) Initiative is an ambitious and comprehensive prevention initiative to promote evidence-based practice to address school safety and the reduction of substance abuse. This article describes the history of the SS/HS initiative and the national evaluation efforts to monitor the success of the initiative. To…

  18. Procedures and Concepts of EPA's Ongoing Sensor Evaluation Efforts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research effort was to develop an understanding of what technology might prove valuable in conducting the next generation of air monitoring. Upon their discovery, such technologies were obtained in collaboration with inventors and commercial and research orga...

  19. The Medical Education Partnership Initiative: PEPFAR's effort to boost health worker education to strengthen health systems.

    PubMed

    Mullan, Fitzhugh; Frehywot, Seble; Omaswa, Francis; Sewankambo, Nelson; Talib, Zohray; Chen, Candice; Kiarie, James; Kiguli-Malwadde, Elsie

    2012-07-01

    The early success of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in delivering antiretroviral medications in poor countries unmasked the reality that many lacked sufficient health workers to dispense the drugs effectively. The 2008 reauthorization of PEPFAR embraced this challenge and committed to supporting the education and training of thousands of new health workers. In 2010 the program, with financial support from the US National Institutes of Health and administrative support from the Health Resources and Services Administration, launched the Medical Education Partnership Initiative to fund thirteen African medical schools and a US university. The US university would serve as a coordinating center to improve the quantity, quality, and retention of the schools' graduates. The program was not limited to training in the delivery of services for patients with HIV/AIDS. Rather, it was based on the principle that investment in medical education and retention would lead to health system strengthening overall. Although results are limited at this stage, this article reviews the opportunities and challenges of the first year of this major transnational medical education initiative and considers directions for future efforts and reforms, national governmental roles, and the sustainability of the program over time. PMID:22778346

  20. 34 CFR 300.301 - Initial evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Evaluations, Eligibility Determinations, Individualized Education Programs, and Educational... conduct a full and individual initial evaluation, in accordance with §§ 300.304 through 300.306, before... this part. (b) Request for initial evaluation. Consistent with the consent requirements in §...

  1. Evaluation of a State Initiative to Improve Child Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Mary A.; Riley, David A.; Adams, Diane; Edie, David

    2005-01-01

    Wisconsin's Early Childhood Excellence Initiative was a $15 million public policy effort designed in 2000 to increase child care quality for low-income children. An evaluation revealed significant improvement in classroom quality, the quality of caregiver interaction, and caregivers' beliefs about children following a complex multi-faceted…

  2. VAP Development: Initiation, Development, Evaluation, and Release

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M; Collis, Fast, J; Flynn, C; Mather, J; McFarlane, S; Monroe, J; Sivaraman, C; Xie, S

    2011-02-23

    This white paper provides a plan to formalize the evaluation of newly developed VAPs and a framework for the development of value-added products through four different stages: Initiation, Development, Evaluation, and Release.

  3. Framework for Evaluating Educational Systemic Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikegulu, T. Nelson

    This paper describes the implementation of the Holistic Systemic Evaluation (HSE), a component of an Education Systemic Initiative's strategic management. The HSE provides general guidance for the implementation and continual improvement of an Education Systemic Initiative Reform (ESIR). The implementation of the education system initiative plan:…

  4. Framework for Evaluation of Equity Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bexley, Emmaline; Harris, Kerri-Lee; James, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Framework for Evaluation of Equity Initiatives has been prepared to support the Go8 Equity Strategy. Its purpose is to assist Group of Eight (Go8) universities to evaluate the effectiveness of their equity initiatives and interventions in the context of federal policies and the distinctive missions and responsibilities of the individual Go8…

  5. Building Teacher Evaluation Systems: Learning from Leading Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspen Institute, 2011

    2011-01-01

    School systems across the country are working hard to fix broken teacher evaluation systems. This work offers the promise of regular, meaningful assessment of teacher performance. While this represents a significant advance, it is one part of a bigger picture: a teacher performance management system that links accountability, support, ongoing…

  6. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report X. Economic analysis and financial plan

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The economic evaluation presented in this volume is based upon the cost estimates developed in the Phase Zero effort and an evaluation of product market values developed by the PACE Company Engineers and Consultants, Inc. All costs and revenues have been adjusted to reflect the impact of inflation, consistent with the forecast shown in Table 2.1, Page 2-19. Tax treatment reflects expert interpretation of the tax law in effect January 1981. The Marketing Analysis section is an abstract of a detailed report prepared by the PACE Company for the Breckinridge Project. It provides the reader with an understanding of the methodology used to establish product values, and identifies and interprets the effects of key variables that impact market prices. The base case economic scenario, considered the most likely to occur, anticipates that the world economic growth, as well as that of the United States, will be substantially less than that experienced during the previous twenty years. Under the scenario, major disruptions in crude oil supply will not occur. Therefore, prices in real terms at the end of this century are projected to be slightly higher than the peak price of 1981. Domestic natural gas supplies are expected to expand as a result of deregulation and increased importation of LNG. Two alternate economic scenarios are also considered. Sensitivity analysis of both alternate economic scenarios and key project variables clearly point to the market price of crude oil as the dominant economic factor determining this project's soundness. The base case forecast is considered to be not only the most likely case but one not likely to be proven optimistic. The Financial Plan section outlines provisions and presents a plan for financial management of the project.

  7. Evaluating Whole-School Reform Efforts: A Guide for District and School Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yap, Kim; Douglas, Inge; Railsback, Jennifer; Shaughnessy, Joan; Speth, Timothy

    This guidebook offers suggestions that can help district and school staff choose an approach for evaluating school-reform efforts. It is intended to provide further evaluation assistance to education stakeholders to ensure that schools conduct evaluation of whole-school reform efforts in a way that provides valid and useful information for…

  8. Recommendations for evaluation of health care improvement initiatives.

    PubMed

    Parry, Gareth J; Carson-Stevens, Andrew; Luff, Donna F; McPherson, Marianne E; Goldmann, Donald A

    2013-01-01

    Intensive efforts are underway across the world to improve the quality of health care. It is important to use evaluation methods to identify improvement efforts that work well before they are replicated across a broad range of contexts. Evaluation methods need to provide an understanding of why an improvement initiative has or has not worked and how it can be improved in the future. However, improvement initiatives are complex, and evaluation is not always well aligned with the intent and maturity of the intervention, thus limiting the applicability of the results. We describe how initiatives can be grouped into 1 of 3 improvement phases-innovation, testing, and scale-up and spread-depending on the degree of belief in the associated interventions. We describe how many evaluation approaches often lead to a finding of no effect, consistent with what has been termed Rossi's Iron Law of Evaluation. Alternatively, we recommend that the guiding question of evaluation in health care improvement be, "How and in what contexts does a new model work or can be amended to work?" To answer this, we argue for the adoption of formative, theory-driven evaluation. Specifically, evaluations start by identifying a program theory that comprises execution and content theories. These theories should be revised as the initiative develops by applying a rapid-cycle evaluation approach, in which evaluation findings are fed back to the initiative leaders on a regular basis. We describe such evaluation strategies, accounting for the phase of improvement as well as the context and setting in which the improvement concept is being deployed. Finally, we challenge the improvement and evaluation communities to come together to refine the specific methods required so as to avoid the trap of Rossi's Iron Law. PMID:24268081

  9. 38 CFR 21.50 - Initial evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... psychologist (CP) or vocational rehabilitation counselor (VRC) will determine: (1) Whether the individual has... in the initial evaluation process. If the individual does not cooperate, the CP or VRC will...

  10. 38 CFR 21.50 - Initial evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... psychologist (CP) or vocational rehabilitation counselor (VRC) will determine: (1) Whether the individual has... in the initial evaluation process. If the individual does not cooperate, the CP or VRC will...

  11. 38 CFR 21.50 - Initial evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... psychologist (CP) or vocational rehabilitation counselor (VRC) will determine: (1) Whether the individual has... in the initial evaluation process. If the individual does not cooperate, the CP or VRC will...

  12. 38 CFR 21.50 - Initial evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... psychologist (CP) or vocational rehabilitation counselor (VRC) will determine: (1) Whether the individual has... in the initial evaluation process. If the individual does not cooperate, the CP or VRC will...

  13. 38 CFR 21.50 - Initial evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... psychologist (CP) or vocational rehabilitation counselor (VRC) will determine: (1) Whether the individual has... in the initial evaluation process. If the individual does not cooperate, the CP or VRC will...

  14. Proliferation resistance: issues, initiatives and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    The vision of a nuclear renaissance has highlighted the issue of proliferation resistance. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power may depend on the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen proliferation resistance. The GenIV International Forum (GIF) and others have devoted attention and resources to proliferation resistance. However, the hope of finding a way to make the peaceful uses of nuclear energy resistant to proliferation has reappeared again and again in the history of nuclear power with little practical consequence. The concept of proliferation resistance has usually focused on intrinsic (technological) as opposed to extrinsic (institutional) factors. However, if there are benefits that may yet be realized from reactors and other facilities designed to minimize proliferation risks, it is their coupling with effective safeguards and other nonproliferation measures that likely will be critical. Proliferation resistance has also traditionally been applied only to state threats. Although there are no technologies that can wholly eliminate the risk of proliferation by a determined state, technology can play a limited role in reducing state threats and perhaps in eliminating many non-state threats. These and other issues are not academic. They affect efforts to evaluate proliferation resistance, including the methodology developed by GIF's Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) Working Group as well as the proliferation resistance initiatives that are being pursued or may be developed in the future. This paper will offer a new framework for thinking about proliferation resistance issues, including the ways the output of the methodology could be developed to inform the decisions that states, the International Atomic Energy (IAEA) and others will have to make in order to fully realize the promise of a nuclear renaissance.

  15. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume 4. Safety and health plan

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The Safety and Health Plan recognizes the potential hazards associated with the Project and has been developed specifically to respond to these risks in a positive manner. Prevention, the primary objective of the Plan, starts with building safety controls into the process design and continues through engineering, construction, start-up, and operation of the Project facilities and equipment. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local health and safety laws, regulations, and codes throughout all Project phases is required and assured. The Plan requires that each major Project phase be thoroughly reviewed and analyzed to determine that those provisions required to assure the safety and health of all employees and the public, and to prevent property and equipment losses, have been provided. The Plan requires followup on those items or situations where corrective action needs were identified to assure that the action was taken and is effective. Emphasis is placed on loss prevention. Exhibit 1 provides a breakdown of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.'s (ASFI's) Loss Prevention Program. The Plan recognizes that the varied nature of the work is such as to require the services of skilled, trained, and responsible personnel who are aware of the hazards and know that the work can be done safely, if done correctly. Good operating practice is likewise safe operating practice. Training is provided to familiarize personnel with good operational practice, the general sequence of activities, reporting requirements, and above all, the concept that each step in the operating procedures must be successfully concluded before the following step can be safely initiated. The Plan provides for periodic review and evaluation of all safety and loss prevention activities at the plant and departmental levels.

  16. Impact of Discussion on Peer Evaluations: Perceptions of Low Achievement and Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huenecke, Todd M.; Waas, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors placed 5th-grade students into small groups of 3 in order to examine the impact of group discussion and displayed effort on children's evaluations of a low-achieving peer. Low effort by a target peer resulted in negative evaluations across attributional, affective, help-giving, and social response dimensions. Children who participated…

  17. 34 CFR 300.301 - Initial evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Initial evaluations. 300.301 Section 300.301 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Evaluations,...

  18. Early efforts to initiate the field of fiber optic smart structures at McDonnell Douglas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udd, Eric

    1998-07-01

    McDonnell Douglas began efforts on fiber optic sensor technology in 1977 that resulted directly in the development of a technology base that was used in the mid 1980s to implement fiber optic nervous systems that later would be termed fiber optic smart structures. This paper overviews some of the early history associated with this program as well as a story of how the field of fiber optic smart structures got its name.

  19. Evaluating Global Climate Change Education Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Global Climate Change Education initiative (GCCE) is a multi-site effort funded by the National Science Foundation to develop web resources. The objective of curricular modules is to improve content knowledge and change attitudes about climate change among undergraduate science students. The two-year evaluation of the project was conducted by Tim Weston from the University of Colorado. The small-scale evaluation first developed measures for attitude and content about climate change, and then administered the measures online. Analysis of results is ongoing. The evaluator wanted to know the attitudes and content knowledge of students after completing the modules, and if attitudes and content knowledge shifted from pre to post. An additional component of the evaluation focused on student understanding of specific global warming topics after completing the modules. Developing the test and survey involved reviewing existing measures, soliciting content from stakeholders in the grant, and then establishing a content framework that covered the important topics in climate change linked to project curricula. The pilot attitude measure contained fourteen agree/disagree items (I believe people should change their lifestyles to help minimize climate change), five self-assessment questions (How informed are you about the different causes of climate change? ), and wo previous experience questions about previous science courses taken, and actions related to climate change. The content measure contained 10 multiple-choice items asking about changes in global average temperature, the scientific methods of climate change, and the primary countries and human activities responsible for climate change. Questions were designed to reflect a mixture of general science literacy about climate change and more specific content related knowledge taught in the curricula. Both content and attitude measures were piloted with students, who answered questions using a think-aloud" interview

  20. The Evaluation of Large Research Initiatives: A Participatory Integrative Mixed-Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trochim, William M.; Marcus, Stephen E.; Masse, Louise C.; Moser, Richard P.; Weld, Patrick C.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few decades there has been a rise in the number of federally funded large scientific research initiatives, with increased calls to evaluate their processes and outcomes. This article describes efforts to evaluate such initiatives in one agency within the U.S. federal government. The authors introduce the Evaluation of Large…

  1. Strategy for Extensible, Evolving Terminology for the Materials Genome Initiative Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Talapady N.; Bartolo, Laura M.; Kattner, Ursula R.; Campbell, Carelyn E.; Elliott, John T.

    2015-08-01

    Intuitive, flexible, and evolving terminology plays a significant role in capitalizing on recommended knowledge representation models for materials engineering applications. In this article, we present a proposed rules-based approach with initial examples from a growing corpus of materials terms in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Materials Data Repository. Our method aims to establish a common, consistent, and evolving set of rules for creating or extending terminology as needed to describe materials data. The rules are intended to be simple and generalizable for users to understand and extend as well as for groups to apply to their own repositories. The rules generate terms that facilitate machine processing and decision making.

  2. Sexual assault training in the military: evaluating efforts to end the "invisible war".

    PubMed

    Holland, Kathryn J; Rabelo, Verónica Caridad; Cortina, Lilia M

    2014-12-01

    Sexual assault is an insidious problem in the United States military. In 2005 the Department of Defense (DoD) created the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office, which centralizes responsibility for sexual assault training. However, this training initiative has undergone little evaluation by outside researchers. Addressing this need, we analyzed responses from over 24,000 active duty personnel who completed the 2010 DoD Workplace and Gender Relations Survey. We assessed whether sexual assault training exposure (None, Minimal, Partial, or Comprehensive) predicted accurate knowledge of sexual assault resources and protocols. Using a social-ecological framework, we investigated whether institutional and individual factors influenced Service members' training exposure and judgment of training effectiveness. According to our results, exposure to comprehensive training predicted lower sexual assault incidence and superior knowledge. However, comprehensive training differed as a function of military branch, rank, gender, and sexual assault history. Judgments of training effectiveness also varied across these dimensions. Our results highlight the importance of considering context, gender, and victimization history when evaluating institutional efforts to end sexual violence. The DoD's 2010 annual report on military sexual assault concluded that "most Active Duty members receive effective training on sexual assault" (p. 104). Our results cast doubt on that assertion. PMID:25183207

  3. Evaluation of Electromyographic Frequency Domain Changes during a Three-Minute Maximal Effort Cycling Test

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ran; Fukuda, David H.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Robinson, Edward H.; Miramonti, Amelia A.; Fragala, Maren S.; Hoffman, Jay R.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the time course of EMG frequency changes during a three-minute maximal effort cycling test (3MT) session and to examine which parameter between mean (MNF) and median (MDF) frequency is more suitable for evaluation of changes in neuromuscular function throughout a 3MT. Eighteen recreationally-active men volunteered to participate in this study. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) was measured using a dynamometer to determine maximal EMG frequency of the vastus lateralis (VL) of the kicking leg during isometric knee extension. A maximal oxygen consumption test (VO2peak) on a cycle ergometer was performed to establish the appropriate load profile for the 3MT which was completed after a period of at least 48 hours. MNF, MDF and power output (PO) values were measured at 10-second epochs throughout the duration of the 3MT. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare the changes in EMG frequency, relative to maximal values from the MVC, and change in PO during the testing procedure. MNF, Root Mean Square (RMS), and PO significantly decreased during the 3MT, while MDF did not change significantly. Statistically, EMG frequency and PO decreased at first and remained constant in response to the 3MT, which may be reflective of differing patterns of muscle fiber type fatigue throughout the testing session. Due to decreased variability, changes in neuromuscular function during this protocol may be better evaluated using MNF than MDF. Key points EMG frequency decreased initially and remained constant in response to all-out cycling test. The change in EMG frequency and power output were similar during all-out cycling test. MNF may be better than MDF for neuromuscular function evaluation during all-out cycling test due to decreased variability. PMID:25983596

  4. Evaluation of Electromyographic Frequency Domain Changes during a Three-Minute Maximal Effort Cycling Test.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Robinson, Edward H; Miramonti, Amelia A; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the time course of EMG frequency changes during a three-minute maximal effort cycling test (3MT) session and to examine which parameter between mean (MNF) and median (MDF) frequency is more suitable for evaluation of changes in neuromuscular function throughout a 3MT. Eighteen recreationally-active men volunteered to participate in this study. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) was measured using a dynamometer to determine maximal EMG frequency of the vastus lateralis (VL) of the kicking leg during isometric knee extension. A maximal oxygen consumption test (VO2peak) on a cycle ergometer was performed to establish the appropriate load profile for the 3MT which was completed after a period of at least 48 hours. MNF, MDF and power output (PO) values were measured at 10-second epochs throughout the duration of the 3MT. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare the changes in EMG frequency, relative to maximal values from the MVC, and change in PO during the testing procedure. MNF, Root Mean Square (RMS), and PO significantly decreased during the 3MT, while MDF did not change significantly. Statistically, EMG frequency and PO decreased at first and remained constant in response to the 3MT, which may be reflective of differing patterns of muscle fiber type fatigue throughout the testing session. Due to decreased variability, changes in neuromuscular function during this protocol may be better evaluated using MNF than MDF. Key pointsEMG frequency decreased initially and remained constant in response to all-out cycling test.The change in EMG frequency and power output were similar during all-out cycling test.MNF may be better than MDF for neuromuscular function evaluation during all-out cycling test due to decreased variability. PMID:25983596

  5. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume III. Cultural resource assessment socioeconomic background data

    SciTech Connect

    Macfarlane, Heather; Janzen, Donald E.

    1980-11-26

    This report has been prepared in conjunction with an environmental baseline study for a commercial coal conversion facility being conducted by Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (ASFI) and Airco Energy Company (AECO). This report represents a cultural resource assessment for the proposed plant site and two potential solid waste disposal areas. This assessment presents data collected by Dames and Moore during a recent archaeological reconnaissance of the unsurveyed southeastern portion of the proposed plant site and two potential solid waste disposal areas. Also, results of two previous surveys on the northern and southwestern portion of the plant site for American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO) and Kentucky Utilities are included. The Dames and Moore survey of the southeastern portion of the plant site identified one archaeological site, three standing structures and one historic cemetery. In addition 47 archaeological sites and six standing structures are known from two previous surveys of the remainder of the plant site (Cowan 1975 and Turnbow et al 1980). Eleven of the previously recorded archaeological sites were recommended for further assessment to evaluate their potential for inclusion within the Holt Bottoms Archaeological District currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. None of the archaeological sites or standing structures located within the plant site during the Dames and Moore survey were recommended for further assessment. A total of eight archaeological sites were located during the Dames and Moore survey of the two potential solid waste disposal areas. Of this total only two sites were recommended for further assessment. Also, one previously unknown historic cemetry was located in the southernmost potential waste disposal area.

  6. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume II. Environmental baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (ASFI) and Airco Energy Company, Inc. (AECI) have recently formed the Breckinridge Project and are currently conducting a process and economic feasibility study of a commercial scale facility to produce synthetic liquid fuels from coal. The coal conversion process to be used is the H-COAL process, which is in the pilot plant testing stage under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at the H-COAL Pilot Plant Project near Catlettsburg, Kentucky. The preliminary plans for the commercial plant are for a 18,140 metric ton/day (24,000 ton/day) nominal coal assumption capacity utilizing the abundant high sulfur Western Kentucky coals. The Western Kentucky area offers a source of the coal along with adequate water, power, labor, transportation and other factors critical to the successful siting of a plant. Various studies by federal and state governments, as well as private industry, have reached similar conclusions regarding the suitability of such plant sites in western Kentucky. Of the many individual sites evaluated, a site in Breckinridge County, Kentucky, approximately 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) west of the town of Stephensport, has been identified as the plant location. Actions have been taken to obtain options to insure that this site will be available when needed. This report contains an overview of the regional setting and results of the baseline environmental studies. These studies include collection of data on ambient air and water quality, sound, aquatic and terrestrial biology and geology. This report contains the following chapters; introduction, review of significant findings, ambient air quality monitoring, sound, aquatic ecology, vegetation, wildlife, geology, soils, surface water, and ground water.

