Science.gov

Sample records for innovation performance empirical

  1. University-Industry Collaboration, Knowledge Management and Enterprise Innovation Performance: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jin; Wei, Shiyang

    2008-01-01

    This empirical study is concerned with university-industry collaboration from a knowledge management perspective. The authors introduce the concepts of "enterprise-level core elements" to define the principle status of an enterprise during university-industry collaboration, and "network embeddedness" as an indication of the closeness of the…

  2. The Mediating Effect of Innovation on the Relationship between Information Technology Investments and Firm Performance: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karanja, Erastus

    2011-01-01

    The last couple of decades has witnessed a plethora of research studies addressing the cause-and-effect relationship between Information Technology (IT) investments and performance at the firm level. These studies elicited mixed results between IT investments and performance which led to various points of view from IT Scholars and Practitioners.…

  3. Organizational Learning, Strategic Flexibility and Business Model Innovation: An Empirical Research Based on Logistics Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yaodong; Cheng, Lin; Zhang, Jian

    Using the data of 237 Jiangsu logistics firms, this paper empirically studies the relationship among organizational learning capability, business model innovation, strategic flexibility. The results show as follows; organizational learning capability has positive impacts on business model innovation performance; strategic flexibility plays mediating roles on the relationship between organizational learning capability and business model innovation; interaction among strategic flexibility, explorative learning and exploitative learning play significant roles in radical business model innovation and incremental business model innovation.

  4. What affects the innovation performance of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the biotechnology industry? An empirical study on Korean biotech SMEs.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2008-10-01

    Research-intensive small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) play a crucial role in the advancement of the biotechnology industry. This paper explored the impacts of internal and contextual variables on innovative activity in Korea and compared the results of this analysis with previous studies of other countries. Our analysis of 149 Korean biotech SMEs showed that the ratio of R&D expenditure to sales, the ratio of R&D employees to total employees, CEO characteristics, governmental support and international networking are positively correlated with a firm's innovation performance. The results may help decision makers to better foster SMEs in the Korean biotechnology industry. PMID:18506395

  5. Innovation in Australian Workplaces: An Empirical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The determinants of innovation were examined using data from 698 Australian workplaces. Results suggest that better employee-management communications are associated with more change and that workplaces with higher levels of training undergo more change. (Author/JOW)

  6. Responsible research and innovation: A manifesto for empirical ethics?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Clare

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 the Nuffield Council on Bioethics launched their report Novel Neurotechnologies: Intervening in the Brain. The report, which adopts the European Commission’s notion of Responsible Research and Innovation, puts forward a set of priorities to guide ethical research into, and the development of, new therapeutic neurotechnologies. In this paper, we critically engage with these priorities. We argue that the Nuffield Council’s priorities, and the Responsible Research and Innovation initiative as a whole, are laudable and should guide research and innovation in all areas of healthcare. However, we argue that operationalising Responsible Research and Innovation requires an in-depth understanding of the research and clinical contexts. Providing such an understanding is an important task for empirical ethics. Drawing on examples from sociology, science and technology studies, and related disciplines, we propose four avenues of social science research which can provide such an understanding. We suggest that these avenues can provide a manifesto for empirical ethics. PMID:26089743

  7. Empirically supported psychological treatments: the challenge of evaluating clinical innovations.

    PubMed

    Church, Dawson; Feinstein, David; Palmer-Hoffman, Julie; Stein, Phyllis K; Tranguch, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    Clear and transparent standards are required to establish whether a therapeutic method is "evidence based." Even when research demonstrates a method to be efficacious, it may not become available to patients who could benefit from it, a phenomenon known as the "translational gap." Only 30% of therapies cross the gap, and the lag between empirical validation and clinical implementation averages 17 years. To address these problems, Division 12 of the American Psychological Association published a set of standards for "empirically supported treatments" in the mid-1990s that allows the assessment of clinical modalities. This article reviews these criteria, identifies their strengths, and discusses their impact on the translational gap, using the development of a clinical innovation called Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) as a case study. Twelve specific recommendations for updates of the Division 12 criteria are made based on lessons garnered from the adoption of EFT within the clinical community. These recommendations would shorten the cycle from the research setting to clinical practice, increase transparency, incorporate recent scientific advances, and enhance the capacity for succinct comparisons among treatments. PMID:25265265

  8. Innovation Adoption Decisions in Organizations: An Empirical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschalk, Rand; Schmitt, Neal

    Research on educational and criminal justice programs sought to clarify the relationship between organizational characteristics and innovation adoption. It focused on the reasons why organizations adopt innovations and the differences in clientele, staff, and decision-making participation between organizations adopting or unaware of an innovative…

  9. The Community Innovation Process: A Conceptualization and Empirical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agnew, John A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Previous research into the community innovation process has tended to emphasize either intercommunity communication or local socioeconomic and political factors. This article incorporates both sets of factors in an analysis of urban renewal, public housing, automated data processing by local municipalities, and public water fluoridation.…

  10. Innovation Management and Performance Framework for Research University in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowang, Tan Owee; Long, Choi Sang; Rasli, Amran

    2015-01-01

    Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL) in Malaysia are recognized as the core of new innovation development. This paper empirically studies one of IHLs in Malaysia with the objectives to gauge the perceived important level of success factors for innovation management, and to examine the relationship between innovation management success factors…

  11. Innovative Double Bypass Engine for Increased Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Sanjivan

    Engines continue to grow in size to meet the current thrust requirements of the civil aerospace industry. Large engines pose significant transportation problems and require them to be split in order to be shipped. Thus, large amounts of time have been spent in researching methods to increase thrust capabilities while maintaining a reasonable engine size. Unfortunately, much of this research has been focused on increasing the performance and efficiencies of individual components while limited research has been done on innovative engine configurations. This thesis focuses on an innovative engine configuration, the High Double Bypass Engine, aimed at increasing fuel efficiency and thrust while maintaining a competitive fan diameter and engine length. The 1-D analysis was done in Excel and then compared to the results from Numerical Propulsion Simulation System (NPSS) software and were found to be within 4% error. Flow performance characteristics were also determined and validated against their criteria.

  12. Organisational Learning and Performance--An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jyothibabu, C.; Pradhan, Bibhuti Bhusan; Farooq, Ayesha

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the important question "how the learning entities--individual, group or organisation--are affecting organisational performance". The answer is important for promoting learning and improving performance. This empirical study in the leading power utility in India found that there is a positive relation between individual- and…

  13. Narrowing the Skills Gap for Innovation: An Empirical Study in the Hospital Sector

    PubMed Central

    Escoval, Ana

    2014-01-01

    hospital’s strategies, as well as changes in the work organization. Relevant implications for managers and policy makers can be drawn from the empirical findings of this paper, building on the current efforts from leading innovating hospitals that are already defining the future of health care. PMID:27025197

  14. Investigating the effects of ICT on innovation and performance of European hospitals: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Spyros; Loukis, Euripidis N

    2016-05-01

    Hospitals are making big investments in various types of ICT, so it is important to investigate their effects on innovation and performance. This paper presents an empirical study in this direction, based on data for 743 hospitals from 18 European countries. We specified and estimated econometrically five equations: one for product innovation, one for process innovation and three equations for the three different dimensions of (ICT-enabled) hospital performance. All five equations included various ICT-related variables reflecting ICT infrastructure and a series of important ICT applications, some of them hospital-specific, and some others of general business use, and also ICT personnel (viewed as a kind of 'soft' ICT investment), while the performance equations also included the two innovation measures. PMID:25822165

  15. Principals' Performance Assessment: Empirical Evidence from an Israeli Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziel, Haim

    2008-01-01

    Despite the current interest in many countries in assessing the principal's performance, stemming from the greater attention to educational reform and accountability, the empirical study of principal's appraisal has been slow to develop. This article was designed to fill partially this gap. Data was collected by semi-structured interviews of eight…

  16. Innovation in Information Technology: Theoretical and Empirical Study in SMQR Section of Export Import in Automotive Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edi Nugroho Soebandrija, Khristian; Pratama, Yogi

    2014-03-01

    This paper has the objective to provide the innovation in information technology in both theoretical and empirical study. Precisely, both aspects relate to the Shortage Mispacking Quality Report (SMQR) Claims in Export and Import in Automotive Industry. This paper discusses the major aspects of Innovation, Information Technology, Performance and Competitive Advantage. Furthermore, In the empirical study of PT. Astra Honda Motor (AHM) refers to SMQR Claims, Communication Systems, Analysis and Design Systems. Briefly both aspects of the major aspects and its empirical study are discussed in the Introduction Session. Furthermore, the more detail discussion is conducted in the related aspects in other sessions of this paper, in particular in Literature Review in term classical and updated reference of current research. The increases of SMQR claim and communication problem at PT. Astra Daihatsu Motor (PT. ADM) which still using the email cause the time of claim settlement become longer and finally it causes the rejected of SMQR claim by supplier. With presence of this problem then performed to design the integrated communication system to manage the communication process of SMQR claim between PT. ADM with supplier. The systems was analyzed and designed is expected to facilitate the claim communication process so that can be run in accordance with the procedure and fulfill the target of claim settlement time and also eliminate the difficulties and problems on the previous manual communication system with the email. The design process of the system using the approach of system development life cycle method by Kendall & Kendall (2006)which design process covers the SMQR problem communication process, judgment process by the supplier, claim process, claim payment process and claim monitoring process. After getting the appropriate system designs for managing the SMQR claim, furthermore performed the system implementation and can be seen the improvement in claim communication

  17. Open Innovation at NASA: A New Business Model for Advancing Human Health and Performance Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.; Keeton, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new business model for advancing NASA human health and performance innovations and demonstrates how open innovation shaped its development. A 45 percent research and technology development budget reduction drove formulation of a strategic plan grounded in collaboration. We describe the strategy execution, including adoption and results of open innovation initiatives, the challenges of cultural change, and the development of virtual centers and a knowledge management tool to educate and engage the workforce and promote cultural change.

  18. Innovative human resource practices in U.S. hospitals: an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Platonova, Elena A; Hernandez, S Robert

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary organizations increasingly recognize human resource (HR) capabilities as a source of sustained competitive advantage; about 80% of an organization's value is attributable to intangible assets, including human assets and capital. Some scholars consider effective human resource management (HRM) the single most important factor affecting organizational performance. This study examined (1) the extent to which HRM strategies were included in organizational strategic planning and (2) the association between the involvement of senior HR professionals in strategic planning and the use of innovative HR practices in U.S. hospitals employing strategic HRM theory. A survey was administered to 168 chief executive officers and HR executives from 85 hospitals during spring 2005. Binary logistic regression was conducted to determine whether HRM involvement was associated with the use of innovative HRM strategies in the hospitals. We found significant associations between HRM strategy inclusion in the strategic planning process and senior HR professionals' involvement in organizational strategic planning and in three innovative HR activities: finding talent in advance for key job openings (odds ratio [OR] = 4.61, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10-7.38), stressing organizational culture and values in the selection process (OR = 3.97, 95% CI: 1.01-3.97), and basing individual or team compensation on goal-oriented results (OR = 6.17, 95% CI: 1.17-3.37). Our data indicate that innovative HR practices were underused in some U.S. hospitals despite their potential to improve overall hospital performance. Hospitals that emphasized effective HRM were more likely to use some of the innovative HR approaches. In this article, we discuss this research and the practical implications of the findings. PMID:24396949

  19. Breakthrough Performance: Creating the Innovative Enterprise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Diane; Bapst, Jerry

    1998-01-01

    Illustrates a new model for innovative enterprises by reviewing the process an instruments and control systems manufacturer used to implement changes in its corporate operating philosophy. Outlines the "Quantum Model": spheres of control, influence, interest, and UNs (unknown, unpredictable, uncontrollable, uncomfortable). Discusses just-in-time…

  20. Impacts of Learning Orientation on Product Innovation Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calisir, Fethi; Gumussoy, Cigdem Altin; Guzelsoy, Ezgi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aims to examine the effect of learning orientation (commitment to learning, shared vision, open-mindedness) on the product innovation performance (product innovation efficacy and efficiency) of companies in Turkey. Design/methodology/approach: A structural equation-modeling approach was applied to identify the variables…

  1. How Physics Teachers Approach Innovation: An Empirical Study for Reconstructing the Appropriation Path in the Case of Special Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Ambrosis, Anna; Levrini, Olivia

    2010-01-01

    This paper concerns an empirical study carried out with a group of high school physics teachers engaged in the Module on relativity of a Master course on the teaching of modern physics. The study is framed within the general research issue of how to promote innovation in school via teachers' education and how to foster fruitful interactions…

  2. An Empirical Analysis of Human Performance and Nuclear Safety Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Joe; Larry G. Blackwood

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this analysis, which was conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was to test whether an empirical connection exists between human performance and nuclear power plant safety culture. This was accomplished through analyzing the relationship between a measure of human performance and a plant’s Safety Conscious Work Environment (SCWE). SCWE is an important component of safety culture the NRC has developed, but it is not synonymous with it. SCWE is an environment in which employees are encouraged to raise safety concerns both to their own management and to the NRC without fear of harassment, intimidation, retaliation, or discrimination. Because the relationship between human performance and allegations is intuitively reciprocal and both relationship directions need exploration, two series of analyses were performed. First, human performance data could be indicative of safety culture, so regression analyses were performed using human performance data to predict SCWE. It also is likely that safety culture contributes to human performance issues at a plant, so a second set of regressions were performed using allegations to predict HFIS results.

