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Sample records for inl experimental program

  1. INL Experimental Program Roadmap for Thermal Hydraulic Code Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn McCreery; Hugh McIlroy

    2007-09-01

    Advanced computer modeling and simulation tools and protocols will be heavily relied on for a wide variety of system studies, engineering design activities, and other aspects of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), the DOE Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), and light-water reactors. The goal is for all modeling and simulation tools to be demonstrated accurate and reliable through a formal Verification and Validation (V&V) process, especially where such tools are to be used to establish safety margins and support regulatory compliance, or to design a system in a manner that reduces the role of expensive mockups and prototypes. Recent literature identifies specific experimental principles that must be followed in order to insure that experimental data meet the standards required for a “benchmark” database. Even for well conducted experiments, missing experimental details, such as geometrical definition, data reduction procedures, and manufacturing tolerances have led to poor Benchmark calculations. The INL has a long and deep history of research in thermal hydraulics, especially in the 1960s through 1980s when many programs such as LOFT and Semiscle were devoted to light-water reactor safety research, the EBRII fast reactor was in operation, and a strong geothermal energy program was established. The past can serve as a partial guide for reinvigorating thermal hydraulic research at the laboratory. However, new research programs need to fully incorporate modern experimental methods such as measurement techniques using the latest instrumentation, computerized data reduction, and scaling methodology. The path forward for establishing experimental research for code model validation will require benchmark experiments conducted in suitable facilities located at the INL. This document describes thermal hydraulic facility requirements and candidate buildings and presents examples of suitable validation experiments related

  2. Status of the INL high-temperature electrolysis research programexperimental and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

    2009-04-01

    This paper provides a status update on the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), with an overview of recent large-scale system modeling results and the status of the experimental program. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor coolant outlet temperatures. In terms of experimental research, the INL has recently completed an Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) HTE test at the 15 kW level. The initial hydrogen production rate for the ILS test was in excess of 5000 liters per hour. Details of the ILS design and operation will be presented. Current small-scale experimental research is focused on improving the degradation characteristics of the electrolysis cells and stacks. Small-scale testing ranges from single cells to multiple-cell stacks. The INL is currently in the process of testing several state-of-the-art anode-supported cells and is working to broaden its relationship with industry in order to improve the long-term performance of the cells.

  3. Experimental Design for the INL Sample Collection Operational Test

    SciTech Connect

    Amidan, Brett G.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Matzke, Brett D.; Filliben, James J.; Jones, Barbara

    2007-12-13

    This document describes the test events and numbers of samples comprising the experimental design that was developed for the contamination, decontamination, and sampling of a building at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This study is referred to as the INL Sample Collection Operational Test. Specific objectives were developed to guide the construction of the experimental design. The main objective is to assess the relative abilities of judgmental and probabilistic sampling strategies to detect contamination in individual rooms or on a whole floor of the INL building. A second objective is to assess the use of probabilistic and Bayesian (judgmental + probabilistic) sampling strategies to make clearance statements of the form “X% confidence that at least Y% of a room (or floor of the building) is not contaminated. The experimental design described in this report includes five test events. The test events (i) vary the floor of the building on which the contaminant will be released, (ii) provide for varying or adjusting the concentration of contaminant released to obtain the ideal concentration gradient across a floor of the building, and (iii) investigate overt as well as covert release of contaminants. The ideal contaminant gradient would have high concentrations of contaminant in rooms near the release point, with concentrations decreasing to zero in rooms at the opposite end of the building floor. For each of the five test events, the specified floor of the INL building will be contaminated with BG, a stand-in for Bacillus anthracis. The BG contaminant will be disseminated from a point-release device located in the room specified in the experimental design for each test event. Then judgmental and probabilistic samples will be collected according to the pre-specified sampling plan. Judgmental samples will be selected based on professional judgment and prior information. Probabilistic samples will be selected in sufficient numbers to provide desired confidence

  4. Data Quality Objectives Supporting the Environmental Direct Radiation Monitoring Program for the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lundell, J. F.; Magnuson, S. O.; Scherbinske, P.; Case, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the development of the data quality objectives (DQOs) for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Environmental Direct Radiation Monitoring Program and follows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) DQO process (EPA 2006). This document also develops and presents the logic to determine the specific number of direct radiation monitoring locations around INL facilities on the desert west of Idaho Falls and in Idaho Falls, at locations bordering the INL Site, and in the surrounding regional area. The selection logic follows the guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) (2015) for environmental surveillance of DOE facilities.

  5. Experimental and Sampling Design for the INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2009-02-16

    This report describes the experimental and sampling design developed to assess sampling approaches and methods for detecting contamination in a building and clearing the building for use after decontamination. An Idaho National Laboratory (INL) building will be contaminated with BG (Bacillus globigii, renamed Bacillus atrophaeus), a simulant for Bacillus anthracis (BA). The contamination, sampling, decontamination, and re-sampling will occur per the experimental and sampling design. This INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test is being planned by the Validated Sampling Plan Working Group (VSPWG). The primary objectives are: 1) Evaluate judgmental and probabilistic sampling for characterization as well as probabilistic and combined (judgment and probabilistic) sampling approaches for clearance, 2) Conduct these evaluations for gradient contamination (from low or moderate down to absent or undetectable) for different initial concentrations of the contaminant, 3) Explore judgment composite sampling approaches to reduce sample numbers, 4) Collect baseline data to serve as an indication of the actual levels of contamination in the tests. A combined judgmental and random (CJR) approach uses Bayesian methodology to combine judgmental and probabilistic samples to make clearance statements of the form "X% confidence that at least Y% of an area does not contain detectable contamination” (X%/Y% clearance statements). The INL-2 experimental design has five test events, which 1) vary the floor of the INL building on which the contaminant will be released, 2) provide for varying the amount of contaminant released to obtain desired concentration gradients, and 3) investigate overt as well as covert release of contaminants. Desirable contaminant gradients would have moderate to low concentrations of contaminant in rooms near the release point, with concentrations down to zero in other rooms. Such gradients would provide a range of contamination levels to challenge the sampling

  6. NEAMS Experimental Support for Code Validation, INL FY2009

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatore; C. Rabiti

    2009-09-01

    The goal is for all modeling and simulation tools to be demonstrated accurate and reliable through a formal Verification and Validation (V&V) process, especially where such tools are to be used to establish safety margins and support regulatory compliance, or to design a system in a manner that reduces the role of expensive mockups and prototypes. Whereas the Verification part of the process does not rely on experiment, the Validation part, on the contrary, necessitates as many relevant and precise experimental data as possible to make sure the models reproduce reality as closely as possible. Hence, this report presents a limited selection of experimental data that could be used to validate the codes devoted mainly to Fast Neutron Reactor calculations in the US. Emphasis has been put on existing data for thermal-hydraulics, fuel and reactor physics. The principles of a new “smart” experiment that could be used to improve our knowledge of neutron cross-sections are presented as well. In short, it consists in irradiating a few milligrams of actinides and analyzing the results with Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy to infer the neutron cross-sections. Finally, the wealth of experimental data relevant to Fast Neutron Reactors in the US should not be taken for granted and efforts should be put on saving these 30-40 years old data and on making sure they are validation-worthy, i.e. that the experimental conditions and uncertainties are well documented.

  7. INL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect

    James Venhuizen

    2005-06-01

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2004. Topics covered include boron analysis in biological samples, computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and collaborative dosimetry studies at the RA-1 facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  8. Evaluation of Storage for Transportation Equipment, Unfueled Convertors, and Fueled Convertors at the INL for the Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    S. G. Johnson; K. L. Lively

    2010-05-01

    This report contains an evaluation of the storage conditions required for several key components and/or systems of the Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These components/systems (transportation equipment, i.e., type ‘B’ shipping casks and the radioisotope thermo-electric generator transportation systems (RTGTS), the unfueled convertors, i.e., multi-hundred watt (MHW) and general purpose heat source (GPHS) RTGs, and fueled convertors of several types) are currently stored in several facilities at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site. For various reasons related to competing missions, inherent growth of the RPS mission at the INL and enhanced efficiency, it is necessary to evaluate their current storage situation and recommend the approach that should be pursued going forward for storage of these vital RPS components and systems. The reasons that drive this evaluation include, but are not limited to the following: 1) conflict with other missions at the INL of higher priority, 2) increasing demands from the INL RPS Program that exceed the physical capacity of the current storage areas and 3) the ability to enhance our current capability to care for our equipment, decrease maintenance costs and increase the readiness posture of the systems.

  9. SECOND GENERATION EXPERIMENTAL EQUIPMENT DESIGN TO SUPPORT VOLOXIDATION TESTING AT INL

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis L. Wahlquit; Kenneth J. Bateman; Brian R. Westphal

    2008-05-01

    Voloxidation is a potential head-end process used prior to aqueous or pyrochemical spent-oxide-fuel treatment. The spent oxide fuel is heated to an elevated temperature in oxygen or air to promote separation of the fuel from the cladding as well as volatize the fission products. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) have been collaborating on voloxidation research through a joint International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI). A new furnace and off-gas trapping system (OTS) with enhanced capability was necessary to perform further testing. The design criteria for the OTS were jointly agreed upon by INL and KAERI. First, the equipment must accommodate the use of spent nuclear fuel and be capable of operating in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the INL. This primarily means the furnace and OTS must be remotely operational and maintainable. The system requires special filters and distinctive temperature zones so that the fission products can be uniquely captured. The OTS must be sealed to maximize the amount of fission products captured. Finally, to accommodate the largest range of operating conditions, the OTS must be capable of handling high temperatures and various oxidizing environments. The constructed system utilizes a vertical split-tube furnace with four independently controlled zones. One zone is capable of reaching 1200°C to promote the release of volatile fission products. The three additional zones that capture fission products can be controlled to operate between 100-1100°C. A detailed description of the OTS will be presented as well as some initial background information on high temperature seal options.

  10. INL HIP Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    B. H. Park; C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue

    2010-02-01

    This document outlines the process used to bond monolithic fuel plates by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). This method was developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. These foils have been used in a number of irradiation experiments in support of the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program.

  11. INL Generic Robot Architecture

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-30

    The INL Generic Robot Architecture is a generic, extensible software framework that can be applied across a variety of different robot geometries, sensor suites and low-level proprietary control application programming interfaces (e.g. mobility, aria, aware, player, etc.).

  12. Data Quality Assurance Program Plan for NRC Division of Risk Analysis Programs at the INL

    SciTech Connect

    Sattison, Martin B.; Wierman, Thomas E.; Vedros, Kurt G.; Germain, Shawn W. St.; Eide, Steven A.; Sant, Robert L.

    2009-07-01

    The Division of Risk Analysis (DRA), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), must ensure that the quality of the data that feed into its programs follow Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidelines and possibly other standards and guidelines used in nuclear power plant risk analyses. This report documents the steps taken in DRA’s Data Quality Improvement project (Job Control Number N6145) to develop a Data Quality Assurance Program Plan. These steps were 1. Conduct a review of data quality requirements 2. Review current data programs, products, and data quality control activities 3. Review the Institute of Nuclear Power Operation (INPO) Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX) data quality programs and characterize the EPIX data quality and uncertainty 4. Compare these programs, products, and activities against the requirements 5. Develop a program plan that provides assurance that data quality is being maintained. It is expected that the Data Quality Assurance Program Plan will be routinely implemented in all aspects of future data collection and processing efforts and that specific portions will be executed annually to provide assurance that data quality is being maintained.

  13. INL Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Sure, we're the nation's leading nuclear-energy research lab — but we're so much more than that! Check out INL's new hi-def overview video, which breaks down who we are and what we do. You might also want to surf on over to our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory to see what kind of job openings we may have for you.

  14. INL Overview

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    Sure, we're the nation's leading nuclear-energy research lab ? but we're so much more than that! Check out INL's new hi-def overview video, which breaks down who we are and what we do. You might also want to surf on over to our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory to see what kind of job openings we may have for you.

  15. INL's Data Center

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Brent Stacey, John Grossenbacher, Shane Johnson

    2010-01-08

    ICE STORM is a super computer procured by INL from a well-knowncomputer vendor, SGI. ICE STORM is rated as No. 64 on the list of ICE STORM is a super computer procured by INL from a well-knowncomputer vendor, SGI. ICE STORM is rated as No. 64 on the lis

  16. INL's Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Brent Stacey, John Grossenbacher, Shane Johnson

    2008-03-26

    ICE STORM is a super computer procured by INL from a well-knowncomputer vendor, SGI. ICE STORM is rated as No. 64 on the list of ICE STORM is a super computer procured by INL from a well-knowncomputer vendor, SGI. ICE STORM is rated as No. 64 on the lis

  17. INL's '@work' Scientific Glassblower

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Russel

    2008-01-01

    INL's '@work' segments feature INL employees and the jobs they perform. This edition features INL's Russell Lewis, a skilled glassblower. Learn more at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory. Prepared by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC under Contract NO.DE-AC07-05ID14517 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains a nonexclusive paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this video, or allow others to do so, for United States Government Purposes.

  18. INL@Work Firefighter

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Did you know INL has its own firefighting team? Its members help protect our remote 890-square-mile site from range fires and other incidents. Meet firefighter Wendy Baron, who was recently named Idaho's firefighter of the year.

  19. INL@Work Firefighter

    ScienceCinema

    Baron, Wendy

    2013-05-28

    Did you know INL has its own firefighting team? Its members help protect our remote 890-square-mile site from range fires and other incidents. Meet firefighter Wendy Baron, who was recently named Idaho's firefighter of the year.

  20. INL Autonomous Navigation System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-30

    The INL Autonomous Navigation System provides instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The system permits high-speed autonomous navigation including obstacle avoidance, waypoing navigation and path planning in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  1. INL Archeology Tour

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Check out this tour of the Idaho National Laboratory's archeological sites. The lab sits on 890-square miles of land and contains numerous archeological artifacts. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. INL Archeology Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    Check out this tour of the Idaho National Laboratory's archeological sites. The lab sits on 890-square miles of land and contains numerous archeological artifacts. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  3. Virtual tour: INL's space battery facility

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This virtual tour shows how INL fuels and tests nuclear power systems for deep space missions. To learn more about INL's contribution to the Mars Science Laboratory, visit http://www.inl.gov/marsrover.

  4. Virtual tour: INL's space battery facility

    ScienceCinema

    Johnson, Steve

    2013-05-28

    This virtual tour shows how INL fuels and tests nuclear power systems for deep space missions. To learn more about INL's contribution to the Mars Science Laboratory, visit http://www.inl.gov/marsrover.

  5. INL Green Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer Dalton

    2005-05-01

    Green buildings, also known as sustainable buildings, resource efficient buildings, and high performance buildings, are structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reducing solid waste and pollutants, and limiting the depletion of natural resources. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish the mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate green design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. With this in mind, the recommendations described in this strategy are intended to form the INL foundation for green building standards. The recommendations in this strategy are broken down into three levels: Baseline Minimum, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)Certification, and Innovative. Baseline Minimum features should be included in all new occupied buildings no matter what the purpose or size. These features do not require significant research, design, or capital costs and yet they can reduce Operation and Maintenance (O&M) costs and produce more environmentally friendly buildings. LEED Certification features are more aggressive than the Baseline Minimums in that they require documentation, studies, and/or additional funding. Combined with the Baseline Minimums, many of the features in this level will need to be implemented to achieve the goal of LEED certification. LEED Silver certification should be the minimum goal for all new buildings (including office buildings, laboratories, cafeterias, and visitor centers) greater than 25,000 square feet or a total cost of $10 million. Innovative features can also contribute to LEED certification, but are less mainstream than those listed in the previous two levels. These features are identified as areas where

  6. Disposal phase experimental program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility comprises surface and subsurface facilities, including a repository mined in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2,150 feet. It has been developed to safely and permanently isolate transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes in a deep geological disposal site. On April 12, 1996, the DOE submitted a revised Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The DOE anticipates receiving an operating permit from the NMED; this permit is required prior to the start of disposal operations. On October 29, 1996, the DOE submitted a Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in accordance with the WIPP land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1992 (Public Law 102-579) as amended, and the requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Parts 191 and 194. The DOE plans to begin disposal operations at the WIPP in November 1997 following receipt of certification by the EPA. The disposal phase is expected to last for 35 years, and will include recertification activities no less than once every five years. This Disposal Phase Experimental Program (DPEP) Plan outlines the experimental program to be conducted during the first 5-year recertification period. It also forms the basis for longer-term activities to be carried out throughout the 35-year disposal phase. Once the WIPP has been shown to be in compliance with regulatory requirements, the disposal phase gives an opportunity to affirm the compliance status of the WIPP, enhance the operations of the WIPP and the national TRU system, and contribute to the resolution of national and international nuclear waste management technical needs. The WIPP is the first facility of its kind in the world. As such, it provides a unique opportunity to advance the technical state of the art for permanent disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes.

  7. [Experimental antitriatomic program in Santiago].

    PubMed

    Neghme, A; Schenone, H; Villarroel, F; Rojas, A

    1991-01-01

    The rural migration to urban centers occurred since the 40s in many Latin American countries, including Santiago the capital city of Chile, originated a growing belt of premises built with light poor material (the rests of previous rural habitations, mud, pieces of timber, plastic and cardboard for walls, and cane stalks and artificial clinkstones for roofs) giving raise to many types of slums. This situation facilitated the passive transport of the different instars, including eggs, of triatomine bugs. Due to the fact that in the 1959-1960 warm seasons, the Santiago province health institutions had received an increasing reported number of triatomine bugs (Triatoma infestans) in dwellings from different periurban, even urban and rural sections of the province, the central local health authorities with the advise of the University of Chile, Department of Parasitology decided to carry out an experimental program against these vectors of Chagas' disease. The program consisted basically in an spray and thorough application of liquid forms (emulsion, suspension, solution) of 1% lindane (average > or = 500 mg per 1 m2), depending on the material of the constructions, to all the surfaces of walls, ceilings, attics and peridomiciliary structures of all the infested dwellings in a sector and those located less than 100 m around. In order to reach triatomine bugs not affected, for different reasons, in the first spraying, a second application, identical to the first was performed to the total number of premises between 30 and 120 days later. Periodical evaluations were made, and positive dwellings found and neighboring ones were sprayed again. During insecticide applications adequate protection measures for spraying workers, inhabitants, domestic animals, household goods and food were adopted. All the steps of the program were accompanied by health education activities directed to individuals, families, school teachers and community institutions, tending to motivate the

  8. Enhanced INL Power Grid Test Bed Infrastructure – Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Carol Ann; West, Grayson Shawn; McBride, Scott Alan

    2014-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory, owns, operates, and maintains transmission and distribution power grid infrastructure to support the INL multi program mission. Sections of this power infrastructure, known as the INL Power Grid Test Bed, have been and are being used by government and industry to develop, demonstrate, and validate technologies for the modern grid, including smart grid, on a full scale utility test bed. INL’s power grid includes 61 miles of 140 MW, 138 kV rated electrical power transmission supplying seven main substations, each feeding a separate facility complex (or ‘city’) within the INL’s 890 square mile Site. This power grid is fed by three commercial utilities into the INL’s main control substation, but is operated independently from the commercial utility through its primary substation and command and control center. Within the INL complex, one of the seven complexes, the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC), has been designated as the INL complex for supporting critical infrastructure research and testing. This complex includes its own substation and 13.8kV distribution network, all configurable and controlled by the INL research and development programs. Through investment partnership with the DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE OE), INL is enhancing its existing distribution infrastructure to expand the types of testing that can be conducted and increase flexibility for testing configurations. The enhancement of the INL Power Grid Test Bed will enable development and full scale testing of smart-grid-related technologies and smart devices including testing interoperability, operational performance, reliability, and resiliency contribution at multiple distribution voltage classes, specifically 15kV, 25kV, and 35kV. The expected time frame for completion of the Phase I portion of the enhancement would be 4th quarter fiscal year (FY) 2015.

  9. INL@Work Cyber Security

    ScienceCinema

    Chaffin, May

    2013-05-28

    May Chaffin is one of many Idaho National Laboratory researchers who are helping secure the nation's critical infrastructure from cyber attacks. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. INL@Work Cyber Security

    SciTech Connect

    Chaffin, May

    2010-01-01

    May Chaffin is one of many Idaho National Laboratory researchers who are helping secure the nation's critical infrastructure from cyber attacks. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. INL High Performance Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-02-01

    High performance buildings, also known as sustainable buildings and green buildings, are resource efficient structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reduce solid waste and pollutants, and limit the depletion of natural resources while also providing a thermally and visually comfortable working environment that increases productivity for building occupants. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish this mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate high performance sustainable design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. Additionally, INL is a large consumer of energy that contributes to both carbon emissions and resource inefficiency. In the current climate of rising energy prices and political pressure for carbon reduction, this guide will help new construction project teams to design facilities that are sustainable and reduce energy costs, thereby reducing carbon emissions. With these concerns in mind, the recommendations described in the INL High Performance Building Strategy (previously called the INL Green Building Strategy) are intended to form the INL foundation for high performance building standards. This revised strategy incorporates the latest federal and DOE orders (Executive Order [EO] 13514, “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance” [2009], EO 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management” [2007], and DOE Order 430.2B, “Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy, and Transportation Management” [2008]), the latest guidelines, trends, and observations in high performance building construction, and the latest changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

  12. INL@Work Hope Lee microbiologist

    ScienceCinema

    Lee, Hope

    2013-05-28

    INL environmental microbiologist Hope Lee is working to develop and apply tools that clean contaminants out of ground water. You can learn more about INL's environmental projects at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  13. INL@Work Hope Lee microbiologist

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hope

    2010-01-01

    INL environmental microbiologist Hope Lee is working to develop and apply tools that clean contaminants out of ground water. You can learn more about INL's environmental projects at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. FELIX construction status and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.; Knott, M.J.; Lari, R.J.; McGhee, D.G.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    FELIX (Fusion Electromagnetic Induction Experiment) is an experimental test facility being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the study of electromagnetic effects in the first wall/blanket/shield (FWBS) systems of fusion reactors. The facility design, construction status, experimental program, instrumentation, and associated computer-code comparisons are described.

  15. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  16. Mars Radiator Characterization Experimental Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.; Hollingsworth, D. Keith

    2004-01-01

    Radiators are an enabling technology for the human exploration and development of the moon and Mars. As standard components of the heat rejection subsystem of space vehicles, radiators are used to reject waste heat to space and/or a planetary environment. They are typically large components of the thermal control system for a space vehicle or human habitation facility, and in some cases safety factors are used to oversize them when the operating environment cannot be fully characterized. Over-sizing can impose significant weight and size penalties that might be prohibitive for future missions. Radiator performance depends on the size of the radiator surface, its emittance and absorptance, the radiator temperature, the effective sky temperature surrounding the radiator, solar radiation and atmospheric irradiation levels, convection to or from the atmosphere (on Mars), and other conditions that could affect the nature of the radiator surface, such as dust accumulation. Most particularly, dust is expected to be a major contributor to the local environmental conditions on either the lunar or Martian surface. This conclusion regarding Mars is supported by measurements of dust accumulation on the Mars Sojourner Rover solar array during the Pathfinder mission. This Final Report describes a study of the effect of Martian dust accumulation on radiator performance. It is comprised of quantitative measurements of effective emittance for a range of dust accumulation levels on surfaces of known emittance under clean conditions. The test radiator coatings were Z-93P, NS-43G, and Silver Teflon (10 mil) film. The Martian dust simulant was Carbondale Red Clay. Results were obtained under vacuum conditions sufficient to reduce convection effects virtually to zero. The experiments required the development of a calorimetric apparatus that allows simultaneous measurements of the effective emittance for all the coatings at each set of experimental conditions. A method of adding dust to

  17. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    ScienceCinema

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2013-05-28

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  19. INL Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, Brenda Ringe; Olson, Christina Liegh; Gilbert, Hollie Kae; Holmer, Marie Pilkington

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year (FY) 2015. Throughout the year, 67 total monitoring visits were completed, with several especially sensitive resources visited on more than one occasion. Overall, FY 2015 monitoring included surveillance of the following 49 individual cultural resource localities: three locations with human remains, one of which is also a cave; nine additional caves; twenty prehistoric archaeological sites; five historic archaeological sites; two historic trails; Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I), a National Historic Landmark; Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) objects located at EBR-I; and eight Arco Naval Proving Ground (NPG) property types. Several INL work processes and projects were also monitored to confirm compliance with original INL CRM recommendations and assess the effects of ongoing work. On two occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. Finally, the current location housing INL Archives and Special Collections was evaluated once. Most of the cultural resources monitored in FY 2015 exhibited no adverse impacts, resulting in Type 1 impact assessments. However, Type 2 impacts were noted 13 times. In one case, a portion of a historic trail was graded without prior review or coordination with the INL CRM Office, resulting in impacts to the surface of the trail and one archaeological site. Evidence of unauthorized artifact collection/ looting was also documented at three archaeological sites located along INL powerlines. Federal agents concluded a FY 2012 investigation by filing civil charges and levying fine under the Archaeological Resource Protection Act against one INL employee for this kind

  20. Gamma Ray Spectrum Catalogs from Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Heath, R. L.

    Gamma-ray spectrometry is widely applied as a tool for the assay of radioactive source material to identify the isotopes present and characterize radiation fields. Beginning with the startup of the world's first high-flux beam reactor, Materials Test Reactor (MTR), INL has pioneered the development of x-ray spectrometry for use in basic nuclear research and a variety of disciplines using radioisotopes and other radiation sources. Beginning in the early 1950s, a program was instituted to make the technique a precise laboratory tool. Standards were established for detectors and nuclear electronics to promote the production of commercial laboratory spectrometers. It was also necessary to produce a comprehensive collection of standard detector response functions for individual radio nuclides to permit the use of gamma-ray spectrometers for identification of radioisotopes present in radiation sources. This led to the publication of standard measurement methodology and a set of Gamma-Ray Spectrum Catalogues. These publications, which established standards for detector systems, experimental methods and reference spectra for both NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors and Ge(Li) - Si( Li) semiconductor devices, became standard reference works, distributed worldwide. Over 40,000 copies have been distributed by the Office of Science and Technical Information (OSTI). Unfortunately, although they are still very much in demand, they are all out of print at this time. The INL is converting this large volume of data to a format which is consistent with current information technology and meets the needs of the scientific community. Three are available online with the longest being more than 800 pages in length. Plotted spectra and decay data have been converted to digital formats and updated, including decay scheme graphics. These online catalogs are: • Ge(Li)-Si(Li) Gamma Spectrum Catalog (Published 3-29-1999) • NaI(Tl) Gamma Spectrum Catalog (Published 4-1-1997) • Gamma

  1. GCFR shielding design and supporting experimental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.G.; Hamilton, C.J.; Bartine, D.

    1980-05-01

    The shielding for the conceptual design of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) is described, and the component exposure design criteria which determine the shield design are presented. The experimental programs for validating the GCFR shielding design methods and data (which have been in existence since 1976) are also discussed.

  2. University Engagement at INL

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, Sean Robert; Rynes, Amanda Renee

    2014-07-01

    There are currently over 900 facilities in over 170 countries which fall under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. As additional nations look to purse civilian nuclear programs or to expand infrastructure already in place, the number of reactors and accompanying facilities as well as the quantity of material has greatly increased. Due to the breadth of the threat and the burden placed on the IAEA as nuclear applications expand, it has become increasingly important that safeguards professionals have a strong understanding of both the technical and political aspects of nonproliferation starting early in their career. To begin overcoming this challenge, Idaho National Laboratory, has partnered with local universities to deliver a graduate level nuclear engineering course that covers both aspects of the field with a focus on safeguards applications. To date over 60 students across multiple disciplines have participated in this course with many deciding to transition into a nonproliferation area of focus in both their academic and professional careers.

  3. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleason, C. C.; Rogers, D. W.; Bahr, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    The primary objectives of this three-phase program are to develop technology for the design of advanced combustors with significantly lower pollutant emission levels than those of current combustors, and to demonstrate these pollutant emission reductions in CF6-50C engine tests. The purpose of the Phase 2 Program was to further develop the two most promising concepts identified in the Phase 1 Program, the double annular combustor and the radial/axial staged combustor, and to design a combustor and breadboard fuel splitter control for CF6-50 engine demonstration testing in the Phase 3 Program. Noise measurement and alternate fuels addendums to the basic program were conducted to obtain additional experimental data. Twenty-one full annular and fifty-two sector combustor configurations were evaluated. Both combustor types demonstrated the capability for significantly reducing pollutant emission levels. The most promising results were obtained with the double annular combustor. Rig test results corrected to CF-50C engine conditions produced EPA emission parameters for CO, HC, and NOX of 3.4, 0.4, and 4.5 respectively. These levels represent CO, HC, and NOX reductions of 69, 90, and 42 percent respectively from current combustor emission levels. The combustor also met smoke emission level requirements and development engine performance and installation requirements.

  4. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report Supporting Radiological Air Surveillance Monitoring for the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, Thomas Jay

    2015-05-01

    This report documents the Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) developed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site ambient air surveillance program. The development of the DQOs was based on the seven-step process recommended “for systematic planning to generate performance and acceptance criteria for collecting environmental data” (EPA 2006). The process helped to determine the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to meet current regulatory requirements and to follow U.S. Department of Energy guidance for environmental surveillance air monitoring design. It also considered the current air monitoring program that has existed at INL Site since the 1950s. The development of the DQOs involved the application of the atmospheric dispersion model CALPUFF to identify likely contamination dispersion patterns at and around the INL Site using site-specific meteorological data. Model simulations were used to quantitatively assess the probable frequency of detection of airborne radionuclides released by INL Site facilities using existing and proposed air monitors.

  5. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    S. J. Payne; N. S. Carpenter; J. M. Hodges; R. G. Berg

    2008-09-01

    During 2007, the INL Seismic Monitoring Program evaluated 2,515 earthquakes from around the world, the western United States, and local region of the eastern Snake River Plain. 671 earthquakes and man-made blasts occurred within the local region outside and within a 161-km (or 100-mile) radius of INL. Of these events, eleven were small to moderate size earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 3.0 to 4.8. 341 earthquakes occurred within the 161-km radius of INL and the majority of these earthquakes were located in active regions of the Basin and Range Province that surrounds the ESRP. Three earthquakes were located within the ESRP at Craters of the Moon National Monument. The earthquakes were of Mc 0.9, 1.4, and 1.8. Since 1972, INL has recorded 36 small-magnitude microearthquakes (M < 2.0) within the ESRP.

  6. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Peduzzi, A.; Vitti, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    The alternate fuels investigation objective was to experimentally determine the impacts, if any, on exhaust emissions, performance, and durability characteristics of the hybrid and vorbix low pollution combustor concepts when operated on test fuels which simulate composition and property changes which might result from future broadened aviation turbine fuel specifications or use of synthetically derived crude feedstocks. Results of the program indicate a significant increase in CO and small NOX increase in emissions at idle for both combustor concepts, and an increase in THC for the vorbix concept. Minimal impact was observed on gaseous emissions at high power. The vorbix concept exhibited significant increase in exhaust smoke with increasing fuel aromatic content. Altitude stability was not affected for the vorbix combustor, but was substantially reduced for the hybrid concept. Severe carbon deposition was observed in both combustors following limited endurance testing with No. 2 home heat fuel. Liner temperature levels were insensitive to variations in aromatic content over the range of conditions investigated.

  7. Program for Experimentation With Expert Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    CERBERUS is forward-chaining, knowledge-based system program useful for experimentation with expert systems. Inference-engine mechanism performs deductions according to user-supplied rule set. Information stored in intermediate area, and user interrogated only when no applicable data found in storage. Each assertion posed by CERBERUS answered with certainty ranging from 0 to 100 percent. Rule processor stops investigating applicable rules when goal reaches certainty of 95 percent or higher. Capable of operating for wide variety of domains. Sample rule files included for animal identification, pixel classification in image processing, and rudimentary car repair for novice mechanic. User supplies set of end goals or actions. System complexity decided by user's rule file. CERBERUS written in FORTRAN 77.

  8. Hydrogen hybrid vehicle engine development: Experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Van Blarigan, P.

    1995-09-01

    A hydrogen fueled engine is being developed specifically for the auxiliary power unit (APU) in a series type hybrid vehicle. Hydrogen is different from other internal combustion (IC) engine fuels, and hybrid vehicle IC engine requirements are different from those of other IC vehicle engines. Together these differences will allow a new engine design based on first principles that will maximize thermal efficiency while minimizing principal emissions. The experimental program is proceeding in four steps: (1) Demonstration of the emissions and the indicated thermal efficiency capability of a standard CLR research engine modified for higher compression ratios and hydrogen fueled operation. (2) Design and test a new combustion chamber geometry for an existing single cylinder research engine, in an attempt to improve on the baseline indicated thermal efficiency of the CLR engine. (3) Design and build, in conjunction with an industrial collaborator, a new full scale research engine designed to maximize brake thermal efficiency. Include a full complement of combustion diagnostics. (4) Incorporate all of the knowledge thus obtained in the design and fabrication, by an industrial collaborator, of the hydrogen fueled engine for the hybrid vehicle power train illustrator. Results of the CLR baseline engine testing are presented, as well as preliminary data from the new combustion chamber engine. The CLR data confirm the low NOx produced by lean operation. The preliminary indicated thermal efficiency data from the new combustion chamber design engine show an improvement relative to the CLR engine. Comparison with previous high compression engine results shows reasonable agreement.

  9. Evaluation with an Experimental Design: The Emergency School Assistance Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Robert L.; York, Robert L.

    The Evaluation of the Emergency School Assistance Program (ESAP) for the 1971-72 school year is the first application of full-blown experimental design with randomized experimental and control cases in a federal evaluation of a large scale program. It is also one of the very few evaluations which has shown that federal programs can raise tested…

  10. An Experimental Visual Literacy Program in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewig, John Warren

    A study explored how children respond to visuals and how a program of visual literacy enhances oral and written response to pictures. The first and fifth grades of two schools, one urban and one suburban, with different socioecomic groups of students, were chosen to participate in a 1-year program consisting of one visual literacy lesson per week.…

  11. INL Wind Farm Project Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Siefert

    2009-07-01

    The INL Wind Farm project proposes to install a 20 MW to 40 MW wind farm on government property, consisting of approximately ten to twenty full-sized (80-meter hub height) towers with 2 MW turbines, and access roads. This includes identifying the optimal turbine locations, building access roads, and pouring the tower foundations in preparation for turbine installation. The project successfully identified a location on INL lands with commercially viable wind resources (i.e., greater than 11 mph sustained winds) for a 20 to 40 MW wind farm. Additionally, the proposed Wind Farm was evaluated against other General Plant Projects, General Purpose Capital Equipment projects, and Line Item Construction Projects at the INL to show the relative importance of the proposed Wind Farm project.

  12. Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs

    SciTech Connect

    V. L. Putman

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications, and additional information

  13. High School Algebra Readiness Program: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbohm, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study measured the effectiveness of a locally created summer Algebra readiness program in a large suburban high school district in New Jersey. Incoming ninth grade students who were not ready for high school algebra were invited to participate in the summer program. The program was designed to provide access to more…

  14. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2010 – December 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    N. Seth Carpenter; Suzette J. Payne; Jed M. Hodges; Robert G. Berg

    2011-09-01

    During 2010, the INL Seismic Monitoring Program evaluated 11,606 earthquakes from around the world, the western United States, and local region of the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). INL located 2,085 earthquakes and man-made blasts within the local region outside and within a 161-km (or 100-mile) radius of INL. Of these events, 53 were small-to-moderate size earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 3.0 to 4.8. 672 earthquakes occurred within the 161-km radius of INL and the majority of these earthquakes were located in active regions of the Basin and Range Province that surrounds the ESRP. There were 10 microearthquakes within the boundary of the ESRP, all of magnitude less than or equal to 2.0. Five of those were located within and near the ESRP at Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM) at mid- and lower-crust depths and are interpreted to be related to fluid movement. Since 1972, INL has recorded 48 small-magnitude, microearthquakes (M = 2.2) within the ESRP (not including COM events) and 22 deep microearthquakes (M = 2.3) in the vicinity of Craters of the Moon National Monument.

  15. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2008 – December 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    S. J. Payne; N. S. Carpenter; J. M. Hodges; R. G. Berg

    2009-09-01

    During 2008, the INL Seismic Monitoring Program evaluated 7,284 earthquakes from around the world, the western United States, and local region of the eastern Snake River Plain. 2,396 earthquakes and man-made blasts were evaluated within the local region outside and within a 161-km (or 100-mile) radius of INL. Of these events, 25 were small to moderate size earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 3.0 to 3.9. 823 earthquakes occurred within the 161-km radius of INL and over 300 events were associated with eight different earthquake swarms which were located in active regions of the Basin and Range Province that surrounds the eastern Snake River Plain. Eight microearthquakes in 2008 of magnitude (M) 2.0 and less were located within the eastern Snake River Plain, seven at or near the Craters of the Moon National Monument and one within the INL boundary. Further analyses of the anomalously deep focal depths (15 to 42 km) and different waveform characteristics of all Craters of the Moon National Monument events (1999-2008) suggest association with magmatic processes. From 1972 to 2008, INL located 36 other small-magnitude microearthquakes (M < 2.0) at depths (< 11 km) within the eastern Snake River Plain and attributes these events to regional tectonic tensional stresses.

  16. Operation Hope: An Experimental Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, A. Paul

    1973-01-01

    In efforts to place more effective social workers in the barrios and ghettoes, this program recruited potential college students from those areas, and provided them with support in academic skill development on-site classes; field placement; and supportive services. The most serious kinds of problem faced by these young people lie in the area of…

  17. FY15 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R. F.; Baker, K. L.; Barrios, M. A.; Beckwith, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Chen, H.; Coppari, F.; Fournier, K. B.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Frenje, J.; Huntington, C. M.; Kraus, R. G.; Lazicki, A. E.; Martinez, D. A.; McNaney, J. M.; Millot, M. A.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Ping, Y.; Pollock, B. B.; Smith, R. F.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Widmann, K.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Wan, A.; Hsing, W.

    2015-12-04

    In FY15, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 468 target shots in FY15, with 315 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 145 shots using just the EP laser system, and 8 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 25% of the total number of shots (56 OMEGA shots and 67 EP shots, including the 8 Joint shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 75% (267 OMEGA shots and 86 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  18. NASA's aeronautics program: Systems technology and experimental program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The appropriateness of the division of effort between the directed to the solution of near-term problems and that directed to long-term technical advances in the program is addressed. Comparisons between in-house work and out-of-house work are presented. Programs include those in: general aviation; propulsive lift; rotorcraft; avionics and flight controls; small transport aircraft; and human/vehicle systems.

  19. Fixed Target Beauty Physics Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Garbincius, P.H.

    1987-11-01

    The current and near term future fixed target physics efforts in observing particles with open beauty are reviewed. This includes a compilation of the non-observation upper limits and the observation of both upsilon and b-states. A short discussion of the theoretical predictions for the hadro-produced beauty pairs is included. The major part of this review is devoted to the techniques and tricks employed, a survey of the current and proposed experiments. A personal summary of the experimental prospects concludes this report. 28 refs., 26 figs.

  20. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

  1. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Peduzzi, A.; Vitti, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Combustor pollution reduction technology for commercial CTOL engines was generated and this technology was demonstrated in a full-scale JT9D engine in 1976. Component rig refinement of the two best combustor concepts were tested. These concepts are the vorbix combustor, and a hybrid combustor which combines the pilot zone of the staged premix combustor and the main zone of the swirl-can combustor. Both concepts significantly reduced all pollutant emissions relative to the JT9D-7 engine combustor. However, neither concept met all program goals. The hybrid combustor met pollution goals for unburned hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide but did not achieve the oxides of nitrogen goal. This combustor had significant performance deficiencies. The Vorbix combustor met goals for unburned hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen but did not achieve the carbon monoxide goal. Performance of the vorbix combustor approached the engine requirements. On the basis of these results, the vorbix combustor was selected for the engine demonstration program. A control study was conducted to establish fuel control requirements imposed by the low-emission combustor concepts and to identify conceptual control system designs. Concurrent efforts were also completed on two addendums: an alternate fuels addendum and a combustion noise addendum.

  2. The influence of precipitation, vegetation and soil properties on the ecohydrology of sagebrush steppe rangelands on the INL site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germino, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    The INL Site and other landscapes having sagebrush steppe vegetation are experiencing a simultaneous change in climate and floristics that result from increases in exotic species. Determining the separate and combined/interactive effects of climate and vegetation change is important for assessing future changes on the landscape and for hydrologic processes. This research uses the 72 experimental plots established and initially maintained for many years as the “Protective Cap Biobarrier Experiment” by Dr. Jay Anderson and the Stoller ESER program, and the experiment is also now referred to as the “INL Site Ecohydrology Study.” We are evaluating long-term impacts of different plant communities commonly found throughout Idaho subject to different precipitation regimes and to different soil depths. Treatments of amount and timing of precipitation (irrigation), soil depth, and either native/perennial or exotic grass vegetation allow researchers to investigate how vegetation, precipitation and soil interact to influence soil hydrology and ecosystem biogeochemistry. This information will be used to improve a variety of models, as well as provide data for these models.