  7. Recommended Resources for Planning to Evaluate Program Improvement Efforts (Including the SSIP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Systemic Improvement at WestEd, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a list of recommended existing resources for state Part C and Part B 619 staff and technical assistance (TA) providers to utilize to support evaluation planning for program improvement efforts (including the State Systemic Improvement Plan, SSIP). There are many resources available related to evaluation and evaluation…

  8. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The project cogeneration plant supplies electric power, process steam and treated boiler feedwater for use by the project plants. The plant consists of multiple turbine generators and steam generators connected to a common main steam header. The major plant systems which are required to produce steam, electrical power and treated feedwater are discussed individually. The systems are: steam, steam generator, steam generator fuel, condensate and feedwater deaeration, condensate and blowdown collection, cooling water, boiler feedwater treatment, coal handling, ash handling (fly ash and bottom ash), electrical, and control system. The plant description is based on the Phase Zero design basis established for Plant 31 in July of 1980 and the steam/condensate balance as presented on Drawing 31-E-B-1. Updating of steam requirements as more refined process information becomes available has generated some changes in the steam balance. Boiler operation with these updated requirements is reflected on Drawing 31-D-B-1A. The major impact of updating has been that less 600 psig steam generated within the process units requires more extraction steam from the turbine generators to close the 600 psig steam balance. Since the 900 psig steam generation from the boilers was fixed at 1,200,000 lb/hr, the additional extraction steam required to close the 600 psig steam balance decreased the quantity of electrical power available from the turbine generators. In the next phase of engineering work, the production of 600 psig steam will be augmented by increasing convection bank steam generation in the Plant 3 fired heaters by 140,000 to 150,000 lb/hr. This modification will allow full rated power generation from the turbine generators.

  9. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Report IV, Volume 4, provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to the Gas Plant (Plant 7). The Gas Plant (Plant 7) receives feed gas streams from various process plants. The Gas Plant compresses, treats, and fractionates the gas streams into intermediate and final products. The following information is included for the plant described in this volume: a description of the plant's process design, including the utility balance, catalysts and chemicals usage, and process flow diagrams; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for the piping and instrument diagrams included in this volume.

  10. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Report IV, Volume 6 provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to Gasification and Purification (Plant 12). Gasification and Purification (Plant 12) produces makeup hydrogen for H-COAL Preheating and Reaction (Plant 3), and produces a medium Btu fuel gas for consumption in fired heaters. The following information is included: a description of the plant's process design, including the utility balance, catalysts and chemicals usage, and a process flow diagram; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for the piping and instrument diagrams included in this volume. Gasification and Purification (Plant 12) utilizes process technology from three licensors: gasification of vacuum bottoms using the Texaco process, shift conversion using the Haldor Topsoe process, and purification of fuel gas and shifted gas using the Allied Chemical Selexol process. This licensed technology is proprietary in nature. As a result, this volume does not contain full disclosure of these processes although a maximum of information has been presented consistent with the confidentiality requirements. Where data appears incomplete in this volume, it is due to the above described limitations. Full data concerning this plant are available for DOE review at the Houston offices of Bechtel Petroleum, Inc.

  11. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Report IV, Volume 3, provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to H-COAL Recycle Slurry Preparation (Plant 5), H-COAL Recycle Hydrogen Compression (Plant 6), and H-COAL Distillate Separation (Plant 17). H-COAL Recycle Slurry Preparation (Plant 5) receives a slurry stream from H-COAL Primary Separation (Plant 4), and then pumps the slurry through hydrocyclones, producing two slurry streams. One, dilute in solids is recycled back to the reactor. The other, concentrated in solids, is further processed to recover liquid products and is then transferred to Gasification and Purification (Plant 12). H-COAL Recycle Hydrogen Compression (Plant 6) compresses and recycles back to the reactor system hydrogen-rich vapor from H-COAL Primary Separation (Plant 4). This recycling maintains a hydrogen partial pressure and gas flow through the reactor vessel. H-COAL Distillate Separation (Plant 17) processes products from H-COAL Primary Separation (Plant 4) and H-COAL Recycle Slurry Preparation to produce light naphtha for the Gas Plant (Plant 7), middle and heavy distillates for tank farms, and heavy naphtha for Naphtha Hydrotreating and Reforming (Plant 18). The following information is included for each of the three plants: a description of the plant's process design, including the utility balance, heat and material balance (if applicable), and a process flow diagram; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for the piping and instrument diagrams included in this volume.

  12. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Report V, Volume 4 provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to Instrument and Plant Air Systems (Plant 36), Telecommunication Systems (Plant 37), Inert Gas Systems (Plant 38), Purge and Flush Oil Systems (Plant 39), Site Development and Roads (Plant 40), Buildings (Plant 41), Solid Waste Management (Plant 42), and Landfill (Plant 44). Instrument and Plant Air Systems (Plant 36) includes all equipment and piping necessary to supply instrument and utility air to the process plants and offsite facilities. Telecommunication Systems (Plant 37) includes the equipment and wiring for: communication throughout the facility; communication between plant data processing systems and offsite computing facilities; and communication with transportation carriers. Inert Gas Systems (Plant 38) provides high purity and low purity nitrogen streams for plant startup and normal operation. Purge and Flush Oil Systems (Plant 39) provides purge and flush oils to various plants. Site Development and Roads (Plant 40) provides site leveling, the addition of roads, fencing, and drainage, and the placement of fills, pilings, footings, and foundations for plants. Buildings (Plant 41) provides buildings for equipment and for personnel, including utilities, lighting, sanitary facilities, heating, air conditioning, and ventilation. Solid Waste Management (Plant 42) identifies, characterizes, segregates, and transports the various types of solid wastes to either Landfill (Plant 44) or outside disposal sites. Landfill (Plant 44) provides disposal of both nonhazardous and hazardous solid wastes. Information is included (as applicable) for each of the eight plants described.

  13. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Report V, Volume 1 provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to Flare System (Plant 19), Tankage (Plant 20), Interconnecting Piping (Plant 21), River Facilities (Plant 22), Rail, Truck, Pipeline (Plant 23), and Electrical Distribution (Plant 30). Flare System (Plant 19) provides primary and auxiliary flare systems for safe collection and disposal of overpressure relief discharges, and operational and emergency venting of flammable vapors and liquids from the various processing plants and loading facilities. Tankage (Plant 20) provides storage for propane and heavier liquid hydrocarbon products, as well as for by-product ammonia, phenols, and liquid sulfur. Interconnecting Piping (Plant 21) includes the fuel gas blending and distribution system and the interconnecting process and utility piping between process plants and offsites. River Facilities (Plant 22) provides the loading of liquid products and by-products into barges for marine surface transportation, and the unloading of coal from barges. Rail, Truck, Pipeline (Plant 23) provides loading and unloading of products shipped by either rail or truck. Electrical Distribution (Plant 30) receives main utility power from the Big River Electric Corporation and distributes the power to the other plants. The following information is included for each of the six plants: a description of the plant's design, including the utility balance, catalysts and chemicals usage, and process flow diagrams, as applicable; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for piping and instrument diagrams.

  14. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Report IV, Volume 7 provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to the Oxygen Plant (Plant 15) and Naphtha Hydrotreating and Reforming (Plant 18). The Oxygen Plant (Plant 15) utilizes low-pressure air separation to manufacture the oxygen required in Gasification and Purification (Plant 12). The Oxygen Plant also supplies nitrogen as needed by the H-COAL process. Naphtha Hydrotreating and Reforming (Plant 18) upgrades the raw H-COAL naphtha. The following information is provided for both plants described in this volume: a description of the plant's process design, including the utility balance, catalysts and chemicals usage, and process flow diagrams; an equipment list including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components (Oxygen Plant only); and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for the piping and instrument diagrams included in this volume.

  15. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Report IV, Volume 5, provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to Cryogenic Hydrogen Purification (Plant 8), Sour Water Treating (Plant 9), and the Sulfur Plant (Plant 10). Cryogenic Hydrogen Purification (Plant 8) purifies the purge gas stream from the Gas Plant (Plant 7, described in Report IV, Volume 4) to a 93% purity hydrogen product. Sour Water Treating (Plant 9) removes free ammonia and acid gases from sour water and separates them to recover a high quality anhydrous ammonia product. The Sulfur Plant (Plant 10) recovers, as a saleable liquid product, approximately 95% of the sulfur in feed streams from the Gas Plant (Plant 7, described in Report IV, Volume 4), Sour Water Treating (Plant 9), Gasification and Purification (Plant 12, described in Report IV, Volume 6), and Stack Gas Scrubbing (Plant 35, described in Report V, Volume 3). The following information is included for each of the three plants described in this volume: a description of the plant's process design, including the utility balance, catalysts and chemicals usage, and a process flow diagram; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for the piping and instrument diagrams included in this volume.

  16. Marine debris removal: one year of effort by the Georgia Sea Turtle-Center-Marine Debris Initiative.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeannie Miller

    2013-09-15

    Once in the marine environment, debris poses a significant threat to marine life that can be prevented through the help of citizen science. Marine debris is any manufactured item that enters the ocean regardless of source, commonly plastics, metal, wood, glass, foam, cloth, or rubber. Citizen science is an effective way to engage volunteers in conservation initiatives and provide education and skill development. The Georgia Sea Turtle Center Marine Debris Initiative (GSTC-MDI) is a grant funded program developed to engage citizens in the removal of marine debris from the beaches of Jekyll Island, GA, USA and the surrounding areas. During the first year of effort, more than 200 volunteers donated over 460 h of service to the removal of marine debris. Of the debris removed, approximately 89% were plastics, with a significant portion being cigarette materials. Given the successful first year, the GSTC-MDI was funded again for a second year. PMID:23891032

  17. Initial laboratory evaluation of color video cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P L

    1991-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video cameras used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than identify an intruder. Monochrome cameras are adequate for that application and were selected over color cameras because of their greater sensitivity and resolution. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Color information is useful for identification purposes, and color camera technology is rapidly changing. Thus, Sandia National Laboratories established an ongoing program to evaluate color solid-state cameras. Phase one resulted in the publishing of a report titled, Initial Laboratory Evaluation of Color Video Cameras (SAND--91-2579).'' It gave a brief discussion of imager chips and color cameras and monitors, described the camera selection, detailed traditional test parameters and procedures, and gave the results of the evaluation of twelve cameras. In phase two six additional cameras were tested by the traditional methods and all eighteen cameras were tested by newly developed methods. This report details both the traditional and newly developed test parameters and procedures, and gives the results of both evaluations.

  18. Initial laboratory evaluation of color video cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, P. L.

    1991-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video cameras used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than identify an intruder. Monochrome cameras are adequate for that application and were selected over color cameras because of their greater sensitivity and resolution. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Color information is useful for identification purposes, and color camera technology is rapidly changing. Thus, Sandia National Laboratories established an ongoing program to evaluate color solid-state cameras. Phase one resulted in the publishing of a report titled, 'Initial Laboratory Evaluation of Color Video Cameras (SAND--91-2579).' It gave a brief discussion of imager chips and color cameras and monitors, described the camera selection, detailed traditional test parameters and procedures, and gave the results of the evaluation of twelve cameras. In phase two, six additional cameras were tested by the traditional methods and all eighteen cameras were tested by newly developed methods. This report details both the traditional and newly developed test parameters and procedures, and gives the results of both evaluations.

  19. Testing the mere effort account of the evaluation-performance relationship.

    PubMed

    McFall, Sametria R; Jamieson, Jeremy P; Harkins, Stephen G

    2009-01-01

    Research traditions in psychology in which the evaluation-performance relationship was examined do not show agreement on the mediating process, nor is there any compelling evidence that favors one account over the others. On the basis of a molecular analysis of performance on the Remote Associates Test (RAT), Harkins (2006) argued that the potential for evaluation motivates participants to perform well, which potentiates prepotent responses. If the prepotent response is correct, performance is facilitated. If the prepotent response is incorrect, and participants do not know, or if they lack the knowledge or time required for correction, performance is debilitated. The present research pits this mere effort account against 4 other potential explanations (withdrawal of effort, processing interference, focus of attention, and drive) on 3 tasks that were specifically selected for this purpose (anagram solution, the Stroop Color-Word task, and the antisaccade task). In each case, the results are consistent with the mere effort account. PMID:19210071

  20. Addressing Hate Crimes: Six Initiatives That Are Enhancing the Efforts of Criminal Justice Practitioners. Hate Crimes Series. Bureau of Justice Assistance Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessler, Stephen

    This publication focuses on initiatives that are designed to address hate crimes by enhancing efforts of the criminal justice system. After discussing the pivotal role of law enforcement in this effort, the paper describes six Bureau of Justice Assistance-funded initiatives, which include: the International Association of Chiefs of Police Summit:…

  1. Education Dept. Reports on Desegregation but Includes No Evaluation of State Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaschik, Scott

    1987-01-01

    Department of Education issuance of reports on the status of 10 states' court-ordered college desegregation without any evaluation of the states' efforts has disappointed civil-rights activists. The unexpected release of the reports was due in part to the threat of Congressional subpoena of the information. (MSE)

  2. Evaluating College Science and Mathematics Instruction: A Reform Effort That Improves Teaching Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Anton; Benford, Russell; Bloom, Irene; Carlson, Marilyn; Falconer, Kathleen; Hestenes, David; Judson, Eugene; Piburn, Michael; Sawada, Daiyo; Turley, Jeff; Wyckoff, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Reports evaluative data on five courses that have taken part in a curriculum reform effort called the Arizona Collaborative for Excellence in the Preparation of Teachers (ACEPT). Discusses the effects of those teaching reforms on substantial improvements in student achievement. Includes principles of effective teaching, reformed teaching…

  3. Teacher Self-Evaluation of Renewal Efforts of Their Teaching Practices To Improve Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fountain, Cheryl; Drummond, Robert J.; Senterfitt, Heather D.

    This study evaluated how teachers perceived their efforts to improve their teaching practices by participating in the Jacksonville Urban Educational Partnership (JUEP), a Professional Development School (PDS). The JUEP was designed to create sustained, high quality, professional development systems for inservice educators in three PDSs. The study…

  4. Evaluating rehabilitation efforts following the Milford Flat Fire: successes, failures, and controlling factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duniway, Michael C.; Palmquist, Emily C.; Miller, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled wildfire in arid and semiarid ecosystems has become an increasing concern in recent decades. Active rehabilitation of fire-affected areas is often quickly initiated to minimize long-term ecosystem damage. However, the complex soil-geomorphic-vegetation patterns and low and variable moisture conditions in these regions makes restoration challenging. To further inform these post-fire management decisions, we present results from 5 years of vegetation and sediment flux monitoring following the Milford Flat Fire in west-central Utah, USA. Our sampling design includes monitoring plots in areas not burned, areas burned but where no rehabilitation was attempted, and burned areas where various rehabilitation approaches were implemented. At each of the 25 plots, vegetation cover and composition data were collected annually, and wind-driven sediment flux was measured using passive dust traps. To evaluate effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in establishing desired species and limiting dominance of undesired species, we analyzed the temporal response of individual species and functional groups as well as community-level multivariate responses. The warm and dry conditions that persisted for approximately 12 months post-treatment, coupled with the surface disturbing rehabilitation approaches used, resulted in near-surface dust fluxes several orders of magnitude higher in treated areas than in unburned or burned areas where no rehabilitation occurred. These dry conditions and high surface sediment flux limited the establishment of seeded species in rehabilitation areas for nearly 3 years. Post-fire rehabilitation did not limit dominance by invasive annual species of concern. Perennial species composition in the areas burned but not subject to post-fire rehabilitation was relatively similar to unburned throughout the study period. In contrast, the burned plots where rehabilitation was attempted were characterized by no (<3%) perennial cover or, in

  5. Effort-Based Decision Making in Schizophrenia: Evaluation of Paradigms to Measure Motivational Deficits.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael F; Horan, William P

    2015-09-01

    Effort-based decision making requires one to decide how much effort to expend for a certain amount of reward. As the amount of reward goes up most people are willing to exert more effort. This relationship between reward level and effort expenditure can be measured in specialized performance-based tasks that have only recently been applied to schizophrenia. Such tasks provide a way to measure objectively motivational deficits in schizophrenia, which now are only assessed with clinical interviews of negative symptoms. The articles in this theme provide reviews of the relevant animal and human literatures (first 2 articles), and then a psychometric evaluation of 5 effort-based decision making paradigms (last 2 articles). This theme section is intended to stimulate interest in this emerging area among basic scientists developing paradigms for preclinical studies, human experimentalists trying to disentangle factors that contribute to performance on effort-based tasks, and investigators looking for objective endpoints for clinical trials of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:26108868

  6. An Evaluation of Preference for Mode of Instruction Following Variations in Response Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romani, Patrick W.; McCoy, Thomasin E.; Wacker, David P.; Padilla-Dalmau, Yaniz C.

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated preference for mode of instruction (i.e., visual or vocal) for four children diagnosed with a language-based learning disability. Each participant was an elementary student who was initially referred to a neuropsychology clinic specializing in learning disabilities. As a part of the evaluation, measures of each…

  7. CRIMALDDI: a co-ordinated, rational, and integrated effort to set logical priorities in anti-malarial drug discovery initiatives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Despite increasing efforts and support for anti-malarial drug R&D, globally anti-malarial drug discovery and development remains largely uncoordinated and fragmented. The current window of opportunity for large scale funding of R&D into malaria is likely to narrow in the coming decade due to a contraction in available resources caused by the current economic difficulties and new priorities (e.g. climate change). It is, therefore, essential that stakeholders are given well-articulated action plans and priorities to guide judgments on where resources can be best targeted. The CRIMALDDI Consortium (a European Union funded initiative) has been set up to develop, through a process of stakeholder and expert consultations, such priorities and recommendations to address them. It is hoped that the recommendations will help to guide the priorities of the European anti-malarial research as well as the wider global discovery agenda in the coming decade. PMID:20626844

  8. Swimming upstream: the challenges and rewards of evaluating efforts to address inequities and reduce health disparities.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Dana; Docto, Lindsay; Peters, Jessica; Lamb, Anne Kelsey; Brindis, Claire

    2013-06-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in the health of Americans are widespread and persistent in the United States despite improvements in the health of Americans overall. Increasingly, strategies for reducing disparities have focused on addressing the factors that contribute to - if not fundamentally underlie - health disparities: social, economic, and environmental inequities, which limit access to resources and cause unhealthy exposures. As public health shifts to interventions that seek to improve the circumstances of disproportionately affected populations and achieve equity through policy change, alternative methods to evaluate these efforts are also required. This paper presents an example of such approaches to addressing asthma disparities through Regional Asthma Management and Prevention's (RAMP) programmatic efforts and an evaluation of these activities. The paper describes RAMP's targets and strategies, as well as the specific evaluation methods applied to each, including activity tracking, observations, surveys, key informant interviews, and case studies. Preliminary evaluation findings are presented, as are lessons learned about the efficacy of the evaluation design features - both its strengths and shortcomings. Findings discussed are intended to contribute to the growing literature that provides evidence for the application of emerging approaches to evaluation that reflect non-traditional public health and support others interested in expanding or replicating this work. PMID:23416287

  9. Evaluation and interpretation of the effects of environmental enrichment utilizing varying degrees of sampling effort.

    PubMed

    Quirke, Thomas; O'Riordan, Ruth M

    2013-01-01

    Documenting the effects of novel forms of enrichment is becoming increasingly important within the field of environmental enrichment. Appropriate documentation and evaluation must accompany any enrichment research project in order for accurate results to be obtained. The objective of the present study was to provide an example of how the level of effort in documenting the effect of enrichment is linked to how it is evaluated. This study was carried out on eight cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) at Fota Wildlife Park, Ireland. Temporal feeding variation was the enrichment type used during this study. Behavior data were collected in five different ways in order to simulate varying degrees of effort. Randomization tests were utilized to analyze behavior data. Significant behavioral differences were observed in the first four sampling methods with patterns of behavior remaining similar in all five methods. However, only the most time intensive method concurred with findings previously published utilizing this form of enrichment. No significant differences in behavior were detected when the least time intensive method was used. Between 1 and 2 hr of data collection daily is necessary to evaluate temporal feeding variation accurately. However, 30-45 min of data collection also gave an insight into the effectiveness of the enrichment. Methods of evaluation can influence the interpretations of the strength of the enriching effect of the treatment. Appropriate evaluation and accurate reporting of enrichment is crucial for the future development of the environmental enrichment field. PMID:22383365

  10. Design, Evaluation and Experimental Effort Toward Development of a High Strain Composite Wing for Navy Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, Joseph; Libeskind, Mark

    1990-01-01

    This design development effort addressed significant technical issues concerning the use and benefits of high strain composite wing structures (Epsilon(sub ult) = 6000 micro-in/in) for future Navy aircraft. These issues were concerned primarily with the structural integrity and durability of the innovative design concepts and manufacturing techniques which permitted a 50 percent increase in design ultimate strain level (while maintaining the same fiber/resin system) as well as damage tolerance and survivability requirements. An extensive test effort consisting of a progressive series of coupon and major element tests was an integral part of this development effort, and culminated in the design, fabrication and test of a major full-scale wing box component. The successful completion of the tests demonstrated the structural integrity, durability and benefits of the design. Low energy impact testing followed by fatigue cycling verified the damage tolerance concepts incorporated within the structure. Finally, live fire ballistic testing confirmed the survivability of the design. The potential benefits of combining newer/emerging composite materials and new or previously developed high strain wing design to maximize structural efficiency and reduce fabrication costs was the subject of subsequent preliminary design and experimental evaluation effort.