  3. Innovators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEA Today, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes various innovations that have been developed to enhance education. These innovations include: helping educators help at-risk students succeed; promoting high school journalism; ensuring quality online learning experiences; developing a student performing group that uses theater to address social issues; and having students design their…

  4. Predicting the performance and innovativeness of scientists and engineers.

    PubMed

    Keller, Robert T

    2012-01-01

    A study of 644 scientists and engineers from 5 corporate research and development organizations investigated hypotheses generated from an interactionist framework of 4 individual characteristics as longitudinal predictors of performance and innovativeness. An innovative orientation predicted 1-year-later and 5-years-later supervisory job performance ratings and 5-years-later counts of patents and publications. An internal locus of control predicted 5-years-later patents and publications, and self-esteem predicted performance ratings for both times and patents. Team-level nonroutine tasks moderated the individual-level relationships between an innovative orientation and performance ratings and patents such that the relationships were stronger in a nonroutine task environment. Implications for an interactionist framework of performance and innovativeness for knowledge workers are discussed. PMID:21875172

  5. Energy performance assessment with empirical methods: application of energy signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belussi, L.; Danza, L.; Meroni, I.; Salamone, F.

    2015-03-01

    Energy efficiency and reduction of building consumption are deeply felt issues both at Italian and international level. The recent regulatory framework sets stringent limits on energy performance of buildings. Awaiting the adoption of these principles, several methods have been developed to solve the problem of energy consumption of buildings, among which the simplified energy audit is intended to identify any anomalies in the building system, to provide helpful tips for energy refurbishments and to raise end users' awareness. The Energy Signature is an operational tool of these methodologies, an evaluation method in which energy consumption is correlated with climatic variables, representing the actual energy behaviour of the building. In addition to that purpose, the Energy Signature can be used as an empirical tool to determine the real performances of the technical elements. The latter aspect is illustrated in this article.

  6. Organizational Learning and Innovation Performance: A Review of the Literature and the Development of a Conceptual Framework and Research Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Lin; Ellinger, Andrea D.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework and research hypotheses based upon a thorough review of the conceptual and limited published empirical research in the organizational learning and innovation performance literatures. Hypotheses indicate the relationships between organizational learning, its antecedent, perception of…

  7. Environmental performance indicators: an empirical study of Canadian manufacturing firms.

    PubMed

    Henri, Jean-François; Journeault, Marc

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this exploratory study is to examine the importance of measurement and use of environmental performance indicators (EPIs) within manufacturing firms. Two research questions are investigated: (i) To what extent are firm characteristics associated with the importance of measurement of various categories of EPIs? (ii) To what extent are firm characteristics associated with global and specific uses of EPIs? More specifically, this paper examines four uses of EPIs (i.e. to monitor compliance, to motivate continuous improvement, to support decision making, and to provide data for external reporting) as well as four characteristics of firms, namely environmental strategy, International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 compliance, size, and ownership. This study contributes to the environmental management accounting literature by collecting and analyzing empirical evidence that provides a better understanding of the associations among firm characteristics and EPIs. PMID:17368921

  8. The Concept of Innovation as Perceived by Public Sector Frontline Staff--Outline of a Tripartite Empirical Model of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegener, Charlotte; Tanggaard, Lene

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the innovation concept in two key welfare areas where the demands for innovation are substantial, namely vocational education and elder care. On the basis of ethnographic fieldwork and interviews on the collaboration between an educational institution and elder care services, the article develops a tripartite empirical…

  9. Beyond feedback control: the interactive use of performance management systems. Implications for process innovation in Italian healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Chiara; Mella, Piero

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows how the use of performance management systems affects managers' perception of satisfaction, the effectiveness of the control system and the performance related to process innovation. An exploratory empirical research has been conducted on 85 managers operating in Italian healthcare organizations. Empirical findings put forward that the interactive--as opposed to diagnostic--use of performance management systems enhances managerial satisfaction with the control system and managerial perception of effectiveness. The present study then showed that it is not the control itself that is an obstacle to innovation in organizations in general (and in health organizations in particular) but the diagnostic use of the control mechanisms, which impedes the interaction between the control personnel and those subject to the control. Finally, this paper addresses managerial implications and further research avenues. PMID:23564664

  10. Empirical tests of performance of some M - estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaś, Marek; Ligas, Marcin

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents an empirical comparison of performance of three well known M - estimators (i.e. Huber, Tukey and Hampel's M - estimators) and also some new ones. The new M - estimators were motivated by weighting functions applied in orthogonal polynomials theory, kernel density estimation as well as one derived from Wigner semicircle probability distribution. M - estimators were used to detect outlying observations in contaminated datasets. Calculations were performed using iteratively reweighted least-squares (IRLS). Since the residual variance (used in covariance matrices construction) is not a robust measure of scale the tests employed also robust measures i.e. interquartile range and normalized median absolute deviation. The methods were tested on a simple leveling network in a large number of variants showing bad and good sides of M - estimation. The new M - estimators have been equipped with theoretical tuning constants to obtain 95% efficiency with respect to the standard normal distribution. The need for data - dependent tuning constants rather than those established theoretically is also pointed out. W artykule przedstawiono empiryczne porównanie trzech dobrze znanych M - estymatorów (Huber'a, Tukey'a oraz Hampel'a) jak również kilku nowych. Nowe estymatory motywowane były funkcjami wagowymi wykorzystywanymi w teorii wielomianów ortogonalnych, estymacji jądrowej oraz jeden motywowany przez funkcję gęstości "półokręgu" Wigner'a. Każdy z estymatorów został użyty do wykrywania obserwacji odstających w skażonych zbiorach danych. Obliczenia wykonano za pomocą "reważonej" metody najmniejszych kwadratów. Ze względu na fakt, iż wariancja resztowa (używana w konstrukcji macierzy kowariancyjnych) nie jest odpornym estymatorem skali, w testach wykorzystano również odporne miary takie jak: rozstęp ćwiartkowy oraz znormalizowane odchylenie medianowe. Testy wykonano na prostej sieci niwelacyjnej w dużej ilości wariantów ukazuj

  11. Innovation and performance: The case of the upstream petroleum sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, A. C. Jai

    This thesis investigates innovation in the upstream crude oil and natural gas sector, a strategic part of the Canadian economy and a vital industry for North American energy trade and security. Significant interest exists in understanding innovation in this sector from a private and public policy perspective. Interest in the sector has intensified recently due to concerns about world oil supply, Canada's oil sands development, and the potential that Canada may become an "energy superpower." The study examines the factors that drive companies involved in exploration, development, and production in the upstream petroleum sector to innovate and the impact of their innovation activities through major technologies on their performance. The thesis focuses on process innovation, which involves the adoption of new or significantly improved production processes, and is distinct from product innovation, which is based on the development and commercialization of a product with improved product characteristics to deliver new services to the consumer. The thesis provides a comprehensive review of the literature and develops an investigative model framework to examine the drivers of innovation and the impact of innovation on performance in the upstream petroleum sector. The research employs a survey questionnaire that was developed to obtain data and information, which was missing in the literature or not publicly available to test key relationships of innovation and performance indicators. In addition to the survey questionnaire, a number of knowledgeable experts in the industry were also interviewed. A total of 68 respondents completed the survey questionnaire, accounting for 40 percent of the firms in the industry. This percentage goes up to over 50 percent when account is taken of extremely small firms who could not fill out the survey. Further, the 68 respondents account for most of the industry revenues, production, and employment. The respondents include most of the key

  12. Prediction of mandibular rotation: an empirical test of clinician performance.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; West, E E

    1984-11-01

    An experiment was conducted in an attempt to determine empirically how effective a number of expert clinicians were at differentiating "backward rotators" from "forward rotators" on the basis of head-film information which might reasonably have been available to them prior to instituting treatment for the correction of Class II malocclusion. As a result of a previously reported ongoing study, pre- and posttreatment head films were available for 188 patients treated in the mixed dentition for the correction of Class II malocclusion and for 50 untreated Class II subjects. These subjects were divided into 14 groups (average size of group, 17; range, 6 to 23) solely on the basis of type of treatment and the clinician from whose clinic the records had originated. From within each group, we selected the two or three subjects who had exhibited the most extreme backward rotation and the two or three subjects who had exhibited the most extreme forward rotation of the mandible during the interval between films. The sole criterion for classification was magnitude of change in the mandibular plane angle of Downs between the pre- and posttreatment films of each patient. The resulting sample contained 32 backward-rotator subjects and 32 forward-rotator subjects. Five expert judges (mean clinical experience, 28 years) were asked to identify the backward-rotator subjects by examination of the pretreatment films. The findings may be summarized as follows: (1) No judge performed significantly better than chance. (2) There was strong evidence that the judges used a shared, though relatively ineffective, set of rules in making their discriminations between forward and backward rotators. (3) Statistical analysis of the predictive power of a set of standard cephalometric measurements which had previously been made for this set of subjects indicated that the numerical data also failed to identify potential backward rotators at a rate significantly better than chance. We infer from these

  13. How physics teachers approach innovation: An empirical study for reconstructing the appropriation path in the case of special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ambrosis, Anna; Levrini, Olivia

    2010-07-01

    This paper concerns an empirical study carried out with a group of high school physics teachers engaged in the Module on relativity of a Master course on the teaching of modern physics. The study is framed within the general research issue of how to promote innovation in school via teachers’ education and how to foster fruitful interactions between research and school practice via the construction of networks of researchers and teachers. In the paper, the problems related to innovation are addressed by focusing on the phase during which teachers analyze an innovative teaching proposal in the perspective of designing their own paths for the class work. The proposal analyzed in this study is Taylor and Wheeler’s approach for teaching special relativity. The paper aims to show that the roots of problems known in the research literature about teachers’ difficulties in coping with innovative proposals, and usually related to the implementation process, can be found and addressed already when teachers approach the proposal and try to appropriate it. The study is heuristic and has been carried out in order to trace the “appropriation path,” followed by the group of teachers, in terms of the main steps and factors triggering the progressive evolution of teachers’ attitudes and competences.

  14. Towards an empirical measure of spacecraft innovation: The case of communication satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajnfarber, Zoe; Weigel, Annalisa L.

    2010-04-01

    This paper seeks to frame the discussion of innovation in the space sector and creates a platform for future analysis. To accomplish this, it addressed three aspects of the task of measurement. First, it surveys several distinct literatures to establish precedence for defining a spacecraft innovation metric. Second, the conceptual trade-offs associated with adopting this principle in the context of communication satellites are elucidated and treated. By defining product boundaries along the dimensions of product scope and market transactions, three paradigms for measurement are proposed; namely: (1) the communication satellite enterprise; (2) the physical satellite; and (3) communication service. Third, under the constraints of historical data collection realities, next-best estimators are put forward as proxies for the parameters required to implement the proposed metrics. Based on these proxies, the relative merits of each measurement paradigm are illustrated through an analysis of the innovation history of communication satellites.

  15. Innovation and performance: The case of the upstream petroleum sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, A. C. Jai

    This thesis investigates innovation in the upstream crude oil and natural gas sector, a strategic part of the Canadian economy and a vital industry for North American energy trade and security. Significant interest exists in understanding innovation in this sector from a private and public policy perspective. Interest in the sector has intensified recently due to concerns about world oil supply, Canada's oil sands development, and the potential that Canada may become an "energy superpower." The study examines the factors that drive companies involved in exploration, development, and production in the upstream petroleum sector to innovate and the impact of their innovation activities through major technologies on their performance. The thesis focuses on process innovation, which involves the adoption of new or significantly improved production processes, and is distinct from product innovation, which is based on the development and commercialization of a product with improved product characteristics to deliver new services to the consumer. The thesis provides a comprehensive review of the literature and develops an investigative model framework to examine the drivers of innovation and the impact of innovation on performance in the upstream petroleum sector. The research employs a survey questionnaire that was developed to obtain data and information, which was missing in the literature or not publicly available to test key relationships of innovation and performance indicators. In addition to the survey questionnaire, a number of knowledgeable experts in the industry were also interviewed. A total of 68 respondents completed the survey questionnaire, accounting for 40 percent of the firms in the industry. This percentage goes up to over 50 percent when account is taken of extremely small firms who could not fill out the survey. Further, the 68 respondents account for most of the industry revenues, production, and employment. The respondents include most of the key

  16. An Empirical Study of a Solo Performance Assessment Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a hypothesized model of solo music performance assessment. Specifically, this study investigates the influence of technique and musical expression on perceptions of overall performance quality. The Aural Musical Performance Quality (AMPQ) measure was created to measure overall performance quality, technique,…

  17. Empirical performance of the multivariate normal universal portfolio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Choon Peng; Pang, Sook Theng

    2013-09-01

    Universal portfolios generated by the multivariate normal distribution are studied with emphasis on the case where variables are dependent, namely, the covariance matrix is not diagonal. The moving-order multivariate normal universal portfolio requires very long implementation time and large computer memory in its implementation. With the objective of reducing memory and implementation time, the finite-order universal portfolio is introduced. Some stock-price data sets are selected from the local stock exchange and the finite-order universal portfolio is run on the data sets, for small finite order. Empirically, it is shown that the portfolio can outperform the moving-order Dirichlet universal portfolio of Cover and Ordentlich[2] for certain parameters in the selected data sets.