  3. ISOFIT - A PROGRAM FOR FITTING SORPTION ISOTHERMS TO EXPERIMENTAL DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotherm expressions are important for describing the partitioning of contaminants in environmental systems. ISOFIT (ISOtherm FItting Tool) is a software program that fits isotherm parameters to experimental data via the minimization of a weighted sum of squared error (WSSE) obje...

  4. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Fiorentino, A.; Greene, W.

    1977-01-01

    A two-stage vortex burning and mixing combustor and associated fuel system components were successfully tested at steady state and transient operating conditions. The combustor exceeded the program goals for all three emissions species, with oxides of nitrogen 10 percent below the goal, carbon monoxide 26 percent below the goal, and total unburned hydrocarbons 75 percent below the goal. Relative to the JT9D-7 combustor, the oxides of nitrogen were reduced by 58 percent, carbon monoxide emissions were reduced by 69 percent, and total unburned hydrocarbons were reduced by 9 percent. The combustor efficiency and exit temperature profiles were comparable to those of production combustor. Acceleration and starting characteristics were deficient relative to the production engine.

  5. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, D. W.; Gleason, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Full annular versions of advanced combustor designs, sized to fit within the CF6-50 engine, were defined, manufactured, and tested at high pressure conditions. Configurations were screened, and significant reductions in CO, HC, and NOx emissions levels were achieved with two of these advanced combustor design concepts. Emissions and performance data at a typical AST cruise condition were also obtained along with combustor noise data as a part of an addendum to the basic program. The two promising combustor design approaches evolved in these efforts were the Double Annular Combustor and the Radial/Axial Combustor. With versions of these two basic combustor designs, CO and HC emissions levels at or near the target levels were obtained. Although the low target NOx emissions level was not obtained with these two advanced combustor designs, significant reductions were relative to the NOx levels of current technology combustors. Smoke emission levels below the target value were obtained.

  6. Experimental challenges of the N* program

    SciTech Connect

    Ralf Gothe

    2012-04-01

    The first challenge faced in investigating the strong interaction from partially explored, where meson-cloud degrees of freedom dominate, to still unexplored distance scales, where the dressed-quark contributions are the dominating degrees of freedom, is to find an experiment that allows to measure observables that are probing this evolving nonperturbative QCD regime over the full range. Baryon spectroscopy can establish more sensitively, and in an almost model-independent way, nucleon excitation and non-resonant reaction amplitudes by complete measurements of pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction off nucleons. Elastic and transition form factors can then trace this evolution by measurements of elastic electron scattering and exclusive single-meson and double-pion electroproduction cross sections off the nucleon that will be extended to higher momentum transfers with the energy-upgraded CEBAF beam at JLab to study the dressed quark degrees of freedom, where their strong interaction is responsible for the ground and excited nucleon state formations. After establishing unprecedented high-precision data, the immanent next challenge is a high-quality analysis to extract these relevant electrocoupling parameters for various resonances that then can be compared to state of the art models and QCD-based calculations. Recent results demonstrate the status of the analysis and pinpoint further challenges, including those to establish QCD-based results directly from the experimental data.

  7. Overview of the Initial HSX Experimental Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. T.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Probert, P. H.; Sakaguchi, V.; Shafii, J.; Shohet, J. L.; Talmadge, J. N.; Kitajima, S.

    1998-11-01

    HSX is in the final assembly and commissioning process at the UW-Madison. Its primary goal is to test the improved neoclassical confinement predicted for quasi-helically symmetric (QHS) magnetic fields. HSX will use 200 kW of 28 GHz ECH to produce currentless hot electron (1 keV) plasmas at densities < 10^13 cm-3 to test low-collisionality electron transport. HSX has a high effective transform, ι_eff=N-mι of 3; giving neoclassical transport equivalent to a q=1/3 tokamak and the possibilty of reduced anomalous transport. Auxiliary coils can change the spectrum from a QHS field structure to that similar to a conventional stellarator. Second harmonic ECH at B=0.5T will be used to produce high-energy trapped electron populations to examine direct particle loss in conventional and QHS field structures. Diagnostics needed to carry out this initial program comprise SX arrays, a PHA Si(Li) system and Doppler spectroscopy. Those developed in collaboration with other institutions include a multi-chord interferometer(UCLA), Thomson scattering(PPPL), and ECEI(UC-Davis).

  8. Learning Effects of an Experimental EFL Program in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Charles Xiaoxue; Calandra, Brendan; Hibbard, Susan T.; McDowell Lefaiver, Mary L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects an experimental English as a Foreign Language (EFL) program in Second Life (SL) had on Chinese student EFL learning. The study took an evaluative approach using quasi-experimental design with participants from one Chinese university and one American university in the southeastern United States. Results indicated…

  9. INL DPAH STAAR 2015 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, Dean Richard

    2015-09-15

    Research conducted at the INL has demonstrated the synergistic extraction of americium using solvents comprised of bis(o,o-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl) dithiophosphinic acid (DPAH “1”) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), butyl bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinate (BuCy272), or dibutyl butylphosphonate (DBBP). One potential drawback of this separations scheme is that soft metals such as silver, cadmium, or palladium and fission products such as zirconium are well extracted by these solvents. Several potential scrubbing reagents were examined. Of the scrubbing reagents studied, cysteine and methione exhibited some ability to scrub soft metals from the loaded solvent. More conventional scrub reagents such as ammonium fluoride or oxalic acid were not effective. Reagents like Bimet and CDTA were not soluble at the acidities used in these studies. Unfortunately, these results indicate that the identification of effective scrubbing reagents for use in a flowsheet based upon the INL DPAH is going to be very difficult.

  10. INL Bettis Water Treatment Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    Bechtel Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (Bettis), West Mifflin, PA, requested that the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) (Battelle Energy Alliance) perform tests using water simulants and three specified media to determine if those ion-exchange (IX) resins will be effective at removing the plutonium contamination from water. This report details the testing and results of the tests to determine the suitability of the media to treat plutonium contaminated water at near nuetral pH.

  11. INL Multi-Robot Control Interface

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-30

    The INL Multi-Robot Control Interface controls many robots through a single user interface. The interface includes a robot display window for each robot showing the robot’s condition. More than one window can be used depending on the number of robots. The user interface also includes a robot control window configured to receive commands for sending to the respective robot and a multi-robot common window showing information received from each robot.

  12. Evaluation Design: New York State Experimental Prekindergarten Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Child Development and Parent Education.

    In order to expose disadvantaged preschool children to a variety of educational experiences and to health and social services, the New York State Legislature funded the State Experimental Prekindergarten Program (PreK). In 1975, a five-year longitudinal evaluation study was begun. The study has two major parts: (1) a general study of 5,800…

  13. Experimental Programs for Emotionally Handicapped Children in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloss, Garvin G.

    Experimental approaches with emotionally disturbed children in day care programs in Ohio public schools are described. A consideration of problems of identification and classification presents Quay's three dimensions of behavior, conduct disorders, inadequacy or immaturity, and personality, and lists types of behavior found in each. Seven kinds of…

  14. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. |

    1992-09-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users` facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF`s experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  15. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Cal Ozaki

    2010-06-01

    To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

  17. INL FY2014 1st Quarterly Performance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Loran Kinghorn

    2014-07-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2 “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 76 occurrence reports and over 16 other deficiency reports (including not reportable events) identified at the INL during the period of October 2013 through December 2013. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) operates the INL under contract DE AC 07 051D14517

  18. Experimental program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this Experimental Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (EPP) to provide a summary of the DOE experimental efforts needed for the performance assessment process for the WIPP, and of the linkages of this process to the appropriate regulations. The Plan encompasses a program of analyses of the performance of the planned repository based on scientific studies, including tests with transuranic waste at laboratory sites, directed at evaluating compliance with the principal regulations governing the WIPP. The Plan begins with background information on the WIPP project, the requirements of the LWA (Land Withdrawal Act), and its objective and scope. It then presents an overview of the regulatory requirements and the compliance approach. Next are comprehensive discussions of plans for compliance with disposal regulations, followed by the SWDA (Solid Waste Disposal Act) and descriptions of activity programs designed to provide information needed for determining compliance. Descriptions and justifications of all currently planned studies designed to support regulatory compliance activities are also included.

  19. An experimental teaching-learning program in histology.

    PubMed

    Li, Enzhong; Chen, Yanfang

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an experimental teaching and learning program used in a histology course with first-year students in the first term of their studies in the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at Huanghuai University, China. Eighty students were divided randomly into two sections (n=40/section). Students in one section were taught using a hybrid case-based and lecture style (experimental section) and the second section was taught using a traditional teaching style (control section). To assess achievement, examinations were administered at the end of every textbook chapter and a final examination was carried out at the end of the course. To determine students' attitude to the teaching styles used, a questionnaire survey was conducted at the end of the term. Results showed that students preferred the experimental style. In the experimental section, students' scores were significantly higher than those of students in the control section both in the chapter and the final examinations (p<.05). Results indicate that the case-based and lecture style is superior to the traditional style of teaching and learning histology. PMID:22130418

  20. Experimental status of the AGS Relativistic Heavy Ion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.

    1994-10-01

    The universal motivation for colliding large nuclei at relativistic energies is the expectation that a small volume of the primordial quark soup, generally referred to as the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), can be created and studied. The QGP is formed via a phase transition caused by either the extreme baryon densities and/or the extreme temperatures achieved in the overlap zone of the two colliding nuclei. Experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) using a beam of Si nuclei at 14.6 GeV per nucleon on various nuclear targets have been completed. These same experiments are now actively searching for signatures of QGP formation using a beam of Au nuclei at 11.7 GeV per nucleon. This paper briefly summarizes some of the key results from the Si beam program and the current status of the experimental Au beam program at the AGS.

  1. The experimental program at the WNR neutron source at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    There are two white neutron sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory which are used in broad scientific program over the energy range from thermal to about seven hundred MeV. Largely because of the increased intensity over such an unprecedented energy range, use of these two facilities for nuclear science research has grown from 36 experimenters in 1987 to 118 in 1990. This paper focuses on research underway or recently completed at the high-energy neutron source of the WNR facility. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³⁵U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greater than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  3. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³⁵U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greatermore » than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.« less

  4. THE EXPERIMENTAL DEALER TRAINING PROGRAM, A PRELIMINARY SUMMARY REPORT OF THE PROGRAM. RURAL SOCIOLOGY REPORT, 56.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WARREN, RICHARD D.; AND OTHERS

    AN EXPERIMENTAL ACTION AND RESEARCH PROJECT WAS CONDUCTED DURING 1960-64 BY THE IOWA AGRICULTURAL AND HOME ECONOMICS EXPERIMENT STATION, IN COOPERATION WITH THE TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY, TO DETERMINE THE INFLUENCE OF AN INTENSIVE TRAINING PROGRAM FOR GENERAL MANAGERS OF LOCAL RETAIL FARM SUPPLY RETAIL BUSINESSES DEALING IN FERTILIZER AND…

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Program to Measure the Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor Lower Plenum for Validation of CFD Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A description of the scaling analysis, experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that will be presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits high-quality measurements to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL MIR system is its large size which allows improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements

  6. Experimental quiet engine program aerodynamic performance of Fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Parker, D. E.; Dunbar, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    This report presents the aerodynamic component test results of Fan C, a high-bypass-ratio, low-aerodynamic-loading, 1550 feet per second (472.4 m/sec), single-stage fan, which was designed and tested as part of the NASA Experimental Quiet Engine Program. The fan was designed to deliver a bypass pressure ratio of 1.60 with an adiabatic efficiency of 84.2 percent at a total fan flow of 915 lb/sec (415.0 kg/sec). It was tested with and without inlet distortion. A bypass total-pressure ratio of 1.61 and an adiabatic efficiency of 83.9 percent at a total fan flow of 921 lb/sec (417.8 kg/sec) were actually achieved. An operating margin in excess of 14.6 percent was demonstrated at design speed.

  7. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon – hydrogen - nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 µm) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90 -95 % nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form.

  8. Airborne Dust Cloud Measurements at the INL National Security Test Range

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Abbott; Norm Stanley; Larry Radke; Charles Smeltzer

    2007-09-01

    experienced atmospheric research groups, such as the INL and Airborne Research Consultants LLC team, can safely and effectively assess difficult air pollutant questions at the INL Site and elsewhere that cannot be otherwise answered. This site-specific, measurement-based assessment provides valuable input to stakeholders in judging the risks associated with these types of events and NSTR project staff in the development of future experimental design and environmental impact assessments.

  9. INL Control System Situational Awareness Technology Final Report 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon Rueff; Bryce Wheeler; Todd Vollmer; Tim McJunkin

    2013-01-01

    The Situational Awareness project is a comprehensive undertaking of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in an effort to produce technologies capable of defending the country’s energy sector infrastructure from cyber attack. INL has addressed this challenge through research and development of an interoperable suite of tools that safeguard critical energy sector infrastructure. The technologies in this project include the Sophia Tool, Mesh Mapper (MM) Tool, Intelligent Cyber Sensor (ICS) Tool, and Data Fusion Tool (DFT). Each is designed to function effectively on its own, or they can be integrated in a variety of customized configurations based on the end user’s risk profile and security needs.

  10. 34 CFR 387.1 - What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INNOVATIVE TRAINING General § 387.1 What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program? This program is... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Experimental and Innovative Training Program? 387.1 Section 387.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of...

  11. Impact of the Listeria monocytogenes Protein InlC on Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Nelly; Gianfelice, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes causes serious food-borne illnesses in pregnant women and the immunocompromised. L. monocytogenes promotes its internalization into host epithelial cells and then uses an F-actin-dependent motility process to spread from infected cells to surrounding healthy cells. In cultured enterocytes, efficient spread of L. monocytogenes requires the secreted bacterial protein InlC. InlC promotes dissemination by physically interacting with and antagonizing the function of the human adaptor protein Tuba. Here we examine the role of InlC and its interaction with host Tuba during infection in mice. The study took advantage of a single-amino-acid substitution (K173A) in InlC that impairs binding to human Tuba but does not affect InlC-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Mice were inoculated intravenously with the wild-type L. monocytogenes strain EGD, an isogenic strain deleted for the inlC gene (ΔinlC), or a strain expressing K173A mutant InlC (inlC.K173A). The 50% lethal doses (LD50) for the ΔinlC or inlC.K173A mutant strain were approximately 4- or 6-fold greater than that for the wild-type strain, indicating a role for inlC in virulence. Compared to the wild-type strain, the inlC.K173A mutant strain exhibited lower bacterial loads in the liver. Histological analysis of livers indicated that the two inlC mutant strains produced smaller foci of infection than did the wild-type strain. These smaller foci are consistent with a role for InlC in cell-to-cell spread in vivo. Taken together, these results provide evidence that interaction of InlC with host Tuba is important for full virulence. PMID:23403554

  12. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 6. Single annulus tests, transient test program

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1 to 2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. This report presents the experimental results for the transient portion of the single annulus test program. The test program was designed to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the MARK 22 reactor. The test program involved testing of both a ribless heater and a ribbed heater under steady state as well as transient conditions. The ribbed heater testing is currently underway and will be reported separately. The steady state portion of this test program with ribless heater was completed and reported in report No. CU-HTRF-T3A. The present report presents transient test results obtained from a ribless, uniform annulus test section. A total of thirty five transients were conducted with six cases in which flow excursion occurred. No unstable conditions resulted for tests in which the steady state Q{sub ratio} OFI limit was not exceeded.

  13. INL Review of Fueling Machine Inspection Tool Development Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, George

    2015-03-01

    A review of a technical proposal for James Fischer Nuclear. The document describes an inspection tool to examine the graphite moderator in an AGR reactor. The system is an optical system to look at the graphite blocks for cracks. INL reviews the document for technical value.

  14. INL Director Discusses Lessons Learned from TMI, Fukushima

    ScienceCinema

    Grossenbacher, John

    2013-05-28

    Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher explains how the U.S. nuclear industry has boosted its safety procedures as a result of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident in 1979 and how the industry plans to use current events at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plants to further enhance safety. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. INL Director Discusses Lessons Learned from TMI, Fukushima

    SciTech Connect

    Grossenbacher, John

    2011-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher explains how the U.S. nuclear industry has boosted its safety procedures as a result of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident in 1979 and how the industry plans to use current events at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plants to further enhance safety. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Strategy for the Identification of an INL Comprehensive Utility Corridor

    SciTech Connect

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01

    This report documents the strategy developed to identify a comprehensive utility corridor (CUC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The strategy established the process for which the Campus Development Office will evaluate land management issues. It is a process that uses geographical information system geospatial technology to layer critical INL mission information in a way that thorough evaluations can be conducted and strategies developed. The objective of the CUC Project was to develop a process that could be implemented to identify potential utility corridor options for consideration. The process had to take into account all the missions occurring on the INL and other land-related issues. The process for developing a CUC strategy consists of the following four basic elements using geographical information system capabilities: 1. Development of an INL base layer map; this base layer map geospatially references all stationary geographical features on INL and sitewide information. 2. Development of current and future mission land-use need maps; this involved working with each directorate to identify current mission land use needs and future land use needs that project 30 years into the future. 3. Development of restricted and potential constraint maps; this included geospatially mapping areas such as wells, contaminated areas, firing ranges, cultural areas, ecological areas, hunting areas, easement, and grazing areas. 4. Development of state highway and power line rights of way map; this included geospatially mapping rights-of-way along existing state highways and power lines running through the INL that support INL operations. It was determined after completing and evaluating the geospatial information that the area with the least impact to INL missions was around the perimeter of the INL Site. Option 1, in this document, identifies this perimeter; however, it does not mean the entire perimeter is viable. Many places along the perimeter corridor cannot

  17. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 5: Single annulus tests, steady-state test program

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents results for the steady state portion of the finless single annulus test program. The objective of the experimental study was to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the MARK 22 reactor. The test program involved testing of both a finless or ribless heater and a ribbed heater. The latter program is currently underway and will be reported separately. For finless heater, testing was conducted in both a steady state and transient mode. The present report presents steady state results for a series of experiments with uniform and asymmetric heating. The demand curves obtained under uniform heating yielded OFI flow-rates which were slightly below those obtained for a circular tube geometry with the same L/D ratio; however, the single annulus had a hydraulic diameter which was approximately fifty percent larger than the circular tube. The asymmetric heating cases were selected to provide the same average power input as the uniform cases. The results for these tests indicated that the flow-rate at OFI increased with the degree of asymmetry.

  18. INL Human Resource Development and the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Gouveia, Fernando; Metcalf, Richard Royce Madison

    2010-07-01

    It is the stated goal of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to promote the development of a strengthened nuclear safeguards base, one with the potential to advance the secure and peaceful implementation of nuclear energy world-wide. To meet this goal, the initiative, among other things, has sought to develop a revitalized effort to ensure the continued availability of next generation safeguards professionals. Accordingly, this paper serves to outline the human capital building strategies taken by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in line with the NGSI. Various components are presented in detail, including INL’s efforts directed at university outreach, in particular the laboratory’s summer internship program, along with the development of various innovative training programs and long-term oriented strategies for student professional development. Special highlights include a video training series, developed by INL in cooperation with LLNL and other laboratories, which sought to expose students and entry-level professionals to the concept and practice of international nuclear safeguards.

  19. An Experimental Studies Program in General Education After One Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Wilt, Robert B.; Klocke, Ronald A.

    The widespread feeling that college officials neglect and ignore student needs in the college curriculum, as well as a concern for the alternatives available to students in the area of general education precipitated the development of this program. The program's directions and goals are systematically elaborated in this report. The basic direction…

  20. Noise addendum experimental clean combustor program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofrin, T. G.; Ross, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of advanced CTOL aircraft engines with reduced exhaust emissions is discussed. Combustor noise information provided during the basic emissions program and used to advantage in securing reduced levels of combustion noise is included. Results are presented of internal pressure transducer measurements made during the scheduled emissions test program on ten configurations involving variations of three basic combustor designs.

  1. 34 CFR 98.3 - Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to instructional material used in a research or... RIGHTS IN RESEARCH, EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS, AND TESTING § 98.3 Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program. (a) All instructional material—including teachers' manuals,...

  2. 34 CFR 98.3 - Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to instructional material used in a research or... RIGHTS IN RESEARCH, EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS, AND TESTING § 98.3 Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program. (a) All instructional material—including teachers' manuals,...

  3. Heat Cycle Reserch Experimental Program report, FY-84

    SciTech Connect

    Whitbeck, J.F.

    1984-09-01

    The Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) is an experimental binary-cycle facility used to investigate different concepts and/or components for generating electrical power from a geothermal resource. This report briefly desc

  4. Thermal Storage Advanced Thruster System (TSATS) Experimental Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. Frank; Lisano, Michael E., II

    1991-01-01

    The Thermal Storage Advanced Thruster System (TSATS) rocket test stand is completely assembled and operational. The first trial experimental runs of a low-energy TSATS prototype rocket was made using the test stand. The features of the rocket test stand and the calibration of the associated diagnostics are described and discussed. Design and construction of the TSATS prototype are discussed, and experimental objectives, procedures, and results are detailed.

  5. Space Nuclear Program INL's role in energizing exploration

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08

    Idaho National Laboratory is helping make space exploration possible with the development of radioisotope power systems, which can work in areas too harsh and too isolated in space where the suns rays cannot be used for energy.

  6. Space Nuclear Program INL's role in energizing exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2008-04-22

    Idaho National Laboratory is helping make space exploration possible with the development of radioisotope power systems, which can work in areas too harsh and too isolated in space where the suns rays cannot be used for energy.

  7. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants’ ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed. PMID:22923854

  8. Model development experimental programs as part of the NRC reactor safety research

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.W.; Hsu, Y.Y.

    1982-07-01

    Experimental and model development programs have a key impact on the overall success of code calculational capabilities in addition to supporting regulatory and licensing decisions. The reactor safety research effort undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has as one of several objectives to obtain experimental data for model and code development and code assessment. This article highlights recent research sponsored under the thermal-hydraulic model-development experimental programs at NRC.

  9. 20 CFR 416.250 - Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Experimental, pilot, and demonstration... Because of Essential Persons § 416.250 Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program... conduct experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects to promote the objectives or improve...

  10. 20 CFR 416.250 - Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Experimental, pilot, and demonstration... Because of Essential Persons § 416.250 Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program... conduct experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects to promote the objectives or improve...

  11. 20 CFR 416.250 - Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Experimental, pilot, and demonstration... Because of Essential Persons § 416.250 Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program... conduct experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects to promote the objectives or improve...

  12. Experimental validation of a landing-dynamics computer program for legged spacecraft landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Stubbs, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Validation of a landing-dynamics computer program has been accomplished by comparing analytical data with data from a limited experimental program. Agreement obtained established the subject landing-dynamics computer program as a reliable design tool for legged spacecraft landers.

  13. An Experimental Test of a First Grade Reading-Typewriting Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernazza, Ann Marie; And Others

    Two classes of randomly assigned first graders were given an experimental form of a reading-typewriting program with one typewriter for each child. The program consisted of 25 workbook lessons, each relating to a single phoneme. The computer was used as a program design tool to determine an optimal teaching order of phonemic elements. The children…

  14. Evaluating an Experimental Audio-Visual Module Programmed to Teach a Basic Anatomical and Physiological System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    The learning efficiency and effectiveness of teaching an anatomical and physiological system to Air Force enlisted trainees utilizing an experimental audiovisual programed module was compared to that of a commercial linear programed text. It was demonstrated that the audiovisual programed approach to training was more efficient than and equally as…

  15. 20 CFR 416.250 - Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... projects in the SSI program. 416.250 Section 416.250 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Because of Essential Persons § 416.250 Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program... administration of the SSI program. These projects will test the advantages of altering certain...

  16. The Development and Experimental Analysis of a Self-Instructional Program in Graphical Kinematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nee, John G.

    A project to help vocational-technical teachers in the development and experimental analysis of self-instructional programs is presented. The emphasis in developing the program was on maximizing effectiveness and efficiency of program-learner interaction as measured by criterion items. These items emphasized cognitive content dealing with the…

  17. EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING AND DESIGN DATA PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOHR, RICHARD L.; WOLFE, GEORGE P.

    AN EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING AND DESIGN DATA PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO DEVELOP A PROPOSED CURRICULUM OUTLINE AND ADMISSION STANDARDS FOR OTHER INSTITUTIONS IN THE PLANNING OF PROGRAMS TO TRAIN COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS. OF THE FIRST CLASS OF 26 STUDENTS, 17 COMPLETED THE PROGRAM AND 12 (INCLUDING ONE WHO DID NOT GRADUATE) WERE…

  18. Significant Educational Research and Innovation: Their Potential Contribution to Experimental Schools Design. A Report to the Experimental Schools Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Stephen K.; And Others

    In essence, the Policy Institute has explored the contributions that tested educational research (including reputedly viable educational innovations not based on formal research and development) might make to actual school and classroom practice within the context of the Experimental Schools Program's planning. The Policy Institute set itself…

  19. Operating Experience Review of the INL HTE Gas Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; K. G. DeWall

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored at hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. Some simple statistics are given for the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  20. Self Actualization of Females in an Experimental Orientation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Wilt, Robert B.; Klocke, Ronald A.

    1971-01-01

    An alternative to the traditional orientation program was developed that forced students to consider their physical and psychological outer limits. Students were confronted in a new and unique way that contributed to the self actualization process of the female portion of the group. (Author/BY)

  1. Experimental Evaluation of the ELS Teacher Education Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horst, Donald P.; And Others

    This report presents the results of pragmatically selected tryouts of the English Language Services "Teacher Education Program" in the Regional English Language Centre in Singapore, the Central Institute of English in Hyderabad, and the Instituto Pedagogico in Caracas. American Institutes for Research, in submitting the present evaluation to the…

  2. Handbook for First Year Experimental Language Development Program: Book One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queensland Dept. of Education, Brisbane (Australia).

    This handbook is a guide to a compensatory language program designed for young, Australian, aboriginal children during their first year at school. It is the result of recent research which shows that reading retardation characteristic of aboriginal children may well be associated with the fact that their linguistic system differs from that in the…

  3. Report on INL Activities for Uncertainty Reduction Analysis of FY11

    SciTech Connect

    G. Plamiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

    2011-09-01

    This report presents the status of activities performed at INL under the ARC Work Package on 'Uncertainty Reduction Analyses' that has a main goal the reduction of uncertainties associated with nuclear data on neutronic integral parameters of interest for the design of advanced fast reactors under consideration by the ARC program. First, an analysis of experiments was carried out. For both JOYO (the first Japanese fast reactor) and ZPPR-9 (a large size zero power plutonium fueled experiment performed at ANL-W in Idaho) the performance of ENDF/B-VII.0 is quite satisfying except for the sodium void configurations of ZPPR-9, but for which one has to take into account the approximation of the modeling. In fact, when one uses a more detailed model (calculations performed at ANL in a companion WP) more reasonable results are obtained. A large effort was devoted to the analysis of the irradiation experiments, PROFIL-1 and -2 and TRAPU, performed at the French fast reactor PHENIX. For these experiments a pre-release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 cross section files was also used, in order to provide validation feedback to the CSWEG nuclear data evaluation community. In the PROFIL experiments improvements can be observed for the ENDF/B-VII.1 capture data in 238Pu, 241Am, 244Cm, 97Mo, 151Sm, 153Eu, and for 240Pu(n,2n). On the other hand, 240,242Pu, 95Mo, 133Cs and 145Nd capture C/E results are worse. For the major actinides 235U and especially 239Pu capture C/E's are underestimated. For fission products, 105,106Pd, 143,144Nd and 147,149Sm are significantly underestimated, while 101Ru and 151Sm are overestimated. Other C/E deviations from unity are within the combined experimental and calculated statistical uncertainty. From the TRAPU analysis, the major improvement is in the predicted 243Cm build-up, presumably due to an improved 242Cm capture evaluation. The COSMO experiment was also analyzed in order to provide useful feedback on fission cross sections. It was found out that ENDF

  4. Search for Pentaquarks: the Experimental Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Niccolai

    2005-01-01

    Experimental evidences for the existence of exotic 5-quark baryons have been reported recently by several groups. These data may open new perspectives in hadron spectroscopy as well as in QCD. However, the statistical significance of these results is quite low, and the pentaquark signal has not been seen in various other experiments. The new dedicated experiments currently underway at CLAS will hopefully give a clearer answer on the existence and, possibly, on the properties of pentaquarks. This paper summarizes the results obtained so far in the search for 5-quark states and describes the characteristics and goals of the new experiments running at CLAS.

  5. Definition study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and associated test program and test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Definition Study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and Associated Test Program and Test Plan, was initiated to identify the most cost effective program for a follow-on to the AST Test Bed Program. The VCEE Study defined various subscale VCE's based on different available core engine components, and a full scale VCEE utilizing current technology. The cycles were selected, preliminary design accomplished and program plans and engineering costs developed for several program options. In addition to the VCEE program plans and options, a limited effort was applied to identifying programs that could logically be accomplished on the AST Test Bed Program VCE to extend the usefulness of this test hardware. Component programs were provided that could be accomplished prior to the start of a VCEE program.

  6. The effectiveness of family planning programs evaluated with true experimental designs.

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, K E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This paper describes the magnitude of effects for family planning programs evaluated with true experimental designs. METHODS: Studies that used true experimental designs to evaluate family planning programs were identified and their results subjected to meta-analysis. RESULTS: For the 14 studies with the information needed to calculate effect size, the Pearson r between program and effect variables ranged from -.08 to .09 and averaged .08. CONCLUSIONS: The programs evaluated in the studies considered have had, on average, smaller effects than many would assume and desire. PMID:9146451

  7. An Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Shipsey, Ian

    2012-07-31

    The Purdue High Energy Physics Group conducts research in experimental and theoretical elementary particle physics and experimental high energy astrophysics. Our goals, which we share with high energy physics colleagues around the world, are to understand at the most fundamental level the nature of matter, energy, space and time, and in order to explain the birth, evolution and fate of the Universe. The experiments in which we are currently involved are: CDF, CLEO-c, CMS, LSST, and VERITAS. We have been instrumental in establishing two major in-house facilities: The Purdue Particle Physics Microstructure Detector Facility (P3MD) in 1995 and the CMS Tier-2 center in 2005. The research efforts of the theory group span phenomenological and theoretical aspects of the Standard Model as well as many of its possible extensions. Recent work includes phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric models, string theory and applications of gauge/gravity duality, the cosmological implications of massive gravitons, and the physics of extra dimensions.

  8. An Overview of an Experimental Demonstration Aerotow Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Bowers, Albion H.; Lokos, William A.; Peters, Todd L.; Gera, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An overview of an experimental demonstration of aerotowing a delta-wing airplane with low-aspect ratio and relatively high wing loading is presented. Aerotowing of future space launch configurations is a new concept, and the objective of the work described herein is to demonstrate the aerotow operation using an airplane configuration similar to conceptual space launch vehicles. Background information on the use of aerotow for a space launch vehicle is presented, and the aerotow system used in this demonstration is described. The ground tests, analytical studies, and flight planning used to predict system behavior and to enhance flight safety are detailed. The instrumentation suite and flight test maneuvers flown are discussed, preliminary performance is assessed, and flight test results are compared with the preflight predictions.

  9. Experimental Program on Composite Steel and Concrete Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubecky, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Plate bridges with encased beams are suitable for building bridges of short and medium range. The paper presented focuses on the research into progressive bridges with encased filler beams of modified steel sections designed to minimize steel consumption without affecting essentially the overall structure resistance. This type of construction is suitable for bridges over short and middle spans as it offers a number of advantages, such as little headroom, quite clear static action of forces and a short construction period with no falsework required. Among some disadvantages is the economic inefficiency of steel I-sections, which are employed in the majority of bridges of this type. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of more economical design approaches and more purposeful arrangement and employment of steel beams. The paper presented brings some results from experimental tests on elements with encased steel filler-beams acting compositely under both short-term static and dynamic loads, and long-term load.

  10. 34 CFR 98.3 - Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or experimentation program or project shall be available for inspection by the parents or guardians... designed to explore or develop new or unproven teaching methods or techniques. (c) For the purpose of...

  11. 34 CFR 98.3 - Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or experimentation program or project shall be available for inspection by the parents or guardians... designed to explore or develop new or unproven teaching methods or techniques. (c) For the purpose of...

  12. 34 CFR 98.3 - Access to instructional material used in a research or experimentation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or experimentation program or project shall be available for inspection by the parents or guardians... designed to explore or develop new or unproven teaching methods or techniques. (c) For the purpose of...

  13. Overview of the Pegasus-II experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, J.S.; Adams, P.J.; Atchison, W.L.

    1998-12-31

    Pegasus-II is a pulsed power facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory which is used to conduct a variety of experiments in the high energy density regime, with applications to the physics of nuclear weapons as well as basic science. The chief mission of the facility is the systematic investigation of hydrodynamic physics issues through the use of a magnetically-driven, cylindrical imploding liner. At 4.3-MJ of stored energy, Pegasus-II is one of the largest capacitor-bank facilities in the world. Peak currents as high as 12 MA have been produced with a quarter-cycle time of 6--8 {micro}s. The active portion of the standardized aluminum liner is a 3.2-g right hollow cylinder designed such that the inner surface of the liner remains at solid aluminum density during the course of the experiment. The run-in time for a typical experiment is {approximately}10 {micro}s. For some experiments, a diagnostic package is placed inside the liner to analyze physical processes associated with multi-microsecond convergent implosions of macroscopic solid shells. These campaigns include the study of instability growth rates, hydrodynamic bounce and mix, and mechanical heating associated with high strain and strain rate. Other experimental studies, in particular those examining the shock /production of ejecta and shock-driven hydrodynamic vortex formation and compression, have involved the use of an internal target package. By varying the Pegasus-II operating conditions, the impact of the liner on an internal target of a few cm diameter results in shock pressures of 100kBar--1MBar with liner velocities of 3 mm/{micro}s--10 mm/{micro}s. Some experiments have been conducted in the regime where strength of materials affects the hydrodynamical behavior of the system, while for other target designs, efforts have been made to minimize the role of material strength. Hydrodynamic experiments on Pegasus-II uniquely combine convergent geometry with axial diagnostic access of macroscopic

  14. Overview and Experimental Program of the Levitated Dipole Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, D.; Hansen, A.; Mauel, M.; Ortiz, E.; Boxer, A.; Ellsworth, J.; Grulke, O.; Karim, I.; Kesner, J.; Minervini, J.; Michael, P.; Zhukovsky, A.

    2003-10-01

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is the first experiment to investigate the behavior of high-temperature plasma confined by a levitated magnetic dipole. LDX consists of a large, high-field, superconducting coil magnetically levitated within a large vacuum vessel. Since field lines pass through the inner bore of the floating coil, the plasma is not lost to the poles. High-temperature plasma having pressure comparable to the confining magnetic pressure β ˜ 1 can be produced and studied. LDX will test recent theories showing unique equilibrium and stability properties of confined plasma with stationary profiles. The LDX physics plan includes the study of high-β plasma, investigation of dipole confinement characteristics, the formation of convective cells within the closed field line geometry, and the possibility of non-local transport. With its three superconducting magnets, LDX highlights the role of innovative magnetic technology that makes possible explorations of entirely new confinement concepts. We describe the project goals, overall program plan, and current status of the experiment.

  15. PROCESS: Program for Research on Operator Control in an Experimental Simulated Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelsma, Otto; Bijlstra, Jim P.

    An experimental tool is described for the investigation of the human control behavior for slow responding dynamic systems. The Program for Research on Operator Control in an Experimental Simulated Setting (PROCESS) is a simulation of a dynamic water-alcohol distillation system that can be used in research on operator training. In particular,…

  16. Experimental Program for Opportunities in Advanced Study and Research in Education. 1981-82 Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Trudy W.; And Others

    The Experimental Program for Opportunities in Advanced Study and Research in Education was a 3-year training program (1979-82) funded by the National Institute of Education to increase participation in educational research of women and minorities at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. During the third project year, these objectives guided the…

  17. The Concepts of Performance-Oriented Instruction Used in Developing the Experimental Volunteer Army Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John E.; And Others

    This report describes the planning and implementing of the Experimental Volunteer Army Training Program (EVATP) at Fort Ord early in 1971. This was the Army's first effort to effect major training innovations in the conversion toward an all-volunteer Army. By the fall of 1971, this program was being used as a model for implementing the EVATP at…

  18. Do Formal Mentoring Programs Matter?: A Longitudinal Randomized Experimental Study of Women Healthcare Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall Egan, Toby; Rosser, Manda H.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a pretest-posttest randomized experimental study comparing the impact of high versus low facilitation of formal mentoring programs on female healthcare workers' performance and attitudes. Results indicated increases in job performance, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment for mentoring program participants from…

  19. An Experimental Approach for the Personalization of a Teacher Education Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockarts, Dorothea Grace

    This project attempted to design an experimental model for a teacher education program in the College of Education of the University of Alabama. The model attempted to identify students' concerns and problems and to test a novel approach for personalizing their programs through the inclusion of microteaching. Three distinct stages were included.…

  20. RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM CAPABILITIES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY (INL)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly Lively; Stephen Johnson; Eric Clarke

    2014-07-01

    --Idaho National Laboratory’s, Space Nuclear Systems and Technology Division established the resources, equipment and facilities required to provide nuclear-fueled, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) to Department of Energy (DOE) Customers. RPSs are designed to convert the heat generated by decay of iridium clad, 238PuO2 fuel pellets into electricity that is used to power missions in remote, harsh environments. Utilization of nuclear fuel requires adherence to governing regulations and the INL provides unique capabilities to safely fuel, test, store, transport and integrate RPSs to supply power—supporting mission needs. Nuclear capabilities encompass RPS fueling, testing, handling, storing, transporting RPS nationally, and space vehicle integration. Activities are performed at the INL and in remote locations such as John F. Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station to support space missions. This paper will focus on the facility and equipment capabilities primarily offered at the INL, Material and Fuel Complex located in a security-protected, federally owned, industrial area on the remote desert site west of Idaho Falls, ID. Nuclear and non-nuclear facilities house equipment needed to perform required activities such as general purpose heat source (GPHS) module pre-assembly and module assembly using nuclear fuel; RPS receipt and baseline electrical testing, fueling, vibration testing to simulate the launch environment, mass properties testing to measure the mass and compute the moment of inertia, electro-magnetic characterizing to determine potential consequences to the operation of vehicle or scientific instrumentation, and thermal vacuum testing to verify RPS power performance in the vacuum and cold temperatures of space.

  1. NASA/Pratt and Whitney experimental clean combustor program: Engine test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Fiorentino, A. J.; Greene, W.

    1977-01-01

    A two-stage vorbix (vortex burning and mixing) combustor and associated fuel system components were successfully tested in an experimental JT9D engine at steady-state and transient operating conditions, using ASTM Jet-A fuel. Full-scale JT9D experimental engine tests were conducted in a phase three aircraft experimental clean combustor program. The low-pollution combustor, fuel system, and fuel control concepts were derived from phase one and phase two programs in which several combustor concepts were evaluated, refined, and optimized in a component test rig. Significant pollution reductions were achieved with the combustor which meets the performance, operating, and installation requirements of the engine.

  2. INL Control System Situational Awareness Technology Annual Report 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon Rueff; Bryce Wheeler; Todd Vollmer; Tim McJunkin; Robert Erbes

    2012-10-01

    The overall goal of this project is to develop an interoperable set of tools to provide a comprehensive, consistent implementation of cyber security and overall situational awareness of control and sensor network implementations. The operation and interoperability of these tools will fill voids in current technological offerings and address issues that remain an impediment to the security of control systems. This report provides an FY 2012 update on the Sophia, Mesh Mapper, Intelligent Cyber Sensor, and Data Fusion projects with respect to the year-two tasks and annual reporting requirements of the INL Control System Situational Awareness Technology report (July 2010).

  3. Operating experience review of an INL gas monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee C.; DeWall, K. G.; Herring, J. S.

