Science.gov

Sample records for injection project trail

  1. Clean Coal III Project: Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection Project Trail 1 Report - Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection - Results with Low Volatile Coal

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1997-11-01

    This report describes the first coal trial test conducted with the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Burns Harbor Plant. This demonstration project is divided into three phases: Phase I - Design Phase II - Construction Phase III - Operation The design phase was conducted in 1991-1993, Construction of the facility began in August 1993 and was completed in late 1994. The coal injection facility began operating in January 1995 and Phase III began in November 1995. The Trial 1 base test on C furnace was carried out in October 1996 as a comparison period for the analysis of the operation during subsequent coal trials.

  2. National Trails Day. Project SEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Mark

    This paper describes how a school district in Maine implemented an outdoor education program centered around National Trails Day (a day of awareness of outdoor recreational areas in the United States). The program combined classroom learning with an all-day hike on the Appalachian Trail by 240 seventh-grade students. Numerous teachers, school…

  3. Effect of Trailing Edge Flow Injection on Fan Noise and Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental investigation using trailing edge blowing for reducing fan rotor/guide vane wake interaction noise was completed in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Data were acquired to measure noise, aerodynamic performance, and flow features for a 22" tip diameter fan representative of modern turbofan technology. The fan was designed to use trailing edge blowing to reduce the fan blade wake momentum deficit. The test objective was to quantify noise reductions, measure impacts on fan aerodynamic performance, and document the flow field using hot-film anemometry. Measurements concentrated on approach, cutback, and takeoff rotational speeds as those are the primary conditions of acoustic interest. Data are presented for a 2% (relative to overall fan flow) trailing edge injection rate and show a 2 dB reduction in Overall Sound Power Level (OAPWL) at all fan test speeds. The reduction in broadband noise is nearly constant and is approximately 1.5 dB up to 20 kHz at all fan speeds. Measurements of tone noise show significant variation, as evidenced by reductions of up to 6 dB in the 2 BPF tone at 6700 rpm.: and increases of nearly 2 dB for the 4 BPF tone at approach speed. Aerodynamic performance measurements show the fan with 2 % injection has an overall efficiency that is comparable to the baseline fan and operates, as intended, with nearly the same pressure ratio and mass flow parameters. Hot-film measurements obtained at the approach operating condition indicate that mean blade wake filling in the tip region was not as significant as expected. This suggests that additional acoustic benefits could be realized if the trailing edge blowing could be modified to provide better filling of the wake momentum deficit. Nevertheless, the hot-film measurements indicate that the trailing edge blowing provided significant reductions in blade wake turbulence. Overall, these results indicate that further work may be required to fully understand the proper

  4. Linking Learning Style Theory with Retention Research: The TRAILS Project. AIR Professional File.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.

    The Trucking Retention and Academic Integration by Learning Style (TRAILS) research project at St. Louis University, which is designed to incorporate information on learning style in ongoing enrollment research and improve campus retention, is described. Learning style and the Tinto Model of student attrition are discussed, along with the…

  5. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-06

    In December 1990, the US Department of Energy selected 13 projects for funding under the Federal Clean Coal Technology Program (Round III). One of the projects selected was the project sponsored by LIFAC North America, (LIFAC NA), titled LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project.'' The host site for this $17 million, three-phase project is Richmond Power and Light's Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 in Richmond, Indiana. The LIFAC technology uses upper-furnace limestone injection with patented humidification of the flue gas to remove 75--85% of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas. In this report, progress for the period July--September 1991 is covered.

  6. Assessing current and projected suitable habitats for tree-of-heaven along the Appalachian Trail

    PubMed Central

    Clark, John; Wang, Yeqiao; August, Peter V.

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of ecosystems by non-native species is a major driver of biodiversity loss worldwide. A critical component of effective land management to control invasion is the identification and active protection of areas at high risk of future invasion. The Appalachian Trail Decision Support System (A.T.-DSS) was developed to inform regional natural resource management by integrating remote sensing data, ground-based measurements and predictive modelling products. By incorporating NASA's remote sensing data and modelling capacities from the Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS), this study examined the current habitat suitability and projected suitable habitat for the invasive species tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima) as a prototype application of the A.T.-DSS. Species observations from forest surveys, geospatial data, climatic projections and maximum entropy modelling were used to identify regions potentially susceptible to tree-of-heaven invasion. The modelling result predicted a 48% increase in suitable area over the study area, with significant expansion along the northern extremes of the Appalachian Trail. PMID:24733947

  7. Assessing current and projected suitable habitats for tree-of-heaven along the Appalachian Trail.

    PubMed

    Clark, John; Wang, Yeqiao; August, Peter V

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of ecosystems by non-native species is a major driver of biodiversity loss worldwide. A critical component of effective land management to control invasion is the identification and active protection of areas at high risk of future invasion. The Appalachian Trail Decision Support System (A.T.-DSS) was developed to inform regional natural resource management by integrating remote sensing data, ground-based measurements and predictive modelling products. By incorporating NASA's remote sensing data and modelling capacities from the Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS), this study examined the current habitat suitability and projected suitable habitat for the invasive species tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima) as a prototype application of the A.T.-DSS. Species observations from forest surveys, geospatial data, climatic projections and maximum entropy modelling were used to identify regions potentially susceptible to tree-of-heaven invasion. The modelling result predicted a 48% increase in suitable area over the study area, with significant expansion along the northern extremes of the Appalachian Trail. PMID:24733947

  8. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The LIFAC technology has similarities to other sorbent injection technologies using humidification, but employs a unique patented vertical reaction chamber located down-stream of the boiler to facilitate and control the sulfur capture and other chemical reactions. This chamber improves the overall reaction efficiency enough to allow the use of pulverized limestone rather than more expensive reagents such as lime which are often used to increase the efficiency of other sorbent injection processes. Sorbent injection is a potentially important alternative to conventional wet lime and limestone scrubbing, and this project is another effort to test alternative sorbent injection approaches. In comparison to wet systems, LIFAC, with recirculation of the sorbent, removes less sulfur dioxide - 75--85% relative to 90% or greater for conventional scrubbers - and requires more reagent material. However, if the demonstration is successful, LIFAC will offer these important advantages over wet scrubbing systems: LIFAC is relatively easy to retrofit to an existing boiler and requires less area than conventional wet FGD systems; LIFAC is less expensive to install than conventional wet FGD processes; LIFAC's overall costs measured on a dollar-per-ton S0{sub 2} removed basis are less, an important advantage in a regulatory regime with trading of emission allocations. LIFAC produces a dry, readily disposable waste by-product versus a wet product; and LIFAC is relatively simple to operate.

  9. Electronic identification with injectable transponders in pig production: results of a field trail on commercial farms and slaughterhouses concerning injectability and retrievability.

    PubMed

    Lambooij, E; Langeveld, N G; Lammers, G H; Huiskes, J H

    1995-12-01

    A nationwide electronic system for the identification of all pigs is a means to achieve a tighter control of livestock and meat in the Netherlands. In order to examine the use of electronic identification transponders, two field trails were performed. Transponders supplied by three separate companies were tested on pigs on commercial farms. In phase 1, each device was examined on separate farms and in phase 2, the three devices were tested on each farm. A total of 3,436 and 5,947 transponders from the different suppliers were injected in the base of the ear at weaning in phase 1 and 2 on seven and five farms, respectively. The following aspects were examined: technical labour for injection and reading, readability of the transponders, impact on tissues at the injection site, and retrieval of the transponder after slaughter. After instruction the farmer was well able to inject a transponder in a restrained piglet. The results show that in phases 1 and 2 1.6% to 7.3% of the transponders were unreadable at retrieval in the slaughter line, which is significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the required maximum loss of 1%. The 1.6% failure rate in phase 1 involved transponders from a single supplier. Loss of identification was associated with rejection after injection, expulsion during inflammation and technical failure. Three weeks after injection on average 0.6% of the piglets had an observable inflammation and at the time of retrieval pus was found around, on average, 1.2% of the transponders. An average of between 37% and 88% of the transponders were retrieved in the slaughter line from the base of the ear in phases 1 and 2. The other transponders were retrieved medial or caudal to this position. This positional variation meant that it was not consistently possible to remove the transponder from the carcass within the required 4 second time period. It was concluded that the systems should be improved before recommending their introduction on a large scale, because the

  10. Evaluation of a Terminal Area In-Trail Approach Spacing, Project and Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelden, Stephen; Johnson, Walter (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    Reported here are the results of work completed as a precursor to Distributed Air Ground (DAG), Concept Element 11 (CE11) research. CE11 is a NASA, Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) concept initiated to promote research on in-trail merging and spacing during approach in the terminal area environment, such that improvements to the National Air Space (NAS) may be realized. A description of the project concept, results of a preliminary study, and a literature review are presented. In terms of conclusions, study results, and reference material respectively: 1) the concept is supported as being significant to NAS capacity improvement, 2) the preliminary study indicated that having more than one downstream, in-trail aircraft present on a CDTI during approach may be advantageous, and that flying traditional Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STAR) utilizing advanced decision support tools (DST) may be complicated by wake turbulence considerations, a lack of vertical awareness on the part of the flight crew, and the 'step-down' nature of many terminal area approaches, and 3) the results of a literature review are presented for future reference.

  11. GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    John K. Godwin

    2005-12-01

    Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

  12. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Sorbent injection is a potentially important alternative to conventional wet lime and limestone scrubbing, and this project is another effort to test alternative sorbent injection approaches. In comparison to wet systems, LIFAC, with recirculation of the sorbent, removes less sulfur dioxide - 75--85% relative to 90% or greater for conventional scrubbers -- and requires more reagent material. However, if the demonstration is wet scrubbing systems: LIFAC is relatively easy to retrofit to an existing boiler and requires less area than conventional wet FGD systems. LIFAC is less expensive to install than conventional wet FGD processes. LIFAC's overall costs measured on a dollar-per-ton SO[sub 2] removed basis are less, an important advantage in a regulatory regime with trading of emission allocations. LIFAC produces a dry, readily disposable waste by-product versus a wet product. LIFAC is relatively simple to operate.

  13. Trail Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Bill

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the maintenance of hiking trails in the United States using volunteer workers from clubs like the American Hiking Society. Describes the organization of the National Trails Day and other methods of promoting trail maintenance. (MDH)

  14. Trailing edges projected to move faster than leading edges for large pelagic fish habitats under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, L. M.; Hobday, A. J.; Possingham, H. P.; Richardson, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that many species are shifting their ranges in concordance with the climate velocity of their preferred environmental conditions/habitat. While accelerated rates in species' range shifts have been noted in areas of intense warming, due to climate change, few studies have considered the influence that both spatial temperature gradients and rates of warming (i.e., the two components of climate velocity) could have on rates of movement in species habitats. We compared projected shifts in the core habitat of nine large pelagic fish species (five tuna, two billfish and two shark species) off the east coast of Australia at different spatial points (centre, leading and trailing edges of the core habitat), during different seasons (summer and winter), in the near-(2030) and long-term (2070), using independent species distribution models and habitat suitability models. Model projections incorporated depth integrated temperature data from 11 climate models with a focus on the IPCC SRES A2 general emission scenario. Projections showed a number of consistent patterns: southern (poleward) shifts in all species' core habitats; trailing edges shifted faster than leading edges; shifts were faster by 2070 than 2030; and there was little difference in shifts among species and between seasons. Averaging across all species and climate models, rates of habitat shifts for 2030 were 45-60 km decade-1 at the trailing edge, 40-45 km decade-1 at the centre, and 20-30 km decade-1 at the leading edge. Habitat shifts for 2070 were 60-70 km decade-1 at the trailing edge, 50-55 km decade-1 at the centre, and 30-40 km decade-1 at the leading edge. It is often assumed that the leading edge of a species range will shift faster than the trailing edge, but there are few projections or observations in large pelagic fish to validate this assumption. We found that projected shifts at the trailing edge were greater than at the centre and leading of core habitats in

  15. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    LIFAC combines upper-furnace limestone injection followed by post- furnace humidification in an activation reactor located between the air preheater and the ESP. The process produces a dry and stable waste product that is partially removed from the bottom of the activation reactor and partially removed at the ESP. In November 1990, after a ten (10) month negotiation period, LIFAC NA and the US DOE entered into a Cooperative Agreement for the design, construction, and demonstration of the LIFAC system. This report is the fifth Technical Progress Report covering the period October 1, 1991 through the end of December 1991. Due to the power plant's planned outage schedule, and the time needed for engineering, design and procurement of critical equipment, DOE and LIFAC NA agreed to execute the Design Phase of the project in August 1990, with DOE funding contingent upon final signing of the Cooperative Agreement.

  16. Trailblazing in East Texas: A Progress Report on the Forest Trail Library Consortium's Networking Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claer, Joycelyn H.

    This report describes the development of the Forest Trail Library Consortium (FTLC), a network of academic, public, and school libraries in Texas. The growth of FTLC from 4 charter members to its current 16 members is traced, including details about goals and funding. The role of special interest groups (SIGs) is examined, and the goals and…

  17. Rediscovering a Stream in Danville, Kentucky: The Clark Run Corridor and Trails Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Debra

    1998-01-01

    In Danville, Kentucky, the community cooperated in converting a neglected stream into a walking trail and park network, resulting in increased community pride, environmental awareness, community revitalization, and public-private cooperation. The local middle school regularly tests the water, and the local college's annual clean-up party earned an…

  18. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    LIFAC combines upper-furnace limestone injection followed by post-furnace humidification in an activation reactor located between the air preheater and the ESP. The process produces a dry and stable waste product that is partially removed from the bottom of the activation reactor and partially removed at the ESP.

  19. The Hawaii trails project: comet-hunting in the main asteroid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, H. H.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The mysterious solar system object 133P/(7968) Elst-Pizarro is dynamically asteroidal, yet displays recurrent comet-like dust emission. Two scenarios were hypothesized to explain this unusual behavior: 1) 133P is a classical comet from the outer solar system that has evolved onto a main-belt orbit or 2) 133P is a dynamically ordinary main-belt asteroid on which subsurface ice has recently been exposed. If 1) is correct, the expected rarity of a dynamical transition onto an asteroidal orbit implies that 133P could be alone in the main belt. In contrast, if 2) is correct, other icy main-belt objects should exist and could also exhibit cometary activity. Aims: Believing 133P to be a dynamically ordinary, yet icy main-belt asteroid, I set out to test the primary prediction of the hypothesis: that 133P-like objects should be common and could be found by an appropriately designed observational survey. Methods: I conducted just such a survey - the Hawaii Trails Project - of selected main-belt asteroids in a search for objects displaying cometary activity. Optical observations were made of targets selected from among the Themis, Koronis, and Veritas asteroid families, the Karin asteroid cluster, and low-inclination, kilometer-scale outer-belt asteroids, using the Lulin 1.0 m, small and moderate aperture research telescope system (SMARTS) 1.0 m, University of Hawaii 2.2 m, southern astrophysical research (SOAR) 4.1 m, Gemini North 8.1 m, Subaru 8.2 m, and Keck I 10 m telescopes. Results: I made 657 observations of 599 asteroids, discovering one active object now known as 176P/LINEAR, leading to the identification of the new cometary class of main-belt comets (MBCs). These results suggest that there could be ~100 currently active MBCs among low-inclination, kilometer-scale outer-belt asteroids. Physically and statistically, MBC activity is consistent with initiation by meter-sized impactors. The estimated rate of impacts and sizes of resulting active sites, however

  20. Evaluation of Load Analysis Methods for NASAs GIII Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Josue; Miller, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC), and FlexSys Inc. (Ann Arbor, Michigan) have collaborated to flight test the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) flaps. These flaps were installed on a Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation (GAC) GIII aircraft and tested at AFRC at various deflection angles over a range of flight conditions. External aerodynamic and inertial load analyses were conducted with the intention to ensure that the change in wing loads due to the deployed ACTE flap did not overload the existing baseline GIII wing box structure. The objective of this paper was to substantiate the analysis tools used for predicting wing loads at AFRC. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and distributed mass inertial models were developed for predicting the loads on the wing. The analysis tools included TRANAIR (full potential) and CMARC (panel) models. Aerodynamic pressure data from the analysis codes were validated against static pressure port data collected in-flight. Combined results from the CFD predictions and the inertial load analysis were used to predict the normal force, bending moment, and torque loads on the wing. Wing loads obtained from calibrated strain gages installed on the wing were used for substantiation of the load prediction tools. The load predictions exhibited good agreement compared to the flight load results obtained from calibrated strain gage measurements.

  1. Snail Trails

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela

    2002-01-01

    The slime trails of snails lead the author's students to a better understanding of science as inquiry and the processes of science. During this five-day activity, students get up close and personal with one of her favorite creatures, the land snail. Students begin by observing the organism and recording their observations. After making initial…

  2. 75 FR 29359 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Tamiami Trail Modifications: Next Steps Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... within the Park and the ecological connectivity between the Park and the Water Conservation Areas'' (2009... (Conservation Planning, Environmental Impact Analysis, and Decision- making), the NPS announces the availability... Water Deliveries to Everglades National Park Project (16 U.S.C. 410r-8), including a continuous...

  3. Policy influences on community trail development.

    PubMed

    Eyler, Amy A; Brownson, Ross C; Evenson, Kelly R; Levinger, David; Maddock, Jay E; Pluto, Delores; Troped, Philip J; Schmid, Thomas L; Carnoske, Cheryl; Richards, Katherine L; Steinman, Lesley E

    2008-06-01

    This study explores processes and policies that facilitate the development of community trails. With funding from Active Living Research and the research framework of the Physical Activity Policy Research Network (PAPRN), we conducted a multiple-site case study. A total of six trails in Hawaii, Massachusetts, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Washington were chosen for study. The goals of this case study were to identify the policy influences on trail development, explore the roles of key players in trail development, and compare and contrast findings from the different trails. Trail development can be a long process. Some of the trails took over a decade to complete because of funding, opposition, and roadblocks in the form of design standard policies. Work in trail development requires a team of many players, and it is necessary to balance their varied motives to accomplish a shared overall goal. Foresight through the master planning process is also a vital component of successful trail development. Finally, community involvement is key. Communities contemplating trail development should explore the effects of policy on the trail projects reported here to proactively identify potential influence. PMID:18469168

  4. Na Ala Hele (Trails for Walking).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Planning and Economic Development, Honolulu.