  18. The performance frontier: innovating for a sustainable strategy.

    PubMed

    Eccles, Robert G; Serafeim, George

    2013-05-01

    A mishmash of sustainability tactics does not add up to a sustainable strategy. Too often, companies launch sustainability programs with the hope that they'll be financially rewarded for doing good, even when those programs aren't relevant to their strategy and operations. They fail to understand the trade-offs between financial performance and performance on environmental, social, and governance (ESG) issues. Improving one typically comes at a cost to the other. But it doesn't have to be this way. It's possible to simultaneously boost both financial and ESG performance-if you focus strategically on issues that are the most "material" to shareholder value, and you develop major innovations in products, processes, and business models that prioritize those concerns. Maps being developed by the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board, which rank the materiality of 43 issues for 88 industries, can provide valuable guidance. And broad initiatives undertaken by three companies-Natura, Dow Chemical, and CLP Group-demonstrate the kind of innovations that will push performance into new territory. Communicating the benefits to stakeholders is also critical, which is why integrated reports, which combine financial and ESG reporting, are now gaining in popularity. PMID:23898735

  19. The Empirical Testing of a Musical Performance Assessment Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a hypothesized model of aurally perceived performer-controlled musical factors that influence assessments of performance quality. Previous research studies on musical performance constructs, musical achievement, musical expression, and scale construction were examined to identify the factors that influence…

  20. Improving Institutional Performance through IT-Enabled Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, William H.

    2005-01-01

    In its report "Innovate America," the National Innovation Initiative (NII) calls for an "innovation infrastructure" as the foundation for the nation's future productivity and competitiveness. The report notes: "Innovation generates the productivity that economists estimate has accounted for half of U.S. GDP growth over the past 50 years... It's…

  1. An empirical performance analysis of commodity memories in commodity servers

    SciTech Connect

    Kerbyson, D. J.; Lang, M. K.; Patino, G.

    2004-01-01

    This work details a performance study of six different commodity memories in two commodity server nodes on a number of microbenchmarks, that measure low-level performance characteristics, as well as on two applications representative of the ASCI workload. Thc memories vary both in terms of performance, including latency and bandwidths, and also in terms of their physical properties and manufacturer. Two server nodes were used; one Itanium-II Madison based system, and one Xeon based system. All the memories examined can be used within both processing nodes. This allows the performance of the memories to be directly examined while keeping all other factors within a processing node the same (processor, motherboard, operating system etc.). The results of this study show that there can be a significant difference in application performance from the different memories - by as much as 20%. Thus, by choosing the most appropriate memory for a processing node at a minimal cost differential, significant improved performance may be achievable.

  2. Group Performance in Information Systems Project Groups: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahli, Bouchaib; Buyukkurt, Meral Demirbag

    2005-01-01

    The importance of teamwork in Information Systems Development (ISD) practice and education has been acknowledged but not studied extensively to date. This paper tests a model of how groups participating in ISD projects perform and examines the relationships between some antecedents of this performance based on group research theory well…

  3. Job stress and job performance controversy: an empirical assessment.

    PubMed

    Jamal, M

    1984-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between job stress and employees' performance and withdrawal behavior among nurses (N = 440) in two hospitals in a metropolitan Canadian city on the east coast. Job stressors assessed included role ambiguity, role overload, role conflict, and resource inadequacy. Employees' performance was operationalized in terms of job performance, motivation, and patient care skill. Withdrawal behaviors assessed were absenteeism, tardiness, and anticipated turnover. Multiple regressions, curvilinear correlation coefficients, and canonical correlations were computed to test the nature of the relationship between stressors and the criterion variables of the study. In general, data were more supportive of the negative linear relationship between stress and performance than for positive linear or curvilinear relationship. However, the stressor role ambiguity did exhibit a monotonic nonlinear relationship with a number of criterion variables. Employees' professional and organizational commitment were proposed to moderate the stress-performance relationship. However, the data only partially supported the role of the moderators. PMID:10265480

  4. Empirical Study of Training and Performance in the Marathon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slovic, Paul

    1977-01-01

    Similar systematic relationships exist between personal characteristics, training, and performance on the marathon, regardless of whether they derive from differences among individuals participating in the same run or from differences within the same person in two separate marathons. (Author)

  5. Does Missing Classes Decelerate Student Exam Performance Progress? Empirical Evidence and Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tin-Chun

    2014-01-01

    A total of 389 business students in undergraduate introductory microeconomics classes in spring 2007, 2009, and 2011, and fall 2012 participated in an exam performance progress study. Empirical evidence suggested that missing classes decelerates and hampers high-performing students' exam performance progress. Nevertheless, the evidence does…

  6. Innovative role of statistics in acid rain performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Warren-Hicks, W.; Etchison, T.; Lieberman, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) of 1990 mandated that affected electric utilities reduce sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions, the primary precursors of acidic deposition, and included an innovative market-based SO{sub 2} regulatory program. A central element of the Acid Rain Program is the requirement that affected utility units install CEMS. This paper describes how the Acid Rain Regulations incorporated statistical procedures in the performance tests for continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) and how statistical analysis was used to assess the appropriateness, stringency, and potential impact of various performance tests and standards that were considered for inclusion in the Acid Rain Regulations. Described here is the statistical analysis that was used to set a relative accuracy standard, establish the calculation procedures for filling in missing data when a monitor malfunctions, and evaluate the performance tests applied to petitions for alternative monitoring systems. The paper concludes that the statistical evaluations of proposed provisions of the Acid Rain Regulations resulted in the adoption of performance tests and standards that were scientifically substantiated, workable, and effective.

  7. Empirical performance of the spectral independent morphological adaptive classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Joel B.; Montgomery, Christine T.; Sanderson, Richard B.; McCalmont, John F.

    2008-04-01

    Effective missile warning and countermeasures continue to be an unfulfilled goal for the Air Force including the wider military and civilian aerospace community. To make the necessary detection and jamming timeframes dictated by today's proliferated missiles and near-term upgraded threats, sensors with required sensitivity, field of regard, and spatial resolution are being pursued in conjunction with advanced processing techniques allowing for detection and discrimination beyond 10 km. The greatest driver of any missile warning system is detection and correct declaration, in which all targets need to be detected with a high confidence and with very few false alarms. Generally, imaging sensors are limited in their detection capability by the presence of heavy background clutter, sun glints, and inherent sensor noise. Many threat environments include false alarm sources like burning fuels, flares, exploding ordinance, and industrial emitters. Spectral discrimination has been shown to be one of the most effective methods of improving the performance of typical missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. Its utility has been demonstrated in the field and on-board multiple aircraft. Utilization of the background and clutter spectral content, coupled with additional spatial and temporal filtering techniques, have yielded robust adaptive real-time algorithms to increase signal-to-clutter ratios against point targets, and thereby to increase detection range. The algorithm outlined is the result of continued work with reported results against visible missile tactical data. The results are summarized and compared in terms of computational cost expected to be implemented on a real-time field-programmable gate array (FPGA) processor.

  8. Performance-Based Service Quality Model: An Empirical Study on Japanese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultan, Parves; Wong, Ho

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to develop and empirically test the performance-based higher education service quality model. Design/methodology/approach: The study develops 67-item instrument for measuring performance-based service quality with a particular focus on the higher education sector. Scale reliability is confirmed using the Cronbach's alpha.…

  9. Diffusing Supply Chain Innovations at Hewlett-Packard Company: Applications of Performance Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargille, Brian; Branvold, Dwight

    2000-01-01

    Explains how Hewlett-Packard creates supply chain management innovations and effectively diffuses new technologies. Outlines how performance technologists help accelerate the diffusion and adoption of innovations by modifying innovations, define the client adoption path, create resources to lead clients through adoption, and improve the diffusion…

  10. Ambidextrous Leadership and Employees' Self-reported Innovative Performance: The Role of Exploration and Exploitation Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacher, Hannes; Robinson, Alecia J.; Rosing, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    The ambidexterity theory of leadership for innovation proposes that leaders' opening and closing behaviors positively predict employees' exploration and exploitation behaviors, respectively. The interaction of exploration and exploitation behaviors, in turn, is assumed to influence employee innovative performance, such that innovative performance…

  11. Innovative approaches to improve bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic device performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye

    In this thesis we studied the electrical properties of bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices fabricated using a variety of conjugated polymers, including regioregular P3HT, regiorandom P3HT, MEH-PPV and Mercedes, and several fullerene derivatives including [C61]PCBM, [C71]PCBM, bis-PCBM, Jalapeno and Habanero. We first optimized the fabrication recipe for P3HT/PCBM devices to yield a power conversion efficiency ˜3.5%, which is comparable to the reported state-of-the-art P3HT/PCBM device performance. We then fabricated OPV devices using alternative high LUMO fullerenes and a narrow bandgap/deep HOMO polymer to enhance OPV device performance and studied the electrical properties of these devices. Devices fabricated using P3HT/Jalapeno demonstrate a high efficiency ˜5%. Finally, we discovered an innovative spin-related method, which can potentially compliment the use of alternative donor/acceptor materials, to enhance OPV device performance. We doped the spin ½ radial Galvinoxyl into P3HT/PCBM devices and improved efficiency from 3.5% to 4%. Our experimental results suggest that the existence of Galvinoxyl at the P3HT/PCBM interface facilitates the exciton/polaron dissociation process, while Galvinoxyl molecules that are sparsely distributed in PCBM domains yield enhanced free charge carrier transport.

  12. Innovative Teaching: An Empirical Study of Computer-Aided Instruction in Quantitative Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonul, Fusun F.; Solano, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate business undergraduate mathematics-based courses in a blended environment of online assignments and exams and offline lectures, and report the impact on academic performance of factors such as classroom attendance, web-based course supplements, and homework. We present results from both ordinary least squares and fixed effects,…

  13. The Relationship Between of Manufacturing Flexibility, Innovation Capability, and Operational Performance in Indonesian Manufacturing SMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, U. S.; Raihan

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between manufacturing flexibility competence and operational performance with technological innovation capability as mediator variables. A survey method was applied to collect data pertaining to the variables being investigated. The findings indicated that manufacturing flexibility competence is positively associated with technological innovation capability and operational performance. The findings also suggested that technological innovation capability types mediated positively to the operational performance implication of manufacturing flexibility competence. This implies that manufacturing organizations pursuing manufacturing flexibility competence need to develop technological innovation capability in obtaining a high operational performance.

  14. Improvement of hospital performance through innovation: toward the value of hospital care.

    PubMed

    Dias, Casimiro; Escoval, Ana

    2013-01-01

    The perspective of innovation as the strategic lever of organizational performance has been widespread in the hospital sector. While public value of innovation can be significant, it is not evident that innovation always ends up in higher levels of performance. Within this context, the purpose of the article was to critically analyze the relationship between innovation and performance,taking into account the specificities of the hospital sector. This article pulls together primary data on organizational flexibility, innovation, and performance from 95 hospitals in Portugal,collected through a survey, data from interviews to hospital administration boards, and a panel of 15 experts. The diversity of data sources allowed for triangulation. The article uses mixed methods to explore the relationship between innovation and performance in the hospital sector in Portugal. The relationship between innovation and performance is analyzed through cluster analysis, supplemented with content analysis of interviews and the technical nominal group. The main findings reveal that the cluster of efficient innovators has twice the level of performance than other clusters. Organizational flexibility and external cooperation are the 2 major factors explaining these differences. The article identifies various organizational strategies to use innovation in order to enhance hospital performance. Overall, it proposes the alignment of perspectives of different stakeholders on the value proposition of hospital services, the embeddedness of information loops, and continuous adjustments toward high-value services. PMID:24902144

  15. Improvement of hospital performance through innovation: toward the value of hospital care.

    PubMed

    Dias, Casimiro; Escoval, Ana

    2013-01-01

    The perspective of innovation as the strategic lever of organizational performance has been widespread in the hospital sector. While public value of innovation can be significant, it is not evident that innovation always ends up in higher levels of performance. Within this context, the purpose of the article was to critically analyze the relationship between innovation and performance, taking into account the specificities of the hospital sector. This article pulls together primary data on organizational flexibility, innovation, and performance from 95 hospitals in Portugal, collected through a survey, data from interviews to hospital administration boards, and a panel of 15 experts. The diversity of data sources allowed for triangulation. The article uses mixed methods to explore the relationship between innovation and performance in the hospital sector in Portugal. The relationship between innovation and performance is analyzed through cluster analysis, supplemented with content analysis of interviews and the technical nominal group. The main findings reveal that the cluster of efficient innovators has twice the level of performance than other clusters. Organizational flexibility and external cooperation are the 2 major factors explaining these differences. The article identifies various organizational strategies to use innovation in order to enhance hospital performance. Overall, it proposes the alignment of perspectives of different stakeholders on the value proposition of hospital services, the embeddedness of information loops, and continuous adjustments toward high-value services. PMID:23629035

  16. Exploring the Best HRM Practices-Performance Relationship: An Empirical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theriou, George N.; Chatzoglou, Prodromos D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to empirically examine the linkages between best human resource (HRM) practices, knowledge management, organisational learning, organisational capabilities and organisational performance. The proposed framework and findings intend to add to the understanding of the specific processes that mediate between best HRM practices…

  17. An Evaluation of Empirical Bayes' Estimation of Value- Added Teacher Performance Measures. Working Paper #31. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Maxfield, Michelle; Reckase, Mark D.; Thompson, Paul; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical Bayes' (EB) estimation is a widely used procedure to calculate teacher value-added. It is primarily viewed as a way to make imprecise estimates more reliable. In this paper we review the theory of EB estimation and use simulated data to study its ability to properly rank teachers. We compare the performance of EB estimators with that of…

  18. Multi-Ethnic Workforce and Business Performance: Review and Synthesis of the Empirical Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoobridge, Gonzalo E.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides an updated review and synthesis of the empirical literature of the determinants of business performance, and discusses directions for future research aimed at developing better theories and advancing knowledge of the specific influence of ethnic minorities on firm financial achievements. The review is intended to overcome the…

  19. The relationship between corporate environmental performance and environmental disclosure: an empirical study in China.