    2015-03-12

    This article describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored in the lab room are hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and both actual and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. In addition, some simple calculations are given to estimate the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98

    SciTech Connect

    Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

  5. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2004 - December 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    S. Payne; A. Holland; J. Hodges; R. Berg

    2005-09-01

    During 2004, INL analyzed more than 2,300 earthquakes. There were 487 earthquakes with magnitudes up to 4.0 located within the 161-km (100-mile) radius of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Seventeen small to moderate earthquakes of magnitudes from 3.0 to 5.0 occurred with the region outside the 161-km radius. Earthquakes activity occurred in areas that have experienced seismic activity in the past, the Basin and Range northwest of the INL, southwestern Montana, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Jackson, Wyoming, and southeastern Idaho. One earthquake was located northeast of Idaho Falls, Idaho within the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). No earthquakes were located within the INL boundaries. Earthquakes were not recorded by strong-motion accelerographs located in INL facilities.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98

    SciTech Connect

    Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

  7. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2005 - December 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    S. J. Payne; A. A. Holland; J. M. Hodges; R. G. Berg

    2006-09-01

    During 2005, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recorded 2390 independent triggers from earthquakes both within the region and from around the world. 38 small to moderate size earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 3.0 to 5.7 occurred within and outside the 161-km (100-mile) radius of INL. Earthquakes activity occurred in areas that have experienced seismic activity in the past, the Basin and Range northwest of the INL, southwestern Montana, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Jackson, Wyoming, and southeastern Idaho. INL recorded the July 26, 2005 body-wave magnitude (mb) 5.7 Dillon, Montana earthquake and 100’s of associated aftershocks. Local residents felt the earthquake and experienced minor damage. The mb 5.7 main shock was located more than 170 km (105 miles) from INL facilities and was not felt. The main shock did not trigger any strong-motion accelerographs (SMAs) located within INL buildings. Free-field SMAs and accelerometers co-located with seismic stations recorded acceleration data. Peak horizontal and vertical accelerations range from 0.0077 to 0.0006 g. There were 449 earthquakes with magnitudes up to 4.6 that occurred within the 161-km radius of the INL in the Basin and Range surrounding the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). No earthquakes occurred within the INL boundaries or the ESRP. The largest earthquake occurred on October 31, 2005 and had a moment magnitude (Mw) 4.6. It was located north of Leadore, Idaho at a distance of 100 km (62 miles) from INL. The earthquake did not trigger SMAs located within INL buildings. Free-field SMAs and accelerometers co-located at seismic stations recorded peak horizontal and vertical accelerations that ranged from 0.0003 to 0.0030 g.

  8. Survey of engineering computational methods and experimental programs for estimating supersonic missile aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, W. C.; Allen, J. M.; Hernandez, G.; Dillenius, M. F. E.; Hemsch, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of engineering computational methods and experimental programs used for estimating the aerodynamic characteristics of missile configurations. Emphasis is placed on those methods which are suitable for preliminary design of conventional and advanced concepts. An analysis of the technical approaches of the various methods is made in order to assess their suitability to estimate longitudinal and/or lateral-directional characteristics for different classes of missile configurations. Some comparisons between the predicted characteristics and experimental data are presented. These comparisons are made for a large variation in flow conditions and model attitude parameters. The paper also presents known experimental research programs developed for the specific purpose of validating analytical methods and extending the capability of data-base programs.

  9. A Review of Out-of-School Time Program Quasi-Experimental and Experimental Evaluation Results. Out-of-School Time Evaluation Snapshot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Priscilla M. D.; Harris, Erin

    As the amount of resources allocated to out-of-school (OST) programming and policymakers' demands for research-based results increase, there is increasing interest in rigorous research designs to examine OST program outcomes. This issue of "Out-of-School Time Evaluation Snapshots" reviews 27 quasi-experimental and experimental OST evaluations and…

  10. [Experimental and theoretical plasma physics program]. [Final progress report, 1982--1983

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, H.

    1983-12-31

    In recent years, members of the Maryland Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory programs, and, in many cases, these theoretical developments helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In the following, the authors summarize the technical progress in five major areas: (1) RF interaction with plasmas including wave propagation and RF heating, (2) spheromak formation, equilibrium, and stability; (3) stability of nonaxisymmetric systems (EBT, mirrors, etc.); (4) stability theory of toroidal plasmas (tokamak, RFP, etc); and (5) nonlinear theory.

  11. BATTELLE ENERGY ALLIANCE, LLC (BEA) 2014 Annual Report for Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    SciTech Connect

    Juan Alvarez; Todd Allen

    2014-10-01

    This Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 annual report provides the Department of Energy (DOE) with BEA’s self-assessment of performance managing and operating the INL for the period ending September 30, 2014. After considering all of the information related to INL performance during the rating period against the Goals, Objectives and Notable Outcomes in the FY 2014 Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP), BEA believes it earned an overall grade closest to an A. The paragraphs below highlight how INL excelled in delivering innovative and impactful research across the three mission areas; how INL has successfully positioned itself for future growth and sustainment; and how, through strong leadership, INL has set and implemented a strategic direction to ensure we meet and exceed the expectations of DOE and other customers. Attachments 1 through 5 provide additional detail on FY 2014 mission accomplishments, outline corporate contributions for success, highlight national and international awards and recognitions at the organization and individual levels, and describe the performance issues and challenges faced in FY 2014. • Attachment 1, “Self-Assessed PEMP Ratings” • Attachment 2, “INL Mission Accomplishments” • Attachment 3, “Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Contributions to INL Success” • Attachment 4, “FY 2014 Awards, Recognition, Professional Roles and Certifications” • Attachment 5, “Performance Issues and Challenges.”

  12. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Randy Bohachek; Charles Park; Bruce Wallace; Phil Winston; Steve Marschman

    2013-04-01

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  13. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Bohachek, Randy; Wallace, Bruce; Winston, Phil; Marschman, Steve

    2013-04-30

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  14. Experimental Pilot Program in Teacher Education. Report for the Period February-June 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Univ. of New York, NY. School of Education

    This paper reports the last phase of planning and development for the Experimental Pilot Program in Teacher Education (EPPTE) which begins in September 1969 as an effort to find an effective alternative to the conventional model for training teachers. Activities of the project staff are described in the areas of (1) Publicity, including response…

  15. Annual Summary. Training and Technology Experimentation, Demonstration, and Utilization Program Activities (January 1-December 31, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Directed primarily toward increasing utilization of industrial resources for training and development of disadvantaged persons, Training and Technology (TAT) activities for 1971 included: (1) development and implementation of experimental approaches to program development and operation, (2) technical support for university-conducted related…

  16. Evaluation of the New York State Experimental Prekindergarten Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of ESC Education Planning and Development.

    An evaluation of the New York State Experimental Prekindergarten Program was begun in 1975 to provide longititudinal data on the effects of prekindergarten on children's development over a period of 5 years. Data were collected on a variety of items, including children's test performance at various times, family background, ratings by teachers,…

  17. NSF's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Subsidizing Academic Research or State Budgets?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    This cross-state empirical study focuses on the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) and examines its impact on the academic research and development (R&D) expenditures financed by state governments. Based on a panel of 50 states during 1979-2006, the empirical results indicate that…

  18. PAC-TAC. Police and Citizens-Together Against Crime. Experimental Action Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochester Univ., NY. Management Research Center.

    This report describes an experimental program in which civilians and police officers work as two-person teams, patrolling fixed "beat" areas in selected urban neighborhoods. These teams work in responding to service calls, aiding regular mobile patrols in their duties, deterring criminal activity and civilian victimization, and developing better…

  19. 77 FR 47676 - Comment Request: Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research Jurisdictional Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... comment; the first was published in the Federal Register at 75 FR 66167 and no comments were received. NSF... Comment Request: Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research Jurisdictional Survey AGENCY... simultaneously with the publication of this second notice. The full submission may be found at:...

  20. 20 CFR 416.250 - Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program. 416.250 Section 416.250 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Eligibility Eligibility for Increased Benefits Because of Essential Persons §...

  1. An Experimental Investigation of a Technique for Predicting Gains from a Special Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Patrick Ralston

    This study was an experimental investigation designed to ascertain the effectiveness of a technique for predicting student success in a special reading program. The disparity between a student's score on a reading test taken silently and his score on an equivalent form which was read orally by the investigator as the student read it silently was…

  2. Section IV.D.3 for DOE 2013 Annual Report: Novel Phosphazene-based Compounds to Enhance Safety and Stability of Cell Chemistries for High Voltage Applications (INL)

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Gering; Mason K. Harrup; Eric J. Dufek; Sergiy V. Sazhin; Harry W. Rollins; David K. Jamison; Fred F. Stewart; John Burba

    2013-09-01

    Electrolytes play a central role in performance and aging in most electrochemical systems. As automotive and grid applications place a higher reliance on electrochemical stored energy, it becomes more urgent to have electrolyte components that enable optimal battery performance while promoting battery safety and longevity. Safety remains a foremost concern for widespread utilization of Li-ion technology in electric-drive vehicles, especially as the focus turns to higher voltage systems (5V). This work capitalizes on the long established INL expertise regarding phosphazene chemistry, aimed at battery-viable compounds for electrolytes and electrodes that are highly tolerant to abusive conditions. This report showcases our 2013 work for the DOE applied battery research (ABR) program, wherein testing results are summarized for INL electrolytes and alternative anode materials.

  3. Hot Water Distribution System Program Documentation and Comparison to Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, Evelyn; Craddick, William G; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Wendt, Robert L; Woodbury, Professor Keith A.

    2007-09-01

    In 2003, the California Energy Commission s (CEC s) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to create a computer program to analyze hot water distribution systems for single family residences, and to perform such analyses for a selection of houses. This effort and its results were documented in a report provided to CEC in March, 2004 [1]. The principal objective of effort was to compare the water and energy wasted between various possible hot water distribution systems for various different house designs. It was presumed that water being provided to a user would be considered suitably warm when it reached 105 F. Therefore, what was needed was a tool which could compute the time it takes for water reaching the draw point to reach 105 F, and the energy wasted during this wait. The computer program used to perform the analyses was a combination of a calculational core, produced by Dr. Keith A. Woodbury, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director, Alabama Industrial Assessment Center, University of Alabama, and a user interface based on LabVIEW, created by Dr. Roberto Lenarduzzi of ORNL. At that time, the computer program was in a relatively rough and undocumented form adequate to perform the contracted work but not in a condition where it could be readily used by those not involved in its generation. Subsequently, the CEC provided funding through Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to improve the program s documentation and user interface to facilitate use by others, and to compare the program s results to experimental data generated by Dr. Carl Hiller. This report describes the program and provides user guidance. It also summarizes the comparisons made to experimental data, along with options built into the program specifically to allow these comparisons. These options were necessitated by the fact that some of the experimental data required options and features not originally included in the program

  4. Overview of the C-2U Advanced Beam-Driven FRC Experimental Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gota, H.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Barnes, D.; Dettrick, S.; Garate, E.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Yang, X.; Ivanov, A. A.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The world's largest compact toroid (CT) device, C-2, has recently been upgraded to C-2U at Tri Alpha Energy to seek for a sustainment of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma by neutral-beam (NB) injection. The C-2 experimental program was successfully completed with dramatic improvements in confinement and stability of FRC plasmas, as well as demonstrated plasma pressure increase and plasma heating by NB injection. To enhance the NB injection effect and further improve the FRC performance, the C-2U experimental program has started with following key system upgrades: (i) increased total NB input power to 10 + MW (15 keV hydrogen) with tilted injection angle; (ii) enhanced edge-biasing capability for stability control; (iii) upgraded particle inventory control systems. The initial C-2U experiment has already demonstrated much further improvements, revealing advanced beam-driven FRC plasmas. In the best operating regime we have successfully achieved plasma sustainment up to 5 + ms; while, in the longer-pulsed regime the plasma lifetime can be extended up to the end of NB pulse-duration (8 + ms). The overall C-2U experimental program and the initial experimental results will be presented at the meeting.

  5. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627). INL PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627). INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-54-12124. Unknown Photographer, 9/21/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627). INL PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627). INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-54-12573. R.G. Larsen, Photographer, 10/20/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. CONSTRUCTION VIEW OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP601) LOOKING NORTHWEST. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION VIEW OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601) LOOKING NORTHWEST. INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-51-1390. Unknown Photographer, 1/31/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. CONSTRUCTION VIEW OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP601) LOOKING EAST. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION VIEW OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601) LOOKING EAST. INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-51-1547. Unknown Photographer, 2/28/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. ETR ELECTRICAL BUILDING, TRA648, INTERIOR. SWITCHGEAR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 563794. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR ELECTRICAL BUILDING, TRA-648, INTERIOR. SWITCHGEAR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-3794. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 11/26/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. ETR ELECTRICAL BUILDING, TRA648. BATTERY ROOM. INL NEGATIVE NO. 563785. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR ELECTRICAL BUILDING, TRA-648. BATTERY ROOM. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-3785. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 11/26/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. INSIDE A FLASH EVAPORATOR. INL NEGATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. INSIDE A FLASH EVAPORATOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 3323. Unknown Photographer, 9/12/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. ETRCF, TRA654, INTERIOR. TEST VESSEL (NOT REACTOR) INSIDE PIT. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR-CF, TRA-654, INTERIOR. TEST VESSEL (NOT REACTOR) INSIDE PIT. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD24-2-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, ca. 2003 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA635. SOUTH SIDE. CAMERA FACING NORTH. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA-635. SOUTH SIDE. CAMERA FACING NORTH. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-41-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. CAFETERIA, TRA616. SERVING LINE AND SHORT ORDER GRILL. INL NEGATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAFETERIA, TRA-616. SERVING LINE AND SHORT ORDER GRILL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 4128. Unknown Photographer, 1/29/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA665, INTERIOR. UPPER LEVEL. CONCRETE WALLS. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA-665, INTERIOR. UPPER LEVEL. CONCRETE WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD42-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 3/2004 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2009 – December 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    N. S. Carpenter; S. J. Payne; J. M. Hodges; R. G. Berg

    2010-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has accumulated 37 years of earthquake data (1972-2009). This report covers the earthquake activity from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2009 and is a continuation of previous annual reports on earthquake activity surrounding the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) and within and near the INL. It discusses the earthquake activity that has occurred around the local region and within a 161-km radius around the INL centered at 43? 39.00' N, 112? 47.00' W). It discusses the seismic station and strong motion accelerograph instrumentation used to record earthquake data and how they were analyzed. It also includes a brief discussion of continuous GPS (Global Positioning System) stations co-located at INL seismic stations.

  17. SOUTH ELEVATION OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP601) LOOKING NORTH. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601) LOOKING NORTH. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-22-5-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 11/1998 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA666, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF TEST LOOP PIPING. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA-666, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF TEST LOOP PIPING. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD30-1-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 6/2001 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA666, INTERIOR. PIPING DETAIL ALONG EAST WALL. INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA-666, INTERIOR. PIPING DETAIL ALONG EAST WALL. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD30-2-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 6/2001 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. STEAM PLANT, TRA609. STANDBY DIESEL GENERATOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 3589. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEAM PLANT, TRA-609. STANDBY DIESEL GENERATOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 3589. Unknown Photographer, 10/29/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. DETAILS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200062700098105071. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAILS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0627-00-098-105071. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 4272-14-108. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. MISCELLANEOUS ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627). INL DRAWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MISCELLANEOUS ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0627-00-098-105631. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 4272-814-134. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Deutsche Bundespost/FTZ activities in the Olympus experimentation program: Ojectives and experiment set-ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugert, M.

    1989-05-01

    The activities of the Telecommunications Engineering Center (FTZ) of the Deutsche Bundespost in the Olympus Experimentation Program are presented. The various communication experiments which are to be carried out in the framework of the GECO (Group of Experimenters of CEPT Administrations for Olympus) are described. These include: TV news gathering/TV distribution, teleseminar experiments, data distribution to microterminal experiments, SMS-TDMA (time division multiple access) experiments, and TDMA frequency diversity experiments. The applied experiment configurations and the layout and design of the transportable 20/30 GHz earth stations to be used in the experiments are described.

  4. SASSIE: A program to study intrinsically disordered biological molecules and macromolecular ensembles using experimental scattering restraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Joseph E.; Raghunandan, Sindhu; Nanda, Hirsh; Krueger, Susan

    2012-02-01

    A program to construct ensembles of biomolecular structures that are consistent with experimental scattering data are described. Specifically, we generate an ensemble of biomolecular structures by varying sets of backbone dihedral angles that are then filtered using experimentally determined restraints to rapidly determine structures that have scattering profiles that are consistent with scattering data. We discuss an application of these tools to predict a set of structures for the HIV-1 Gag protein, an intrinsically disordered protein, that are consistent with small-angle neutron scattering experimental data. We have assembled these algorithms into a program called SASSIE for structure generation, visualization, and analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins and other macromolecular ensembles using neutron and X-ray scattering restraints. Program summaryProgram title: SASSIE Catalogue identifier: AEKL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 991 624 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 826 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python, C/C++, Fortran Computer: PC/Mac Operating system: 32- and 64-bit Linux (Ubuntu 10.04, Centos 5.6) and Mac OS X (10.6.6) RAM: 1 GB Classification: 3 External routines: Python 2.6.5, numpy 1.4.0, swig 1.3.40, scipy 0.8.0, Gnuplot-py-1.8, Tcl 8.5, Tk 8.5, Mac installation requires aquaterm 1.0 (or X window system) and Xcode 3 development tools. Nature of problem: Open source software to generate structures of disordered biological molecules that subsequently allow for the comparison of computational and experimental results is limiting the use of scattering resources. Solution method: Starting with an all atom model of a protein, for example, users can input

  5. Effect of formal specifications on program complexity and reliability: An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Amrit L.; Sahoo, Swarupa N.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of an experimental study undertaken to assess the improvement in program quality by using formal specifications. Specifications in the Z notation were developed for a simple but realistic antimissile system. These specifications were then used to develop 2 versions in C by 2 programmers. Another set of 3 versions in Ada were independently developed from informal specifications in English. A comparison of the reliability and complexity of the resulting programs suggests the advantages of using formal specifications in terms of number of errors detected and fault avoidance.

  6. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    S. J. Payne; N. S. Carpenter; J. M. Hodges; R. G. Berg

    2007-09-01

    During 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recorded 1998 independent triggers from earthquakes both within the region and from around the world. Fifteen small to moderate size earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 3.0 to 4.5 occurred within and outside the 161-km (100-mile) radius of INL. There were 357 earthquakes with magnitudes up to 4.5 that occurred within the 161-km radius of the INL. The majority of earthquakes occurred in the Basin and Range Province surrounding the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). The largest of these earthquakes had a body-wave magnitude (mb) 4.5 and occurred on February 5, 2006. It was located northeast of Spencer, Idaho near the east-west trending Centennial fault along the Idaho-Montana border. The earthquake did not trigger SMAs located within INL buildings. Three earthquakes occurred within the ESRP, two of which occurred within the INL boundaries. One earthquake of coda magnitude (Mc) 1.7 occurred on October 18, 2006 and was located southeast of Pocatello, Idaho. The two earthquakes within the INL boundaries included the local magnitude (ML) 2.0 on July 31, 2006 located near the southern termination of the Lemhi fault and the Mc 0.4 on August 6, 2006 located near the center of INL. The ML 2.0 earthquake was well recorded by most of the INL seismic stations and had a focal depth of 8.98 km. First motions were used to compute a focal mechanism, which indicated normal faulting along one of two possible fault planes that may strike N76ºW and dip 70±3ºSW or strike N55ºW and dip 20±13ºNE. Slip along a normal fault that strikes N76ºW and dips 70±3ºSW is consistent with slip along a possible segment of the NW-trending Lemhi normal fault.

  7. Purification of the inlB gene product of Listeria monocytogenes and demonstration of its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Müller, S; Hain, T; Pashalidis, P; Lingnau, A; Domann, E; Chakraborty, T; Wehland, J

    1998-07-01

    Entry of Listeria monocytogenes into nonphagocytic cells requires the inlAB gene products. InlA and InlB are bacterial cell wall-associated polypeptides that can be released by sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment. By applying more gentle extraction methods, we have purified InlB in its native form. Treatment of bacteria with various nondenaturating agents including mutanolysin, thiol reagents, sodium chloride, and detergents like Triton X-100 or 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate did not release substantial amounts of InlB from the bacterial cell wall. Instead, InlB was nearly quantitatively extracted in a solubilized form by treatment of bacteria with 1 M Tris-Cl or other protonated amines at pH 7.5. However, the reduced solubility of the extracted InlB in low-salt buffers hampered further biochemical purification. A panel of monoclonal antibodies against listerial Tris-Cl extracts containing InlB was therefore produced to generate reagents for use in affinity chromatography. One of the monoclonal antibodies enabled purification of the InlB protein to homogeneity with relatively high yields. When added externally, purified InlB associated with the surface of noninvasive bacteria such as Listeria innocua or an L. monocytogenes inlB2 mutant, where it promoted entry of these strains into Vero cells >300- and 17-fold, respectively. This effect was even more dramatic for HeLa cells, where the observed invasion was increased about 9,000- and 4,000-fold, respectively. The availability of purified native, invasion-competent InlB will allow analysis of the molecular basis of InlB-mediated entry into tissue culture cell lines in greater detail. PMID:9632576

  8. Controls-structures interaction guest investigator program: Overview and phase 1 experimental results and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith-Taylor, Rudeen; Tanner, Sharon E.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator program is described in terms of its support of the development of CSI technologies. The program is based on the introduction of CSI researchers from industry and academia to available test facilities for experimental validation of technologies and methods. Phase 1 experimental results are reviewed with attention given to their use of the Mini-MAST test facility and the facility for the Advance Control Evaluation of Structures. Experiments were conducted regarding the following topics: collocated/noncollocated controllers, nonlinear math modeling, controller design, passive/active suspension systems design, and system identification and fault isolation. The results demonstrate that significantly enhanced performance from the control techniques can be achieved by integrating knowledge of the structural dynamics under consideration into the approaches.

  9. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Nucleation in Supercooled Liquid Silicon. Final Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    Im, J.

    2004-04-29

    The original objectives of the present program consisted of two specific nucleation-related research activities; (1) to provide a set of experimental data that will enable the quantitative examination of classical nucleation theory, and (2) to describe the phenomenon of nucleation by developing general expressions of nucleation that include both the thermal and athermal components and that correctly consider and incorporate the transient effects that arise from the nonstationary cluster distribution profile.

  10. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  11. Experimental program for real gas flow code validation at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Strawa, Anthony W.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Park, Chul

    1989-01-01

    The experimental program for validating real gas hypersonic flow codes at NASA Ames Rsearch Center is described. Ground-based test facilities used include ballistic ranges, shock tubes and shock tunnels, arc jet facilities and heated-air hypersonic wind tunnels. Also included are large-scale computer systems for kinetic theory simulations and benchmark code solutions. Flight tests consist of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment, the Space Shuttle, Project Fire 2, and planetary probes such as Galileo, Pioneer Venus, and PAET.

  12. Experimental program for real gas flow code validation at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Strawa, Anthony W.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Park, Chul

    1988-01-01

    The experimental program for validating real gas hypersonic flow codes at NASA Ames is described. Ground based test facilities used include ballistic ranges, shock tubes and shock tunnels, arcjet facilities and heated air hypersonic wind tunnels. Also included are large scale computer systems for kinetic theory simulations and benchmark code solutions. Flight tests consist of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment, the Space Shuttle, Project Fire 2, and planetary probes such as Galileo, Pioneer Venus and PAET.

  13. Experimental results concerning global observables from the CERN SPS heavy ion program

    SciTech Connect

    Young, G.R.

    1990-06-01

    A brief overview is given of experimental results obtained during the initial operation of the heavy-ion program at the CERN SPS during the period 1986--1988. This paper confines itself to a presentation of results on so-called global observables, such as energy flow and multiplicity distributions, and on information extracted from them. Of particular interest among the latter are an estimate of the magnitude and spatial distribution of the energy density attained. 3 refs., 27 figs.

  14. A theoretical/experimental program to develop active optical pollution sensors, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poultney, S. K.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on experimental investigations of Lidar and the application of Lidar to environmental and atmospheric science. Specifically the following programs are considered: calibration and application of the LaRC 48-inch Lidar; efficient and certain detection of SO2 and other gases in the calibration tank using the Raman Stack Monitor Lidar; the potential of Lidar remote sensing from the space shuttle; and the planning and mounting of efforts to realize the promise of backscatter differential absorption Lidar.

  15. A digital computer propulsion control facility: Description of capabilities and summary of experimental program results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J. R.; Arpasi, D. J.; Lehtinen, B.

    1976-01-01

    Flight weight digital computers are being used today to carry out many of the propulsion system control functions previously delegated exclusively to hydromechanical controllers. An operational digital computer facility for propulsion control mode studies has been used successfully in several experimental programs. This paper describes the system and some of the results concerned with engine control, inlet control, and inlet engine integrated control. Analytical designs for the digital propulsion control modes include both classical and modern/optimal techniques.

  16. European satellite broadcasting with L-Sat - Technical concept and experimental program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, H.-H.

    1983-09-01

    The L-Sat payload components for two 12-GHz-band TV channels (one covering Italy and one for experimental national or European experimental broadcasts) are briefly characterized, and preliminary plans for their use after the launch of L-Sat in 1986 are reviewed. A single antenna and receiver are used for the 18-GHz uplink, with a 3.7 x 2.4-deg 3-dB-illuminated zone; channel amplifiers with AGC, 230-W TWTA transmitters, and pointable antennas provide 62-dBW EIRP in channel 24 for Italy and either channel 20 or channel 28 for the experimental program, which is to last 3 years and include both production experiments (such as simultaneous translations and use of multiple subtitles via videotext) and technical trials (such as power control and forward adaptive cross-polar cancellation on the uplink). Maps of the coverage areas, block diagrams, tables, and drawings are provided.

  17. Experimental and Demonstration Program, Copper Country Intermediate School District. End of Budget Period Reports 1972 and 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    End of budget period reports are presented for an experimental and demonstration program aimed at increasing the learning process and achievement of K-4 children and to effect internal and external change in teachers' attitudes and behavior. The program, instituted in a rural, low income area, consists of an Orff music program and a theater…

  18. 100% MOX BWR experimental program design using multi-parameter representative

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise, P.; Fougeras, P.; Cathalau, S.

    2012-07-01

    A new multiparameter representative approach for the design of Advanced full MOX BWR core physics experimental programs is developed. The approach is based on sensitivity analysis of integral parameters to nuclear data, and correlations among different integral parameters. The representativeness method is here used to extract a quantitative relationship between a particular integral response of an experimental mock-up and the same response in a reference project to be designed. The study is applied to the design of the 100% MOX BASALA ABWR experimental program in the EOLE facility. The adopted scheme proposes an original approach to the problem, going from the initial 'microscopic' pin-cells integral parameters to the whole 'macroscopic' assembly integral parameters. This approach enables to collect complementary information necessary to optimize the initial design and to meet target accuracy on the integral parameters to be measured. The study has demonstrated the necessity of new fuel pins fabrication, fulfilling minimal costs requirements, to meet acceptable representativeness on local power distribution. (authors)

  19. EVALUATION OF CORE PHYSICS ANALYSIS METHODS FOR CONVERSION OF THE INL ADVANCED TEST REACTOR TO LOW-ENRICHMENT FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Mark DeHart; Gray S. Chang

    2012-04-01

    Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR.

  20. Mirror test for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor at the JET tokamak: An overview of the program

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, M. J.; De Temmerman, G.; Coad, J. P.; Vince, J.; Drake, J. R.; Le Guern, F.; Murari, A.; Pitts, R. A.; Walker, C.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2006-06-15

    Metallic mirrors will be essential components of all optical spectroscopy and imaging systems for plasma diagnosis that will be used at the next-step magnetic fusion experiment, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Any change of the mirror performance, in particular, reflectivity, will influence the quality and reliability of detected signals. At the instigation of the ITER Design Team, a dedicated technical and experimental activity aiming at the assessment of mirror surface degradation as a result of exposure to the plasma has been initiated on the JET tokamak. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the mirror test program, including design details of the mirror samples and their supports, their locations within JET, and the issue of optical characterization of the mirrors both before and after exposure. The postexposure characterization is particularly challenging in JET as a consequence of an environment in which both tritium and beryllium are present.

  1. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for the Experimental Program

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E I

    2002-11-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system and a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Administration and when completed will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. NIF is now entering the first phases of its laser commissioning program. Low-energy preamplifier rod laser shots have been successfully propagated through the entire laser chain. Higher energy shots are planned through the end of 2002. NIF's target experimental systems are also being installed in preparation for laser performance and experimental capability commissioning starting in 2003.

  2. Low pollution combustor designs for CTOL engines - Results of the Experimental Clean Combustor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Peduzzi, A.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The NASA/Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Experimental Clean Combustor Program is a multi-year, major contract effort. Primary program objectives are the generation of combustor technology for development of advanced commercial CTOL engines with lower exhaust emissions than current aircraft and demonstration of this technology in a full-scale JT9D engine in 1976. This paper describes the pollution and performance goals, Phase I and II test results, and the Phase III combustor hardware, pollution sampling techniques, and test plans. Best results were obtained with the Vorbix concept which employs multiple burning zones and improved fuel preparation and distribution. Substantial reductions were achieved in all pollutant categories, meeting the 1979 EPA standards for NOx, THC, and smoke when extrapolated to JT9D cycle conditions. The Vorbix concept additionally demonstrated the capability for acceptable altitude relight and did not appear to have unsolvable durability or exit temperature distribution problems.

  3. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A major phase of the wind energy program is the development of reliable wind turbines for supplying cost-competitive electrical energy. This paper discusses the preliminary results of two projects in this phase of the program. First an experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are reviewed. Also discussed are the results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs. These studies show wind energy costs of 7 to 1.5 c/kWH for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 a year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  4. High-energy-physics studies. Progress report, Part I. Experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The experimental high energy physics program at Ohio State University for 1982 is described. The following topics are discussed: a search for neutrino oscillations at LAMPF; measuring charm and beauty decays via hadronic production in a hybrid emulsion spectrometer; prompt neutrino production experiment; search for long-lived particles from neutrino interactions in a tagged emulsion spectrometer; electron-positron interactions at CESR-CLEO; a search for exotic forms of stable matter; and development of computer systems for data processing and for development of detectors. (GHT)

  5. The 3D structure of the hadrons: recents results and experimental program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz Camacho, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    The understanding of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at large distances still remains one of the main outstanding problems of nuclear physics. Studying the internal structure of hadrons provides a way to probe QCD in the non-perturbative domain and can help us unravel the internal structure of the most elementary blocks of matter. Jefferson Lab (JLab) has already delivered results on how elementary quarks and gluons create nucleon structure and properties. The upgrade of JLab to 12 GeV will allow the full exploration of the valence-quark structure of nucleons and the extraction of real threedimensional pictures. I will present recent results and review the future experimental program at JLab.

  6. SuperState: a computer program for the control of operant behavioral experimentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuqiang

    2006-09-15

    Operant behavioral researches require precise control of experimental devices for delivering stimuli and monitoring behavioral responses. The author developed a software solution named SuperState for controlling hardware devices and running reinforcement schedules. The Microsoft Windows compatible software was written by use of an object-oriented programming language Borland Delphi 5.0, which has simplified the programming of the application. SuperState is a stand-alone easy-to-use green software, without the need for the experimenter to master any scripting languages. It features: (1) control of multiple operant cages running independent reinforcement schedules; (2) enough cage devices (16 digital inputs and 16 digital outputs for each cage) suitable for the need of most operant behavioral equipments; (3) control of most standard ISA-type digital interface cards including Med-Associates Super-port cards and a PCI-type card AC6412, and highly expandable to support other PCI-type interface cards; (4) high-resolution device control (1ms); (5) a built-in real-time cumulative recorder; (6) extensive data analyzing including event recorder, cumulative recorder, block analyzing; the summarized results can be transferred easily to Microsoft Excel spreadsheets through the Clipboard. PMID:16466799

  7. Introducing Third-Year Chemistry Students to the Planning and Design of an Experimental Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jeffrey G.; Phillips, David Norman; van Bronswijk, Wilhelm

    1997-10-01

    The design and planning of an experimental program is often an important aspect of the job description of recent graduate employees in chemical industry and time should therefore be devoted to this activity in an undergraduate course. This paper describes a pencil and paper activity which involves the design and planning of an experimental programme which may lead to the solution of the problem. These skills are an essential pre-requisite to any experimental activity. We provide the students with a list of problems similar to those that a new graduate could encounter on commencing employment in chemical industry. They are real problems, which the Inorganic Chemistry staff of the School have been previously asked to solve for local industry. A staff member acts as the "client", and the students is the "consultant". The aim is that by a series of interviews between the client and the consultant, the students can refine a vague problem statement into a quantitative statement, and then from this develop a proposal to investigate the problem in order to confirm the cause. This proposal is submitted to the client for assessment. The students are expected to arrange one meeting with the supervisor in each week. This activity is highly commended by the School of Applied Chemistry's Advisory Board, which is primarily comprised of industrial chemists.

  8. Multi-scale experimental programs for estimating groundwater recharge in hydrologically changing basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Neil; Larsen, Josh; Reading, Lucy; Bulovic, Nevenka; Jarihani, Abdollah; Finch, Warren

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater recharge estimates are required to evaluate sustainable groundwater abstractions and to support groundwater impacts assessments associated with minerals and energy extraction. Increasingly, recharge estimates are also needed for regional and global scale water cycle modelling. This is especially the case in the great arid and semi-arid basins of the world due to increased water scarcity and dependence of ecosystems and livelihoods on their water supplies, and the considerable potential influence of groundwater on the hydrological cycle. Groundwater resources in the semi-arid Surat Basin of south-east Queensland, Australia, support extensive groundwater-dependent ecosystems and have historically been utilised for regional agriculture and urban water-use. Large volumes of water are currently being produced and will continue to do so as a part of coal seam gas extraction. There is considerable uncertainty about the impacts of gas extraction on water resources and the hydrological cycle, and much of this uncertainty stems from our limited knowledge about recharge processes and how to upscale them. Particular questions are about the role of storm events in controlling annual recharge, the relative contributions of local 'recharge zones' versus diffuse recharge and the translation of (relatively easily quantified) shallow drainage estimates to groundwater recharge. A multi-scale recharge research program is addressing these questions, using multiple approaches in estimating groundwater recharge, including plot and catchment scale monitoring, use of remote sensed data and simulation models. Results during the first year of the program have resulted in development of process hypotheses and experimental designs at three field sites representing key gaps in knowledge. The presentation will overview the process of designing the experimental program; how the results from these sites will be integrated with existing knowledge; and how results will be used to advance

  9. THE FIRST FIVE YEARS--A 1967 RECOLLECTION OF THE EXPERIMENTAL LIBERAL ARTS ENRICHMENT PROGRAM AT MARYMOUNT COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BERG, M. MAJELLA

    THE EXPERIMENTAL, ENRICHED, LIBERAL ARTS PROGRAM AT MARYMOUNT COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA IS AN ATTEMPT TO INTRODUCE INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUES IN THE TEACHING OF SEVERAL LIBERAL ARTS COURSES. ENGLISH, HISTORY, LANGUAGE, AND PHILOSPHY TEACHERS ARE EXPERIMENTING WITH A VARIETY OF INNOVATIVE AND INDEPENDENT STUDY PROGRAMS. IN ONE OF THESE EXPERIMENTS, FRESHMEN…

  10. DATA LOGGING SYSTEMS FOR MONITORING LONG-TERM RADON MITIGATION EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS IN SCHOOLS AND OTHER LARGE BUILDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses data logging systems for monitoring long-term radon mitigation experimental programs in schools and other large buildings. Several mitigation systems have been installed in schools as part of a mitigation research program conducted by the U.S. EPA. ach install...

  11. INL Reactor Technology Complex Out-of-Service Buried Piping Hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas M. Gerstner

    2008-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Reactor Technology Complex (RTC) buried piping and components are being characterized to determine if they should be managed as hazardous waste and subject to the Hazardous Waste Management Act /Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RTC buried piping and components involve both active piping and components from currently operating nuclear facilities, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and inactive lines from facilities undergoing D&D activities. The issue exists as to the proper methods to analyze and control hazards associated with D&D activities on facilities collocated with existing operating nuclear facilities, or future collocated facilities being considered with the resurgent nuclear industry. During initial characterization activities, it was determined that residual radioactive material in several inactive RTC lines and components could potentially exceed hazard category (HC) 3 thresholds. In addition, concerns were raised as to how to properly isolate active nuclear facility piping and components from those inactive lines undergoing RCRA actions, and whether the operating facility safety basis could be impacted. Work was stopped, and a potential inadequacy in the safety analysis (PISA) was declared, even though no clear safety basis existed for the inactive, abandoned lines and equipment. An unreviewed safety question (USQ) and an occurrence report resulted. A HC 3 or greater Nuclear Facility/Activity for the buried piping and components was also declared in the occurrence report. A qualitative hazard assessment was developed to evaluate the potential hazards associated with characterization activities, and any potential effects on the safety basis of the collocated RTC operating nuclear facilities. The hazard assessment clearly demonstrated the low hazards associated with the activities based on form and dispersiblity of the radioactive material in the piping and components. The hazard assessment developed

  12. Experimental Program to Elucidate and Control Stimulated Brillouin and Raman Backscattering in Long-Scale Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Wilke, M.D.

    1998-10-19

    Laser-plasma instability is a serious concern for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where laser beams illuminate the interior of a cavity (called a hohlraum) to produce X-rays to drive the implosion of a fusion capsule. Stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscattering (SRS and SBS) could result in unacceptably high laser reflectivities. Unfortunately, it is impossible at present to fully simulate these processes realistically. The authors experimental program aims to understand these instabilities by pursuing a dual strategy. (1) They use a gas-filled hohlraum design, which best approaches ignition-hohlraum conditions, on the Nova laser to identify important non linear trends. (2) They are shifting towards more fundamental experiments with a nearly diffraction-limited interaction laser beam illuminating extremely well characterized plasmas on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos to probe the relevant fundamental processes.

  13. Noise characteristics of upper surface blown configurations. Experimental program and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Searle, N.; Blakney, D. F.; Pennock, A. P.; Gibson, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental data base was developed from the model upper surface blowing (USB) propulsive lift system hardware. While the emphasis was on far field noise data, a considerable amount of relevant flow field data were also obtained. The data were derived from experiments in four different facilities resulting in: (1) small scale static flow field data; (2) small scale static noise data; (3) small scale simulated forward speed noise and load data; and (4) limited larger-scale static noise flow field and load data. All of the small scale tests used the same USB flap parts. Operational and geometrical variables covered in the test program included jet velocity, nozzle shape, nozzle area, nozzle impingement angle, nozzle vertical and horizontal location, flap length, flap deflection angle, and flap radius of curvature.

  14. Results of the NASA/General Electric Experimental Clean Combustor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleason, C. C.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The NASA/General Electric Experimental Clean Combustor Program is a multi-year, major contract effort. Primary program objectives are the generation of technology for development of advanced commercial CTOL engines with lower exhaust emissions than current aircraft and, demonstrations of this technology in a full-scale CF6-50C engine in 1976. This paper describes pollution and performance goals, Phase I and II test results and Phase III hardware, pollution sampling techniques and test plans. Pollution results are presented in emission index and Environmental Protection Agency 1979 Standard Parameters (EPAP). Best results were obtained with a double annular combustor concept. This concept, which incorporates multistage burning, produced EPAP values extrapolated to CF6-50C engine conditions for CO, HC, and NOx of 3.3, 0.3 and 4.5, respectively. These represent respective CO, HC and NOx percentage reductions of 69, 93 and 42%, compared to current CF6-50 engine values. The combustor also met development engine performance requirements.

  15. INL Director Discusses the Future for Nuclear Energy in the United States

    ScienceCinema

    Grossenbacher, John

    2013-05-28

    Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher explains that the United States should develop its energy policies based on an assessment of the current events at Japan's Fukushima nuclear reactors and the costs and benefits of providing electricity through various energy sources. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. INL Director Discusses the Future for Nuclear Energy in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Grossenbacher, John

    2011-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher explains that the United States should develop its energy policies based on an assessment of the current events at Japan's Fukushima nuclear reactors and the costs and benefits of providing electricity through various energy sources. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  17. SOUTH ELEVATION AND DETAILS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP601). INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION AND DETAILS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0601-00-291-103082. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 542-12-B-76. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. ARCHITECTURAL WALL SECTIONS OF HOT PILOT PLANT (CPP640). INL DRAWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARCHITECTURAL WALL SECTIONS OF HOT PILOT PLANT (CPP-640). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0640-00-279-111682. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 8952-CPP-640-A-5. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. BUILDING DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP601). INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BUILDING DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0601-00-291-103080. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 542-11-B-74. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. EAST AND WEST ELEVATIONS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627). INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST AND WEST ELEVATIONS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0627-00-098-105067. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 4272-14-104. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. MISCELLANEOUS ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS OF HOT PILOT PLANT (CPP640). INL DRAWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MISCELLANEOUS ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS OF HOT PILOT PLANT (CPP-640). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-640-00-279-111684. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 8952-CPP-640-A-7. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. NORTH AND SOUTH SECTIONS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627). INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH AND SOUTH SECTIONS OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0627-00-098-105068. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 4272-14-105. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. STRUCTURAL DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP601). INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STRUCTURAL DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0601-00-291-103079. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 542-11-B-73. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. EAST AND WEST ELEVATIONS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP601). INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST AND WEST ELEVATIONS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0601-00-291-103081. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 542-11-B-75. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Progress report of a research program in experimental and theoretical high energy physics, 1 June 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, R.; Cutts, D.; Fried, H.M.

    1993-06-01

    The main emphasis in the theoretical program has been in the area of string theory; also investigated were confinement and other aspects of QCD, electroweak symmetry breaking, and electroweak baryogenesis. The research program in computational physics concentrated on the development of the source Galerkin method of numerical quantum field theory. One portion of the experimental program dealt with interactions of leptons and hadrons from accelerator and strophysics sources. A description of the Large Volume Detector at Gran Sasso and its use as a stellar collapse monitor is given, along with an account of research and development on resistive plate counters. The rest of the experimental program concerns hadron collider and neutrino physics, with major emphasis on the D0 experiment at the TeVatron. The commissioning of the D0 detector and its operation are described, along with D0 analysis. Also reported is a novel cryogenic technique utilizing superfluid helium for neutrino calorimetry. 122 refs., 7 tabs., 23 figs.