    This proposal for the development of a system of administering hiking trails in the state of Hawaii when such trails would involve various public and private jurisdictions emphasizes three elements: (a) proposing means of administration involving multiple jurisdictions; (b) demonstrating by means of a proposed project on the west coast of the Big…

  5. Perceptual Geography through Urban Trails.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dove, Jane

    1997-01-01

    Describes a project whereby geography students were charged with designing an urban trail (city walk with informational markers) that would accommodate specific groups. Chosen groups included people with physical disabilities, 10-year olds, and those interested in local street art. Discusses the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective objectives of…

  6. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. The Pimlico Chemistry Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrows, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Describes a chemistry "trail" (similar to a nature trail) which focuses on chemical phenomena in the environment. The trail includes 20 stops in and around a local school. Types of phenomena examined include building materials, air pollution, corrosion of metals, swimming pools, and others. Additional activities are also suggested. (DH)

  8. Injection and Monitoring at the Wallula Basalt Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Spane, Frank A.; Amonette, James E.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Continental flood basalts represent one of the largest geologic structures on earth but have received comparatively little attention for geologic storage of CO2. Flood basalt lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have large potential capacity for storage of CO2. In appropriate geologic settings, interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock flow interior sections may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Previous laboratory experiments showed the relatively rapid chemical reaction of CO2-saturated pore water with basalts to form stable carbonate minerals. However, recent laboratory tests with water-saturated supercritical CO2 show that mineralization reactions occur in this phase as well, providing a second and potentially more important mineralization pathway than was previously understood. Field testing of these concepts is proceeding with drilling of the world’s first supercritical CO2 injection well in flood basalt being completed in May 2009 near the township of Wallula in Washington State and corresponding CO2 injection permit granted by the State of Washington in March 2011. Injection of a nominal 1000 MT of CO2 was completed in August 2013 and site monitoring is in progress. Well logging conducted immediately after injection termination confirmed the presence of CO2 predominantly within the upper flow top region, and showed no evidence of vertical CO2 migration outside the well casing. Shallow soil gas samples collected around the injection well show no evidence of leakage and fluid and gas samples collected from the injection zone show strongly elevated concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, and Fe and 13C/18O isotopic shifts that are consistent with basalt-water chemical reactions. If proven viable by this field test and others that are in progress or being planned, major flood basalts in the U.S., India, and perhaps Australia would provide significant additional CO2 storage capacity

  9. Injection and Monitoring at the Wallula Basalt Pilot Project

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McGrail, B. Peter; Spane, Frank A.; Amonette, James E.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Continental flood basalts represent one of the largest geologic structures on earth but have received comparatively little attention for geologic storage of CO2. Flood basalt lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have large potential capacity for storage of CO2. In appropriate geologic settings, interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock flow interior sections may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Previous laboratory experiments showed the relatively rapid chemical reaction of CO2-saturated pore water with basalts to form stable carbonate minerals. However, recent laboratory tests with water-saturated supercritical CO2 show thatmore » mineralization reactions occur in this phase as well, providing a second and potentially more important mineralization pathway than was previously understood. Field testing of these concepts is proceeding with drilling of the world’s first supercritical CO2 injection well in flood basalt being completed in May 2009 near the township of Wallula in Washington State and corresponding CO2 injection permit granted by the State of Washington in March 2011. Injection of a nominal 1000 MT of CO2 was completed in August 2013 and site monitoring is in progress. Well logging conducted immediately after injection termination confirmed the presence of CO2 predominantly within the upper flow top region, and showed no evidence of vertical CO2 migration outside the well casing. Shallow soil gas samples collected around the injection well show no evidence of leakage and fluid and gas samples collected from the injection zone show strongly elevated concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, and Fe and 13C/18O isotopic shifts that are consistent with basalt-water chemical reactions. If proven viable by this field test and others that are in progress or being planned, major flood basalts in the U.S., India, and perhaps Australia would provide significant additional CO2 storage

  10. Bethlehem Steel Corporation Blast Furnace Granulated Coal Injection Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    Construction of the proposed BFGCI system is not expected to have significant impacts on air quality, noise, and land use at the Burns Harbor Plant area. Operation of the proposed BFGCI system is not expected to have significant impacts on the environment at the Burns Harbor Plant area. An increase of approximately 30 tons/yr for NO{sub x} and approximately 13 tons/yr for particulate matter (from the coal storage area) is expected. These emissions are within the currently permitted levels. Carbon dioxide emissions, which are unregulated, would increase by about 220,000 tons/yr at the Burns Harbor Plant. Water withdrawn and returned to Lake Michigan would increase by 1.3 million gal/d (0.4 percent of existing permitted discharge) for non-contact cooling water. No protected species, floodplains, wetlands, or cultural resources would be affected by operation of the proposed facility. Small economic benefits would occur from the creation of 5 or 6 permanent new jobs during the operation of the proposed demonstration project and subsequent commercial operation. Under the No Action Alternative, the proposed project would not receive cost-shared funding support from DOE.

  11. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Quarterly report No. 4, July--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-06

    In December 1990, the US Department of Energy selected 13 projects for funding under the Federal Clean Coal Technology Program (Round III). One of the projects selected was the project sponsored by LIFAC North America, (LIFAC NA), titled ``LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project.`` The host site for this $17 million, three-phase project is Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 in Richmond, Indiana. The LIFAC technology uses upper-furnace limestone injection with patented humidification of the flue gas to remove 75--85% of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas. In this report, progress for the period July--September 1991 is covered.

  12. Oregon Trail Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The road to the U.S. West, known as the Oregon Trail, had its first real traffic in 1843 when a group of about 1000 people left Independence, Missouri and traveled west. This teacher's guide contains short descriptions of the main landmarks and stopping points that were significant along the northwest portion of the Oregon Trail. The guide is…

  13. The Cedar Project: risk factors for transition to injection drug use among young, urban Aboriginal people

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cari L.; Pearce, Margo E.; Moniruzzaman, Akm; Thomas, Vicky; Christian, Chief Wayne; Schechter, Martin T.; Spittal, Patricia M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Studies suggest that Aboriginal people in Canada are over-represented among people using injection drugs. The factors associated with transitioning to the use of injection drugs among young Aboriginal people in Canada are not well understood. Methods: The Cedar Project is a prospective cohort study (2003–2007) involving young Aboriginal people in Vancouver and Prince George, British Columbia, who use illicit drugs. Participants’ venous blood samples were tested for antibodies to HIV and the hepatitis C virus, and drug use was confirmed using saliva screens. The primary outcomes were use of injection drugs at baseline and tranisition to injection drug use in the six months before each follow-up interview. Results: Of 605 participants, 335 (55.4%) reported using injection drugs at baseline. Young people who used injection drugs tended to be older than those who did not, female and in a relationship. Participants who injected drugs were also more likely than those who did not to have been denied shelter because of their drug use, to have been incarcerated, to have a mental illness and to have been involved in sex work. Transition to injection drug use occurred among 39 (14.4%) participants, yielding a crude incidence rate of 19.8% and an incidence density of 11.5 participants per 100 person-years. In unadjusted analysis, transition to injection drug use was associated with being female (odds ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06–3.72), involved in sex work (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.75–6.40), having a history of sexually transmitted infection (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.07–3.78) and using drugs with sex-work clients (OR 2.51, 95% CI 1.19–5.32). In adjusted analysis, transition to injection drug use remained associated with involvement in sex work (adjusted OR 3.94, 95% CI 1.45–10.71). Interpretation: The initiation rate for injection drug use of 11.5 participants per 100 person-years among participants in the Cedar Project is distressing. Young

  14. Argentine ant trail pheromone disruption is mediated by trail concentration.

    PubMed

    Suckling, David Maxwell; Stringer, Lloyd D; Corn, Joshua E

    2011-10-01

    Argentine ant trail pheromone disruption, using continuous release of the trail pheromone compound (Z)-9-hexadecanal, reduces the incidence of trails and foraging rates of field populations. However, little is known about the concentrations of pheromone required for successful disruption. We hypothesized that higher pheromone quantities would be necessary to disrupt larger ant populations. To test this, we laid a 30-cm long base trail of (Z)-9-hexadecanal on a glass surface at low and high rates (1 and 100 pg/cm) (Trail 1), and laid a second, shorter trail (Trail 2, 10 cm long, located 1.5 cm upwind) near the middle of Trail 1 at six rates (1, 10, 100, 1,000, 10,000, and 100,000 pg/cm). We then recorded and digitized movements of individual ants following Trail 1, and derived a regression statistic, r (2), as an index of trail integrity, and also recorded arrival success at the other end of the trail (30 cm) near a food supply. Disruption of trails required 100 fold more pheromone upwind, independent of base-trail concentration. This implies that in the field, trail disruption is likely to be less successful against high ant-trail densities (greater concentration of trail pheromone), and more successful against newly formed or weak trails, as could be expected along invasion fronts. PMID:21964852

  15. DIRBE Comet Trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, Richard G.

    2014-12-01

    Re-examination of the Cosmic Background Explorer Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) data reveals the thermal emission of several comet dust trails. The dust trails of 1P/Halley, 169P/NEAT, and 3200 Phaethon have not been previously reported. The known trails of 2P/Encke and 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 are also seen. The dust trails have 12 and 25 μm surface brightnesses of \\lt 0.1 and \\lt 0.15 MJy sr-1, respectively, which is \\lt 1% of the zodiacal light intensity. The trails are very difficult to see in any single daily image of the sky, but are evident as rapidly moving linear features in movies of the DIRBE data. Some trails are clearest when crossing through the orbital plane of the parent comet, but others are best seen at high ecliptic latitudes as the Earth passes over or under the dust trail. All these comets have known associations with meteor showers. This re-examination also reveals 1 additional comet and 13 additional asteroids that had not previously been recognized in the DIRBE data.

  16. DRBE comet trails

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, Richard G.

    2014-12-01

    Re-examination of the Cosmic Background Explorer Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) data reveals the thermal emission of several comet dust trails. The dust trails of 1P/Halley, 169P/NEAT, and 3200 Phaethon have not been previously reported. The known trails of 2P/Encke and 73P/Schwassmann–Wachmann 3 are also seen. The dust trails have 12 and 25 μm surface brightnesses of <0.1 and <0.15 MJy sr{sup −1}, respectively, which is <1% of the zodiacal light intensity. The trails are very difficult to see in any single daily image of the sky, but are evident as rapidly moving linear features in movies of the DIRBE data. Some trails are clearest when crossing through the orbital plane of the parent comet, but others are best seen at high ecliptic latitudes as the Earth passes over or under the dust trail. All these comets have known associations with meteor showers. This re-examination also reveals 1 additional comet and 13 additional asteroids that had not previously been recognized in the DIRBE data.

  17. DIRBE Comet Trails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Re-examination of the COBE DIRBE data reveals the thermal emission of several comet dust trails.The dust trails of 1P/Halley, 169P/NEAT, and 3200 Phaethon have not been previously reported.The known trails of 2P/Encke, and 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 are also seen. The dust trails have 12 and 25 microns surface brightnesses of <0.1 and <0.15 MJy/sr, respectively, which is <1% of the zodiacal light intensity. The trails are very difficult to see in any single daily image of the sky, but are evident as rapidly moving linear features in movies of the DIRBE data. Some trails are clearest when crossing through the orbital plane of the parent comet, but others are best seen at high ecliptic latitudes as the Earth passes over or under the dust trail. All these comets have known associations with meteor showers. This re-examination also reveals one additional comet and 13 additional asteroids that had not previously been recognized in the DIRBE data.

  18. Make a Nature Trail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Janice K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the planning, construction, use, and maintenance of a nature trail. Ideal for demonstrating interrelationships between plants and animals, conservation practices, wildlife management, plant succession, forestry, geologic features and other scientific phenomena. (JR)

  19. A Tale of Two Trails: Exploring Different Paths to Success

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jennifer G.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Davis, William J.; Bors, Philip; Rodríguez, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background This comparative case study investigates 2 successful community trail initiatives, using the Active Living By Design (ALBD) Community Action Model as an analytical framework. The model includes 5 strategies: preparation, promotion, programs, policy, and physical projects. Methods Key stakeholders at 2 sites participated in in-depth interviews (N = 14). Data were analyzed for content using Atlas Ti and grouped according to the 5 strategies. Results Preparation Securing trail resources was challenging, but shared responsibilities facilitated trail development. Promotions The initiatives demonstrated minimal physical activity encouragement strategies. Programs Community stakeholders did not coordinate programmatic opportunities for routine physical activity. Policy Trails’ inclusion in regional greenway master plans contributed to trail funding and development. Policies that were formally institutionalized and enforced led to more consistent trail construction and safer conditions for users. Physical Projects Consistent standards for way finding signage and design safety features enhanced trail usability and safety. Conclusions Communities with different levels of government support contributed unique lessons to inform best practices of trail initiatives. This study revealed a disparity between trail development and use-encouragement strategies, which may limit trails’ impact on physical activity. The ALBD Community Action Model provided a viable framework to structure cross-disciplinary community trail initiatives. PMID:21597125

  20. Trail Crews: Developing a Service Component to Your Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehringer, Brad; Merrill, Kurt

    Through wilderness stewardship programs, service projects, or trail crews, college outdoor programs can help land management agencies with their maintenance needs and provide student participants with rewarding service learning opportunities. Trail crews are usually composed of volunteer outdoor enthusiasts who take part in a multitude of…

  1. Into the Woods: A 6th-Grade Nature Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilburn, Douglas

    1983-01-01

    Describes an ecology project in which sixth-grade students built and operated a nature trail on the edge of school property. Classes toured the trail and participated in grade-appropriate follow-up activities (e.g., art lessons and soil analysis activities). (RH)

  2. 76 FR 26336 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Proposed Klingle Valley Trail in Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Proposed Klingle Valley Trail...)(1). The actions relate to the proposed Klingle Valley Trail project in Northwest Washington, DC... Northwest Washington, DC: The Klingle Valley Trail project. The project includes construction of a...

  3. Certification trails for data structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gregory F.; Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    Certification trails are a recently introduced and promising approach to fault detection and fault tolerance. The applicability of the certification trail technique is significantly generalized. Previously, certification trails had to be customized to each algorithm application; trails appropriate to wide classes of algorithms were developed. These certification trails are based on common data-structure operations such as those carried out using these sets of operations such as those carried out using balanced binary trees and heaps. Any algorithms using these sets of operations can therefore employ the certification trail method to achieve software fault tolerance. To exemplify the scope of the generalization of the certification trail technique provided, constructions of trails for abstract data types such as priority queues and union-find structures are given. These trails are applicable to any data-structure implementation of the abstract data type. It is also shown that these ideals lead naturally to monitors for data-structure operations.

  4. BLAST FURNACE GRANULAR COAL INJECTION SYSTEM. Final Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-10-01

    Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC) requested financial assistance from the Department of Energy (DOE), for the design, construction and operation of a 2,800-ton-per-day blast furnace granulated coal injection (BFGCI) system for two existing iron-making blast furnaces. The blast furnaces are located at BSC's facilities in Burns Harbor, Indiana. The demonstration project proposal was selected by the DOE and awarded to Bethlehem in November 1990. The design of the project was completed in December 1993 and construction was completed in January 1995. The equipment startup period continued to November 1995 at which time the operating and testing program began. The blast furnace test program with different injected coals was completed in December 1998.

  5. Blast furnace granular coal injection project. Annual report, January--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This annual report describes the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection project being implemented at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s (BSC) Burns Harbor Plant. The project is receiving cost-sharing from the US Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administrated by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with the DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-91MC27362. This installation is the first in the United States to employ British Steel technology that uses granular coal to provide part of the fuel requirement of blast furnaces. The project will demonstrate/assess a broad range of technical/economic issues associated with the use of coal for this purpose. These include: coal grind size, coal injection rate, coal source (type) and blast furnace conversion method. To achieve the program objectives, the demonstration project is divided into the following three Phases: Phase I -- design; Phase II -- construction; and Phase III -- operation. Preliminary design (Phase I) began in 1991 with detailed design commencing in 1993. Construction at Burns Harbor (Phase II) began in August 1993 and was completed at the end of 1994. A 100% construction review meeting was held in December and attended by representatives of DOE, Fluor Daniel and Bethlehem Steel. The coal preparation mills were started up in December, 1994, and the first coal was injected into ``D`` blast furnace on December 19, 1994. Near the end of the year, the grinding mills and injection facility were being prepared for performance testing during the first quarter of 1995. The demonstration test program (phase III) will start in the fourth quarter of 1995.

  6. Non-linear meteor trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Martin

    1988-08-01

    In this essay an attempt is made to not only review but reopen the debate on nonlinear meteor trails. On the basis of data culled from various, now historical, sources it is found that approximately one in every two hundred of the visual meteors is likely to show a nonlinear trail, and that of such trails about 60 percent will be continuously curved and 40 percent sinusoidal. It is suggested that two mechanisms may explain the various trail types: the continuously curved trails being a manifestation of the classical Magnus effect, and the sinusoidal trails resulting from torque-free precession.

  7. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 12, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    In December 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy selected 13 projects for funding under the Federal Clean Coal Technology Program (Round III). One of the projects selected was the project sponsored by LIFAC North America, (LIFAC NA), titled {open_quotes}LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project.{close_quotes} The LIFAC technology uses upper-furnace limestone injection with patented humidification of the flue gas to remove 75-85% of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas. The host site for this $22 million, three-phase project is Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 in Richmond, Indiana. The three project phases are: (1) Design; (2A) Long Lead Procurement; (2B) Construction; and (3) Operations. The design phase began on August 8, 1990 and was scheduled to last six months. Phase 2A, long lead procurement, overlaps the design phase and was expected to require about four months to complete. The construction phase was then to continue for another seven months, while the operations phase was scheduled to last about twenty-six months. In November 1990, after a ten (10) month negotiation period, LIFAC NA and the U.S. DOE entered into a Cooperative Agreement for the design, construction, and demonstration of the LIFAC system. This report is the twelfth Technical Progress Report covering the period July 1, 1993 through the end of September 1993. Due to the power plant`s planned outage in March 1991, and the time needed for engineering, design and procurement of critical equipment, DOE and LIFAC NA agreed to execute the Design Phase of the project in August 1990, with DOE funding contingent upon final signing of the Cooperative Agreement.

  8. Blast Furnace Granulated Coal Injection System Demonstration Project public design report. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The public design report describes the Blast Furnace Granulated Coal Injection (BFGCI) project under construction at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s (BSC) Burns Harbor, Indiana, plant. The project is receiving cost-sharing from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administrated by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with the DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-91MC27362. The project is the first installation in the United States for the British Steel technology using granular coal in blast furnaces. The objective is to demonstrate that granular coal is an economic and reliable fuel which can successfully be applied to large North American blast furnaces. These include: coal grind size, coal injection rate, coal source (type) and blast furnace conversion method. To achieve the program objectives, the demonstration project is divided into the following three Phases: Phase I-Design; Phase II-Procurement & Construction; and Phase III-Operation. Preliminary design (Phase I) began in 1991 with detailed design commencing in April 1993. Construction at Burns Harbor (Phase II) began August 1993. Construction is expected to be complete in the first quarter of 1995 which will be followed by a demonstration test program (Phase III).

  9. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 6, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The LIFAC technology has similarities to other sorbent injection technologies using humidification, but employs a unique patented vertical reaction chamber located down-stream of the boiler to facilitate and control the sulfur capture and other chemical reactions. This chamber improves the overall reaction efficiency enough to allow the use of pulverized limestone rather than more expensive reagents such as lime which are often used to increase the efficiency of other sorbent injection processes. Sorbent injection is a potentially important alternative to conventional wet lime and limestone scrubbing, and this project is another effort to test alternative sorbent injection approaches. In comparison to wet systems, LIFAC, with recirculation of the sorbent, removes less sulfur dioxide - 75--85% relative to 90% or greater for conventional scrubbers - and requires more reagent material. However, if the demonstration is successful, LIFAC will offer these important advantages over wet scrubbing systems: LIFAC is relatively easy to retrofit to an existing boiler and requires less area than conventional wet FGD systems; LIFAC is less expensive to install than conventional wet FGD processes; LIFAC`s overall costs measured on a dollar-per-ton S0{sub 2} removed basis are less, an important advantage in a regulatory regime with trading of emission allocations. LIFAC produces a dry, readily disposable waste by-product versus a wet product; and LIFAC is relatively simple to operate.

  10. The Injection System of the INFN-SuperB Factory Project: Preliminary Design

    SciTech Connect

    Boni, Roberto; Guiducci, Susanna; Preger, Miro; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Chance, Antoine; Dadoun, Olivier; Poirier, Freddy; Variola, Alessandro; Seeman, John; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    The ultra high luminosity B-factory (SuperB) project of INFN requires a high performance and reliable injection system, providing electrons at 4 GeV and positrons at 7 GeV, to fulfil the very tight requirements of the collider. Due to the short beam lifetime, continuous injection of electron and positron bunches in both LER and HER rings is necessary to maintain an high average luminosity. Polarized electrons are required for experiments and must be delivered by the injection system, due to the beam lifetime shorter than the ring polarization build-up: they will be produced by means of a SLAC-SLC polarized gun. The emittance and the energy spread of the e{sup -}/e{sup +} beams are reduced in a 1 GeV Damping Ring (DR) before injection in the main rings. Two schemes for positron production are under study, one with e{sup -}/e{sup +} conversion at low energy (< 1 Gev) and one with conversion at 6 GeV and a recirculation line to bring the positrons back to the DR. Acceleration through the Linac is provided by a 2856 MHz RF system made of travelling wave (TW), room temperature accelerating structures.