    PubMed

    Meng, X H; Zeng, S X; Shi, Jonathan J; Qi, G Y; Zhang, Z B

    2014-12-01

    Based on a content analysis of 533 Chinese listed companies, this study examines how corporate environmental performance affects not only the level of detail of a company's environmental disclosures, but also what information is disclosed. The results show that (1) both poor and good performers have more disclosure than the median (i.e., "mixed") performers, which provides empirical evidence to support a nonlinear relationship between corporate environmental performance and environmental disclosure; (2) poor performers disclose more soft information on environmental performance than good performers, and good performers disclose more solid information; and (3) although poor performers increase disclosure after being exposed as environmental violators, they avoid disclosing negative environmental information, such as the violation and the associated penalties. This study provides additional evidence for a nonlinear relationship between environmental performance and disclosure in emerging markets, and suggests environmental disclosure may not be a valid signal to differentiate good performers from poor performers in contemporary China. PMID:25113230

  20. A Factor Analysis on Teamwork Performance: An Empirical Study of Inter-Instituted Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Mingchang; Chen, Ya-Hsueh

    2014-01-01

    Problem Statement: Inter-instituted collaboration has attracted broad attention for educational quality improvement in the last decade. The team performance of these innovative team projects received foremost attention, particularly with knowledge-sharing, emotional intelligence, and team conflicts. Purpose of Study: The purpose of the study was…

  1. Performance of Lempel-Ziv compressors with deferred innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Martin

    1989-01-01

    The noiseless data-compression algorithms introduced by Lempel and Ziv (LZ) parse an input data string into successive substrings each consisting of two parts: The citation, which is the longest prefix that has appeared earlier in the input, and the innovation, which is the symbol immediately following the citation. In extremal versions of the LZ algorithm the citation may have begun anywhere in the input; in incremental versions it must have begun at a previous parse position. Originally the citation and the innovation were encoded, either individually or jointly, into an output word to be transmitted or stored. Subsequently, it was speculated that the cost of this encoding may be excessively high because the innovation contributes roughly 1g(A) bits, where A is the size of the input alphabet, regardless of the compressibility of the source. To remedy this excess, it was suggested to store the parsed substring as usual, but encoding for output only the citation, leaving the innovation to be encoded as the first symbol of the next substring. Being thus included in the next substring, the innovation can participate in whatever compression that substring enjoys. This strategy is called deferred innovation. It is exemplified in the algorithm described by Welch and implemented in the C program compress that has widely displaced adaptive Huffman coding (compact) as a UNIX system utility. The excessive expansion is explained, an implicit warning is given against using the deferred innovation compressors on nearly incompressible data.

  2. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America field testing that shed light on how real-world water usage affects energy saving estimates of high-efficiency water heating systems.

  3. Theoretical and testing performance of an innovative indirect evaporative chiller

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yi; Xie, Xiaoyun

    2010-12-15

    An indirect evaporative chiller is a device used to produce chilled water at a temperature between the wet bulb temperature and dew point of the outdoor air, which can be used in building HVAC systems. This article presents a theoretical analysis and practical performance of an innovative indirect evaporative chiller. First, the process of the indirect evaporative chiller is introduced; then, the matching characteristics of the process are presented and analyzed. It can be shown that the process that produces cold water by using dry air is a nearly-reversible process, so the ideal produced chilled water temperature of the indirect evaporative chiller can be set close to the dew point temperature of the chiller's inlet air. After the indirect evaporative chiller was designed, simulations were done to analyze the output water temperature, the cooling efficiency relative to the inlet dew point temperature, and the COP that the chiller can performance. The first installation of the indirect evaporative chiller of this kind has been run for 5 years in a building in the city of Shihezi. The tested output water temperature of the chiller is around 14-20 C, which is just in between of the outdoor wet bulb temperature and dew point. The tested COP{sub r,s} of the developed indirect evaporative chiller reaches 9.1. Compared with ordinary air conditioning systems, the indirect evaporative chiller can save more than 40% in energy consumption due to the fact that the only energy consumed is from pumps and fans. An added bonus is that the indirect evaporative chiller uses no CFCs that pollute to the aerosphere. The tested internal parameters, such as the water-air flow rate ratio and heat transfer area for each heat transfer process inside the chiller, were analyzed and compared with designed values. The tested indoor air conditions, with a room temperature of 23-27 C and relative humidity of 50-70%, proved that the developed practical indirect evaporative chiller successfully

  4. Performance modeling of the Ballard Mark IV solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell. 2: Empirical model development

    SciTech Connect

    Amphlett, J.C.; Baumert, R.M.; Mann, R.F.; Peppley, B.A.; Roberge, P.R. ); Harris, T.J. )

    1995-01-01

    A parametric model predicting the performance of a solid polymer electrolyte, proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been developed using a combination of mechanistic and empirical modeling techniques. This paper details the empirical analysis which yielded the parametric coefficients employed in the model. A 28 run experiment covering a range of operating currents (50 to 300 ASF), temperatures (328 to 358 K), oxygen partial pressures (0.6 to 3.1 atm abs.) and hydrogen partial pressures (2.0 to 3.1 atm abs.) was conducted. Parametric equations for the activation overvoltage and the internal resistance of the fuel cell were obtained from linear regression. The factors to be employed in the linear regression had been previously determined through a mechanistic analysis of fuel cell processes. Activation overvoltage was modeled as a function of the operating temperature, the product of operating temperature, and the logarithm of the operating current, and the product of operating temperature and the logarithm of the oxygen concentration at the catalyst reaction sites. The internal resistance of the fuel cell was modeled as a function of the operating temperature and the current. Correlation of the empirical model to experimental data was very good. It is anticipated that the mechanistic validity yielded by the coupling of mechanistic and empirical modeling techniques will also allow for accurate predictive capabilities outside of the experimental range.

  5. The Wreading Experiment: Performative Strategies for Teaching Women's Innovative Poetries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Emily

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an upper-level, special topics English course she designed as a "workshop" in "wreading" contemporary women's innovative poetries. She was inspired to "wreading" by Charles Bernstein's essay "Creative Wreading: A Primer," in which he offers interactive and reactive responses to assigned texts as the grounds…

  6. Performance and reliability of empirical mobility relationships for the prediction of Debris Flow inundated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, Alessandro; Berti, Matteo; Mammoliti, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Empirical mobility relationships can be used for preliminary DF Hazard assessment. An adaptation of the original relationships has been proposed for alpine debris flows (DFLOWZ model; Berti and Simoni, 2007). Once a reference debris flow volume is chosen, the code DFLOWZ allows to estimate the area potentially affected by the event based on the mutual relationships between channel cross-sectional area, planimetric area of the deposit and overall volume. We back-analyzed 25 DF events occurred in the Bolzano province (Italy), ranging in volume from 3,000 to 300,000 m3 and evalutated the performance of the automated method through an objective reliability index. Our aim is: - evaluate the effects of uncertainty associated with the empirical mobility relationships; - assess other possible sources of error or violations of the assumptions that underlie the model. Results indicate that a high-resolution DEM (≤ 2.5 m) is essential to get a reliable inundation prediction over a fan. The code itself performs well, in a wide range of situations, demonstrating the conceptual correctness of underlying assumptions. The most relevant source of error remains the uncertainty associated with the empirical mobility relationships, due mainly to errors in volume measurements of DF deposits. Their improvement can be achieved through the collection of high quality field data of DF events.

  7. High Performance Work System, HRD Climate and Organisational Performance: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muduli, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to study the relationship between high-performance work system (HPWS) and organizational performance and to examine the role of human resource development (HRD) Climate in mediating the relationship between HPWS and the organizational performance in the context of the power sector of India. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  8. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This Top Innovation profile describes the Standard for Home Performance-Related Data Transfer (known as HPXML), developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, which facilitates smooth communication between program tracking systems and energy upgrade analysis software,

  9. TESTING AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF AN INNOVATIVE INTERNAL PIPE SEALING SYSTEM FOR WASTEWATER MAIN REHABILITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many utilities are seeking emerging and innovative rehabilitation technologies to extend the service life of their infrastructure systems. This report describes the testing and performance evaluation of an internal pipe sealing system, which provides a permanent physical seal fo...

  10. The dark and bright sides of self-efficacy in predicting learning, innovative and risky performances.

    PubMed

    Salanova, Marisa; Lorente, Laura; Martínez, Isabel M

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the different role that efficacy beliefs play in the prediction of learning, innovative and risky performances. We hypothesize that high levels of efficacy beliefs in learning and innovative performances have positive consequences (i.e., better academic and innovative performance, respectively), whereas in risky performances they have negative consequences (i.e., less safety performance). To achieve this objective, three studies were conducted, 1) a two-wave longitudinal field study among 527 undergraduate students (learning setting), 2) a three-wave longitudinal lab study among 165 participants performing innovative group tasks (innovative setting), and 3) a field study among 228 construction workers (risky setting). As expected, high levels of efficacy beliefs have positive or negative consequences on performance depending on the specific settings. Unexpectedly, however, we found no time x self-efficacy interaction effect over time in learning and innovative settings. Theoretical and practical implications within the social cognitive theory of A. Bandura framework are discussed. PMID:23156920

  11. The Impact of a Researcher's Structural Position on Scientific Performance: An Empirical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Contandriopoulos, Damien; Duhoux, Arnaud; Larouche, Catherine; Perroux, Mélanie

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the nature and structure of scientific collaboration as well as the association between academic collaboration networks and scientific productivity. Based on empirical data gathered from the CVs of 73 researchers affiliated with an academic research network in Canada, this study used social network analysis (SNA) to examine the association between researchers' structural position in the network and their scientific performance. With reference to Granovetter's and Burt's theories on weak ties and structural holes, we argue it is the bridging position a researcher holds in a scientific network that matters most to improve scientific performance. The results of correlation scores between network centrality and two different indicators of scientific performance indicate there is a robust association between researchers' structural position in collaboration networks and their scientific performance. We believe this finding, and the method we have developed, could have implications for the way research networks are managed and researchers are supported. PMID:27579954

  12. Innovative Technology For Testing Of Protective Gloves Specific Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Păun, Florin Adrian; Părăian, Mihaela; Jurca, Adrian; Lupu, Leonard; Berzan, Muntean Florina

    2015-07-01

    Presence of hazards along carrying on the work tasks by operators require making use of personal protective equipment, adequate from ensuring protection standpoint. Protecting workers against hazards implies the personal protective equipment to fulfill certain constructional and safety requirements which are very important for the level of protection that should be ensured. This paperwork aims at identifying the constructional and safety requirements for hand protection equipment, as well as the applicable test methods whose results would allow their farther characterization regarding the protection ensured. Innovative solutions are presented, regarding the test stand for determining the blade cut resistance of protective gloves.

  13. A causal model of the linkages between innovative ecological responsiveness and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Johnnie

    The purpose of this study was to examine the question "What are the organizational "antecedents" and "downstream" effects of innovative ecological responsiveness in the electric service industry?" Data were collected primarily from the chief operating, financial, and environmental/regulatory officers from 101 investor owned electric power producers across the United States. Theory from the organizational innovation literature was integrated with the organizational adaptation literature to identify the relationship between the organizational determinants of innovative adaptive responses, as well as to project the financial implications of these responses. Since innovations are a means of introducing change into organizations in order to facilitate the adaptation process, these two theoretical frameworks were found to be quite complementary. Statistical results suggest that "culture and context" matter. Managerial ideology was found to be significantly related to innovative ecological responsiveness. Regulatory uncertainty was significantly and positively related to the range of innovative responses implemented by a company. The range of innovative activities implemented by a company had a significant positive effect on financial performance. This finding suggests that firms that adopt a broad range of activities tend to perform better, indicating a possible synergistic effect in this adaptive pattern.