  11. Initial evaluation of automated treatment planning software.

    PubMed

    Gintz, Dawn; Latifi, Kujtim; Caudell, Jimmy; Nelms, Benjamin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Even with advanced inverse-planning techniques, radiation treatment plan opti-mization remains a very time-consuming task with great output variability, which prompted the development of more automated approaches. One commercially available technique mimics the actions of experienced human operators to pro-gressively guide the traditional optimization process with automatically created regions of interest and associated dose-volume objectives. We report on the initial evaluation of this algorithm on 10 challenging cases of locoreginally advanced head and neck cancer. All patients were treated with VMAT to 70 Gy to the gross disease and 56 Gy to the elective bilateral nodes. The results of post-treatment autoplanning (AP) were compared to the original human-driven plans (HDP). We used an objective scoring system based on defining a collection of specific dosimetric metrics and corresponding numeric score functions for each. Five AP techniques with different input dose goals were applied to all patients. The best of them averaged the composite score 8% lower than the HDP, across the patient population. The difference in median values was statistically significant at the 95% confidence level (Wilcoxon paired signed-rank test p = 0.027). This result reflects the premium the institution places on dose homogeneity, which was consistently higher with the HDPs. The OAR sparing was consistently better with the APs, the differences reaching statistical significance for the mean doses to the parotid glands (p < 0.001) and the inferior pharyngeal constrictor (p = 0.016), as well as for the maximum doses to the spinal cord (p = 0.018) and brainstem (p = 0.040). If one is prepared to accept less stringent dose homogeneity criteria from the RTOG 1016 protocol, nine APs would comply with the protocol, while providing lower OAR doses than the HDPs. Overall, AP is a promising clinical tool, but it could benefit from a better process for shifting the balance between the target dose

  12. Global threat reduction initiative efforts to address transportation challenges associated with the recovery of disused radioactive sealed sources - 10460

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, Julie; Abeyta, Cristy L; Griffin, Justin M; Matzke, James L; Pearson, Michael W; Cuthbertson, Abigail; Rawl, Richard; Singley, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Proper disposition of disused radioactive sources is essential for their safe and secure management and necessary to preclude their use in malicious activities. Without affordable, timely transportation options, disused sealed sources remain in storage at hundreds of sites throughout the country and around the world. While secure storage is a temporary measure, the longer sources remain disused or unwanted the chances increase that they will become unsecured or abandoned. The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Off-Site Source Recovery Project (GTRIlOSRP), recovers thousands of disused and unwanted sealed sources annually as part of GTRl's larger mission to reduce and protect high risk nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. Faced with decreasing availability of certified transportation containers to support movement of disused and unwanted neutron- and beta/gamma-emitting radioactive sealed sources, GTRIlOSRP has initiated actions to ensure the continued success of the project in timely recovery and management of sealed radioactive sources. Efforts described in this paper to enhance transportation capabilities include: {sm_bullet} Addition of authorized content to existing and planned Type B containers to support the movement of non-special form and other Type B-quantity sealed sources; {sm_bullet} Procurement of vendor services for the design, development, testing and certification of a new Type B container to support transportation of irradiators, teletherapy heads or sources removed from these devices using remote handling capabilities such as the IAEA portable hot cell facility; {sm_bullet} Expansion of shielded Type A container inventory for transportation of gamma-emitting sources in activity ranges requiring use of shielding for conformity with transportation requirements; {sm_bullet} Approval of the S300 Type A fissile container for transport of Pu-239 sealed sources internationally; {sm_bullet} Technology transfer of field

  13. Improving documentation of clinical care within a clinical information network: an essential initial step in efforts to understand and improve care in Kenyan hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Tuti, Timothy; Bitok, Michael; Malla, Lucas; Paton, Chris; Muinga, Naomi; Gathara, David; Gachau, Susan; Mbevi, George; Nyachiro, Wycliffe; Ogero, Morris; Julius, Thomas; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2016-01-01

    In many low income countries health information systems are poorly equipped to provide detailed information on hospital care and outcomes. Information is thus rarely used to support practice improvement. We describe efforts to tackle this challenge and to foster learning concerning collection and use of information. This could improve hospital services in Kenya. We are developing a Clinical Information Network, a collaboration spanning 14 hospitals, policy makers and researchers with the goal of improving information available on the quality of inpatient paediatric care across common childhood illnesses in Kenya. Standardised data from hospitals’ paediatric wards are collected using non-commercial and open source tools. We have implemented procedures for promoting data quality which are performed prior to a process of semi-automated analysis and routine report generation for hospitals in the network. In the first phase of the Clinical Information Network, we collected data on over 65 000 admission episodes. Despite clinicians’ initial unfamiliarity with routine performance reporting, we found that, as an initial focus, both engaging with each hospital and providing them information helped improve the quality of data and therefore reports. The process has involved mutual learning and building of trust in the data and should provide the basis for collaborative efforts to improve care, to understand patient outcome, and to evaluate interventions through shared learning. We have found that hospitals are willing to support the development of a clinically focused but geographically dispersed Clinical Information Network in a low-income setting. Such networks show considerable promise as platforms for collaborative efforts to improve care, to provide better information for decision making, and to enable locally relevant research. PMID:27398232

  14. Evaluation of the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RTI International, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) Initiative, funded by the U.S. Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Justice, is an ambitious federal effort to improve the health and well-being of children and adolescents. The Initiative focuses on integrated prevention and treatment programs, strategies, and services designed to…

  15. How Students' Perceptions of the Source of Effort Influence Their Ability Evaluations of Other Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muenks, Katherine; Miele, David B.; Wigfield, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present studies was to examine whether students' reasoning about the relation between levels of effort and ability is influenced by the perceived source of an individual's effort. Two sources of others' effort were examined: "task-elicited effort," or effort due primarily to the subjective difficulty of the task, and…

  16. The Utah Educational Technology Initiative: Evaluation Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergendoller, John R.; And Others

    This report begins with an overview of the Utah Educational Technology Initiative (ETI) that describes the state's financial commitment to educational improvement through educational technology, the ETI allocation process, the requirement that school districts and colleges of education match ETI funds with locally-generated funds or in-kind…

  17. Evaluation of Arroyo Channel Restoration Efforts using Hydrological Modeling: Rancho San Bernardino, Sonora, MX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemison, N. E.; DeLong, S.; Henderson, W. M.; Adams, J.

    2012-12-01

    In the drylands of the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico, historical river channel incision (arroyo cutting) has led to the destruction of riparian ecological systems and cieñega wetlands in many locations. Along Silver Creek on the Arizona-Sonora border, the Cuenca Los Ojos Foundation has been installing rock gabions and concrete and earthen berms with a goal of slowing flash floods, raising groundwater levels, and refilling arroyo channels with sediment in an area that changed from a broad, perennially wet cieñega to a narrow sand- and gravel-dominated arroyo channel with an average depth of ~6 m. The engineering efforts hope to restore desert wetlands, regrow riparian vegetation, and promote sediment deposition along the arroyo floor. Hydrological modeling allows us to predict how rare flood events interact with the restoration efforts and may guide future approaches to dryland ecological restoration. This modeling is complemented by detailed topographic surveying and use of streamflow sensors to monitor hydrological processes in the restoration project. We evaluate the inundation associated with model 10-, 50-, 100-, 500-, and 1,000-year floods through the study area using FLO-2D and HEC-RAS modeling environments in order to evaluate the possibility of returning surface inundation to the former cieñega surface. According to HEC-RAS model predictions, given current channel configuration, it would require a 500-year flood to overtop the channel banks and reinundate the cieñega (now terrace) surface, though the 100-year flood may lead to limited terrace surface inundation. Based on our models, 10-year floods were ~2 m from overtopping the arroyo walls, 50-year floods came ~1.5 m from overtopping the arroyos, 100-year floods were ~1.2 m from overtopping, and 500- and 1,000-year floods at least partially inundated the cieñega surface. The current topography of Silver Creek does not allow for frequent flooding of the former cieñega; model predictions

  18. 76 FR 9329 - Efficiency Initiative Effort To Reduce Non-Value-Added Costs Imposed on Industry by Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ...) Dr. Ashton Carter, dated September 14, 2010, Memorandum to Acquisition Professionals, DoD is... first stage of Undersecretary Carter's Better Buying Power Initiative. Many of these suggestions were... Undersecretary Carter's Efficiency Initiative. Trade secrets and commercial or financial information...

  19. Focusing on the Whole Student: An Evaluation of Massachusetts' Wraparound Zones Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandhi, Allison Gruner; Slama, Rachel; Park, So Jung

    2016-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, efforts to turn around low-performing schools have increasingly become a central component of federal and state education policy agendas. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the impact of the Wraparound Zones Initiative (WAZ), a program supported by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education…

  20. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  1. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  2. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  3. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  4. 40 CFR 8.7 - Initial environmental evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Initial environmental evaluation. 8.7 Section 8.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF NONGOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES IN ANTARCTICA § 8.7 Initial environmental evaluation. (a) Submission of IEE to the EPA. Unless a PERM has...

  5. 40 CFR 8.7 - Initial environmental evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Initial environmental evaluation. 8.7 Section 8.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF NONGOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES IN ANTARCTICA § 8.7 Initial environmental evaluation. (a)...

  6. 40 CFR 8.7 - Initial environmental evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Initial environmental evaluation. 8.7 Section 8.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF NONGOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES IN ANTARCTICA § 8.7 Initial environmental evaluation. (a) Submission of IEE to the EPA. Unless a PERM has...

  7. 40 CFR 8.7 - Initial environmental evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Initial environmental evaluation. 8.7 Section 8.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF NONGOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES IN ANTARCTICA § 8.7 Initial environmental evaluation. (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 8.7 - Initial environmental evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Initial environmental evaluation. 8.7 Section 8.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF NONGOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES IN ANTARCTICA § 8.7 Initial environmental evaluation. (a)...

  9. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... Bureau institution considered medically appropriate, or to a community hospital....

  10. Does degree of alteration in effort sense caused by eccentric exercise significantly affect initial exercise hyperpnea in humans?

    PubMed

    Hotta, Norio; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Ogata, Hisayoshi; Maher, Patrick; Okumura, Naoya; Ishida, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown an exaggeration in exercise hyperpnea 2 days after eccentric exercise (ECC). Enhancement in central command has been suggested as one candidate to account for this effect given that ECC-induced neuromuscular dysfunction increases relative exercise intensity, thus resulting in reinforcement of effort sense. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to elucidate whether the degree of alteration in effort sense caused by ECC affects exercise hyperpnea. Ten subjects performed 20-s single-arm extension-flexion exercises with weight strapped to the wrist, and ventilatory response was measured before (Pre) and 2 days after ECC (D2). Relative exercise intensity at Pre was 5 % of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of Pre, whereas that at D2 was 9 % MVC of D2 because of decline in muscle strength. Ventilatory responses were significantly exaggerated at D2 with a significant increase in effort sense. Although effort sense was significantly reduced during exercise at D2 when wrist weight was subtracted to match relative exercise intensity at Pre (5 % MVC of D2), ventilatory responses were still significantly higher than those of Pre. After the disappearance of post-ECC muscle damage, subjects performed the same exercise with weight added (9 % MVC of Pre) so that effort was equalized to match that of D2; however, no significant increase in ventilatory response was detected. The fact that the extent of change in effort sense caused by ECC-induced neuromuscular dysfunction did not affect ventilatory response at the onset of exercise after ECC may suggest that the exaggeration of ventilatory response after ECC is caused by mechanisms other than alteration of the central command. PMID:27558395

  11. Evaluating the benefits of risk prevention initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, G.

    2012-04-01

    The likelihood and adverse impacts of water-related disasters, such as floods and landslides, are increasing in many countries because of changes in climate and land-use. This presentation illustrates some preliminary results of a comprehensive demonstration of the benefits of risk prevention measures, carried out within the European FP7 KULTURisk project. The study is performed by using a variety of case studies characterised by diverse socio-economic contexts, different types of water-related hazards (floods, debris flows and landslides, storm surges) and space-time scales. In particular, the benefits of state-of-the-art prevention initiatives, such as early warning systems, non-structural options (e.g. mapping and planning), risk transfer strategies (e.g. insurance policy), and structural measures, are showed. Lastly, the importance of homogenising criteria to create hazard inventories and build memory, efficient risk communication and warning methods as well as active dialogue with and between public and private stakeholders, is highlighted.

  12. The evaluation of insufficient cognitive effort in schizophrenia in light of low IQ scores.

    PubMed

    Whearty, Kayla M; Allen, Daniel N; Lee, Bern G; Strauss, Gregory P

    2015-09-01

    Low IQ has recently been shown to predict neuropsychological effort test failure in healthy and neurological populations. Although low IQ is common in schizophrenia (SZ), its effect on effort test performance remains unclear in this population. The current study examined the role of IQ in effort test performance in a sample of 60 outpatients with SZ and 30 demographically matched healthy controls (CN). Participants were administered a battery of neuropsychological tests, and insufficient effort was calculated using two embedded effort indices: the Reliable Digit Span Effort Index and the Finger Tapping Effort Index. Results indicated that 16.1% of SZ patients and 0% CN failed both effort measures and that 32.1% of SZ and 3.3% of CN failed one measure. In SZ, IQ in the <70 or 70-79 range was associated with the highest rates of falling below the effort cut-off scores; however, patients with IQs in the low-average or higher range (>80) did not fall below effort cut-offs. Findings suggest that low IQ is a significant predictor of insufficient effort during neuropsychological test performance in schizophrenia, calling into question the validity of neuropsychological effort testing in SZ patients with low IQ. PMID:26026486

  13. Summary of results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s vehicle evaluation data collection efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, P.; Kelly, K.; Motta, R.; Broderick, J.

    1996-05-01

    The U.S. DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a data collection project for light-duty, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) for about 4 years. The project has collected data on 10 vehicle models (from the original equipment manufacturers) spanning model years 1991 through 1995. Emissions data have also been collected from a number of vehicles converted to natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most of the vehicles involved in the data collection and evaluation are part of the General Services Administration`s fleet of AFVs. This evaluation effort addressed the performance and reliability, fuel economy, and emissions of light- duty AFVs, with comparisons to similar gasoline vehicles when possible. Driver-reported complaints and unscheduled vehicle repairs were used to assess the performance and reliability of the AFVs compared to the comparable gasoline vehicles. Two sources of fuel economy were available, one from testing of vehicles on a chassis dynamometer, and the other from records of in-service fuel use. This report includes results from emissions testing completed on 169 AFVs and 161 gasoline control vehicles.

  14. Diode laser prostatectomy (VLAP): initial canine evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopchok, George E.; Verbin, Chris; Ayres, Bruce; Peng, Shi-Kaung; White, Rodney A.

    1995-05-01

    This study evaluated the acute and chronic effects of diode laser (960 nm) prostatectomy using a Prolase II fiber in a canine model (n equals 5). The laser fiber consists of a 1000 um quartz fiber which reflects a cone of laser energy, at 45 degree(s) to the axis of the fiber, into the prostatic urethra (Visual Laser Ablation of Prostate). Perineal access was used to guide a 15.5 Fr cystoscope to the level of the prostate. Under visual guidance and continual saline irrigation, 60 watts of laser power was delivered for 60 seconds at 3, 9, and 12 o'clock and 30 seconds at the 6 o'clock (posterior) positions for a total energy fluence of 12,600 J. One prostate received an additional 60 second exposure at 3 and 9 o'clock for a total fluence of 19,800 J. The prostates were evaluated at one day (n equals 1) and 8 weeks (n equals 4). The histopathology of laser effects at one day show areas of necrosis with loss of glandular structures and stromal edema. Surrounding this area was a zone of degenerative glandular structures extending up to 17.5 mm (cross sectional diameter). The histopathology of the 8 week laser treated animals demonstrated dilated prostatic urethras with maximum cross- sectional diameter of 23.4 mm (mean equals 18.5 +/- 3.9 mm). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of diode laser energy for prostatic tissue coagulation and eventual sloughing. The results also demonstrate the safety of diode laser energy, with similar tissue response as seen with Nd:YAG laser, for laser prostatectomy.

  15. Initial efforts to develop a national strategy to protect crop wild relatives native or naturalized in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historically, the call to conserve crop wild relatives has been driven by habitat degradation fueled by exponential population growth. Today, we have a clarion call for action, as historic impetuses are compounded by the forecast of global climate change. In the United States efforts have been movin...

  16. Initial ACTR retrieval technology evaluation test material recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.

    1996-04-01

    Millions of gallons of radiaoctive waste are contained in underground storage tanks at Hanford (SE Washington). Techniques for retrieving much of this waste from the storage tanks have been developed. Current baseline approach is to use sluice jets for single-shell tanks and mixer pumps for double-shell tanks. The Acquire Commercial Technology for Retrieval (ACTR) effort was initiated to identify potential improvements in or alternatives to the baseline waste retrieval methods. Communications with a variety of vendors are underway to identify improved methods that can be implemented at Hanford with little or no additional development. Commercially available retrieval methods will be evaluated by a combination of testing and system-level cost estimation. Current progress toward developing waste simulants for testing ACTR candidate methods is reported; the simulants are designed to model 4 different types of tank waste. Simulant recipes are given for wet sludge, hardpan/dried sludge,hard saltcake, and soft saltcake. Comparisons of the waste and simulant properties are documented in this report.

  17. The Development of Value Clarification Skills: Initial Efforts in an Eighth Grade Social Studies Class, Part 2. Occasional Paper Series No. 75-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingman, Barry

    The first part of this manuscript relates the initial efforts of a teacher who attempted to apply the value clarification approach in an eighth grade social studies class. The approach is based on Louis Rath's seven-part approach to values clarification which encourages children to choose and to prize one's beliefs and behaviors, and to act on…

  18. Thermionic system evaluation test (TSET) facility construction: A United States and Russian effort

    SciTech Connect

    Wold, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    The Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) is a ground test of an unfueled Russian TOPAZ-II in-core thermionic space reactor powered by electric heaters. The facility that will be used for testing of the TOPAZ-II systems is located at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) complex in Albuquerque, NM. The reassembly of the Russian test equipment is the responsibility of International Scientific Products (ISP), a San Jose, CA, company and Inertek, a Russian corporation, with support provided by engineers and technicians from Phillips Laboratory (PL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the University of New Mexico (UNM). This test is the first test to be performed under the New Mexico Strategic Alliance agreement. This alliance consist of the PL, SNL, LANL, and UNM. The testing is being funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) with the PL responsible for project execution.

  19. Thermionic system evaluation test (TSET) facility construction: A United States and Russian effort

    SciTech Connect

    Wold, S.K. )

    1993-01-15

    The Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) is a ground test of an unfueled Russian TOPAZ-II in-core thermionic space reactor powered by electric heaters. The facility that will be used for testing of the TOPAZ-II systems is located at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) complex in Albuquerque, NM. The reassembly of the Russian test equipment is the responsibility of International Scientific Products (ISP), a San Jose, CA, company and Inertek, a Russian corporation, with support provided by engineers and technicians from Phillips Laboratory (PL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the University of New Mexico (UNM). This test is the first test to be performed under the New Mexico Strategic Alliance agreement. This alliance consists of the PL, SNL, LANL, and UNM. The testing is being funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) with the PL responsible for project execution.

  20. An effort to improve track and intensity prediction of tropical cyclones through vortex initialization in NCUM-global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vivek; Routray, A.; Mallick, Swapan; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-05-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) have strong impact on socio-economic conditions of the countries like India, Bangladesh and Myanmar owing to its awful devastating power. This brings in the need of precise forecasting system to predict the tracks and intensities of TCs accurately well in advance. However, it has been a great challenge for major operational meteorological centers over the years. Genesis of TCs over data sparse warm Tropical Ocean adds more difficulty to this. Weak and misplaced vortices at initial time are one of the prime sources of track and intensity errors in the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. Many previous studies have reported the forecast skill of track and intensity of TC improved due to the assimilation of satellite data along with vortex initialization (VI). Keeping this in mind, an attempt has been made to investigate the impact of vortex initialization for simulation of TC using UK-Met office global model, operational at NCMRWF (NCUM). This assessment is carried out by taking the case of a extremely severe cyclonic storm "Chapala" that occurred over Arabian Sea (AS) from 28th October to 3rd November 2015. Two numerical experiments viz. Vort-GTS (Assimilation of GTS observations with VI) and Vort-RAD (Same as Vort-GTS with assimilation of satellite data) are carried out. This vortex initialization study in NCUM model is first of its type over North Indian Ocean (NIO). The model simulation of TC is carried out with five different initial conditions through 24 hour cycles for both the experiments. The results indicate that the vortex initialization with assimilation of satellite data has a positive impact on the track and intensity forecast, landfall time and position error of the TCs.