  11. Trailing TRAIL Resistance: Novel Targets for TRAIL Sensitization in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Rachana; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is the major hindrance in the successful cancer therapy. The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family of ligands, which initiates apoptosis in cancer cells through interaction with the death receptors DR4 and DR5. TRAIL is perceived as an attractive chemotherapeutic agent as it specifically targets cancer cells while sparing the normal cells. However, TRAIL therapy has a major limitation as a large number of the cancer develop resistance toward TRAIL and escape from the destruction by the immune system. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular targets and signaling pathways responsible for TRAIL resistance is imperative for devising effective therapeutic strategies for TRAIL resistant cancers. Although, various molecular targets leading to TRAIL resistance are well-studied, recent studies have implicated that the contribution of some key cellular processes toward TRAIL resistance need to be fully elucidated. These processes primarily include aberrant protein synthesis, protein misfolding, ubiquitin regulated death receptor expression, metabolic pathways, epigenetic deregulation, and metastasis. Novel synthetic/natural compounds that could inhibit these defective cellular processes may restore the TRAIL sensitivity and combination therapies with such compounds may resensitize TRAIL resistant cancer cells toward TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In this review, we have summarized the key cellular processes associated with TRAIL resistance and their status as therapeutic targets for novel TRAIL-sensitizing agents. PMID:25883904

  12. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 9, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Sorbent injection is a potentially important alternative to conventional wet lime and limestone scrubbing, and this project is another effort to test alternative sorbent injection approaches. In comparison to wet systems, LIFAC, with recirculation of the sorbent, removes less sulfur dioxide - 75--85% relative to 90% or greater for conventional scrubbers -- and requires more reagent material. However, if the demonstration is wet scrubbing systems: LIFAC is relatively easy to retrofit to an existing boiler and requires less area than conventional wet FGD systems. LIFAC is less expensive to install than conventional wet FGD processes. LIFAC`s overall costs measured on a dollar-per-ton SO{sub 2} removed basis are less, an important advantage in a regulatory regime with trading of emission allocations. LIFAC produces a dry, readily disposable waste by-product versus a wet product. LIFAC is relatively simple to operate.

  13. Finding a voice: participatory research with street-involved youth in the youth injection prevention project.

    PubMed

    Coser, Larissa Rodrigues; Tozer, Kira; Van Borek, Natasha; Tzemis, Despina; Taylor, Darlene; Saewyc, Elizabeth; Buxton, Jane A

    2014-09-01

    This article uses a Positive Youth Development framework to explore the experiences of six experiential youth coresearchers (YCs) in the Youth Injection Prevention (YIP) participatory research project, and the parallel track process of empowerment and capacity building that developed. The YIP project was conducted in Metro Vancouver at the BC Centre for Disease Control and community organizations serving street-involved youth. A process evaluation was conducted to explore themes in the YCs experience in the project, as well as process strengths and challenges. Semistructured interviews with the YCs, researcher field notes, and team meeting and debrief session minutes were analyzed. The YIP project appears to have exerted a positive influence on the YCs. Positive self-identities, sense of purpose, reconceptualization of intellectual ability, new knowledge and skills, supportive relationships, finding a voice, and social and self-awareness were among the positive impacts. Process strengths included team-building activities, team check-in and checkout sessions, and professional networking opportunities. Process challenges included the time required to help YCs overcome personal barriers to participation. The YIP project demonstrates that participatory research with street-involved youth is a viable research option that contributes to positive youth development and empowerment. PMID:24668583

  14. Blast furnace granular coal injection project. Annual report, January--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This annual report describes the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection project being implemented at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s (BSC) Burns Harbor Plant. The project is receiving cost-sharing from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administrated by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with the DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-91MC27362. This installation is the first in the United States to employ British Steel technology that uses granular coal to provide part of the fuel requirement of blast furnaces. The project will demonstrate/assess a broad range of technical/economic issues associated with the use of coal for this purpose. To achieve the program objectives, the demonstration project is divided into the following three Phases: (1) Phase I - Design. (2) Phase II - Construction. (3) Phase III - Operation. Preliminary Design (Phase I) began in 1991 with detailed design commencing in 1993. Construction at Burns Harbor (Phase II) began in August 1993 and was completed at the end of 1994. The demonstration test program (Phase III) started in the fourth quarter of 1995.

  15. Experimental evaluation of the certification-trail method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gregory F.; Wilson, Dwight S.; Masson, Gerald M.; Itoh, Mamoru; Smith, Warren W.; Kay, Jonathan S.

    1993-01-01

    Certification trails are a recently introduced and promising approach to fault-detection and fault-tolerance. A comprehensive attempt to assess experimentally the performance and overall value of the method is reported. The method is applied to algorithms for the following problems: huffman tree, shortest path, minimum spanning tree, sorting, and convex hull. Our results reveal many cases in which an approach using certification-trails allows for significantly faster overall program execution time than a basic time redundancy-approach. Algorithms for the answer-validation problem for abstract data types were also examined. This kind of problem provides a basis for applying the certification-trail method to wide classes of algorithms. Answer-validation solutions for two types of priority queues were implemented and analyzed. In both cases, the algorithm which performs answer-validation is substantially faster than the original algorithm for computing the answer. Next, a probabilistic model and analysis which enables comparison between the certification-trail method and the time-redundancy approach were presented. The analysis reveals some substantial and sometimes surprising advantages for ther certification-trail method. Finally, the work our group performed on the design and implementation of fault injection testbeds for experimental analysis of the certification trail technique is discussed. This work employs two distinct methodologies, software fault injection (modification of instruction, data, and stack segments of programs on a Sun Sparcstation ELC and on an IBM 386 PC) and hardware fault injection (control, address, and data lines of a Motorola MC68000-based target system pulsed at logical zero/one values). Our results indicate the viability of the certification trail technique. It is also believed that the tools developed provide a solid base for additional exploration.

  16. Predicting the spatial extent of injection-induced zones of enhanced permeability at the Northwest Geysers EGS Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Dobson, P.F.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of coupled thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical (THM) modeling of a proposed stimulation injection associated with an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) demonstration project at the northwest part of The Geysers geothermal field, California. The project aims at creating an EGS by directly and systematically injecting cool water at relatively low pressure into a known High Temperature (about 280 to 350 C) Zone (HTZ) located under the conventional (240 C) steam reservoir at depths below 3 km. Accurate micro-earthquake monitoring from the start of the injection will be used as a tool for tracking the development of the EGS. We first analyzed historic injection and micro-earthquake data from an injection well (Aidlin 11), located about 3 miles to the west of the new EGS demonstration area. Thereafter, we used the same modeling approach to predict the likely extent of the zone of enhanced permeability for a proposed initial injection in two wells (Prati State 31 and Prati 32) at the new EGS demonstration area. Our modeling indicates that the proposed injection scheme will provide additional steam production in the area by creating a zone of permeability enhancement extending about 0.5 km from each injection well which will connect to the overlying conventional steam reservoir.

  17. Isotopic Approaches to Evaluate the Fate of Injected CO2 in Two Geological Storage Projects in Mature Oilfields in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, B.; Johnson, G.; Nightingale, M.; Maurice, S.; Raistrick, M.; Taylor, S.; Hutcheon, I.; Perkins, E.

    2008-12-01

    Monitoring and verification of CO2 storage is an essential component of geological storage projects. We present evidence from two enhanced oil recovery projects in Canada that geochemical and isotopic techniques can be successfully used to trace the fate of injected CO2. Geochemical and isotopic data for fluids and gases obtained from multiple wells at the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas Weyburn CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project (Saskatchewan, Canada) and from the Penn West Pembina Cardium CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery Monitoring Pilot (Alberta, Canada) were collected before and throughout the CO2 injection phase. Carbon isotope ratios of injected CO2 in the Weyburn project were significantly lower than those of background CO2 in the reservoir. In contrast, carbon isotope ratios of injected CO2 at Penn West's Pembina Cardium CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery Monitoring Pilot were markedly higher than those of background CO2. After commencement of CO2 injection, the concentrations and carbon isotope values of CO2 and HCO3- in fluids and gases repeatedly obtained from monitoring wells were determined. Increasing CO2 and HCO3- concentrations in concert with carbon isotope values trending towards those of the injected CO2 revealed effective solubility and ionic trapping of injected CO2 at several monitoring wells at both study sites. In addition, changes in the oxygen isotope values of reservoir fluids provided independent evidence for dissolution of injected CO2 in the produced waters. We conclude that geochemical and isotopic monitoring techniques can play an essential role in verification of CO2 storage provided that the isotopic composition of the injected CO2 is distinct.

  18. The 2013 seismic sequence close to gas injection platform of the Castor project, offshore Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesca, Simone; Grigoli, Francesco; Heimann, Sebastian; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Buforn, Elisa; Maghsoudi, Samira; Blanch, Estefania; Dahm, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    A spatially localized seismic sequence has originated few tens of kilometres offshore the Mediterranean coast of Spain, starting on September 5, 2013, and lasting at least until October 2013. The sequence culminated in a maximal moment magnitude Mw 4.3 earthquake, on October 1, 2013. The epicentral region is located near the offshore platform of the Castor project, where gas is conducted through a pipeline from mainland and where it was recently injected in a depleted oil reservoir, at about 2 km depth. We analyse the temporal evolution of the seismic sequence and use full waveform techniques to derive absolute and relative locations, estimate depths and focal mechanisms for the largest events in the sequence (with magnitude mbLg larger than 3), and compare them to a previous event (April 8, 2012, mbLg 3.3) taking place in the same region prior to the gas injection. Moment tensor inversion results show that the overall seismicity in this sequence is characterized by oblique mechanisms with a normal fault component, with a 30° low-dip angle plane oriented NNE-SSW and a sub- vertical plane oriented NW-SE. The combined analysis of hypocentral location and focal mechanisms could indicate that the seismic sequence corresponds to rupture processes along sub- horizontal shallow surfaces, which could have been triggered by the gas injection in the reservoir,. An alternative scenario includes the iterated triggering of a system of steep faults oriented NW-SE, which were identified by prior marine seismics investigations. The most relevant seismogenic feature in the area is the Fosa de Amposta fault system, which includes different strands mapped at different distances to the coast, with a general NE-SW orientation, roughly parallel to the coastline. No significant known historical seismicity has involved this fault in the past. Our both scenarios exclude its activation, as its known orientation is inconsistent with focal mechanism results.

  19. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 5, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    LIFAC combines upper-furnace limestone injection followed by post- furnace humidification in an activation reactor located between the air preheater and the ESP. The process produces a dry and stable waste product that is partially removed from the bottom of the activation reactor and partially removed at the ESP. In November 1990, after a ten (10) month negotiation period, LIFAC NA and the US DOE entered into a Cooperative Agreement for the design, construction, and demonstration of the LIFAC system. This report is the fifth Technical Progress Report covering the period October 1, 1991 through the end of December 1991. Due to the power plant`s planned outage schedule, and the time needed for engineering, design and procurement of critical equipment, DOE and LIFAC NA agreed to execute the Design Phase of the project in August 1990, with DOE funding contingent upon final signing of the Cooperative Agreement.

  20. Rapid Adiabatic Preparation of Injective Projected Entangled Pair States and Gibbs States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yimin; Molnár, András; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2016-02-01

    We propose a quantum algorithm for many-body state preparation. It is especially suited for injective projected entangled pair states and thermal states of local commuting Hamiltonians on a lattice. We show that for a uniform gap and sufficiently smooth paths, an adiabatic runtime and circuit depth of O (polylog N ) can be achieved for O (N ) spins. This is an almost exponential improvement over previous bounds. The total number of elementary gates scales as O (N p o l y l o g N ) . This is also faster than the best known upper bound of O (N2) on the mixing times of Monte Carlo Markov chain algorithms for sampling classical systems in thermal equilibrium.

  1. Projecting Sexual and Injecting HIV Risks into Future Outcomes with Agent-Based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobashev, Georgiy V.; Morris, Robert J.; Zule, William A.

    Longitudinal studies of health outcomes for HIV could be very costly cumbersome and not representative of the risk population. Conversely, cross-sectional approaches could be representative but rely on the retrospective information to estimate prevalence and incidence. We present an Agent-based Modeling (ABM) approach where we use behavioral data from a cross-sectional representative study and project the behavior into the future so that the risks of acquiring HIV could be studied in a dynamical/temporal sense. We show how the blend of behavior and contact network factors (sexual, injecting) play the role in the risk of future HIV acquisition and time till obtaining HIV. We show which subjects are the most likely persons to get HIV in the next year, and whom they are likely to infect. We examine how different behaviors are related to the increase or decrease of HIV risks and how to estimate the quantifiable risk measures such as survival HIV free.

  2. H2S Injection and Sequestration into Basalt - The SulFix Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudbrandsson, S.; Moola, P.; Stefansson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric H2S emissions are among major environmental concern associated with geothermal energy utilization. It is therefore of great importance for the geothermal power sector to reduce H2S emissions. Known solutions for H2S neutralization are both expensive and include production of elemental sulfur and sulfuric acid that needs to be disposed of. Icelandic energy companies that utilize geothermal power for electricity production have decided to try to find an environmentally friendly and economically feasible solution to reduce the H2S emission, in a joint venture called SulFix. The aim of SulFix project is to explore the possibilities of injecting H2S dissolved in water into basaltic formations in close proximity to the power plants for permanent fixation as sulfides. The formation of sulfides is a natural process in geothermal systems. Due to basalt being rich in iron and dissolving readily at acidic conditions, it is feasible to re-inject the H2S dissolved in water, into basaltic formations to form pyrite. To estimate the mineralization rates of H2S, in the basaltic formation, flow through experiments in columns were conducted at various H2S concentrations, temperatures (100 - 240°C) and both fresh and altered basaltic glass. The results indicate that pyrite rapidly forms during injection into fresh basalt but the precipiation in altered basalt is slower. Three different alteration stages, as a function of distance from inlet, can be observed in the column with fresh basaltic glass; (1) dissolution features along with precipitation, (2) precipitation increases, both sulfides and other secondary minerals and (3) the basalt looks to be unaltered and little if any precipitation is observed. The sulfur has precipitated in the first half of the column and thereafter the solution is possibly close to be supersaturated with respect to the rock. These results indicate that the H2S sequestration into basalt is possible under geothermal conditions. The rate limiting

  3. The "Owl Trail"--A Sensory Awareness Rope Trail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Robert B.

    1978-01-01

    Constructed and experienced by students engaged in an outdoor education class at East Stroudsburg State College in Pennsylvania, the "Owl Trail" is a self guided rope trail (600 yards in length) employing such devices as sensory corrals, bridges, and "go to" ropes (ropes attached to the main rope which provide side trip experiences). (JC)

  4. TRAIL/TRAIL Receptor System and Susceptibility to Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    García-León, Juan Antonio; Pinto-Medel, María Jesús; Oliver-Martos, Begoña; Ortega-Pinazo, Jesús; Suardíaz, Margarita; García-Trujillo, Lucía; Guijarro-Castro, Cristina; Benito-León, Julián; Prat, Isidro; Varadé, Jezabel; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Urcelay, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)/TRAIL receptor system participates in crucial steps in immune cell activation or differentiation. It is able to inhibit proliferation and activation of T cells and to induce apoptosis of neurons and oligodendrocytes, and seems to be implicated in autoimmune diseases. Thus, TRAIL and TRAIL receptor genes are potential candidates for involvement in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS). To test whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genes encoding TRAIL, TRAILR-1, TRAILR-2, TRAILR-3 and TRAILR-4 are associated with MS susceptibility, we performed a candidate gene case-control study in the Spanish population. 59 SNPs in the TRAIL and TRAIL receptor genes were analysed in 628 MS patients and 660 controls, and validated in an additional cohort of 295 MS patients and 233 controls. Despite none of the SNPs withstood the highly conservative Bonferroni correction, three SNPs showing uncorrected p values<0.05 were successfully replicated: rs4894559 in TRAIL gene, p = 9.8×10−4, OR = 1.34; rs4872077, in TRAILR-1 gene, p = 0.005, OR = 1.72; and rs1001793 in TRAILR-2 gene, p = 0.012, OR = 0.84. The combination of the alleles G/T/A in these SNPs appears to be associated with a reduced risk of developing MS (p = 2.12×10−5, OR = 0.59). These results suggest that genes of the TRAIL/TRAIL receptor system exerts a genetic influence on MS. PMID:21814551

  5. On Entropy Trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhi, Saeed; Taghavi, Ray; Keshmiri, Shawn

    2015-11-01

    Stealth technology is developed for military aircraft to minimize their signatures. The primary attention was focused on radar signature, followed by the thermal and noise signatures of the vehicle. For radar evasion, advanced configuration designs, extensive use of carbon composites and radar-absorbing material, are developed. On thermal signature, mainly in the infra-red (IR) bandwidth, the solution was found in blended rectangular nozzles of high aspect ratio that are shielded from ground detectors. For noise, quiet and calm jets are integrated into vehicles with low-turbulence configuration design. However, these technologies are totally incapable of detecting new generation of revolutionary aircraft. These shall use all electric, distributed, propulsion system that are thermally transparent. In addition, composite skin and non-emitting sensors onboard the aircraft will lead to low signature. However, based on the second-law of thermodynamics, there is no air vehicle that can escape from leaving an entropy trail. Entropy is thus the only inevitable signature of any system, that once measured, can detect the source. By characterizing the entropy field based on its statistical properties, the source may be recognized, akin to face recognition technology. Direct measurement of entropy is cumbersome, however as a derived property, it can be easily measured. The measurement accuracy depends on the probe design and the sensors onboard. One novel air data sensor suite is introduced with promising potential to capture the entropy trail.

  6. A Computational Modeling Mystery Involving Airfoil Trailing Edge Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Yeunun; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    In a curious result, Fairman (2002) observed that steady RANS calculations predicted larger lift than the experimentally-measured data for six different airfoils with non-traditional trailing edge treatments, whereas the time average of unsteady RANS calculations matched the experiments almost exactly. Are these results reproducible? If so, is the difference between steady and unsteady RANS calculations a numerical artifact, or is there a physical explanation? The goals of this project are to solve this thirteen year old mystery and further to model viscous/load coupling for airfoils with non-traditional trailing edges. These include cupped, beveled, and blunt trailing edges, which are common anti-singing treatments for marine propeller sections. In this talk, we present steady and unsteady RANS calculations (ANSYS Fluent) with careful attention paid to the possible effects of asymmetric unsteady vortex shedding and the modeling of turbulence anisotropy. The effects of non-traditional trailing edge treatments are visualized and explained.

  7. Global Variation of Meteor Trail Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Hinrichs, J.; Urbina, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first global simulations on the occurrence of meteor trail plasma irregularities. These results seek to answer the following questions: when a meteoroid disintegrates in the atmosphere will the resulting trail become plasma turbulent, what are the factors influencing the development of turbulence, and how do they vary on a global scale. Understanding meteor trail plasma turbulence is important because turbulent meteor trails are visible as non-specular trails to coherent radars, and turbulence influences the evolution of specular radar meteor trails, particularly regarding the inference of mesospheric temperatures from trail diffusion rates, and their usage for meteor burst communication. We provide evidence of the significant effect that neutral atmospheric winds and density, and ionospheric plasma density have on the variability of meteor trail evolution and the observation of nonspecular meteor trails, and demonstrate that trails are far less likely to become and remain turbulent in daylight, explaining several observational trends using non-specular and specular meteor trails.

  8. Efforts of a Kansas Foundation to Increase Physical Activity and Improve Health by Funding Community Trails, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Katie M.; Lightner, Joseph; Oestman, Katherine B.; Kaczynski, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Trails are associated with increased physical activity; however, little is known about the process of building trails by various types of organizations. From 2005 through 2012 the Sunflower Foundation: Health Care for Kansans (Sunflower) funded multiple organizations to construct 70 trails of varying lengths and surfaces in municipalities, schools, and communities across Kansas. The purpose of this study was to assess the process of developing and implementing community trail projects across Kansas with funding from a public foundation. Methods In 2012, we stratified funded organizations by type and conducted proportional random sampling to select 20 key informants from those organizations to participate in structured telephone interviews. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Two researchers coded interview transcripts according to issues identified by participants. Results Issues associated with trail-building identified as important were collaboration among groups, unexpected construction costs, champions for the project, and level of difficulty of construction. Participants indicated that trails facilitated physical activity. Trails were integrated into communities through events such as walking events and other promotional efforts; these efforts were thought to increase trail use. The perceived outcomes of building the trails included providing the community with a physical activity resource, inspiring the community to start additional trail projects, and increasing the physical activity of local residents. Conclusion Sunflower’s funding was instrumental in developing trail projects to provide new physical activity resources across Kansas. Public health practitioners seeking to increase physical activity should seek funding from foundations that focus on health. PMID:25427316

  9. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  10. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-10-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  11. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, T.; Erbslöh, S.; Carolus, T.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length.

  12. Low-cost real-time infrared scene generation for image projection and signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; King, David E.; Bowden, Mark H.