  14. Building performance-based accountability with limited empirical evidence: performance measurement for public health preparedness.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Shoshana R; Nelson, Christopher D; McLees, Anita W; Mumford, Karen; Thomas, Craig

    2013-08-01

    Efforts to respond to performance-based accountability mandates for public health emergency preparedness have been hindered by a weak evidence base linking preparedness activities with response outcomes. We describe an approach to measure development that was successfully implemented in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Public Health Emergency Preparedness Cooperative Agreement. The approach leverages insights from process mapping and experts to guide measure selection, and provides mechanisms for reducing performance-irrelevant variation in measurement data. Also, issues are identified that need to be addressed to advance the science of measurement in public health emergency preparedness. PMID:24229520

  15. Performance of an innovative FWS constructed wetland in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Dialynas, G; Kefalakis, N; Dialynas, M; Angelakis, A

    2002-01-01

    Pompia is an ancient name of a small community in Messara valley, which is the main agricultural area, in central Crete. The constructed wetland in Pompia is a free water surface (FWS) system, for treating the wastewater of the local community of 1,200 p.e. That wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is a pilot plant but it is simple, safe, innovative, and environmentally friendly. The WWTP was funded by the Region of Crete. The Eastern Crete Development Organization was responsible for the design, supervision, management, and initial operation. The project was completed in August 1999, and has been under operation since then. The effluent is considered to be equivalent to tertiary treated municipal wastewater, and it will be used to irrigate olive orchards. The general sense for a visitor is that the FWS system operates like a natural marsh and a habitat of birds and wild animals. In addition, very high removal rates for BOD5, COD, TSS, TKN, TP, TC, and FC have been obtained. PMID:12361033

  16. Percentile-based Empirical Distribution Function Estimates for Performance Evaluation of Healthcare Providers

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Susan M.; Louis, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Hierarchical models are widely-used to characterize the performance of individual healthcare providers. However, little attention has been devoted to system-wide performance evaluations, the goals of which include identifying extreme (e.g., top 10%) provider performance and developing statistical benchmarks to define high-quality care. Obtaining optimal estimates of these quantities requires estimating the empirical distribution function (EDF) of provider-specific parameters that generate the dataset under consideration. However, the difficulty of obtaining uncertainty bounds for a square-error loss minimizing EDF estimate has hindered its use in system-wide performance evaluations. We therefore develop and study a percentile-based EDF estimate for univariate provider-specific parameters. We compute order statistics of samples drawn from the posterior distribution of provider-specific parameters to obtain relevant uncertainty assessments of an EDF estimate and its features, such as thresholds and percentiles. We apply our method to data from the Medicare End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Program, a health insurance program for people with irreversible kidney failure. We highlight the risk of misclassifying providers as exceptionally good or poor performers when uncertainty in statistical benchmark estimates is ignored. Given the high stakes of performance evaluations, statistical benchmarks should be accompanied by precision estimates. PMID:21918583

  17. The performance of selected semi-empirical and DFT methods in studying C60 fullerene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikorska, Celina; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    The capability of reproducing the open circuit voltages (V oc) of 15 representative C60 fullerene derivatives was tested using the selected quantum mechanical methods (B3LYP, PM6, and PM7) together with the two one-electron basis sets. Certain theoretical treatments (e.g. PM6) were found to be satisfactory for preliminary estimates of the open circuit voltages (V oc), whereas the use of the B3LYP/6-31G(d) approach has been proven to assure highly accurate results. We also examined the structural similarity of 19 fullerene derivatives by employing principle component analysis (PCA). In order to express the structural features of the studied compounds we used molecular descriptors calculated with semi-empirical (PM6 and PM7) and density functional (B3LYP/6-31G(d)) methods separately. In performing PCA, we noticed that semi-empirical methods (i.e. PM6 and PM7) seem satisfactory for molecules, in which one can distinguish the aromatic and the aliphatic parts in the cyclopropane ring of PCBM (phenyl-C61-buteric acid methyl ester) and they significantly overestimate the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (E HOMO). The use of the B3LYP functional, however, is recommended for studying methanofullerenes, which closely resemble the structure of PCBM, and for their modifications.

  18. An empirical investigation of operator performance in cognitively demanding simulated emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, E.M.; Mumaw, R.J.; Lewis, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    This report documents the results of an empirical study of nuclear power plant operator performance in cognitively demanding simulated emergencies. During emergencies operators follow highly prescriptive written procedures. The objectives of the study were to understand and document what role higher-level cognitive activities such as diagnosis, or more generally `situation assessment`, play in guiding operator performance, given that operators utilize procedures in responding to the events. The study examined crew performance in variants of two emergencies: (1) an Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accident and (2) a Loss of Heat Sink scenario. Data on operator performance were collected using training simulators at two plant sites. Up to 11 crews from each plant participated in each of two simulated emergencies for a total of 38 cases. Crew performance was videotaped and partial transcripts were produced and analyzed. The results revealed a number of instances where higher-level cognitive activities such as situation assessment and response planning enabled crews to handle aspects of the situation that were not fully addressed by the procedures. This report documents these cases and discusses their implications for the development and evaluation of training and control room aids, as well as for human reliability analyses.

  19. Video-Based Teacher Performance Assessment: Innovations in New York State Teacher Certification Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvestro, John R.; And Others

    The New York State Education Department is currently developing an innovative and comprehensive system for teacher certification assessment. One component is the Assessment of Teaching Skills-Performance (ATS-P), a video-based performance assessment for which teachers would prepare and submit a videotape of their instruction for evaluation by…

  20. Performing Art-Based Research: Innovation in Graduate Art Therapy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Bruce L.; Hoffman, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an innovation in art therapy research and education in which art-based performance is used to generate, embody, and creatively synthesize knowledge. An art therapy graduate student's art-based process of inquiry serves to demonstrate how art and performance may be used to identify the research question, to conduct a…

  1. Minnesota's Nursing Facility Performance-Based Incentive Payment Program: An Innovative Model for Promoting Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Valerie; Arling, Greg; Lewis, Teresa; Abrahamson, Kathleen A.; Mueller, Christine; Edstrom, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Minnesota's Nursing Facility Performance-Based Incentive Payment Program (PIPP) supports provider-initiated projects aimed at improving care quality and efficiency. PIPP moves beyond conventional pay for performance. It seeks to promote implementation of evidence-based practices, encourage innovation and risk taking, foster collaboration…

  2. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open Innovation Successes and Collaborative Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2014-01-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, which resulted in the development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the open innovation successes and collaborative projects developed over this timeframe, including the efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC), which was established to advance human health and performance innovations for spaceflight and societal benefit via collaboration in new markets.

  3. Towards high performing hospital enterprise systems: an empirical and literature based design framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Fradinho, Jorge Miguel

    2014-05-01

    Our understanding of enterprise systems (ES) is gradually evolving towards a sense of design which leverages multidisciplinary bodies of knowledge that may bolster hybrid research designs and together further the characterisation of ES operation and performance. This article aims to contribute towards ES design theory with its hospital enterprise systems design (HESD) framework, which reflects a rich multidisciplinary literature and two in-depth hospital empirical cases from the US and UK. In doing so it leverages systems thinking principles and traditionally disparate bodies of knowledge to bolster the theoretical evolution and foundation of ES. A total of seven core ES design elements are identified and characterised with 24 main categories and 53 subcategories. In addition, it builds on recent work which suggests that hospital enterprises are comprised of multiple internal ES configurations which may generate different levels of performance. Multiple sources of evidence were collected including electronic medical records, 54 recorded interviews, observation, and internal documents. Both in-depth cases compare and contrast higher and lower performing ES configurations. Following literal replication across in-depth cases, this article concludes that hospital performance can be improved through an enriched understanding of hospital ES design.

  4. Education Reforms and Innovations to Improve Student Assessment Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAfee, Wade J.

    2014-01-01

    International assessments such as the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) have exhibited United States students specifically in the fourth and eighth grades, are not performing well when compared to their international peers. Educational stakeholders including…

  5. Building America System Research Results. Innovations for High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-05-01

    This report provides a summary of key lessons learned from the first 10 years of the Building America program and also included a summary of the future challenges that must be met to reach the program’s long term performance goals.

  6. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open innovation successes and collaborative projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Elizabeth E.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-11-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, setting the course for development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the successful execution of the strategy, driving organizational change through open innovation efforts and collaborative projects, including efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC).

  7. Structural Conditions for Collaboration and Learning in Innovation Networks: Using an Innovation System Performance Lens to Analyse Agricultural Knowledge Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, Frans; Klerkx, Laurens; Roep, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We investigate how the structural conditions of eight different European agricultural innovation systems can facilitate or hinder collaboration and social learning in multidisciplinary innovation networks. Methodology: We have adapted the Innovation System Failure Matrix to investigate the main barriers and enablers eight countries…

  8. Effects of market, e-marketing, and technology orientations on innovativeness and performance in Turkish health organizations.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Hanifi Murat; Sürer, Atilla

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of strategic orientation on innovativeness and performance in health organizations in Turkey. We test hypotheses that market, e-marketing, and technology orientations positively affect innovativeness and performance. Market and technology orientations are found not have a significant effect on performance, but e-marketing orientation and innovativeness have a significant and positive effect. We also investigate indirect effects on innovativeness and performance. The analyses of direct and indirect effects are an important contribution to understanding relationships among research variables. PMID:27191549

  9. Effects of Market, E-Marketing, and Technology Orientations on Innovativeness and Performance in Turkish Health Organizations.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Hanifi Murat; Sürer, Atilla

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of strategic orientation on innovativeness and performance in health organizations in Turkey. We hypothesize that market, e-marketing, and technology orientations positively affect innovativeness and performance. Market and technology orientations are found not have a significant effect on performance, but e-marketing orientation and innovativeness have a significant and positive effect. We also investigate indirect effects on innovativeness and performance. The analyses of direct and indirect effects are an important contribution to understanding relationships among research variables. PMID:26674257

  10. Reciprocating and Screw Compressor semi-empirical models for establishing minimum energy performance standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Hassan; Armstrong, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The efficiency bar for a Minimum Equipment Performance Standard (MEPS) generally aims to minimize energy consumption and life cycle cost of a given chiller type and size category serving a typical load profile. Compressor type has a significant chiller performance impact. Performance of screw and reciprocating compressors is expressed in terms of pressure ratio and speed for a given refrigerant and suction density. Isentropic efficiency for a screw compressor is strongly affected by under- and over-compression (UOC) processes. The theoretical simple physical UOC model involves a compressor-specific (but sometimes unknown) volume index parameter and the real gas properties of the refrigerant used. Isentropic efficiency is estimated by the UOC model and a bi-cubic, used to account for flow, friction and electrical losses. The unknown volume index, a smoothing parameter (to flatten the UOC model peak) and bi-cubic coefficients are identified by curve fitting to minimize an appropriate residual norm. Chiller performance maps are produced for each compressor type by selecting optimized sub-cooling and condenser fan speed options in a generic component-based chiller model. SEER is the sum of hourly load (from a typical building in the climate of interest) and specific power for the same hourly conditions. An empirical UAE cooling load model, scalable to any equipment capacity, is used to establish proposed UAE MEPS. Annual electricity use and cost, determined from SEER and annual cooling load, and chiller component cost data are used to find optimal chiller designs and perform life-cycle cost comparison between screw and reciprocating compressor-based chillers. This process may be applied to any climate/load model in order to establish optimized MEPS for any country and/or region.

  11. An empirical and computational method for performance evaluation of vertical axis wind energy capture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Jesse Jason

    This Dissertation presents the author's investigation and development of a systematic method for evaluating the aerodynamic performance of Vertical Axis Wind Energy Capture Systems (WECS) apart from their electrical generation capability. The current standard method for specifying a wind energy machine is to discuss its rated power in kilowatts (or megawatts when capacity exceeds 100 kW). While this holistic method is effective for comparing machines it does not reveal the essential characteristics necessary for optimization of individual machine components. The method developed herein separates the performance characteristics of the WECS from the generation characteristics and isolates them for benchmarking and optimization. In order to develop an evaluation criterion, it was essential to evaluate and benchmark the current state of the art for wind energy capture. A thorough history of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) development and technology transfer, a standardized set of VAWT terms and a complete taxonomy of WECS types are included to ensure comparisons remain appropriate and within the same class of machine. Existing analytical methods for WECS and wind energy airfoils are surveyed and appropriate methods are selected and presented for establishing lift, drag, solidity, and specific power. A novel technique is developed for more accurately calculating VAWT solidity and is presented along with the numerous historical methods for solidity calculation. Empirical methods are presented for characterizing advance ratio and aerodynamic coefficient of performance. Results show that a VAWT can be optimized aerodynamically without consideration of generator efficiency using low capital cost rapid prototyping methods and an unsophisticated open loop wind tunnel. Wind tunnel model production with a rapid prototyping machine and kilowatt scale prototyping using composite material fabrication are discussed. Fixed and mobile test tower design and instrumentation are

  12. Innovations in Setting Performance Standards for K-12 Test-Based Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Kristen; Plake, Barbara S.

    2010-01-01

    Standard setting is a systematic process that uses a combination of judgmental and empirical procedures to make recommendations about where on the score continuum "cut scores" should be placed. Cut scores divide the score scale into categories consistent with the descriptions of student performance associated with multiple levels of achievement.…

  13. The Role of Trait Emotional Intelligence in Academic Performance: Theoretical Overview and Empirical Update.

    PubMed

    Perera, Harsha N

    2016-01-01

    Considerable debate still exists among scholars over the role of trait emotional intelligence (TEI) in academic performance. The dominant theoretical position is that TEI should be orthogonal or only weakly related to achievement; yet, there are strong theoretical reasons to believe that TEI plays a key role in performance. The purpose of the current article is to provide (a) an overview of the possible theoretical mechanisms linking TEI with achievement and (b) an update on empirical research examining this relationship. To elucidate these theoretical mechanisms, the overview draws on multiple theories of emotion and regulation, including TEI theory, social-functional accounts of emotion, and expectancy-value and psychobiological model of emotion and regulation. Although these theoretical accounts variously emphasize different variables as focal constructs, when taken together, they provide a comprehensive picture of the possible mechanisms linking TEI with achievement. In this regard, the article redresses the problem of vaguely specified theoretical links currently hampering progress in the field. The article closes with a consideration of directions for future research. PMID:26515326

  14. Examining the Relationship between Learning Organization Characteristics and Change Adaptation, Innovation, and Organizational Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontoghiorghes, Constantine; Awbre, Susan M.; Feurig, Pamela L.