  1. Evaluation of the Florida Master Teacher Initiative: Final Evaluation Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Haiwen; Warner, Miya; Golan, Shari; Wechsler, Marjorie; Park, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of the Florida Master Teacher Initiative (FMTI)--an i3-funded early learning program aimed at improving the quality of teaching and student outcomes in grades PreK through third grade in high need schools. The FMTI schools participated in four program components: (1) a job-embedded graduate…

  2. National Evaluation of the Youth Firearms Violence Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunworth, Terence

    Between 1985 and 1994 the rate of violent criminal acts committed by juveniles rose sharply. Juvenile homicides committed with a handgun more than doubled. This bulletin discusses the national evaluation of the Youth Firearms Violence Initiative (YFVI), a program initiated by the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) to fund…

  3. Initial Evaluation of the Patient with Suspected Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jetté, Nathalie; Wiebe, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    The initial evaluation of the patient with suspected epilepsy is multifaceted and includes a careful history, diagnostic evaluation (EEG and brain imaging) and prompt referral to an epilepsy specialist to clarify seizure types and epilepsy syndrome. Screening for mental health conditions also should be considered, along with neurocognitive testing when deficits of language, memory, learning, attention, or executive function are present or when MRI shows involvement of brain regions implicated in cognitive function. In this review, we examine the approach to the initial evaluation of those with new-onset unprovoked seizures and possible epilepsy. PMID:27086982

  4. Finding the Impact in a Messy Intervention: Using an Integrated Design to Evaluate a Comprehensive Citywide Health Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzman, Beth C.; Mijanovich, Tod; Silver, Diana; Brecher, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This article uses the evaluation of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's (RWJF) Urban Health Initiative (UHI), a 10-year effort to improve health and safety outcomes in distressed cities, to demonstrate the strength of an evaluation design that integrates theory of change and quasi-experimental approaches, including the use of comparison cities.…

  5. Some Preliminary Evaluation Notes of an Effective Schools Effort: Project SHAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.; DuVall, Lloyd

    Pupils at three elementary schools and one junior high school among Area 1 inner-city schools of St. Louis Missouri, were identified as scoring well below norms on standardized tests. An effort to change the educational programs at these schools netted financial support and the creation of Project SHAL (named for the schools involved). Inservice…

  6. Effortful Pitch Glide: A Potential New Exercise Evaluated by Dynamic MRI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miloro, Keri Vasquez; Pearson, William G., Jr.; Langmore, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanics of the effortful pitch glide (EPG) with swallowing using dynamic MRI. The EPG is a combination of a pitch glide and a pharyngeal squeeze maneuver for targeting laryngeal and pharyngeal muscles. The authors hypothesized that the EPG would elicit significantly greater structural…

  7. Practice nursing: an evaluation of a training practice initiative.

    PubMed

    Stark, S; Warne, T; Street, C

    2001-05-01

    Globally, health care is moving towards a primary care approach. In the UK initiatives for nurses wishing to gain experience in primary and community care may be crucial with the advent of Primary Care Groups (PCGs) and Primary Care Trusts (PCTs). This paper outlines an initiative in practice nursing, developed as a pilot study by a Health Authority. The training practice initiative was aimed at nurses returning to practice and offered them an experiential and supportive career pathway into primary care. The evaluation (carried out over 1 year), highlighted that those primarily involved in the initiative--the trainees, educators and general practitioners--felt it had been successful, especially in relation to professional development issues. The funding bodies for the initiative, who previously had concerns over the recruitment and retention of practice nurses, were also optimistic that the support networks which developed as a result of the initiative had raised morale. The paper suggests several educational, organizational and professional issues which arose from the evaluation exercise. Further, it suggests how this initiative, in an extended form, could provide an effective basis for the training and development of nursing staff in PCGs/PCTs. PMID:11339872

  8. A geospatial evaluation of Aedes vigilax larval control efforts across a coastal wetland, Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kurucz, N; Whelan, P I; Carter, J M; Jacups, S P

    2009-12-01

    Adjacent to the northern suburbs of Darwin is a coastal wetland that contains important larval habitats for Aedes vigilax (Skuse), the northern salt marsh mosquito. This species is a vector for Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus, as well as an appreciable human pest. In order to improve aerial larval control efforts, we sought to identify the most important vegetation categories and climatic/seasonal aspects associated with control operations in these wetlands. By using a generalized linear model to compare aerial control for each vegetation category, we found that Schoenoplectus/mangrove areas require the greatest amount of control for tide-only events (30.1%), and also extensive control for tide and rain events coinciding (18.2%). Our results further indicate that tide-affected reticulate vegetation indicated by the marsh grasses Sporobolus virginicus and Xerochloa imberbis require extensive control for Ae. vigilax larvae after rain-only events (44.7%), and tide and rain events coinciding (38.0%). The analyses of vector control efforts by month indicated that September to January, with a peak in November and December, required the most control. A companion paper identifies the vegetation categories most associated with Aedes vigilax larvae population densities in the coastal wetland. To maximize the efficiency of aerial salt marsh mosquito control operations in northern Australia, aerial control efforts should concentrate on the vegetation categories with high larval densities between September and January. PMID:20836835

  9. Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative. Year 3 Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Paula; And Others

    An evaluation of the Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative brings together three phases: (1) a pilot outcome study conducted with a sample of six local workplace education programs and featuring the perspectives of workers, labor, and management; (2) program profiles for seven federally funded workplace education programs coordinated by the…

  10. Evaluation of a Complex, Multisite, Multilevel Grants Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollison, Julia; Hill, Gary; Yu, Ping; Murray, Stephen; Mannix, Danyelle; Mathews-Younes, Anne; Wells, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) national evaluation seeks to assess both the implementation process and the results of the SS/HS initiative, exploring factors that have contributed to or detracted from grantee success. Each site is required to forge partnerships with representatives from education, mental health, juvenile justice, and…

  11. Evaluating School Travel Initiatives and Promoting "Healthy Travel" through PSHCE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baslington, Hazel

    2010-01-01

    The number of primary school children travelling to school by car in the UK has almost doubled from 22% to 43% in 20 years. A governmental policy response is school travel plans (STPs). This paper reports the findings of an empirical evaluation designed to measure the effectiveness of the travel initiative at three schools. Quantitative and…

  12. Prevention Initiative Program. Final Evaluation Report Fiscal 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Patricia; Borger, Jeanne

    This report provides an evaluation of the Prevention Initiative Program's second-funded year in the Chicago Public Schools. The program's purpose was to reduce school failure by providing health and social services to young families, improving parenting skills, and assisting young mothers to complete high school. The program served pregnant or…

  13. 45 CFR 641.17 - Initial environmental evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Initial environmental evaluation. 641.17 Section 641.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR PROPOSED NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACTIONS IN ANTARCTICA §...

  14. 45 CFR 641.17 - Initial environmental evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Initial environmental evaluation. 641.17 Section 641.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR PROPOSED NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACTIONS IN ANTARCTICA §...

  15. 45 CFR 641.17 - Initial environmental evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Initial environmental evaluation. 641.17 Section 641.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR PROPOSED NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACTIONS IN ANTARCTICA §...

  16. 45 CFR 641.17 - Initial environmental evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Initial environmental evaluation. 641.17 Section 641.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR PROPOSED NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACTIONS IN ANTARCTICA §...

  17. 45 CFR 641.17 - Initial environmental evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Initial environmental evaluation. 641.17 Section 641.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR PROPOSED NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACTIONS IN ANTARCTICA §...

  18. Evaluating Whole-School Reform Efforts: A Guide for District and School Staff. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yap, Kim; Aldersebaes, Inge; Railsback, Jennifer; Shaughnessy, Joan; Speth, Timothy

    This guidebook provides evaluation assistance to district and school staff. It was published in response to the Comprehensive School Reform Demonstration (CSRD) Program, passed by Congress in 1997 to provide incentives and support for low-performing, high-poverty schools. CSRD is an attempt to ensure that schools conduct evaluation of whole-school…

  19. State and Local Efforts to Investigate the Validity and Reliability of Scores from Teacher Evaluation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herlihy, Corinne; Karger, Ezra; Pollard, Cynthia; Hill, Heather C.; Kraft, Matthew A.; Williams, Megan; Howard, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Context: In the past two years, states have implemented sweeping reforms to their teacher evaluation systems in response to Race to the Top legislation and, more recently, NCLB waivers. With these new systems, policymakers hope to make teacher evaluation both more rigorous and more grounded in specific job performance domains such as teaching…

  20. Escaping the Dusty Shelf: Legislative Evaluation Offices' Efforts to Promote Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanlandingham, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    Although scholars have proposed many steps to increase evaluation use, there has been little comparative empirical study of whether researchers follow these recommendations and whether specific steps are associated with greater utilization. This study of state legislative evaluators finds that those that regularly meet with stakeholders and…

  1. Current Trends in Reform Efforts, Educational Practices, and Program Evaluation Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tagliaferri, Jamie; Townsend, Erica

    2011-01-01

    This article is about the changes in educational reform that have adversely affected teachers and their principals. With the new evaluation system, teachers and school leaders will be evaluated partially on student success. Other educational reforms include the discontinuing of New York State Regents Exams in January and in August. A…

  2. Evaluation and development of an ED management model: an effort to optimize patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Kelly S; Pemberton, Meg

    2013-09-01

    In 2008, the emergency department at Mary Washington Hospital was in the midst of a crisis marked by increasing volumes, increasing numbers of left without being seen (LWBS) patients, falling patient satisfaction numbers and a staff dissatisfied with ED leadership. The existing ED model of charge nurses, a nurse manager, and an administrative director was not working. The single nurse manager could not effectively manage the over 200 staff members he/she was assigned. Based upon the findings from the employee satisfaction survey the inability of the nurse managers to properly manage such large numbers of employees was at the core of the issue. Through benchmarking with a similar healthcare system, an evidence based leadership model was identified, developed, and implemented. The model included the addition of six patient care managers with 24-hour coverage in the department, led to a reduced number of direct reports per manager, and an increased connection with employees. The goal was to engage employees in the effort to provide patient centered, quality care. Residual benefits of our change effort improved the patient satisfaction scores as evidenced by meeting organizational goals within 12 months; goal was exceeded in the following year. Additionally, the walk out rate was reduced 75% over 18 months. The correlation between satisfied employees, patient satisfaction, and reduced walk-outs cannot be ignored. Engaged employees positively impact service and quality. PMID:23998226

  3. Transdisciplinary Research and Evaluation for Community Health Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Gary W.; Neubauer, Leah C.; Bangi, Audrey K.; Francisco, Vincent T.

    2010-01-01

    Transdisciplinary research and evaluation projects provide valuable opportunities to collaborate on interventions to improve the health and well-being of individuals and communities. Given team members’ diverse backgrounds and roles or responsibilities in such projects, members’ perspectives are significant in strengthening a project’s infrastructure and improving its organizational functioning. This article presents an evaluation mechanism that allows team members to express the successes and challenges incurred throughout their involvement in a multisite transdisciplinary research project. Furthermore, their feedback is used to promote future sustainability and growth. Guided by a framework known as organizational development, the evaluative process was conducted by a neutral entity, the Quality Assurance Team. A mixed-methods approach was utilized to garner feedback and clarify how the research project goals could be achieved more effectively and efficiently. The multiple benefits gained by those involved in this evaluation and implications for utilizing transdisciplinary research and evaluation teams for health initiatives are detailed. PMID:18936267

  4. Evaluating science return in space exploration initiative architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budden, Nancy Ann; Spudis, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    Science is an important aspect of the Space Exploration Initiative, a program to explore the Moon and Mars with people and machines. Different SEI mission architectures are evaluated on the basis of three variables: access (to the planet's surface), capability (including number of crew, equipment, and supporting infrastructure), and time (being the total number of man-hours available for scientific activities). This technique allows us to estimate the scientific return to be expected from different architectures and from different implementations of the same architecture. Our methodology allows us to maximize the scientific return from the initiative by illuminating the different emphases and returns that result from the alternative architectural decisions.

  5. Relations among Student Effort, Perceived Class Difficulty Appropriateness, and Student Evaluations of Teaching: Is It Possible to "Buy" Better Evaluations through Lenient Grading?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckert, Teresa M.; Latier, Amanda; Ringwald-Burton, Amy; Drazen, Colleen

    2006-01-01

    Some professors argue that it is possible to "buy" higher course evaluations by grading more leniently and requiring less work. This study investigated the relations of student effort, appropriateness of class difficulty, and course evaluations with a sample of 463 undergraduates from a mid-sized, Midwestern university. Findings support the…

  6. Thermal and flow analysis of the Fluor Daniel, Inc., Nuclear Material Storage Facility renovation design (initial 30% effort of Title 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Steinke, R.G.; Mueller, C.; Knight, T.D.

    1998-03-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code CFX4.2 was used to evaluate steady-state thermal-hydraulic conditions in the Fluor Daniel, Inc., Nuclear Material Storage Facility renovation design (initial 30% of Title 1). Thirteen facility cases were evaluated with varying temperature dependence, drywell-array heat-source magnitude and distribution, location of the inlet tower, and no-flow curtains in the drywell-array vault. Four cases of a detailed model of the inlet-tower top fixture were evaluated to show the effect of the canopy-cruciform fixture design on the air pressure and flow distributions.

  7. Evaluating a questionnaire to measure improvement initiatives in Swedish healthcare

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quality improvement initiatives have expanded recently within the healthcare sector. Studies have shown that less than 40% of these initiatives are successful, indicating the need for an instrument that can measure the progress and results of quality improvement initiatives and answer questions about how quality initiatives are conducted. The aim of the present study was to develop and test an instrument to measure improvement process and outcome in Swedish healthcare. Methods A questionnaire, founded on the Minnesota Innovation Survey (MIS), was developed in several steps. Items were merged and answer alternatives were revised. Employees participating in a county council improvement program received the web-based questionnaire. Data was analysed by descriptive statistics and correlation analysis. The questionnaire psychometric properties were investigated and an exploratory factor analysis was conducted. Results The Swedish Improvement Measurement Questionnaire consists of 27 items. The Improvement Effectiveness Outcome dimension consists of three items and has a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.67. The Internal Improvement Processes dimension consists of eight sub-dimensions with a total of 24 items. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the complete dimension was 0.72. Three significant item correlations were found. A large involvement in the improvement initiative was shown and the majority of the respondents were satisfied with their work. Conclusions The psychometric property tests suggest initial support for the questionnaire to study and evaluate quality improvement initiatives in Swedish healthcare settings. The overall satisfaction with the quality improvement initiative correlates positively to the awareness of individual responsibilities. PMID:23391160

  8. Evaluation the initial estimators using deterministic minimum covariance determinant algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrawashdeh, Mufda Jameel; Sabri, Shamsul Rijal Muhammad; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study is to examine five initial estimators introduced by Hubert et al. [1] with five additional new initial estimators by using the Deterministic Minimum Covariance Determinant algorithm, DetMCD. The objective of the DetMCD is to robustify the location and scatter matrix parameters. Since these parameters are highly influenced by the presence of outliers, the DetMCD is a newly highly robust algorithm, where it is constructed to overcome the outlier's problem. DetMCD precedes the non-random subsets, which computes a small number of deterministic initial estimators and followed by concentration steps. Here, we are going to compare the DetMCD algorithm based on two groups of estimators - one with original five Huberts' estimators and the other five new estimators. The determinant values of these estimators are observed to evaluate the performance via several cases.

  9. Constraints and Limitations in Evaluating Math Curricular Reform Efforts: Pacesetter Math Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camara, Wayne J.

    This paper addresses the challenges and strategies of evaluating curricular reforms in secondary schools by presenting a case study of the College Board's Pacesetter Math course, a fourth level course that was entering its third year in 1995-96. The Pacesetter math course is intended to be an alternative to more traditional pre-calculus courses,…

  10. Evaluation of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in cranes: applications to conservation efforts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvi, S.I.; Miller, M.M.; Goto, R.M.; Gee, G.F.; Briles, W.E.

    2001-01-01

    Although there have been heated discussions concerning the relative importance of using Mhc diversity as a basis for selecting breeders in conservation projects, most parties agree that the genetic variability residual in an endangered species should be maintained through genetic management, if at all possible. Substantial evidence exists (particularly in birds) documenting the influences of specific Mhc haplotypes on disease outcome and also that those individuals which are heterozygous for Mhc alleles appear to have an advantage for survival over those that are homozygous. Thus, conservation of genetic variability of the Mhc is likely important for the preservation of fitness, especially in small breeding populations. More than half of the world's crane species are listed as endangered. Members of all 15 known species are represented among breeding animals for captive propagation at the International Crane Foundation (Wisconsin) and the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Maryland). Collaborative multi-organization efforts and the availability of extensive pedigree records have allowed the study of Mhc variability in several species of cranes. We have found, for example, that Mhc diversity in the captive Florida sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pratensis) population appears high, whereas in the captive whooping crane (Grus americana), which has undergone a severe 'genetic bottleneck,? both the number of alleles and the levels of heterozygosity appear to be substantially reduced.

  11. An Evaluation of TCP with Larger Initial Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allman, Mark; Hayes, Christopher; Ostermann, Shawn

    1998-01-01

    Transmission Control Protocol (TCP's) slow start algorithm gradually increases the amount of data a sender injects into the network, which prevents the sender from overwhelming the network with an inappropriately large burst of traffic. However, the slow start algorithm can make poor use of the available band-width for transfers which are small compared to the bandwidth-delay product of the link, such as file transfers up to few thousand characters over satellite links or even transfers of several hundred bytes over local area networks. This paper evaluates a proposed performance enhancement that raises the initial window used by TCP from 1 MSS-sized segment to roughly 4 KB. The paper evaluates the impact of using larger initial windows on TCP transfers over both the shared Internet and dialup modem links.

  12. [Initial evaluation and management of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Rujic, Dragana; Sundbøll, Jens; Tofig, Bawer Jalal; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Pareek, Manan

    2016-01-18

    The paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias (SVT) are commonly encountered arrhythmias and include atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia, atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia, and focal atrial tachycardia. These tachycardias share several clinical features as well as similar management strategies. The probable mechanism of paroxysmal SVT can often be diagnosed from the clinical findings and a 12-lead ECG. This review describes the initial evaluation and treatment of patients with paroxysmal SVT, including distinctive features from the most important differential diagnoses. PMID:26815585

  13. The Nonverbal Accommodation Analysis System (NAAS): Initial application and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Bylund, Carma L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the development, initial application, and evaluation of the Nonverbal Accommodation Analysis System (NAAS). Grounded in Communication Accommodation Theory, this coding system provides a method for analyzing physician and patient nonverbal accommodation behaviors within medical consultations. Methods Video recordings of 45 new visit consultations at a comprehensive cancer center were coded using the NAAS. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability were assessed. For validation purposes, two independent coders rated all consultations for theoretically-related constructs. Results The NAAS demonstrated high levels of reliability. Statistically significant correlations were observed across all 10 behavior categories for both inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. Evidence of content and construct validity was also observed. Conclusion The current study presents the initial application and evaluation of a coding system meant for analysis of the nonverbal behavior of physicians and patients within medical consultations. The results of this initial trial and psychometric evaluation provide evidence of the NAAS as a valid and reliable nonverbal accommodation coding system. PMID:20851559

  14. Benchmarks and performance indicators: two tools for evaluating organizational results and continuous quality improvement efforts.

    PubMed

    McKeon, T

    1996-04-01

    Benchmarks are tools that can be compared across companies and industries to measure process output. The key to benchmarking is understanding the composition of the benchmark and whether the benchmarks consist of homogeneous groupings. Performance measures expand the concept of benchmarking and cross organizational boundaries to include factors that are strategically important to organizational success. Incorporating performance measures into a balanced score card will provide a comprehensive tool to evaluate organizational results. PMID:8634466

  15. The Prime Time Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida: QIS Development Process Evaluation--Year 2 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Lockaby, Tracey

    2006-01-01

    This report covers the second year of a 3-year process evaluation of the Prime Time Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida, a system-building effort to strengthen the availability and quality of after-school programs in the county. During the past two decades, the after-school field has expanded enormously. This growth has occurred partly in…

  16. Summary of the GASP code application and evaluation effort for scramjet combustor flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Shivakumar; Bittner, Robert D.; Bobskill, Glenn J.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulations of 3D turbulent mixing and reacting flows have been systematically evaluated by comparison with experimental data and other numerical solutions to provide confidence in the General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP) code version 1.3. Specifically, the GASP flow solver has been used to model high speed flow through scram jet combustors. Unit injector problems evaluated include (1) UVA staged sonic normal injection of air into Mach 2 air stream, (2) the VPI Mach 1.7 low angled (15 deg) flush wall helium injection into an unconfined Mach 6 'cold air' stream, and (3) the HYPULSE angled (30 deg) flush wall hydrogen injection into a Mach 6, high enthalpy (flight Mach 17 simulation) nitrogen and air test gases. Results of the numerical simulation for the first two test cases have been compared with detailed in-stream measurements and with SPARK CFD solutions. The results for the last two cases have been compared with measured wall pressure and heat flux data and with SPARK CFD solutions. The present GASP solutions compare favorably with both the experimental data and the SPARK solutions.

  17. A common evaluation framework for the African Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The African Health Initiative includes highly diverse partnerships in five countries (Ghana, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia), each of which is working to improve population health by strengthening health systems and to evaluate the results. One aim of the Initiative is to generate cross-site learning that can inform implementation in the five partnerships during the project period and identify lessons that may be generalizable to other countries in the region. Collaborators in the Initiative developed a common evaluation framework as a basis for this cross-site learning. Methods This paper describes the components of the framework; this includes the conceptual model, core metrics to be measured in all sites, and standard guidelines for reporting on the implementation of partnership activities and contextual factors that may affect implementation, or the results it produces. We also describe the systems that have been put in place for data management, data quality assessments, and cross-site analysis of results. Results and conclusions The conceptual model for the Initiative highlights points in the causal chain between health system strengthening activities and health impact where evidence produced by the partnerships can contribute to learning. This model represents an important advance over its predecessors by including contextual factors and implementation strength as potential determinants, and explicitly including equity as a component of both outcomes and impact. Specific measurement challenges include the prospective documentation of program implementation and contextual factors. Methodological issues addressed in the development of the framework include the aggregation of data collected using different methods and the challenge of evaluating a complex set of interventions being improved over time based on continuous monitoring and intermediate results. PMID:23819778

  18. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Efforts over the last Two Decades to Reduce Human Losses due to Natural Hazards, and A Proposal for Future Efforts (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, B. E.; Chakos, A.