  6. Experimental plan for the fuel-oil study. Weatherization Assistance Program: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.; Brown, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    An up-to-date assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) is being performed by the US Department of Energy WAP Division and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Five studies form the evaluation. Major goals of the Fuel-Oil Study are to estimate the fuel oil saved by the WAP in the Northeast during the 1990 and 1991 program years, identify and quantify non-energy impacts of the WAP, assess the cost effectiveness of the WAP within this submarket, and assess factors which may cause savings and cost effectiveness to vary. The study will only analyze single-family houses in the nine states in the Northeast census region and will be carried out over two heating seasons (1990 and 1991 WAP program years). A split-winter, pre- and post-weatherization experimental design with a control group will be used. Houses will be monitored over one winter. Energy conservation measures will be installed in the weatherized houses in January of each winter by the local WAP subgrantee. One hundred twenty five weatherized houses and 75 control houses will be monitored over the 1990--1991 winter; a different set of 200 houses will be monitored over the 1991--1992 winter. The houses will be evenly distributed among 25 subgrantees. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature data will be collected for all houses. Fuel-oil delivery data will be collected for each house monitored over the 1990--1991 winter for at least a year before weatherization. The delivery data will be analyzed to determine if the accuracy of the study can be improved by collecting fuel-oil delivery data on a larger sample of houses over the 1991--1992 winter. Detailed survey information will be obtained on all the houses. This information includes descriptive details of the house and its mechanical systems, details on household size and other demographics, and occupant answers to questions regarding comfort, safety, and operation of their space-heating system and house.

  7. Experimental program of the Super-FRS Collaboration at FAIR and developments of related instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Äystö, J.; Behr, K.-H.; Benlliure, J.; Bracco, A.; Egelhof, P.; Fomichev, A.; Galès, S.; Geissel, H.; Grahn, T.; Grigorenko, L. V.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hayano, R.; Heinz, S.; Itahashi, K.; Jokinen, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Lenske, H.; Mukha, I.; Münzenberg, G.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Pfützner, M.; Plaß, W.; Prochazka, A.; Purushothaman, S.; Saito, T.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, H.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Toki, H.; Trache, L.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.; Winkler, M.; Zamfir, V.

    2016-06-01

    The physics program at the super-conducting fragment separator (Super-FRS) at FAIR, being operated in a multiple-stage, high-resolution spectrometer mode, is discussed. The Super-FRS will produce, separate and transport radioactive beams at high energies up to 1.5 AGeV, and it can be also used as a stand-alone experimental device together with ancillary detectors. Various combinations of the magnetic sections of the Super-FRS can be operated in dispersive, achromatic or dispersion-matched spectrometer ion-optical modes, which allow measurements of momentum distributions of secondary-reaction products with high resolution and precision. A number of unique experiments in atomic, nuclear and hadron physics are suggested with the Super-FRS as a stand-alone device, in particular searches for new isotopes, studies of hypernuclei, delta-resonances in exotic nuclei and spectroscopy of atoms characterized by bound mesons. Rare decay modes like multiple-proton or neutron emission and the nuclear tensor force observed in high-momentum regime can be also addressed. The in-flight radioactivity measurements as well as fusion, transfer and deep-inelastic reaction mechanisms with the slowed-down and energy-bunched fragment beams are proposed for the high-resolution and energy buncher modes at the Super-FRS.

  8. Non-invasive Energy Spread monitoring for the JLAB Experimental Program Via SLI's

    SciTech Connect

    Arne Freyberger

    2005-03-19

    The hypernuclear physics program at Jefferson Lab [JLAB] requires a tight upper limit on the RMS beam energy spread of sigmaE over E < 3 x 10{sup -5}. The energy spread is determined by measuring the beam width at a dispersive location (D {approx} 4 m) in the transport line to the experimental halls. Ignoring the intrinsic beam size, this low energy spread corresponds to an upper bound on the beam width of sigma{sub beam} < 120 mu-m. Such small beam sizes cannot be measured using direct imaging of the synchrotron light due to diffraction limitations. Using interferometry of the synchrotron light the resolution of the optical system can be made very high. The non-invasive nature of this measurement is also very advantageous as it allows continuous energy spread monitoring. Two synchrotron light interferometers have been built and installed at Jefferson Lab, one each in the Hall-A and Hall-C transport lines. The two devices operate over a beam current range from 10 to 120 mu-A and have a spatial resolution better than 10 mu-m. The structure of the interferometer, the experience gained during its installation, beam measurements and energy spread stability are presented.

  9. Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV) Experimental Aerodynamics Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Woods, William C.; Engelund, Walter C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the experimental aerodynamics test program to ensure mission success for the autonomous flight of the Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). The HXRV is a 12-ft long, 2700 lb lifting body technology demonstrator designed to flight demonstrate for the first time a fully airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system. Three flights are currently planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10, beginning in the fall of 2000. The research vehicles will be boosted to the prescribed scramjet engine test point where they will separate from the booster, stabilize, and initiate engine test. Following 5+ seconds of powered flight and 15 seconds of cow-open tares, the cowl will close and the vehicle will fly a controlled deceleration trajectory which includes numerous control doublets for in-flight aerodynamic parameter identification. This paper reviews the preflight testing activities, wind tunnel models, test rationale, risk reduction activities, and sample results from wind tunnel tests supporting the flight trajectory of the HXRV from hypersonic engine test point through subsonic flight termination.

  10. Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV) Experimental Aerodynamics Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Woods, William C.; Engelund, Walter C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the experimental aerodynamics test program to ensure mission success for the autonomous flight of the Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). The HXRV is a 12-ft long, 2700 lb lifting body technology demonstrator designed to flight demonstrate for the first time a fully airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system. Three flights are currently planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10, beginning in the fall of 2000. The research vehicles will be boosted to the prescribed scramjet engine test point where they will separate from the booster, stabilize. and initiate engine test. Following 5+ seconds of powered flight and 15 seconds of cowl-open tares, the cowl will close and the vehicle will fly a controlled deceleration trajectory which includes numerous control doublets for in-flight aerodynamic parameter identification. This paper reviews the preflight testing activities, wind tunnel models, test rationale. risk reduction activities, and sample results from wind tunnel tests supporting the flight trajectory of the HXRV from hypersonic engine test point through subsonic flight termination.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Human Capitol Development Program Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rynes, Amanda R.

    2014-09-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative HCD Subprogram has successfully employed unique nuclear capabilities and employee expertise through INL to achieve multiple initiatives in FY14. These opportunities range from internship programs to university and training courses. One of the central facets of this work has been the international safeguards pre inspector training course. Another significant milestone is the INL led university engagement effort which resulted in courses being offered at ISU and University of Utah.

  12. A Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD): Support for the Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate Code Validation Program (COVAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, S.A.; Anderson, C.E. Jr.; Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Hunt, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    The Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD) described in this paper was developed to aid researchers with code validation for impacts that occur at velocities faster than the testable regime. Codes of concern include both hydrocodes and fast-running analytical or semi-empirical models used to predict the impact phenomenology and damage that results to projectiles and targets. There are several well documented experimental programs that can serve as benchmarks for code validation; these are identified and described. Recommendations for further experimentation (a canonical problem) to provide validation data are also discussed.

  13. Ohio University's 100 Level English Program: A Balanced, Experimental Structure That Satisfies Almost Everyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Reid

    A description of the 100 level English program at Ohio University, an explanation of how the program got started, and a brief evaluation of how the students and faculty responded to the program are included in this paper. Acknowledging that the students come into the program with 12 years or more of study of English composition and literature, the…

  14. Evaluation of transcription levels of inlA, inlB, hly, bsh and prfA genes in Listeria monocytogenes strains using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and ability of invasion into human CaCo-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tamburro, Manuela; Sammarco, Michela Lucia; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Fanelli, Incoronata; Minelli, Fabio; Ripabelli, Giancarlo

    2015-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes virulence depends on the activity of well-characterized virulence factors. In this study, transcription levels of inlA, inlB, hly, bsh and prfA genes in L. monocytogenes strains, and the ability of invasion into CaCo-2 cells were investigated. Serotyping, multiplex-PCR for serovar identification and restriction fragment analysis of inlA were performed. Transcription levels and invasiveness were evaluated by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and by in vitro assays, respectively. The isolates were of serovars 1/2a, 4b, 1/2c, 1/2b and 3a. Full-length inlA profiles were found for nine of ten clinical isolates, while five of seven cultures from foods showed truncated profile. The analysis of transcription levels of virulence factors encoding genes demonstrated a substantial inter-strain heterogeneity, with clinical strains showing higher levels for almost all genes than isolates from food. A correlation between transcription levels of inlA and inlB, as well as between bsh and prfA, was observed. Significant differences between clinical strains and food isolates in the invasion of CaCo-2 cells were found. Analysis of gene transcription and invasiveness of human cells suggests different virulence phenotypes among L. monocytogenes populations, and this characterization could be a useful tool for risk assessment purposes and for the development of public health strategies. PMID:25673285

  15. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE ON PARTICLE COLLECTION MECHANISMS: EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a theoretical and experimental investigation of the effects of high temperatures and high pressures (HTPs) on fundamental particle collection mechanisms. It gives experimental results of inertial impaction, cyclone separation, Brownian diffusion, and e...

  16. 34 CFR 75.740 - Protection of and access to student records; student rights in research, experimental programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements of section 444 of GEPA and its implementing regulations in 34 CFR part 99. (Section 444 is the... implementing regulations at 34 CFR part 98. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1221e-3, 1232g, 1232h, and 3474) ... rights in research, experimental programs, and testing. 75.740 Section 75.740 Education Office of...

  17. 34 CFR 75.740 - Protection of and access to student records; student rights in research, experimental programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements of section 444 of GEPA and its implementing regulations in 34 CFR part 99. (Section 444 is the... implementing regulations at 34 CFR part 98. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1221e-3, 1232g, 1232h, and 3474) ... rights in research, experimental programs, and testing. 75.740 Section 75.740 Education Office of...

  18. 34 CFR 76.740 - Protection of and access to student records; student rights in research, experimental programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 99. (Section 438 is the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.) (b) Under most... requirements of section 439 of GEPA and its implementing regulations at 34 CFR part 98. (Authority: 20 U.S.C... rights in research, experimental programs, and testing. 76.740 Section 76.740 Education Office of...

  19. 34 CFR 75.740 - Protection of and access to student records; student rights in research, experimental programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements of section 444 of GEPA and its implementing regulations in 34 CFR part 99. (Section 444 is the... implementing regulations at 34 CFR part 98. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1221e-3, 1232g, 1232h, and 3474) ... rights in research, experimental programs, and testing. 75.740 Section 75.740 Education Office of...

  20. 34 CFR 75.740 - Protection of and access to student records; student rights in research, experimental programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements of section 444 of GEPA and its implementing regulations in 34 CFR part 99. (Section 444 is the... implementing regulations at 34 CFR part 98. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1221e-3, 1232g, 1232h, and 3474) ... rights in research, experimental programs, and testing. 75.740 Section 75.740 Education Office of...

  1. 34 CFR 76.740 - Protection of and access to student records; student rights in research, experimental programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 99. (Section 438 is the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.) (b) Under most... requirements of section 439 of GEPA and its implementing regulations at 34 CFR part 98. (Authority: 20 U.S.C... rights in research, experimental programs, and testing. 76.740 Section 76.740 Education Office of...

  2. 34 CFR 76.740 - Protection of and access to student records; student rights in research, experimental programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 99. (Section 438 is the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.) (b) Under most... requirements of section 439 of GEPA and its implementing regulations at 34 CFR part 98. (Authority: 20 U.S.C... rights in research, experimental programs, and testing. 76.740 Section 76.740 Education Office of...

  3. 34 CFR 76.740 - Protection of and access to student records; student rights in research, experimental programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 99. (Section 438 is the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.) (b) Under most... requirements of section 439 of GEPA and its implementing regulations at 34 CFR part 98. (Authority: 20 U.S.C... rights in research, experimental programs, and testing. 76.740 Section 76.740 Education Office of...

  4. An Experimental Comparison of Two Methods Of Teaching Numerical Control Manual Programming Concepts; Visual Media Versus Hands-On Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biekert, Russell

    Accompanying the rapid changes in technology has been a greater dependence on automation and numerical control, which has resulted in the need to find ways of preparing programers for industrial machines using numerical control. To compare the hands-on equipment method and a visual media method of teaching numerical control, an experimental and a…

  5. An Evaluation of the Experimental Anthropology Program at Magee Secondary School During the Spring Semester of 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Allan G.; And Others

    This study was performed to examine the effectiveness of an experimental anthropology program conducted in a secondary school. A semantic differential scale consisting of ten pairs of bipolar adjectives was administered in pre- and post-test sessions to anthropology students to measure their attitudes toward the following concepts: Culture,…

  6. Effects On Achievement from Programmed Instruction of Experimentally Induced Familiarization of Content and Different Response Modes. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Theodore; Kagen, Edward

    A study of programed instruction sought to establish an attribute by treatment interaction (ATI) between prior familiarity of material and response mode. Two experimental variables (familiarization and response mode) and two subject attributes (sex and I.Q.) were employed. Junior High (JH) and graduate student (GS) were assigned to familiarization…

  7. Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

    1993-11-01

    EG&G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG&G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG&G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG&G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and efficiently completing the requirements for WETP.

  8. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BURRELL,KH

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, the authors have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) the authors have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {le} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. They have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiation power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet

  9. Report on INL Activities for Uncertainty Reduction Analysis of FY12

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores

    2012-09-01

    The work scope of this project related to the Work Packages of “Uncertainty Reduction Analyses” with the goal of reducing nuclear data uncertainties is to produce a set of improved nuclear data to be used both for a wide range of validated advanced fast reactor design calculations, and for providing guidelines for further improvements of the ENDF/B files (i.e. ENDF/B-VII, and future releases). Recent extensive sensitivity/uncertainty studies, performed within an international OECD-NEA initiative, have quantified for the first time the impact of current nuclear data uncertainties on design parameters of the major FCR&D and GEN-IV systems, and in particular on Na-cooled fast reactors with different fuels (oxide or metal), fuel composition (e.g. different Pu/TRU ratios) and different conversion ratios. These studies have pointed out that present uncertainties on the nuclear data should be significantly reduced, in order to get full benefit from the advanced modeling and simulation initiatives. Nuclear data plays a fundamental role in performance calculations of advanced reactor concepts. Uncertainties in the nuclear data propagate into uncertainties in calculated integral quantities, driving margins and costs in advanced system design, operation and safeguards. This package contributes to the resolution of technical, cost, safety, security and proliferation concerns in a multi-pronged, systematic, science-based R&D approach. The Nuclear Data effort identifies and develops small scale, phenomenon-specific experiments informed by theory and engineering to reduce the number of large, expensive integral experiments. The Nuclear Data activities are leveraged by effective collaborations between experiment and theory, between DOE programs and offices, at national laboratories and universities, both domestic and international. The primary objective is to develop reactor core sensitivity and uncertainty analyses that identify the improvement needs of key nuclear data which

  10. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel

  11. INL-Site Idaho Completion Project Long Term Stewardship Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Olaveson, B.

    2007-09-17

    This Strategic Plan provides a brief historical overview of ICP long-term stewardship at the INL Site and the major goals and strategies that will drive the continued implementation of long-term stewardship in the future. The specific activities and processes that will be required to implement these goals should be outlined within an implementation plan and within implementing procedures and work plans.

  12. INL receives GreenGov Presidential Award for fleet fuel efficiency improvements

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    Idaho National Laboratory has received a 2010 GreenGov Presidential Award for outstanding achievement in fuel efficiency in its bus and automotive fleets. The award was presented today in Washington, D.C., as part of a three-day symposium on improving sustainability and energy efficiency across the federal government. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  13. INL receives GreenGov Presidential Award for fleet fuel efficiency improvements

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has received a 2010 GreenGov Presidential Award for outstanding achievement in fuel efficiency in its bus and automotive fleets. The award was presented today in Washington, D.C., as part of a three-day symposium on improving sustainability and energy efficiency across the federal government. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. INL Director Explains How the National Labs Are Assisting With Japan's Nuclear Crisis

    ScienceCinema

    Grossenbacher, John

    2013-05-28

    Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher discusses the types of nuclear expertise and capabilities that exist within the U.S. Department of Energy's national labs to assist with the Japan nuclear crisis. He also explains how the labs will provide long-term research that will uncover lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear plants. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. INL Director Explains How the National Labs Are Assisting With Japan's Nuclear Crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Grossenbacher, John

    2011-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher discusses the types of nuclear expertise and capabilities that exist within the U.S. Department of Energy's national labs to assist with the Japan nuclear crisis. He also explains how the labs will provide long-term research that will uncover lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear plants. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Experimental Program for Opportunities in Advanced Study and Research in Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Trudy W.; And Others

    The University of Tennessee-Knoxville program for advancement of minorities and women in the field of educational research is described in terms of accomplishment of the five objectives of the program. These objectives are as follows: (1) to develop and demonstrate an effective training program combining postdoctoral (Law Enforcement…

  17. Anger & Aggression Management in Young Adolescents: An Experimental Validation of the SCARE Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, D. Scott; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    A study examined the validity of the SCARE program; an anger management program developed with high school students. Adolescents (n=207) exposed to the SCARE program had significantly lower levels of anger and aggression, slightly higher anger control, and lower scores on aggressive and violent attitudes a year after exposure. (Contains…

  18. An Assessment of the Experimental and Demonstration Interstate Program for South Texas Migrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    The overall purpose of this program was to develop and determine the feasibility and value of a coordinated interstate program of multi-agency resources for Mexican American migrant farm workers. Basic areas of concern leading to this goal were (1) the need for a program of employability and supportive services for migrant families who, because of…

  19. INL Sitewide Institutional Controls Annual Report FY2006

    SciTech Connect

    W. L. Jolley

    2006-08-01

    This document reports the results of the fiscal year 2006 institutional controls assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act sites at the Idaho National Laboratory. These activities are described in the INEEL Sitewide Institutional Control Plan. Inspections were performed by Long-term Stewardship Program personnel with representatives of the various facilities. The assessments showed that the various institutional control measures in place across the Idaho National Laboratory Site are functioning as intended. Information in the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Comprehensive Facilities and Land Use Plan was reviewed as part of the annual assessment and was revised as needed to reflect the current status of the institutional control sites.

  20. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BURRELL,HK

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, they have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) they have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {ge} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. The authors have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiated power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet

  1. Integrated Operation of INL HYTEST System and High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Synthetic Natural Gas Production

    SciTech Connect

    Carl Marcel Stoots; Lee Shunn; James O'Brien

    2010-06-01

    The primary feedstock for synthetic fuel production is syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Current hydrogen production technologies rely upon fossil fuels and produce significant quantities of greenhouse gases as a byproduct. This is not a sustainable means of satisfying future hydrogen demands, given the current projections for conventional world oil production and future targets for carbon emissions. For the past six years, the Idaho National Laboratory has been investigating the use of high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) to produce the hydrogen feedstock required for synthetic fuel production. High-temperature electrolysis water-splitting technology, combined with non-carbon-emitting energy sources, can provide a sustainable, environmentally-friendly means of large-scale hydrogen production. Additionally, laboratory facilities are being developed at the INL for testing hybrid energy systems composed of several tightly-coupled chemical processes (HYTEST program). The first such test involved the coupling of HTSE, CO2 separation membrane, reverse shift reaction, and methanation reaction to demonstrate synthetic natural gas production from a feedstock of water and either CO or a simulated flue gas containing CO2. This paper will introduce the initial HTSE and HYTEST testing facilities, overall coupling of the technologies, testing results, and future plans.

  2. An integrated plant-life extension program for EBR-II (Experimental Breeder Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    An integrated plant-life extension program is being developed and implemented at EBR-II. The program plan has five primary areas of focus, and is structured to take advantage of inherent features of the liquid-metal-cooled reactor that give it potential for very long life. The program is centered around development and increased use of computer-based software systems for surveillance, diagnostics, prognostics, data handling, and knowledge transfer. Even though the program is only partially implemented, benefits are already being realized in the form of increased understanding of plant system status and performance due to development of diagnostic data-handling software for manipulation of plant sensor data, and improved force monitoring and protection of the remotely operated fuel handling system. The eventual integration of the elements of the program is a key feature that is expected to enhance the overall effectiveness of the program.

  3. Final Report - Assessment of Testing Options for the NTR at the INL

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Steven D; McLing, Travis L; McCurry, Michael; Plummer, Mitchell A

    2013-02-01

    One of the main technologies that can be developed to dramatically enhance the human exploration of space is the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR). Several studies over the past thirty years have shown that the NTR can reduce the cost of a lunar outpost, reduce the risk of a human mission to Mars, enable fast transits for most missions throughout the solar system, and reduce the cost and time for robotic probes to deep space. Three separate committees of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences have recommended that NASA develop the NTR. One of the primary issues in development of the NTR is the ability to verify a flight ready unit. Three main methods can be used to validate safe operation of a NTR: 1) Full power, full duration test in an above ground facility that scrubs the rocket exhaust clean of any fission products; 2) Full power , full duration test using the Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) technique to capture the exhaust in subsurface strata; 3) Test of the reactor fuel at temperature and power density in a driver reactor with subsequent first test of the fully integrated NTR in space. The first method, the above ground facility, has been studied in the past. The second method, SAFE, has been examined for application at the Nevada Test Site. The third method relies on the fact that the Nuclear Furnace series of tests in 1971 showed that the radioactive exhaust coming from graphite based fuel for the NTR could be completely scrubbed of fission products and the clean hydrogen flared into the atmosphere. Under funding from the MSFC, the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) at the Idaho National laboratory (INL) has completed a reexamination of Methods 2 and 3 for implementation at the INL site. In short, the effort performed the following: 1) Assess the geology of the INL site and determine a location suitable SAFE testing; 2) Perform calculations of gas transport throughout the geology; 3) Produce a cost estimate of a

  4. Promoting Resilience in Youth from Divorced Families: Lessons Learned from Experimental Trials of the New Beginnings Program

    PubMed Central

    Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Schenck, Clorinda E.; Sandler, Irwin N.

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the contributions that the program of research on the New Beginnings Program (NBP) has made to understanding pathways to resilience in youth who experience parental divorce. First, the research demonstrating that divorce increases risk for mental health, physical health and social adaptation problems is reviewed. Next, theory and research linking social environmental-level and youth-level modifiable risk factors and resilience resources to youth’s post-divorce adjustment are presented. The conceptual framework underlying the NBP and the risk factors and resilience resources targeted in this program are described next. The short-term and long-term results of two experimental, randomized efficacy trials of the NBP and moderators and mediators of its effects are then presented. Analyses that examine whether youth self-systems beliefs account for the links between program-induced changes in family-level resilience resources and positive long-term program on adaptation outcomes are presented and how experimental trials can be used to further theories of resilience for youth facing adversities is discussed. The final section describes directions for future research on the NBP. PMID:19807862

  5. The MIRTE Experimental Program: An Opportunity to Test Structural Materials in Various Configurations in Thermal Energy Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Leclaire, Nicolas; Le Dauphin, Francois-Xavier; Duhamel, Isabelle; Briggs, Blair; Piot, Jerome; Rennesson, Malvina; Laville, Arnaud

    2014-11-04

    The MIRTE (Materials in Interacting and Reflecting configurations, all Thicknesses) program was established to answer the needs of criticality safety practitioners in terms of experimental validation of structural materials and to possibly contribute to nuclear data improvement, which ultimately supports reactor safety analysis as well. MIRTE took the shape of a collaboration between the AREVA and ANDRA French industrialists and a noncommercial international funding partner such as the U.S. Department of Energy. The aim of this paper is to present the configurations of the MIRTE 1 and MIRTE 2 programs and to highlight the results of the titanium experiments recently published in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments.

  6. INL Site Executable Plan for Energy and Transportation Fuels Management

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest L. Fossum

    2008-11-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  7. The Magic Kingdom: A Preschool Screening Program. Experimental Edition - Third Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingold, William

    Described is the Magic Kingdom preschool screening program designed to provide an efficient, low cost, and comprehensive means for identifying children with special needs. Sections address the following program components: target population; definition of terms such as accomodations (facilities), admission ticket (preschool screening report), and…

  8. Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Summary of Experimental Impacts after Three Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Patrick; Gutmann, Babette; Puma, Michael; Kisida, Brian; Rizzo, Lou; Eissa, Nada

    2009-01-01

    The District of Columbia School Choice Incentive Act of 2003, passed by the Congress in January 2004, established the first federally funded, private school voucher program in the United States. The purpose of the new scholarship program is to provide low-income parents, particularly those whose children attend schools identified for improvement…

  9. Systematic Instruction for Retarded Children: The Illinois Program - Experimental Edition. Part II: Systematic Language Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawney, James W.; Hipsher, Lee Wright

    The teacher's manual on programed language instruction for trainable mentally handicapped children consists of curriculum of basic level vocabulary and teaching methods of small group instruction, reinforcement techniques, and specific learning principles. Distinctive features of the program are said to be: controlled language statements and…

  10. Workshop of the Experimental Project on Programmed Instruction in Asia. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    The present situation and future trends of programed learning in Ceylon, Republic of China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Republic of Viet-Nam are described by the Workshop participants. Some of the unique features of programed learning are examined with respect to the…

  11. A Guide to Establishing a Science/Mathematics Research Program in High School. Experimental.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Harvey; And Others

    This guide has been designed to help teachers, supervisors, and administrators set up a science or mathematics research program which should provide students with a set of basic "tools" for use in problem solving situations. The guide is organized into 17 chapters. The first 15 chapters focus on: organizing a research program; recruiting students;…

  12. Using a Quasi-Experimental Research Design to Assess Knowledge in Continuing Medical Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markert, Ronald J.; O'Neill, Sally C.; Bhatia, Subhash C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of continuing medical education (CME) programs include knowledge acquisition, skill development, clinical reasoning and decision making, and health care outcomes. We conducted a yearlong medical education research study in which knowledge acquisition in our CME programs was assessed. Method: A randomized…

  13. An Experimental Study Evaluating Professional Development Activities within a State Funded Pre-Kindergarten Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Susan H.; Swank, Paul R.; Anthony, Jason L.; Assel, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and evaluation for scaling up a comprehensive early childhood teacher professional development program into 11 communities across 2 years with funding through state legislative actions. The comprehensive program had four major components based on results from a previous multi-condition random assignment…

  14. The Controls-Structures Interaction Guest Investigator Program - An overview and phase I experimental results. [for flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith-Taylor, Rudeen; Tanner, Sharon E.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator program is described in terms of its support of the development of CSI technologies. The program is based on the introduction of CSI researchers from industry and academia to available test facilities for experimental validation of technologies and methods. Phase I experimental results are reviewed with attention given to their use of the Mini-MAST test facility and the facility for the Advance Control Evaluation of Structures. Experiments were conducted regarding: collocated/noncollocated controllers, nonlinear math modeling, controller design, passive/active suspension systems design, and system identification and fault isolation. The results demonstrate that significantly enhanced performance from the control techniques can be achieved by integrating knowledge of the structural dynamics under consideration into the approaches.

  15. An overview of prechronic and chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity experimental study designs and criteria used by the National Toxicology Program.

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, R S; Huff, J E; Schwetz, B S; Selkirk, J

    1990-01-01

    Since the establishment of the National Toxicology Program (NTP), there have been gradual changes in strategies to evaluate the overall toxicity of chemicals as well as their carcinogenic potential. The spectrum of toxicologic information sought on selected chemicals has been broadened by the multidisciplinary approach to evaluating chemicals. This paper describes the scientific rationale and experimental processes used by NTP in designing studies. Also, an outline of current NTP protocols are given for prechronic and chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity studies. PMID:2205492

  16. Experimental assessment of a computer program used in Space Shuttle orbiter entry heating analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. L.; Hudgins, J.

    1983-01-01

    A high temperature reusable surface insulation (HRSI) tile taken from the Space Shuttle orbiter was subjected to a nominal heating rate of 60 kW/sq m in the laboratory. The surface temperature response to this heating was measured and used as input to a computer program which computed the applied heating rate. The program is part of a software system that is used to infer convective heating rates to the orbiter thermal protection system during entry. The measured and computed heating rates are compared. Results confirm the applicability of this program to the determination of flight heat transfer rates from flight measured surface temperature data.

  17. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. L. Jolley

    2006-07-27

    On November 9, 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality approved the Record of Decision Experimental Breeder Reactor-I/Boiling Water Reactor Experiment Area and Miscellaneous Sites, which requires a Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan for the then Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory). This document, first issued in June 2004, fulfilled that requirement. The revision is needed to provide an update as remedial actions are completed and new areas of concern are found. This Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan is based on guidance in the May 3, 1999, EPA Region 10 Final Policy on the Use of Institutional Controls at Federal Facilities; the September 29, 2000, EPA guidance Institutional Controls: A Site Manager's Guide to Identifying, Evaluating, and Selecting Institutional Controls at Superfund and RCRA Corrective Action Cleanups; and the April 9, 2003, DOE Policy 454.1, "Use of Institutional Controls." These policies establish measures that ensure short- and long-term effectiveness of institutional controls that protect human health and the environment at federal facility sites undergoing remedial action pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and/or corrective action pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The site-specific institutional controls currently in place at the Idaho National Laboratory are documented in this Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan. This plan is being updated, along with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Comprehensive Facilities and Land Use Plan, to reflect the progress of remedial activities and changes in CERCLA sites.

  18. INVESTIGATION OF NEW TECHNIQUES FOR CONTROL OF SMELTER ARSENIC BEARING WASTES. VOLUME I: EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1976, the Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory at Cincinnati sponsored a research program at the Mineral Research Center, Montana Tech Alumni Foundation, to investigate a variety of approaches to the fixation of arsenic bearing wastes, particularly smelter flue dusts, ...

  19. OSMOSE an experimental program for improving neutronic predictions of advanced nuclear fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R. T.; Aliberti, G.; Zhong, Z.; Graczyk, D.; Loussi, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Commissariat a l Energie Atomique

    2007-10-18

    This report describes the technical results of tasks and activities conducted in FY07 to support the DOE-CEA collaboration on the OSMOSE program. The activities are divided into five high-level tasks: reactor modeling and pre-experiment analysis, sample fabrication and analysis, reactor experiments, data treatment and analysis, and assessment for relevance to high priority advanced reactor programs (such as GNEP and Gen-IV).

  20. Quantitative Assessment of Detection Frequency for the INL Ambient Air Monitoring Network

    SciTech Connect

    A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

    2014-11-01

    A quantitative assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) air monitoring network was performed using frequency of detection as the performance metric. The INL air monitoring network consists of 37 low-volume air samplers in 31 different locations. Twenty of the samplers are located on INL (onsite) and 17 are located off INL (offsite). Detection frequencies were calculated using both BEA and ESER laboratory minimum detectable activity (MDA) levels. The CALPUFF Lagrangian puff dispersion model, coupled with 1 year of meteorological data, was used to calculate time-integrated concentrations at sampler locations for a 1-hour release of unit activity (1 Ci) for every hour of the year. The unit-activity time-integrated concentration (TICu) values were calculated at all samplers for releases from eight INL facilities. The TICu values were then scaled and integrated for a given release quantity and release duration. All facilities modeled a ground-level release emanating either from the center of the facility or at a point where significant emissions are possible. In addition to ground-level releases, three existing stacks at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, and Material and Fuels Complex were also modeled. Meteorological data from the 35 stations comprising the INL Mesonet network, data from the Idaho Falls Regional airport, upper air data from the Boise airport, and three-dimensional gridded data from the weather research forecasting model were used for modeling. Three representative radionuclides identified as key radionuclides in INL’s annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants evaluations were considered for the frequency of detection analysis: Cs-137 (beta-gamma emitter), Pu-239 (alpha emitter), and Sr-90 (beta emitter). Source-specific release quantities were calculated for each radionuclide, such that the maximum inhalation dose at any publicly accessible sampler or the National

  1. Intermediate experimental vehicle, ESA program aerodynamics-aerothermodynamics key technologies for spacecraft design and successful flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutheil, Sylvain; Pibarot, Julien; Tran, Dac; Vallee, Jean-Jacques; Tribot, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of placing Europe among the world's space players in the strategic area of atmospheric re-entry, several studies on experimental vehicle concepts and improvements of critical re-entry technologies have paved the way for the flight of an experimental space craft. The successful flight of the Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV), under ESA's Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP), is definitively a significant step forward from the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator flight (1998), establishing Europe as a key player in this field. The IXV project objectives were the design, development, manufacture and ground and flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled reentry system, which is highly flexible and maneuverable. The paper presents, the role of aerodynamics aerothermodynamics as part of the key technologies for designing an atmospheric re-entry spacecraft and securing a successful flight.

  2. INL Active Interrogation Testing In Support of the GNEP Safeguards Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester

    2008-04-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. Work at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in the area of active interrogation, using neutron and photon sources, has been under way for many years to develop methods for detecting and quantifying nuclear material for national and homeland security research areas. This research knowledge base is now being extended to address nuclear safeguards and process monitoring issues related to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). As a first step in this area preliminary scoping studies have been performed to investigate the usefulness of using active neutron interrogation, with a low-power electronic neutron generator, to assay Department of Transportation 6M shipping drums containing uranium oxide fuel rodlets from INL’s zero power physics reactor. Using the paired-counting technique during the die-away time period of interrogation, a lower detection limit of approximately 4.2 grams of enriched uranium (40% 235U) was calculated for a 40 minute measurement using a field portable 2.5 MeV neutron source and an array of 16 moderated helium-3 neutron tubes. Future work in this area, including the use of a more powerful neutron source and a better tailored detector array, would likely improve this limit to a much lower level. Further development work at INL will explore the applicability of active interrogation in association with the nuclear safeguards and process monitoring needs of the advanced GNEP facilities under consideration. This work, which will include both analyses and field demonstrations, will be performed in collaboration with colleagues at INL and elsewhere that have expertise in nuclear fuel reprocessing as well as active interrogation and its use for nuclear material analyses.

  3. FY-12 INL KR CAPTURE ACTIVITIES SUPPORTING THE OFF-GAS SIGMA TEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D Law

    2012-08-01

    Tasks performed this year by INL Kr capture off-gas team members can be segregated into three separate task sub-sections which include: 1) The development and testing of a new engineered form sorbent, 2) An initial NDA gamma scan effort performed on the drum containing the Legacy Kr-85 sample materials, and 3) Collaborative research efforts with PNNL involving the testing of the Ni-DOBDC MOF and an initial attempt to make powdered chalcogel material into an engineered form using our binding process. This document describes the routes to success for the three task sub-sections.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF VIDEO-TAPING PROCEDURES IN AN EXPERIMENTAL READING PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHWARTZ-LITTMANN, CAROLE

    THE EXPERIMENTAL USE OF VIDEO AND TAPE RECORDINGS IN TEACHING THREE NEUROLOGICALLY DISABLED BOYS AGED 8, 9, AND 10 TO READ IS REPORTED. EXPERIENCE CHARTS WERE USED TO PRESENT BOTH UNCONTROLLED AND CONTROLLED VOCABULARY. THREE SPACES VIDEO-TAPED DEMONSTRATIONS WITH THE CHILDREN WERE USED TO DIAGNOSE PROGRESS AND AS MOTIVATIONAL DEVICES. THE…

  5. SELECTIVE DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION IN PRACTICE, SURVEY OF OPERATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL SDI PROGRAMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOWNIE, CURRIE S.; HOSHOVSKY, ALEXANDER G.

    AN OVERVIEW OF THE OPERATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEMS ESTABLISHED FOR THE SELECTIVE DISSEMINATION OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION (SDI) IS PRESENTED. AN ATTEMPT HAS ALSO BEEN MADE TO IDENTIFY THE TRENDS WHICH MAY SHAPE THE FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SELECTIVE DISSEMINATION PROCEDURES. THE REPORT IS BASED IN PART ON THE EXISTING SDI…

  6. Social cohesion through football: a quasi-experimental mixed methods design to evaluate a complex health promotion program

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Social isolation and disengagement fragments local communities. Evidence indicates that refugee families are highly vulnerable to social isolation in their countries of resettlement. Research to identify approaches to best address this is needed. Football United is a program that aims to foster social inclusion and cohesion in areas with high refugee settlement in New South Wales, Australia, through skills and leadership development, mentoring, and the creation of links with local community and corporate leaders and organisations. The Social Cohesion through Football study's broad goal is to examine the implementation of a complex health promotion program, and to analyse the processes involved in program implementation. The study will consider program impact on individual health and wellbeing, social inclusion and cohesion, as well as analyse how the program by necessity interacts and adapts to context during implementation, a concept we refer to as plasticity. The proposed study will be the first prospective cohort impact study to our knowledge to assess the impact of a comprehensive integrated program using football as a vehicle for fostering social inclusion and cohesion in communities with high refugee settlement. Methods/design A quasi-experimental cohort study design with treatment partitioning involving four study sites. The study employs a 'dose response' model, comparing those with no involvement in the Football United program with those with lower or higher levels of participation. A range of qualitative and quantitative measures will be used in the study. Study participants' emotional well being, resilience, ethnic identity and other group orientation, feelings of social inclusion and belonging will be measured using a survey instrument complemented by relevant data drawn from in-depth interviews, self reporting measures and participant observation. The views of key informants from the program and the wider community will also be solicited. Discussion

  7. Far from Home: An Experimental Evaluation of the Mother-Child Home Program in Bermuda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarr, Sandra; McCartney, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    Effects of the Mother-Child Home Program (MCHP) were evaluated with a broad range of measures on cognition, social behavior, and emotion. Findings indicated that children in Bermuda scored above U.S. norms on cognitive tests and were functioning well in the preschool period. The MCHP had few demonstrable effects on any segment of the sample. (RH)

  8. An Analysis of the Sensitivity of Quasi-Experimental Net Impact Estimates of CETA Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Katherine P.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Net impact estimates of Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) programs vary widely and can be explained by the different evaluation methodologies used. Estimates are sensitive to the inclusion of recently unemployed persons in the comparison sample and assumptions about the time of decision to enroll in CETA. (GDC)

  9. An Experimental Model for Clinical Experiences: A Social Studies Preservice Preparation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shive, R. Jerrald

    1988-01-01

    Reviews recent research which indicates the need for a variety of field-based learning experiences which are closely integrated with teacher preparation. Examines a program at the University of Iowa (Ames) in which the social studies methods course was moved to a high school so that students observed high school classes and received instruction…

  10. Scientific Inquiry Training for High School Students: Experimental Evaluation of a Model Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Kenneth D.

    1978-01-01

    Fifty-nine secondary school physics students were assigned to treatment groups: (1) Project Physics units, (2) Project Physics and verbal learning unit, and (3) a training program in scientific inquiry. Posttest results revealed that, on most aspects of a science inquiry test, treatments 2 and 3 had significantly greater effect on achievement than…

  11. Experimental Use of A Programming Language (APL) at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creveling, Cyrus J., Ed.

    This document explains A Programming Language (APL) and describes the experiment that the Information Processing Division has undertaken to introduce APL to the Goddard Scientific Community. A brief historical sketch of steps taken to date is included and appendices giving illustrative examples of how APL actually has been used at the Goddard…

  12. The Development and Assessment of an Experimental Teacher Training Program for Beginning Graduate Assistants in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Michael D.

    In this study a training program for new teaching assistants in freshman chemistry was developed and assessed. All new assistants in the Freshman Division were assigned by a stratified random technique to either the control or treatment group, with the latter receiving inservice training in the skills of teaching recitation classes. This training…

  13. Pattern of Plagiarism in Novice Students' Generated Programs: An Experimental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmadzadeh, Marzieh; Mahmoudabadi, Elham; Khodadadi, Farzad

    2011-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence shows that in computer programming courses plagiarism is a widespread problem. With the growing number of students in such courses, manual plagiarism detection is impractical. This requires instructors to use one of the many available plagiarism detection tools. Prior to choosing one of such tools, a metric that assures the…

  14. Views of South African Chemistry Students in University Bridging Programs on the Reliability of Experimental Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dlamini, Betty; Rollnick, Marissa; Lotz, Sandra; Lubben, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Reports on an investigation of the status of procedural knowledge in chemistry among students entering into bridging programs at two South African universities. Findings show that students overall tend to repeat in order to get a recurring reading. Very few students were able to use a line of best fit for a set of graphical data. Discusses…

  15. An Experimental Program in Vocational Education at the Elementary School Level. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Robert E.