    1998-07-01

    As cost becomes an increasingly important factor in the development and testing of Infrared sensors and flight computer/processors, the need for accurate hardware-in-the- loop (HWIL) simulations is critical. In the past, expensive and complex dedicated scene generation hardware was needed to attain the fidelity necessary for accurate testing. Recent technological advances and innovative applications of established technologies are beginning to allow development of cost-effective replacements for dedicated scene generators. These new scene generators are mainly constructed from commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software components. At the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (MRDEC), researchers have developed such a dynamic IR scene generator (IRSG) built around COTS hardware and software. The IRSG is used to provide dynamic inputs to an IR scene projector for in-band seeker testing and for direct signal injection into the seeker or processor electronics. AMCOM MRDEC has developed a second generation IRSG, namely IRSG2, using the latest Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI) Onyx2 with Infinite Reality graphics. As reported in previous papers, the SGI Onyx Reality Engine 2 is the platform of the original IRSG that is now referred to as IRSG1. IRSG1 has been in operation and used daily for the past three years on several IR projection and signal injection HWIL programs. Using this second generation IRSG, frame rates have increased from 120 Hz to 400 Hz and intensity resolution from 12 bits to 16 bits. The key features of the IRSGs are real time missile frame rates and frame sizes, dynamic missile-to-target(s) viewpoint updated each frame in real-time by a six-degree-of- freedom (6DOF) system under test (SUT) simulation, multiple dynamic objects (e.g. targets, terrain/background, countermeasures, and atmospheric effects), latency compensation, point-to-extended source anti-aliased targets, and

  13. 75 FR 12254 - Official Trail Marker for the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... National Park Service Official Trail Marker for the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail AGENCY: National.... SUMMARY: This notice issues the official trail marker insignia of the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail... P. Arakaki, Superintendent, Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail. The insignia depicted below...

  14. Air injection project breathes fire into aging West Hackberry oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Duey, R.

    1996-02-01

    Amoco, the DOE and LSU seek more oil from Gulf Coast salt dome fields with air injection technique. The West Hackberry Field in Louisiana is a water-driven reservoir. By injecting air into the high-pressure, high-temperature reservoir rock, the water is backed down, allowing the oil to drain off the steeply dipped rock.

  15. Onto better TRAILs for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Miguel, D; Lemke, J; Anel, A; Walczak, H; Martinez-Lostao, L

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), also known as Apo-2 ligand (Apo2L), is a member of the TNF cytokine superfamily. By cross-linking TRAIL-Receptor (TRAIL-R) 1 or TRAIL-R2, also known as death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5), TRAIL has the capability to induce apoptosis in a wide variety of tumor cells while sparing vital normal cells. The discovery of this unique property among TNF superfamily members laid the foundation for testing the clinical potential of TRAIL-R-targeting therapies in the cancer clinic. To date, two of these therapeutic strategies have been tested clinically: (i) recombinant human TRAIL and (ii) antibodies directed against TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2. Unfortunately, however, these TRAIL-R agonists have basically failed as most human tumors are resistant to apoptosis induction by them. It recently emerged that this is largely due to the poor agonistic activity of these agents. Consequently, novel TRAIL-R-targeting agents with increased bioactivity are currently being developed with the aim of rendering TRAIL-based therapies more active. This review summarizes these second-generation novel formulations of TRAIL and other TRAIL-R agonists, which exhibit enhanced cytotoxic capacity toward cancer cells, thereby providing the potential of being more effective when applied clinically than first-generation TRAIL-R agonists. PMID:26943322

  16. Onto better TRAILs for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, D; Lemke, J; Anel, A; Walczak, H; Martinez-Lostao, L

    2016-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), also known as Apo-2 ligand (Apo2L), is a member of the TNF cytokine superfamily. By cross-linking TRAIL-Receptor (TRAIL-R) 1 or TRAIL-R2, also known as death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5), TRAIL has the capability to induce apoptosis in a wide variety of tumor cells while sparing vital normal cells. The discovery of this unique property among TNF superfamily members laid the foundation for testing the clinical potential of TRAIL-R-targeting therapies in the cancer clinic. To date, two of these therapeutic strategies have been tested clinically: (i) recombinant human TRAIL and (ii) antibodies directed against TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2. Unfortunately, however, these TRAIL-R agonists have basically failed as most human tumors are resistant to apoptosis induction by them. It recently emerged that this is largely due to the poor agonistic activity of these agents. Consequently, novel TRAIL-R-targeting agents with increased bioactivity are currently being developed with the aim of rendering TRAIL-based therapies more active. This review summarizes these second-generation novel formulations of TRAIL and other TRAIL-R agonists, which exhibit enhanced cytotoxic capacity toward cancer cells, thereby providing the potential of being more effective when applied clinically than first-generation TRAIL-R agonists. PMID:26943322

  17. Trail Pheromone Disruption of Argentine Ant Trail Formation and Foraging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Stringer, L.D.; Snook, K.; Banko, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Trail pheromone disruption of invasive ants is a novel tactic that builds on the development of pheromone-based pest management in other insects. Argentine ant trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, was formulated as a micro-encapsulated sprayable particle and applied against Argentine ant populations in 400 m2 field plots in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. A widely dispersed point source strategy for trail pheromone disruption was used. Traffic rates of ants in bioassays of treated filter paper, protected from rainfall and sunlight, indicated the presence of behaviorally significant quantities of pheromone being released from the formulation for up to 59 days. The proportion of plots, under trade wind conditions (2-3 m s-1), with visible trails was reduced for up to 14 days following treatment, and the number of foraging ants at randomly placed tuna-bait cards was similarly reduced. The success of these trail pheromone disruption trials in a natural ecosystem highlights the potential of this method for control of invasive ant species in this and other environments. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010.

  18. Trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail formation and foraging.

    PubMed

    Suckling, David Maxwell; Peck, Robert W; Stringer, Lloyd D; Snook, Kirsten; Banko, Paul C

    2010-01-01

    Trail pheromone disruption of invasive ants is a novel tactic that builds on the development of pheromone-based pest management in other insects. Argentine ant trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, was formulated as a micro-encapsulated sprayable particle and applied against Argentine ant populations in 400 m2 field plots in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. A widely dispersed point source strategy for trail pheromone disruption was used. Traffic rates of ants in bioassays of treated filter paper, protected from rainfall and sunlight, indicated the presence of behaviorally significant quantities of pheromone being released from the formulation for up to 59 days. The proportion of plots, under trade wind conditions (2–3 m s−1), with visible trails was reduced for up to 14 days following treatment, and the number of foraging ants at randomly placed tuna-bait cards was similarly reduced. The success of these trail pheromone disruption trials in a natural ecosystem highlights the potential of this method for control of invasive ant species in this and other environments. PMID:20077128

  19. Characterizing near-surface CO2 conditions before injection - Perspectives from a CCS project in the Illinois Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, R.A., II; Krapac, I.G.; Lewicki, J.L.; Curtis-Robinson, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium is conducting a large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) project in Decatur, Illinois, USA to demonstrate the ability of a deep saline formation to store one million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) from an ethanol facility. Beginning in early 2011, CO2 will be injected at a rate of 1,000 tonnes/day for three years into the Mount Simon Sandstone at a depth of approximately 2,100 meters. An extensive Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) program has been undertaken for the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) and is focused on the 0.65 km2 project site. Goals include establishing baseline conditions to evaluate potential impacts from CO2 injection, demonstrating that project activities are protective of human health and the environment, and providing an accurate accounting of stored CO2. MVA efforts are being conducted pre-, during, and post- CO2 injection. Soil and net CO2 flux monitoring has been conducted for more than one year to characterize near-surface CO2 conditions. More than 2,200 soil CO2 flux measurements have been manually collected from a network of 118 soil rings since June 2009. Three ring types have been evaluated to determine which type may be the most effective in detecting potential CO 2 leakage. Bare soil, shallow-depth rings were driven 8 cm into the ground and were prepared to minimize surface vegetation in and near the rings. Bare soil, deep-depth rings were prepared similarly, but were driven 46 cm. Natural-vegetation, shallow-depth rings were driven 8 cm and are most representative of typical vegetation conditions. Bare-soil, shallow-depth rings had the smallest observed mean flux (1.78 ??mol m-2 s-1) versus natural-vegetation, shallow-depth rings (3.38 ??mol m-2 s-1). Current data suggest bare ring types would be more sensitive to small CO2 leak signatures than natural ring types because of higher signal to noise ratios. An eddy covariance (EC) system has been in use since June

  20. HUBBLE: ON THE ASTEROID TRAIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronomers Karl Stapelfeldt and Robin Evans have tracked down about 100 small asteroids by hunting through more than 28,000 archival images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Here is a sample of what they have found: four archival images that show the curved trails left by asteroids. [Top left]: Hubble captured a bright asteroid, with a visual magnitude of 18.7, roaming in the constellation Centaurus. Background stars are shown in white, while the asteroid trail is depicted in blue at top center. The trail has a length of 19 arc seconds. This asteroid has a diameter of one and one-quarter miles (2 kilometers), and was located 87 million miles from Earth and 156 million miles from the sun. Numerous orange and blue specks in this image and the following two images were created by cosmic rays, energetic subatomic particles that struck the camera's detector. [Top right]: Here is an asteroid with a visual magnitude of 21.8 passing a galaxy in the constellation Leo. The trail is seen in two consecutive exposures, the first shown in blue and the second in red. This asteroid has a diameter of half a mile (0.8 kilometers), and was located 188 million miles from Earth and 233 million miles from the sun. [Lower left]: This asteroid in the constellation Taurus has a visual magnitude of 23, and is one of the faintest seen so far in the Hubble archive. It moves from upper right to lower left in two consecutive exposures; the first trail is shown in blue and the second in red. Because of the asteroid's relatively straight trail, astronomers could not accurately determine its distance. The estimated diameter is half a mile (0.8 kilometers) at an Earth distance of 205 million miles and a sun distance of 298 million miles. [Lower right]: This is a broken asteroid trail crossing the outer regions of galaxy NGC 4548 in Coma Berenices. Five trail segments (shown in white) were extracted from individual exposures and added to a cleaned color image

  1. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 11, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The LIFAC technology has similarities to other sorbent injection technologies using humidification, but employs a unique patented vertical reaction chamber located down-stream of the boiler to facilitate and a 220 MW coal-fired boiler located at Kristiinankaupunki. At this facility, a slipstream (5000 SCFM) containing the calcined limestone was used to test a small-scale activation reactor (2.5 MW) in which the gas was humidified. Reactor residence times of 3 to 12 seconds resulted in SO{sub 2} removal rates up to 84%. Additional LIFAC pilot-scale tests were conducted at the 8 MW (thermal) level at the Neste Kulloo combustion laboratory to develop the relationships between the important operating and design parameters. Polish low-sulfur coal was burned to achieve 84% S0{sub 2} removal. In 1986, full-scale testing of LIFAC was conducted at Imatran Voima`s Inkoo power plant on a 250 MW utility boiler. An activation chamber was built to treat a flue gas stream representing about 70 MW. Even though the boiler was 250 MW, the 70 MW stream represented about one-half of the flue gas feeding one of the plant`s two ESP`s (i.e., each ESP receives a 125 MW gas stream). This boiler used a 1.5% sulfur coal and sulfur removal was initially 61%. By late 1987, SO{sub 2} removal rates had improved to 76%. In 1988, a LIFAC activation reactor was added to treat an additional 125 MW -- i.e., an entire flue gas/ESP stream-worth of flue gas from this same boiler. This newer activation reactor is achieving 7580% SO{sub 2} removal with Ca:S ratios between 2:1 and 2.5:1. In 1988, the first tests using high-sulfur US coals were run at the pilot scale at the Neste Kulloo Research Center, using a Pittsburgh No. 8 coal containing 3% sulfur. SO{sub 2} removal rates of 77% were achieved at a Ca:S ratio of 2:1. This LIFAC demonstration project will be conducted on a 60 MW boiler burning high-sulfur US coals to demonstrate the commercial application of the LIFAC process to US utilities.

  2. Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project. Phase I status report, April 1981-April 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, L.; Hanson, J.; Didwall, E.; Kasameyer, P.; Smith, A.; Hearst, J.; Daily, W.; Crow, N.; Younker, J.; Murray, W.

    1982-08-13

    The feasibility of using remote geophysical techniques to monitor the movement of injected brine has been evaluated. It was established that no single approach is likely to be identified that can be used to accurately monitor the precise location of the injected fluid. Several approaches have been considered in parallel because they add new dimensions to the existing monitoring capabilities, and are likely to cover a range of applications at a variety of geothermal sites. These include: microseismicity - a seismic net is used to record small magnitude events associated with injection; streaming potential - self potential anomalies produced by a moving fluid identify fluid flow direction; cross borehole geotomography - two-dimensional image of flow pathways is constructed using electromagnetic waves; and well pressure response to solid earth tide - changes in pore pressures are used to discriminate fracture/pore porosity and estimate fracture orientations.

  3. Drug-related harm among people who inject drugs in Thailand: summary findings from the Mitsampan Community Research Project

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For decades, Thailand has experienced high rates of illicit drug use and related harms. In response, the Thai government has relied on drug law enforcement to address this problem. Despite these efforts, high rates of drug use persist, and Thailand has been contending with an enduring epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among people who inject drugs (IDU). Methods In response to concerns regarding drug-related harm in Thailand and a lack of research focused on the experiences and needs of Thai IDU, the Mitsampan Community Research Project was launched in 2008. The project involved administering surveys capturing a range of behavioral and other data to community-recruited IDU in Bangkok in 2008 and 2009. Results In total, 468 IDU in Bangkok were enrolled in the project. Results revealed high rates of midazolam injection, non-fatal overdose and incarceration. Syringe sharing remained widespread among this population, driven primarily by problems with access to syringes and methamphetamine injection. As well, reports of police abuse were common and found to be associated with high-risk behavior. Problems with access to evidence-based drug treatment and HIV prevention programs were also documented. Although compulsory drug detention centers are widely used in Thailand, data suggested that these centers have little impact on drug use behaviors among IDU in Bangkok. Conclusions The findings from this project highlight many ongoing health and social problems related to illicit drug use and drug policies in Bangkok. They also suggest that the emphasis on criminal justice approaches has resulted in human rights violations at the hands of police, and harms associated with compulsory drug detention and incarceration. Collectively, the findings indicate the urgent need for the implementation of evidence-based policies and programs in this setting. PMID:24099081

  4. Monitoring a large volume CO2 injection: Year two results from SECARB project at Denbury's Cranfield, Mississippi, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hovorka, S.D.; Meckel, T.A.; Trevino, R.H.; Lu, J.; Nicot, J.-P.; Choi, J.-W.; Freeman, D.; Cook, P.; Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J. B.; Freifeild, B.M.; Doughty, C.; Carrigan, C.R.; La-Brecque, D.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Thordsen, J.J.; Phelps, T.J.; Yang, C.; Romanak, K.D.; Zhang, T.; Holt, R.M.; Lindler, J.S.; Butsch, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) early project in western Mississippi has been testing monitoring tools and approaches to document storage efficiency and storage permanence under conditions of CO2 EOR as well as downdip injection into brine. Denbury Onshore LLC is host for the study and has brought a depleted oil and gas reservoir, Cranfield Field, under CO2 flood. Injection was started in July 2008 and has now achieved injection rates greater than 1.2 million tons/year though 23 wells, with cumulative mass injected as of August, 2010 of 2.2 million metric tons. Injection is into coarse grained fluvial deposits of the Cretaceous lower Tuscaloosa Formation in a gentle anticline at depths of 3300 m. A team of researchers from 10 institutions has collected data from five study areas, each with a different goal and different spatial and temporal scale. The Phase 2 study began at the start of injection and has been using pressure and temperature as a tool for assessing permanence mostly in the oil productive interval. Real-time read-out shows high sensitivity to distant changes in injection rate and confirms the geologic model of reservoir compartmentalization. Above-zone pressure monitoring ???120 m above the injection interval is used to test the sensitivity of this approach for documentation of integrity of the confining system in an area of numerous well completions as pressure increase is induced in the reservoir by more than 70 bar. Monitoring of the High Volume Injection Test (HiVIT) area includes repeat measurements of aqueous geochemistry in the injection zone. Rock-water-CO 2 interactions in the reservoir as CO2 dissolves are minimized by mineral "armoring" by abundant chlorite cement in high permeability reservoir sandstone. Geochemical monitoring of confined freshwater aquifers at depths of 70-100 m is underway. Groundwater analysis focuses on assessment of the sensitivity of this method to detect leakage above background

  5. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Quarterly report No. 3, April--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    LIFAC combines upper-furnace limestone injection followed by post-furnace humidification in an activation reactor located between the air preheater and the ESP. The process produces a dry and stable waste product that is partially removed from the bottom of the activation reactor and partially removed at the ESP.

  6. 75 FR 37463 - Official Trail Marker for the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... National Park Service Official Trail Marker for the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail AGENCY.... SUMMARY: This notice issues the official trail marker insignia of the Star-Spangled Banner National..., Superintendent, Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail. The insignia depicted below is prescribed as...

  7. 75 FR 37462 - Official Trail Marker for the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... National Park Service Official Trail Marker for the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail....S.C. 701. SUMMARY: This notice issues the official trail marker insignias of the Captain John Smith... John Maounis, Superintendent, Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail. The...

  8. 'Wild Treasure' Thornless Trailing Blackberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild Treasure is a new trailing blackberry cultivar from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service breeding program in Corvallis, OR, released in cooperation with Oregon State University. Wild Treasure is thornless and has high quality fruit that are very small and can be mech...

  9. On the Trail to Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The University of Hartford planned fitness trail will allow students to develop their bodies by providing a jogging route to improve cardiovascular fitness and exercise stations designed to provide warm-up exercises and improve strength, flexibility, balance, and endurance. (Author/MLF)

  10. Life on the Oregon Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middle Level Learning: Teaching and Learning Social Studies in the Middle Grades, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This supplement to "Social Education" and "Social Studies & the Young Learner" seeks to support creative and rigorous social studies teaching in middle schools. The articles show how students can revisit the Oregon Trail through the diaries of children, learn about the five themes of geography (location, place, human/environment interaction,…

  11. Carving a New Assessment Trail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morriston, Terry

    2007-01-01

    TRAILS (Tool for Real-Time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills), is a free online test of student information-handling skills. It was formulated by the Institute for Library and Information Literacy Education and Kent State University Libraries. Based on the Ohio Academic Content Standards and the philosophy of Information Power, it assesses…

  12. NASA aircraft trailing vortex research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    A brief description is given of NASA's comprehensive program to study the aircraft trailing vortex problem. Wind tunnel experiments are used to develop the detailed processes of wing tip vortex formation and explore different means to either prevent trailing vortices from forming or induce early break-up. Flight tests provide information on trailing vortex system behavior behind large transport aircraft, both near the ground, as in the vicinity of the airport, and at cruise/holding pattern altitudes. Results from some flight tests are used to show how pilots might avoid the dangerous areas when flying in the vicinity of large transport aircraft. Other flight tests will be made to verify and evaluate trailing vortex elimination schemes developed in the model tests. Laser Doppler velocimeters being developed for use in the research program and to locate and measure vortex winds in the airport area are discussed. Field tests have shown that the laser Doppler velocimeter measurements compare well with those from cup anemometers.

  13. Describing Trails: Distance or Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Beverly R.; Bixler, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether trails on visitor maps should indicate distance only or include "time to complete," Cleveland Metroparks interviewed 287 adult visitors to a large regional zoo. The mean perceived "average time to walk a mile" was 17 minutes, but responses ranged from 1.5 to 60 minutes. Half of respondents underestimated the time needed. (SV)

  14. The Healthy Trail Food Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dorcas S.

    An 800-mile canoe trip down a Canadian river provided the testing ground for the tenets of this trail food book. On the seven week expedition two pounds of food per person per day at a daily cost of $1.70 were carried. The only perishables were cheese, margarine, and onions. Recipes and menu ideas from that expedition are provided along with…

  15. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amier, R. K.

    1981-11-01

    A two dimensional section of a helicopter main rotor blade was tested in an acoustic wind tunnel at close to full-scale Reynolds numbers to obtain boundary layer data and acoustic data for use in developing an acoustic scaling law and testing a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Results were extended to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a helicopter rotor trailing edge noise prediction. Comparisons of the calculated noise levels with helicopter flyover spectra demonstrate that trailing edge noise contributes significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies. This noise mechanism is expected to control the minimum rotor noise. In the case of noise radiation from a local blade segment, the acoustic directivity pattern is predicted by the first principles trailing edge noise theory. Acoustic spectra are predicted by a scaling law which includes Mach number, boundary layer thickness and observer position. Spectrum shape and sound pressure level are also predicted by the first principles theory but the analysis does not predict the Strouhal value identifying the spectrum peak.