    2009-12-01

    While there is evidence that efforts over the last 20 years to reduce human and fiscal losses due to natural hazards have been effective, there is also evidence that, despite these efforts, we can expect large and, perhaps, even increasing losses in the future. If this conclusion is correct—and unacceptable—then what should be done differently to reduce these losses? One piece of the answer can be found through analyzing why the efforts to date have not been more effective. Another piece can be found through examining the characteristics of successful social movements. For a social movement is what we are talking about when we advocate changing human behavior in order to reduce risk from natural hazards. We cannot attribute the disappointingly modest success of past risk reduction efforts to inadequate science or engineering: the reduction of natural disaster losses in both the U.S. and Japan over the last century indicates that humans possess the required scientific and engineering expertise to reduce the risk of natural hazards, and reduce it significantly. If the problem is that this expertise is not being applied outside of Japan and the U.S., where the risk is concentrated, then we need to understand why. There are numerous examples, after all, of widespread, rapid adoption of modern technologies (such as the internet), once these technologies were perceived to be beneficial. Yet not only have earthquake engineering advances failed to be adopted where they are needed, even existing building codes are often not followed. To understand this behavioral paradox better, we turn to human psychology. In the last several years, Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times has invoked the work of psychologists, in order to explore how our brains may not have yet evolved to respond properly to certain types of modern risks. Kristof refers, for example, to Professor Daniel Gilbert, who argues that threats that will catch our attention will either be personalized, imminent

  19. Evaluation of angler effort and harvest of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Lake Scanewa, Washington, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, Theresa L.; Kock, Tobias J.; Ekstrom, Brian K.; Tomka, Ryan G.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    2011-01-01

    A creel evaluation was conducted in Lake Scanewa, a reservoir on the Cowlitz River, to monitor catch rates of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and determine if the trout fishery was having negative impacts on juvenile anadromous salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the system. The trout fishery, which is supported by releases of 20,000 fish (2 fish per pound) per year from June to August, was developed to mitigate for the construction of the Cowlitz Falls Dam in 1994. The trout fishery has a target catch rate of at least 0.50 fish per hour. Interviews with 1,214 anglers during the creel evaluation found that most anglers targeted rainbow trout (52 percent) or Chinook and coho salmon (48 percent). The interviewed anglers caught a total of 1,866 fish, most of which were rainbow trout (1,213 fish; 78 percent) or coho salmon (311 fish; 20 percent). We estimated that anglers spent 17,365 hours fishing in Lake Scanewa from June to November 2010. Catch rates for boat anglers (1.39 fish per hour) exceeded the 0.50 fish per hour target, whereas catch rates for shore anglers (0.35 fish per hour) fell short of the goal. The combined catch rates for all trout anglers in the reservoir were 0.96 fish per hour. We estimated that anglers harvested 7,584 (95 percent confidence interval = 2,795-12,372 fish) rainbow trout during the study period and boat anglers caught more fish than shore anglers (5,975 and 1,609 fish, respectively). This estimate suggests that more than 12,000 of the 20,000 rainbow trout released into Lake Scanewa during 2010 were not harvested, and could negatively impact juvenile salmon in the reservoir through predation or competition. We examined 1,236 stomach samples from rainbow trout and found that 2.1 percent (26 fish) of these samples contained juvenile fish. Large trout (greater than 300 millimeters) had a higher incidence of predation than small trout (less than 300 millimeters; 8.50 and 0.06 percent, respectively). A total of 39 fish were found in rainbow

  20. Using Basic Ethical Principles to Evaluate Safety Efforts in Transfusion Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Jay P.

    2012-01-01

    Pursuit of pharmaceutical purity of the blood in the bag has led to a shrinking donor base and a significantly more expensive product. Decisions regarding new infectious marker testing and donor deferrals have typically been made emphasizing decreasing one specific risk without considering the effect the intervention will have on the overall safety and availability of blood transfusion. Regulations have been formulated by governmental agencies with limited input from the medical community. The decision making process has lacked risk benefit analyses and has not had the robustness associated with spirited discussions. Policies made in this manner may result in certain risks being decreased but can also have adverse unintended consequences. Being guided by the ethical principles of nonmaleficence, beneficence, autonomy, and justice, we need to evaluate our actions in the context of overall blood safety rather than narrowly focusing on any one area. PMID:24089647

  1. Evaluation of Freshwater Mussel (Mollusca: Unionoidea) Fitness Pre- and Post- Relocation Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, H. E.; Farris, J. L.; Christian, A. D.

    2005-05-01

    Freshwater mussels are often displaced by human activities. Construction of bridges that offer potential impact to large numbers mussels often results in a relocation strategy to minimize loss. While this may reduce mortality, the metabolic consequences of relocation have not been evaluated. In this study we measured glycogen and lipid concentrations and RNA to DNA ratios to determine fitness impairments on relocated mussels. We hypothesize that organisms subjected to continuous stress should first use stored glycogen, followed by growth cessation measured as a reduction of RNA in relation to the DNA present, and finally a mobilization of tissue lipids, measured as a decrease in tissue lipid concentrations. We collected mantle snips from three surrogate species of mussels from four sites on the White River in eastern Arkansas during late summer, to establish expected glycogen, lipid, and RNA:DNA levels. Mean tissue lipids concentrations (μg/g) were 63.09, 67.96, and 50.46 for Quadrula quadrula, Q. pustulosa and Obliquaria reflexa, respectively. Mean tissue glycogen concentrations (μg/g) were 346.66, 592.26, and 336.58 for Q. quadrula, Q. pustulosa, and O. reflexa, respectively. This study can provide response information on relocated individuals as well as provide estimation of sufficient time required for mussel adaptation to novel environments.

  2. Initial evaluation of continuous fiber reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    NiAl is being evaluated as a potential matrix material as part of an overall program to develop and understand high-temperature structural composites. Currently, continuous fiber composites have been fabricated by the powder cloth technique incorporating either W(218) or single crystal Al2O3 fibers as reinforcements in both binary NiAl and a solute strengthened NiAl(.05 at. pct Zr) matrix. Initial evaluation of these composite systems have included: fiber push-out testing to measure matrix/fiber bond strengths, bend testing to determine strength as a function of temperature and composite structure, and thermal cycling to establish the effect of matrix and fiber properties on composite life. The effect of matrix/fiber bond strength and matrix strength on several composite properties will be discussed.

  3. Laboratory and Field-Based Evaluation of Short-Term Effort with Maximal Intensity in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lencse-Mucha, Judit; Molik, Bartosz; Marszałek, Jolanta; Kaźmierska-Kowalewska, Kalina; Ogonowska-Słodownik, Anna

    2015-11-22

    Results of previous studies have not indicated clearly which tests should be used to assess short-term efforts of people with intellectual disabilities. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate laboratory and field-based tests of short-term effort with maximal intensity of subjects with intellectual disabilities. Twenty four people with intellectual disability, who trained soccer, participated in this study. The 30 s Wingate test and additionally an 8 s test with maximum intensity were performed on a bicycle ergometer. The fatigue index, maximal and mean power, relative maximal and relative mean power were measured. Overall, nine field-based tests were conducted: 5, 10 and 20 m sprints, a 20 m shuttle run, a seated medicine ball throw, a bent arm hang test, a standing broad jump, sit-ups and a hand grip test. The reliability of the 30 s and 8 s Wingate tests for subjects with intellectual disability was confirmed. Significant correlation was observed for mean power between the 30 s and 8 s tests on the bicycle ergometer at a moderate level (r >0.4). Moreover, significant correlations were indicated between the results of laboratory tests and field tests, such as the 20 m sprint, the 20 m shuttle run, the standing long jump and the medicine ball throw. The strongest correlation was in the medicine ball throw. The 30 s Wingate test is a reliable test assessing maximal effort in subjects with intellectual disability. The results of this research confirmed that the 8 s test on a bicycle ergometer had a moderate correlation with the 30 s Wingate test in this population, thus, this comparison needs further investigation to examine alternativeness of the 8 s to 30 s Wingate tests. The non-laboratory tests could be used to indirectly assess performance in short-term efforts with maximal intensity. PMID:26834874

  4. Laboratory and Field-Based Evaluation of Short-Term Effort with Maximal Intensity in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Lencse-Mucha, Judit; Molik, Bartosz; Marszałek, Jolanta; Kaźmierska-Kowalewska, Kalina; Ogonowska-Słodownik, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Results of previous studies have not indicated clearly which tests should be used to assess short-term efforts of people with intellectual disabilities. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate laboratory and field-based tests of short-term effort with maximal intensity of subjects with intellectual disabilities. Twenty four people with intellectual disability, who trained soccer, participated in this study. The 30 s Wingate test and additionally an 8 s test with maximum intensity were performed on a bicycle ergometer. The fatigue index, maximal and mean power, relative maximal and relative mean power were measured. Overall, nine field-based tests were conducted: 5, 10 and 20 m sprints, a 20 m shuttle run, a seated medicine ball throw, a bent arm hang test, a standing broad jump, sit-ups and a hand grip test. The reliability of the 30 s and 8 s Wingate tests for subjects with intellectual disability was confirmed. Significant correlation was observed for mean power between the 30 s and 8 s tests on the bicycle ergometer at a moderate level (r >0.4). Moreover, significant correlations were indicated between the results of laboratory tests and field tests, such as the 20 m sprint, the 20 m shuttle run, the standing long jump and the medicine ball throw. The strongest correlation was in the medicine ball throw. The 30 s Wingate test is a reliable test assessing maximal effort in subjects with intellectual disability. The results of this research confirmed that the 8 s test on a bicycle ergometer had a moderate correlation with the 30 s Wingate test in this population, thus, this comparison needs further investigation to examine alternativeness of the 8 s to 30 s Wingate tests. The non-laboratory tests could be used to indirectly assess performance in short-term efforts with maximal intensity. PMID:26834874

  5. Evaluating time dynamics of topographic threshold relations for gully initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayas, Antonio; Vanwalleghem, Tom; Poesen, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Gully erosion is one of the most important soil degradation processes at global scale. However, modelling of gully erosion is still difficult. Despite advances in the modelling of gully headcut rates and incision rates, it remains difficult to predict the location of gully initiation points and trajectories. In different studies it has been demonstrated that a good method of predicting gully initiation is by using a slope (S) - area (A) threshold. Such an S-A relation is a simple way of estimating the critical discharges needed to generate a critical shear stress that can incise a particular soil and initiate a gully. As such, the simple S-A threshold will vary if the rainfall-runoff behaviour of the soil changes or if the soil's erodibility changes. Over the past decades, important agronomic changes have produced significant changes in the soil use and soil management in SW Spain. It is the objective of this research to evaluate how S-A relations for gully initiation have changed over time and for two different land uses, cereal and olive. Data was collected for a gully network in the Cordoba Province, SW Spain. From photo-interpretation of historical air photos between 1956 and 2013, the gully network and initiation points were derived. In total 10 different time steps are available (1956; 1977; 1984; 1998; 2001; 2004; 2006; 2008; 2010; 2013). Topographical thresholds were extracted by combining the digitized gully network with the DEM. Due to small differences in the alignment of ortophotos and DEM, an optimization technique was developed in GIS to extract the correct S-A value for each point. With the S-A values for each year, their dynamics was evaluated as a function of land use (olive or cereal) and in function of the following variables in each of the periods considered: • soil management • soil cover by weeds, where weed growth was modeled from the daily soil water balance • rainfall intensity • root cohesion, , where root growth was modeled from

  6. Initial laboratory evaluation of color video cameras: Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.L.

    1993-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video cameras used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than to identify intruders. The monochrome cameras were selected over color cameras because they have greater sensitivity and resolution. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Because color camera technology is rapidly changing and because color information is useful for identification purposes, Sandia National Laboratories has established an on-going program to evaluate the newest color solid-state cameras. Phase One of the Sandia program resulted in the SAND91-2579/1 report titled: Initial Laboratory Evaluation of Color Video Cameras. The report briefly discusses imager chips, color cameras, and monitors, describes the camera selection, details traditional test parameters and procedures, and gives the results reached by evaluating 12 cameras. Here, in Phase Two of the report, we tested 6 additional cameras using traditional methods. In addition, all 18 cameras were tested by newly developed methods. This Phase 2 report details those newly developed test parameters and procedures, and evaluates the results.

  7. Initial Results of an MDO Method Evaluation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia M.; Kodiyalam, Srinivas

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Langley MDO method evaluation study seeks to arrive at a set of guidelines for using promising MDO methods by accumulating and analyzing computational data for such methods. The data are collected by conducting a series of re- producible experiments. In the first phase of the study, three MDO methods were implemented in the SIGHT: framework and used to solve a set of ten relatively simple problems. In this paper, we comment on the general considerations for conducting method evaluation studies and report some initial results obtained to date. In particular, although the results are not conclusive because of the small initial test set, other formulations, optimality conditions, and sensitivity of solutions to various perturbations. Optimization algorithms are used to solve a particular MDO formulation. It is then appropriate to speak of local convergence rates and of global convergence properties of an optimization algorithm applied to a specific formulation. An analogous distinction exists in the field of partial differential equations. On the one hand, equations are analyzed in terms of regularity, well-posedness, and the existence and unique- ness of solutions. On the other, one considers numerous algorithms for solving differential equations. The area of MDO methods studies MDO formulations combined with optimization algorithms, although at times the distinction is blurred. It is important to

  8. H. J. RES. 431: A Joint Resolution to establish that it is the policy of the United States to encourage and support conservation efforts initiated by Brazil to protect the Amazon forest, and that the United States should redouble its efforts to reduce its pollution of the global environment. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, November 2, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    H.J.RES.431: A Joint Resolution to establish that it is the policy of the United States to encourage and support conservation efforts initiated by Brazil to protect the Amazon forest, and that the United States should redouble its efforts to reduce its pollution of the global environment.

  9. Potential of Environmental DNA to Evaluate Northern Pike (Esox lucius) Eradication Efforts: An Experimental Test and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Dunker, Kristine J; Sepulveda, Adam J; Massengill, Robert L; Olsen, Jeffrey B; Russ, Ora L; Wenburg, John K; Antonovich, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Determining the success of invasive species eradication efforts is challenging because populations at very low abundance are difficult to detect. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling has recently emerged as a powerful tool for detecting rare aquatic animals; however, detectable fragments of DNA can persist over time despite absence of the targeted taxa and can therefore complicate eDNA sampling after an eradication event. This complication is a large concern for fish eradication efforts in lakes since killed fish can sink to the bottom and slowly decay. DNA released from these carcasses may remain detectable for long periods. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of eDNA sampling to detect invasive Northern pike (Esox lucius) following piscicide eradication efforts in southcentral Alaskan lakes. We used field observations and experiments to test the sensitivity of our Northern pike eDNA assay and to evaluate the persistence of detectable DNA emitted from Northern pike carcasses. We then used eDNA sampling and traditional sampling (i.e., gillnets) to test for presence of Northern pike in four lakes subjected to a piscicide-treatment designed to eradicate this species. We found that our assay could detect an abundant, free-roaming population of Northern pike and could also detect low-densities of Northern pike held in cages. For these caged Northern pike, probability of detection decreased with distance from the cage. We then stocked three lakes with Northern pike carcasses and collected eDNA samples 7, 35 and 70 days post-stocking. We detected DNA at 7 and 35 days, but not at 70 days. Finally, we collected eDNA samples ~ 230 days after four lakes were subjected to piscicide-treatments and detected Northern pike DNA in 3 of 179 samples, with a single detection at each of three lakes, though we did not catch any Northern pike in gillnets. Taken together, we found that eDNA can help to inform eradication efforts if used in conjunction with multiple lines of inquiry and sampling

  10. Promoting conversations between physicians and families about childhood obesity: evaluation of physician communication training within a clinical practice improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Shue, Carolyn K; Whitt, Justin K; Daniel, Linda; Shue, Christian B

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity rates have incrementally increased since the 1980s, sparking calls for initiatives focused on addressing this public health concern. In response, the family medicine residency clinic profiled in this research designed, executed, and evaluated a practice improvement initiative focused on physician communication behaviors and clinic processes that impact the management of unhealthy pediatric weight. The results of the evaluation effort demonstrated increased physician knowledge of communication principles, improvements in weight management counseling rates, and opportunities for health delivery system changes to promote the effective clinical management of unhealthy pediatric weight. PMID:26362560

  11. Development and initial evaluation of a treatment decision dashboard

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For many healthcare decisions, multiple alternatives are available with different combinations of advantages and disadvantages across several important dimensions. The complexity of current healthcare decisions thus presents a significant barrier to informed decision making, a key element of patient-centered care. Interactive decision dashboards were developed to facilitate decision making in Management, a field marked by similarly complicated choices. These dashboards utilize data visualization techniques to reduce the cognitive effort needed to evaluate decision alternatives and a non-linear flow of information that enables users to review information in a self-directed fashion. Theoretically, both of these features should facilitate informed decision making by increasing user engagement with and understanding of the decision at hand. We sought to determine if the interactive decision dashboard format can be successfully adapted to create a clinically realistic prototype patient decision aid suitable for further evaluation and refinement. Methods We created a computerized, interactive clinical decision dashboard and performed a pilot test of its clinical feasibility and acceptability using a multi-method analysis. The dashboard summarized information about the effectiveness, risks of side effects and drug-drug interactions, out-of-pocket costs, and ease of use of nine analgesic treatment options for knee osteoarthritis. Outcome evaluations included observations of how study participants utilized the dashboard, questionnaires to assess usability, acceptability, and decisional conflict, and an open-ended qualitative analysis. Results The study sample consisted of 25 volunteers - 7 men and 18 women - with an average age of 51 years. The mean time spent interacting with the dashboard was 4.6 minutes. Mean evaluation scores on scales ranging from 1 (low) to 7 (high) were: mechanical ease of use 6.1, cognitive ease of use 6.2, emotional difficulty 2

  12. Older adults' evaluations of middle-aged children's attempts to initiate discussion of care needs.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Craig; Fisher, Carla L; Pitts, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    We explored how older adults evaluated the strategies used by an adult child to initiate discussion of future care needs, and subsequently, whether these judgments affected older adults' willingness to engage in discussions about eldercare if approached in a similar fashion by one of their own children. One hundred and thirty older adults were randomly assigned to read one of four scripts depicting efforts by a middle-aged daughter to raise the topic of future care needs with her mother by implementing a variety of facework behaviors. Scripts manipulated the degree to which the daughter conveyed respect for her mother's desires for autonomy (negative face) and connection (positive face). The daughter's facework significantly predicted older parents' evaluation of her as supportive, which in turn predicted their willingness to discuss future care needs with one of their own children if they were to approach the conversation in a similar way. PMID:24156501

  13. Evaluating the potential effectiveness of proposed environmental justice initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, N.L.; Namovicz, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    Congress directed the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create the Technical Assistance Grant (TAG) program to address the concerns of these citizens and, thereby improve community relations at Superfund sites. TAGs provide funding to allow affected residents to hire independent scientific and technical consultants to help them understand the issues at the site and better participate in remedy selection. This study will not directly assess the experience of Environmental Justice sites within the Superfund program. Rather, this study examines existing data on TAGs and the applicability of an expanded TAG program in addressing expressed Environmental Justice concerns. Specifically, the study compares the characteristics of sites with TAGs to a matched control group of sites/communities without TAGs. The study establishes a rigorous statistical baseline upon which it can evaluate the marginal contribution of outreach initiatives to the needs and concerns of minority and low income communities. The results of these analyses will serve as a foundation for evaluating proposed changes in the scope and emphasis of Superfund`s community relations and Environmental Justice outreach programs.

  14. Evaluating Maori community initiatives to promote healthy eating, healthy action.

    PubMed

    Hamerton, Heather; Mercer, Christine; Riini, Denise; McPherson, Brighid; Morrison, Laurie

    2014-03-01

    Māori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand, experience poorer health than non-Māori across a range of health measures. Interventions focused at an individual level have proved largely ineffective; 'bottom-up' approaches where communities determine their own priorities may be more sustainable than 'top-down' approaches where goals are determined by health authorities. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an innovative health promotion programme aimed at improving Māori health and to discuss the importance of ownership and control of health initiatives by Māori. Evaluators conducted a comprehensive evaluation of a Healthy Eating Healthy Action programme in six small Māori health agencies, gathering information from programme managers and co-ordinators, participants and wider community members about what changes were occurring at individual, family and community levels. Effective interventions built on cultural values and practices and were delivered by Māori with close connections to the community. Changes in nutrition and physical activity made by participants also benefitted their wider families and community. The changes demonstrated subtle but important shifts in thinking about healthy eating and healthy activity that in the longer term could lead to more measurable change towards improved quality of life for people within communities. PMID:22952336

  15. Initial evaluation of Stilwell: a multimedia virtual community.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Mike; Crumbie, Alison

    2011-03-01

    Narrative pedagogy has emerged in the last decade as a new approach designed to complement the conventional approaches to education. It is concerned with understanding the meaning of events to people, appreciating multiple perspectives and the emotional content of health care. However there is a paucity of evaluative research concerning its impact. We have used narrative pedagogy to create Stilwell, a realistic narrative telling the stories of 60 characters living in a typical community. Stilwell is a real place (fictional name) and our multimedia model brings the community to life as a virtual practicum for a wide range of health professional students. This paper presents the results of our initial focus group evaluation of student learning experiences with Stilwell. The data indicates students found it a very different way of learning which allowed them to relate theory to practice in ways they had never done before. The realism of Stilwell was a challenge and generated considerable student emotional involvement with the characters, leading to significant novel learning activity. We reflect on how student feedback has allowed us to shape and improve Stilwell as it develops. PMID:21071274

  16. RSRM TP-H1148 Main Grain Propellant Crack Initiation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earnest, Todd E.