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the relationship between certain learning organization characteristics and change adaptation, innovation, and bottom-line organizational performance. The following learning organization characteristics were found to be the strongest predictors of rapid change adaptation, quick product or…

  15. Training, Innovation and Business Performance: An Analysis of the Business Longitudinal Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, A. Michael

    This paper uses the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Business Longitudinal Survey to explore relationships between training, innovation, and firm performance for Australian businesses with less than 200 employees. The longitudinal nature of the data is used to test various hypotheses about the nature of the link between training, business changes,…

  16. Organizational performance, Marketing strategy, and Financial strategic alignment: an empirical study on Iranian pharmaceutical firms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Strategic Functional-level planning should be aligned with business level and other functional strategies of a company. It is presumed that assimilating the strategies could have positive contribution to business performance, in this regard alignment between marketing strategy and financial strategy seems to be the most important strategies being studied. An empirical work in generic pharmaceutical manufacturing companies for evaluating effect of alignment between these two functions on organizational performance was developed in this paper. Methods All Iranian pharmaceutical generic manufactures listed in Tehran stock market have been tested for period of five years between 2006–2010 and their marketing strategies were determined by using Slater and Olson taxonomy and their financial strategies have been developed by calculating total risk and total return of sample companies for five years based on rate of risk and return in the frame of a 2 × 2 matrix. For the business performance three profitability indices including Q-Tubin (Rate of market value to net asset value), ROA (Return on Asset), ROE (Return on Equity) have been tested. For analysis, a series of one-way ANOVAs as a collection of statistical models within marketing strategies considering financial strategy as independent variable and the three performance measures as dependent variables was used. Results Results show strategic alignment between financial and marketing has significant impact on profitability of company resulting in arise of all three profitability indices. Q tubing’s rate were 2.33,2.09,2.29,2.58 and rate of ROA were 0.21,0.194,0.25,0.22 and rate of ROE were 0.44,0.46,0.45,0.42 for matched strategy types, respectively the rates shown here are more than average meaning that specific type of marketing strategy is fitted with specific type of financial strategy. Conclusion Managers should not consider decisions regarding marketing strategy independently of their financial

  17. Building America Top Innovations 2012: High-Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-offs: Production Builders

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research showing how some energy-efficiency measure cost increases can balance against measures that reduce up-front costs: Advanced framing cuts lumber costs, right sizing can mean downsizing the HVAC, moving HVAC into conditioned space cuts installation costs, designing on a 2-foot grid reduces materials waste, etc.

  18. LCOE reduction for parabolic trough CSP: Innovative solar receiver with improved performance at medium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stollo, A.; Chiarappa, T.; D'Angelo, A.; Maccari, A.; Matino, F.

    2016-05-01

    Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) applications represent an effective possibility to gain energy from the Sun; however, the lasting CSP market crisis compels continuous improvements in terms of cost reduction and performance increase. Focused on parabolic trough technology, this paper describes the innovation studied and realized on solar receivers to gain optimized optical performance while increasing the production versatility, hence boosting the solar plant efficiency and finally reducing the estimated LCOE.

  19. Innovation, Innovation, Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Innovation, Universities and Skills. The new title of the department offers much food for thought. The title is indeed an intriguing and important one. Bringing the idea of innovation right to the fore is, to use an overworked term, challenging. Pinning down what innovation means is not at all easy. There are three different lines of argument. The…

  20. More Health Expenditure, Better Economic Performance? Empirical Evidence From OECD Countries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhmei

    2015-01-01

    Recent economic downturns have led many countries to reduce health spending dramatically, with the World Health Organization raising concerns over the effects of this, in particular among the poor and vulnerable. With the provision of appropriate health care, the population of a country could have better health, thus strengthening the nation's human capital, which could contribute to economic growth through improved productivity. How much should countries spend on health care? This study aims to estimate the optimal health care expenditure in a growing economy. Applying the experiences of countries from the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) over the period 1990 to 2009, this research introduces the method of system generalized method of moments (GMM) to derive the design of the estimators of the focal variables. Empirical evidence indicates that when the ratio of health spending to gross domestic product (GDP) is less than the optimal level of 7.55%, increases in health spending effectively lead to better economic performance. Above this, more spending does not equate to better care. The real level of health spending in OECD countries is 5.48% of GDP, with a 1.87% economic growth rate. The question which is posed by this study is a pertinent one, especially in the current context of financially constrained health systems around the world. The analytical results of this work will allow policymakers to better allocate scarce resources to achieve their macroeconomic goals. PMID:26310501

  1. Technology transfer from biomedical research to clinical practice: measuring innovation performance.

    PubMed

    Balas, E Andrew; Elkin, Peter L

    2013-12-01

    Studies documented 17 years of transfer time from clinical trials to practice of care. Launched in 2002, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) translational research initiative needs to develop metrics for impact assessment. A recent White House report highlighted that research and development productivity is declining as a result of increased research spending while the new drugs output is flat. The goal of this study was to develop an expanded model of research-based innovation and performance thresholds of transfer from research to practice. Models for transfer of research to practice have been collected and reviewed. Subsequently, innovation pathways have been specified based on common characteristics. An integrated, intellectual property transfer model is described. The central but often disregarded role of research innovation disclosure is highlighted. Measures of research transfer and milestones of progress have been identified based on the Association of University Technology Managers 2012 performance reports. Numeric milestones of technology transfer are recommended at threshold (top 50%), target (top 25%), and stretch goal (top 10%) performance levels. Transfer measures and corresponding target levels include research spending to disclosure (<$1.88 million), disclosure to patents (>0.81), patents to start-up (>0.1), patents to licenses (>2.25), and average per license income (>$48,000). Several limitations of measurement are described. Academic institutions should take strategic steps to bring innovation to the center of scholarly discussions. Research on research, particularly on pathways to disclosures, is needed to improve R&D productivity. Researchers should be informed about the technology transfer performance of their institution and regulations should better support innovators. PMID:24142938

  2. Innovative target for integration and early evaluation of infrared sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadson, Carl F.

    1993-11-01

    Evaluation of infrared sensor performance begins with integration on an optical test station and initial acquisition of a source target image. Preliminary performance evaluation includes sensor radiant response, image performance, and sensor alignment. Integration and preliminary performance evaluation may be expedited by the use of an innovative target consisting of a cold background surrounding a hot extended source with a thin, cold wire obscuration. This paper describes an appropriate target geometry and provides a nomogram that allows estimation of sensor focal error based on an observed ratio of target image response between two detector elements.

  3. Impact of Intellectual Capital on Organisational Performance: An Empirical Study of Companies in the Hang Seng Index (Part 1)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kin Hang

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper, which is written in two parts, is to investigate empirically if intellectual capital (IC) has an impact on the financial aspects of organisational performance as well as attempting to identify the IC components that may be the drivers for the leading financial indicators of listed companies. The study sought…

  4. Impact of Intellectual Capital on Organisational Performance: An Empirical Study of Companies in the Hang Seng Index (Part 2)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kin Hang

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper, which is written in two parts, is to investigate empirically if intellectual capital (IC) has an impact on the financial aspects of organisational performance as well as attempting to identify the IC components that may be the drivers for the leading financial indicators of listed companies. The study sought…

  5. Public Management Reform and Organizational Performance: An Empirical Assessment of the U.K. Labour Government's Public Service Improvement Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Richard M.; Boyne, George A.

    2006-01-01

    We present the first empirical assessment of the U.K. Labour government's program of public management reform. This reform program is based on rational planning, devolution and delegation, flexibility and incentives, and enhanced choice. Measures of these variables are tested against external and internal indicators of organizational performance.…

  6. The Impact of Student Composition on Schools' Value-Added Performance: A Comparison of Seven Empirical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Anneke C.; Thomas, Sally M.

    2015-01-01

    In many countries, policy makers struggle with the development of value-added indicators of school performance for educational accountability purposes and in particular with the choice whether school context measured in the form of student composition variables should be included. This study investigates differences between 7 empirical studies…

  7. Innovation Value of Information Technology: Impact of Information Technology--Intensity on Innovation Capability and Firm Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramamani, Mahesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Though information technology adoptions have been always referred to as innovations in firms, much of the business value literature has concentrated on the tangible and immediately measurable impacts of information technology (IT) adoptions. This study aims to explore the impact of information technology investments on the innovativeness of a…

  8. The European ALMA project: new design and technologies for innovative performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; Rampini, F.; Lapeyre, P.

    2008-07-01

    The development process of the ALMA project from its first prototype phase to the present one of serial production, has stimulated the development of concepts of innovative engineering and manufacturing design. The technologies adopted such as the large use of composite materials, motorizations without contact (Direct Drive) etc., have allowed to obtain extreme performances with reference to the scientific/environmental context. ALMA technologies represent a new gateway for the astrophysical applications of the future.

  9. The sustainability of new programs and innovations: a review of the empirical literature and recommendations for future research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The introduction of evidence-based programs and practices into healthcare settings has been the subject of an increasing amount of research in recent years. While a number of studies have examined initial implementation efforts, less research has been conducted to determine what happens beyond that point. There is increasing recognition that the extent to which new programs are sustained is influenced by many different factors and that more needs to be known about just what these factors are and how they interact. To understand the current state of the research literature on sustainability, our team took stock of what is currently known in this area and identified areas in which further research would be particularly helpful. This paper reviews the methods that have been used, the types of outcomes that have been measured and reported, findings from studies that reported long-term implementation outcomes, and factors that have been identified as potential influences on the sustained use of new practices, programs, or interventions. We conclude with recommendations and considerations for future research. Methods Two coders identified 125 studies on sustainability that met eligibility criteria. An initial coding scheme was developed based on constructs identified in previous literature on implementation. Additional codes were generated deductively. Related constructs among factors were identified by consensus and collapsed under the general categories. Studies that described the extent to which programs or innovations were sustained were also categorized and summarized. Results Although "sustainability" was the term most commonly used in the literature to refer to what happened after initial implementation, not all the studies that were reviewed actually presented working definitions of the term. Most study designs were retrospective and naturalistic. Approximately half of the studies relied on self-reports to assess sustainability or elements that

  10. An Evaluation of Empirical Bayes's Estimation of Value-Added Teacher Performance Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Maxfield, Michelle; Reckase, Mark D.; Thompson, Paul N.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical Bayes's (EB) estimation has become a popular procedure used to calculate teacher value added, often as a way to make imprecise estimates more reliable. In this article, we review the theory of EB estimation and use simulated and real student achievement data to study the ability of EB estimators to properly rank teachers. We compare the…

  11. Changes in Anatomy Instruction and USMLE Performance: Empirical Evidence on the Absence of a Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddy, Monica M.; Swanson, David B.; Drake, Richard L.; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy instruction has evolved over the past two decades as many medical schools have undergone various types of curricular reform. To provide empirical evidence about whether or not curricular changes impact the acquisition and retention of anatomy knowledge, this study investigated the effect of variation in gross anatomy course hours,…

  12. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems.

  13. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems. All data gathered in this investigation are contained in the CD-ROM.

  14. Proposal of an innovative benchmark for comparison of the performance of contactless digitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuliano, Luca; Minetola, Paolo; Salmi, Alessandro

    2010-10-01

    Thanks to the improving performances of 3D optical scanners, in terms of accuracy and repeatability, reverse engineering applications have extended from CAD model design or reconstruction to quality control. Today, contactless digitizing devices constitute a good alternative to coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) for the inspection of certain parts. The German guideline VDI/VDE 2634 is the only reference to evaluate whether 3D optical measuring systems comply with the declared or required performance specifications. Nevertheless it is difficult to compare the performance of different scanners referring to such a guideline. An adequate novel benchmark is proposed in this paper: focusing on the inspection of production tools (moulds), the innovative test piece was designed using common geometries and free-form surfaces. The reference part is intended to be employed for the evaluation of the performance of several contactless digitizing devices in computer-aided inspection, considering dimensional and geometrical tolerances as well as other quantitative and qualitative criteria.