    A one-year study evaluated the Human Development Program, or "Magic Circle," a project (conducted in the Tuscaloosa County (Alabama) School District) designed to explore student concerns and ideas in the areas of awareness, mastery, and social interaction and consisting of daily twenty-minute classroom meetings of teacher and pupils in a circular…

  16. An Experimental Juvenile Probation Program: Effects on Parent and Peer Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brank, Eve; Lane, Jodi; Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to provide a wider range of services to youth and their families than is traditionally available in routine probation, the South Oxnard Challenge Project (SOCP) employed a team approach to service delivery of an intensive probation program. The researchers interviewed juveniles who were randomly assigned to either the SOCP…

  17. Effects of a Computer-Assisted-Instruction Program in a Prison Setting: An Experimental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelder, John Stuart; Rachal, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A study to determine the extent of differences between inmates who used computer-assisted instruction and those who received traditional instruction in a prison education program found no differences in posttest scores. Possible explanations included attitudes toward testing, motivation, teacher support, dynamics of prison culture, and software…

  18. High School PREP: Thematic Planning, Fall '83. Preparation for Raising Educational Performance. [HS PREP Experimental Program].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This is a handbook designed for carrying out the goals and objectives of Preparation for Raising Educational Performance (PREP), a thematic, remedial program for ninth graders in New York City public schools. The lessons presented in the handbook model an approach to learning which follows the patterns of actual language development: listening,…

  19. After Action Report:Idaho National Laboratory (INL) 2014 Multiple Facility Beyond Design Basis (BDBE) Evaluated Drill October 21, 2014

    SciTech Connect

    V. Scott Barnes

    2014-12-01

    On October 21, 2014, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in coordination with local jurisdictions, and Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) conducted an evaluated drill to demonstrate the ability to implement the requirements of DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System” when responding to a beyond design basis event (BDBE) scenario as outlined in the Office of Health, Safety, and Security Operating Experience Level 1 letter (OE-1: 2013-01). The INL contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA), in coordination with CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI), and Idaho Treatment Group LLC (ITG), successfully demonstrated appropriate response measures to mitigate a BDBE event that would impact multiple facilities across the INL while protecting the health and safety of personnel, the environment, and property. Offsite response organizations participated to demonstrate appropriate response measures.

  20. Optimal trajectories for flexible-link manipulator slewing using recursive quadratic programming: Experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Eisler, G.R.; Feddema, J.T.

    1994-09-01

    Procedures for trajectory planning and control of flexible link robots are becoming increasingly important to satisfy performance requirements of hazardous waste removal efforts. It has been shown that utilizing link flexibility in designing open loop joint commands can result in improved performance as opposed to damping vibration throughout a trajectory. The efficient use of link compliance is exploited in this work. Specifically, experimental verification of minimum time, straight line tracking using a two-link planar flexible robot is presented. A numerical optimization process, using an experimentally verified modal model, is used for obtaining minimum time joint torque and angle histories. The optimal joint states are used as commands to the proportional-derivative servo actuated joints. These commands are precompensated for the nonnegligible joint servo actuator dynamics. Using the precompensated joint commands, the optimal joint angles are tracked with such fidelity that the tip tracking error is less than 2.5 cm.

  1. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program]. [Purdue Univ. , West Lafayette, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac[endash]Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  2. A linear programming approach to characterizing norm bounded uncertainty from experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheid, R. E.; Bayard, D. S.; Yam, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The linear programming spectral overbounding and factorization (LPSOF) algorithm, an algorithm for finding a minimum phase transfer function of specified order whose magnitude tightly overbounds a specified nonparametric function of frequency, is introduced. This method has direct application to transforming nonparametric uncertainty bounds (available from system identification experiments) into parametric representations required for modern robust control design software (i.e., a minimum-phase transfer function multiplied by a norm-bounded perturbation).

  3. Photon attenuation coefficients of Heavy-Metal Oxide glasses by MCNP code, XCOM program and experimental data: A comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Khayatt, A. M.; Ali, A. M.; Singh, Vishwanath P.

    2014-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients, μ/ρ, total interaction cross-section, σt, and mean free path (MFP) of some Heavy Metal Oxides (HMO) glasses, with potential applications as gamma ray shielding materials, have been investigated using the MCNP-4C code. Appreciable variations are noted for all parameters by changing the photon energy and the chemical composition of HMO glasses. The numerical simulations parameters are compared with experimental data wherever possible. Comparisons are also made with predictions from the XCOM program in the energy region from 1 keV to 100 MeV. Good agreement noticed indicates that the chosen Monte Carlo method may be employed to make additional calculations on the photon attenuation characteristics of different glass systems, a capability particularly useful in cases where no analogous experimental data exist.

  4. Local Neutron Flux Distribution Measurements by Wire-Dosimetry in the AMMON Experimental Program in the EOLE Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruel, A.; Di Salvo, J.; Roche, A.; Girard, J.-M.; Philibert, H.; Bonora, J.; Ledoux, J.-F.; Morel, C.; Lecluze, A.; Foucras, A.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Colombier, A.-C.

    2016-02-01

    Dosimetry measurements were carried out during the AMMON experimental program, in the EOLE facility. Al-0.1 wt% Au wires were positioned along curved fuel plates of JHR-type assemblies to investigate the azimuthal and axial gold capture rate profiles, directly linked to the thermal and epithermal flux. After irradiation, wires were cut into small segments (a few mm), and the gold capture rate of each part was measured by gamma spectrometry on the MADERE platform. This paper presents results in the "hafnium" configuration, and more specifically the azimuthal flux profile characterization. The final uncertainty on each measured wire lies below 1% (at 2 standard deviations). Experimental profiles are in a good agreement against Monte Carlo calculations, and the 4% capture rate increase at the plate edge is well observed. The flux dissymmetry due to assembly position in the core is also measured, and shows a 10% discrepancy between the two edges of the plate.

  5. The Efficacy of a Family-Based Intervention Program on Childhood Obesity: A Quasi-Experimental Design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ying; Kao, Chia-Chan; Hsu, Hsiu-Yueh; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Hsu, Shu-Hua

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to assess the efficacy of a family-based (FB) weight-loss and behavior-modification intervention among overweight/obese children (age 9-11 years) and their parents in Taiwan. The intervention group (52 child-parent dyads) participated in an FB program for 7 weeks. The control group (55 child-parent dyads) received an educational pamphlet about obesity prevention. The children's body mass index (BMI) z-scores were the primary outcome variable. The parents' BMI, high-calorie (HC) food-intake behaviors, screen-related behaviors, and restrictions on children's consumption of HC foods and screen-related behaviors and the availability of HC foods at home were the secondary outcome variables. Outcome variables were measured at baseline (T0), at the end of the intervention (T1), and 4 weeks after the end of the intervention (T2). A linear mixed model was used to assess the efficacy of the FB program. Results indicated that the children's BMI z-scores decreased significantly more from T0 to T2 in the experimental group than in the control group. The decreases in parents' HC food-intake behaviors and availability of HC foods at home and the increase in parental restrictions on children's consumption of HC foods were significantly greater in the experimental than in the control group from T0 to T1 and T0 to T2. The FB program was effective in modifying parental behaviors and the weight of overweight/obese children in a Taiwanese population. PMID:25589085

  6. An Overview of the Experimental 50-cm Laser Ramjet (X-50LR) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Franklin B.; Larson, C. William; Knecht, Sean D.

    2006-05-01

    In January 2001, the X-50LR program was initiated to scale the Lightcraft concept ultimately to a 50-cm focal diameter, and to launch a 50 cm, fully functional vehicle, into space in either a sounding rocket or suborbital trajectory by the end of FY 2009. The current work involves scaling from the 10-cm aluminum Lightcraft to a fully composite 25-cm laser ramjet vehicle (X-25LR). An overview and status of this program will be given in terms of the various efforts that support this development. These efforts will include testing at the High Energy Laser System Test Facility (HELSTF), New Mexico; some results of the laser launch system study by Flight Unlimited; supporting research by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR); the different facets of attitude control in a small business program with Polaris Sensors Technology; continuing development of a launch model at The Pennsylvania State University; and, the development of a thrust measurement technique, and the use of a "mini-thruster" for research with The University of Alabama, Huntsville in collaboration with the AFRL. This paper will be followed by a number of papers giving additional details of the efforts briefly overviewed in this presentation.

  7. Experimental Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing Wind Tunnel Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Florance, James R.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; DeMoss, Joshua; Silva, Walter A.; Panetta, Andrew; Lively, Peter; Tumwa, Vic

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) program is a cooperative effort among NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Boeing Company, encompassing flight testing, wind tunnel testing and analyses. The objective of the AAW program is to investigate the improvements that can be realized by exploiting aeroelastic characteristics, rather than viewing them as a detriment to vehicle performance and stability. To meet this objective, a wind tunnel model was crafted to duplicate the static aeroelastic behavior of the AAW flight vehicle. The model was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel in July and August 2004. The wind tunnel investigation served the program goal in three ways. First, the wind tunnel provided a benchmark for comparison with the flight vehicle and various levels of theoretical analyses. Second, it provided detailed insight highlighting the effects of individual parameters upon the aeroelastic response of the AAW vehicle. This parameter identification can then be used for future aeroelastic vehicle design guidance. Third, it provided data to validate scaling laws and their applicability with respect to statically scaled aeroelastic models.

  8. Valores, Creencias Y Objectivos: Base del programa de la Escuela Experimental P.K. Yonge. (Values, Beliefs and Objectives: The Basis of Experimental Schools P.K. Yonge's Program.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. Coll. of Education.

    The values, beliefs, and objectives that form the core of the program at the Experimental School P.K. Yonge in the University of Florida are presented in this paper which is written in Spanish. This experimental school serves approximately 900 students from grades one through twelve. The function of the school is to conduct research to solve…

  9. Capabilities of the INL ZPPR to Support Active Interrogation Research with SNM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, D. L.; Seabury, E. H.; Turnage, J. A.; Brush, B. A.; Perry, E. F.

    2009-03-01

    For over 40 years Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and its predecessor organizations have maintained and operated the Zero-Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) as a test bed for studying reactor physics and nuclear reactor design. Although ZPPR is no longer operated as an active research reactor, its infrastructure (radiation shielding, safety systems, physical safeguards) and special nuclear material (SNM) inventory (variably enriched uranium and plutonium fuels available in metallic, oxide, alloy, and other forms) still make the facility a unique national resource for research and development activities involving the use of SNM. Recently INL has utilized this resource to serve as a test and evaluation facility for active interrogation research and development. This facility is currently hosting scoping experiments using neutron and x-ray radiation sources to characterize SNM active interrogation signatures and to develop tools and techniques to detect and identify shielded SNM. This paper presents an overview of the facility's infrastructure and assets and describes recent active interrogation experiments that have taken place using high-energy x-ray sources and compact electronic neutron generators.

  10. Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at INL for ICP

    SciTech Connect

    J. Bradley Mason; Kevin Ryan; Scott Roesener; Michael Cowen; Duane Schmoker; Pat Bacala; Bill Landman

    2006-03-01

    The patented THOR® steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected as the technology of choice for treatment of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). SBW is an acidic tank waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at INL. It consists primarily of waste from decontamination activities and laboratory wastes. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, alkali and aluminum nitrates, with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium and strontium. The THOR® steam reforming process will convert the SBW tank waste feed into a dry, solid, granular product. The THOR® technology was selected to treat SBW, in part, because it can provide flexible disposal options to accommodate the final disposition path selected for SBW. THOR® can produce a final end-product that will meet anticipated requirements for disposal as Remote-Handled TRU (RH-TRU) waste; and, with modifications, THOR® can also produce a final endproduct that could be qualified for disposal as High Level Waste (HLW). SBW treatment will be take place within the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), a new facility that will be located at the INTEC. This paper provides an overview of the THOR® process chemistry and process equipment being designed for the IWTU.

  11. Capabilities of the INL ZPPR to Support Active Interrogation Research with SNM

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury; Jennifer A. Turnage; Bevin A. Brush; Eugene F. Perry

    2008-08-01

    For over 40 years Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and its predecessor organizations have maintained and operated the Zero-Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) as a test bed for studying reactor physics and nuclear reactor design. Although the ZPPR is no longer operated as an active research reactor, it’s infrastructure (radiation shielding, safety systems, physical safeguards) and special nuclear material (SNM) inventory (variably enriched uranium and plutonium fuels available in metallic, oxide, alloy, and other forms) still makes the facility a unique national resource for research and development activities involving the use of SNM. Recently INL has utilized this facility to serve as a test and evaluation facility for active interrogation research and development. This facility is currently hosting scoping experiments using neutron and x-ray radiation sources to characterize SNM active interrogation signatures and to develop tools and techniques to detect and identify shielded SNM. This paper presents an overview of the facility’s infrastructure and assets and describes recent active interrogation experiments that have taken place using high-energy x-ray sources and compact electronic neutron generators.

  12. Spike-train acquisition, analysis and real-time experimental control using a graphical programming language (LabView).

    PubMed

    Nordstrom, M A; Mapletoft, E A; Miles, T S

    1995-11-01

    A solution is described for the acquisition on a personal computer of standard pulses derived from neuronal discharge, measurement of neuronal discharge times, real-time control of stimulus delivery based on specified inter-pulse interval conditions in the neuronal spike train, and on-line display and analysis of the experimental data. The hardware consisted of an Apple Macintosh IIci computer and a plug-in card (National Instruments NB-MIO16) that supports A/D, D/A, digital I/O and timer functions. The software was written in the object-oriented graphical programming language LabView. Essential elements of the source code of the LabView program are presented and explained. The use of the system is demonstrated in an experiment in which the reflex responses to muscle stretch are assessed for a single motor unit in the human masseter muscle. PMID:8750090

  13. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, T.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary results of two projects in the development phase of reliable wind turbines designed to supply cost-competitive electrical energy were discussed. An experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are first reviewed. The results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs are also discussed. These studies predict wind energy costs of 1.5 to 7 cents per kW-h for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 per year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  14. Experimental results of a deflected thrust V/STOL nozzle research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burstadt, P. L.; Johns, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    Four deflected thrust nozzle concepts, designed to operate at the low pressure ratio typical of high bypass-ratio turbofan engines for medium speed (subsonic) V/STOL aircraft, were studied. Maps of overall performance characteristics and exit velocity distributions are used to highlight similarities and differences between the four concepts. Analytically determined secondary flows at the exit of a 90 deg circular pipe bend are compared with the experimental results from the more complex three dimensional geometries. The relative impact of total-pressure losses and secondary flows on nozzle thrust coefficient is addressed by numerical integration of exit velocity measurements. Previously announced in STAR as N83-25657

  15. Experimental results of a deflected thrust V/STOL nozzle research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burstadt, P. L.; Johns, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    Four deflected thrust nozzle concepts, designed to operate at the low pressure ratio typical of high bypass-ratio turbofan engines for medium speed (subsonic) V/STOL aircraft, were studied. Maps of overall performance characteristics and exit velocity distributions are used to highlight similarities and differences between the four concepts. Analytically determined secondary flows at the exit of a 90 deg circular pipe bend are compared with the experimental results from the more complex three dimensional geometries. The relative impact of total-pressure losses and secondary flows on nozzle thrust coefficient is addressed by numerical integration of exit velocity measurements.

  16. Engineering experimental program on the effects of near-space radiation on lithium doped solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results of an experimental evaluation of the real-time degradation characteristics of lithium-diffused silicon solar cells are reported. A strontium-90 radioisotope was used for simulation of a typical earth-orbital electron environment. The experiment was performed in an ion pump vacuum chamber with samples maintained at -50, +20, +50, and +80 C. Samples were illuminated during the 6-month exposure run with solar cell 1-5 characteristics measured periodically in situ. This 6-month exposure corresponded to a 1 MeV equivalent fluence of approximately 10 to the 14th power electrons/sq cm. Several types of lithium cells were irradiatied and compared directly with conventional N/P cells. The best lithium cells compared favorably with N/P cells, particularly at the higher test temperatures. With a slight improvement of initial performance characteristics, lithium cells appear feasible for 5 to 10 year missions at synchronous altitude. Based on the reported results and those of other irradiation experiments, lithium cells would appear to be superior to N/P cells in proton-dominated earth-orbital environments. Another important conclusion of the effort was that illuminated/loaded cells degrade more rapidly than do dark/unloaded cells. The irradiation experiment provided data of high quality with a high degree of confidence because of the experimental and statistical analysis techniques utilized.

  17. The experimental clean combustor program: Description and status to November 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    The generation of technology was studied for the development of advanced commercial CTOL aircraft engines with lower exhaust emissions than current aircraft. The program is in three phases. Phase 1, already completed, consisted of screening tests of low pollution combustor concepts. Phase 2, currently in progress, consists of test rig refinement of the most promising combustor concepts. Phase 2 test results are reported. Phase 3, also currently in progress, consists of incorporating and evaluating the best combustors as part of a complete engine. Engine test plans and pollution sampling techniques are described in this report. Program pollution goals, specified at engine idle and take-off conditions, are idle emission index value of 20 and 4 for carbon monoxide (CO) and total unburned hydrocarbons (THC), respectively, and at take-off are an oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission index level of 10 and a smoke number of 15. Pollution data were obtained at all engine operating conditions. Results are presented in terms of emission index and also in terms of the Environmental Protection Agency's 1979 Standards Parameter.

  18. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 1. [aircraft exhaust/gas analysis - gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Peduzzi, A.; Vitti, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A program of screening three low emission combustors for conventional takeoff and landing, by testing and analyzing thirty-two configurations is presented. Configurations were tested that met the emission goals at idle operating conditions for carbon monoxide and for unburned hydrocarbons (emission index values of 20 and 4, respectively). Configurations were also tested that met a smoke number goal of 15 at sea-level take-off conditions. None of the configurations met the goal for oxides of nitrogen emissions at sea-level take-off conditions. The best configurations demonstrated oxide of nitrogen emission levels that were approximately 61 percent lower than those produced by the JT9D-7 engine, but these levels were still approximately 24 percent above the goal of an emission index level of 10. Additional combustor performance characteristics, including lean blowout, exit temperature pattern factor and radial profile, pressure loss, altitude stability, and altitude relight characteristics were documented. The results indicate the need for significant improvement in the altitude stability and relight characteristics. In addition to the basic program for current aircraft engine combustors, seventeen combustor configurations were evaluated for advanced supersonic technology applications. The configurations were tested at cruise conditions, and a conceptual design was evolved.

  19. Theory and Experimental Program for p-B11 Fusion with the Dense Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Eric J.; Krupakar Murali, S.; Haboub, A.

    2011-10-01

    Lawrenceville Plasma Physics Inc. has initiated a 2-year-long experimental project to test the scientific feasibility of achieving controlled fusion using the dense plasma focus (DPF) device with hydrogen-boron (p-B11) fuel. The goals of the experiment are: first, to confirm the achievement of high ion and electron energies observed in previous experiments from 2001; second, to greatly increase the efficiency of energy transfer into the plasmoid where the fusion reactions take place; third, to achieve the high magnetic fields (>1 GG) needed for the quantum magnetic field effect, which will reduce cooling of the plasma by X-ray emission; and finally, to use p-B11 fuel to demonstrate net energy gain. The experiments are being conducted with a newly constructed dense plasma focus in Middlesex, NJ which is expected to generate peak currents in excess of 2 MA. Some preliminary results are reported.

  20. Experimental instrumentation system for the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, William H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive optics are used in telescopes for both viewing objects with minimum distortion and for transmitting laser beams with minimum beam divergence and dance. In order to test concepts on a smaller scale, NASA MSFC is in the process of setting up an adaptive optics test facility with precision (fraction of wavelengths) measurement equipment. The initial system under test is the adaptive optical telescope called PAMELA (Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture). Goals of this test are: assessment of test hardware specifications for PAMELA application and the determination of the sensitivities of instruments for measuring PAMELA (and other adaptive optical telescopes) imperfections; evaluation of the PAMELA system integration effort and test progress and recommended actions to enhance these activities; and development of concepts and prototypes of experimental apparatuses for PAMELA.

  1. Study and design of cryogenic propellant acquisition systems. Volume 2: Supporting experimental program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burge, G. W.; Blackmon, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Areas of cryogenic fuel systems were identified where critical experimental information was needed either to define a design criteria or to establish the feasibility of a design concept or a critical aspect of a particular design. Such data requirements fell into three broad categories: (1) basic surface tension screen characteristics; (2) screen acquisition device fabrication problems; and (3) screen surface tension device operational failure modes. To explore these problems and to establish design criteria where possible, extensive laboratory or bench test scale experiments were conducted. In general, these proved to be quite successful and, in many instances, the test results were directly used in the system design analyses and development. In some cases, particularly those relating to operational-type problems, areas requiring future research were identified, especially screen heat transfer and vibrational effects.

  2. Experimental program for the evaluation of turbofan/turboshaft c conversion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, J. G.; Wenzel, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    A TF34 turbofan engine is being modified to produce shaft power from an output coupling on the fan disk when variable inlet guide vanes are closed to reduce fan airflow. The engine, called a convertible engine, could be used on advanced rotorcraft such as X-wing, ABC (Advanced Blade Concept), and Folding Tilt Rotor, and on V/STOL craft in which two engines are cross-coupled. The engine will be tested on an outdoor static test stand at NASA Lewis Research Center. Steady-state tests will be made to measure performance in turbofan, turboshaft, and combined power output modes. Transient tests will be made to determine the response to the engine and a new digital engine control system for several types of rapid changes in thrust and shaft loads. The paper describes the engine modifications, the test facility equipment, proposed testing techniques for several types of tests, and typical test results predicted from engine performance computer programs.

  3. The Super-BigBite Experimental Program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab for the 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Riordan, Seamus

    2009-04-01

    A series of approved nucleon structure experiments that utilize a new spectrometer called Super-BigBite for Je erson Lab experimental Hall A after the 12 GeV upgrade will be presented. These experiments will obtain unprecedented measurements of the internal quark structure of nucleons by measuring the three electromagnetic form factors, GpE, GnE, and GnM, and the single-spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized 3He nucleus. At the core of these experiments is the Super-BigBite spectrometer, a non-focusing large angular and momentum acceptance spectrometer that is designed to operate in environments of high luminosity up to ~ 10^38 Hz=cm2 and to be highly reconfigurable to meet a wide range of experimental needs. The large acceptance of the spectrometer allows for these experiments to obtain statistical precisions comparable to or better than previous measurements. This also allows for the form factor measurements to be carried out to unprecedentedly high Q2. An overview the upcoming experimental program goals and hardware in development will be presented.

  4. An integrated experimental program to understanding leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites across scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarens, A. F.; Wang, S.; Liang, B.; Peters, C. A.; Fitts, J. P.; Deng, H.; Ellis, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    Leakage from the deep saline aquifers targeted in geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is difficult to study because of heterogeneities in the structure and chemical composition of the subsurface along with the characteristically large length scales and resulting phase changes that are involved. The chemical and physical processes that govern the buoyancy driven flow of CO2 are important to understand because leakage could undermine the nominal goal of GCS to keep CO2 out of the atmosphere. Here we report on a partnership between Princeton and the University of Virginia (UVa) to study these processes experimentally across multiple length scales in both porous media and fractured caprocks. Experiments span length scales from microns to meters, and the processes studied range from geochemical reactions to the physics of flow. In this presentation, we summarize the suite of experiments that are underway and present recent findings. We seek to demonstrate that this coordinated, multi-disciplinary, multi-scale research collaboration will lead to improved understanding of the fundamental processes that may control the permanence of stored CO2. At UVa, the aim has been to characterize the interfacial properties that will impact buoyancy driven flows in porous media. Contact angle experiments at the CO2-brine-mineral interface have been carried out on silica, carbonate and clay minerals. These results will be used to inform how mineral heterogeneity influences multiphase buoyant flow through sandstones in which pore surfaces are frequently coated by diagenetic clays. Although all minerals are water wetting, the pH point of zero charge was found to be a good predictor of maximum wetting for a solid surface. When the CO2 was not in equilibrium with the brine, hysteric effects were observed as CO2 dissolved into the bulk fluid. Some of this is associated with contact line pinning on certain surfaces that may be driven by salt precipitation near the phase interface. Contact

  5. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III results

  6. Jamie's Ministry of Food: Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of Immediate and Sustained Impacts of a Cooking Skills Program in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Flego, Anna; Herbert, Jessica; Waters, Elizabeth; Gibbs, Lisa; Swinburn, Boyd; Reynolds, John; Moodie, Marj

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the immediate and sustained effectiveness of the first Jamie's Ministry of Food Program in Australia on individuals' cooking confidence and positive cooking/eating behaviours. Methods A quasi- experimental repeated measures design was used incorporating a wait-list control group. A questionnaire was developed and administered at baseline (T1), immediately post program (T2) and 6 months post completion (T3) for participants allocated to the intervention group, while wait -list controls completed it 10 weeks prior to program commencement (T1) and just before program commencement (T2). The questionnaire measured: participants' confidence to cook, the frequency of cooking from basic ingredients, and consumption of vegetables, vegetables with the main meal, fruit, ready-made meals and takeaway. Analysis used a linear mixed model approach for repeated measures using all available data to determine mean differences within and between groups over time. Subjects All adult participants (≥18 years) who registered and subsequently participated in the program in Ipswich, Queensland, between late November 2011- December 2013, were invited to participate. Results In the intervention group: 694 completed T1, 383 completed T1 and T2 and 214 completed T1, T2 and T3 assessments. In the wait-list group: 237 completed T1 and 149 completed T1 and T2 assessments. Statistically significant increases within the intervention group (P<0.001) and significant group*time interaction effects (P<0.001) were found in all cooking confidence measures between T1 and T2 as well as cooking from basic ingredients, frequency of eating vegetables with the main meal and daily vegetable intake (0.52 serves/day increase). Statistically significant increases at T2 were sustained at 6 months post program in the intervention group. Conclusions Jamie's Ministry of Food Program, Australia improved individuals' cooking confidence and cooking/eating behaviours contributing to a healthier

  7. Cockpit Interruptions and Distractions: An Analysis of ASRS Reports and an Experimental Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismukes, R. K.; Young, Grant E.; Connors, Mary (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A recent detailed analysis of 107 ASRS incident reports focusing on interruptions and distractions as their primary feature revealed several interesting and surprising findings. Of those tasks that were interfered with, over 40% fell within the category of monitoring; for example, monitoring the autopilot flying the aircraft, monitoring the pilot flying, or monitoring the altimeter or navigation instruments for future action. Surprisingly, over 60% of the tasks that were considered distractions fell under the broad category of communication or conversation. Using these findings, we have developed an experimental paradigm that will help us understand the method by which pilots perform certain monitoring tasks. Specifically, we hope to determine the degree to which pilots rely on internal time mechanisms versus external cues as a means of successfully completing a monitoring task. In addition, we will incorporate a battery of competing aviation type tasks, including communication, to see how these tasks affect the process of monitoring. The long range goal of this research is to find operational solutions that facilitate effective monitoring in the presence of both sudden interruptions and distractions that lead to unintended multiple tasks situations.

  8. Intermediate Experimental Vehicle, ESA Program Aerothermodynamics- Transition And Steps And Gaps Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verand, Jean-Luc; Pelissier, Christian; Sourgen, Frederic; Fontaine, Joelle; Garcon, Francois; Spel, Martin; van Hauwaert, Pierre; Charbonnier, Dominique; Vos, Jan; Vallee, Jean-Jacques; Pibarot, Julien; Tribot, Jean-Pierre; Mareschi, Vincenzo; Ferrarella, Daniella; Rufolo, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    The Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) project objectives are the design, development, manufacture and ground and flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re-entry system, which is highly flexible and manoeuvrable. The IXV vehicle is a flying test bed for securing the next step of operational space vehicle development by supporting technology demonstration and system concept through the following objectives: a) Aerothermodynamics b) Advanced In Flight Experiments c) Thermal Protection System d) Guidance Navigation and Control e) System design The assessment of the general aerothermodynamic environment of IXV vehicle is mainly performed considering a smooth simplified geometry. However, the thermal protection system of IXV includes a mono-block ceramic matrix composite nose and an assembly of shingles between which steps and gaps are generated. From an aerothermodynamic point of view, such a distributed roughness layout cannot be ignored in terms of modification of the interaction between the flow and the body. To assess this effect, dedicated Mach number 5.5 wind tunnel tests (ONERA, S3MA facility) and numerical simulations (RTECH and CFS Engineering) have been performed during the phase C2 of the project. The paper presents the general logic of the work, with emphasis on the wind tunnel model design, tests involving infrared thermal measurements as well as the CFD rebuilding of the flow in the wind tunnel and the extrapolation from ground-to-flight.

  9. Experimental active and passive dosimetry systems for the NASA Skylab program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, M. F.; Janni, J. F.; Ainsworth, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    Active and passive dosimetry instrumentation to measure absorbed dose, charged particle spectra, and linear energy transfer spectra inside the command module and orbital workshop on the Skylab program were developed and tested. The active dosimetry system consists of one integral unit employing both a tissue equivalent ionization chamber and silicon solid state detectors. The instrument measures dose rates from 0.2 millirad/hour to 25 rads/hour, linear energy transfer spectra from 2.8 to 42.4 Kev/micron, and the proton and alpha particle energy spectra from 0.5 to 75 Mev. The active dosimeter is equipped with a portable radiation sensor for use in astronaut on-body and spacecraft shielding surveys during passage of the Skylab through significant space radiations. Data are transmitted in real time or are recorded by onboard spacecraft tape recorder for rapid evaluation of the radiation levels. The passive dosimetry systems consist of twelve (12) hard-mounted assemblies, each containing a variety of passive radiation sensors which are recoverable at the end of the mission for analysis.

  10. Large Engine Technology Program. Task 21: Rich Burn Liner for Near Term Experimental Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hautman, D. J.; Padget, F. C.; Kwoka, D.; Siskind, K. S.; Lohmann, R. P.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the task reported herein, which was conducted as part of the NASA sponsored Large Engine Technology program, was to define and evaluate a near-term rich-zone liner construction based on currently available materials and fabrication processes for a Rich-Quench-Lean combustor. This liner must be capable of operation at the temperatures and pressures of simulated HSCT flight conditions but only needs sufficient durability for limited duration testing in combustor rigs and demonstrator engines in the near future. This must be achieved at realistic cooling airflow rates since the approach must not compromise the emissions, performance, and operability of the test combustors, relative to the product engine goals. The effort was initiated with an analytical screening of three different liner construction concepts. These included a full cylinder metallic liner and one with multiple segments of monolithic ceramic, both of which incorporated convective cooling on the external surface using combustor airflow that bypassed the rich zone. The third approach was a metallic platelet construction with internal convective cooling. These three metal liner/jacket combinations were tested in a modified version of an existing Rich-Quench-Lean combustor rig to obtain data for heat transfer model refinement and durability verification.

  11. [Experimental studies with mice on the program of the biosatellite BION-M1 mission].

    PubMed

    Andreev-Andrievsky, A A; Shenkman, B S; Popova, A S; Dolguikh, O N; Anokhin, K V; Soldatov, P E; Ilyin, E A; Sychev, V N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the BION-M1 project was laying the evidence and technological basis for addressing the medical issues of future remote space exploration missions by humans. The program of researches with the use of mice was focused on elicitation of cellular and molecular mechanisms of the muscular, cardiovascular and immune reactions to extended exposure in microgravity. The comprehensive studies combined lifetime measurements with investigations of mice tissues and cells by dint of the cutting-edge morphological, biochemical and molecular biology techniques. Males of mice C57/BL6 aged 4 to 5 months were chosen as the object of studies. They were distributed into the flight, ground control and two vivarium (laboratory control) groups and investigated immediately on return and after 7 days of readaptation. Some of the physiological functions were recorded throughout the flight. To ensure wellbeing of the animals in the experiments and to enhance data quality, prior to launch the mice were specially trained so as to accommodate to the group living, eating space food, and in-flight stress factors. Those of the mice that were designated for lifetime investigations were tested and received training pre-launch. PMID:25033610

  12. Experimental But Not Sex Differences of a Mental Rotation Training Program on Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rodán, Antonio; Contreras, María José; Elosúa, M Rosa; Gimeno, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of visuospatial processing in areas related to the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, where there is still a considerable gap in the area of sex differences, the interest in the effects of visuospatial skills training continues to grow. Therefore, we have evaluated the visuospatial improvement of adolescents after performing a computerized mental rotation training program, as well as the relationship of this visuospatial ability with other cognitive, emotional factors and those factors based on the experience with videogames. The study, which was performed on students aged 14 and 15 years old, showed a significant improvement in this visuospatial skill for a training group (n = 21) compared to a control group (n = 24). Furthermore, no significant sex differences were obtained for spatial ability or for any of the other tasks evaluated, either before or after training. Regarding the relationship between skills, a significant correlation between experience with video games and spatial ability was found, as well as between mathematical reasoning and intelligence and with spatial ability in the initial phase for the total sample. These findings are discussed from a cognitive point of view and within the current sociocultural context, where the equal use of new technologies could help reduce the visuospatial gap between sexes. PMID:27462290

  13. Experimental But Not Sex Differences of a Mental Rotation Training Program on Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Rodán, Antonio; Contreras, María José; Elosúa, M. Rosa; Gimeno, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of visuospatial processing in areas related to the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, where there is still a considerable gap in the area of sex differences, the interest in the effects of visuospatial skills training continues to grow. Therefore, we have evaluated the visuospatial improvement of adolescents after performing a computerized mental rotation training program, as well as the relationship of this visuospatial ability with other cognitive, emotional factors and those factors based on the experience with videogames. The study, which was performed on students aged 14 and 15 years old, showed a significant improvement in this visuospatial skill for a training group (n = 21) compared to a control group (n = 24). Furthermore, no significant sex differences were obtained for spatial ability or for any of the other tasks evaluated, either before or after training. Regarding the relationship between skills, a significant correlation between experience with video games and spatial ability was found, as well as between mathematical reasoning and intelligence and with spatial ability in the initial phase for the total sample. These findings are discussed from a cognitive point of view and within the current sociocultural context, where the equal use of new technologies could help reduce the visuospatial gap between sexes. PMID:27462290

  14. The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Experimental Programs and Software Advancing DOE’s Waste Disposal/Tank Closure Efforts – 15436

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Heather; Flach, Greg; Smith, Frank; Langton, Christine; Brown, Kevin; Mallick, Pramod

    2015-01-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Tank Waste Management-sponsored Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is chartered with providing the technical basis for implementing cement-based waste forms and radioactive waste containment structures for long-term disposal. DOE needs in this area include the following to support progress in final treatment and disposal of legacy waste and closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) tanks in the DOE complex: long-term performance predictions, flow sheet development and flow sheet enhancements, and conceptual designs for new disposal facilities. The DOE-EM Cementitious Barriers Partnership is producing software and experimental programs resulting in new methods and data needed for end-users involved with environmental cleanup and waste disposal. Both the modeling tools and the experimental data have already benefited the DOE sites in the areas of performance assessments by increasing confidence backed up with modeling support, leaching methods, and transport properties developed for actual DOE materials. In 2014, the CBP Partnership released the CBP Software Toolbox –“Version 2.0” which provides concrete degradation models for 1) sulfate attack, 2) carbonation, and 3) chloride initiated rebar corrosion, and includes constituent leaching. These models are applicable and can be used by both DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for service life and long-term performance evaluations and predictions of nuclear and radioactive waste containment structures across the DOE complex, including future SRS Saltstone and HLW tank performance assessments and special analyses, Hanford site HLW tank closure projects and other projects in which cementitious barriers are required, the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project which requires source terms from cementitious containment structures as input to their flow simulations, regulatory reviews of DOE performance

  15. Experimental test plan: USDOE/JAERI collaborative program for the coated particle fuel performance test

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, M.J.; Fukuda, K.

    1989-12-01

    This document describes the coated-particle fuel performance test agreed to under Annex 2 of the arrangement between the US Department of Energy and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on cooperation in research and development regarding high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The test will evaluate the behavior of reference fuel compacts containing coated-particle fuels fabricated according to the specifications for the US Modular HTGR and the Japanese High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) concepts. Two experimental capsules, HRB-21 and HRB-22, are being tested. Capsule HRB-21 contains only US reference fuel, and HRB-22 contains only JAERI reference fuel. Both capsules will be irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Capsule HRB-21 will be operated at a mean volumetric fuel temperature of 975{degrees}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 26% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) and a fast fluence of {le}4.5 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. Capsule HRB-22 will be operated at a mean centerline fuel temperature of 1250 to 1300{degrees}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 5.5% FIMA and a fast fluence of 1.7 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. Performance of the fuels during irradiation will be closely monitored using on-line fission gas surveillance. Following irradiation, both capsules will undergo detailed examinations and core heatup simulation testing. Results from in-reactor monitoring and postirradiation testing will be analyzed to comparatively assess US and Japanese coated-particle fuel performance. 3 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. High- and Low-Level Dissonance-Based Eating Disorder Prevention Programs with Young Women with Body Image Concerns: An Experimental Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Whitney; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: As cognitive dissonance is theorized to contribute to the effects of dissonance-based eating disorder prevention programs, we evaluated a high-dissonance version of this program against a low-dissonance version and a wait-list control condition to provide an experimental test of the mechanism of intervention effects. Method: Female…

  17. EFFECTS OF EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS IN MATHEMATICS ON RELEVANT ATTITUDES AND INTERESTS OF NINTH GRADE PUPILS AS MEASURED BY QUESTIONNAIRE INDICES. INTERIM REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RYAN, JAMES J.

    THIS INTERIM REPORT COVERS ONE PHASE OF A BROADER PROGRAM AIMED AT STUDYING THE EFFECTS OF THREE EXPERIMENTAL MATHEMATICS PROGRAMS IN NINTH-GRADE ALGEBRA--BALL STATE, THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL MATHEMATICS (UICSM), AND SCHOOL MATHEMATICS STUDY GROUP (SMSG)--ON THE ATTITUDES AND INTERESTS PUPILS DEVELOP TOWARD MATHEMATICS. THE…

  18. Problem Implementation as a Lever for Change: An Experimental Study of the Effects of a Professional Development Program on Students' Mathematics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santagata, Rossella; Kersting, Nicole; Givvin, Karen B.; Stigler, James W.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates, through an experimental design, the effectiveness of a professional development program on teacher knowledge and practices and on student learning. The program consisted of a series of video-based modules designed to respond to needs of U.S. teachers, as highlighted by findings from the 1999 Third International Mathematics…

  19. (Experimental development, testing and research work in support of the inertial confinement fusion program)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.; Luckhardt, R.; Terry, N.; Drake, D.; Gaines, J.

    1990-04-27

    This KMS Fusion Semi-Annual Technical Report covers the period October 1989 through March 1990. It contains a review of work performed by KMS Fusion, Inc. (KMSF), in support of the national program to achieve inertially confined fusion (ICF). A major section of the report is devoted to target technology, a field which is expected to play an increasingly important role in the overall KMSF fusion effort. Among the highlights of our efforts in this area covered in this report are: improvements and new developments in target fabrication techniques, including a discussion of techniques for introducing gaussian bumps and bands on target surfaces. Development of a single automated system for the interferometric characterization of transparent shells. Residual gas analysis of the blowing gases contained in glass shells made from xerogels. These usually include CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, and are objectionable because they dilute the fuel. Efforts to observe the ice layers formed in the {beta}-layering process in cryogenic targets, and to simulate the formation of these layers. In addition to our work on target technology, we conducted experiments with the Chroma laser and supported the ICF effort at other labs with theoretical and computational support as well as diagnostic development. Included in the work covered in this report are: experiments on Chroma to study interpenetration of and ionization balance in laser generated plasmas. Diagnostic development, including an optical probe for the Aurora laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a high energy x-ray continuum spectrograph for Aurora. Investigation of the radiation cooling instability as a possible mechanism for the generation of relatively cold, dense jets observed in ICF experiments.

  20. To Support Research Activities Under the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    2003-01-01

    The Alabama NASA EPSCoR Program is a collaborative venture of The Alabama Space Grant Consortium, The Alabama EPSCoR, and faculty and staff at 10 Alabama colleges and universities as well as the Alabama School of Math and Science in Mobile. There are two Research Clusters which include infrastructure-building and outreach elements embedded in their research activities. Each of the two Research Clusters is in an area of clear and demonstrable relevance to NASA's mission, to components of other Alabama EPSCoR projects, and to the State of Alabama's economic development. This Final Report summarizes and reports upon those additional activities occurring after the first report was submitted in March 2000 (included here as Appendix C). Since the nature of the activities and the manner in which they relate to one another differ by cluster, these clusters function independently and are summarized in parallel in this report. They do share a common administration by the Alabama Space Grant Consortium (ASGC) and by this means, good ideas from each group were communicated to the other, as appropriate. During the past year these research teams, involving 15 scientists, 16 graduate students, 16 undergraduates, and 7 high school students involving 10 Alabama universities had 14 peer reviewed scientific journal articles published, 21 others reviewed for publication or published in proceedings, gave 7 formal presentations and numerous informal presentations to well over 3000 people, received 3 patents and were awarded 14 research proposals for more than $213K dollars in additional research related to these investigations. Each cluster's activities are described and an Appendix summarizes these achievements.