    2005-01-01

    Pressurized TP-HI 148 propellant fracture toughness testing was performed to assess the potential for initiation of visually undetectable cracks in the RSRM forward segment transition region during motor ignition. Two separate test specimens were used in this evaluation. Testing was performed in cold-gas and hot-fire environments, and under both static and dynamic pressurization conditions. Analysis of test results demonstrates safety factors against initiation of visually undetectable cracks in excess of 8.0. The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) forward segment is cast with PBAN propellant (TP-HI 148) to form T an 1 1-point star configuration that transitions to a tapered center perforated bore (see Figure 1). The geometry of the transition region between the fin valleys and the bore causes a localized area of high strain during horizontal storage. Updated analyses using worst-case mechanical properties at 40 F and improved modeling techniques indicated a slight reduction in safety margins over previous predictions. Although there is no history of strain induced cracks or flaws in the transition region propellant, a proactive test effort was initiated to better understand the implications of the new analysis, primarily the resistance of TP-H1148 propellant to crack initiation' during RSRM ignition.

  17. Informing the Design and Evaluation of Superuser Care Management Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Joel C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health care spending is concentrated among a small number of high-cost patients, and the popularity of initiatives to improve care and reduce cost among such “superusers” (SUs) is growing. However, SU costs decline naturally over time, even without intervention, a statistical phenomenon known as regression-to-the-mean (RTM). Objectives: We assess the magnitude of RTM in hospital costs for cohorts of hospital SUs identified on the basis of high inpatient (IP) or emergency department (ED) utilization. We further examine how cost and RTM are associated with patient characteristics including behavioral health (BH) problems, multiple chronic conditions, and indicators of vulnerability. Study Design: Using longitudinally linked all-payer hospital billing data, we selected patient cohorts with ≥2 IP stays (IP SUs) or ≥6 ED visits (ED SUs) during a 6-month baseline period, and additional subgroups defined by combinations of IP and ED superuse. Population Studied: A total of 289,060 NJ hospital IP and treat-and-release ED patients over 2009–2011. Results: Hospital costs among IP and ED SUs declined 70% and 38%, respectively, over 8 quarters following the baseline period. The decrease occurs more quickly for IP SUs compared with ED SUs. Presence of BH problems was positively associated with costs among patients overall, but the relationship varied by SU cohort. Conclusions: Understanding patterns of RTM among SU populations is important for designing intervention strategies, as there is greater potential for savings among patients with more persistent costs (less RTM). Further, as many SU initiatives lack resources for rigorous evaluation, quantifying the extent of RTM is vital for interpreting program outcomes. PMID:27219632

  18. Initial Evaluation of Space Environmental Effects on the NGST Sunshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooldridge, Eve M.; Powers, Charles

    1998-01-01

    The "Next Generation Space Telescope" (NGST), the follow-on telescope to the Hubble Space Telescope, will carry on exploration of the early universe with a primary mirror 6-8 meters in diameter optimized to operate in the infrared. The mirror and its instruments will perform extremely deep exposures at near infra-red wavelengths (0.5-30 microns), and will operate for 5-10 years. In order to achieve the requirements, cryogenic temperatures between 30-60 Kelvin must be maintained on the telescope (OTA) and in the science module (SIM). A primary feature for passive cooling in the designs presented is that of an enormous, light-weight deployable sunshield. As a result, issues of contamination from the sunshield and space environmental effects on the sunshield itself present a critical matter: if the sunshield becomes a source of contamination, or if environmental effects damage the sunshield, the NGST mission could be compromised or could fail completely. A molecular redistribution analysis has been performed on the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) design for NGST. The analysis revealed that because the shield will initially cool down faster than the OTA, the shield would not be a significant source of molecular contamination during the cooling phase. However, if the shield were ever to warm up, it would be a very large source of molecular contamination. The sunshield itself is susceptible to degradation from an external source of contamination: the space environment at L2 or at 1 x 3 AU. It is therefore necessary to design the sunshield to withstand the space environment. Thin films and coatings on the sunshield have been evaluated and testing has begun so that a suitable film and/or coating can be chosen or developed for the NGST mission. The evaluation and test results will be presented.

  19. Initial Evaluations in the Interview: Relationships with Subsequent Interviewer Evaluations and Employment Offers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, Murray R.; Swider, Brian W.; Stewart, Greg L.

    2010-01-01

    The authors of this study examine how evaluations made during an early stage of the structured interview (rapport building) influence end of interview scores, subsequent follow-up employment interviews, and actual internship job offers. Candidates making better initial impressions received more internship offers (r = 0.22) and higher interviewer…

  20. Development and initial evaluation of the SCI-FI/AT

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Alan M.; Slavin, Mary D.; Ni, Pengsheng; Kisala, Pamela A.; Tulsky, David S.; Heinemann, Allen W.; Charlifue, Susie; Tate, Denise G.; Fyffe, Denise; Morse, Leslie; Marino, Ralph; Smith, Ian; Williams, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe the domain structure and calibration of the Spinal Cord Injury Functional Index for samples using Assistive Technology (SCI-FI/AT) and report the initial psychometric properties of each domain. Design Cross sectional survey followed by computerized adaptive test (CAT) simulations. Setting Inpatient and community settings. Participants A sample of 460 adults with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) stratified by level of injury, completeness of injury, and time since injury. Interventions None Main outcome measure SCI-FI/AT Results Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Item response theory (IRT) analyses identified 4 unidimensional SCI-FI/AT domains: Basic Mobility (41 items) Self-care (71 items), Fine Motor Function (35 items), and Ambulation (29 items). High correlations of full item banks with 10-item simulated CATs indicated high accuracy of each CAT in estimating a person's function, and there was high measurement reliability for the simulated CAT scales compared with the full item bank. SCI-FI/AT item difficulties in the domains of Self-care, Fine Motor Function, and Ambulation were less difficult than the same items in the original SCI-FI item banks. Conclusion With the development of the SCI-FI/AT, clinicians and investigators have available multidimensional assessment scales that evaluate function for users of AT to complement the scales available in the original SCI-FI. PMID:26010975

  1. Clinical and Organizational Factors in the Initial Evaluation of Patients With Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jim Yeung, Sai-Ching; Tanoue, Lynn T.; Gould, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This guideline is intended to provide an evidence-based approach to the initial evaluation of patients with known or suspected lung cancer. It also includes an assessment of the impact of timeliness of care and multidisciplinary teams on outcome. Methods: The applicable current medical literature was identified by a computerized search and evaluated using standardized methods. Recommendations were framed using the approach described by the Guidelines Oversight Committee of the American College of Chest Physicians. Data sources included MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Results: Initial evaluation should include a thorough history and physical examination; CT imaging; pulmonary function tests; and hemoglobin, electrolyte, liver function, and calcium levels. Additional testing for distant metastases and paraneoplastic syndromes should be determined on the basis of these results. Paraneoplastic syndromes may have an adverse impact on cancer treatment, so they should be controlled rapidly with the goal of proceeding with definitive cancer treatment in a timely manner. Although the relationship between timeliness of care and survival is difficult to quantify, efforts to deliver timely care are reasonable and should be balanced with the need to attend to other dimensions of health-care quality (eg, safety, effectiveness, efficiency, equality, consistency with patient values and preferences). Quality care will require multiple disciplines. Although it is difficult to assess the impact, we suggest that a multidisciplinary team approach to care be used, particularly for patients requiring multimodality therapy. Conclusions: The initial evaluation of patients with lung cancer should include a thorough history and physical examination, pulmonary function tests, CT imaging, basic laboratory tests, and selective testing for distant metastases and paraneoplastic syndromes. PMID:23649435

  2. Experimental Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Initiation from Corroded Hemispherical Notches in Aerospace Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Daniel B.; Forman, Royce; Shindo, David

    2010-01-01

    A test program was developed and executed to evaluate the influence of corroded hemispherical notches on the fatigue crack initiation and propagation in aluminum 7075-T7351, 4340 steel, and D6AC steel. Surface enhancements such as shot peening and laser shock peening were also incorporated as part of the test effort with the intent of improving fatigue performance. In addition to the testing, fracture mechanics and endurance limit based analysis methods were evaluated to characterize the results with the objective of challenging typical assumptions used in modeling fatigue cracks from corrosion pits. The results specifically demonstrate that the aluminum and steel alloys behave differently with respect to fatigue crack initiation from hemispherical corrosion pits. The aluminum test results were bounded by the fracture mechanics and endurance limit models while exhibiting a general insensitivity to the residual stress field generated by shot peening. The steel specimens were better characterized by the endurance limit fatigue properties and did exhibit sensitivities to residual stresses from the shot peening and laser shock peening

  3. Cuyahoga County Early Childhood Initiative Evaluation: Phase II Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulton, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    Since mid-1999, a bold initiative has been underway in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, to improve the well-being of the youngest members of the greater Cleveland community. A community-wide initiative targeting children from birth through age five and their families was launched in July 1999, and in the following 5 years demonstrated substantial success…

  4. Sobering Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgram, Gail Gleason; Anderson, David S.

    1996-01-01

    Reports on a study to identify excellent campus-based initiatives to prevent alcohol abuse by college students. Offers recommendations to colleges which stress that alcohol-abuse prevention programs be long-term, broad-based, and integrated into the institution and community. Offers recommendations to trustees which stress their role in…

  5. Evaluating Cloud Initialization in a Convection-permit NWP Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Chen, Baode

    2015-04-01

    In general, to avoid "double counting precipitation" problem, in convection permit NWP models, it was a common practice to turn off convective parameterization. However, if there were not any cloud information in the initial conditions, the occurrence of precipitation could be delayed due to spin-up of cloud field or microphysical variables. In this study, we utilized the complex cloud analysis package from the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) to adjust the initial states of the model on water substance, such as cloud water, cloud ice, rain water, et al., that is, to initialize the microphysical variables (i.e., hydrometers), mainly based on radar reflectivity observations. Using the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model, numerical experiments with/without cloud initialization and convective parameterization were carried out at grey-zone resolutions (i.e. 1, 3, and 9 km). The results from the experiments without convective parameterization indicate that model ignition with radar reflectivity can significantly reduce spin-up time and accurately simulate precipitation at the initial time. In addition, it helps to improve location and intensity of predicted precipitation. With grey-zone resolutions (i.e. 1, 3, and 9 km), using the cumulus convective parameterization scheme (without radar data) cannot produce realistic precipitation at the early time. The issues related to microphysical parametrization associated with cloud initialization were also discussed.

  6. Bay Area Fatherhood Initiatives: Policymaker and Practitioner Perspectives on Intergrating Fathering Efforts. A Report from the Bay Area Fathering Integrated Data System (BAyFIDS) II Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadsden, Vivian L.; Rethemeyer, R. Karl

    The past 10 years have been a period of enormous growth in efforts around father involvement, with local government systems attempting to meet the needs of the diverse father population. The Bay Area Fathering Indicators Data System (BAYFIDS) Project is designed to track and analyze the operation and impact of fathering programs and describe the…

  7. AQMEII: A New International Initiative on Air Quality Model Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    We provide a conceptual view of the process of evaluating regional-scale three-dimensional numerical photochemical air quality modeling system, based on an examination of existing approached to the evaluation of such systems as they are currently used in a variety of application....

  8. Formative Evaluation of the Student Achievement Initiative "Learning Year"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Davis; Ellwein, Todd; Boswell, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    In September 2007, the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC) officially launched the Student Achievement Initiative, a system-wide policy to reward colleges for improvements in student achievement. Developed by a task force comprised of State Board members, college trustees, presidents, and faculty representatives,…

  9. Evaluation and Sustainability of the Healthy Learners Asthma Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splett, Patricia L.; Erickson, Cecelia D.; Belseth, Stephanie B.; Jensen, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    The Healthy Learners Asthma Initiative (HLAI) involved collaboration between Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS), local health care providers/payors, parents, and other partners. The intervention included development of enhanced asthma care in school health offices and clinic performance improvement projects to foster adoption of National Institutes…

  10. Evaluation of Year 2 of the Alabama Reading Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Marcia R.; Snyder, Scott W.; Spor, Mary W.

    This report summarizes research supports addressing three areas as targets for educational improvement in Alabama: beginning reading, expansion of reading power, and intensive intervention for those who are reading below grade level. The paper also describes Alabama's statewide initiative to implement best practices in these areas and summarizes…

  11. Evaluation of the Alabama Reading Initiative, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Marcia R.; Spor, Mary W.

    A study examined the effectiveness and the impact of preservice instruction of the second year of the Alabama Reading Initiative (ARI), which is designed to achieve 100% literacy by targeting reading performance of beginning reading and first-grade students, to expand the reading power for second- through twelfth-grade students, and to intervene…

  12. Individualized Intervention for Social Competence: An Initial Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Barry H.

    The report describes the initial development of the Individualized Intervention for Social Competence (IISC) program, an individualized social skills training program for elementary aged emotionally disturbed children. Twenty-nine behavioral objectives cluster along the dimensions of aggression and withdrawal, and are divided into two major…

  13. 20 CFR 220.105 - Initial evaluation of a previous disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Initial evaluation of a previous disability... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Evaluation of Disability § 220.105 Initial evaluation of a previous disability. (a) In some cases, the Board may determine that a claimant is not currently disabled but...

  14. 20 CFR 220.105 - Initial evaluation of a previous disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Initial evaluation of a previous disability... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Evaluation of Disability § 220.105 Initial evaluation of a previous disability. (a) In some cases, the Board may determine that a claimant is not currently disabled but...

  15. 20 CFR 220.105 - Initial evaluation of a previous disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Initial evaluation of a previous disability... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Evaluation of Disability § 220.105 Initial evaluation of a previous disability. (a) In some cases, the Board may determine that a claimant is not currently disabled but...

  16. A Model for Statewide Evaluation of a Universal Positive Behavior Support Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfner Childs, Karen; Kincaid, Don; George, Heather Peshak

    2010-01-01

    Several statewide evaluations of Tier 1/Universal Level Positive Behavior Support (PBS) implementation efforts have been conducted, adhering to the evaluation template developed by Horner, Sugai, and Lewis-Palmer in 2005. Building on these examples, Florida's Positive Behavior Support Project developed a comprehensive evaluation system that sought…

  17. Evaluation of COSMO-ART in the Framework of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Lea; Brunner, Dominik; Im, Ulas; Galmarini, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    The Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) coordinated by the EC-JRC and US-EPA, promotes since 2008 research on regional air quality model evaluation across the atmospheric modelling communities of Europe and North America. AQMEII has now reached its Phase 2 that is dedicated to the evaluation of on-line coupled chemistry-meteorology models as opposed to Phase 1 where only off-line models were considered. At European level, AQMEII collaborates with the COST Action "European framework for on-line integrated air quality and meteorology modelling" (EuMetChem). All European groups participating in AQMEII performed simulations over the same spatial domain (Europe at a resolution of about 20 km) and using the same simulation strategy (e.g. no nudging allowed) and the same input data as much as possible. The initial and boundary conditions (IC/BC) were shared between all groups. Emissions were provided by the TNO-MACC database for anthropogenic emissions and the FMI database for biomass burning emissions. Chemical IC/BC data were taken from IFS-MOZART output, and meteorological IC/BC from the ECWMF global model. Evaluation data sets were collected by the Joint Research Center (JRC) and include measurements from surface in situ networks (AirBase and EMEP), vertical profiles from ozone sondes and aircraft (MOZAIC), and remote sensing (AERONET, satellites). Since Phase 2 focuses on on-line coupled models, a special effort is devoted to the detailed speciation of particulate matter components, with the goal of studying feedback processes. For the AQMEII exercise, COSMO-ART has been run with 40 levels of vertical resolution, and a chemical scheme that includes the SCAV module of Knote and Brunner (ACP 2013) for wet-phase chemistry and the SOA treatment according to VBS (volatility basis set) approach (Athanasopoulou et al., ACP 2013). The COSMO-ART evaluation shows that, next to a good performance in the meteorology, the gas phase chemistry is well

  18. The Cucumber Genome Initiative-An International Effort to Unlock the Genetic Potential of an Orphan Crop Using Novel Genomic Technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber is an important vegetable in the world. However, its narrow genetic basis makes it a less desirable species for genetic study and molecular breeding. The Cucumber Genome Initiative (CuGI) was established with aims: 1) to obtain a complete sequence of the genome; 2) to get an in-depth und...

  19. The Promise and Challenge of Practice-Research Collaborations: Guiding Principles and Strategies for Initiating, Designing, and Implementing Program Evaluation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secret, Mary; Abell, Melissa L.; Berlin, Trey

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a set of guiding principles and strategies to facilitate the collaborative efforts of social work researchers and practitioners as they initiate, design, and implement outcome evaluations of human service interventions and programs. Beginning with an exploration of the interpersonal barriers to practice-research collaborations,…

  20. Evaluation of an artificial estuarine habitat-initial stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poonai, P.

    1973-01-01

    In order to study the influence of an artificial habitat of discarded automobile tires upon the biomass in and around it, three sites were selected in the Banana River of which two will contain small groups of tires and one will not. Over a given period, the populations in and around the tires will be compared with those which existed initially or prevail on the natural site. Preliminary observations indicate that adequate numbers may be present in the lower trophic levels but that there are perhaps inadequate populations of upper level carnivores which it appears can be increased by an artificial habitat.

  1. Driver Improvement Training and Evaluation: Initial Development. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittenburg, John A.; And Others

    A driver improvement training program using multimedia classroom lessons and multiple car driving range exercises was given to U.S. Coast Guard recruits. Training was evaluated by comparing matched control and experimental groups. Baseline data including driving history, biographical, and physical characteristics was collected. Driving range,…

  2. The Grief Evaluation Measure (GEM): An Initial Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, John R.; Baker, John; Matteis, Margherite; Rosenthal, Saul; Ware, Eugenia S.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Grief Evaluation Measure (GEM), a new instrument designed to screen for the development of a complicated mourning response in a bereaved adult. The GEM provides a quantitative and qualitative assessment of risk factors, including the mourner's loss and medical history, coping resources before and after…

  3. Surveillance for Asian H5N1 avian influenza in the United States. The government initiates early detection efforts in wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ip, Hon S.; Slota, Paul G.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing concern over the potential for migratory birds to introduce the Asian H5N1 strain of avian influenza to North America prompted the White House Policy Coordinating Committee for Pandemic Influenza Preparedness to request that the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Interior (DOI) develop a plan for the early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the United States. To promote coordination among wildlife, agriculture, and human health agencies on HPAI surveillance efforts, the two Departments worked with representatives from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to develop the U.S. Interagency Strategic Plan for Early Detection of Asian H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Wild Migratory Birds.

  4. Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation: Results of the Initial Psychometric Study.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Amy E; Penn, David L; Green, Michael F; Harvey, Philip D

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of social cognition in treatment trials remains problematic due to poor and limited psychometric data for many tasks. As part of the Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation (SCOPE) study, the psychometric properties of 8 tasks were assessed. One hundred and seventy-nine stable outpatients with schizophrenia and 104 healthy controls completed the battery at baseline and a 2-4-week retest period at 2 sites. Tasks included the Ambiguous Intentions Hostility Questionnaire (AIHQ), Bell Lysaker Emotion Recognition Task (BLERT), Penn Emotion Recognition Task (ER-40), Relationships Across Domains (RAD), Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task (Eyes), The Awareness of Social Inferences Test (TASIT), Hinting Task, and Trustworthiness Task. Tasks were evaluated on: (i) test-retest reliability, (ii) utility as a repeated measure, (iii) relationship to functional outcome, (iv) practicality and tolerability, (v) sensitivity to group differences, and (vi) internal consistency. The BLERT and Hinting task showed the strongest psychometric properties across all evaluation criteria and are recommended for use in clinical trials. The ER-40, Eyes Task, and TASIT showed somewhat weaker psychometric properties and require further study. The AIHQ, RAD, and Trustworthiness Task showed poorer psychometric properties that suggest caution for their use in clinical trials. PMID:25943125

  5. Evaluation of the GEM-AQ simulations for the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobocki, Lech; Gawuc, Lech; Jefimow, Maciej; Kaminski, Jacek; Porebska, Magdalena; Struzewska, Joanna; Zdunek, Malgorzata

    2013-04-01

    A multiscale, on-line meteorological and air quality model GEM-AQ was used to simulate ozone and particulate matter over the European continent in 2006, as a part of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). In contrast to the majority of models participating in the Phase I of AQMEII, the GEM-AQ configuration employed here utilized neither external meteorological fields nor lateral boundary conditions, owing to the global-extent and variable grid resolution of the model setup. We will present evaluation results for global model performance statistics calculated for the entire year and more detailed performance analysis of pollution episodes. Evaluation of meteorological parameters includes comparisons of model-predicted wind, temperature and cloudiness with hourly observations at surface weather stations, daily maxima, and comparison with upper-air soundings at selected sites. Frequency distribution of principal boundary layer parameters and its spatial structure will be presented. Air quality predictions are assessed in terms of ground-level daily mean ozone concentrations and its daily peak values, vertical structure as inferred from ozone soundings, and particulate matter daily mean concentrations at the surface.

  6. Modeling and Evaluating Pilot Performance in NextGen: Review of and Recommendations Regarding Pilot Modeling Efforts, Architectures, and Validation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, Christopher; Sebok, Angelia; Keller, John; Peters, Steve; Small, Ronald; Hutchins, Shaun; Algarin, Liana; Gore, Brian Francis; Hooey, Becky Lee; Foyle, David C.