  16. Ho-Nee-Um Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Harriet; And Others

    Appreciation and concern for the preservation of our natural resources by all citizens is the primary concern of this teacher's guide for use in the elementary grades. It employes the use of a filmstrip in conjunction with a local nature trail, to guide students in developing awareness - by looking closely, listening, touching, and smelling. Major…

  17. Westward Expansion: The Oregon Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, James F.

    This 8-week interdisciplinary unit for fourth- and fifth-grade students helps children address the U.S. westward expansion in the 1840's using the interactive software program, The Oregon Trail. The unit provides connections to literature, geography, computer/mathematics skills, language arts, and research skills. The work is done in cooperative…

  18. Intravitreal injection

    MedlinePlus

    Retinal vein occlusion-intravitreal injection; Triamcinolone-intravitreal injection; Dexamethasone-intravitreal injection; Lucentis-intravitreal injection; Avastin-intravitreal injection; Bevacizumab-intravitreal injection; Ranibizumab- ...

  19. Electronic Escape Trails for Firefighters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles; Schipper, John; Betts, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    A proposed wireless-communication and data-processing system would exploit recent advances in radio-frequency identification devices (RFIDs) and software to establish information lifelines between firefighters in a burning building and a fire chief at a control station near but outside the building. The system would enable identification of trails that firefighters and others could follow to escape from the building, including identification of new trails should previously established trails become blocked. The system would include a transceiver unit and a computer at the control station, portable transceiver units carried by the firefighters in the building, and RFID tags that the firefighters would place at multiple locations as they move into and through the building (see figure). Each RFID tag, having a size of the order of a few centimeters, would include at least standard RFID circuitry and possibly sensors for measuring such other relevant environmental parameters as temperature, levels of light and sound, concentration of oxygen, concentrations of hazardous chemicals in smoke, and/or levels of nuclear radiation. The RFID tags would be activated and interrogated by the firefighters and control-station transceivers. Preferably, RFID tags would be configured to communicate with each other and with the firefighters units and the control station in an ordered sequence, with built-in redundancy. In a typical scenario, as firefighters moved through a building, they would scatter many RFID tags into smoke-obscured areas by use of a compressed-air gun. Alternatively or in addition, they would mark escape trails by dropping RFID tags at such points of interest as mantraps, hot spots, and trail waypoints. The RFID tags could be of different types, operating at different frequencies to identify their functions, and possibly responding by emitting audible beeps when activated by signals transmitted by transceiver units carried by nearby firefighters.

  20. Retinofugal Projections from Melanopsin-Expressing Retinal Ganglion Cells Revealed by Intraocular Injections of Cre-Dependent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Delwig, Anton; Larsen, DeLaine D.; Yasumura, Douglas; Yang, Cindy F.; Shah, Nirao M.; Copenhagen, David R.

    2016-01-01

    To understand visual functions mediated by intrinsically photosensitive melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs), it is important to elucidate axonal projections from these cells into the brain. Initial studies reported that melanopsin is expressed only in retinal ganglion cells within the eye. However, recent studies in Opn4-Cre mice revealed Cre-mediated marker expression in multiple brain areas. These discoveries complicate the use of melanopsin-driven genetic labeling techniques to identify retinofugal projections specifically from mRGCs. To restrict labeling to mRGCs, we developed a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying a Cre-dependent reporter (human placental alkaline phosphatase) that was injected into the vitreous of Opn4-Cre mouse eyes. The labeling observed in the brain of these mice was necessarily restricted specifically to retinofugal projections from mRGCs in the injected eye. We found that mRGCs innervate multiple nuclei in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, amygdala, thalamus and midbrain. Midline structures tended to be bilaterally innervated, whereas the lateral structures received mostly contralateral innervation. As validation of our approach, we found projection patterns largely corresponded with previously published results; however, we have also identified a few novel targets. Our discovery of projections to the central amygdala suggests a possible direct neural pathway for aversive responses to light in neonates. In addition, projections to the accessory optic system suggest that mRGCs play a direct role in visual tracking, responses that were previously attributed to other classes of retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, projections to the zona incerta raise the possibility that mRGCs could regulate visceral and sensory functions. However, additional studies are needed to investigate the actual photosensitivity of mRGCs that project to the different brain areas. Also, there is a concern of "overlabeling" with very

  1. Oregon trails revisted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, A. J.; Alexander, C. J.; Hall, M. J.; Isaacson, D. L.; Murray, R. J.; Schrumpf, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Oregon State University's Environmental Remote Sensing Applications Laboratory (ERSAL) has six full-time researchers with expertise in a variety of biological, Earth, atmospheric and computer sciences as well as image interpretation and statistical techniques. The primary emphasis of the ERSAL research and demonstration program is the development and application of remote sensing technology in operational resource management programs. LANDSAT multi-spectral, multi-date digital data and imagery are utilized in concert with high altitude NASA-acquired photography, low altitude ERSAL-acquired photography, and field observations and data to provide customized, inexpensive and useful final products. Synopses are given of 9 applications projects conducted in Oregon.

  2. Experimental investigation of airfoil trailing edge heat transfer and aerodynamic losses

    SciTech Connect

    Brundage, A.L.; Plesniak, M.W.; Lawless, P.B.; Ramadhyani, S.

    2007-01-15

    Modern gas turbine development is being driven by the often-incompatible goals of increased efficiency, better durability, and reduced emissions. High turbine inlet temperatures and ineffective cooling at the trailing edge of a first-stage stator vane lead to corrosion, oxidation, and thermal fatigue. Observations of this region in engines frequently reveal burn marks, cracks, and buckling. Fundamental studies of the importance of trailing edge heat transfer to the design of an optimal cooling scheme are scarce. An experimental study of an actively cooled trailing edge configuration, in which coolant is injected through a slot, is performed. Trailing edge heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements are reported. An optimum balance between maximizing blade row aerodynamic efficiency and improving thermal protection at the trailing edge is estimated to be achieved when blowing ratios are in the range between 2.1% and 2.8%. The thermal phenomena at the trailing edge are dominated by injection slot heat transfer and flow physics. These measured trends are generally applicable over a wide range of gas turbine applications. (author)

  3. Uncovering the complexity of ant foraging trails.

    PubMed

    Czaczkes, Tomer J; Grüter, Christoph; Jones, Sam M; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2012-01-01

    The common garden ant Lasius niger use both trail pheromones and memory of past visits to navigate to and from food sources. In a recent paper we demonstrated a synergistic effect between route memory and trail pheromones: the presence of trail pheromones results in experienced ants walking straighter and faster. We also found that experienced ants leaving a pheromone trail deposit less pheromone. Here we focus on another finding of the experiment: the presence of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), which are used as home range markers by ants, also affects pheromone deposition behavior. When walking on a trail on which CHCs are present but trail pheromones are not, experienced foragers deposit less pheromone on the outward journey than on the return journey. The regulatory mechanisms ants use during foraging and recruitment behavior is subtle and complex, affected by multiple interacting factors such as route memory, travel direction and the presence trail pheromone and home-range markings. PMID:22482017

  4. The analyses of destruction of the meteoric trail on radar observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, A.; Tereshin, S.; Abrosimov, J.

    It is known, that ambipolar diffusion defines a destruction of an ionic-electronic trail of underdense type. At the same time attempts of an explanation of destruction of overdense trail by only ambipolar diffusion give large deviations of definition of duration of the meteoric trail. Reduction of duration of existence of the meteoric trail was explained by influence of change of parameter s in distribution of meteoric bodies on weights; influence of effects recombination; to adhere of electrons to the neutral molecules, atoms and turbulent diffusion. The analysis of works of this problem gives, that researchers do not have the good explanation of processes of destruction of the meteoric trail. In this work we try to define the most important processes of destruction of the overdense meteoric trail and to construct model of destruction of an meteoric trail. The analysis of rate of reactions shows, that procesess of the recombination with electronic stabilization, dissociative recombination, two-step process with participation of atmospheric ozone also influence on reduction of concentration of electronic in trail. We constructed models of distributions of duration of radio echo using only one mechanism and combination of all mechanism. Now we plan experimental observations for distinguish of influence of each of mechanisms. This work was funded by the Russian Foundation for Fundamental Research (Project ? 00-02-16845)

  5. Monitoring CO2 injection with a buried geophone array: Stage 2C of CO2CRC Otway Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urosevic, M.; Gurevich, B.; Pevzner, R.; Tertyshnikov, K.; Shulakova, V.; Glubokovskikh, S.; Popik, D.; Kepic, A.; Robertson, M.; Freifeld, B. M.; Daley, T. M.; Singh, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Stage 2 of the CO2CRC project involves injection of a small quantity of CO2, 15 Kt, into the Paaratte formation, a saline aquifer located at a depth of around 1500 m in the Otway basin, Victoria, Australia. The project aims to investigate the limits of time lapse seismic methodologies in order to devise an optimal monitoring program. That includes time lapse signal and noise prediction, time lapse data acquisition design and finally data analysis. The strength of the time lapse (TL) seismic is governed by the magnitudes of both the time lapse signal and time lapse noise. They are in turn both dependent on numerous factors which need to be addressed through modelling studies and data acquisition technologies. Geological information is used to build a detailed 3D static model for the dynamic reservoir simulations and analysis of CO2 plume distribution for small quantities of CO2 injected into the deepest Paaratte member. Various lithological scenarios and variations in permeability distribution are tested until arriving at the "most likely" solution. The final model is used initially for 1D and subsequently for the full 3D time lapse modelling. These time lapse modelling results, combined with field tests and noise analysis, show clearly that small quantities of CO2 injected into a relatively thin (~20 m in thickness) saline aquifer would benefit from utilizing a permanent 3D seismic array to achieve desired repeatability, that is reduction in time lapse seismic noise. Buried receiver array was designed and deployed at the CO2CRC Otway during January and February. The array comprises 908 high-sensitivity geophones deployed at 4 m depth below the surface. Baseline 3D was acquired in March 2015. Some 3003 shots were acquired by a crew of 7 people over 9 days. Benchmark tests show a significant improvement in data quality compared to surface geophones. With this approach there are no cables or other seismic infrastructure on the surface. This significantly reduces

  6. TRAIL receptor signalling and modulation: Are we on the right TRAIL?

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Devalingam; Szegezdi, Eva; Keane, Maccon; de Jong, Steven; Samali, Afshin

    2009-05-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand or Apo2 ligand (TRAIL/Apo2L) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily of cytokines that induces apoptosis upon binding to its death domain-containing transmembrane receptors, death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4, DR5). Importantly, TRAIL preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells while exhibiting little or no toxicity in normal cells. To date, research has focused on the mechanism of apoptosis induced by TRAIL and the processes involved in the development of TRAIL resistance. TRAIL-resistant tumours can be re-sensitized to TRAIL by a combination of TRAIL with chemotherapeutics or irradiation. Studies suggest that in many cancer cells only one of the two death-inducing TRAIL receptors is functional. These findings as well as the aim to avoid decoy receptor-mediated neutralization of TRAIL led to the development of receptor-specific TRAIL variants and agonistic antibodies. These molecules are predicted to be more potent than native TRAIL in vivo and may be suitable for targeted treatment of particular tumours. This review focuses on the current status of TRAIL receptor-targeting for cancer therapy, the apoptotic signalling pathway induced by TRAIL receptors, the prognostic implications of TRAIL receptor expression and modulation of TRAIL sensitivity of tumour cells by combination therapies. The mechanisms of TRAIL resistance and the potential measures that can be taken to overcome them are also addressed. Finally, the status of clinical trials of recombinant TRAIL and DR4-/DR5-specific agonistic antibodies as well as the pre-clinical studies of receptor-selective TRAIL variants is discussed including the obstacles facing the use of these molecules as anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:19117685

  7. Plume and plate controlled hotspot trails in the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, John; Jokat, Wilfried; le Roex, Anton; Class, Cornelia; Wijbrans, Jan; Keßling, Stefanie; Kuiper, Klaudia; Nebel, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    Discovering if hotspots observed on the Earth's surface are explained by underlying plumes rising from the deep mantle or by shallow plate-driven processes continues to be an essential goal in Earth Science. Key evidence underpinning the mantle plume concept is the existence of age-progressive volcanic trails recording past plate motion relative to surface hotspots and their causal plumes. Using the icebreaker RV Polarstern, we sampled scattered hotspot trails on the 2,000 km-wide southeast Atlantic hotspot swell, which projects down to one of the Earth's two largest and deepest regions of slower-than-average seismic wave speed - the Africa Low Shear Wave Velocity Province - caused by a massive thermo-chemical 'pile' on the core-mantle boundary. We showed recently using Ar/Ar isotopic ages - and crustal structure and seafloor ages - that these hotspot trails are age progressive and formed synchronously across the swell, consistent with African plate motion over plumes rising from the stable edge of a Low Shear Wave Velocity Province (LLSVP) (O'Connor et al., 2012). We showed furthermore that hotspot trails formed initially only at spreading boundaries at the outer edges of the swell until roughly 44 million years ago, when they started forming across the swell, far from spreading boundaries in lithosphere that was sufficiently weak (young) for plume melts to reach the surface. We concluded that if plume melts formed synchronous age progressive hotspot trails whenever they could penetrate the lithosphere, then hotspot trails in the South Atlantic are controlled by the interplay between deep plumes and the shallow motion and structure of the African plate. If the distribution of hotspot trails reflects where plume melts could or could not penetrate the continental or oceanic lithosphere then plumes could have been active for significantly longer than indicated by their volcanic chains. This provides a mechanism for extended late stage interplay between deep mantle

  8. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  9. INITIAL TEST RESULTS OF THE LIMESTONE INJECTION MULTISTAGE BURNER (LIMB) DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses SO2 removal efficiency and low-NOx burner performance obtained during short term tests, as well as the impact of LIMB ash on electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station. Project goals are to demonstrate 50% or more SO2 remov...

  10. 77 FR 36525 - Cheniere Creole Trail Pipeline Company, L.P.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cheniere Creole Trail Pipeline Company, L.P.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Creole Trail Expansion Project and Request for Comments on Environmental Issues The staff of...

  11. 77 FR 58826 - Cheniere Creole Trail Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... Terminal; and A pig \\1\\ trap and associated valves at the SPLNG Terminal. \\1\\ A ``pig'' is a tool that is... Energy Regulatory Commission Cheniere Creole Trail Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Creole Trail Expansion Project The staff of the Federal...

  12. Trail formation based on directed pheromone deposition.

    PubMed

    Boissard, Emmanuel; Degond, Pierre; Motsch, Sebastien

    2013-05-01

    We propose an Individual-Based Model of ant-trail formation. The ants are modeled as self-propelled particles which deposit directed pheromone particles and interact with them through alignment interaction. The directed pheromone particles intend to model pieces of trails, while the alignment interaction translates the tendency for an ant to follow a trail when it meets it. Thanks to adequate quantitative descriptors of the trail patterns, the existence of a phase transition as the ant-pheromone interaction frequency is increased can be evidenced. We propose both kinetic and fluid descriptions of this model and analyze the capabilities of the fluid model to develop trail patterns. We observe that the development of patterns by fluid models require extra trail amplification mechanisms that are not needed at the Individual-Based Model level. PMID:22526837

  13. Experimental Plan: Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection 300 Area Uranium Plume Treatability Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2006-09-20

    This Test Plan describes a laboratory-testing program to be performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of the 300-FF-5 Feasibility Study (FS). The objective of the proposed treatability test is to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium contaminated groundwater in situ. This study will be used to: (1) Develop implementation cost estimates; (2) Identify implementation challenges; and (3) Investigate the technology's ability to meet remedial objectives These activities will be conducted in parallel with a limited field investigation, which is currently underway to more accurately define the vertical extent of uranium in the vadose zone, and in the capillary fringe zone laterally throughout the plume. The treatability test will establish the viability of the method and, along with characterization data from the limited field investigation, will provide the means for determining how best to implement the technology in the field. By conducting the treatability work in parallel with the ongoing Limited Field Investigation, the resulting Feasibility Study (FS) will provide proven, site-specific information for evaluating polyphosphate addition and selecting a suitable remediation strategy for the uranium plume within the FS time frame at an overall cost savings.

  14. Assessing Urban Walking Trail Use and Changes in the Trail Environment Using Systematic Observational Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Duncan C.; Wilson, Dawn K.; Kugler, Kassandra A.; Colabianchi, Natalie; McKenzie, Thomas L.; Ainsworth, Barbara E.; Reed, Julian; Schmidt, Sara C.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the extent to which two systematic observation protocols which were modified for underserved communities (low income, minorities) could be utilized to reliably assess a) use of walking trails and b) physical environmental features of these trails. This study was a supplement to the Positive Action for Today's Health (PATH) walking trial. The modified tools were shown to be reliable methods for a) measuring trail use and b) assessing physical features of the trail in underserved environments. Reliability data for measuring trail use were found to be high (ICC = .98, p < .01). Reliabilities for measuring features of the trail ranged from fair to highly reliable (κ = .77 - 1.00; ICC = .34 - 1.00). The observation tools that were customized for this study were shown to be reliable instruments for measuring trail use and assessing physical features of walking trails in underserved communities. PMID:22795357

  15. 30 CFR 75.603 - Temporary splice of trailing cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temporary splice of trailing cable. 75.603... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.603 Temporary splice of trailing cable. One temporary splice may be made in any trailing cable. Such trailing cable...

  16. 30 CFR 75.603 - Temporary splice of trailing cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Temporary splice of trailing cable. 75.603... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.603 Temporary splice of trailing cable. One temporary splice may be made in any trailing cable. Such trailing cable...

  17. 30 CFR 75.603 - Temporary splice of trailing cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Temporary splice of trailing cable. 75.603... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.603 Temporary splice of trailing cable. One temporary splice may be made in any trailing cable. Such trailing cable...

  18. 30 CFR 75.603 - Temporary splice of trailing cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temporary splice of trailing cable. 75.603... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.603 Temporary splice of trailing cable. One temporary splice may be made in any trailing cable. Such trailing cable...

  19. Low-cost real-time infrared scene generation for image projection and signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; King, David E.; Bowden, Mark H.

    1997-07-01

    As cost becomes an increasingly important factor in the development and testing of infrared (IR) sensors and flight computer/processors, the need for accurate hardware-in-the- loop simulations is critical. In the past, expensive and complex dedicated scene generation hardware was needed to attain the fidelity necessary for accurately testing systems under test (SUT). Recent technological advances and innovative applications of established technologies are beginning to allow development of cost effective replacements for dedicated scene generators. These new scene generators are mainly constructed from commercial off-the- shelf (COTS) hardware and software components. At the U.S. Army Missile Command (MICOM) researchers have developed such a dynamic IR scene generator (IRSG) built around COTS hardware and software. The IRSG is being used to provide inputs to an IR scene projector for in-band sensor testing and for direct signal injection into the sensor or processor electronics. Using this `baseline' IRSG, up to 120 frames per second (Hz) of 12-bit intensity images are being generated at 640 by 640 pixel resolution. The IRSG SUT-to- target viewpoint is dynamically updated in real time by a six-degree-of-freedom SUT simulation executing on a facility simulation computer, synchronized with an external signal from the SUT hardware, and compensates for system latency using a special purpose hardware component implemented on a single VME card. Multiple dynamic targets, terrain/backgrounds, countermeasures, and atmospheric effects in real time by the facility simulation computer via a shared memory interface to the IRSG. The `next generation' IRSG is currently under development at MICOM using `next generation' COTS hardware and software. `Next generation' performance specifications are estimated to yield 16-bit intensity, 250 - 300 Hz frame rate, at 1024 X 1024 pixel resolution.