  1. Passive and Active Radiation Measurements Capability at the INL Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Neibert; John Zabriskie; Collin Knight; James L. Jones

    2010-12-01

    The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility is a Department of Energy facility located in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex. It contains various nuclear and non-nuclear materials that are available to support many radiation measurement assessments. User-selected, single material, nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be readily utilized with ZPPR clamshell containers with almost no criticality concerns. If custom, multi-material configurations are desired, the ZPPR clamshell or an approved aluminum Inspection Object (IO) Box container may be utilized, yet each specific material configuration will require a criticality assessment. As an example of the specialized material configurations possible, the National Nuclear Security Agency’s Office of Nuclear Verification (NNSA/NA 243) has sponsored the assembly of six material configurations. These are shown in the Appendixes and have been designated for semi-permanent storage that can be available to support various radiation measurement applications.

  2. TRUEX Radiolysis Testing Using the INL Radiolysis Test Loop: FY-2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Richard D. Tillotson; Rocklan G. McDowell; Jack D. Law

    2012-09-01

    The INL radiolysis test loop has been used to evaluate the affect of radiolytic degradation upon the efficacy of the strip section of the TRUEX flowsheet for the recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from acidic solution. The nominal composition of the TRUEX solvent used in this study is 0.2 M CMPO and 1.4 M TBP dissolved in n-dodecane and the nominal composition of the TRUEX strip solution is 1.5 M lactic acid and 0.050 M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Gamma irradiation of a mixture of TRUEX process solvent and stripping solution in the test loop does not adversely impact flowsheet performance as measured by stripping americium ratios. The observed increase in americium stripping distribution ratios with increasing absorbed dose indicates the radiolytic production of organic soluble degradation compounds.

  3. Summary of TRUEX Radiolysis Testing Using the INL Radiolysis Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Rocklan G. McDowell; Gracy Elias; Jack D. Law

    2012-03-01

    The INL radiolysis and hydrolysis test loop has been used to evaluate the effects of hydrolytic and radiolytic degradation upon the efficacy of the TRUEX flowsheet for the recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from acidic solution. Repeated irradiation and subsequent re-conditioning cycles did result in a significant decrease in the concentration of the TBP and CMPO extractants in the TRUEX solvent and a corresponding decrease in americium and europium extraction distributions. However, the build-up of solvent degradation products upon {gamma}-irradiation, had little impact upon the efficiency of the stripping section of the TRUEX flowsheet. Operation of the TRUEX flowsheet would require careful monitoring to ensure extraction distributions are maintained at acceptable levels.

  4. Use of SUSA in Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for INL VHTR Coupled Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom

    2010-06-01

    The need for a defendable and systematic Uncertainty and Sensitivity approach that conforms to the Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) process, and that could be used for a wide variety of software codes, was defined in 2008.The GRS (Gesellschaft für Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit) company of Germany has developed one type of CSAU approach that is particularly well suited for legacy coupled core analysis codes, and a trial version of their commercial software product SUSA (Software for Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses) was acquired on May 12, 2010. This interim milestone report provides an overview of the current status of the implementation and testing of SUSA at the INL VHTR Project Office.

  5. Overview of recent experimental results from the DIII-D advanced tokamak program.

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K. H.

    2003-12-01

    The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last international atomic energy agency (IAEA) meeting, we have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) we have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, we have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {ge} 10 for 4{tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM); (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, we have stabilized the (m, n) = (3, 2) NTM and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) we have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2, 1) NTM in initial experiments; (5) we have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) we have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36{tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx_equal} as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. We have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and AT operating modes: (1) we have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, edge localized modes (ELM) heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25{tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiated power; (2) we have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet injection of noble gases; (3) we have found that the heat and particle fluxes to the inner strike points of balanced, double-null divertors are much

  6. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  7. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 1. Single tube uniformly heated tests: Part 1, Technical discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate flow instability in circular tubes under vertical down-flow conditions. The test section L/D ratio range was 86 to 270. The maximum test section surface heat flux was one million Btu/hr-ft{sup 2}. Over 1700 data points were obtained. The effect of flowrate, inlet temperature, exit pressure, and heat flux on the initiation of flow instability was determined. In addition, the data was used to evaluate various methods of predicting the onset of flow instability. Using the measured wall temperatures, surface temperatures and heat transfer coefficients have been obtained. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient along the tube under both single and two phase conditions were developed.

  8. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-05-01

    In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

  9. Integrated modeling and experimental programs to predict brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Beauheim, R.L.; Howarth, S.M.; Vaughn, P.; Webb, S.W.; Larson, K.W.

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation of the performance of the WIPP repository involves modeling of brine and gas flow in the host rocks of the Salado Formation, which consist of halite and anhydrite interbeds. Numerous physical, chemical, and structural processes, must be understood to perform this modeling. Gas generation within the repository is strongly coupled to the amount of brine inflow to the repository because brine aids in the corrosion of metals and associated generation of hydrogen gas. Increasing gas pressure in the repository decreases the rate of brine inflow. Ultimately, the gas pressure may exceed the brine pressure and gas may flow out of the repository. Relative-permeability curves and a correlation between threshold pressure and permeability taken from studies reported in the literature were used in PA models prior to being experimentally verified as appropriate for WIPP. In addition, interbed permeabilities were treated as constant and independent of effective stress in early models. Subsequently, the process of interbed fracturing (or fracture dilation) was recognized to limit gas pressures in the repository to values below lithostatic, and assumed (and unverified) relationships between porosity, permeability, and pore pressure were employed. Parameter-sensitivity studies performed using the simplified models identified important parameters for which site-specific data were needed. Unrealistic modeling results, such as room pressures substantially above lithostatic, showed the need to include additional processes in the models. Field and laboratory experimental programs have been initiated in conjunction with continued model development to provide information on important processes and parameters.

  10. Detecting and Removing Inconsistencies between Experimental Data and Signaling Network Topologies Using Integer Linear Programming on Interaction Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Leonidas G.; Klamt, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Cross-referencing experimental data with our current knowledge of signaling network topologies is one central goal of mathematical modeling of cellular signal transduction networks. We present a new methodology for data-driven interrogation and training of signaling networks. While most published methods for signaling network inference operate on Bayesian, Boolean, or ODE models, our approach uses integer linear programming (ILP) on interaction graphs to encode constraints on the qualitative behavior of the nodes. These constraints are posed by the network topology and their formulation as ILP allows us to predict the possible qualitative changes (up, down, no effect) of the activation levels of the nodes for a given stimulus. We provide four basic operations to detect and remove inconsistencies between measurements and predicted behavior: (i) find a topology-consistent explanation for responses of signaling nodes measured in a stimulus-response experiment (if none exists, find the closest explanation); (ii) determine a minimal set of nodes that need to be corrected to make an inconsistent scenario consistent; (iii) determine the optimal subgraph of the given network topology which can best reflect measurements from a set of experimental scenarios; (iv) find possibly missing edges that would improve the consistency of the graph with respect to a set of experimental scenarios the most. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by interrogating a manually curated interaction graph model of EGFR/ErbB signaling against a library of high-throughput phosphoproteomic data measured in primary hepatocytes. Our methods detect interactions that are likely to be inactive in hepatocytes and provide suggestions for new interactions that, if included, would significantly improve the goodness of fit. Our framework is highly flexible and the underlying model requires only easily accessible biological knowledge. All related algorithms were implemented in a freely

  11. Characterization of mixed CH-TRU waste for the WIPP Experimental Test Program conducted at ANL-W

    SciTech Connect

    Dwight, C.C.; McClellan, G.C.; Guay, K.P. ); Courtney, J.C. ); Duff, M.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is participating in the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program by characterizing and repackaging mixed contact-handled transuranic waste. Characterization activities include gas sampling the waste containers, visually examining the waste contents, categorizing the contents according to their gas generation potentials, and weighing the contents. The waste is repackaged from 0.21m{sup 3} (55 gallon) drums into instrumented steel test bins which can hold up to six drum-equivalents in volume. Eventually the loaded test bins will be shipped to WIPP where they will be evaluated during a five-year test program. Three test bins of inorganic solids (primarily glass) were prepared between March and September 1991 and are ready for shipment to WIPP. The characterization activities confirmed process knowledge of the waste and verified the nondestructive examinations; the gas sample analyses showed the target constituents to be within allowable regulatory limits. A new waste characterization chamber is being developed at ANL-W which will improve worker safety, decrease the potential for contamination spread, and increase the waste characterization throughput. The new facility is expected to begin operations by Fall 1992. A comprehensive summary of the project is contained herein.

  12. Characterization of mixed CH-TRU waste for the WIPP Experimental Test Program conducted at ANL-W

    SciTech Connect

    Dwight, C.C.; McClellan, G.C.; Guay, K.P.; Courtney, J.C.; Duff, M.J.

    1992-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is participating in the Department of Energy`s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program by characterizing and repackaging mixed contact-handled transuranic waste. Characterization activities include gas sampling the waste containers, visually examining the waste contents, categorizing the contents according to their gas generation potentials, and weighing the contents. The waste is repackaged from 0.21m{sup 3} (55 gallon) drums into instrumented steel test bins which can hold up to six drum-equivalents in volume. Eventually the loaded test bins will be shipped to WIPP where they will be evaluated during a five-year test program. Three test bins of inorganic solids (primarily glass) were prepared between March and September 1991 and are ready for shipment to WIPP. The characterization activities confirmed process knowledge of the waste and verified the nondestructive examinations; the gas sample analyses showed the target constituents to be within allowable regulatory limits. A new waste characterization chamber is being developed at ANL-W which will improve worker safety, decrease the potential for contamination spread, and increase the waste characterization throughput. The new facility is expected to begin operations by Fall 1992. A comprehensive summary of the project is contained herein.

  13. A program for calculating expansion-tube flow quantities for real-gas mixtures and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1972-01-01

    A computer program written in FORTRAN 4 language is presented which determines expansion-tube flow quantities for real test gases CO2 N2, O2, Ar, He, and H2, or mixtures of these gases, in thermochemical equilibrium. The effects of dissociation and first and second ionization are included. Flow quantities behind the incident shock into the quiescent test gas are determined from the pressure and temperature of the quiescent test gas in conjunction with: (1) incident-shock velocity, (2) static pressure immediately behind the incident shock, or (3) pressure and temperature of the driver gas (imperfect hydrogen or helium). The effect of the possible existence of a shock reflection at the secondary diaphragm of the expansion tube is included. Expansion-tube test-section flow conditions are obtained by performing an isentropic unsteady expansion from the conditions behind the incident shock or reflected shock to either the test-region velocity or the static pressure. Both a thermochemical-equilibrium expansion and a frozen expansion are included. Flow conditions immediately behind the bow shock of a model positioned at the test section are also determined. Results from the program are compared with preliminary experimental data obtained in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube.

  14. Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Russell .

    2009-09-10

    This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional

  15. Cyber Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Noyes

    2012-03-01

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These trainings vary from web-based cyber security trainings for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/ Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  16. Experimental quiet engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    Full-scale low-tip-speed fans, a full-scale high-tip-speed fan, scale model versions of fans, and two full-scale high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines, were designed, fabricated, tested, and evaluated. Turbine noise suppression was investigated. Preliminary design studies of flight propulsion system concepts were used in application studies to determine acoustic-economic tradeoffs. Salient results are as follows: tradeoff evaluation of fan tip speed and blade loading; systematic data on source noise characteristics and suppression effectiveness; documentation of high- and low-fan-speed aerodynamic and acoustic technology; aerodynamic and acoustic evaluation of acoustic treatment configurations, casing tip bleed, serrated and variable pitch rotor blades, leaned outlet guide vanes, slotted tip casings, rotor blade shape modifications, and inlet noise suppression; systematic evaluation of aerodynamic and acoustic effects; flyover noise projections of engine test data; turbine noise suppression technology development; and tradeoff evaluation of preliminary design high-fan-speed and low-fan-speed flight engines.

  17. Pumped spoiling experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Sladky, J. Jr.

    1987-08-01

    This report documents a series of wind tunnel tests on a sample airfoil designed to evaluate and quantify the ''pumped spoiling'' concept. The test airfoil was a Sandia National Laboratories natural laminar flow section designated SAND-1850. All tests were operated at a Reynolds Number of 1.5 million with a model having a 1-ft chord and a 9-ft span. The spoiling perforations consisted of 1.6 mm diameter holes on 6.35 mm centers. The pressure in the internal plenum that supplied the spoiling air to the perforations was maintained at the tunnel dynamic head. Test results were consistent and repeatable. Up to an angle of attack of 6/sup 0/, there was very little difference in the lift coefficient among the many test arrangements studied. Past 8/sup 0/, however, the lift coefficient trends were very sensitive to the test configuration of the model. The report includes the test results for 32 combinations of the spoiling arrangements ranging from ''clean'' baseline airfoil to spoiling flow through all perforations. In addition to the section coefficients, the report presents model force data and section pressure profiles. 29 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Achieving High Reliability Operations Through Multi-Program Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Holly M. Ashley; Ronald K. Farris; Robert E. Richards

    2009-04-01

    Over the last 20 years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has adopted a number of operations and safety-related programs which has each periodically taken its turn in the limelight. As new programs have come along there has been natural competition for resources, focus and commitment. In the last few years, the INL has made real progress in integrating all these programs and are starting to realize important synergies. Contributing to this integration are both collaborative individuals and an emerging shared vision and goal of the INL fully maturing in its high reliability operations. This goal is so powerful because the concept of high reliability operations (and the resulting organizations) is a masterful amalgam and orchestrator of the best of all the participating programs (i.e. conduct of operations, behavior based safety, human performance, voluntary protection, quality assurance, and integrated safety management). This paper is a brief recounting of the lessons learned, thus far, at the INL in bringing previously competing programs into harmony under the goal (umbrella) of seeking to perform regularly as a high reliability organization. In addition to a brief diagram-illustrated historical review, the authors will share the INL’s primary successes (things already effectively stopped or started) and the gaps yet to be bridged.

  19. Generating information-rich high-throughput experimental materials genomes using functional clustering via multitree genetic programming and information theory.

    PubMed

    Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-04-13

    High-throughput experimental methodologies are capable of synthesizing, screening and characterizing vast arrays of combinatorial material libraries at a very rapid rate. These methodologies strategically employ tiered screening wherein the number of compositions screened decreases as the complexity, and very often the scientific information obtained from a screening experiment, increases. The algorithm used for down-selection of samples from higher throughput screening experiment to a lower throughput screening experiment is vital in achieving information-rich experimental materials genomes. The fundamental science of material discovery lies in the establishment of composition-structure-property relationships, motivating the development of advanced down-selection algorithms which consider the information value of the selected compositions, as opposed to simply selecting the best performing compositions from a high throughput experiment. Identification of property fields (composition regions with distinct composition-property relationships) in high throughput data enables down-selection algorithms to employ advanced selection strategies, such as the selection of representative compositions from each field or selection of compositions that span the composition space of the highest performing field. Such strategies would greatly enhance the generation of data-driven discoveries. We introduce an informatics-based clustering of composition-property functional relationships using a combination of information theory and multitree genetic programming concepts for identification of property fields in a composition library. We demonstrate our approach using a complex synthetic composition-property map for a 5 at. % step ternary library consisting of four distinct property fields and finally explore the application of this methodology for capturing relationships between composition and catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction for 5429 catalyst compositions in a

  20. The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, D.N.; Schwalm, C.; Michalak, A.M; Schaefer, K.; King, A.W.; Wei, Y.; Jacobson, A.; Liu, S.; Cook, R.; Post, W.M.; Berthier, G.; Hayes, D.; Huang, M.; Ito, A.; Lei, H.; Lu, C.; Mao, J.; Peng, C.H.; Peng, S.; Poulter, B.; Riccuito, D.; Shi, X.; Tian, H.; Wang, W.; Zeng, N.; Zhao, F.; Zhu, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

  1. Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Includes a collection of eight short articles describing model community college programs. Discusses a literacy program, a mobile computer classroom, a support program for at-risk students, a timber-harvesting program, a multimedia presentation on successful women graduates, a career center, a collaboration with NASA, and an Israeli engineering…

  2. Using a Non-Equivalent Groups Quasi Experimental Design to Reduce Internal Validity Threats to Claims Made by Math and Science K-12 Teacher Recruitment Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin, Laura

    2009-10-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act national policy established in 2009 calls for ``meaningful data'' that demonstrate educational improvements, including the recruitment of high-quality teachers. The scant data available and the low credibility of many K-12 math/science teacher recruitment program evaluations remain the major barriers for the identification of effective recruitment strategies. Our study presents a methodology to better evaluate the impact of recruitment programs on increasing participants' interest in teaching careers. The research capitalizes on the use of several control groups and presents a non-equivalent groups quasi-experimental evaluation design that produces program effect claims with higher internal validity than claims generated by current program evaluations. With this method that compares responses to a teaching career interest question from undergraduates all along a continuum from just attending an information session to participating (or not) in the recruitment program, we were able to compare the effect of the program in increasing participants' interest in teaching careers versus the evolution of the same interest but in the absence of the program. We were also able to make suggestions for program improvement and further research. While our findings may not apply to other K-12 math/science teacher recruitment programs, we believe that our evaluation methodology does and will contribute to conduct stronger program evaluations. In so doing, our evaluation procedure may inform recruitment program designers and policy makers.

  3. Overview of the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Experimental Program and Future Plan on C-2 Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaokang; Gota, Hiroshi; Binderbauer, Michl; Tuszewski, Michel; Guo, Houyang; Garate, Eusebio; Barnes, Dan; Putvinski, Sergei; Tajima, Toshiki; Sevier, Leigh

    2014-10-01

    C-2 is the world's largest compact-toroid (CT) device at Tri Alpha Energy that produces field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas by colliding/merging oppositely-directed CTs and seeks to study the evolution, heating and sustainment effects of neutral-beam (NB) injection into FRCs. Recently, significant progress has been made in C-2 on both technology and physics fronts, achieving ~ 5 ms stable plasmas with a dramatic improvement in confinement. FRCs are stabilized with an edge biasing using end-on plasma-guns and/or electrodes, and are partially sustained with NB injection (20 keV Hydrogen, ~ 4 MW). Recent work to reduce scrape-off layer and radiative losses has succeeded in reducing the average power balance deficit to ~ 1.5 MW. Increasing plasma pressure and electron temperature are now observed during brief periods of the discharge, which indicate a sign of NB injection effect such as accumulating fast-ions as well as heating core/edge plasmas. Highlights of these advances, broader C-2 experimental program, and future plan on upgrading the C-2 device with new NBs (15 keV, up to 10 MW injection power, selectable beam injection angle) will be presented.

  4. INL - NNL an International Technology Collaboration Case Study - Advanced Fogging Technologies for Decommissioning - 13463

    SciTech Connect

    Banford, Anthony; Edwards, Jeremy; Demmer, Rick; Rankin, Richard; Hastings, Jeremy

    2013-07-01

    International collaboration and partnerships have become a reality as markets continue to globalize. This is the case in nuclear sector where over recent years partnerships commonly form to bid for capital projects internationally in the increasingly contractorized world and international consortia regularly bid and lead Management and Operations (M and O) / Parent Body Organization (PBO) site management contracts. International collaboration can also benefit research and technology development. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) are internationally recognized organizations delivering leading science and technology development programmes both nationally and internationally. The Laboratories are actively collaborating in several areas with benefits to both the laboratories and their customers. Recent collaborations have focused on fuel cycle separations, systems engineering supporting waste management and decommissioning, the use of misting for decontamination and in-situ waste characterisation. This paper focuses on a case study illustrating how integration of two technologies developed on different sides of the Atlantic are being integrated through international collaboration to address real decommissioning challenges using fogging technology. (authors)

  5. Experimental Pi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corris, G.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of pi by means of experimental methods. Polygon circle ratios, Archimedes' method, Buffon's needles, a Monte Carlo method, and prime number approaches are used. Presents three BASIC programs for the calculations. (YP)

  6. A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS ON PUPIL ACHIEVEMENT OBSERVED DURING FIRST THREE YEARS OF THE PROJECT, SECONDARY MATHEMATICS EVALUATION PROJECT. INTERIM REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERICKSEN, GERALD L.; RYAN, JAMES J.

    A REPORT IS GIVEN OF THE FIRST 3 YEARS OF A FIELD STUDY CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SEVERAL PROTOTYPE, SECONDARY MATHEMATICS PROGRAMS THAT WERE PRODUCED BY DIFFERENT CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT GROUPS. MATHEMATICS TEACHERS WHO HAD NO PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE WITH "MODERN" OR EXPERIMENTAL APPROACHES TO MATHEMATICS TAUGHT A SELECTED…

  7. Program in Business Communication at the University of Texas at Austin. A Pre-Test-Post-Test and Experimental-Control Group Analysis of the Personnel Department's Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, James D.; Kerr, Deborah

    A study used pretests/posttests and experimental/control groups to evaluate four business communication skills (BCS) programs conducted with employees at the University of Texas at Austin. Of 91 BCS participants, 86 were women and ages for all participants ranged from 20 to 61 years. Del Gaizo's four levels of evaluation (happiness index, learning…

  8. What Works for Early Language and Literacy Development: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Intervention Strategies. Fact Sheet. Publication #2011-18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisler, Alison; Ling, Thomson

    2011-01-01

    Given the importance of the early childhood period as a time when the foundation is laid for later language and literacy, it is important to determine what activities and experiences lead to positive language and literacy outcomes in early childhood. This Fact Sheet reviews fifteen experimentally-evaluated programs and intervention strategies that…

  9. A quasi-experimental study of a reminiscence program focused on autobiographical memory in institutionalized older adults with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Teresa Silveira; Afonso, Rosa Marina Lopes Brás Martins; Ribeiro, Óscar Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Working with past memories through reminiscence interventions has been practiced for several decades with successful outcomes on mental health in older adults. Few studies however have focused on autobiographical memory recall in older individuals with cognitive impairment. This study aims to analyze the impact of an individual reminiscence program in a group of older persons with cognitive decline living in nursing homes on the dimensions of cognition, autobiographical memory, mood, behavior and anxiety. A two-group pre-test and post-test design with single blinded assessment was conducted. Forty-one participants were randomized to an experimental group (n=20) and a control group (n=21). The first group attended five weekly individual reminiscence sessions. Changes in the outcome measures were examined for cognition (Montreal Cognitive Assessment; Autobiographical Memory Test), behavior (Alzheimer Disease Assessment Subscale Non-Cog) and emotional status (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia; Geriatric Depression Scale, and Geriatric Anxiety Inventory). Participants attending reminiscence sessions exhibited better outcomes compared to the control group in cognition, anxiety and depression (p<0.001), and presented a higher number of retrieved autobiographical events, specificity of evoked memories and positive valence of events (p<0.001), and also presented lower latency time for recalling events, and lower negative recalled events (p<0.01). This study supports the potential value of reminiscence therapy in improving the recall of autobiographical memory. Reminiscence therapy can be helpful to maintain or improve cognitive function, decrease anxiety and manage depressive symptoms and altered behavior, but further investigation is needed to clarify long-term effects. PMID:27347792

  10. MPACT FY2011 Advanced Time-Correlated Measurement Research at INL

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; S. M. Watson

    2011-09-01

    Simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate advanced time-correlated measurement methods for characterizing and assaying nuclear material for safeguarding the nuclear fuel cycle. These activities are part of a project studying advanced instrumentation techniques in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and its Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) program. For fiscal year 2011 work focused on examining the practical experimental aspects of using a time-tagged, associated-particle electronic neutron generator for interrogating low-enrichment uranium in combination with steady-state interrogation using a moderated 241Am-Li neutron source. Simulation work for the project involved the use of the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation tool to determine the relative strength and the time-of-flight energy spectra of different sample materials under irradiation. Work also took place to develop a post-processor parser code to extract comparable data from the MCNP5&6 codes. Experiments took place using a commercial deuterium-tritium associated-particle electronic neutron generator to irradiate a number of uranium-bearing material samples. Time-correlated measurements of neutron and photon signatures of these measurements were made using five liquid scintillator detectors in a novel array, using high-speed waveform digitizers for data collection. This report summarizes the experiments that took place in FY2011, presents preliminary analyses that have been carried out to date for a subpart of these experiments, and describes future activities planned in this area. The report also describes support Idaho National Laboratory gave to Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2011 to facilitate 2-dimensional imagery of mixed-oxide fuel pins for safeguards applications as a part of the MPACT program.

  11. Use of Geologic and Paleoflood Information for INL Probabilistic Flood Hazard Decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostenaa, D.; O'Connell, D.; Creed, B.

    2009-05-01

    inputs of multiple investigators, with extensive use of external peer review. The paleoflood-based results were adopted as the official basis for flood hazard decisions at INL.

  12. High-temperature-staged fluidized-bed combustion (HITS), bench scale experimental test program conducted during 1980. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R E; Jassowski, D M; Newton, R A; Rudnicki, M L

    1981-04-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the process feasibility of the first stage of the HITS two-stage coal combustion system. Tests were run in a small (12-in. ID) fluidized bed facility at the Energy Engineering Laboratory, Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, Sacramento, California. The first stage reactor was run with low (0.70%) and high (4.06%) sulfur coals with ash fusion temperatures of 2450/sup 0/ and 2220/sup 0/F, respectively. Limestone was used to scavenge the sulfur. The produced low-Btu gas was burned in a combustor. Bed temperature and inlet gas percent oxygen were varied in the course of testing. Key results are summarized as follows: the process was stable and readily controllable, and generated a free-flowing char product using coals with low (2220/sup 0/F) and high (2450/sup 0/F) ash fusion temperatures at bed temperatures of at least 1700/sup 0/ and 1800/sup 0/F, respectively; the gaseous product was found to have a total heating value of about 120 Btu/SCF at 1350/sup 0/F, and the practicality of cleaning the hot product gas and delivering it to the combustor was demonstrated; sulfur capture efficiencies above 80% were demonstrated for both low and high sulfur coals with a calcium/sulfur mole ratio of approximately two; gasification rates of about 5,000 SCF/ft/sup 2/-hr were obtained for coal input rates ranging from 40 to 135 lbm/hr, as required to maintain the desired bed temperatures; and the gaseous product yielded combustion temperatures in excess of 3000/sup 0/F when burned with preheated (900/sup 0/F) air. The above test results support the promise of the HITS system to provide a practical means of converting high sulfur coal to a clean gas for industrial applications. Sulfur capture, gas heating value, and gas production rate are all in the range required for an effective system. Planning is underway for additional testing of the system in the 12-in. fluid bed facility, including demonstration of the second stage char burnup

  13. An experimental evaluation of theory-based mother and mother-child programs for children of divorce.

    PubMed

    Wolchik, S A; West, S G; Sandler, I N; Tein, J Y; Coatsworth, D; Lengua, L; Weiss, L; Anderson, E R; Greene, S M; Griffin, W A

    2000-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of 2 theory-based preventive interventions for divorced families: a program for mothers and a dual component mother-child program. The mother program targeted mother-child relationship quality, discipline, interparental conflict, and the father-child relationship. The child program targeted active coping, avoidant coping, appraisals of divorce stressors, and mother-child relationship quality. Families with a 9- to 12-year-old child (N = 240) were randomly assigned to the mother, dual-component, or self-study program. Postintervention comparisons showed significant positive program effects of the mother program versus self-study condition on relationship quality, discipline, attitude toward father-child contact, and adjustment problems. For several outcomes, more positive effects occurred in families with poorer initial functioning. Program effects on externalizing problems were maintained at 6-month follow-up. A few additive effects of the dual-component program occurred for the putative mediators; none occurred for adjustment problems. PMID:11068970

  14. Mortality and translocation assay to study the protective capacity of Bifidobacterium lactis INL1 against Salmonella Typhimurium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Zacarías, M F; Reinheimer, J; Forzani, L; Grangette, C; Vinderola, G

    2014-12-01

    The mouse has been largely used for the study of the protective capacity of probiotics against intestinal infections caused by Salmonella. In this work we aimed at comparing the mortality and translocation assay for the study of the protective capacity of the human breast milk-derived strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis INL1 on a model of gut infection by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Different doses of S. Typhimurium FUNED and B. animalis subsp. lactis INL 1 were administered to Balb/c mice in a mortality or a translocation assay. The survival of the control group in the mortality assay resulted to be variable along experiments, and then we preferred to use a translocation assay where the preventive administration of 109 cfu of bifidobacteria/mouse for 10 consecutive days significantly reduced the number of infected animals and the levels of translocation to liver and spleen, with enhanced secretory immunoglobulin A and interleukin 10 production in the small and large intestine, respectively. Ten days of B. animalis subsp. lactis strain INL1 administration to mice significantly reduced both the incidence and the severity of Salmonella infection in a mouse model of translocation. This work provided the first evidence that a translocation assay, compared to a mortality assay, could be more useful to study the protective capacity of probiotics against Salmonella infection, as more information can be obtained from mice and less suffering is conferred to animals due to the fact that the mortality assay is shorter than the latter. These facts are in line with the guidelines of animal research recently established by the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement & Reduction of Animals in Research. PMID:24902954

  15. The 213-amino-acid leucine-rich repeat region of the listeria monocytogenes InlB protein is sufficient for entry into mammalian cells, stimulation of PI 3-kinase and membrane ruffling.

    PubMed

    Braun, L; Nato, F; Payrastre, B; Mazié, J C; Cossart, P

    1999-10-01

    The Listeria monocytogenes InlB protein is a 630-amino-acid surface protein that mediates entry of the bacterium into a wide variety of cell types, including hepatocytes, fibroblasts and epithelial cells such as Vero, HEp-2 and HeLa cells. Invasion stimulates host proteins tyrosine phosphorylation, PI 3-kinase activity and rearrangements in the actin cytoskeleton. We previously showed that InlB is sufficient for entry of InlB-coated latex beads into cells and recent results indicate that purified InlB can stimulate PI 3-kinase activity and is thus the first bacterial agonist of this lipid kinase. In this study, we identified the region of InlB responsible for entry and stimulation of signal transduction events. Eight monoclonal antibodies directed against InlB were raised and, of those, five inhibited bacterial entry. These five antibodies recognized epitopes within the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) region and/or the inter-repeat (IR) region. InlB-staphylococcal protein A (SPA) fusion proteins and recombinant InlB derivatives were generated and tested for their capacity to mediate entry into cultured mammalian cells. All the InlB derivatives that carried the amino-terminal 213-amino-acid LRR region conferred invasiveness to the normally non-invasive bacterium L. innocua or to inert latex beads and the corresponding purified polypeptides inhibited bacterial entry. In addition, the 213-amino-acid LRR region was able to stimulate PI 3-kinase activity and changes in the actin cytoskeleton (membrane ruffling). These properties were not detected with purified internalin, another invasion protein of L. monocytogenes that displays LRRs similar to those of InlB. Taken together, these results show that the first 213 amino acids of InlB are critical for its specific properties. PMID:10540282

  16. Systematic Instruction for Retarded Children: The Illinois Program - Experimental Edition. Part IV: Motor Performance and Recreation Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linford, Anthony G.; Jeanrenaud, Claudine Y.

    The manual of programed instruction for motor skills and recreational activities for trainable mentally handicapped children includes guidelines on basic recreation movements, rhythm in music, handicrafts, and miscellaneous activities. The guidelines employ principles of behavior change and direct instruction. Detailed programed instruction lists…

  17. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, October 22, 1976-February 24, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    The Dental Auxiliary Department of the University of Puerto Rico designed a career option dental auxiliary training program which is a step ladder program with three exit points over a period of two academic years. The first option is a six-month track to train a traditional chairside dental auxiliary. The second option is a nine-month track to…

  18. Experimental Impacts of a Teacher Professional Development Program in Chile on Preschool Classroom Quality and Child Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Leyva, Diana; Snow, Catherine E.; Treviño, Ernesto; Barata, M. Clara; Weiland, Christina; Gomez, Celia J.; Moreno, Lorenzo; Rolla, Andrea; D'Sa, Nikhit; Arbour, Mary Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We assessed impacts on classroom quality and on 5 child language and behavioral outcomes of a 2-year teacher professional-development program for publicly funded prekindergarten and kindergarten in Chile. This cluster-randomized trial included 64 schools (child N = 1,876). The program incorporated workshops and in-classroom coaching. We found…

  19. The Influence of Father Education Programs on the Levels of Father Involvement with Children: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taskin, Necdet; Erkan, Semra

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to reveal the effects of father education programs on the levels of their involvement with their children aged 2 to 9. The study group comprised 14 fathers who participate in a father education program. The study employed the pre-test-posttest design. Data were collected by using Father Interview Forms. The independent variable of…

  20. Special Class for the Gifted Young: A 34-Year Experimentation with Early College Entrance Programs in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dai, David Yun; Steenbergen-Hu, Saiying

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the Special Class for the Gifted Young (SCGY), an early college entrance program in mathematics and science in China, which has been a focus for media coverage and public discussion of accelerated education in China. We first describe the admission policy and academic programming of SCGY and delineate its distinct features.…

  1. Experimental impacts of a teacher professional development program in Chile on preschool classroom quality and child outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Leyva, Diana; Snow, Catherine E; Treviño, Ernesto; Barata, M Clara; Weiland, Christina; Gomez, Celia J; Moreno, Lorenzo; Rolla, Andrea; D'Sa, Nikhit; Arbour, Mary Catherine

    2015-03-01

    We assessed impacts on classroom quality and on 5 child language and behavioral outcomes of a 2-year teacher professional-development program for publicly funded prekindergarten and kindergarten in Chile. This cluster-randomized trial included 64 schools (child N = 1,876). The program incorporated workshops and in-classroom coaching. We found moderate to large positive impacts on observed emotional and instructional support as well as classroom organization in prekindergarten classrooms after 1 year of the program. After 2 years of the program, moderate positive impacts were observed on emotional support and classroom organization. No significant program impacts on child outcomes were detected at posttest (1 marginal effect, an increase in a composite of self-regulation and low problem behaviors, was observed). Professional development for preschool teachers in Chile can improve classroom quality. More intensive curricular approaches are needed for these improvements to translate into effects on children. PMID:25706589

  2. Documentation of Short Stack and Button Cell Experiments Performed at INL and Ceramatec during FY07

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. J. Hartvigsen; J. S. Herring

    2007-09-01

    This report provides documentation of experimental research activities performed at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Ceramatec, Inc. during FY07 under the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, High Temperature Electrolysis Program. The activities discussed in this report include tests on single (button) cells, short planar stacks and tubular cells. The objectives of these small-scale tests are to evaluate advanced electrode, electrolyte, and interconnect materials, alternate modes of operation (e.g., coelectrolysis), and alternate cell geometries over a broad range of operating conditions, with the aim of identifying the most promising material et, cell and stack geometry, and operating conditions for the high-temperature electrolysis application. Cell performance is characterized in erms of initial area-specific resistance and long-term stability in the electrolysis mode. Some of the tests were run in the coelectrolysis mode. Research into coelectrolysis was funded by Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD). Coelectrolysis simultaneously converts steam to hydrogen and carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. This process is complicated by the reverse shift reaction. An equilibrium model was developed to predict outlet compositions of steam, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide resulting from coelectrolysis. Predicted ompositions were compared to measurements obtained with a precision micro-channel gas chromatograph.

  3. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  4. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  5. Extended Development Work to Validate a HLW Calcine Waste Form via INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    James A. King; Vince Maio

    2011-09-01

    To accomplish calcine treatment objectives, the Idaho Clean-up Project contractor, CWI, has chosen to immobilize the calcine in a glass-ceramic via the use of a Hot-Isostatic-Press (HIP); a treatment selection formally documented in a 2010 Record of Decision (ROD). Even though the HIP process may prove suitable for the calcine as specified in the ROD and validated in a number of past value engineering sessions, DOE is evaluating back-up treatment methods for the calcine as a result of the technical, schedule, and cost risk associated with the HIPing process. Consequently DOE HQ has requested DOE ID to make INL's bench-scale cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM) available for investigating its viability as a process alternate to calcine treatment. The waste form is the key component of immobilization of radioactive waste. Providing a solid, stable, and durable material that can be easily be stored is the rationale for immobilization of radioactive waste material in glass, ceramic, or glass-ceramics. Ceramic waste forms offer an alternative to traditional borosilicate glass waste forms. Ceramics can usually accommodate higher waste loadings than borosilicate glass, leading to smaller intermediate and long-term storage facilities. Many ceramic phases are known to possess superior chemical durability as compared to borosilicate glass. However, ceramics are generally multiphase systems containing many minor phase that make characterization and prediction of performance within a repository challenging. Additionally, the technologies employed in ceramic manufacture are typically more complex and expensive. Thus, many have proposed using glass-ceramics as compromise between in the more inexpensive, easier to characterize glass waste forms and the more durable ceramic waste forms. Glass-ceramics have several advantages over traditional borosilicate glasses as a waste form. Borosilicate glasses can inadvertently devitrify, leading to a less durable product that could crack

  6. Harmonizing Databases? Using a Quasi-Experimental Design to Evaluate a Public Mental Health Re-entry Program1

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaogang; Fisher, William; Fulwiler, Carl; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Johnson, Craig; Pinals, Debra A.; Sampson, Lisa; Siegfriedt, Julianne

    2012-01-01

    Our study is the first-ever initiative to merge administrative databases in Massachusetts to evaluate an important public mental health program. It examines post-incarceration outcomes of adults with serious mental illness (SMI) enrolled in the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH) Forensic Transition Team (FTT) program. The program began in 1998 with the goal of transitioning offenders with SMI released from state and local correctional facilities utilizing a core set of transition activities. In this study we evaluate the program’s effectiveness using merged administrative data from various state agencies for the years 2007 – 2011, comparing FTT clients to released prisoners who, despite having serious mental health disorders, did not meet the criterion for DMH services. By systematically describing our original study design and the barriers we encountered, this report will inform future efforts to evaluate public programs using merged administrative databases and electronic health records. PMID:22436598

  7. Reducing HIV Risk among Transgender Women in Thailand: A Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of the Sisters Program

    PubMed Central

    Pawa, Duangta; Firestone, Rebecca; Ratchasi, Sindh; Dowling, Olivia; Jittakoat, Yaowalak; Duke, Alex; Mundy, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Transgender women are particularly at risk of HIV infection, but little evidence exists on effective HIV prevention strategies with this population. We evaluated whether Sisters, a peer-led program for transgender women, could reduce HIV risks in Pattaya, Thailand. The study used time-location sampling to recruit 308 transgender women in Pattaya into a behavioral survey in 2011. Coarsened exact matching was used to create statistically equivalent groups of program participants and non-participants, based on factors influencing likelihood of program participation. Using multivariable logistic regression, we estimated effects of any program participation and participation by delivery channel on: condom use at last sex; consistent condom and condom/water-based lubricant use in the past 3 months with commercial, casual, and regular partners; and receipt of HIV testing in the past 6 months. Program coverage reached 75% of the population. In a matched sub-sample (n = 238), participation in outreach was associated with consistent condom/water-based lubricant use with commercial partners (AOR 3.22, 95% CI 1.64–6.31). Attendance at the Sisters drop-in center was associated with receiving an HIV test (AOR 2.58, 95% CI 1.47–4.52). Dedicated transgender-friendly programs are effective at reducing HIV risks and require expansion to better serve this key population and improve HIV prevention strategies. PMID:24204750

  8. Formative Evaluation of an Experimental BE/E [Basic Electricity and Electronics] Program. Report No. 9-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishburne, R. P., Jr.; Mims, Diane M.

    An experimental Basic Electricity and Electronics course (BE/E) utilizing a lock-step, instructor presentation methodology was developed and evaluated at the Service School Command, Great Lakes. The study, directed toward the training of lower mental group, school nonqualified personnel, investigated comparative data on test performance, attitude,…

  9. MDTA VOCATIONAL EXPERIMENTAL-DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FOR TRAINING AND PLACEMENT OF YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS. 11TH PROGRESS REPORT, COMMUNITY SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCKEE, JOHN M.; AND OTHERS

    THE VOCATIONAL EXPERIMENTAL-DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT DRAPER CORRECTIONAL CENTER, AN EXPERIMENT TO REDUCE RECIDIVISM THROUGH VOCATIONAL TRAINING, IN ITS FIRST 21 MONTHS TRAINED 173 YOUTHS IN SEVEN TRADES AND PLACED 150 GRADUATES IN JOBS. DETAILS OF SELECTION, COUNSELING, TRAINING, PLACEMENT, AND FOLLOW-UP OF INMATES THE USE OF INDIVIDUALIZED…

  10. An Experimental Comparison of the Effects of Three Methods of Conducting Visitation Conferences in Cooperative Distributive Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, E. Clayton

    Twelve cooperative high school distributive education programs were studied to determine the effects of three methods of conducting visitation conferences on: (1) students' attitude toward distributive education, (2) students' attitude toward training stations, (3) students' work performance rating, (4) parents' attitude toward distributive…

  11. What Works for Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. Publication #2014-64

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Heather; Manlove, Jennifer; Moore, Kristen Anderson; Mass, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The United States continues to have one of the highest teen birth rates in the developed world, and adolescent rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are also high. These factors highlight the need to identify effective evidence-based programs to improve adolescent reproductive health. This brief synthesizes findings from 118 experimental…

  12. Experimental program to stimulate competitive energy research in North Dakota: Summary and significance of DOE Trainee research

    SciTech Connect

    Boudjouk, Philip

    1999-07-01

    The general goals of the North Dakota DOE/EPSCoR Program are to enhance the capabilities of North Dakota's researchers to conduct nationally competitive energy-related research and to develop science and engineering human resources to meet current and future needs in energy-related areas. Doctoral students were trained and energy research was conducted.