    2013-01-01

    NextGen operations are associated with a variety of changes to the national airspace system (NAS) including changes to the allocation of roles and responsibilities among operators and automation, the use of new technologies and automation, additional information presented on the flight deck, and the entire concept of operations (ConOps). In the transition to NextGen airspace, aviation and air operations designers need to consider the implications of design or system changes on human performance and the potential for error. To ensure continued safety of the NAS, it will be necessary for researchers to evaluate design concepts and potential NextGen scenarios well before implementation. One approach for such evaluations is through human performance modeling. Human performance models (HPMs) provide effective tools for predicting and evaluating operator performance in systems. HPMs offer significant advantages over empirical, human-in-the-loop testing in that (1) they allow detailed analyses of systems that have not yet been built, (2) they offer great flexibility for extensive data collection, (3) they do not require experimental participants, and thus can offer cost and time savings. HPMs differ in their ability to predict performance and safety with NextGen procedures, equipment and ConOps. Models also vary in terms of how they approach human performance (e.g., some focus on cognitive processing, others focus on discrete tasks performed by a human, while others consider perceptual processes), and in terms of their associated validation efforts. The objectives of this research effort were to support the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in identifying HPMs that are appropriate for predicting pilot performance in NextGen operations, to provide guidance on how to evaluate the quality of different models, and to identify gaps in pilot performance modeling research, that could guide future research opportunities. This research effort is intended to help the FAA

  7. Hawai'i P-3 Initiative: Findings from the First Year of the Evaluation. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellman, Gail L.; Kilburn, M. Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Recent efforts to improve K-12 educational outcomes have had mixed success. One possible reason is that many students entering kindergarten lack the basic skills to succeed in school. In 2007, with support from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Hawai'i launched its P-3 (preschool through third-grade) initiative, the early childhood component of the…

  8. Initial clinical evaluation of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Allison E.; Shan, Jing; Wu, Gongting; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping; Heath, Michael; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David

    2016-03-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is the gold standard for image evaluation of lung disease, including lung cancer and cystic fibrosis. It provides detailed information of the lung anatomy and lesions, but at a relatively high cost and high dose of radiation. Chest radiography is a low dose imaging modality but it has low sensitivity. Digital chest tomosynthesis (DCT) is an imaging modality that produces 3D images by collecting x-ray projection images over a limited angle. DCT is less expensive than CT and requires about 1/10th the dose of radiation. Commercial DCT systems acquire the projection images by mechanically scanning an x-ray tube. The movement of the tube head limits acquisition speed. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array in benchtop phantom studies. The stationary x-ray source allows for fast image acquisition. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of s-DCT for patient imaging. We have successfully imaged 31 patients. Preliminary evaluation by board certified radiologists suggests good depiction of thoracic anatomy and pathology.

  9. Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative; Volume 5, Strategic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1994-03-01

    Members of the Task HI (Strategic Evaluation) team were responsible for the development of a methodology to evaluate policies designed to alleviate air pollution in Mexico City. This methodology utilizes information from various reports that examined ways to reduce pollutant emissions, results from models that calculate the improvement in air quality due to a reduction in pollutant emissions, and the opinions of experts as to the requirements and trade-offs that are involved in developing a program to address the air pollution problem in Mexico City. The methodology combines these data to produce comparisons between different approaches to improving Mexico City`s air quality. These comparisons take into account not only objective factors such as the air quality improvement or cost of the different approaches, but also subjective factors such as public acceptance or political attractiveness of the different approaches. The end result of the process is a ranking of the different approaches and, more importantly, the process provides insights into the implications of implementing a particular approach or policy.

  10. Initial evaluation of the bottoms up time recovery technique

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford, A.; Bartholomew, T.; Stein, S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a new time transfer methodology and evaluates the performance of a number of globally distributed timing systems that utilize the technique. Active steering of high performance atomic clocks based on one-way GPS broadcasts is implemented automatically at remote sites. Data flows {open_quotes}up{close_quotes} to a central node where a series of processing and analysis steps provide after-the-fact calibration data. Using this technique, the widely separated sites can be inter-calibrated and their individual UTC time recovery performance can be monitored, managed and maintained. Relative synchronization between sites is as low as 2.5 ns over a 4000 mile baseline, and UTC(USNO) time recovery system wide is below 10ns.

  11. NOTE: A rapid procedure for initial drug evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, A. K.; Neti, S.; Macpherson, P. A.

    2001-06-01

    The overall aim of this work is to develop computer simulations to aid in the selection of proposed medicines and identify those most likely to succeed. One important feature is a systems approach to simulate both the target area with which the drug is designed to interact as well as the surrounding areas where feedback mechanisms may alter the expected effect. The simulation must be rapid if it is to be used to evaluate large numbers of potential drugs. Thus the procedure simplifies many of the known complex phenomena to provide a general framework and feedback mechanisms. An example of the use of the simulation to study a drug used to treat hypertension is given. A possible use of the technique is shown using the example of the effect of varying the drug dosage on the contraction of the arteriole muscle.

  12. Initial clinical evaluation of stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calliste, Jabari; Tucker, Andrew W.; Gidcumb, Emily; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z.

    2015-03-01

    Full field digital mammography (FFDM) has been the gold standard for mammography. It detects the presence, distribution, and morphology of microcalcifications (MCs), helping predict malignancy. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has overcome some limitations of FFDM such as poor sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values, due to superimposition of tissue, especially in dense breasts. Current DBT systems move an x-ray tube in either continuous (CM), or step-and-shoot motion (SSM). These systems are less effective than FFDM in MC detection due to lower spatial resolution. Motion of the x-ray source and system mechanical instability cause image blur. The image quality is further affected by patient motion due to the relatively long scan time. We developed a stationary DBT (s-DBT) system using a carbon nanotube (CNT) X-ray source array. The CNT array is electronically controlled, rapidly acquiring projection images over a large angular span, with zero tube motion. No source motion, coupled with a large angular span, results in improved in-plane and depth resolution. Using physical phantoms and human specimens, this system demonstrated higher spatial resolution than CM DBT. The objective of this study is to compare the diagnostic clinical performance of s-DBT to that of FFDM. Under UNC's IRB regulations, 100 patients with breast lesions are being recruited and imaged with both modalities. A reader study will compare the diagnostic accuracy of the modalities. We have successfully imaged the first 30 patients. Initial results indicate that s-DBT alone produces comparable MC sharpness, and increased lesion conspicuity compared to FFDM.

  13. Modeling the impact of simulated educational interventions on the use and abuse of pharmaceutical opioids in the United States: a report on initial efforts.

    PubMed

    Wakeland, Wayne; Nielsen, Alexandra; Schmidt, Teresa D; McCarty, Dennis; Webster, Lynn R; Fitzgerald, John; Haddox, J David

    2013-10-01

    Three educational interventions were simulated in a system dynamics model of the medical use, trafficking, and nonmedical use of pharmaceutical opioids. The study relied on secondary data obtained in the literature for the period of 1995 to 2008 as well as expert panel recommendations regarding model parameters and structure. The behavior of the resulting systems-level model was tested for fit against reference behavior data. After the base model was tested, logic to represent three educational interventions was added and the impact of each intervention on simulated overdose deaths was evaluated over a 7-year evaluation period, 2008 to 2015. Principal findings were that a prescriber education intervention not only reduced total overdose deaths in the model but also reduced the total number of persons who receive opioid analgesic therapy, medical user education not only reduced overdose deaths among medical users but also resulted in increased deaths from nonmedical use, and a "popularity" intervention sharply reduced overdose deaths among nonmedical users while having no effect on medical use. System dynamics modeling shows promise for evaluating potential interventions to ameliorate the adverse outcomes associated with the complex system surrounding the use of opioid analgesics to treat pain. PMID:24084403

  14. Initial evaluation and management of the critical burn patient.

    PubMed

    Vivó, C; Galeiras, R; del Caz, Ma D P

    2016-01-01

    The major improvement in burn therapy is likely to focus on the early management of hemodynamic and respiratory failures in combination with an aggressive and early surgical excision and skin grafting for full-thickness burns. Immediate burn care by first care providers is important and can vastly alter outcomes, and it can significantly limit burn progression and depth. The goal of prehospital care should be to cease the burning process as well as prevent future complications and secondary injuries for burn shock. Identifying burn patients appropriate for immediate or subacute transfer is an important step in reducing morbidity and mortality. Delays in transport to Burn Unit should be minimized. The emergency management follows the principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support Guidelines for assessment and stabilization of airway, breathing, circulation, disability, exposure and environment control. All patients with suspected inhalation injury must be removed from the enclosure as soon as possible, and immediately administer high-flow oxygen. Any patient with stridor, shortness of breath, facial burns, singed nasal hairs, cough, soot in the oral cavity, and history of being in a fire in an enclosed space should be strongly considered for early intubation. Fibroscopy may also be useful if airway damage is suspected and to assess known lung damage. Secondary evaluation following admission to the Burn Unit of a burned patient suffering a severe thermal injury includes continuation of respiratory support and management and treatment of inhalation injury, fluid resuscitation and cardiovascular stabilization, pain control and management of burn wound. PMID:26724246

  15. The Skills to Pay the Bills: An Evaluation of an Effort to Help Nonprofits Manage Their Finances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen; Grossman, Jean; Andrews, Kristine; Carrington, Nicholas; Rojas, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This study examines a Wallace Foundation-sponsored initiative aimed at improving the financial management skills and practices of 25 Chicago afterschool providers through training and coaching. Two models for this professional development were provided and each produced long-lasting improvements. Moreover, organizations receiving the…

  16. Hepatic arterial spin labelling MRI: an initial evaluation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ramasawmy, R; Campbell-Washburn, A E; Wells, J A; Johnson, S P; Pedley, R B; Walker-Samuel, S; Lythgoe, M F

    2015-01-01

    The development of strategies to combat hepatic disease and augment tissue regeneration has created a need for methods to assess regional liver function. Liver perfusion imaging has the potential to fulfil this need, across a range of hepatic diseases, alongside the assessment of therapeutic response. In this study, the feasibility of hepatic arterial spin labelling (HASL) was assessed for the first time in mice at 9.4 T, its variability and repeatability were evaluated, and it was applied to a model of colorectal liver metastasis. Data were acquired using flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery-arterial spin labelling (FAIR-ASL) with a Look–Locker readout, and analysed using retrospective respiratory gating and a T1-based quantification. This study shows that preclinical HASL is feasible and exhibits good repeatability and reproducibility. Mean estimated liver perfusion was 2.2 ± 0.8 mL/g/min (mean ± standard error, n = 10), which agrees well with previous measurements using invasive approaches. Estimates of the variation gave a within-session coefficient of variation (CVWS) of 7%, a between-session coefficient of variation (CVBS) of 9% and a between-animal coefficient of variation (CVA) of 15%. The within-session Bland–Altman repeatability coefficient (RCWS) was 18% and the between-session repeatability coefficient (RCBS) was 29%. Finally, the HASL method was applied to a mouse model of liver metastasis, in which significantly lower mean perfusion (1.1 ± 0.5 mL/g/min, n = 6) was measured within the tumours, as seen by fluorescence histology. These data indicate that precise and accurate liver perfusion estimates can be achieved using ASL techniques, and provide a platform for future studies investigating hepatic perfusion in mouse models of disease. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25522098

  17. Initial Evaluation of a New Electromechanical Cooler for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, RL

    2002-10-21

    The use of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) constitutes the current state of the art in cryogenic cooling for high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, which are widely used for {gamma}-ray and characteristic X-ray spectroscopy because of their excellent energy discrimination. Use of LN{sub 2} requires a liquid nitrogen supply, cumbersome storage tanks and plumbing, and the frequent attention of personnel to be sure that nitrogen levels are sufficient to maintain the detectors at a sufficiently low operating temperature. Safety hazards also are associated with the use of LN{sub 2}, both because of the potential for severe frostbite on exposure to skin and because it displaces ambient oxygen when it evaporates in closed spaces. Existing electromechanical coolers have, until now, been more expensive to procure and maintain than LN{sub 2} systems. Performance and reliability have also been serious issues because of microphonic degradation of photon energy peak resolution and cooler failures due to compressor oil becoming entrained in the refrigerant. This report describes the results of tests of a new HPGe detector cooling technology, the PerkinElmer ORTEC{reg_sign} Products X-Cooler{trademark} that, according to the manufacturer, significantly reduces the lifetime cost of the cooling system without degradation of the output signal. The manufacturer claims to have overcome cost, performance and reliability problems of older-generation electromechanical coolers, but the product has no significant history of use, and this project is the first independent evaluation of its performance for Total cost savings for the DOE and other agencies that use HPGe systems extensively for safeguards monitoring is expected to be quite significant if the new electromechanical cooler technology is shown to be reliable and if performance characteristics indicate its usefulness for this application. The technology also promises to make HPGe monitoring, characterization and detection available for

  18. Participatory Evaluation of a Community Mobilization Effort to Enroll Wyandotte County, Kansas, Residents Through the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Sepers, Charles E.; McKain, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Successful implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) depends on the capacity of local communities to mobilize for action. Yet the literature offers few systematic investigations of what communities are doing to ensure support for enrollment. In this empirical case study, we report implementation and outcomes of Enroll Wyandotte, a community mobilization effort to facilitate enrollment through the ACA in Wyandotte County, Kansas. We describe mobilization activities during the first round of open enrollment in coverage under the ACA (October 1, 2013–March 31, 2014), including the unfolding of community and organizational changes (e.g., new enrollment sites) and services provided to assist enrollment over time. The findings show an association between implementation measures and newly created accounts under the ACA (the primary outcome). PMID:25905820

  19. Identifying Armed Respondents to Domestic Violence Restraining Orders and Recovering Their Firearms: Process Evaluation of an Initiative in California

    PubMed Central

    Frattaroli, Shannon; Claire, Barbara E.; Vittes, Katherine A.; Webster, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated a law enforcement initiative to screen respondents to domestic violence restraining orders for firearm ownership or possession and recover their firearms. Methods. The initiative was implemented in San Mateo and Butte counties in California from 2007 through 2010. We used descriptive methods to evaluate the screening process and recovery effort in each county, relying on records for individual cases. Results. Screening relied on an archive of firearm transactions, court records, and petitioner interviews; no single source was adequate. Screening linked 525 respondents (17.7%) in San Mateo County to firearms; 405 firearms were recovered from 119 (22.7%) of them. In Butte County, 88 (31.1%) respondents were linked to firearms; 260 firearms were recovered from 45 (51.1%) of them. Nonrecovery occurred most often when orders were never served or respondents denied having firearms. There were no reports of serious violence or injury. Conclusions. Recovering firearms from persons subject to domestic violence restraining orders is possible. We have identified design and implementation changes that may improve the screening process and the yield from recovery efforts. Larger implementation trials are needed. PMID:24328660

  20. Formative Evaluation of the Understanding the Early Years Initiative. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the findings of the formative evaluation of the Understanding the Early Years (UEY) Initiative. The evaluation was conducted to examine issues of implementation and design, early progress in achieving immediate objectives, and issues related to accountability. The evaluation team was also asked to provide preliminary guidance…

  1. Evaluating U.S. medical schools' efforts to educate faculty researchers on research integrity and research misconduct policies and procedures.

    PubMed

    Titus, Sandra Larsen

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how well U.S. medical school institutions are doing to promote research integrity. It is an important question to ask in order to determine whether there are sufficient and adequate protections in place to protect the U.S. Public Health Service's (PHS) resources devoted to medical research. This paper focuses on 5,100 medical school researchers' knowledge of what constitutes research misconduct as well as their willingness to report it to the research integrity officer (RIO) and educate their Ph.D. trainees. We learned that 5.6% of researchers could correctly distinguish seven or more of the nine scenarios that depicted likely research misconduct, as defined by the PHS regulations, from scenarios describing other ethical issues. Instead, researchers had expansive definitions and often inappropriately identified infractions such as conflicts of interest, Institutional Review Board (IRB) violations, and other breaches in ethical standards to be research misconduct. In addition, researchers who correctly identified four instances of likely research misconduct in the test items were highly unlikely to report their observations to a RIO. Researchers also provided insight on the factors they believe influence their decision making process of whether to report research misconduct. In addition, this paper also reports on the guidance that faculty said they provided their trainees on research misconduct issues. We conclude with a discussion and recommendations on what institutional leaders might consider doing in order to enhance their research integrity efforts and protect their institution's reputation. PMID:24073604

  2. Revisiting the link between breeding effort and oxidative balance through field evaluation of two sympatric sibling insect species.

    PubMed

    Rey, Benjamin; Pélisson, Pierre-François; Bel-Venner, Marie-Claude; Voituron, Yann; Venner, Samuel

    2015-03-01

    The idea that oxidative stress could be a major force governing evolutionary trade-offs has recently been challenged by experimental approaches in laboratory conditions, triggering extensive debates centered on theoretical and methodological issues. Here, we revisited the link between oxidative stress and reproduction by measuring multiple antioxidant and oxidative damages in wild-caught females of two sibling weevil species (Curculio elephas, C. glandium). The strength of our study arised from (1) studied species that were sympatric and exploited similar resource, but displayed contrasting reproductive strategies and (2) individuals were sampled throughout adult life so as to relate oxidative status to breeding effort. We found that the short-lived C. elephas sacrifices red-ox homeostasis for immediate reproduction upon emergence as characterized by low antioxidant defenses and elevated oxidative damage. Comparatively, C. glandium massively invests in antioxidant and maintains low oxidative damage, which may contribute to their extended prereproductive period. Intriguingly, we also reveal, for the first time in a field study, an unexpected reactivation of antioxidant defenses with the onset of reproduction. Our results thus support the existence of a strong, but complex relationship between oxidative stress and life-history evolution and highlight the need for a finer-scale picture of antioxidant strategies. PMID:25521015

  3. Evaluation Approaches for a National ICT Initiative: The Example of Laptops for New Zealand Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Alister; Cowie, Bronwen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will highlight the successful evaluation approaches deployed for long-term exploration of the impact of a national policy initiative as well as some of the results and outcomes. An interactive feedback process informed decision-making at the national and local level thereby enhancing both the initiative and its implementation in…

  4. A Plan for the Evaluation of California's Class Size Reduction Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirst, Michael; Bomstedt, George; Stecher, Brian

    In July 1996, California began its Class Size Reduction (CSR) Initiative. To gauge the effectiveness of this initiative, an analysis of its objectives and an overview of proposed strategies for evaluating CSR are presented here. An outline of the major challenges that stand between CSR and its mission are provided. These include logistical…

  5. A Portfolio-Based Evaluation of Utah's Education Technology Initiative: 1990-1991 School Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergendoller, John R.; And Others

    This report examines the impact of the Utah Educational Technology Initiative (ETI) on student performance and student access to computers during the initial year of implementation in the 1990-91 school year. Chapter 1 describes ETI goals, the goals of the evaluation report, the concept of portfolio analysis, and organization of the report. An…

  6. The Springfield Weed and Seed Initiative: A Process Description and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Donald G.

    A process description and preliminary evaluation are provided for the Weed and Seed initiative in Springfield (Illinois). This initiative involved local, state, and federal resources in projects that included (1) facility improvement, (2) drug prevention, (3) youth education and child care, (4) jobs and vocational training, (5) resident…

  7. Preventing Youth Violence. A Summary of Program Evaluations. Urban Health Initiative Monograph Series, Monograph 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellermann, Arthur L.; Fuqua-Whitley, Dawna S.; Rivara, Frederick P.

    This summary explaining the results of evaluations of programs to prevent youth violence is an attempt to fill the gap in information about what works and what does not. An effort is made to place the problem of youth violence in perspective, using information largely taken from Bureau of Justice statistics. The existing programs are divided into…

  8. Formative and summative evaluation efforts for the Teacher Enhancement Institute conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center, summer 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Randal D.

    1994-01-01

    The Teacher Enhancement Institute (TEI) at NASA Langley Research Center was developed in response to Executive Order 12821 which mandates national laboratories to 'assist in the mathematics and science education of our Nation's students, teachers, parents, and the public by establishing programs at their agency to provide for training elementary and secondary school teachers to improve their knowledge of mathematics and science. Such programs, to the maximum extent possible, shall involve partnerships with universities, state and local elementary and secondary school authorities, corporations and community based organizations'. The faculty worked closely with one another and the invited speakers to insure that the sessions supported the objectives. Speakers were informed of the objectives and given guidance concerning form and function for the session. Faculty members monitored sessions to assist speakers and to provide a quality control function. Faculty provided feedback to speakers concerning general objective accomplishment. Participant comments were also provided when applicable. Post TEI surveys asked for specific comments about each TEI session. During the second of the two, two week institutes, daily critiques were provided to the participants for their reflection. This seemed to provide much improved feedback to speakers and faculty because the sessions were fresh in each participant's mind. Between sessions one and two, some changes were made to the program as a result of the formative evaluation process. Those changes, though, were minor in nature and comprised what may be called 'fine tuning' a well conceived and implemented program. After the objectives were written, an assessment instrument was developed to test the accomplishment of the objectives. This instrument was actually two surveys, one given before the TEI and one given after the TEI. In using such a series, it was expected that changes in the participants induced by attendance at TEI may be

  9. Developmental evaluation and the 'Stronger Economies Together' initiative in the United States.

    PubMed

    Honadle, Beth Walter; Zapata, Marisa A; Auffrey, Christopher; vom Hofe, Rainer; Looye, Johanna

    2014-04-01

    This article describes a developmental evaluation and explains its impact on the Stronger Economies Together (SET) initiative of the U.S. Department of Agriculture in collaboration with the Nation's four Regional Rural Development Centers and Land-Grant universities. Through a dynamic process, this evaluation of the early phases of an initiative led to continuous program alterations based on feedback. The relationship of the evaluation team to the initiative's coordinating team enabled seamless transfer of observations, suggestions, and recommendations to decision makers. The multidisciplinary character of the evaluation team provided a diverse set of perspectives with a depth of subject matter and knowledge from relevant fields. One lesson is that developmental evaluators must be flexible, nimble, creative, and adaptive. When expected data are imperfect or nonexistent, the team must collect alternate information and make recommendations to improve data collection. As the initiative proceeded and modifications came about, the evaluation team had to recognize the changes in the program and focus on different questions. This experience with developmental evaluation provides insights into how interdisciplinary teams may need to change course and conduct a developmental evaluation when a formative evaluation was originally envisioned. PMID:24365696

  10. Summary of Liquid Oxygen/Hydrogen, Direct Metal Laser Sintering Injector Testing and Evaluation Effort at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Gregory; Bullard, David B.