  15. Modern Disposable Diaper Construction: Innovations in Performance Help Maintain Healthy Diapered Skin.

    PubMed

    Counts, Jennifer L; Helmes, C Tucker; Kenneally, Dianna; Otts, David R

    2014-06-24

    Disposable diapers today employ dramatically better fitting, less bulky, and more environmentally friendly features that deliver better performance and help provide protection for infant skin. Continuous innovations in technology and materials have resulted in new generations of disposable diapers that provide extended dryness and reduced leakage. Driven by studies on the skin's response to inherent influences, such as overhydration and irritation, the qualities of disposable diapers today present significant enhancements for skin health compared with earlier disposable versions and even cloth diapers. Over the years, these enhancements in disposable diapers have helped lead to a reduction in incidence and severity of diaper dermatitis. PMID:24961775

  16. Innovative use of controlled availability fertilizers with high performance for intensive agriculture and environmental conservation.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Sadao

    2005-12-01

    A variety of slow release fertilizers, controlled release (availability) fertilizers (CAFs), and stability fertilizers have been developed in response to the serious drawbacks of the conventional fertilizers since the early 1960's. Of these fertilizers, CAFs which are coated with resin are consumed in the largest quantity in the world. Selecting CAFs with higher performance, the author will discuss about: 1) Innovation of agro-technologies for various field crops including new concepts of fertilizer application, 2) high yielding of field crops, 3) enhancing quality and safety of farm products, and 4) controlling the adverse effect of intensive agriculture on the environment. PMID:16512212

  17. Innovative use of controlled availability fertilizers with high performance for intensive agriculture and environmental conservation.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Sadao

    2005-09-01

    A variety of slow release fertilizers, controlled release (availability) fertilizers (CAFs), and stability fertilizers have been developed in response to the serious drawbacks of the conventional fertilizers since the early 1960's. Of these fertilizers, CAFs which are coated with resin are consumed in the largest quantity in the world. Selecting CAFs with higher performance, the author will discuss about: 1) Innovation of agro-technologies for various field crops including new concepts of fertilizer application, 2) high yielding of field crops, 3) enhancing quality and safety of farm products, and 4) controlling the adverse effect of intensive agriculture on the environment. PMID:20549445

  18. Evaluating the predictive performance of empirical estimators of natural mortality rate using information on over 200 fish species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Then, Amy Y.; Hoenig, John M; Hall, Norman G.; Hewitt, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Many methods have been developed in the last 70 years to predict the natural mortality rate, M, of a stock based on empirical evidence from comparative life history studies. These indirect or empirical methods are used in most stock assessments to (i) obtain estimates of M in the absence of direct information, (ii) check on the reasonableness of a direct estimate of M, (iii) examine the range of plausible M estimates for the stock under consideration, and (iv) define prior distributions for Bayesian analyses. The two most cited empirical methods have appeared in the literature over 2500 times to date. Despite the importance of these methods, there is no consensus in the literature on how well these methods work in terms of prediction error or how their performance may be ranked. We evaluate estimators based on various combinations of maximum age (tmax), growth parameters, and water temperature by seeing how well they reproduce >200 independent, direct estimates of M. We use tenfold cross-validation to estimate the prediction error of the estimators and to rank their performance. With updated and carefully reviewed data, we conclude that a tmax-based estimator performs the best among all estimators evaluated. The tmax-based estimators in turn perform better than the Alverson–Carney method based on tmax and the von Bertalanffy K coefficient, Pauly's method based on growth parameters and water temperature and methods based just on K. It is possible to combine two independent methods by computing a weighted mean but the improvement over the tmax-based methods is slight. Based on cross-validation prediction error, model residual patterns, model parsimony, and biological considerations, we recommend the use of a tmax-based estimator (M=4.899t−0.916max, prediction error = 0.32) when possible and a growth-based method (M=4.118K0.73L−0.33∞ , prediction error = 0.6) otherwise.

  19. Prediction of Human Glomerular Filtration Rate from Preterm Neonates to Adults: Evaluation of Predictive Performance of Several Empirical Models.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Iftekhar; Staschen, Carl-Michael

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive performance of several allometric empirical models (body weight dependent, age dependent, fixed exponent 0.75, a data-dependent single exponent, and maturation models) to predict glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in preterm and term neonates, infants, children, and adults without any renal disease. In this analysis, the models were developed from GFR data obtained from inulin clearance (preterm neonates to adults; n = 93) and the predictive performance of these models were evaluated in 335 subjects (preterm neonates to adults). The primary end point was the prediction of GFR from the empirical allometric models and the comparison of the predicted GFR with measured GFR. A prediction error within ±30% was considered acceptable. Overall, the predictive performance of the four models (BDE, ADE, and two maturation models) for the prediction of mean GFR was good across all age groups but the prediction of GFR in individual healthy subjects especially in neonates and infants was erratic and may be clinically unacceptable. PMID:26801317

  20. Interventions (Solutions) Usage and Expertise in Performance Technology Practice: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Tiem, Darlene M.

    2004-01-01

    Performance technology (PT) is complex, drawing theory from instructional design, organizational development, communications, industrial psychology, and industrial engineering to name a few. The Standards of Performance Technology developed for the certified performance technology designation codified the processes used in the practice of…

  1. Psychological Determinants of University Students' Academic Performance: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebka, Bartosz

    2014-01-01

    This study utilises an integrated conceptual model of academic performance which captures a series of psychological factors: cognitive style; self-theories such as self-esteem and self-efficacy; achievement goals such as mastery, performance, performance avoidance and work avoidance; study-processing strategies such as deep and surface learning;…

  2. Performance Support Systems in University Teaching-Introduction and Empirical Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Bastiaens, Theo J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of performance support systems in university teaching. In four different studies a performance support system with education elements was built to support students while they learn and work on their assignments. Performance support systems originally originated from business and industry but seem to be very valuable…

  3. An empirical examination of the mechanisms mediating between high-performance work systems and the performance of Japanese organizations.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Riki; Lepak, David P; Wang, Heli; Takeuchi, Kazuo

    2007-07-01

    The resource-based view of the firm and social exchange perspectives are invoked to hypothesize linkages among high-performance work systems, collective human capital, the degree of social exchange in an establishment, and establishment performance. The authors argue that high-performance work systems generate a high level of collective human capital and encourage a high degree of social exchange within an organization, and that these are positively related to the organization's overall performance. On the basis of a sample of Japanese establishments, the results provide support for the existence of these mediating mechanisms through which high-performance work systems affect overall establishment performance. PMID:17638466

  4. Innovative two-stage mesophilic/thermophilic anaerobic degradation of sonicated sludge: performances and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Gianico, A; Braguglia, C M; Gallipoli, A; Mininni, G

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates for the first time, on laboratory scale, the possible application of an innovative enhanced stabilization process based on sequential mesophilic/thermophilic anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge, with low-energy sonication pretreatment. The first mesophilic digestion step was conducted at short hydraulic retention time (3-5 days), in order to favor volatile fatty acid production, followed by a longer thermophilic step of 10 days to enhance the bioconversion kinetics, assuring a complete pathogen removal. The high volatile solid removals, up to 55%, noticeably higher compared to the performances of a single-stage process carried out in same conditions, can guarantee the stability of the final digestate for land application. The ultrasonic pretreatment influenced significantly the fatty acid formation and composition during the first mesophilic step, improving consequently the thermophilic conversion of these compounds into methane. Methane yield from sonicated sludge digestion reached values up to 0.2 Nm(3)/kgVSfed. Positive energy balances highlighted the possible exploitation of this innovative two-stage digestion in place of conventional single-stage processes. PMID:24906832

  5. National Innovation and Knowledge Performance: The Role of Higher Education Teaching and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saad, Mohammed; Guermat, Cherif; Brodie, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of the higher education system (HES) in the production of national innovation. We focus on the issue of institutional diversity of HESs and its impact on national innovation systems. We identify four key HES characteristics and hypothesize their influence on the production of national innovation. The empirical…

  6. An empirically derived figure of merit for the quality of overall task performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemay, Moira

    1989-01-01

    The need to develop an operationally relevant figure of merit for the quality of performance of a complex system such as an aircraft cockpit stems from a hypothesized dissociation between measures of performance and those of workload. Performance can be measured in terms of time, errors, or a combination of these. In most tasks performed by expert operators, errors are relatively rare and often corrected in time to avoid consequences. Moreover, perfect performance is seldom necessary to accomplish a particular task. Moreover, how well an expert performs a complex task consisting of a series of discrete cognitive tasks superimposed on a continuous task, such as flying an aircraft, does not depend on how well each discrete task is performed, but on their smooth sequencing. This makes the amount of time spent on each subtask of paramount importance in measuring overall performance, since smooth sequencing requires a minimum amount of time spent on each task. Quality consists in getting tasks done within a crucial time interval while maintaining acceptable continuous task performance. Thus, a figure of merit for overall quality of performance should be primarily a measure of time to perform discrete subtasks combined with a measure of basic vehicle control. Thus, the proposed figure of merit requires doing a task analysis on a series of performance, or runs, of a particular task, listing each discrete task and its associated time, and calculating the mean and standard deviation of these times, along with the mean and standard deviation of tracking error for the whole task. A set of simulator data on 30 runs of a landing task was obtained and a figure of merit will be calculated for each run. The figure of merit will be compared for voice and data link, so that the impact of this technology on total crew performance (not just communication performance) can be assessed. The effect of data link communication on other cockpit tasks will also be considered.

  7. An Empirical Examination of the Mechanisms Mediating between High-Performance Work Systems and the Performance of Japanese Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeuchi, Riki; Lepak, David P.; Wang, Heli; Takeuchi, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    The resource-based view of the firm and social exchange perspectives are invoked to hypothesize linkages among high-performance work systems, collective human capital, the degree of social exchange in an establishment, and establishment performance. The authors argue that high-performance work systems generate a high level of collective human…

  8. Epidemic Surveillance Using an Electronic Medical Record: An Empiric Approach to Performance Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongzhang; Gaff, Holly; Smith, Gary; DeLisle, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds Electronic medical records (EMR) form a rich repository of information that could benefit public health. We asked how structured and free-text narrative EMR data should be combined to improve epidemic surveillance for acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods Eight previously characterized ARI case detection algorithms (CDA) were applied to historical EMR entries to create authentic time series of daily ARI case counts (background). An epidemic model simulated influenza cases (injection). From the time of the injection, cluster-detection statistics were applied daily on paired background+injection (combined) and background-only time series. This cycle was then repeated with the injection shifted to each week of the evaluation year. We computed: a) the time from injection to the first statistical alarm uniquely found in the combined dataset (Detection Delay); b) how often alarms originated in the background-only dataset (false-alarm rate, or FAR); and c) the number of cases found within these false alarms (Caseload). For each CDA, we plotted the Detection Delay as a function of FAR or Caseload, over a broad range of alarm thresholds. Results CDAs that combined text analyses seeking ARI symptoms in clinical notes with provider-assigned diagnostic codes in order to maximize the precision rather than the sensitivity of case-detection lowered Detection Delay at any given FAR or Caseload. Conclusion An empiric approach can guide the integration of EMR data into case-detection methods that improve both the timeliness and efficiency of epidemic detection. PMID:25006878

  9. Causal Relationships among Technology Acquisition, Absorptive Capacity, and Innovation Performance: Evidence from the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jieun; Hong, Suckchul; Ohm, Jay; Yang, Taeyong

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of absorptive capacity in improving a firm’s innovation performance. Specifically, we examine firm interaction with the knowledge and capabilities of outside organizations and the effect on the firm’s bottom line. We use the impulse-response function of the vector auto-regressive model to gain insight into this relationship by estimating the time required for the effect of each activity level to reach outputs, the spillover effects. We apply this methodology to pharmaceutical firms, which we classify into two sub-groups – large firms and medium and small firms – based on sales. Our results show that the impact of an activity on any other activity is delayed by three years for large firms and by one to two years for small and medium firms. PMID:26181440

  10. An Empirical Look at Developmental Interventions and Student Performance in the First Intermediate Accounting Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Terry J.; Foote, Rebecca A.; Phillips, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Due to concerns about student performance in Intermediate Accounting I, our Department of Accounting established an Intermediate Readiness Committee in the spring of 2006 to create a developmental program for students entering Intermediate I, with the goal of improving performance in that course. Over the next two years, the Committee established…

  11. The Importance of Civic Responsibility in Higher Performing Middle Schools: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Kristen C.

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, a district-wide focus on the development of civic responsibility is seen as an important component in the success of higher performing middle schools. Salient features of best practice were gathered from teacher and administrator interviews and documentary evidence in 10 higher performing, yet "beating the odds" schools, and…

  12. Cognitive Load Theory: An Empirical Study of Anxiety and Task Performance in Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, I-Jung; Chang, Chi-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: This study explores the relationship among three variables--cognitive load, foreign language anxiety, and task performance. Cognitive load refers to the load imposed on working memory while performing a particular task. The authors hypothesized that anxiety consumes the resources of working memory, leaving less capacity for cognitive…

  13. Performance-based management and quality of work: an empirical assessment.

    PubMed

    Falzon, Pierre; Nascimento, Adelaide; Gaudart, Corinne; Piney, Cécile; Dujarier, Marie-Anne; Germe, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    In France, in the private sector as in the public sector, performance-based management tends to become a norm. Performance-based management is supposed to improve service quality, productivity and efficiency, transparency of allotted means and achieved results, and to better focus the activity of employees and of the whole organization. This text reports a study conducted for the French Ministry of Budget by a team of researchers in ergonomics, sociology and management science, in order to assess the impact of performance-based management on employees, on teams and on work organization. About 100 interviews were conducted with employees of all categories and 6 working groups were set up in order to discuss and validate or amend our first analyses. Results concern several aspects: workload and work intensification, indicators and performance management and the transformation of jobs induced by performance management. PMID:22317310

  14. Empirical study of self-configuring genetic programming algorithm performance and behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenkin, E.; Semenkina, M.

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of the self-configuring genetic programming algorithm with a modified uniform crossover operator that implements a selective pressure on the recombination stage, is studied over symbolic programming problems. The operator's probabilistic rates interplay is studied and the role of operator variants on algorithm performance is investigated. Algorithm modifications based on the results of investigations are suggested. The performance improvement of the algorithm is demonstrated by the comparative analysis of suggested algorithms on the benchmark and real world problems.

  15. An empirical investigation of dispositional antecedents and performance-related outcomes of credit scores.

    PubMed

    Bernerth, Jeremy B; Taylor, Shannon G; Walker, H Jack; Whitman, Daniel S

    2012-03-01

    Many organizations use credit scores as an employment screening tool, but little is known about the legitimacy of such practices. To address this important gap, the reported research conceptualized credit scores as a biographical measure of financial responsibility and investigated dispositional antecedents and performance-related outcomes. Using personality data collected from employees, objective credit scores obtained from the Fair Isaac Corporation, and performance data provided by supervisors, we found conscientiousness to be positively related and agreeableness to be negatively related to credit scores. Results also indicate significant relationships between credit scores and task performance and organizational citizenship behaviors. Credit scores did not, however, predict workplace deviance. Implications for organizations currently using or planning to use credit scores as part of the screening process are discussed. PMID:22023073

  16. Macropore flow at the field scale: predictive performance of empirical models and X-ray CT analyzed macropore characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, M.; Moldrup, P.; Schaap, M.; Tuller, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Vögel, H.-J.; Wollesen de Jonge, L.