  13. Does Moving to Better Neighborhoods Lead to Better Schooling Opportunities? Parental School Choice in an Experimental Housing Voucher Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Stefanie; Rosenblatt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous research has demonstrated that children growing up in poor communities have limited access to high-performing schools, while more affluent neighborhoods tend to have higher-ranking schools and more opportunities for after-school programs and activities. Therefore, many researchers and policy makers expected not only that the…

  14. OTSEGO COUNTY EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM FOR TESTING METHODS OF FORMING FARM MANAGEMENT STUDY GROUPS, A PROGRESS REPORT. EXTENSION STUDY, NUMBER 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LONGEST, JAMES W.; GENGENBACK, WILLIAM H.

    THE MOST FREQUENT METHOD OF GROUP FORMATION FOR INTENSIVE FARM MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS IN NEW YORK STATE HAS BEEN TO COMBINE ALL INTERESTED FARMERS IN LARGE GROUPS AT THE COUNTY EXTENSION HEADQUARTERS. THIS EXPERIMENT WAS SET UP TO STUDY THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO METHODS OF FORMING SMALL GROUPS--BY SOCIOMETRIC CHOICE OR SIMILAR CHARACTERISTICS. ALL…

  15. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN THE USE OF PROGRAMMED MATERIALS FOR SEVENTH-GRADE OPEN-ENDED LABORATORY EXPERIENCES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARNES, PHYLLIS EILEEN

    ASCERTAINED WAS THE COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO TECHNIQUES OF TEACHING SEVENTH GRADE GENERAL SCIENCE--(1) A NON-PROGRAMED, PROBLEM-SOLVING APPROACH, AND (2) A PROBLEM-SOLVING APPROACH THROUGH SELECTED, OPEN-ENDED, LABORATORY EXPERIENCES. SPECIFICALLY, THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO DETERMINE WHETHER THERE WERE ANY SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE…

  16. Lessons Learned from the Use of Randomized and Quasi-Experimental Field Designs for the Evaluation of Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Andy; Johnson, R. Burke

    2008-01-01

    As a result of the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2002, the field of education has seen a heavy emphasis on the use of "scientifically based research" for designing and testing the effectiveness of new and existing educational programs. According to NCLB, when addressing basic cause and effect questions scientifically based research…

  17. Advanced theoretical and experimental studies in automatic control and information systems. [including mathematical programming and game theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Polak, E.; Zadeh, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    A series of research projects is briefly summarized which includes investigations in the following areas: (1) mathematical programming problems for large system and infinite-dimensional spaces, (2) bounded-input bounded-output stability, (3) non-parametric approximations, and (4) differential games. A list of reports and papers which were published over the ten year period of research is included.

  18. A Weight-Loss Program Using Self-Control Techniques in a Correctional Facility: An Experimental Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Edward E.; DeNinno, John

    1977-01-01

    Self-control techniques were taught to an obese 27-year-old black male to help modify overeating behavior. Self-reinforcement was utilized in addition to systematic isolation of chained eating behavior from associated stimulus situations. A physical exercise program was employed in conjunction with the self-control techniques. (Author)

  19. An Experimental Comparison of Two Types of Self-Instructional Programs for a SAGE System Paired-Associate Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shettel, Harris H.; Lindley, Richard H.

    A study was conducted to determine the optimal presentation methods for teaching the phonetic alphabet which is characteristic of much of the symbolic material which forms part of the SAGE L-system operator task. This discrete-item, paired-associate material was prepared in six different formats: (1) long continuous-discourse program, overt…

  20. "Learn Young, Learn Fair", a Stress Management Program for Fifth and Sixth Graders: Longitudinal Results from an Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraag, Gerda; Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Kok, Gerjo; Hosman, Clemens

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effects of a universal stress management program (Learn Young, Learn Fair) on stress, coping, anxiety and depression in fifth and sixth grade children. Methods: Fifty-two schools (1467 children) participated in a clustered randomized controlled trial. Data was collected in the fall of 2002, the spring of 2003,…

  1. Assessment of needs for satellite tracking of birds and suggestions for expediting a program. [experimental design using Nimbus 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craighead, F. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Equipment development and testing, animal-instrument interphase or attachment methods, and the evaluation of various feasibility-tracking experiments with raptors are described as well as suggestions for expediting a future program. Results of animal-instrument interphases work indicate that large free-flying birds can be successfully instrumented with radio packages comparable in weight to satellite-transmitter packages. The 401 MHz frequency proved satisfactory for a combination of satellite and ground tracking of migrating birds. Tests run for nearly a year with the Nimbus 6 satellite and a miniaturized, one-watt prototype RAMS transmitter produced encouraging results in regard to location accuracy, frequency of contact with satellite and use of whip antennas. A future program is recommended with priority given to development of six operational transmitters for feasibility experiments.

  2. Exploratory studies of the cruise performance of upper surface blown configurations. Experimental program: Test facilities, model design instrumentation, and lowspeed, high-lift tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.; Hackett, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The model hardware, test facilities and instrumentation utilized in an experimental study of upper surface blown configurations at cruise is described. The high speed (subsonic) experimental work, studying the aerodynamic effects of wing nacelle geometric variations, was conducted around semispan model configurations composed of diversified, interchangeable components. Power simulation was provided by high pressure air ducted through closed forebody nacelles. Nozzle geometry was varied across size, exit aspect ratio, exit position and boattail angle. Three dimensional force and two dimensional pressure measurements were obtained at cruise Mach numbers from 0.5 to 0.8 and at nozzle pressure ratios up to about 3.0. The experimental investigation was supported by an analytical synthesis of the system using a vortex lattice representation with first order power effects. Results are also presented from a compatibility study in which a short haul transport is designed on the basis of the aerodynamic findings in the experimental study as well as acoustical data obtained in a concurrent program. High lift test data are used to substantiate the projected performance of the selected transport design.

  3. Evaluation of conventional resistance to European corn borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in experimental maize lines developed from a backcross breeding program.

    PubMed

    Abel, C A; Berhow, M A; Wilson, R L; Binder, B F; Hibbard, B E

    2000-12-01

    Plant resistance is a promising control method for the two most damaging insect pests of maize, Zea mays L.: the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), and the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Fifteen experimental lines of maize, derived from a backcross breeding program designed to introgress resistance to European corn borer from Peruvian maize into two U.S. Corn Belt adapted inbred lines, were evaluated for resistance to European corn borer and western corn rootwonrm. The experimental lines were in the second generation of backcrossing. All experimental lines were resistant to leaf blade feeding by European corn borer. These lines had low levels of 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one, a chemical commonly associated with leaf blade feeding resistance, indicating that this was not the mechanism of resistance to leaf blade feeding in these lines. Eleven experimental lines were resistant to leaf sheath and collar feeding by European corn borer. Useful sources of European corn borer ovipositional nonpreference and root feeding resistance to western corn rootworm were not identified. Some of the lines evaluated in this study may provide useful sources of resistance to both leaf blade and leaf sheath and collar feeding by European corn borer. PMID:11142317

  4. Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS. An Integrated, Prioritized Work Plan for Diagnostic Development and Maintenance and Supporting Capability

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2010-09-01

    This Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS is an integrated prioritized work plan for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), program that is independent of individual National Security Enterprise Laboratories’ (Labs) requests or specific Subprograms being supported. This prioritized work plan is influenced by national priorities presented in the Predictive Capability Framework (PCF) and other strategy documents (Primary and Secondary Assessment Technologies Plans and the Plutonium Experiments Plan). This document satisfies completion criteria for FY 2010 MRT milestone #3496: Document an integrated, prioritized work plan for diagnostic development, maintenance, and supporting capability. This document is an update of the 3-year NNSS plan written a year ago, September 21, 2009, to define and understand Lab requests for diagnostic implementation. This plan is consistent with Lab interpretations of the PCF, Primary Assessment Technologies, and Plutonium Experiment plans.

  5. Program for upgrading nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting at all facilities within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)

    SciTech Connect

    Yuferev, V.; Zhikharev, S.; Yakimov, Y.

    1998-12-31

    As part of the Department of Energy-Russian program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A), plans have now been formulated to install an integrated MPC and A system at all facilities containing large quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF, Arzamas-16) complex. In addition to storage facilities, the complex houses a number of critical facilities used to conduct nuclear physics research and facilities for developing procedures for disassembly of nuclear weapons.

  6. Impact of an Alcohol Poisoning Storyline in a Fictional Television Program: An Experimental Study With a Live-to-Air Stimulus.

    PubMed

    Bavin, Lynda M; Owens, Richard Glynn

    2016-10-01

    Storylines in fictional television programs may be an effective medium for health-promoting messages. This randomized pretest-posttest (N = 111) with follow-up (n = 71) study examined the persuasive impact of an alcohol poisoning story in the program ER on viewers' drinking-related beliefs, attitudes, intentions, and behavior. The perception of persuasive intent is theorized to be a key factor influencing a narrative's impact; therefore, this study also examined the influence of perceived persuasive intent on viewing outcomes. Viewing group participants were asked to view a specific upcoming episode of ER when it was first scheduled to air on national television in New Zealand. The results suggest that the alcohol poisoning story had a beneficial impact on viewers' drinking-related beliefs, attitudes, and intentions. Perceived persuasive intent was not a significant predictor of viewing outcomes. This study is the first randomized experiment that has used a live-to-air stimulus to examine the impact of a health-promoting storyline in a fictional television program that has been created and broadcast in a developed nation. The significant effects found at post-viewing and follow-up provide further empirical support to the existing experimental literature, with enhanced ecological validity, for the potential positive impact of health-promoting storylines in fictional television programs. PMID:27007690

  7. AMPS data management requirements study, appendix 1. [user manuals (computer programs)/display devices - computerized simulation/experimentation/ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Flow charts and display formats for the simulation of five experiments are given. The experiments are: (1) electromagnetic wave transmission; (2) passive observations of ambient plasma; (3) ionospheric measurements with subsatellite; (4) electron accelerator beam measurements; and (5) measurement of acoustical gravity waves in the sodium layer using lasers. A detailed explanation of the simulation procedure, definition of variables, and an explanation of how the experimenter makes display choices is also presented. A functional description is included on each flow chart and the assumptions and definitions of terms and scope of the flow charts and displays are presented.

  8. Application of Frequency of Detection Methods in Design and Optimization of the INL Site Ambient Air Monitoring Network

    SciTech Connect

    Rood, Arthur S.; Sondrup, A. Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    This report presents an evaluation of a hypothetical INL Site monitoring network and the existing INL air monitoring network using frequency of detection methods. The hypothetical network was designed to address the requirement in 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H (2006) that “emissions of radionuclides to ambient air from U.S. DOE facilities shall not exceed those amounts that would cause any member of the public to receive in any year an effective dose equivalent exceeding 10 mrem/year.” To meet the requirement for monitoring only, “radionuclide releases that would result in an effective dose of 10% of the standard shall be readily detectable and distinguishable from background.” Thus, the hypothetical network consists of air samplers placed at residence locations that surround INL and at other locations where onsite livestock grazing takes place. Two exposure scenarios were used in this evaluation: a resident scenario and a shepherd/rancher scenario. The resident was assumed to be continuously present at their residence while the shepherd/rancher was assumed to be present 24-hours at a fixed location on the grazing allotment. Important radionuclides were identified from annual INL radionuclide National Emission Standards for Hazardous Pollutants reports. Important radionuclides were defined as those that potentially contribute 1% or greater to the annual total dose at the radionuclide National Emission Standards for Hazardous Pollutants maximally exposed individual location and include H-3, Am-241, Pu-238, Pu 239, Cs-137, Sr-90, and I-131. For this evaluation, the network performance objective was set at achieving a frequency of detection greater than or equal to 95%. Results indicated that the hypothetical network for the resident scenario met all performance objectives for H-3 and I-131 and most performance objectives for Cs-137 and Sr-90. However, all actinides failed to meet the performance objectives for most sources. The shepherd/rancher scenario showed

  9. Assessment of Potential Flood Events and Impacts at INL's Proposed Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Sites

    SciTech Connect

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter

    2010-09-01

    Rates, depths, erosion potential, increased subsurface transport rates, and annual exceedance probability for potential flooding scenarios have been evaluated for the on-site alternatives of Idaho National Laboratory’s proposed remote handled low-level waste disposal facility. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of flood impacts are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE-O 435.1), its natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95), and the Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) guidance in addition to being required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental assessment (EA). Potential sources of water evaluated include those arising from (1) local precipitation events, (2) precipitation events occurring off of the INL (off-site precipitation), and (3) increased flows in the Big Lost River in the event of a Mackay Dam failure. On-site precipitation events include potential snow-melt and rainfall. Extreme rainfall events were evaluated for the potential to create local erosion, particularly of the barrier placed over the disposal facility. Off-site precipitation carried onto the INL by the Big Lost River channel was evaluated for overland migration of water away from the river channel. Off-site precipitation sources evaluated were those occurring in the drainage basin above Mackay Reservoir. In the worst-case scenarios, precipitation occurring above Mackay Dam could exceed the dam’s capacity, leading to overtopping, and eventually complete dam failure. Mackay Dam could also fail during a seismic event or as a result of mechanical piping. Some of the water released during dam failure, and contributing precipitation, has the potential of being carried onto the INL in the Big Lost River channel. Resulting overland flows from these flood sources were evaluated for

  10. VALIDATION OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY (MC&A) SYSTEM EFFECTIVENESS TOOL (MSET) AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY (INL)

    SciTech Connect

    Meppen, Bruce; Haga, Roger; Moedl, Kelley; Bean, Tom; Sanders, Jeff; Thom, Mary Alice

    2008-07-01

    A Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) Functional Model has been developed to describe MC&A systems at facilities possessing Category I or II Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Emphasis is on achieving the objectives of 144 “Fundamental Elements” in key areas ranging from categorization of nuclear material to establishment of Material Balance Areas (MBAs), controlling access, performing quality measurements of inventories and transfers, timely reporting all activities, and detecting and investigating anomalies. An MC&A System Effectiveness Tool (MSET), including probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology for evaluating MC&A effectiveness and relative risk, has been developed to accompany the Functional Model. The functional model and MSET were introduced at the 48th annual International Nuclear Material Management (INMM) annual meeting in July, 20071,2. A survey/questionnaire is used to accumulate comprehensive data regarding the MC&A elements at a facility. Data is converted from the questionnaire to numerical values using the DELPHI method and exercises are conducted to evaluate the overall effectiveness of an MC&A system. In 2007 a peer review was conducted and a questionnaire was completed for a hypothetical facility and exercises were conducted. In the first quarter of 2008, a questionnaire was completed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and MSET exercises were conducted. The experience gained from conducting the MSET exercises at INL helped evaluate the completeness and consistency of the MC&A Functional Model, descriptions of fundamental elements of the MC&A Functional Model, relationship between the MC&A Functional Model and the MC&A PRA tool and usefulness of the MSET questionnaire data collection process.

  11. A retrospective quasi-experimental study of a transitional housing program for patients with severe and persistent mental illness.

    PubMed

    Siskind, Dan; Harris, Meredith; Kisely, Steve; Siskind, Victor; Brogan, James; Pirkis, Jane; Crompton, David; Whiteford, Harvey

    2014-07-01

    Transitional housing programs aim to improve living skills and housing stability for tenuously housed patients with mental illness. 113 consecutive Transitional Housing Team (THT) patients were matched to 139 controls on diagnosis, time of presentation, gender and prior psychiatric hospitalisation and compared using a difference-in-difference analysis for illness acuity and service use outcomes measured 1 year before and after THT entry/exit. There was a statistically significant difference-in-difference favouring THT participants for bed days (mean difference in difference -20.76 days, SE 9.59, p = 0.031) and living conditions (HoNOS Q11 mean difference in difference -0.93, SE 0.23, p < 0.001). THT cost less per participant (I$14,024) than the bed-days averted (I$17,348). The findings of reductions in bed days and improved living conditions suggest that transitional housing programs can have a significant positive impact for tenuously housed patients with high inpatient service usage, as well as saving costs for mental health services. PMID:24150440

  12. Influence of maternal overnutrition and gestational diabetes on the programming of metabolic health outcomes in the offspring: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Troy J; Moyce, Brittany L; Kereliuk, Stephanie M; Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus have risen across the world during the past few decades and has also reached an alarming level among children. In addition, women are currently more likely than ever to enter pregnancy obese. As a result, the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus is also on the rise. While diet and lifestyle contribute to these trends, population health data show that maternal obesity and diabetes during pregnancy during critical stages of development are major factors that contribute to the development of chronic disease in adolescent and adult offspring. Fetal programming of metabolic function, through physiological and (or) epigenetic mechanisms, may also have an intergenerational effect, and as a result may perpetuate metabolic disorders in the next generation. In this review, we summarize the existing literature that characterizes how maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in the offspring. In particular, we focus on animal studies that investigate the molecular mechanisms that are programmed by the gestational environment and lead to disease phenotypes in the offspring. We also review interventional studies that prevent disease with a developmental origin in the offspring. PMID:25673017

  13. Analytical prediction with multidimensional computer programs and experimental verification of the performance, at a variety of operating conditions, of two traveling wave tubes with depressed collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.; Kosmahl, H. G.; Ramins, P.; Stankiewicz, N.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are compared for two high performance, octave bandwidth TWT's that use depressed collectors (MDC's) to improve the efficiency. The computations were carried out with advanced, multidimensional computer programs that are described here in detail. These programs model the electron beam as a series of either disks or rings of charge and follow their multidimensional trajectories from the RF input of the ideal TWT, through the slow wave structure, through the magnetic refocusing system, to their points of impact in the depressed collector. Traveling wave tube performance, collector efficiency, and collector current distribution were computed and the results compared with measurements for a number of TWT-MDC systems. Power conservation and correct accounting of TWT and collector losses were observed. For the TWT's operating at saturation, very good agreement was obtained between the computed and measured collector efficiencies. For a TWT operating 3 and 6 dB below saturation, excellent agreement between computed and measured collector efficiencies was obtained in some cases but only fair agreement in others. However, deviations can largely be explained by small differences in the computed and actual spent beam energy distributions. The analytical tools used here appear to be sufficiently refined to design efficient collectors for this class of TWT. However, for maximum efficiency, some experimental optimization (e.g., collector voltages and aperture sizes) will most likely be required.

  14. QCSEE - The key to future short-haul air transport. [Quiet, Clean, Short-Haul Experimental Engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciepluch, C. C.; Willis, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the design and test procedure for the QCSEE (quiet, clean, short-haul experimental engine). The engines designed for the YC-14 and YC-15 STOL aircraft, both use a very low fan pressure ratio to keep jet-flap noise about 3 dB below total system noise. Other noise reducing features discussed are the low tip speed fans and a carefully selected number of fan blades and vanes with adequate spacing between them. Attention is also given to the development of a low emissions combustor, and reduction of fan frame weight, through the use of graphite/epoxy material. The YC-15 engine also employs variable pitch fans to provide thrust reversal, thus saving weight. Finally, it is noted that the tests have proven that the engines could be configurated to meet the needs of a powered lift system without excessively compromising performance or weight.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron characteristics of VVER-1000 core using the MCU-PD program and comparison of the results with calculations by the BIPR-7A program and experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Dement'ev, V. G.; Oleinik, D. S.

    2011-12-15

    The Monte Carlo method has been used to simulate the neutron transport in nuclear reactors for over fifty years. Fast progress in computer power and development of more and more robust and reliable algorithms, codes, and nuclear databases allow solving more challenging problems, including three-dimensional (3D) simulations of full-scale reactor cores. Short descriptions of a full-scale 3D model of the VVER-1000 core and algorithms and methods implemented in the MCU-PD and BIPR-7A codes and a comparison of the calculations by each program as well as a comparison with experimental data are given in this paper.

  16. Developmental programming of the metabolic syndrome by maternal nutritional imbalance: how strong is the evidence from experimental models in mammals?

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, James A; Khan, Imran Y; Taylor, Paul D; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Poston, Lucilla

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of abnormalities focusing on insulin resistance and associated with high risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, is reaching epidemic proportions. Prevalent in both developed and developing countries, the metabolic syndrome has largely been attributed to altered dietary and lifestyle factors that favour the development of central obesity. However, population-based studies have suggested that predisposition to the metabolic syndrome may be acquired very early in development through inappropriate fetal or neonatal nutrition. Further evidence for developmental programming of the metabolic syndrome has now been suggested by animal studies in which the fetal environment has been manipulated through altered maternal dietary intake or modification of uterine artery blood flow. This review examines these studies and assesses whether the metabolic syndrome can be reliably induced by the interventions made. The validity of the different species, diets, feeding regimes and end-point measures used is also discussed. PMID:15459241

  17. A High Soy Diet Reduces Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Bcl-xL Expression In Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lovekamp-Swan, Tara; Glendenning, Michele; Schreihofer, Derek A.

    2009-01-01

    Soy phytoestrogens have been proposed as an alternative to estrogen replacement therapy and have demonstrated potential neuroprotective effects in the brain. We have shown that a high soy diet significantly reduces infarct size following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Here, we tested the hypothesis that a high soy diet would attenuate programmed cell death after stroke. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and fed either an isoflavone-reduced diet (IFP) or a high soy diet (SP) for 2 weeks before undergoing 90 minutes of transient MCAO (tMCAO) followed by 22.5 hr reperfusion. Infarct size, as assessed by TTC staining, was significantly reduced by a high soy diet (p< 0.05). Apoptosis in the ischemic cortex, measured by TUNEL staining, was significantly reduced by the high soy diet. The number of active caspase-3 positive cells and caspase-mediated α-spectrin cleavage was also significantly decreased in the ischemic cortex of SP rats. Furthermore, nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was significantly reduced in the ischemic cortex of SP rats. Soy significantly increased bcl-xL mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic cortex compared to IFP rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased neuronal expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL in the ischemic cortex of both IFP and SP rats following tMCAO. These results suggest that a high soy diet decreases both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent programmed cell death following tMCAO. Further, a high soy diet enhances expression of the cell survival factor bcl-xL following tMCAO, contributing to the neuroprotective effects of soy in the ischemic cortex. PMID:17706879

  18. Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

    2008-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i

  19. ETR, TRA642. BASEMENT SPACE ALLOCATION FOR EXPERIMENTERS CA. 1966, SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. BASEMENT SPACE ALLOCATION FOR EXPERIMENTERS CA. 1966, SOUTHEAST QUADRANT OF FLOOR. WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DIVISION (WAPD) AND BETTIS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY (BAPL) CONSUME MOST OF THE QUADRANT. PHILLIPS PETROLEUM COMPANY ETR-E-2256, 12/1966. INL INDEX NO. 532-0642-00-706-021256, REV. F. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Experimental test program for evaluation of solid lubricant coating as applied to compliant foil gas bearings to 315 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental apparatus and test procedure was developed to compare the performance of two solid lubricant coatings for air lubricated compliant foil gas bearings in the temperature range of 25 to 315 C. Polyimide bonded additive (SBGC) were tested extensively for durability and frictional characteristics. A partial arc bearing constructed of Inconel X-750 was coated on the bore with one of these coatings. The foil was subjected to repeated start/stop cycles. Performance comparisons reveal that although both coatings survive thousands of start/stop cycles, only the PBGF coated bearing achieves the specified 9000 start/stops. There is enough wear on the SBGC coated bearing to warrant termination of the test prior to 9000 start/stop cycles due to coating failure. The frictional characteristics of the PBGF are better at the elevated temperatures than at lower temperatures; a marked increase in sliding friction occurs as the temperature decreases. The SBGC maintains relatively constant frictional characteristics independent of operating temperature.

  1. Experimental and analytical program to determine strains in 737 LAP splice joints subjected to normal fuselage pressurization loads

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.; Jeong, D.Y.

    1996-02-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center (FAATC) has initiated several research projects to assess the structural integrity of the aging commercial aircraft fleet. One area of research involves the understanding of a phenomenon known as ``Widespread Fatigue Damage`` or WFD, which refers to a type of multiple element cracking that degrades the damage tolerance capability of an aircraft structure. Research on WFD has been performed both experimentally and analytically including finite element modeling of fuselage lap splice joints by the Volpe Center. Fuselage pressurization tests have also been conducted at the FAA`s Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to obtain strain gage data from select locations on the FAA/AANC 737 Transport Aircraft Test Bed. One-hundred strain channels were used to monitor five different lap splice bays including the fuselage skin and substructure elements. These test results have been used to evaluate the accuracy of the analytical models and to support general aircraft analysis efforts. This paper documents the strain fields measured during the AANC tests and successfully correlates the results with analytical predictions.

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the reduction in parachute drag caused by forebody wake effects: data compilation and program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate approximate analytical methods for predicting the reduction in parachute drag caused by forebody wake effects. The drag of a 20/sup 0/ conical ribbon parachute was measured at several axial stations behind an ogive cylinder forebody with and without fins. The same parachute was tested in undisturbed flow (where wake effects were negligible) so that the effects of suspension line length on parachute drag could be separated from the drag losses caused by the turbulent wake. Total head pressure surveys were made across the forebody wake and integrated across the canopy skirt area to determine the effective dynamic pressure acting on the parachute. Experimental results confirmed the validity of the underlying physical model of the parachute/wake interaction: the ratio of parachute drag behind a forebody divided by wake-free parachute drag is equal to the ratio of effective dynamic pressure acting on the parachute divided by free-stream dynamic pressure. However, the inability of existing turbulent wake theoretical models to make accurate predictions of wake velocity distributions for arbitrary forebody shapes is a fundamental limitation of the drag-loss analysis. If wake velocity profiles are known, the empirical constants in the turbulent wake theoretical models can be adjusted and accurate estimates of wake-induced parachute drag loss can be obtained from existing theory.

  3. Energy Spread Monitoring for the JLAB Experimental Program: Synchrotron Light Interferometers, Optical Transition Radiation Monitors, and Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.-C.; Chevtsov, P.; Day, A.; Freyberger, A. P.; Hicks, R.; Joyce, M.; Denard, J.-C.

    2004-11-10

    The hypernuclear physics program at JLAB requires an electron beam with small transverse size ({sigma} {approx} 100 {mu}m) and an upper limit on the RMS energy spread of ({delta}E/E) < 3 x 10{sup -5}. To measure and monitor these parameters, a beam size and energy spread measurement system has been created. The system consists of a set of wire scanners, Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) detectors, and Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI). The energy spread is measured via a set of wire scans performed at specific locations in the transport line, which is an invasive process. During physics operation the energy spread is monitored continuously with the OTR and/or the SLI. These devices are non-invasive [or nearly non-invasive in the case of OTR] and operate over a very wide range of beam energies (1-6 GeV) and currents ({approx}100 {mu}A down to few {mu}A). All components of this system are automated in an EPICS accelerator control environment. The paper presents our operational experience with the beam size and energy spread measurement system and its maintenance.

  4. Energy Spread Monitoring for the JLAB Experimental Program: Synchrotron Light Interferometers, Optical Transition Radiation Monitors and Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Arne Freyberger; Yu-Chiu Chao; Pavel Chevtsov; Anthony Day; William Hicks; Michele Joyce; Jean-Claude Denard

    2004-05-01

    The hypernuclear physics program at JLAB requires an electron beam with small transverse size (sigma {approx} 100 {micro}m) and an upper limit on the RMS energy spread of delta E / E < 3 x 10{sup -}5. To measure and monitor these parameters, a beam size and energy spread measurement system has been created. The system consists of a set of wire scanners, Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) detectors, and Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI). The energy spread is measured via a set of wire scans performed at specific locations in the transport line, which is an invasive process. During physics operation the energy spread is monitored continuously with the OTR and/or the SLI. These devices are noninvasive [or nearly non-invasive in the case of OTR] and operate over a very wide range of beam energies (1.6 GeV) and currents ({approx}100 {micro}A down to few {micro}A). All components of this system are automated in an EPICS accelerator control environment. The paper presents our operational experience with the beam size and energy spread measurement system and its maintenance.

  5. Programmed death-1 pathway in host tissues ameliorates Th17/Th1-mediated experimental chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hideaki; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kobayashi, Koichiro; Nishimori, Hisakazu; Matsuoka, Ken-Ichi; Fujii, Nobuharu; Kondo, Eisei; Tanaka, Takehiro; Chen, Lieping; Azuma, Miyuki; Yagita, Hideo; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2014-09-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major cause of late death and morbidity after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, but its pathogenesis remains unclear. We investigated the role of the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway in chronic GVHD using a well-defined mouse model of B10.D2 (H-2(d)) donor to BALB/c (H-2(d)) recipients. PD-1 expression on allogeneic donor T cells was upregulated continuously in chronic GVHD development, whereas PD-L1 expression in host tissues was transiently upregulated and declined to basal levels in the late posttransplant period. Blockade of the PD-1 pathway by anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1, or anti-PD-L2 mAbs exacerbated clinical and pathologic chronic GVHD. Chimeric mice revealed that PD-L1 expression in host tissues suppressed expansion of IL-17(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells, and that PD-L1 expression on hematopoietic cells plays a role in the development of regulatory T cells only during the early transplantation period but does not affect the severity of chronic GVHD. Administration of the synthetic retinoid Am80 overcame the IL-17(+)IFN-γ(+) T cell expansion caused by PD-L1 deficiency, resulting in reduced chronic GVHD damage in PD-L1(-/-) recipients. Stimulation of the PD-1 pathway also alleviated chronic GVHD. These results suggest that the PD-1 pathway contributes to the suppression of Th17/Th1-mediated chronic GVHD and may represent a new target for the prevention or treatment of chronic GVHD. PMID:25080485

  6. Effects of Palliative Care Training Program on Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs and Experiences Among Student Physiotherapists: A Preliminary Quasi-experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil P; Jim, Anand; Sisodia, Vaishali

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physiotherapists play an inherent role in the multidisciplinary palliative care team. Existing knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and experiences influence their team participation in palliative care. Aims: The objective of this study was to assess the changes in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and experiences among student physiotherapists who attended a palliative care training program. Settings and Design: Preliminary quasi-experimental study design, conducted at an academic institution. Materials and Methods: Fifty-two student physiotherapists of either gender (12 male, 40 female) of age (20.51±1.78 years) who attended a palliative care training program which comprised lectures and case examples of six-hours duration participated in this study. The study was performed after getting institutional approval and obtaining participants’ written informed consent. The lecture content comprised WHO definition of palliative care, spiritual aspects of life, death and healing, principles, levels and models of palliative care, and role of physiotherapists in a palliative care team. The physical therapy in palliative care-knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and experiences scale (PTiPC-KABE Scale)- modified from palliative care attitudes scale were used for assessing the participants before and after the program. Statistical Analysis: Paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test at 95% confidence interval using SPSS 11.5 for Windows. Results: Statistically significant differences (P<0.05) were noted for all four subscales- knowledge (7.84±4.61 points), attitudes (9.46±8.06 points), beliefs (4.88±3.29 points) and experiences (15.8±11.28 points) out of a total score of 104 points. Conclusions: The focus-group training program produced a significant positive change about palliative care in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and experiences among student physiotherapists. PMID:21633621

  7. Redundant Roles for Met Docking Site Tyrosines and the Gab1 Pleckstrin Homology Domain in InlB-Mediated Entry of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Basar, Tumay; Shen, Yang; Ireton, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes causes food-borne illnesses leading to gastroenteritis, meningitis, or abortion. Listeria induces its internalization into some mammalian cells through interaction of the bacterial surface protein InlB with host Met receptor tyrosine kinase. Binding of InlB leads to phosphorylation of Met and the adapter Gab1 and to activation of host phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase. The mammalian ligand of Met, hepatocyte growth factor, promotes cell motility and morphogenesis in a manner dependent on phosphorylation of two docking site tyrosines at positions 1349 and 1356 in the receptor's cytoplasmic tail. Here we determined if these tyrosines were essential for Listeria entry. A derivative of the human cell line T47D stably expressing a truncated Met lacking most of its cytoplasmic domain was unable to support InlB-mediated signaling or entry. Surprisingly, cells expressing mutant Met containing phenylalanine substitutions in both tyrosines 1349 and 1356 (MetYF) allowed entry and InlB-induced Gab1 phosphorylation. However, in contrast to the situation in cells expressing wild-type Met, Gab1 phosphorylation in MetYF cells required PI 3-kinase activity. The Gab1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain was constitutively associated with the plasma membrane of cells in a PI 3-kinase-dependent manner. Overexpression of the PH domain blocked entry of Listeria into cells expressing MetYF but not into cells expressing wild-type Met. Taken together, these results indicate that the docking site tyrosines are dispensable for internalization when membrane localization of Gab1 is constitutive. Distinct pathways of recruitment by phosphorylated tyrosines in Met and PH domain ligands in the membrane are redundant for bacterial entry. PMID:15784547

  8. Persistent and transient Listeria monocytogenes strains from retail deli environments vary in their ability to adhere and form biofilms and rarely have inlA premature stop codons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjin; Ray, Andrea J; Hammons, Susan R; Oliver, Haley F

    2015-02-01

    Based on recent risk assessments, up to 83% of listeriosis cases from deli meat in the United States are predicted to be from ready-to-eat deli meats contaminated during processing at retail grocery stores. Listeria monocytogenes is known to use sanitizer tolerance and biofilm formation to survive, but interplay of these mechanisms along with virulence potential and persistence mechanisms specific to deli environments had yet to be elucidated. In this study, 442 isolates from food and nonfood contact surfaces in 30 retail delis over 9 months were tested for inlA premature stop codons (PMSCs); inlA encodes InlA, which is necessary to cause listeriosis. A total of 96 isolates, composed of 23 persistent and 73 transient strains, were tested for adhesion and biofilm-forming ability and sanitizer tolerance. Only 10/442 isolates had inlA PMSCs (p<0.001). Strains with PMSCs were not persistent, even in delis with other persistent strains. Most (7/10) PMSC-containing isolates were collected from food contact surfaces (p<0.001); 6/10 PMSC-containing isolates were found in moderate prevalence delis (p<0.05). Persistent strains had enhanced adhesion on day 1 of a 5-day adhesion-biofilm formation assay. However, there was no significant difference in sanitizer tolerance between persistent and transient strains. Results suggest that foods contaminated with persistent L. monocytogenes strains from the retail environment are (1) likely to have wild-type virulence potential and (2) may persist due to increased adhesion and biofilm formation capacity rather than sanitizer tolerance, thus posing a significant public health risk. PMID:25569840

  9. Does the theory-driven program affect the risky behavior of drug injecting users in a healthy city? A quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Karimy, Mahmood; Abedi, Ahmad Reza; Abredari, Hamid; Taher, Mohammad; Zarei, Fatemeh; Rezaie Shahsavarloo, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: The horror of HIV/AIDS as a non-curable, grueling disease is a destructive issue for every country. Drug use, shared needles and unsafe sex are closely linked to the transmission of HIV/AIDS. Modification or changing unhealthy behavior through educational programs can lead to HIV prevention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of theory-based education intervention on HIV prevention transmission in drug addicts. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 69 male drug injecting users were entered in to the theory- based educational intervention. Data were collected using a questionnaire, before and 3 months after four sessions (group discussions, lecture, film displaying and role play) of educational intervention. Results: The findings signified that the mean scores of constructs (self-efficacy, susceptibility, severity and benefit) significantly increased after the educational intervention, and the perceived barriers decreased (p< 0.001). Also, the history of HIV testing was reported to be 9% before the intervention, while the rate increased to 88% after the intervention. Conclusion: The present research offers a primary founding for planning and implementing a theory based educational program to prevent HIV/AIDS transmission in drug injecting addicts. This research revealed that health educational intervention improved preventive behaviors and the knowledge of HIV/AIDS participants. PMID:27390684

  10. Forecast of criticality experiments and experimental programs needed to support nuclear operations in the United States of America: 1994--1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, D.

    1994-03-01

    This Forecast is generated by the Chair of the Experiment Needs Identification Workgroup (ENIWG), with input from Department of Energy and the nuclear community. One of the current concerns addressed by ENIWG was the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board`s Recommendation 93-2. This Recommendation delineated the need for a critical experimental capability, which includes (1) a program of general-purpose experiments, (2) improving the information base, and (3) ongoing departmental programs. The nuclear community also recognizes the importance of criticality theory, which, as a stepping stone to computational analysis and safety code development, needs to be benchmarked against well-characterized critical experiments. A summary project of the Department`s needs with respect to criticality information includes (1) hands-on training, (2) criticality and nuclear data, (3) detector systems, (4) uranium- and plutonium-based reactors, and (5) accident analysis. The Workgroup has evaluated, prioritized, and categorized each proposed experiment and program. Transportation/Applications is a new category intended to cover the areas of storage, training, emergency response, and standards. This category has the highest number of priority-1 experiments (nine). Facilities capable of performing experiments include the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF) along with Area V at Sandia National Laboratory. The LACEF continues to house the most significant collection of critical assemblies in the Western Hemisphere. The staff of this facility and Area V are trained and certified, and documentation is current. ENIWG will continue to work with the nuclear community to identify and prioritize experiments because there is an overwhelming need for critical experiments to be performed for basic research and code validation.

  11. Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at INL

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; David H. Meikrantz; Nick R. Mann; Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-09-01

    Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5 cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at the INL Troy G. Garn, Dave H. Meikrantz, Nick R. Mann, Jack D. Law, Terry A. Todd Idaho National Laboratory Commercially available, Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACC) are currently being evaluated for processing dissolved nuclear fuel solutions to selectively partition integrated elements using solvent extraction technologies. These evaluations include hydraulic and clean-in-place (CIP) testing of a commercially available 12.5 cm unit. Data from these evaluations is used to support design of future nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Hydraulic testing provides contactor throughput performance data on two-phase systems for a wide range of operating conditions. Hydraulic testing results on a simple two-phase oil and water system followed by a 30 % Tributyl phosphate in N-dodecane / nitric acid pair are reported. Maximum total throughputs for this size contactor ranged from 20 to 32 liters per minute without significant other phase carryover. A relatively new contactor design enhancement providing Clean-in-Place capability for ACCs was also investigated. Spray nozzles installed into the central rotor shaft allow the rotor internals to be cleaned, offline. Testing of the solids capture of a diatomaceous earth/water slurry feed followed by CIP testing was performed. Solids capture efficiencies of >95% were observed for all tests and short cold water cleaning pulses proved successful at removing solids from the rotor.

  12. INL SITEWIDE INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS, AND OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE PLAN FOR CERCLA RESPONSE ACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    JOLLEY, WENDELL L

    2008-02-05

    On November 9, 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality approved the 'Record of Decision Experimental Breeder Reactor-I/Boiling Water Reactor Experiment Area and Miscellaneous Sites', which required a Site-wide institutional controls plan for the then Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory). This document, first issued in June 2004, fulfilled that requirement. This revision identifies and consolidates the institutional controls and operations and maintenance requirements into a single document.

  13. Hydrogen engine development: Experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Van Blarigan, P.

    1996-10-01

    In the continuing development of a hydrogen fueled IC engine optimized for application to a generator set or hybrid vehicle, experiments were performed at Sandia National Laboratories on two engine configurations. The intent is to maximize thermal efficiency while complying with strict emissions standards. The initial investigation was conducted utilizing a spark ignited 0.491 liter single cylinder Onan engine and has progressed to a spark ignited 0.850 liter modified for single cylinder operation Perkins engine. Both combustion chamber geometries were {open_quotes}pancake{close_quotes} shaped and achieved a compression ratio of 14:1. The engines were operated under premixed conditions. The results demonstrate that both engines can comply with the California Air Resources Board`s proposed Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle standards for NO{sub x} during operation at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. The Onan engine achieved an indicated thermal efficiency of 43% at 1800 RPM, as determined by integration of the pressure-volume relationships. Initial experiments with the larger displacement Perkins engine have realized a gain, relative to the Onan engine, in indicated thermal efficiency of 2% at 1800 RPM, and 15% at 1200 RPM.

  14. Initial Operation of the High Temperature Electrolysis Integrated Laboratory Scale Experiment at INL

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Stoots; J. E. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

    2008-06-01

    An integrated laboratory scale, 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other “integral” issues. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation.

  15. Relaxation dynamics of deeply supercooled confined water inl,l-diphenylalanine micro/nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, P. M. G. L.; Ishikawa, M. S.; Kogikoski, S.; Alves, W. A.; Martinho, H.

    The temperature dependence (10-290 K) of the low-frequency (20-150 cm-1) Raman-active phonon modes of supercooled con?ned water in L,L-diphenylalanine micro/nanotubes was analysed. The isolated dynamics of a specific geometry of water cluster (pentamer) in supercooled confined regime was studied in detail. A particular mode concerning water-nanotube interaction was also probed. A fragile-to-strong transition at 204 K was observed and related to the crossing of the Widom line. The critical exponent analyses of the relaxation rate data based on mode-coupling theory indicated perfect agreement among experimental data and theory. Our results are consistent with the existence of a second critical point of water.