    2015-01-01

    The last several years have witnessed a significant advancement in the area of additive manufacturing technology. One area that has seen substantial expansion in application has been laser sintering (or melting) in a powder bed. This technology is often termed 3D printing or various acronyms that may be industry, process, or company specific. Components manufactured via 3D printing have the potential to significantly reduce development and fabrication time and cost. The usefulness of 3D printed components is influenced by several factors such as material properties and surface roughness. This paper details three injectors that were designed, fabricated, and tested in order to evaluate the utility of 3D printed components for rocket engine applications. The three injectors were tested in a hot-fire environment with chamber pressures of approximately 1400 psia. One injector was a 28 element design printed by Directed Manufacturing. The other two injectors were identical 40 element designs printed by Directed Manufacturing and Solid Concepts. All the injectors were swirl-coaxial designs and were subscale versions of a full-scale injector currently in fabrication. The test and evaluation programs for the 28 element and 40 element injectors provided a substantial amount of data that confirms the feasibility of 3D printed parts for future applications. The operating conditions of previously tested, conventionally manufactured injectors were reproduced in the 28 and 40 element programs in order to contrast the performance of each. Overall, the 3D printed injectors demonstrated comparable performance to the conventionally manufactured units. The design features of the aforementioned injectors can readily be implemented in future applications with a high degree of confidence.

  11. Initial Efforts at Asteroid Lightcurve Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, B. D.

    2007-05-01

    The problem of determining the shape of an asteroid from its lightcurve has been studied for many years. Henry Norris Russell presented a paper in 1906 that said it couldn't be done with any certainty. However, further study during the 20th century said otherwise and several methods were developed that had various levels of success. In the last several years, many asteroid shape and spin axis models have been produced using methods pioneered by Mikko Kaasalainen and others. The author has converted the original FORTRAN and C code of Kaasalainen and Durech so that it is available to anyone wanting to develop their own inversion program. Models based on lightcurves the author and others have obtained are shown.

  12. Evaluation of the Penn Macy Initiative To Advance Academic Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Lois K.; Swan, Beth Ann; Lang, Norma E.

    2003-01-01

    In the Penn Macy Initiative, 21 nursing schools participated in summer institutes and follow-up consultations to refine practice. Evaluation data from participants' daily and postinstitute feedback, institutional self-evaluations, and comparison of school accomplishments identified critical indicators of progress in academic practice. A key…

  13. The Research and Development in Organisations Approach and the Evaluation of a Mainstream Behaviour Support Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmins, Paul; Shepherd, Deborah; Kelly, Tom

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a local authority behaviour support initiative that involved the re-location of four behaviour support teachers from pupil referral units into three mainstream secondary schools to work with pupils at risk of exclusion. The evaluation was largely illuminative (Parlett, 1981) and focused on the effect of…

  14. Review of the nutritional implications of farmers' markets and community gardens: a call for evaluation and research efforts.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Lacey Arneson; Laska, Melissa Nelson; Larson, Nicole I; Story, Mary

    2010-03-01

    The development and promotion of farmers' markets and community gardens is growing in popularity as a strategy to increase community-wide fruit and vegetable consumption. Despite large numbers of farmers' markets and community gardens in the United States, as well as widespread enthusiasm for their use as a health promotion tool, little is known about their influence on dietary intake. This review examines the current scientific literature on the implications of farmers' market programs and community gardens on nutrition-related outcomes in adults. Studies published between January 1980 and January 2009 were identified via PubMed and Agricola database searches and by examining reference lists from relevant studies. Studies were included in this review if they took place in the United States and qualitatively or quantitatively examined nutrition-related outcomes, including dietary intake; attitudes and beliefs regarding buying, preparing, or eating fruits and vegetables; and behaviors and perceptions related to obtaining produce from a farmers' market or community garden. Studies focusing on garden-based youth programs were excluded. In total, 16 studies were identified for inclusion in this review. Seven studies focused on the impact of farmers' market nutrition programs for Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children participants, five focused on the influence of farmers' market programs for seniors, and four focused on community gardens. Findings from this review reveal that few well-designed research studies (eg, those incorporating control groups) utilizing valid and reliable dietary assessment methods to evaluate the influence of farmers' markets and community gardens on nutrition-related outcomes have been completed. Recommendations for future research on the dietary influences of farmers' markets and community gardens are provided. PMID:20184990

  15. Integrating Assessment and Evaluation Into Partnership Initiatives: Lessons From the Community Partnerships for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Giunta, Nancy; Thomas, M Lori

    2015-08-01

    Communities nationwide have formed cross-sector partnerships to face the needs of an aging population, particularly for the purpose of improving long-term supportive service systems. Research is limited on how evaluation strategies are incorporated into partnership work, especially in the field of aging. This retrospective qualitative study reviewed administrative and key informant interview data to examine how 15 community partnerships (CPs) within the Community Partnerships for Older Adults (CPFOA) national program incorporated evaluation into their work. The four overarching lessons drawn from our inquiry suggest that effective CPs: (a) incorporate both formative and summative methods into evaluation, (b) use and develop the knowledge and skills of its members, (c) support flexible and creative evaluation methods and strategies, and (d) use internal and external resources to support evaluation efforts, particularly with nontraditional partners. There is a need for continued research to capture the methodological complexity of partnership evaluation. PMID:24652885

  16. School Violence Interventions in the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative: Evaluation of Two Early Intervention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Oliver T.; Boroughs, Michael; Armstrong, Kathleen H.

    2007-01-01

    The Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative was designed to encourage collaboration among school districts and local community service providers in the provision of behavioral health prevention and early intervention efforts. These efforts would address the physical safety of students as well as provide mental health, violence prevention, and…

  17. Looking Forward with LIFE: Literacy Initiative for Empowerment. Global LIFE Mid-Term Evaluation Report 2006-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanemann, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) launched the Literacy Initiative for Empowerment (2006-2015)--LIFE--to tackle the literacy challenge. This is a collaborative effort to accelerate literacy efforts in thirty five of the world's most challenged countries and thereby to unlock progress to reach all of the…

  18. Exchanging Ideas on Evaluation: Evaluating an Initial Management Skills Course: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Pat

    1979-01-01

    Describes an evaluation study of an interpersonal effectiveness management course for first-level supervisors. The evaluator collected information using graduate appraisal of course content, skill retention, measures, significant incident techniques, analysis of work products/records, appraisal of instructor, observation checklists, and…

  19. The Development of the Manchester Motor Skills Assessment (MMSA): An Initial Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, C.; Cole, M.; Crook, H.; Fletcher, J.; Lucanz, J.; Noble, J.

    2007-01-01

    This article is an initial evaluation of a motor skills assessment for primary aged children. The Manchester Motor Skills Assessment (MMSA) is designed to be quick and easy for teaching assistants to complete, with the dual purposes of informing group programme planning and demonstrating an individual child's progress following a period of…

  20. Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) - Utrecht, Netherlands The May 8, 2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 4th workshop of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) was held on May 8 in Utrecht, The Netherlands, in conjunction with the NATO/SPS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application. AQMEII was launched in 2009 as a l...

  1. Housing Services for Child Welfare-Involved Families: An Initial Evaluation Using Observational Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Patrick J.; Taylor, Jeremy J.; Rufa, Anne K.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of housing services among child welfare-involved families using observational data. Propensity score matching with data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being compared intact families (n = 183) who received housing services 12 months after initial investigation to nontreated families balanced on…

  2. Teaching Costs in Seven French Universities. Initial Evaluations. Program on Institutional Management in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham-Frois, Gilbert

    Methods of evaluating unit operating costs and the development of the services and departments of French universities are examined. After an initial phase devoted to working out a common methodology, it was decided that the latter should be put directly to the test and that devices would have to be found to bridge the gaps in existing data, as,…

  3. 20 CFR 220.21 - Initial evaluation of a previous occupational disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... disability. 220.21 Section 220.21 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Disability Under the Railroad Retirement Act for Work in an Employee's Regular Railroad Occupation § 220.21 Initial evaluation of a previous occupational...

  4. 20 CFR 220.21 - Initial evaluation of a previous occupational disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... disability. 220.21 Section 220.21 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Disability Under the Railroad Retirement Act for Work in an Employee's Regular Railroad Occupation § 220.21 Initial evaluation of a previous occupational...

  5. Formative Evaluation of the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the findings and conclusions, and recommendations for the Formative Evaluation of the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers (TIOW). The TIOW was introduced in 2006 to help older workers in vulnerable communities who had lost their jobs to extend their labour market participation and reintegrate into employment. The TIOW is…

  6. Baylor SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program: Model Description and Initial Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, James H.; Kowalchuk, Alicia; Waters, Vicki; Laufman, Larry; Shilling, Elizabeth H.

    2012-01-01

    The Baylor College of Medicine SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program is a multilevel project that trains residents and faculty in evidenced-based screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) methods for alcohol and substance use problems. This paper describes the training program and provides initial evaluation after the…

  7. Using the Concept of "Population Dose" in Planning and Evaluating Community-Level Obesity Prevention Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheadle, Allen; Schwartz, Pamela M.; Rauzon, Suzanne; Bourcier, Emily; Senter, Sandra; Spring, Rebecca; Beery, William L.

    2013-01-01

    When planning and evaluating community-level initiatives focused on policy and environment change, it is useful to have estimates of the impact on behavioral outcomes of particular strategies (e.g., building a new walking trail to promote physical activity). We have created a measure of estimated strategy-level impact--"population dose"--based on…

  8. 38 CFR 21.376 - Travel expenses for initial evaluation and counseling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Travel expenses for... and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Interregional and Intraregional Travel of Veterans § 21.376 Travel expenses for initial evaluation and counseling. When VA asks a disabled veteran to report to...

  9. 20 CFR 220.21 - Initial evaluation of a previous occupational disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Disability Under the Railroad Retirement Act for Work in an Employee's Regular Railroad Occupation § 220.21 Initial evaluation of a previous occupational disability. (a) In some cases, the Board may determine that a claimant is not currently disabled for work in...

  10. 20 CFR 220.21 - Initial evaluation of a previous occupational disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Disability Under the Railroad Retirement Act for Work in an Employee's Regular Railroad Occupation § 220.21 Initial evaluation of a previous occupational disability. (a) In some cases, the Board may determine that a claimant is not currently disabled for work in...

  11. "Bums on Seats" or "Listening to Voices: Evaluating Widening Participation Initiatives Using Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Liz

    2000-01-01

    Evaluation of initiatives for widening participation in higher education by nontraditional groups should avoid positivist, economic approaches in favor of participatory action research (PAR). An example from Britain shows how PAR finds local solutions for local problems; promotes empowerment, ownership, and sustainability; and bridges and…

  12. 49 CFR 40.297 - Does anyone have the authority to change a SAP's initial evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Does anyone have the authority to change a SAP's initial evaluation? 40.297 Section 40.297 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Substance Abuse Professionals...

  13. 49 CFR 40.297 - Does anyone have the authority to change a SAP's initial evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Does anyone have the authority to change a SAP's initial evaluation? 40.297 Section 40.297 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Substance Abuse Professionals...

  14. 49 CFR 40.297 - Does anyone have the authority to change a SAP's initial evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Does anyone have the authority to change a SAP's initial evaluation? 40.297 Section 40.297 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Substance Abuse Professionals...

  15. 49 CFR 40.297 - Does anyone have the authority to change a SAP's initial evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Does anyone have the authority to change a SAP's initial evaluation? 40.297 Section 40.297 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Substance Abuse Professionals...

  16. 49 CFR 40.297 - Does anyone have the authority to change a SAP's initial evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Does anyone have the authority to change a SAP's initial evaluation? 40.297 Section 40.297 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Substance Abuse Professionals...

  17. Impact and Process Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    2013-05-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the impacts and processes of the former Wind Powering America(WPA) initiative sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). WPA has an underlying goal of dramatically increasing the use of wind energy in the U.S.

  18. Early College High School Initiative. Evaluation Year End Report: 2003?2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Andrea R.; Cole, Susan; Melton, Janet; Safran, Stephanie; Vogel, Tyler; Walton, Laura; Adelman, Nancy; Hall, Catherine; Keating, Kaelie Knowles; Murray, Samantha; Nielsen, Natalie; Schaffner, Monika

    2005-01-01

    This is the first year-end report produced as part of the on-going evaluation of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Early College High School Initiative. The program provides funding and support for the establishment of Early College High Schools, which are organized to allow all enrolled students the opportunity to earn a high school diploma…

  19. Path Forward for the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article lays out the objectives for Phase 2 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). The inhalation of air pollutants such as ozone and fine particles has been linked to adverse impacts on human health, and the atmospheric deposition of pollutan...

  20. Evaluation of the Alabama Reading Initiative, 1999-2000. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Marcia R.; Spor, Mary W.

    This paper is a summary of the evaluation of the second complete year of the implementation of the Alabama Reading Initiative (ARI), which is designed to achieve 100% literacy by targeting reading performance of beginning reading and first-grade students, to expand the reading power for second- through twelfth-grade students and to intervene for…

  1. Factorial Validity of a Questionnaire to Evaluate University Students' Initial Perception of Learning Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doménech-Betoret, Fernando; Fortea-Bagán, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Education research has clearly verified that a student's perception of the system to evaluate the subject matter will play a fundamental role in his/her implication (deep approach vs. surface approach) in the teaching/learning process of the subject matter. The present work aims to examine the factorial validity and reliability of a…

  2. Cancer Education Program Evaluation: A Responsive Approach to Planning an Evaluation and Initial Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearsol, James A.

    This paper describes evaluation planning for the Cancer Education Program (CEP) at Ohio State University (OSU). The three-year OSU CEP project was designed as a multidisciplinary cancer education program. A responsive method, which trades off some measurement precision in order to increase the usefulness of the findings, was employed in the…

  3. Program management plan for development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts associated with Oak Ridge Reservation`s Land Disposal Restrictions Federal Facility Compliance Agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, T.B.

    1994-04-01

    This program management plan covers the development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all the waste listed in Appendix B of the ORR`s LDR/FFCA as well as any new wastes which meet Appendix B criteria. To successfully identify a treatment method, at least a proof-of-principle level of understanding must be obtained: that is, the candidate processes must be demonstrated as effective in treating the wastes to the LDR; however, an optimized process is not required. Where applicable and deemed necessary and where the budgets will support them, pilot-scale demonstrations will be pursued. The overall strategy being adopted in this program will be composed of the following activities: Scoping of the study; characterization; development and screening of alternatives; treatability investigations; and detailed analysis of alternatives.

  4. Initial evaluation of dry storage issues for spent nuclear fuels in wet storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, R J; Johnson, Jr, A B; Lund, A L; Gilbert, E R

    1996-07-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has evaluated the basis for moving selected spent nuclear fuels in the CPP-603 and CPP-666 storage pools at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from wet to dry interim storage. This work is being conducted for the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company as part of the effort to determine appropriate conditioning and dry storage requirements for these fuels. These spent fuels are from 22 test reactors and include elements clad with aluminum or stainless steel and a wide variety of fuel materials: UAl{sub x}, UAl{sub x}-Al and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermets, U-5% fissium, UMo, UZrH{sub x}, UErZrH, UO{sub 2}-stainless steel cermet, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-stainless steel cermet. The study also included declad uranium-zirconium hydride spent fuel stored in the CPP-603 storage pools. The current condition and potential failure mechanisms for these spent fuels were evaluated to determine the impact on conditioning and dry storage requirements. Initial recommendations for conditioning and dry storage requirements are made based on the potential degradation mechanisms and their impacts on moving the spent fuel from wet to dry storage. Areas needing further evaluation are identified.

  5. Navy superconductivity efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  6. A longitudinal evaluation of a project-based learning initiative in an engineering undergraduate programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Wayne; Palmer, Stuart; Bennett, Mitchell

    2012-05-01

    Project-based learning (PBL) is a well-known student-centred methodology for engineering design education. The methodology claims to offer a number of educational benefits. This paper evaluates the student perceptions of the initial and second offering of a first-year design unit at Griffith University in Australia. It builds on an earlier evaluation conducted after the initial offering of the unit. It considers the implementation of the recommended changes. Evaluations of the two offerings reveal that students (in both the initial and second offering) generally enjoyed the experience, but that the second offering was found to be a significantly more enjoyable learning experience. Students in the second offering also reported a significantly better understanding of what they needed to do for the design projects and where to find the requisite information. The oral presentation aspect of the initial and second offerings received the lowest satisfaction rating. The inclusion (and delivery) of the computer-aided drawing component of the unit is seen as a positive aspect by some students, but many others comment on it negatively. The best aspects of the PBL unit and those aspects needing further improvement were similar to the findings of other investigations documented in the literature.

  7. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Repository Impact Evaluation FY-05 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, W G

    2005-09-12

    An important long-term objective of advanced nuclear fuel cycle (AFC) technologies is to provide improvement in the long-term management of radioactive waste. Compared to a once-thru fuel cycle, it is possible to generate far less waste, and potentially easier waste to manage, with advanced fuel cycles. However, the precise extent and value of these benefits are complex and difficult to quantify. This document presents a status report of efforts within AFCI Systems Analysis to define and quantify the AFC benefits to geologic disposal, development of cooperative efforts with the US repository program, and participation with international evaluations of AFC impacts on waste management. The primary analysis of repository benefits is conducted by ANL. This year repository impact evaluations have included: (1) Continued evaluation of LWR recycle benefits in support of scenario analysis. (2) Extension of repository analyses to consider long-term dose reductions. (3) Developing the opportunity for cooperation with the U.S. repository program. (4) International cooperation with OECD-NEA.

  8. Variations in thematic mapper spectra of soil related to tillage and crop residue management - Initial evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeley, M. W.; Ruschy, D. L.; Linden, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A cooperative research project was initiated in 1982 to study differences in thematic mapper spectral characteristics caused by variable tillage and crop residue practices. Initial evaluations of radiometric data suggest that spectral separability of variably tilled soils can be confounded by moisture and weathering effects. Separability of bare tilled soils from those with significant amounts of corn residue is enhanced by wet conditions, but still possible under dry conditions when recent tillage operations have occurred. In addition, thematic mapper data may provide an alternative method to study the radiant energy balance at the soil surface in conjunction with variable tillage systems.

  9. Initial evaluation and management of infertility by the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Frey, Keith A; Patel, Ketan S

    2004-11-01

    Infertility is a common condition seen in primary care practices. Infertility is defined as 1 year of unprotected intercourse during which a pregnancy is not achieved. in the United States, 15% to 20% of all couples are infertile, with higher rates seen in older couples. The causes of infertility include abnormalities of any portion of the male or female reproductive system. The female partner usually presents initially for an infertilty problem, often in the context of an annual well-women examination. The primary care physician who provides such preventive care can initiate the diagnostic evaluation and can treat some causes of infertility. PMID:15544024

  10. Painless thyroiditis associated to thyroid carcinoma: role of initial ultrasonography evaluation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Raisa Bressan; Macedo, Bruno Mussoi de; Izquierdo, Rogério Friedrich; Meyer, Erika Laurini Souza

    2016-04-01

    Even though it is a rare event, most associations of thyroid carcinoma with subacute thyroiditis described in the literature are related to its granulomatous form (Quervain's thyroiditis). We present a patient with subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis (painless thyroiditis) and papillary thyroid cancer that was first suspected in an initial ultrasound evaluation. A 30-year old female patient who was referred to the emergency room due to hyperthyroidism symptoms was diagnosed with painless thyroiditis established by physical examination and laboratory findings. With the presence of a palpable painless thyroid nodule an ultrasound was prescribed and the images revealed a suspicious thyroid nodule, microcalcification focus in the heterogeneous thyroid parenquima and cervical lymphadenopathy. Fine needle aspiration biopsy was taken from this nodule; cytology was assessed for compatibility with papillary thyroid carcinoma. Postsurgical pathology evaluation showed a multicentric papillary carcinoma and lymphocytic infiltration. Subacute thyroiditis, regardless of type, may produce transitory ultrasound changes that obscure the coexistence of papillary carcinoma. Due to this, initial thyroid ultrasound evaluation should be delayed until clinical recovery. We recommended a thyroid ultrasound exam for initial evaluation of painless thyroiditis, particularly in patients with palpable thyroid nodule. Further cytological examination is recommended in cases presenting with suspect thyroid nodule and/or non-nodular hypoechoic (> 1 cm) or heterogeneous areas with microcalcification focus. PMID:26421671