  20. Pharmacological Interventions Including Medical Injections for Neck Pain: An Overview as Part of the ICON§ Project

    PubMed Central

    Peloso, Paul M; Khan, Mahweesh; Gross, Anita R; Carlesso, Lisa; Santaguida, Lina; Lowcock, Janet; MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, Dave; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Langevin, Pierre; Shi, Qiyun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct an overview (review-of-reviews) on pharmacological interventions for neck pain. Search Strategy: Computerized databases and grey literature were searched from 2006 to 2012. Selection Criteria: Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCT) in adults with acute to chronic neck pain reporting effects of pharmacological interventions including injections on pain, function/disability, global perceived effect, quality of life and patient satisfaction. Data Collection & Analysis: Two independent authors selected articles, assessed risk of bias and extracted data The GRADE tool was used to evaluate the body of evidence and an external panel provided critical review. Main Results: We found 26 reviews reporting on 47 RCTs. Most pharmacological interventions had low to very low quality methodologic evidence with three exceptions. For chronic neck pain, there was evidence of: a small immediate benefit for eperison hydrochloride (moderate GRADE, 1 trial, 157 participants);no short-term pain relieving benefit for botulinum toxin-A compared to saline (strong GRADE; 5 trial meta-analysis, 258 participants) nor for subacute/chronic whiplash (moderate GRADE; 4 trial meta-analysis, 183 participants) including reduced pain, disability or global perceived effect; andno long-term benefit for medial branch block of facet joints with steroids (moderate GRADE; 1 trial, 120 participants) over placebo to reduce pain or disability; Reviewers' Conclusions: While in general there is a lack of evidence for most pharmacological interventions, current evidence is against botulinum toxin-A for chronic neck pain or subacute/chronic whiplash; against medial branch block with steroids for chronic facet joint pain; but in favour of the muscle relaxant eperison hydrochloride for chronic neck pain. PMID:24155805

  1. Delivery of tumor-homing TRAIL sensitizer with long-acting TRAIL as a therapy for TRAIL-resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yumin; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Kim, Tae Hyung; Lim, Sung Mook; Eom, Ha Na; Park, Jae Hyung; Na, Dong Hee; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Kang Choon; Pomper, Martin G; Lee, Seulki

    2015-12-28

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has attracted great interest as a cancer therapy because it selectively induces death receptor (DR)-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells while sparing normal tissue. However, recombinant human TRAIL demonstrates limited therapeutic efficacy in clinical trials, possibly due to TRAIL-resistance of primary cancers and its inherent short half-life. Here we introduce drug delivery approaches to maximize in vivo potency of TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant tumor xenografts by (1) extending the half-life of the ligand with PEGylated TRAIL (TRAILPEG) and (2) concentrating a TRAIL sensitizer, selected from in vitro screening, in tumors via tumor-homing nanoparticles. Antitumor efficacy of TRAILPEG with tumor-homing sensitizer was evaluated in HCT116 and HT-29 colon xenografts. Western blot, real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry and cell viability assays were employed to investigate mechanisms of action and antitumor efficacy of the combination. We discovered that doxorubicin (DOX) sensitizes TRAIL-resistant HT-29 colon cancer cells to TRAIL by upregulating mRNA expression of DR5 by 60% in vitro. Intravenously administered free DOX does not effectively upregulate DR5 in tumor tissues nor demonstrate synergy with TRAILPEG in HT-29 xenografts, but rather introduces significant systemic toxicity. Alternatively, when DOX was encapsulated in hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles (HAC/DOX) and intravenously administered with TRAILPEG, DR-mediated apoptosis was potentiated in HT-29 tumors by upregulating DR5 protein expression by 70% and initiating both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways with reduced systemic toxicity compared to HAC/DOX or free DOX combined with TRAILPEG (80% vs. 40% survival rate; 75% vs. 34% tumor growth inhibition). This study demonstrates a unique approach to overcome TRAIL-based therapy drawbacks using sequential administration of a tumor-homing TRAIL sensitizer and long-acting TRAILPEG. PMID:26381901

  2. Status of the S.E. Geysers effluent pipeline & injection project

    SciTech Connect

    Dellinger, M.

    1997-12-31

    A unique public/private partnership of local, state, federal, and corporate stakeholders is constructing the world`s first wastewater-to-electricity system in Lake County, California. A rare example of a genuinely {open_quotes}sustainable{close_quotes} system, three Lake County communities will recycle their treated wastewater effluent through the Geysers geothermal steamfield to produce an estimated 625,000 MWh of electricity annually from six existing geothermal power plants. The concept is shown schematically. Construction was initiated in October 1995, and as of this writing, the system is approximately 85% complete. Operational start-up is expected in October 1997. The key to the project`s success thus far has been its emphasis on cooperative action among affected stakeholders; and a broad, community-based view of solving problems rather than the traditional, narrower view of engineering-driven technical solutions. Special attention has been given to environmentally-responsive engineering design to avoid or minimize adverse environmental impacts.

  3. Twisted injectivity in projected entangled pair states and the classification of quantum phases

    SciTech Connect

    Buerschaper, Oliver

    2014-12-15

    We introduce a class of projected entangled pair states (PEPS) which is based on a group symmetry twisted by a 3-cocycle of the group. This twisted symmetry is expressed as a matrix product operator (MPO) with bond dimension greater than 1 and acts on the virtual boundary of a PEPS tensor. We show that it gives rise to a new standard form for PEPS from which we construct a family of local Hamiltonians which are gapped, frustration-free and include fixed points of the renormalization group flow. Based on this insight, we advance the classification of 2D gapped quantum spin systems by showing how this new standard form for PEPS determines the emergent topological order of these local Hamiltonians. Specifically, we identify their universality class as DIJKGRAAF–WITTEN topological quantum field theory (TQFT). - Highlights: • We introduce a new standard form for projected entangled pair states via a twisted group symmetry which is given by nontrivial matrix product operators. • We construct a large family of gapped, frustration-free Hamiltonians in two dimensions from this new standard form. • We rigorously show how this new standard form for low energy states determines the emergent topological order.

  4. Beam Trail Tracking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.; Carmichael, Linden Ralph; Neswold, Richard; Yuan, Zongwei

    2015-01-01

    We present a system for acquiring and sorting data from select devices depending on the destination of each particular beam pulse in the Fermilab accelerator chain. The 15 Hz beam that begins in the Fermilab ion source can be directed to a variety of additional accelerators, beam lines, beam dumps, and experiments. We have implemented a data acquisition system that senses the destination of each pulse and reads the appropriate beam intensity devices so that profiles of the beam can be stored and analysed for each type of beam trail. We envision utilizing this data long term to identify trends in the performance of the accelerators

  5. Near-surface monitoring for the ZERT shallow CO2 injection project

    SciTech Connect

    Strazisar, Brian R.; Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. Rodney; Hammack, Richard W.; Veloski, Garret A.

    2009-12-01

    As part of a collaborative effort operated by the Zero Emission Research and Technology Center (ZERT), a series of two shallow releases of CO2 Was performed at a test site in Bozeman, MT. The purpose of the experiment was to simulate possible leakage scenarios from a carbon capture and storage operation in order to further develop and verify monitoring technologies used to characterize and quantify the release of CO2. The project included collaboration with several research groups and organizations. Presented here are the results of soil-gas monitoring conducted by researchers from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, including CO2 flux measurement, soil-gas analysis, perfluorocarbon tracer monitoring, and soil resistivity measurements. Together, these methods proved to be effective in detecting and characterizing leakage in the near-surface.

  6. Near-surface monitoring for the ZERT shallow CO2 injection project

    SciTech Connect

    Strazisar BR; Wells AW; Diehl JR

    2009-12-01

    As part of a collaborative effort operated by the Zero Emission Research and Technology Center (ZERT), a series of two shallow releases of CO2 was performed at a test site in Bozeman, MT. The purpose of the experiment was to simulate possible leakage scenarios from a carbon capture and storage operation in order to further develop and verify monitoring technologies used to characterize and quantify the release of CO2. The project included collaboration with several research groups and organizations. Presented here are the results of soil–gasmonitoring conducted by researchers from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, including CO2 flux measurement, soil–gas analysis, perfluorocarbon tracer monitoring, and soil resistivity measurements. Together, these methods proved to be effective in detecting and characterizing leakage in the near-surface.

  7. Airbag Trail Dubbed 'Magic Carpet'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Airbag Trail Dubbed 'Magic Carpet' (QTVR)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Magic Carpet Close-upMagic Carpet Close-up HD

    This section of the first color image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been further processed to produce a sharper look at a trail left by the one of rover's airbags. The drag mark was made after the rover landed and its airbags were deflated and retracted. Scientists have dubbed the region the 'Magic Carpet' after a crumpled portion of the soil that appears to have been peeled away (lower left side of the drag mark). Rocks were also dragged by the airbags, leaving impressions and 'bow waves' in the soil. The mission team plans to drive the rover over to this site to look for additional clues about the composition of the martian soil. This image was taken by Spirit's panoramic camera.

    This extreme close-up image (see insets above) highlights the martian feature that scientists have named 'Magic Carpet' because of its resemblance to a crumpled carpet fold. Scientists think the soil here may have detached from its underlying layer, possibly due to interaction with the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's airbag after landing. This image was taken on Mars by the rover's panoramic camera.

  8. Riding a Trail of Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the comet Encke riding along its pebbly trail of debris (long diagonal line) between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. This material actually encircles the solar system, following the path of Encke's orbit. Twin jets of material can also be seen shooting away from the comet in the short, fan-shaped emission, spreading horizontally from the comet.

    Encke, which orbits the Sun every 3.3 years, is well traveled. Having exhausted its supply of fine particles, it now leaves a long trail of larger more gravel-like debris, about one millimeter in size or greater. Every October, Earth passes through Encke's wake, resulting in the well-known Taurid meteor shower.

    This image was captured by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer when Encke was 2.6 times farther away than Earth is from the Sun. It is the best yet mid-infrared view of the comet at this great distance. The data are helping astronomers understand how rotating comets eject particles as they circle the Sun.

  9. Low-Speed Fan Noise Reduction With Trailing Edge Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Tweedt, Daniel L.; Fite, E. Brian; Envia, Edmane

    2002-01-01

    An experimental proof-of-concept test was conducted to demonstrate reduction of rotor-stator interaction noise through rotor-trailing edge blowing. The velocity deficit from the viscous wake of the rotor blades was reduced by injecting air into the wake from a trailing edge slot. Composite hollow rotor blades with internal flow passages were designed based on analytical codes modeling the internal flow. The hollow blade with interior guide vanes creates flow channels through which externally supplied air flows from the root of the blade to the trailing edge. The impact of the rotor wake-stator interaction on the acoustics was also predicted analytically. The Active Noise Control Fan, located at the NASA Glenn Research Center, was used as the proof- of-concept test bed. In-duct mode and farfield directivity acoustic data were acquired at blowing rates (defined as mass supplied to trailing edge blowing system divided by fan mass flow) ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 percent. The first three blade passing frequency harmonics at fan rotational speeds of 1700 to 1900 rpm were analyzed. The acoustic tone power levels (PWL) in the inlet and exhaust were reduced 11.5 and -0.1, 7.2 and 11.4, 11.8 and 19.4 PWL dB, respectively. The farfield tone power levels at the first three harmonics were reduced 5.4, 10.6, and 12.4 dB PWL. At selected conditions, two-component hotwire and stator vane unsteady surface pressures were acquired. These measurements illustrate the physics behind the noise reduction.

  10. Trail inventory and assessment approaches to trail system planning at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, P.B.; Marion, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Trail system planning and management require accurate assessments of existing trail resources and their condition. A standardized and efficient process for surveying, inventorying, and assessing trail systems was developed and applied in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Two approaches employed were (1) a Trail System Inventory, and (2) Prescriptive Work Logs. These complimentary approaches provide resource managers with valuable information regarding the location and length of individual trails, their current condition and needed maintenance work, and material and labor estimates necessary to conduct such work.

  11. In-Trail Procedure (ITP) Algorithm Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this document is to provide a detailed description of the In-Trail Procedure (ITP) algorithm, which is part of the Airborne Traffic Situational Awareness In-Trail Procedure (ATSA-ITP) application. To this end, the document presents a high level description of the ITP Algorithm and a prototype implementation of this algorithm in the programming language C.

  12. On the Oregon Trail. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    In this lesson, students work with primary documents and latter-day photographs to recapture the experience of traveling on the Oregon Trail. The learning objectives of the lesson are: (1) to learn about the pioneer experience on the Oregon Trail; (2) to evaluate a historical re-enactment in light of documentary evidence; and (3) to synthesize…

  13. Nature Trails for the Visually Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Jonathan R.

    Many interpretive nature trails have been established for the visually impaired in recent years. The objectives of the investigation were to (a) identify what has been done in the past in the way of nature trail design for the visually impaired, (b) compare this with what professional workers for the visually impaired consider important in the…

  14. Back in Time on a Mathematics Trail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    The recently revised "Northern Ireland Primary Curriculum" recommends that teachers make use of the environment to extend children's understanding of mathematics. One approach to using the environment in mathematics is to take children on a mathematics trail. A mathematics trail uses the resources and features within the environment as a stimulus…

  15. ICPP injection well alternative project, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) portion of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been obtaining water needed for its operations from the Snake River aquifer, which occupies the entire region underlying the site. Most of this water has been used for cooling operating equipment, while a small portion has found various process uses. After passing through the ICPP process area, these waters are then returned to the aquifer. A small portion (about 1%) of the returned stream contains measurable amounts of radioactivity derived from the miscellaneous process users. This report and the recommendations contained herein are based upon stream flows projected for 1985 as supplied by DOE for the ICPP. 26 different alternatives for handling cooling water, chemical, and low level radioactive water disposal are examined. These cases are considered from technical, environmental, safety, and economic points of view. The level of detail is sufficient to eliminate non-viable cases, and to identify those which offer improvements over present practice. The Environmental/Safety Risk Factors were evaluated on a qualitative comparison basis only. Before a recommended improvement is incorporated into the waste disposal system, a conceptual design study should be made which would evaluate all those secondary effects and environmental factors that, by the very nature of the screening process, this study has not provided. Certain synergistic combinations have been noted and are discussed. This report does note whether the operations considered are in regulatory compliance, or are likely to be capable of providing lasting improvement to the waste water system. Qualitative comparisons were made between the various alternatives to confirm their relationship with applicable standards.

  16. Stator Loading Measurements Behind a Fan With Trailing Edge Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.

    2000-01-01

    The problem of aircraft noise pollution around airports has become increasingly important as those areas have become more densely populated. Currently, the removal of older noisier aircraft from operation is reducing noise levels around airports; however, with air traffic projected to increase by about 5% over the next decade the number of commercial aircraft operating in the world is expected to be about 17,700 by the year 2007. To keep noise levels around airports from increasing as a result of traffic increases, it is important to investigate new methods of noise reduction. The objective of this work is to provide a better understanding of the effects that trailing edge blowing has on stator unsteady loading. This is done by presenting flowfield and stator loading data from experiments conducted with and without trailing edge blowing.

  17. Trail impacts and trail impact management related to ecotourism visitation at Torres del Paine National Park, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrell, T.A.; Marion, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ecotourism and protected area visitation in Central and South America are largely dependent upon a relatively undisturbed quality of natural resources. However, visitation may impact vegetation, soil, water and wildlife resources, and degrade visitor facilities such as recreation sites and trails. Findings are reported from trail impact research conducted at Torres del Paine National Park in Patagonia, Chile. The frequency and magnitude of selected trail impacts and the relative effect of the amount of use, vegetation type, trail position and trail grade are investigated. Findings differed from previous studies in that amount of use was significantly related to both trail width increases and trail erosion. Management actions to minimize trail impacts are offered.

  18. TRAIL death receptors and cancer therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Ying Sheikh, M. Saeed

    2007-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) also known as Apo2L is an apoptotic molecule that belongs to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily of cytokines. It mediates its apoptotic effects via its cognate death receptors including DR4 and DR5. Agonistic monoclonal antibodies have also been developed that selectively activate TRAIL death receptors to mediate apoptosis. Multiple clinically relevant agents also upregulate the expression of TRAIL death receptors, and cooperate with TRAIL as well as DR4 and DR5-specific agonistic antibodies to exhibit tumor cell killing. TRAIL is currently in phase I clinical trials, whereas DR4 and DR5-specific agonistic antibodies have been tested in phase I and II studies. Thus, TRAIL has clearly distinguished itself from the other family members including TNF-alpha and FasL both of which could not make it to the clinic due to their toxic nature. It is therefore, evident that the future of TRAIL-based therapeutic approaches looks brighter.

  19. The Death Ligand TRAIL in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lorz, Corina; Benito-Martín, Alberto; Boucherot, Anissa; Ucero, Alvaro C.; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Henger, Anna; Armelloni, Silvia; Santamaría, Beatriz; Berthier, Celine C.; Kretzler, Matthias; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death contributes to diabetic nephropathy (DN), but its role is not well understood. The tubulointerstitium from DN biopsy specimens was microdissected, and expression profiles of genes related to apoptosis were analyzed. A total of 112 (25%) of 455 cell death–related genes were found to be significantly differentially regulated. Among those that showed the greatest changes in regulation were two death receptors, OPG (the gene encoding osteoprotegerin) and Fas, and the death ligand TRAIL. Glomerular and proximal tubular TRAIL expression, assessed by immunohistochemistry, was higher in DN kidneys than controls and was associated with clinical and histologic severity of disease. In vitro, proinflammatory cytokines but not glucose alone regulated TRAIL expression in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2. TRAIL induced tubular cell apoptosis in a dosage-dependant manner, an effect that was more marked in the presence of high levels of glucose and proinflammatory cytokines. TRAIL also activated NF-κB, and inhibition of NF-κB sensitized cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. It is proposed that TRAIL-induced cell death could play an important role in the progression of human DN. PMID:18287563

  20. Miles In Trail (MIT) Restrictions: A Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal; Green, Steven; Roherty, Tom; Aston, John

    2003-01-01

    Miles-in-trail restrictions are issued to meet the airport and/or airspace capacity. The purpose of this paper is to review the currently practiced miles-in-trail operations for traffic flow management at a typical en route Air Traffic Control Center. The paper describes roles and considerations of both traffic management coordinators and the controllers in planning, coordination, execution, and monitoring of miles-in-trail restrictions. The paper addresses the type of decisions that traffic management coordinators must make and the different information required to plan and monitor miles-in-trail restrictions. The implications of miles-in-trail restrictions on controller workload are also addressed. Using the Cleveland center as an example, the paper also identified some challenging traffic situations that required miles-in-trail restrictions on a regular basis. The paper is expected to benefit the research and development community as it provides the current challenges in traffic flow management and strengths and weakness of miles-in-trail operations.

  1. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Manning, L.M.; Stringer, L.D.; Cappadonna, J.; El-Sayed, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m2) to 1- and 4-m2 plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  2. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity.

    PubMed

    Suckling, D M; Peck, R W; Manning, L M; Stringer, L D; Cappadonna, J; El-Sayed, A M

    2008-12-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m(2)) to 1- and 4-m(2) plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. PMID:19034574

  3. TRIPPy: Python-based Trailed Source Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Alexandersen, Mike; Schwamb, Megan E.; Marsset, Michael E.; Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, JJ; Bannister, Michele T.; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey

    2016-05-01

    TRIPPy (TRailed Image Photometry in Python) uses a pill-shaped aperture, a rectangle described by three parameters (trail length, angle, and radius) to improve photometry of moving sources over that done with circular apertures. It can generate accurate model and trailed point-spread functions from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. Appropriate aperture correction provides accurate, unbiased flux measurement. TRIPPy requires numpy, scipy, matplotlib, Astropy (ascl:1304.002), and stsci.numdisplay; emcee (ascl:1303.002) and SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) are optional.

  4. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  5. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  6. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  7. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  8. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  9. Trail marking by larvae of the eastern tent caterpillar.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, T D

    1976-11-26

    Eastern tent caterpillars that are successful foragers deposit trails as they return to the tent that are more attractive than the exploratory trails of the unfed larvae. The trails of these fed returning larvae attract unfed tentmates to food finds anre chemical factors account for the attractiveness of these trails. PMID:982055

  10. 30 CFR 77.602 - Permanent splicing of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permanent splicing of trailing cables. 77.602... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.602 Permanent splicing of trailing cables. When permanent splices in trailing cables are made, they shall be: (a) Mechanically strong with adequate electrical conductivity;...

  11. 30 CFR 75.600 - Trailing cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cables; flame resistance. 75.600... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.600 Trailing cables; flame resistance. Trailing cables used in coal mines shall meet the requirements established...

  12. 30 CFR 75.600 - Trailing cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trailing cables; flame resistance. 75.600... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.600 Trailing cables; flame resistance. Trailing cables used in coal mines shall meet the requirements established...

  13. 30 CFR 77.606 - Energized trailing cables; handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Energized trailing cables; handling. 77.606... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606 Energized trailing cables; handling. Energized medium- and high-voltage trailing cables shall be handled only by persons wearing protective rubber gloves (see §...

  14. 30 CFR 77.604 - Protection of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection of trailing cables. 77.604 Section 77.604 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY... MINES Trailing Cables § 77.604 Protection of trailing cables. Trailing cables shall be...