  16. Progress report of a research program in experimental high energy physics, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980. [Brown Univ. , Providence, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.M.; Widgoff, M.

    1980-10-01

    An experimental program to study the interactions of hadrons and photons is being carried out with hybrid systems that include bubble chambers as visible targets as well as counter spectrometers. Experiments are being performed at the accelerators of the laboratories at Batavia, Stanford, and Geneva, Switzerland. The bubble chamber - hybrid system group is engaged in several experiments at Fermilab. Extensive analysis of the interactions of 147-GeV/c ..pi../sup +/, K/sup +/, and p in hydrogen is in progress. The results of an earlier experiment on ..pi../sup -/p interactions at the same momentum, in the same experimental set-up, are available for comparison; in this way the range of incident-channel quantum numbers studied is extended with a minimum of systematic error. This year there has been particular emphasis on associated production in interactions of the form ab ..-->.. cX, on rho/sup 0/ production, and on multiparticle correlations. Comparison of hadron production by hadrons with hadron production by leptons is being extended to all the incident particles, for a variety of kinematic variables. Two experiments with an improved hybrid system are now scheduled for data-taking at Fermilab in early 1981, to study ..pi../sup + -/K/sup +/ and p/sup + -/ interactions in hydrogen, and in aluminum, slver, and gold foils, at beam momenta of 200 and 400 GeV/c. A similar study at 250 GeV/c, using the large European Hybrid System at CERN, will begin during 1981. During the spring and summer of 1980, data-taking was begun on two experiments investigating photoproduction of charm and vector mesons, in a polarized monoenergetic backscattered laser beam of 20 GeV/c using the SLAC Hybrid Facility.

  17. The Effect of Ursolic Acid on Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis Is Related to Programed Cell Death and Presents Therapeutic Potential in Experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Eduardo S.; Campos, Bruno L. S.; Jesus, Jéssica A.; Laurenti, Márcia D.; Ribeiro, Susan P.; Kallás, Esper G.; Rafael-Fernandes, Mariana; Santos-Gomes, Gabriela; Silva, Marcelo S.; Sessa, Deborah P.; Lago, João H. G.; Levy, Débora; Passero, Luiz F. D.

    2015-01-01

    Among neglected tropical diseases, leishmaniasis is one of the most important ones, affecting more than 12 million people worldwide. The available treatments are not well tolerated, and present diverse side effects, justifying the search for new therapeutic compounds. In the present study, the activity of ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) were assayed in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis (in vitro and in vivo). Promastigote forms of L. amazonensis were incubated with OA and UA for 24h, and effective concentration 50% (EC50) was estimated. Ultraestructural alterations in Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes after UA treatment were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, and the possible mode of action was assayed through Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, caspase 3/7 activity, DNA fragmentation and transmembrane mitochondrial potential. The UA potential was evaluated in intracellular amastigotes, and its therapeutic potential was evaluated in L. amazonensis infected BALB/c mice. UA eliminated L. amazonensis promastigotes with an EC50 of 6.4 μg/mL, comparable with miltefosine, while OA presented only a marginal effect on promastigote forms at 100 μg/mL. The possible mechanism by which promastigotes were eliminated by UA was programmed cell death, independent of caspase 3/7, but it was highly dependent on mitochondria activity. UA was not toxic for peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice, and it was able to eliminate intracellular amastigotes, associated with nitric oxide (NO) production. OA did not eliminate amastigotes nor trigger NO. L. amazonensis infected BALB/c mice submitted to UA treatment presented lesser lesion size and parasitism compared to control. This study showed, for the first time, that UA eliminate promastigote forms through a mechanism associated with programed cell death, and importantly, was effective in vivo. Therefore, UA can be considered an interesting candidate for future tests as a prototype drug for the treatment

  18. INL FY 2011 SITE SUSTAINABILITY PLAN WITH THE FY 2010 ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest L. Fossum; Steve A. Birrer

    2010-12-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 'Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management,' the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B 'Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management' and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, 'Environmental Protection Program.' These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  19. FY 2012 INL SITE SUSTAINABILITY PLAN WITH THE FY 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest L. Fossum; Steve A. Birrer

    2012-01-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  20. FY 2013 INL SITE SUSTAINABILITY PLAN WITH THE FY 2012 ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest L. Fossum; Steve A. Birrer

    2012-12-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  1. FINAL REPORT OF FY 1999, 2000, AND 2001 ACTIVITIES: CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRATED SOUNDING SYSTEM IN SUPPORT OF THE DOE/ARM EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Ed R. Westwater CIRES, University of Colorado /NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory 325 Broadway MS R/E/ET1 Boulder, Colorado 80305

    2002-04-30

    OAK B188 FINAL REPORT OF FY 1999, 2000, AND 2001 ACTIVITIES: CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRATED SOUNDING SYSTEM IN SUPPORT OF THE DOE/ARM EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM The basic goals of the research are to develop and test algorithms and deploy instruments that improve measurements of atmospheric quantities relevant to radiative transfer and climate research. Primary among these atmospheric variables are integrated amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid, as well as profiles of temperature, water vapor and cloud liquid. A primary thrust of this research is to combine data from instruments available to ARM to maximize their importance in radiative transfer and climate research. To gather data relevant to these studies, participation in field experiments, especially intensive operating periods, as well as the subsequent analysis and dissemination of collected data, is of primary importance. Examples of relevant experiments include several Water Vapor Intensive Operating Periods at the Southern Great Plains Cloud And Radiation Testbed site, experiments in the Tropical Western Pacific such as PROBE and Nauru'99, and experiments at the North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean site. This final report describes our analyses of data taken during these field experiments.

  2. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2011 - December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    S. J. Payne; J. M. Hodges; R. G. Berg; D. F. Bruhn

    2012-12-01

    During 2011, the Idaho National Laboratory Seismic Monitoring Program evaluated 21,928 independent triggers that included earthquakes from around the world, the western United States, and local region of the Snake River Plain. Seismologists located 2,063 earthquakes and man-made blasts within and near the 161-km (or 100-mile) radius of the Idaho National Laboratory. Of these events, 16 were small-to-moderate size earthquakes ranging in magnitude (M) from 3.0 to 4.4. Within the 161-km radius, the majority of 941 earthquakes (M < 4.4) occurred in the active regions of the Basin and Range Province with only six microearthquakes occurring in the Snake River Plain. In the northern and southeastern Basin and Range, eight earthquake swarms occurred and included over 325 events. Five of the Snake River Plain earthquakes were located within and near the northern and southern ends of the Great Rift volcanic rift zone. All have anomalously deep focal depths (16 to 38 km) and waveforms indicative of fluid movement at mid- and lower-crustal levels and are a continuation of activity observed at Craters of the Moon National Monument since 2007. Since 1972, the Idaho National Laboratory has recorded 55 small-magnitude microearthquakes (M = 2.2) within the eastern Snake River Plain and 25 deep microearthquakes (M = 2.3) in the vicinity of Craters of the Moon National Monument.

  3. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2012 - December 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S. J.; Bruhn, D. F.; Hodges, J. M.; Berg, R. G.

    2015-03-01

    During 2012, the Idaho National Laboratory Seismic Monitoring Program evaluated 17,329 independent triggers that included earthquakes from around the world, the western United States, and local region of the Snake River Plain. Seismologists located 1,460 earthquakes and man-made blasts within and near the 161-km (or 100-mile) radius of the Idaho National Laboratory. Of these earthquakes, 16 had small-to-moderate size magnitudes (M) from 3.0 to 3.6. Within the 161-km radius, the majority of 695 earthquakes (M < 3.6) occurred in the active regions of the Basin and Range Provinces adjacent to the eastern Snake River Plain. Only 11 microearthquakes occurred within the Snake River Plain, four of which occurred in Craters of the Moon National Monument. The earthquakes had magnitudes from 1.0 to 1.7 and occurred at deep depths (11-24 km). Two events with magnitudes less than 1.0 occurred within the Idaho National Laboratory boundaries and had depths less than 10 km.

  4. Transmutation Performance Analysis for Inert Matrix Fuels in Light Water Reactors and Computational Neutronics Methods Capabilities at INL

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Pope; Samuel E. Bays; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; Mehdi Asgari; Benoit Forget

    2009-05-01

    The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF, thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCmCf, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu. The results of this infinite lattice assembly-wise study using SCALE 5.1 indicate that it may be feasible to recycle TRU in this manner using an otherwise typical PWR assembly without violating peaking factor limits.

  5. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  6. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  7. Refinement, testing, and application of an Integrated Data Assimilation/Sounding System (IDASS) for the DOE/ARM Experimental Program. Final report for period September 20, 1990 - May 8, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, David B.

    2002-04-09

    This report describes work done by NCAR under the ''Refinement, Testing, and Application of an Integrated Data Assimilation/Sounding System (IDASS) for the DOE/ARM Experimental Program''. It includes a discussion of the goals, findings and a list of 27 journal articles, 92 non-refereed papers and 30 other presentations not associated with a formal publication.

  8. Health and Safety Considerations Associated with Sodium-Cooled Experimental Nuclear Fuel Dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Carvo, Alan E.

    2015-04-01

    Between the mid-1970s and the mid-1980s Sandia National Laboratory constructed eleven experimental assemblies to simulate debris beds formed in a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. All but one of the assemblies were irradiated. The experimental assemblies were transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2007 and 2008 for storage, dismantlement, recovery of the uranium for reuse in the nuclear fuel cycle, and disposal of unneeded materials. This paper addresses the effort to dismantle the assemblies down to the primary containment vessel and repackage them for temporary storage until such time as equipment necessary for sodium separation is in place.

  9. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  10. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  11. Evaluation of a training program for health care workers to improve the quality of care for rape survivors: a quasi-experimental design study in Morogoro, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Abeid, Muzdalifat; Muganyizi, Projestine; Mpembeni, Rose; Darj, Elisabeth; Axemo, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Background Sexual violence against women and children in Tanzania and globally is a human rights violation and a developmental challenge. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the impact of training health professionals on rape management. The specific objectives were to evaluate the changes of knowledge and attitudes toward sexual violence among a selected population of health professionals at primary health care level. Design A quasi-experimental design using cross-sectional surveys was conducted to evaluate health care workers’ knowledge, attitude, and clinical practice toward sexual violence before and after the training program. The study involved the Kilombero (intervention) and Ulanga (comparison) districts in Morogoro region. A total of 151 health professionals at baseline (2012) and 169 in the final assessment (2014) participated in the survey. Data were collected using the same structured questionnaire. The amount of change in key indicators from baseline to final assessment in the two areas was compared using composite scores in the pre- and post-interventions, and the net intervention effect was calculated by the difference in difference method. Results Overall, there was improved knowledge in the intervention district from 55% at baseline to 86% and a decreased knowledge from 58.5 to 36.2% in the comparison area with a net effect of 53.7% and a p-value less than 0.0001. The proportion of participants who exhibited an accepting attitude toward violence declined from 15.3 to 11.2% in the intervention area but increased from 13.2 to 20.0% in the comparison area. Conclusions Training on the management of sexual violence is feasible and the results indicate improvement in healthcare workers’ knowledge and practice but not attitudes. Lessons learned from this study for successful replication of such an intervention in similar settings require commitment from those at strategic level within the health service to ensure that adequate resources are

  12. EXPERIMENTATION WITH TAPED MATERIALS AND NATIVE INFORMANTS TO DEVELOP FOR SMALL COLLEGES SOME PROGRAMS OF INDEPENDENT STUDY IN THE NEGLECTED LANGUAGES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOYD-BOWMAN, PETER

    A SIMPLE, INEXPENSIVE, AND LARGELY SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL LANGUAGE PROGRAM WAS ESTABLISHED AND EVALUATED FOR FIVE ACADEMIC QUARTERS AT KALAMAZOO COLLEGE IN MICHIGAN. THE PROGRAM WAS CALLED THE "NEGLECTED LANGUAGE PROGRAM" (NLP) AND OFFERED INSTRUCTION IN MANDARIN CHINESE, JAPANESE, HINDI-URDU, PERSIAN, SWAHILI, AND BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE. ITS PURPOSE…

  13. Characterization of specific alleles in InlA and PrfA of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from foods in Osaka, Japan and their ability to invade Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kanki, Masashi; Naruse, Hisayo; Taguchi, Masumi; Kumeda, Yuko

    2015-10-15

    Listeria monocytogenes expresses the surface protein internalin A (InlA), enabling the invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells to cause severe food-borne diseases. Full-length sequence analysis of inlA of 114 food isolates resulted in the detection of 29 isolates with a premature stop codon (PMSC) mutation and 6 isolates with 3-codon deletion mutations (aa 738 to 740) in inlA. The isolates with inlA PMSCs demonstrated a significantly lower level of invasion than the other food isolates in a Caco-2 cell invasion assay (P<0.01), but the isolates with the 3-codon deletion exhibited invasion comparable to the isolates with non-truncated InlA (P>0.05). According to analysis of the positive regulatory factor A (PrfA) sequences of 114 L. monocytogenes isolates, 7 isolates of serotype 1/2a from chicken samples contained a PrfA protein with a 5-nucleotide deletion from 712 to 716, including a stop codon. Although the isolates with a 5-nucleotide deletion in prfA demonstrated invasion comparable to the isolates with non-truncated InlA and PrfA after growth at 30 °C (P>0.05), they exhibited a significantly higher level of invasion than the other isolates after growth at 20 °C (P<0.01). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of L. monocytogenes isolates with the stop-codon deletion of PrfA. PMID:26143289

  14. Spatio-temporal assessment of soil erosion risk in different agricultural zones of the Inle Lake region, southern Shan State, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Htwe, Thin Nwe; Brinkmann, Katja; Buerkert, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Myanmar is one of Southeast Asia's climatically most diverse countries, where sheet, rill, and gully erosion affect crop yields and subsequently livelihood strategies of many people. In the unique wetland ecosystem of Inle Lake, soil erosion in surrounding uplands lead to sedimentation and pollution of the water body. The current study uses the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to identify soil erosion risks of the Inle Lake region in space and time and to assess the relationship between soil erosion and degradation for different agricultural zones and cropping systems. Altogether, 85% of soil losses occurred on barren land along the steep slopes. The hotspot of soil erosion risk is situated in the western uplands characterized by unsustainable land use practices combined with a steep topography. The estimated average soil losses amounted to 19.9, 10.1, and 26.2 t ha(-1) yr(-1) in 1989, 2000, and 2009, respectively. These fluctuations were mainly the results of changes in precipitation and land cover (deforestation (-19%) and expansion of annual cropland (+35%) from 1989 to 2009). Most farmers in the study area have not yet adopted effective soil protection measures to mitigate the effects of soil erosion such as land degradation and water pollution of the lake reservoir. This urgently needs to be addressed by policy makers and extension services. PMID:26350794

  15. Deconvolution Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-02-18

    The program is suitable for a lot of applications in applied mathematics, experimental physics, signal analytical system and some engineering applications range i.e. deconvolution spectrum, signal analysis and system property analysis etc.

  16. Use and Evaluation of Psuedo-Geostationary Lightning Mapping Data within the 2010 Experimental Warning Program and GOES-R Proving Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, K. M.; Siewert, C.; Stano, G. T.; Bruning, E. C.; Kingfield, D.; Baranowski, B.

    2010-12-01

    The primary objective of the Experimental Warning Program (EWP) is to evaluate the accuracy and the operational utility of new science, technology, and products in a testbed setting in order to gain feedback for improvements prior to their potential implementation into National Weather Service (NWS) operations. A developmental product for the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) was demonstrated during the Spring 2010 EWP as part of the GOES-R Proving Ground. This product was created using data from ground-based Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) networks sorted into flashes and displayed at the 8 km resolution expected with the GLM. During the EWP, forecasters were able to examine the lightning data in AWIPS in conjunction with radar and other multi-sensor products as part of their warning-decision process for both real-time and archive events. Forecasters were then asked to provide feedback through both online surveys following the event and discussion with lead scientists. In general, the PGLM products provided a strong support tool for the forecasters and helped increase forecaster confidence to warn or not warn on a storm. Forecasters viewed future GLM data as a “great tool” or a possible “mainstream product” for “situational awareness.” Multiple forecaster comments echoed the idea of using the GLM data as an additional tool to radar, particularly during the early stages of storm development. Suggestions were given regarding display of the data as well as for future product integration. This feedback will help shape the design of the products and educational tools concerning lightning data ahead of the availability of GOES-R data in the local NWS offices. In addition to the individual forecaster feedback, all warnings issued by the forecasters during the EWP have been scored (POD, FAR) and compared with the official NWS warnings to determine what type of influence the GOES-R products may have had on the warning decision process as well as on

  17. INL Tracer Interpretation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-03-27

    This spreadsheet application is for tracer test analysis. The analyses are based on the first temporal moment of a tracer. The governing equations are briefly discussed, and the individual steps required of the user are outlined. A series of Excel macros written in Visual Basic calculate mean residence time, swept pore volume, and flow-storage geometry from a tracer history.

  18. INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Clark; G.C. Knighton; R.S. Fielding; N.P. Hallinan

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various improvements being made ‘on the fly’ in a trial and error process.

  19. Systems Sustainability: Implementation of Enhanced Maintenance Programs at the Kurchatov Institute, the All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental physics and the All-Russian Scientific Institute for Technical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Coppinger, M.; Pikula, M.; Randolph, J.D.; Windham, M.

    1999-09-20

    Implementation of quality maintenance programs is essential to enhancing sustainable continuous operations of United States funded Materials Protection, Control and Accountability (MPC and A) equipment/systems upgrades at various Russian nuclear facilities. An effective maintenance program is expected to provide assurances to both parties for achieving maximum continuous systems operations with minimum down time. To be effective, the program developed must focus on minimum down time for any part of a system. Minimum down time is realized through the implementation of a quality maintenance program that includes preventative maintenance, necessary diagnostic tools, properly trained technical staff, and an in-house inventory of required spare parts for repairing the impacted component of the system. A centralized maintenance management program is logistically essential for the success of this effort because of the large volume of MPC and A equipment/systems installed at those sites. This paper will discuss current programs and conditions at the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute, the All-Russian Scientific Institute for Technical Physics and the All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics and will address those steps necessary to implement an upgraded program at those sites.

  20. MSFC Skylab experimenter's reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The methods and techniques for experiment development and integration that evolved during the Skylab Program are described to facilitate transferring this experience to experimenters in future manned space programs. Management responsibilities and the sequential process of experiment evolution from initial concept through definition, development, integration, operation and postflight analysis are outlined in the main text and amplified, as appropriate, in appendixes. Emphasis is placed on specific lessons learned on Skylab that are worthy of consideration by future programs.

  1. The Platinum Bullet: An Experimental Evaluation of CUNY's Accelerated Study in Associate Program (ASAP)--New Three-Year Impacts, Cost Analyses, and Implementation Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Michael; Scrivener, Susan; Fresques, Hannah; Ratledge, Alyssa; Rudd, Tim; Sommo, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    The City University of New York's (CUNY's) Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) combines many of the ideas from a range of programs into a comprehensive model that requires students to attend school full-time, and provides supports and incentives for three years. ASAP's financial aid reforms, enhanced student services, and scheduling…

  2. Program Experimentation Project on Special Summer Camp and Follow-Up on Youth Activities to Break the Poverty Cycle. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkin, Roderick

    Residential summer work programs in a camp setting for disadvantaged high school youth from welfare families were conducted in the summers of 1967 (in Montezuma, Colorado) and 1968 (in Montezuma, Colorado and Jamaica, Vermont). Followup activities during the school year following the youths' summer camp work program were part of overall project…

  3. Development, Evaluation, and Use of Programmed Materials. A Report on the Activities of the Materials Development Unit, MDT Vocational Experimental-Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, John M.; And Others

    The project described in this report attempted to provide a special project for the selection, counseling, testing, assessment, training, placement, and follow-up of prison inmates whose many problems prevented their profiting from conventional programs in vocational training. The mathematical approach to programing was used in developing the…

  4. Les programmes revises des technologies du genie electrique et leur experimentation (The Revised Programs of Electrical Engineering Technologies and Their Pilot Testing).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conseil des Colleges, Quebec (Quebec).

    In 1992, the Council of Colleges in Quebec undertook an analysis of proposed revisions to the electrical/electronic technology programs offered by the province's public colleges. The planned revision affects a large number of programs and colleges and would have important repercussions outside of the domain of the physical sciences. Part 1 of the…

  5. What Works for African American Children and Adolescents: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. Fact Sheet. Publication #2011-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandy, Tawana; Moore, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    The disproportionate vulnerability of African American youth to certain negative outcomes, including teen pregnancy, low academic achievement, HIV infection, and violent death, has emphasized the need for out-of-school time program providers and funders to seek programs that have been found to have positive impacts for this population.…

  6. Chart-Recorded Capillary Pulse Pressure Measurement as an Unobtrusive Means of Detecting Unspecified Frame-Specific Flaws in Programmed Instruction Sequences: An Experimental Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraley, Lawrence E., Jr.

    Capillary pulse pressure measurement may have potential as a covert but direct means of determining a subject's level of affect as he encounters the frame-by-frame content of programed instruction. An experiment was designed which called for recording the capillary pulse pressure of subjects as they worked through some programed instruction…

  7. EXPERIMENTAL/ENGINEERING SUPPORT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCIES FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION (FBC) PROGRAM: FINAL REPORT. VOLUME I. SULFUR OXIDE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of the desulfurization performance and attrition behavior of limestone and dolomite sorbents for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) systems used with coal. It gives results of experimental thermogravimetric anal...

  8. IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY PROGRAM TO OBTAIN BENCHMARK DATA ON THE FLOW PHENOMENA IN A SCALED MODEL OF A PRISMATIC GAS-COOLED REACTOR LOWER PLENUM FOR THE VALIDATION OF CFD CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a typical prismatic gas-cooled (GCR) reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A detailed description of the model, scaling, the experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that are presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic GCR design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements reveal undeveloped, non-uniform flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and charts that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet flow is also presented.

  9. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 5, 6, 7, & 8: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:2 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  10. HTR-Proteus Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 5,6,7,&8: Columnar Hexagonal Point-on-Point Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Sterbentz, James W.; Snoj, Luka; Lengar, Igor; Koberl, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  11. MTR,TRA603. EXPERIMENTERS' SPACE ALLOCATIONS IN BASEMENT AS OF 1963. SHIELDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR,TRA-603. EXPERIMENTERS' SPACE ALLOCATIONS IN BASEMENT AS OF 1963. SHIELDED CUBICLES WERE IDENTIFIED BY SPONSORING LABORATORY AND ITS TEST HOLE NUMBER IN THE REACTOR, IE, "KAPL HB-1" SIGNIFIED KNOLLS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY, HORIZONTAL BEAM NO. 1. "WAPD" WAS WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DIVISION. CATCH TANKS AND SAMPLE STATIONS FOR TEST LOOPS WERE ASSOCIATED WITH THESE CUBICLES. NOTE DESKS, STORAGE CABINETS, SWITCH GEAR, INSTRUMENT PANELS. PHILLIPS PETROLEUM COMPANY MTR-E-5205, 4/1963. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-706-009757, REV. 5. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. Air Dispersion Modeling for the INL Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emission Cap Component

    SciTech Connect

    Sondrup, Andrus Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is applying for a synthetic minor, Sitewide, air quality permit to construct (PTC) with a facility emission cap (FEC) component from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to limit its potential to emit to less than major facility limits for criteria air pollutants (CAPs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) regulated under the Clean Air Act. This document is supplied as an appendix to the application, Idaho National Laboratory Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emissions Cap Component, hereafter referred to as “permit application” (DOE-ID 2015). Air dispersion modeling was performed as part of the permit application process to demonstrate pollutant emissions from the INL will not cause a violation of any ambient air quality standards. This report documents the modeling methodology and results for the air dispersion impact analysis. All CAPs regulated under Section 109 of the Clean Air Act were modeled with the exception of lead (Pb) and ozone, which are not required to be modeled by DEQ. Modeling was not performed for toxic air pollutants (TAPs) as uncontrolled emissions did not exceed screening emission levels for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic TAPs. Modeling for CAPs was performed with the EPA approved AERMOD dispersion modeling system (Version 14134) (EPA 2004a) and five years (2000-2004) of meteorological data. The meteorological data set was produced with the companion AERMET model (Version 14134) (EPA 2004b) using surface data from the Idaho Falls airport, and upper-air data from Boise International Airport supplied by DEQ. Onsite meteorological data from the Grid 3 Mesonet tower located near the center of the INL (north of INTEC) and supplied by the local National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) office was used for surface wind directions and wind speeds. Surface data (i

  13. Big Sisters: An Experimental Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidl, Fredrick W.

    1982-01-01

    Assessed the effects of participation in a Big Sisters' Program. The first part consisted of interviews (N=20) with pairs of Big Sisters-Little Sisters. The second part evaluated program effectiveness experimentally. Findings indicated positive relationships between pairs, and improved behavior of experimental girls versus controls. (RC)

  14. Experimentally Estimated Impacts of School Vouchers on College Enrollment and Degree Attainment. Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series. PEPG 15-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chingos, Matthew M.; Peterson, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first experimental estimates of the long-term impacts of a voucher to attend private school by linking data from a privately sponsored voucher initiative in New York City, which awarded the scholarships by lottery to low-income families, to administrative records on college enrollment and degree attainment. We find no significant…

  15. A Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of a Community-Based HIV Prevention Intervention for Mexican American Female Adolescents: The SHERO's Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Gary W.; Bangi, Audrey K.; Sanchez, Bernadette; Doll, Mimi; Pedraza, Ana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a quasi-experimental evaluation of a community-based, culturally and ecologically tailored HIV prevention intervention for Mexican American female adolescents grounded in the AIDS risk reduction model. A total of 378 Mexican American female adolescents (mean age = 15.2) participated in either the nine-session SHERO's (a…

  16. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderoni, P.; Sharpe, J.; Shimada, M.; Denny, B.; Pawelko, B.; Schuetz, S.; Longhurst, G.; Hatano, Y.; Hara, M.; Oya, Y.; Otsuka, T.; Katayama, K.; Konishi, S.; Noborio, K.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  17. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    SciTech Connect

    P. Calderoni; P. Sharpe; M. Shimada

    2009-09-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  18. GUIDANCE FOR RESEARCH HOUSE STUDIES OF THE FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM, VOLUME 2: MODEL-BACKED EXPERIMENTAL PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINING RADON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides guidance and a readily available reference to groups involved with the Florida Radon Research Program's (FRRP's) research house studies. It includes: 1): Lists of Parameters for continuous and periodic high and low resolution measurements; (2) Protocols for c...

  19. "PCI Reading Program": The Final Report of a Three Year Experimental Study in Brevard Public Schools and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toby, Megan; Jaciw, Andrew; Ma, Boya; Lipton, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    PCI Education conducted a three-year longitudinal study to determine the comparative effectiveness of the "PCI Reading Program" ("PCI") for students with severe disabilities as implemented in Florida's Brevard Public Schools and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. The primary question addressed by the study is whether students whose teachers have…

  20. History of Africa, Topic 2. Africa South of the Sahara: An Experimental Program of Study for Secondary School Social Studies Students. Teaching and Student Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA. Project Africa.

    An historical perspective on the social, political, and economic events of the past which were instrumental in shaping modern Africa is presented in this curriculum program. Contained in the teaching guide and student text are units on (1) prehistoric Africa and the mystery of the Zimbabwe kingdom, (2) pre-twentieth century black African kingdoms,…

  1. Social Information-Processing Skills and Aggression: A Quasi-Experimental Trial of the Making Choices and Making Choices Plus Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzian, Mary A.; Li, Jilan; Fraser, Mark W.; Day, Steven H.; Rose, Roderick A.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the findings from an efficacy trial of a school-based, universal prevention program designed to reduce aggressive behavior of by strengthening emotion regulation and social information-processing (SIP) skills. Three cohorts of third graders (N = 479) participated in this study. The first cohort participated in the Making…

  2. What Works for Female Children and Adolescents: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. Fact Sheet. Publication #2012-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Kelly; Terzian, Mary A.; Moore, Kristin A.

    2012-01-01

    Girls face unique developmental challenges in childhood and adolescence. Compared to boys, girls tend to report more mental health problems, and they are susceptible to reproductive health risks, such as unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease. While a number of evidence-based programs have been found to be effective at reducing risk…

  3. THE EXPERIMENTAL DEALER TRAINING PROGRAM, CHANGES IN KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PERFORMANCE OF FARM SUPPLY DEALERS, CHANGES IN BUSINESS FIRMS. RURAL SOCIOLOGY REPORT NUMBER 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WARREN, RICHARD D.; AND OTHERS

    A RESEARCH PROJECT WAS CONDUCTED BY THE IOWA AGRICULTURAL AND HOME ECONOMICS EXPERIMENT STATION TO DETERMINE THE INFLUENCE OF AN INTENSIVE TRAINING PROGRAM FOR GENERAL MANAGERS OF LOCAL RETAIL FARM SUPPLY BUSINESSES DEALING IN FERTILIZER AND AGRICULTURAL CEHMICALS. CHANGES IN KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PERFORMANCE, INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT AND…

  4. Results of an Experimental Program to Provide Low Cost Computer Searches of the NASA Information File to University Graduate Students in the Southeast. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Frederick O.; Phillips, Dennis M.

    In an effort to increase dissemination of scientific and technological information, a program was undertaken whereby graduate students in science and engineering could request a computer-produced bibliography and/or abstracts of documents identified by the computer. The principal resource was the National Aeronautics and Space Administration…

  5. A Quasi-Experimental Investigation of How the Gates Millennium Scholars Program Is Related to College Students' Time Use and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DesJardins, Stephen L.; McCall, Brian P.; Ott, Molly; Kim, Jiyun

    2010-01-01

    A national scholarship program provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is designed to improve access to and success in higher education for low-income high-achieving minority students by providing them with full tuition scholarships and non-monetary support. We use a regression discontinuity approach to investigate whether the receipt of…

  6. What Works for Older Youth during the Transition to Adulthood: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. Fact Sheet. Publication #2010-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Alena M.; Mbwana, Kassim; Hair, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    Major strides have been made in the field of youth development. However, youth transitioning into adulthood have not received similar attention. These older youth have frequently been overlooked by policymakers and practitioners who have been more focused on designing programs and services for adolescents and young children. Because older youth…

  7. AN EXPERIMENTAL COMPARISON OF A CONVENTIONAL TV LESSON WITH A PROGRAMMED TV LESSON REQUIRING ACTIVE STUDENT RESPONSE. STUDIES IN TELEVISED INSTRUCTION, REPORT 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GROPPER, GEORGE L.; LUMSDAINE, ARTHUR A.

    A SERIES OF EXPERIMENTS WAS CONDUCTED TO TEST THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TELEVISED INSTRUCTION. THIS REPORT, THE SECOND IN A SERIES, EXAMINED THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ACTIVE STUDENT RESPONSE ON LEARNING DURING TELEVISED LESSON. PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMING DERIVED FROM TEACHING-MACHINE RESEARCH AND APPLIED IN THIS STUDY INCLUDED (1) THE REDUCTION OF LESSON…

  8. A New Approach to Educational Preparation for Public Library Service: An Experimental Program in Library Education for Work with a Specialized Clientele. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Annie T.

    In 1967 the School of Library and Information Services of the University of Maryland received a grant from the U.S. Office of Education for a demonstration project to prepare students for service to socially and economically disadvantaged groups. The innovative core of this program was a laboratory library located in one of the black ghettos of…

  9. Experimental Lithium-Ion Battery Developed for Demonstration at the 2007 NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, William R.; Baldwin, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Electrochemistry Branch designed and built five lithium-ion battery packs for demonstration in spacesuit simulators as a part of the 2007 Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS) activity at Cinder Lake, Arizona. The experimental batteries incorporated advanced, NASA-developed electrolytes and included internal protection against over-current, overdischarge and over-temperature. The 500-g experimental batteries were designed to deliver a constant power of 22 W for 2.5 hr with a minimum voltage of 13 V. When discharged at the maximum expected power output of 38.5 W, the batteries operated for 103 min of discharge time, achieving a specific energy of 130 Wh/kg. This report summarizes design details and safety considerations. Results for field trials and laboratory testing are summarized.

  10. Efficacy of a group-based parenting program on stress and self-efficacy among Japanese mothers: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Sally; Bloomfield, Linda; Appleton, Jane; Kitaoka, Kazuyo

    2013-12-01

    Early child development and the impact of parenting on later life are of global concern. The rise in child abuse and maltreatment in Japan suggests that measures to increase self-efficacy and reduce stress would benefit Japanese parents. In this study, we explored if Japanese parents attending a 123Magic parenting program reported reduced stress and enhanced self-efficacy. Questionnaire data were collected from 49 mothers attending a parenting program conducted in public nursery schools in one prefecture in Japan. There were significant changes in parenting self-efficacy scores (P < 0.001) and parenting stress scores (P < 0.01). Focus groups with 16 parents also found that there were benefits to parents in terms of increased confidence and less stress. The findings provide support for the role of public health nurses in delivering group-based parenting support in Japan. PMID:23725544

  11. Can Reproductive Health Voucher Programs Improve Quality of Postnatal Care? A Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of Kenya’s Safe Motherhood Voucher Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Claire; Abuya, Timothy; Warren, Charlotte E.; Obare, Francis; Kanya, Lucy; Bellows, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This study tests the group-level causal relationship between the expansion of Kenya’s Safe Motherhood voucher program and changes in quality of postnatal care (PNC) provided at voucher-contracted facilities. We compare facilities accredited since program inception in 2006 (phase I) and facilities accredited since 2010-2011 (phase II) relative to comparable non-voucher facilities. PNC quality is assessed using observed clinical content processes, as well as client-reported outcome measures. Two-tailed unpaired t-tests are used to identify differences in mean process quality scores and client-reported outcome measures, comparing changes between intervention and comparison groups at the 2010 and 2012 data collection periods. Difference-in-differences analysis is used to estimate the reproductive health (RH) voucher program’s causal effect on quality of care by exploiting group-level differences between voucher-accredited and non-accredited facilities in 2010 and 2012. Participation in the voucher scheme since 2006 significantly improves overall quality of postnatal care by 39% (p=0.02), where quality is defined as the observable processes or components of service provision that occur during a PNC consultation. Program participation since phase I is estimated to improve the quality of observed maternal postnatal care by 86% (p=0.02), with the largest quality improvements in counseling on family planning methods (IRR 5.0; p=0.01) and return to fertility (IRR 2.6; p=0.01). Despite improvements in maternal aspects of PNC, we find a high proportion of mothers who seek PNC are not being checked by any provider after delivery. Additional strategies will be necessary to standardize provision of packaged postnatal interventions to both mother and newborn. This study addresses an important gap in the existing RH literature by using a strong evaluation design to assess RH voucher program effectiveness on quality improvement. PMID:25835713

  12. Analysis and Methane Gas Separations Studies for City of Marsing, Idaho An Idaho National Laboratory Technical Assistance Program Study

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Orme

    2012-08-01

    Introduction and Background Large amounts of methane in well water is a wide spread problem in North America. Methane gas from decaying biomass and oil and gas deposits escape into water wells typically through cracks or faults in otherwise non-porous rock strata producing saturated water systems. This methane saturated water can pose several problems in the delivery of drinking water. The problems range from pumps vapor locking (cavitating), to pump houses exploding. The City of Marsing requested Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assist with some water analyses as well as to provide some engineering approaches to methane capture through the INL Technical Assistance Program (TAP). There are several engineering approaches to the removal of methane and natural gas from water sources that include gas stripping followed by compression and/or dehydration; membrane gas separators coupled with dehydration processes, membrane water contactors with dehydration processes.

  13. Wirtanen At 3au An Experimental Program In The Laboratory Under Simulated Space-conditions, Accompanying The Rosetta Space-mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, H.; Richter, L.; Möhlmann, D.; Drescher, J.; Seidensticker, K. J.; Tokano, T.

    Simulated Space-Conditions in an earth laboratory, e.g. in a specially designed vacuum chamber with an adjusted insolation source cannot only support the development and qualification of space mission experiment hardware, but also an "in situ" investigation of the surface-near planetary phenomena. This was already demonstrated in the comet simulation program KOSI, performed in the DLR Space Simulator from 1986 to 1993 after the successful GIOTTO Space Mission to Comet P´Halley in 1986. The results of the simulation experiments have been helpful in understanding the recorded phenomena. Based on the experiences gathered in KOSI, we are now facing the ROSETTA space mission to Comet P´Wirtanen in 2003 with an extremely long hibernation phase till 2011. At this time the ROSETTA spacecraft will meet the cometary nucleus. Laboratory Experiments with different cometary analogous materials (CAM) and with different insolation periods will be performed in the DLR-PLANETARY SIMULATION FACILITY. This chamber, automatically cooled by liquid nitrogen (77K) has an internal space for experiments of 1.5m in diameter and 1.8m in height. Gas-dust interaction phenomena, and the thermal behaviour can be studied as well as the crustal and mantle formation and the structural change of the CAM by sintering and recondensation. We invite colleagues to join this program with ideas, models and hardware.

  14. Results of an experimental program investigating the effects of simulated ice on the performance of the NACA 63A415 airfoil with flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaguli, R. J.; Bragg, M. B.; Gregorek, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Aerodynamic data from a test program in the Icing Research Tunnel are reported for a NACA 63A415 airfoil, with fowler flap, clean and with simulated ice shapes. The effect of three ice shapes on airfoil performance are presented, two of the simulated ice shapes are from earlier Icing Tunnel tests. Lift, drag, and moment coefficients are reported for the airfoil, clean and with ice, for angles of attack from approximately zero lift to maximum lift and for flap deflections of 0, 10, 20, and 30 degrees. Surface pressure distribution plots for the airfoil and flap are presented for all runs. Some preliminary oil flow visualization data are also discussed. Large drag penalties were measured in all instances. Maximum lift penalties were in general serious, and depend upon the ice shape and flap deflection.

  15. Program plan and summary, remote fluvial experimental (REFLEX) series: Research experiments using advanced remote sensing technologies with emphasis on hydrologic transport, and hydrologic-ecologic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wobber, F.J.

    1986-10-01

    This document describes research designed to evaluate advanced remote sensing technologies for environmental research. A series of Remote Fluvial Experiments (REFLEX) - stressing new applications of remote sensing systems and use of advanced digital analysis methods - are described. Program strategy, experiments, research areas, and future initiatives are summarized. The goals of REFLEX are: (1) to apply new and developing aerial and satellite remote sensing technologies - including both advanced sensor systems and digital/optical processing - for interdisciplinary scientific experiments in hydrology and to hydrologic/ecologic interactions; (2) to develop new concepts for processing and analyzing remote sensing data for general scientific application; and (3) to demonstrate innovative analytical technologies that advance the state of the art in applying information from remote sensing systems, for example, supercomputer processing and analysis.

  16. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-12

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development.

  17. Adsorption Isotherms for Xenon and Krypton using INL HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Veronica J. Rutledge; Jack D. Law

    2014-08-01

    The generation of adsorption isotherms compliments the scale-up of off-gas processes used to control the emission of encapsulated radioactive volatile fission and activation products released during Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) reprocessing activities. A series of experiments were conducted to obtain capacity results for varying Kr and Xe gas concentrations using HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN engineered form sorbents. Gas compositions for Kr ranged from 150-40,000 ppmv and 250-5020 ppmv for Xe in a helium balance. The experiments were all performed at 220 K at a flowrate of 50 sccm. Acquired capacities were then respectively fit to the Langmuir equation using the Langmuir linear regression method to obtain the equilibrium parameters Qmax and Keq. Generated experimental adsorption isotherms were then plotted with the Langmuir predicted isotherms to illustrate agreement between the two. The Langmuir parameters were provided for input into the OSPREY model to predict breakthrough of single component adsorption of Kr and Xe on HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN sorbents at the experimental conditions tested. Kr and Xe capacities resulting from model breakthrough predictions were then compared to experimental capacities for model validation.

  18. Program evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings from the panel on program evaluation. Some of the papers included are the following: Seattle City Light's Industrial Retrofit Demonstration Project Uses Quasi-Experimental Research Design and Metering to Measure Savings, Evaluation for PUCs, and The Takeback Effect Low-income Weatherizations Fact or Fiction

  19. Implementation Plan for the Office of Nuclear Energy Knowledge Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-12-01

    The primary purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Knowledge Management (KM) Program is to capture, share, disseminate, and ensure the ability to apply the knowledge created by the major nuclear energy Research and Development (R&D) programs. In support of the KM program, the Implementation Plan for the Office of NE KM Program outlines the knowledge management and distributed data environment that is required for its success. In addition to enumerating some strategic goals and objectives, this document characterizes the initial program and identifies computer-based areas of investment required for increased knowledge sharing and collaboration. It identifies and addresses investments already in existence and describes how these investments can be further enhanced and implemented to support a distributed KM program. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is leading the effort to identify and address these investments through the implementation of a distributed KM program that includes participants from ten of the major DOE national laboratories.

  20. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Abadlia, L.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, F.; Khalouk, K.; Gasser, J. G.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.