  15. 30 CFR 77.604 - Protection of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protection of trailing cables. 77.604 Section 77.604 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY... MINES Trailing Cables § 77.604 Protection of trailing cables. Trailing cables shall be...

  16. 30 CFR 75.604 - Permanent splicing of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permanent splicing of trailing cables. 75.604... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.604 Permanent splicing of trailing cables. When permanent splices in trailing cables are made, they shall be:...

  17. 30 CFR 77.606 - Energized trailing cables; handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Energized trailing cables; handling. 77.606... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606 Energized trailing cables; handling. Energized medium- and high-voltage trailing cables shall be handled only by persons wearing protective rubber gloves (see §...

  18. 30 CFR 75.604 - Permanent splicing of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permanent splicing of trailing cables. 75.604... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.604 Permanent splicing of trailing cables. When permanent splices in trailing cables are made, they shall be:...

  19. 30 CFR 75.826 - High-voltage trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-voltage trailing cables. 75.826 Section 75...-Voltage Longwalls § 75.826 High-voltage trailing cables. High-voltage trailing cables must: (a) Meet existing trailing cable requirements and the approval requirements of the high-voltage continuous...

  20. 30 CFR 77.602 - Permanent splicing of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permanent splicing of trailing cables. 77.602... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.602 Permanent splicing of trailing cables. When permanent splices in trailing cables are made, they shall be: (a) Mechanically strong with adequate electrical conductivity;...

  1. 30 CFR 75.826 - High-voltage trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false High-voltage trailing cables. 75.826 Section 75...-Voltage Longwalls § 75.826 High-voltage trailing cables. High-voltage trailing cables must: (a) Meet existing trailing cable requirements and the approval requirements of the high-voltage continuous...

  2. 30 CFR 75.600 - Trailing cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trailing cables; flame resistance. 75.600... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.600 Trailing cables; flame resistance. Trailing cables used in coal mines shall meet the requirements established...

  3. 30 CFR 75.826 - High-voltage trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false High-voltage trailing cables. 75.826 Section 75...-Voltage Longwalls § 75.826 High-voltage trailing cables. High-voltage trailing cables must: (a) Meet existing trailing cable requirements and the approval requirements of the high-voltage continuous...

  4. 30 CFR 77.602 - Permanent splicing of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permanent splicing of trailing cables. 77.602... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.602 Permanent splicing of trailing cables. When permanent splices in trailing cables are made, they shall be: (a) Mechanically strong with adequate electrical conductivity;...

  5. 30 CFR 77.606 - Energized trailing cables; handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Energized trailing cables; handling. 77.606... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606 Energized trailing cables; handling. Energized medium- and high-voltage trailing cables shall be handled only by persons wearing protective rubber gloves (see §...

  6. 30 CFR 75.604 - Permanent splicing of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permanent splicing of trailing cables. 75.604... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.604 Permanent splicing of trailing cables. When permanent splices in trailing cables are made, they shall be:...

  7. 30 CFR 77.604 - Protection of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protection of trailing cables. 77.604 Section 77.604 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY... MINES Trailing Cables § 77.604 Protection of trailing cables. Trailing cables shall be...

  8. 30 CFR 75.600 - Trailing cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trailing cables; flame resistance. 75.600... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.600 Trailing cables; flame resistance. Trailing cables used in coal mines shall meet the requirements established...

  9. 30 CFR 75.604 - Permanent splicing of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permanent splicing of trailing cables. 75.604... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.604 Permanent splicing of trailing cables. When permanent splices in trailing cables are made, they shall be:...

  10. 30 CFR 75.826 - High-voltage trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false High-voltage trailing cables. 75.826 Section 75...-Voltage Longwalls § 75.826 High-voltage trailing cables. High-voltage trailing cables must: (a) Meet existing trailing cable requirements and the approval requirements of the high-voltage continuous...

  11. 30 CFR 77.602 - Permanent splicing of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permanent splicing of trailing cables. 77.602... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.602 Permanent splicing of trailing cables. When permanent splices in trailing cables are made, they shall be: (a) Mechanically strong with adequate electrical conductivity;...

  12. 30 CFR 77.604 - Protection of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection of trailing cables. 77.604 Section 77.604 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY... MINES Trailing Cables § 77.604 Protection of trailing cables. Trailing cables shall be...

  13. 30 CFR 75.606 - Protection of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection of trailing cables. 75.606 Section... AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.606 Protection of trailing cables. Trailing cables shall be adequately protected to prevent damage by mobile equipment....

  14. 30 CFR 77.606 - Energized trailing cables; handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Energized trailing cables; handling. 77.606... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606 Energized trailing cables; handling. Energized medium- and high-voltage trailing cables shall be handled only by persons wearing protective rubber gloves (see §...

  15. Europa's Northern Trailing Hemisphere: Lineament Stratigraphic Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueredo, P. H.; Hare, T.; Ricq, E.; Strom, K.; Greeley, R.; Tanaka, K.; Senske, D.

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of the global distribution of Europan geologic units in time and space is a necessary step for the synthesis of the results of the Galileo mission and in preparation for future exploration (namely, by JIMO) of the satellite. We have initiated the production of the first Global Geological Map of Europa. As a base map, we use the recently published global photomosaic of Europa (U.S.G.S. Map I-2757) and additional Galileo SSI images at their original resolution. The map is being produced entirely on GIS format for analysis and combination with other datasets [1]. One of the main objectives of this project is to establish a global stratigraphic framework for Europa. In the absence of a well-developed cratering record, this goal will be achieved using the satellite s global network of lineaments (ridges, ridge complexes and bands; cf. [2]). Here we present the preliminary stratigraphic framework synthesized from the sequence of lineaments derived for the northern trailing hemisphere of Europa (Figure 1, below), and we discuss its significance and some emerging implications.

  16. Targeting different types of human meningioma and glioma cells using a novel adenoviral vector expressing GFP-TRAIL fusion protein from hTERT promoter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of Ad/gTRAIL (an adenoviral vector in which expression of GFP and TRAIL is driven by a human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, hTERT) on malignant meningiomas and gliomas. Background Gliomas and meningiomas are the two most common types of human brain tumors. Currently there is no effective cure for recurrent malignant meningiomas or for gliomas. Ad/gTRAIL has been shown to be effective in killing selected lung, colon and breast cancer cells, but there have been no studies reporting its antitumor effects on malignant meningiomas. Therefore, we tested the antitumor effect of Ad/gTRAIL for the first time in human malignant meningioma and glioma cell lines, and in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts. Methods Materials and Methods: Human malignant meningioma and glioma cells were infected with adenoviruses, Ad/gTRAIL and Ad/CMV-GFP. Cell viability was determined by proliferation assay. FACS analysis and quantification of TRAIL were used to measure apoptosis in these cells. We injected Ad/gTRAIL viruses in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts, and measured the brain tumor volume, quantified apoptosis by TUNEL assay in the brain tumor tissue. Results Our studies demonstrate that in vitro/in vivo treatment with Ad/gTRAIL virus resulted in significant increase of TRAIL activity, and elicited a greater tumor cell apoptosis in malignant brain tumor cells as compared to treatment with the control, Ad/CMV-GFP virus without TRAIL activity. Conclusions We showed for the first time that adenovirus Ad/gTRAIL had significant antitumor effects against high grade malignant meningiomas as well as gliomas. Although more work needs to be done, our data suggests that Ad/gTRAIL has the potential to be useful as a tool against malignant brain tumors. PMID:22035360

  17. Small Molecular TRAIL Inducer ONC201 Induces Death in Lung Cancer Cells: A Preclinical Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Zhou, Jihong; Li, Zhanhua; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively targets cancer cells. The present preclinical study investigated the anti-cancer efficiency of ONC201, a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer, in lung cancer cells. We showed that ONC201 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative in both established (A549 and H460 lines) and primary human lung cancer cells. It was yet non-cytotoxic to normal lung epithelial cells. Further, ONC201 induced exogenous apoptosis activation in lung cancer cells, which was evidenced by TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR5) induction and caspase-8 activation. The caspase-8 inhibitor or TRAIL/DR5 siRNA knockdown alleviated ONC201's cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells. Molecularly, ONC201 in-activated Akt-S6K1 and Erk signalings in lung cancer cells, causing Foxo3a nuclear translocation. For the in vivo studies, intraperitoneal injection of ONC201 at well-tolerated doses significantly inhibited xenografted A549 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Further, ONC201 administration induced TRAIL/DR5 expression, yet inactivated Akt-S6K1 and Erk in tumor tissues. These results of the study demonstrates the potent anti-lung cancer activity by ONC201. PMID:27626799

  18. 17 CFR 37.205 - Audit trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... database. A swap execution facility's audit trail program shall include an electronic transaction history database. An adequate transaction history database includes a history of all indications of interest..., including all order modifications and cancellations. An adequate transaction history database also...

  19. Miniature Trailing Edge Effector for Aerodynamic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hak-Tae (Inventor); Bieniawski, Stefan R. (Inventor); Kroo, Ilan M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improved miniature trailing edge effectors for aerodynamic control are provided. Three types of devices having aerodynamic housings integrated to the trailing edge of an aerodynamic shape are presented, which vary in details of how the control surface can move. A bucket type device has a control surface which is the back part of a C-shaped member having two arms connected by the back section. The C-shaped section is attached to a housing at the ends of the arms, and is rotatable about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down and neutral states. A flip-up type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down, neutral and brake states. A rotating type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the chord line to provide up, down and neutral states.

  20. Intra-axonal Neurobiotin injection rapidly stains the long-range projections of identified trigeminal primary afferents in vivo: comparisons with HRP and PHA-L.

    PubMed

    Jacquin, M F; Hu, J W; Sessle, B J; Renehan, W E; Waite, P M

    1992-01-01

    Currently available methods for studying the morphology of physiologically characterized primary afferents are limited by difficulties inherent in impaling thin fibers and by the limited distances over which conventional tracers move during the course of a recording session. We have encountered an alternative method that overcomes these limitations. Neurobiotin (NB; Vector) injections into rat trigeminal (V) primary afferents in the brain stem or V ganglion provided rapid, long-range staining with recording and electrophoretic parameters that are commonly used to eject horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHA-L). When NB was injected into brain stem fibers responsive to vibrissal deflection with A-beta conduction velocities, collaterals were darkly stained in each of the 4 V subnuclei, as well as the cervical dorsal horn. Labeled fibers were also seen in the V root and peripherally in the infra-orbital nerve for a distance up to 15 mm from the injection site (30 mm total). Cell bodies in the ganglion were never labeled. When NB was injected into V ganglion cells with low- or high-threshold receptive fields and A-beta or A-delta conduction velocities, parent axons were stained in the V spinal tract to the level of the obex, and collaterals were visible in each of the 4 V subnuclei. Such long-range staining occurred within 4 h of tracer injection. HRP never stained brain stem fibers following ganglion cell injections and, when injected centrally with the same survival intervals used with NB, dark staining was limited to within 4 mm of the injection site. Unlike NB or HRP, PHA-L injections rarely produced useful data, either because of the high mortality accompanying attempts to achieve a 1-2 week survival period or because injected neurons were not recovered. Due to its rapid and robust transport, NB is a more convenient and reliable tracer than PHA-L for producing long-range staining of the projections of identified ganglion cells

  1. A trail of research revisted.

    PubMed

    Liener, Irvin E

    2002-10-23

    The author describes how his interest in the nutritional value of soybeans led to a trail of research that had many ramifications. In an attempt to account for the poor nutritional value of raw soybeans and the beneficial effect of heat treatment, a protein displaying hemagglutinating activity and capable of inhibiting the growth of rats was isolated and characterized. This protein subsequently proved to be an example of a class of proteins that were later referred to as "lectins". Lectins were also isolated from kidney beans and shown to be even more toxic than the soybean lectin. Concurrent studies with the soybean trypsin inhibitors revealed that these proteins inhibited growth by stimulating the secretory activity of the pancreas and could in the long term cause acinar cell adenoma of the pancreas. Acute experiments with human subjects showed that the human pancreas also responded to the stimulatory effects of the so-called Bowman-Birk soybean inhibitor. The studies on soybean trypsin inhibitors were expanded to include a protease inhibitor present in blood, alpha-1-antitrypsin, a deficiency of which leads to emphysema in humans. The mechanism whereby this protein inhibits leucocyte elastase was investigated. On the basis of these results the intratracheal administration of a synthetic peptide inhibitor of elastase attached to albumin microspheres was found to prevent elastase-induced emphysema in hamsters. PMID:12381154

  2. A standard audit trail format

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, M.

    1995-02-01

    The central role of audit trails, or (more properly) logs, in security monitoring needs little description, for it is too well known for any to doubt it. Auditing, or the analysis of logs, is a central part of security not only in computer system security but also in analyzing financial and other non-technical systems. As part of this process, it is often necessary to reconcile logs from different sources. This speaks of a need for a standard logging format. A standard log format robust enough to meet the needs of heterogeneity, transportability across various network protocols, and flexibility sufficient to meet a variety of needs in very different environments must satisfy two basic properties: extensibility and portability. This report presents the author`s proposed format for a standard log record. In section 3, he shows how and where the translation should be done, and in section 4 he demonstrates how log records from several disparate systems would be put into this format. Section 5 concludes with some observations and suggestions for future work.

  3. 76 FR 8992 - National Trails System Act and Railroad Rights-of-Way

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Surface Transportation Board 49 CFR Part 1152 National Trails System Act and Railroad Rights-of-Way AGENCY... railbanking and interim trail use under the National Trails System Act (Trails Act). DATES: Comments are due... railbanking and interim trail use under Section 8(d) of the National Trails System Act (Trails Act), 16...

  4. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... it.Golimumab injection comes in prefilled syringes and auto-injection devices for subcutaneous injection. Use each syringe ... method.Do not remove the cap from the auto-injection device or the cover from the prefilled ...

  5. Use and Nonuse of a Rail Trail Conversion for Physical Activity: Implications for Promoting Trail Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Anna E.; Reed, Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is limited research examining both use and nonuse of trails for physical activity. Purpose: Such research might enable health educators to better promote physical activity on trails.Methods:We used random digit dialing methods to survey 726 respondents in 2012. Results: The majority (75.1%) of respondents reported not using the…

  6. Nature Trails, Braille Trails, Foot Paths, Fragrance Gardens, Touch Museums for the Blind; Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Foundation for the Blind, New York, NY.

    The policy statement by the American Foundation for the Blind deals with nature trails, braille trails, foot paths, fragrance gardens, and touch museums for the blind. It is stated that the foundation approves of services such as provision of tape recorded guides and planting of fragrant shrubs which would benefit all users while recognizing…

  7. Energy saving through trail following in a marine snail.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark S; Blackwell, Janine

    2007-05-01

    Most snails and slugs locomote over a layer of mucus and although the resultant mucus trail is expensive to produce, we show that this expense can be reduced by trail following. When tracking over fresh conspecific trails, the marine intertidal snail Littorina littorea (L.) produced only approximately 27% of the mucus laid by marker snails. When tracking over weathered trails, snails adjusted their mucus production to recreate a convex trail profile of similar shape and thickness to the trail as originally laid. Maximum energy saving occurs when following recently laid trails which are little weathered. Many and diverse ecological roles for trail following have been proposed. Energy saving is the only role that applies across the Gastropoda and so may help to explain why trail following is such a well-established behaviour. PMID:17327203

  8. Trailing edge modifications for flatback airfoils.

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Daniel L.; van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    The adoption of blunt trailing edge airfoils (also called flatback airfoils) for the inboard region of large wind turbine blades has been proposed. Blunt trailing edge airfoils would not only provide a number of structural benefits, such as increased structural volume and ease of fabrication and handling, but they have also been found to improve the lift characteristics of thick airfoils. Therefore, the incorporation of blunt trailing edge airfoils would allow blade designers to more freely address the structural demands without having to sacrifice aerodynamic performance. These airfoils do have the disadvantage of generating high levels of drag as a result of the low-pressure steady or periodic flow in the near-wake of the blunt trailing edge. Although for rotors, the drag penalty appears secondary to the lift enhancement produced by the blunt trailing edge, high drag levels are of concern in terms of the negative effect on the torque and power generated by the rotor. Hence, devices are sought that mitigate the drag of these airfoils. This report summarizes the literature on bluff body vortex shedding and bluff body drag reduction devices and proposes four devices for further study in the wind tunnel.

  9. TRIPPy: Trailed Image Photometry in Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Wesley; Alexandersen, Mike; Schwamb, Megan E.; Marsset, Michaël; Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Bannister, Michele T.; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    Photometry of moving sources typically suffers from a reduced signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) or flux measurements biased to incorrect low values through the use of circular apertures. To address this issue, we present the software package, TRIPPy: TRailed Image Photometry in Python. TRIPPy introduces the pill aperture, which is the natural extension of the circular aperture appropriate for linearly trailed sources. The pill shape is a rectangle with two semicircular end-caps and is described by three parameters, the trail length and angle, and the radius. The TRIPPy software package also includes a new technique to generate accurate model point-spread functions (PSFs) and trailed PSFs (TSFs) from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. The TSF is merely the convolution of the model PSF, which consists of a moffat profile, and super-sampled lookup table. From the TSF, accurate pill aperture corrections can be estimated as a function of pill radius with an accuracy of 10 mmag for highly trailed sources. Analogous to the use of small circular apertures and associated aperture corrections, small radius pill apertures can be used to preserve S/Ns of low flux sources, with appropriate aperture correction applied to provide an accurate, unbiased flux measurement at all S/Ns.

  10. The trail pheromone of the venomous samsum ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis.

    PubMed

    Mashaly, Ashraf Mohamed Ali; Ahmed, Ashraf Mohamed; Al-Abdullah, Mosa Abdullah; Al-Khalifa, Mohamed Saleh

    2011-01-01

    Ant species use branching networks of pheromone trails for orientation between nest and resources. The current study demonstrated that workers of the venomous samsum ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae), employ recruitment trail pheromones discharged from the Dufour's gland. Secretions of other abdomen complex glands, as well as hindgut gland secretions, did not evoke trail following. The optimum concentration of trail pheromone was found to be 0.1 gland equivalent/40 cm trail. This concentration demonstrated effective longevity for about one hour. This study also showed that P. sennaarensis and Tapinoma simrothi each respond to the trail pheromones of the other species as well as their own. PMID:21529253

  11. Fully human monoclonal antibodies to TRAIL-R1 enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhichao; Han, Xiaojian; Sun, Xin; Shen, Meiying; Huang, Jingjing; Li, Yaying; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Pang, Da; Jin, Shoude; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Jin, Aishun

    2016-06-24

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or agonistic antibodies targeting TRAIL-receptors (TRAIL-Rs) can selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, they have limited antitumor efficacy in clinical trials. We previously generated ten fully human monoclonal Abs to TRAIL-receptor type 1 (TR1-mAbs) using immunospot array assay on a chip (ISAAC technology). We found that the TR1-mAbs exhibited different effects on TRAIL-induced apoptosis (enhanced or blocked apoptosis). Here, we further demonstrated that some mAbs competed with TRAIL for binding to TRAIL-R1 expressed on tumor cells that blocked TRAIL-induced apoptosis (B-TR1-Ab), whereas others did not compete with TRAIL that enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis (E-TR1-Ab). Combination of E-TR1-Ab (TR1-419) with TRAIL leads to enhanced antitumor activity in various tumor cells in vitro. E-TR1-419 and TRAIL could cooperate to upregulate the mRNA expression and protein levels of TRAIL-R1 and to promote caspase-8 cleavage and increased JNK phosphorylation. Our results suggest that combining E-TR1 Ab with TRAIL could provide a new therapeutic strategy for tumor immunotherapies. PMID:27208782

  12. TRAIL: a Tokamak Rail Gun Limiter for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J R; Yu, W S; Fillo, J A; Usher, J L

    1980-01-01

    An attractive new limiter concept is investigated. The Tokamak Rail Gun Limiter (TRAIL) system impacts a stream of moderate velocity pellets (100 to 200 m/sec through the plasma edge region to absorb energy and define the plasma boundary. The pellets are recycled, after cooling, to the injector in an E-M mass accelerator. Heat fluxes of approx. 30,000 W/cm/sup 2/ can be readily accommodated by the pellets, with very low recirculating power requirements (approx. 0.1%) for the accelerator. The mass accelerator velocity requirements are well within the present state-of-the-art (several km/sec). Accelerators injecting pellets at approx. 1 km/sec can be used to control local plasma temperature and current profiles and to act as energy absorbers to shut down the plasma without damage to the first wall if a plasma disruption occurs.

  13. Non-specular meteor trail diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrud, L.; Oppenheim, M.; Close, S.; Ray, L.; McMillion, K.

    2003-12-01

    Plasma simulations demonstrate that meteor trails are unstable to growth of gradient-drift Farley-Buneman (GDFB) waves that become turbulent and generate large B-field aligned irregularities (FAI). These simulations and our analysis indicate that the non-specular echos, that can extend between 5-10 km in altitude range, are reflections from plasma instability generated FAI. We present models showing that the specific altitude range of trail instability depends on meteor and atmospheric properties. This variability will allow researchers to infer neutral temperature, neutral wind velocity, and meteoric velocity and composition in completely new ways. We demonstrate some of these non-specular trail diagnostic techniques using radar observations from the ALTAIR and Piura radar facilities. Finally, we present examples of a low altitude variety of non-specular echos that may be related to PMSE.

  14. Therapeutic applications of TRAIL receptor agonists in cancer and beyond.

    PubMed

    Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P; Griffith, Thomas S

    2015-11-01

    TRAIL/Apo-2L is a member of the TNF superfamily first described as an apoptosis-inducing cytokine in 1995. Similar to TNF and Fas ligand, TRAIL induces apoptosis in caspase-dependent manner following TRAIL death receptor trimerization. Because tumor cells were shown to be particularly sensitive to this cytokine while normal cells/tissues proved to be resistant along with being able to synthesize and release TRAIL, it was rapidly appreciated that TRAIL likely served as one of our major physiologic weapons against cancer. In line with this, a number of research laboratories and pharmaceutical companies have attempted to exploit the ability of TRAIL to kill cancer cells by developing recombinant forms of TRAIL or TRAIL receptor agonists (e.g., receptor-specific mAb) for therapeutic purposes. In this review article we will describe the biochemical pathways used by TRAIL to induce different cell death programs. We will also summarize the clinical trials related to this pathway and discuss possible novel uses of TRAIL-related therapies. In recent years, the physiological importance of TRAIL has expanded beyond being a tumoricidal molecule to one critical for a number of clinical settings - ranging from infectious disease and autoimmunity to cardiovascular anomalies. We will also highlight some of these conditions where modulation of the TRAIL/TRAIL receptor system may be targeted in the future. PMID:26343199

  15. Prediction and Detection of Land Surface Deformation Associated with CO2 Injection at the FutureGen 2.0 Carbon Capture and Storage Project Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, C. E.; Spane, F.; Bonneville, A.; Murray, C. J.; Nguyen, B. N.; Vermeul, V. R.; Gilmore, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will inject 22 MMT of supercritical CO2 into the Mt Simon sandstone reservoir utilizing four deep-injection wells and a comprehensive monitoring program, which includes surface deformation monitoring. Analytical and numerical modeling analysis were both performed to predict potential vertical elevation changes based on simulated pressure changes and geomechanical properties for the targeted injection zone. Pressure changes due to continuous CO2 injection of 1.1 MMT of CO2/year over 20 years were obtained using the STOMP-CO2 numerical simulator. Injection zone elastic properties were calculated primarily from wireline geomechanical survey results that were obtained from the initial FutureGen 2.0 stratigraphic borehole. The continuous wireline geomechanical log elastic property results were utilized to estimate model layer thickness and rock compressibility for the various injection zone/model layers and were compared with hydrologic characterization results. Compressibility estimates obtained both from hydrologically based, in-situ tests, together with limited laboratory core samples provided similarly low compressibility results (1.0510-7 to 4.9210-7 psi-1) to those derived from the geomechanical wireline surveys. The predicted surface deformation was then estimated using two parallel modelling approaches. First, an analytical Biot-based, poro-elastic model was used to calculate an equivalent vertical displacement at land surface from the expected pore pressure increase and predicted injection zone model layer rock compressibility. The second method utilized a fully 3-D geomechanical modelling analysis to calculate the expected deformation at the surface using a STOMP-CO2/ABAQUS® sequentially coupled simulator. The predicted surface uplift after 20-years of continuous injection for both methods indicated a maximum deformation of approximately 20-25 mm, with most of the deformation occurring during the first 2 years. Surface deformation

  16. Ant foraging on complex trails: route learning and the role of trail pheromones in Lasius niger.

    PubMed

    Czaczkes, Tomer J; Grüter, Christoph; Ellis, Laura; Wood, Elizabeth; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2013-01-15

    Ants are central place foragers and use multiple information sources to navigate between the nest and feeding sites. Individual ants rapidly learn a route, and often prioritize memory over pheromone trails when tested on a simple trail with a single bifurcation. However, in nature, ants often forage at locations that are reached via more complex routes with multiple trail bifurcations. Such routes may be more difficult to learn, and thus ants would benefit from additional information. We hypothesized that trail pheromones play a more significant role in ant foraging on complex routes, either by assisting in navigation or route learning or both. We studied Lasius niger workers foraging on a doubly bifurcating trail with four end points. Route learning was slower and errors greater on alternating (e.g. left-right) versus repeating routes (e.g. left-left), with error rates of 32 and 3%, respectively. However, errors on alternating routes decreased by 30% when trail pheromone was present. Trail pheromones also aid route learning, leading to reduced errors in subsequent journeys without pheromone. If an experienced forager makes an error when returning to a food source, it reacts by increasing pheromone deposition on the return journey. In addition, high levels of trail pheromone suppress further pheromone deposition. This negative feedback mechanism may act to conserve pheromone or to regulate recruitment. Taken together, these results demonstrate further complexity and sophistication in the foraging system of ant colonies, especially in the role of trail pheromones and their relationship with learning and the use of private information (memory) in a complex environment. PMID:22972897

  17. Trailing edge noise prediction using Amiet's method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, T. F.

    1981-01-01

    Amiet's (1976, 1978) solution to the problem of airfoil trailing edge noise prediction is discussed in light of the results of evanescent wave theory's application to the measured surface pressure behavior near the trailing edge of an airfoil with a turbulent boundary layer. The method employed by Amiet has the advantage of incorporating the effect of finite chord in its solution. The assumed form of the pressure distribution is examined as well as the constant turbulent boundary layer convection assumption, which is found to be unnecessarily restrictive.

  18. 6. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view after stop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view after stop four. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  19. 9. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Reagan House. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Reagan House. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  20. 8. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, handbuilt rock pile. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, hand-built rock pile. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  1. 5. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, vista at stop three. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, vista at stop three. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  2. 1. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, entrance sign. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, entrance sign. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  3. 3. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, view between second and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, view between second and third stops - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  4. 2. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view before first ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view before first stop. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  5. 7. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, rocks along edge of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, rocks along edge of road. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  6. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Title Sheet Great Smoky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Title Sheet - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  7. 12. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, place of a thousand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, place of a thousand drips, view from road. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  8. 11. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, boulders along road after ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, boulders along road after stop 13. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  9. 36 CFR 7.100 - Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Interconnecting Trail System Route 85 near the Blanchard-Shirley Road. (4) Massachusetts Turnpike to Lower Goose... Massachusetts Turnpike Appalachian Trail Bridge to the northeastern shore of Lower Goose Pond. (5)...

  10. 36 CFR 7.100 - Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Interconnecting Trail System Route 85 near the Blanchard-Shirley Road. (4) Massachusetts Turnpike to Lower Goose... Massachusetts Turnpike Appalachian Trail Bridge to the northeastern shore of Lower Goose Pond. (5)...

  11. 36 CFR 7.100 - Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Interconnecting Trail System Route 85 near the Blanchard-Shirley Road. (4) Massachusetts Turnpike to Lower Goose... Massachusetts Turnpike Appalachian Trail Bridge to the northeastern shore of Lower Goose Pond. (5)...

  12. 36 CFR 7.100 - Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Interconnecting Trail System Route 85 near the Blanchard-Shirley Road. (4) Massachusetts Turnpike to Lower Goose... Massachusetts Turnpike Appalachian Trail Bridge to the northeastern shore of Lower Goose Pond. (5)...

  13. 36 CFR 7.100 - Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Interconnecting Trail System Route 85 near the Blanchard-Shirley Road. (4) Massachusetts Turnpike to Lower Goose... Massachusetts Turnpike Appalachian Trail Bridge to the northeastern shore of Lower Goose Pond. (5)...

  14. 7. SHOWING METHOD OF SLEDDING WIND CABLE DOWN YAKI TRAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. SHOWING METHOD OF SLEDDING WIND CABLE DOWN YAKI TRAIL TO THE BRIDGE, WEIGHT OF CABLE AND DRUM APPROXIMATELY 2200 POUNDS - Kaibab Trail Suspension Bridge, Spanning Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  15. 5. VIEW OF TRAIL WHERE IT PASSES THROUGH SAGE AREA, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF TRAIL WHERE IT PASSES THROUGH SAGE AREA, OWL CREEK IN CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. VIEW LOOKING EAST - Hole-in-the-Rock Trail, Running From Bluff Vicinity to Escalante, Garfield County, Bluff, San Juan County, UT

  16. Aeroelastic Response of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Transtition Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Lung, Shun-fat

    2016-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator was a joint task under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory and FlexSys, Inc. (Ann Arbor, Michigan), chartered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop advanced technologies that enable environmentally friendly aircraft, such as continuous mold-line technologies. The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator encompassed replacing the Fowler flaps on the SubsoniC Aircraft Testbed, a Gulfstream III (Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah, Georgia) aircraft, with control surfaces developed by FlexSys, Inc., a pair of uniquely-designed, unconventional flaps to be used as lifting surfaces during flight-testing to substantiate their structural effectiveness. The unconventional flaps consisted of a main flap section and two transition sections, inboard and outboard, which demonstrated the continuous mold-line technology. Unique characteristics of the transition sections provided a challenge to the airworthiness assessment for this part of the structure. A series of build-up tests and analyses were conducted to ensure the data required to support the airworthiness assessment were acquired and applied accurately. The transition sections were analyzed both as individual components and as part of the flight-test article assembly. Instrumentation was installed in the transition sections based on the analysis to best capture the in-flight aeroelastic response. Flight-testing was conducted and flight data were acquired to validate the analyses. This paper documents the details of the aeroelastic assessment and in-flight response of the transition sections of the unconventional Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge flaps.

  17. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... at golimumab injection before injecting it. Check the expiration date printed on the auto-injection device or carton and do not use the medication if the expiration date has passed. Do not use a prefilled syringe ...

  18. Broadband Noise Reduction of a Low-Speed Fan Noise Using Trailing Edge Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental proof-of-concept test was conducted to demonstrate reduction of rotor-stator interaction noise through the use of rotor-trailing edge blowing. The velocity deficit from the viscous wake of the rotor blades was reduced by injecting air into the wake from a continuous trailing edge slot. Hollow blades with interior guide vanes create flow channels through which externally supplied air flows from the blade root to the trailing edge. A previous paper documented the substantial tonal reductions of this Trailing Edge Rotor Blowing (TERB) fan. This report documents the broadband characteristics of TERB. The Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF), located at the NASA Glenn Research Center, was used as the proof-of-concept test bed. Two-component hotwire data behind the rotor, unsteady surface pressures on the stator vane, and farfield directivity acoustic data were acquired at blowing rates of 1.1, 1.5, and 1.8 percent of the total fan mass flow. The results indicate a substantial reduction in the rotor wake turbulent velocity and in the stator vane unsteady surface pressures. Based on the physics of the noise generation, these indirect measurements indicate the prospect of broadband noise reduction. However, since the broadband noise generated by the ANCF is rotor-dominated, any change in the rotor-stator interaction broadband noise levels is barely distinguishable in the farfield measurements.

  19. 36 CFR 212.21 - Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Crest National Scenic... AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Administration of the Forest Transportation System § 212.21 Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. The Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail as defined by the National Trails...

  20. 36 CFR 212.21 - Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Crest National Scenic... AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Administration of the Forest Transportation System § 212.21 Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. The Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail as defined by the National Trails...

  1. 36 CFR 212.21 - Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Crest National Scenic... AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Administration of the Forest Transportation System § 212.21 Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. The Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail as defined by the National Trails...

  2. 21 CFR 1311.215 - Internal audit trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Internal audit trail. 1311.215 Section 1311.215... ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.215 Internal audit trail. (a) The pharmacy... audit trail functions. (6) For application service providers, attempted or successful...

  3. 21 CFR 1311.215 - Internal audit trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Internal audit trail. 1311.215 Section 1311.215... ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.215 Internal audit trail. (a) The pharmacy... audit trail functions. (6) For application service providers, attempted or successful...

  4. 21 CFR 1311.215 - Internal audit trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Internal audit trail. 1311.215 Section 1311.215... ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.215 Internal audit trail. (a) The pharmacy... audit trail functions. (6) For application service providers, attempted or successful...

  5. Rails-to-Trails: A Valuable Resource for Outdoor Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Describes the rails-to-trails movement, particularly in Ontario, where abandoned railways are converted to trails for hiking, skiing, cycling, and horseback riding. Proposes the often controversial rails-to-trails issue as a resource for discussion in outdoor leadership classes, focusing on rural and urban viewpoints. Also suggests using the…

  6. 30 CFR 57.4057 - Underground trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground trailing cables. 57.4057 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control § 57.4057 Underground trailing cables. Underground trailing cables shall be accepted...

  7. 30 CFR 75.828 - Trailing cable pulling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cable pulling. 75.828 Section 75.828... Longwalls § 75.828 Trailing cable pulling. The trailing cable must be de-energized prior to being pulled by any equipment other than the continuous mining machine. The cable manufacturer's recommended...

  8. 30 CFR 57.12039 - Protection of surplus trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protection of surplus trailing cables. 57.12039... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12039 Protection of surplus trailing cables. Surplus trailing cables to shovels, cranes and similar equipment shall be— (a) Stored in cable boats; (b) Stored on...

  9. 30 CFR 57.12003 - Trailing cable overload protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trailing cable overload protection. 57.12003... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12003 Trailing cable overload protection. Individual overload protection or short circuit protection shall be provided for the trailing cables of mobile equipment....

  10. 30 CFR 57.4057 - Underground trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underground trailing cables. 57.4057 Section 57.4057 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4057 Underground trailing cables. Underground trailing cables shall be accepted...

  11. 30 CFR 57.12088 - Splicing trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Splicing trailing cables. 57.12088 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12088 Splicing trailing cables. No splice, except a vulcanized splice or its equivalent, shall be made in a trailing cable within 25 feet of the machine unless the machine is equipped with...

  12. 30 CFR 57.12003 - Trailing cable overload protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trailing cable overload protection. 57.12003... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12003 Trailing cable overload protection. Individual overload protection or short circuit protection shall be provided for the trailing cables of mobile equipment....

  13. 30 CFR 57.4057 - Underground trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Underground trailing cables. 57.4057 Section 57.4057 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4057 Underground trailing cables. Underground trailing cables shall be accepted...

  14. 30 CFR 57.12088 - Splicing trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Splicing trailing cables. 57.12088 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12088 Splicing trailing cables. No splice, except a vulcanized splice or its equivalent, shall be made in a trailing cable within 25 feet of the machine unless the machine is equipped with...

  15. 30 CFR 75.828 - Trailing cable pulling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trailing cable pulling. 75.828 Section 75.828... Longwalls § 75.828 Trailing cable pulling. The trailing cable must be de-energized prior to being pulled by any equipment other than the continuous mining machine. The cable manufacturer's recommended...

  16. 30 CFR 75.828 - Trailing cable pulling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trailing cable pulling. 75.828 Section 75.828... Longwalls § 75.828 Trailing cable pulling. The trailing cable must be de-energized prior to being pulled by any equipment other than the continuous mining machine. The cable manufacturer's recommended...

  17. 30 CFR 57.12088 - Splicing trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Splicing trailing cables. 57.12088 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12088 Splicing trailing cables. No splice, except a vulcanized splice or its equivalent, shall be made in a trailing cable within 25 feet of the machine unless the machine is equipped with...

  18. 30 CFR 57.12003 - Trailing cable overload protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cable overload protection. 57.12003... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12003 Trailing cable overload protection. Individual overload protection or short circuit protection shall be provided for the trailing cables of mobile equipment....

  19. 30 CFR 57.12039 - Protection of surplus trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protection of surplus trailing cables. 57.12039... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12039 Protection of surplus trailing cables. Surplus trailing cables to shovels, cranes and similar equipment shall be— (a) Stored in cable boats; (b) Stored on...

  20. 30 CFR 57.12088 - Splicing trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Splicing trailing cables. 57.12088 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12088 Splicing trailing cables. No splice, except a vulcanized splice or its equivalent, shall be made in a trailing cable within 25 feet of the machine unless the machine is equipped with...

  1. 30 CFR 57.12003 - Trailing cable overload protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trailing cable overload protection. 57.12003... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12003 Trailing cable overload protection. Individual overload protection or short circuit protection shall be provided for the trailing cables of mobile equipment....

  2. 30 CFR 57.4057 - Underground trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underground trailing cables. 57.4057 Section 57.4057 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4057 Underground trailing cables. Underground trailing cables shall be accepted...

  3. 30 CFR 57.12039 - Protection of surplus trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection of surplus trailing cables. 57.12039... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12039 Protection of surplus trailing cables. Surplus trailing cables to shovels, cranes and similar equipment shall be— (a) Stored in cable boats; (b) Stored on...

  4. 30 CFR 57.12038 - Attachment of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Attachment of trailing cables. 57.12038 Section... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12038 Attachment of trailing cables. Trailing cables shall be attached to machines in a suitable manner to protect the cable from damage and to prevent strain on...

  5. 30 CFR 75.828 - Trailing cable pulling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trailing cable pulling. 75.828 Section 75.828... Longwalls § 75.828 Trailing cable pulling. The trailing cable must be de-energized prior to being pulled by any equipment other than the continuous mining machine. The cable manufacturer's recommended...

  6. 36 CFR 212.21 - Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Crest National Scenic... AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Administration of the Forest Transportation System § 212.21 Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. The Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail as defined by the National Trails...

  7. 36 CFR 212.21 - Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Crest National Scenic... AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Administration of the Forest Transportation System § 212.21 Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. The Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail as defined by the National Trails...

  8. Etoposide sensitizes neuroblastoma cells expressing caspase 8 to TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Ryung; Lee, Myoung Woo; Kim, Dae Seong; Jo, Ha Yeong; Lee, Soo Hyun; Chueh, Hee Won; Jung, Hye Lim; Yoo, Keon Hee; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2012-01-01

    TRAIL [TNF (tumour necrosis factor)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand] is a promising agent for clinical use since it kills a wide range of tumour cells without affecting normal cells. We provide evidence that pretreatment with etoposide significantly enhanced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via up-regulation of DR5 (death receptor 5 or TRAIL-R2) expression in the caspase 8 expressing neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-MC. In addition, sequential treatment with etoposide and TRAIL increased caspases 8, 9 and 3 activation, Mcl-1 cleavage and Bid truncation, which suggests that the ability of etoposide and TRAIL to induce apoptosis is mediated through activation of an intrinsic signalling pathway. Although TRAIL-R2 expression increased in IMR-32 cells in response to etoposide treatment, cell death was not increased by concurrent treatment with TRAIL compared with etoposide alone, because the cells lacked caspase 8 expression. Restoration of caspase 8 expression by exposure to IFNγ (interferon γ) sensitizes IMR-32 cells to TRAIL. Moreover, pretreatment with etoposide increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in caspase 8 restored IMR-32 cells through activation of a caspase cascade that included caspases 8, 9 and 3. These results indicate that the etoposide-mediated sensitization of neuroblastoma cells to TRAIL is associated with an increase in TRAIL-R2 expression and requires caspase 8 expression. These observations support the potential use of a combination of etoposide and TRAIL in future clinical trials. PMID:23124518

  9. Trails and Greenways: Alternatives to "Carmageddon."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David T.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses personal and societal effects of automobile-centered landscapes and development. Recommends fundamental reexamination of community development and beliefs regarding desirable human settlement. Suggests greenways and trails as a multifunctional means for revitalizing communities in a more ecological fashion. Presents the Niagara region of…

  10. ‘Columbia Star’ thornless trailing blackberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Columbia Star’ is a new thornless, trailing blackberry (Rubus subg. Rubus Watson) cultivar from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, released in cooperation with the Oregon State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station. ...