    2015-11-01

    Predictions of macropore flow is important for maintaining both soil and water quality as it governs key related soil processes e.g. soil erosion and subsurface transport of pollutants. However, macropore flow currently cannot be reliably predicted at the field scale because of inherently large spatial variability. The aim of this study was to perform field scale characterization of macropore flow and investigate the predictive performance of (1) current empirical models for both water and air flow, and (2) X-ray CT derived macropore network characteristics. For this purpose, 65 cylindrical soil columns (6 cm diameter and 3.5 cm height) were extracted from the topsoil (5 to 8.5 cm depth) in a 15 m × 15 m grid from an agricultural loamy field located in Silstrup, Denmark. All soil columns were scanned with an industrial CT scanner (129 μm resolution) and later used for measurements of saturated water permeability, air permeability and gas diffusivity at -30 and -100 cm matric potentials. Distribution maps for both water and air permeabilities and gas diffusivity reflected no spatial correlation irrespective of the soil texture and organic matter maps. Empirical predictive models for both water and air permeabilities showed poor performance as they were not able to realistically capture macropore flow because of poor correlations with soil texture and bulk density. The tested empirical model predicted well gas diffusivity at -100 cm matric potential, but relatively failed at -30 cm matric potential particularly for samples with biopore flow. Image segmentation output of the four employed methods was nearly the same, and matched well with measured air-filled porosity at -30 cm matric potential. Many of the CT derived macropore network characteristics were strongly interrelated. Most of the macropore network characteristics were also strongly correlated with saturated water permeability, air permeability, and gas diffusivity. The correlations between macropore

  17. Do Learning and Study Skills Affect Academic Performance?--An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Richard; MacKewn, Angie; Moser, Ernest; VanVuren, Ken W.

    2012-01-01

    Universities and colleges are very interested in understanding the factors that influence their students' academic performance. This paper describes a study that was conducted at a mid-sized public university in the mid-south, USA, to examine this issue. In this study, the 10-scale, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI) (Weinstein et…

  18. Key Issues in Empirically Identifying Chronically Low-Performing and Turnaround Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    One of the US Department of Education's key priorities is turning around the nation's persistently low-achieving schools, yet exactly how to identify low-performing schools is a task left to state policy makers, and a myriad of definitions have been utilized. In addition, exactly how to recognize when a school begins to turn around is not well…

  19. An Empirical Investigation of Dispositional Antecedents and Performance-Related Outcomes of Credit Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernerth, Jeremy B.; Taylor, Shannon G.; Walker, H. Jack; Whitman, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    Many organizations use credit scores as an employment screening tool, but little is known about the legitimacy of such practices. To address this important gap, the reported research conceptualized credit scores as a biographical measure of financial responsibility and investigated dispositional antecedents and performance-related outcomes. Using…

  20. Conceptual Paradigms and Empirical Investigations for Evaluating INTELSAT's Past Performance and Future Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Marcellus S.

    This paper summarizes the results of a recent study of the past performance and future prospects of the International Telecommunications Satellite (INTELSAT) Organization. First, an overview of INTELSAT's history is provided and major policy issues are detailed. Five alternative paradigms are then presented through which to evaluate INTELSAT's…

  1. The Empirical Relationship among Organisational Learning, Continuous Improvement and Performance Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Hongyi; Ho, Kario; Ni, Wenbin

    2008-01-01

    There are still many questions remain unanswered about the relationship between Organisational Learning (OL) and Continuous Improvement (CI). For example, how do OL and CI contribute to business performance? Are OL and CI equal? Do OL and CI support each other? Should OL and CI be implemented separately or together? If together, how to integrate…

  2. Measuring Organizational Learning Capability in Indian Managers and Establishing Firm Performance Linkage: An Empirical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatnagar, Jyotsna

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to measure Organizational Learning Capability (OLC) perception in the managers of public, private and multinational organizations and establish the link between OLC and firm performance. Design/methodology/approach: The data were collected from a sample of 612 managers randomly drawn from Indian industry,…

  3. Performance of the internal audit department under ERP systems: empirical evidence from Taiwanese firms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Hsien; Chen, Hui-Chiao; Chang, Jui-Chu; Leu, Jun-Der; Chao Chen, Der; Purbokusumo, Yuyun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the performance of the internal audit department (IAD) and its contribution to a company under enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems was examined. It is anticipated that this will provide insight into the factors perceived to be crucial to a company's effectiveness. A theoretical framework was developed and tested using the sample of Taiwanese companies. Using mail survey procedures, we elicited perceptions from key internal auditors about the ERP system and auditing software, as well as their opinions concerning the IAD's effectiveness and its contribution within a company. Data were analysed using the partial least square (PLS) regression to test the hypotheses. Drawing upon a sample of Taiwanese firms, the study suggests that a firm can improve the performance of the IAD through an enterprise-wide integrated, effective ERP system and appropriate auditing software. At the same time, the performance of the IAD can also contribute significantly to the company. The results also show that investments in computer-assisted auditing techniques (CAATs) are crucial due to their tremendous effectiveness in regard to the performance of the IAD and for the contributions CAATs can make to a company.

  4. Feasibility Study on Thermal-Hydraulic Performance of Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR)

    SciTech Connect

    Akira, Ohnuki; Kazuyuki, Takase; Masatoshi, Kureta; Hiroyuki, Yoshida; Hidesada, Tamai; Wei, Liu; Toru, Nakatsuka; Takeharu, Misawa; Hajime, Akimoto

    2006-07-01

    R and D project to investigate thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles of Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) is started at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in collaboration with power company, reactor vendors, universities since 2002. The FLWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as effective utilization of uranium resources, multiple recycling of plutonium, high burn-up and long operation cycle, based on matured LWR technologies. MOX fuel assemblies with tight lattice arrangement are used to increase the conversion ratio by reducing the moderation of neutron. Increasing the in-core void fraction also contributes to the reduction of neutron moderation. The confirmation of thermal-hydraulic feasibility is one of the most important R and D items for the FLWR because of the tight lattice configuration. In this paper, we will show the R and D plan and summarize experimental studies. The experimental study is performed mainly using large-scale (37-rod bundle) test facility. Most important objective of the large-scale test is to resolve a fundamental subject whether the core cooling under a tight-lattice configuration is feasible. The characteristics of critical power and flow behavior are investigated under different geometrical configuration and boundary conditions. The configuration parameter is the gap between rods (FY2004) and the rod bowing (FY2005). We have confirmed the thermal-hydraulic feasibility from the experimental results. (authors)

  5. Enhancing learning, innovation, adaptation, and sustainability in health care organizations: the ELIAS performance management framework.

    PubMed

    Persaud, D David

    2014-01-01

    The development of sustainable health care organizations that provide high-quality accessible care is a topic of intense interest. This article provides a practical performance management framework that can be utilized to develop sustainable health care organizations. It is a cyclical 5-step process that is premised on accountability, performance management, and learning practices that are the foundation for a continuous process of measurement, disconfirmation, contextualization, implementation, and routinization This results in the enhancement of learning, innovation, adaptation, and sustainability (ELIAS). Important considerations such as recognizing that health care organizations are complex adaptive systems and the presence of a dynamic learning culture are necessary contextual factors that maximize the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Importantly, the ELIAS framework utilizes data that are already being collected by health care organizations for accountability, improvement, evaluation, and strategic purposes. Therefore, the benefit of the framework, when used as outlined, would be to enhance the chances of health care organizations achieving the goals of ongoing adaptation and sustainability, by design, rather than by chance. PMID:25068873

  6. An implementation of co-simulation for performance prediction of innovative integrated HVAC systems in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Trcka, Marija; Wetter, Michael; Hensen, Jan L.M.

    2010-07-01

    Integrated performance simulation of buildings and heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems can help reducing energy consumption and increasing level of occupant comfort. However, no singe building performance simulation (BPS) tool offers sufficient capabilities and flexibilities to accommodate the ever-increasing complexity and rapid innovations in building and system technologies. One way to alleviate this problem is to use co-simulation. The co-simulation approach represents a particular case of simulation scenario where at least two simulators solve coupled differential-algebraic systems of equations and exchange data that couples these equations during the time integration. This paper elaborates on issues important for co-simulation realization and discusses multiple possibilities to justify the particular approach implemented in a co-simulation prototype. The prototype is verified and validated against the results obtained from the traditional simulation approach. It is further used in a case study for the proof-of-concept, to demonstrate the applicability of the method and to highlight its benefits. Stability and accuracy of different coupling strategies are analyzed to give a guideline for the required coupling frequency. The paper concludes by defining requirements and recommendations for generic cosimulation implementations.

  7. Experimental analysis of the aerodynamic performance of an innovative low pressure turbine rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infantino, Daniele; Satta, Francesca; Simoni, Daniele; Ubaldi, Marina; Zunino, Pietro; Bertini, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    In the present work the aerodynamic performances of an innovative rotor blade row have been experimentally investigated. Measurements have been carried out in a large scale low speed single stage cold flow facility at a Reynolds number typical of aeroengine cruise, under nominal and off-design conditions. The time-mean blade aerodynamic loadings have been measured at three radial positions along the blade height through a pressure transducer installed inside the hollow shaft, by delivering the signal to the stationary frame with a slip ring. The time mean aerodynamic flow fields upstream and downstream of the rotor have been measured by means of a five-hole probe to investigate the losses associated with the rotor. The investigations in the single stage research turbine allow the reproduction of both wake-boundary layer interaction as well as vortex-vortex interaction. The detail of the present results clearly highlights the strong dissipative effects induced by the blade tip vortex and by the momentum defect as well as the turbulence production, which is generated during the migration of the stator wake in the rotor passage. Phase-locked hot-wire investigations have been also performed to analyze the time-varying flow during the wake passing period. In particular the interaction between stator and rotor structures has been investigated also under off-design conditions to further explain the mechanisms contributing to the loss generation for the different conditions.

  8. Mixing students and performance artists to provide innovative ways of communicating scientific research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Manen, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    In May 2007 the Open University (U.K.) in conjunction with the MK (Milton Keynes) Gallery invited performance artists Noble and Silver to work with a group of students to design innovative methods of disseminating their research to a general audience. The students created a multitude of well-received live and multimedia performances based on their research. Students found they greatly benefited from the artists' and each others' different viewpoints and backgrounds, resulting in improved communication skills and varying interpretations of their own topic of interest. This work focuses on research aimed at identifying precursory activity at volcanoes using temperature, earthquake and ground movement data, to aid improvement of early warning systems. For this project an aspect of the research relevant to the public was chosen: the importance of appropriately timed warnings regarding the possibility of an eruption. If a warning is issued too early it may cause complacency and apathy towards the situation, whereas issuing a warning too late may endanger lives and property. An interactive DVD was produced which leads the user through the events preceding a volcanic eruption. The goal is to warn the public about the impending eruption at the most appropriate time. Data is presented in short film clips, after which questions are posed. Based on the player's answers the consequences or follow-up events of the choices are explored. We aim to improve and expand upon this concept in the near future, as well as making the DVD available to schools for educational purposes.

  9. Do the Dynamics of Prior Information Depend on Task Context? An Analysis of Optimal Performance and an Empirical Test

    PubMed Central

    van Ravenzwaaij, Don; Mulder, Martijn J.; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2012-01-01

    In speeded two-choice tasks, optimal performance is prescribed by the drift diffusion model. In this model, prior information or advance knowledge about the correct response can manifest itself as a shift in starting point or as a shift in drift rate criterion. These two mechanisms lead to qualitatively different choice behavior. Analyses of optimal performance (i.e., Bogacz et al., 2006; Hanks et al., 2011) have suggested that bias should manifest itself in starting point when difficulty is fixed over trials, whereas bias should (additionally) manifest itself in drift rate criterion when difficulty is variable over trials. In this article, we challenge the claim that a shift in drift criterion is necessary to perform optimally in a biased decision environment with variable stimulus difficulty. This paper consists of two parts. Firstly, we demonstrate that optimal behavior for biased decision problems is prescribed by a shift in starting point, irrespective of variability in stimulus difficulty. Secondly, we present empirical data which show that decision makers do not adopt different strategies when dealing with bias in conditions of fixed or variable across-trial stimulus difficulty. We also perform a test of specific influence for drift rate variability. PMID:22615704

  10. Meteorological conditions associated to high sublimation amounts in semiarid high-elevation Andes decrease the performance of empirical melt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James; Burlando, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Empirical melt (EM) models are often preferred to surface energy balance (SEB) models to calculate melt amounts of snow and ice in hydrological modelling of high-elevation catchments. The most common reasons to support this decision are that, in comparison to SEB models, EM models require lower levels of meteorological data, complexity and computational costs. However, EM models assume that melt can be characterized by means of a few index variables only, and their results strongly depend on the transferability in space and time of the calibrated empirical parameters. In addition, they are intrinsically limited in accounting for specific process components, the complexity of which cannot be easily reconciled with the empirical nature of the model. As an example of an EM model, in this study we use the Enhanced Temperature Index (ETI) model, which calculates melt amounts using air temperature and the shortwave radiation balance as index variables. We evaluate the performance of the ETI model on dry high-elevation sites where sublimation amounts - that are not explicitly accounted for the EM model - represent a relevant percentage of total ablation (1.1 to 8.7%). We analyse a data set of four Automatic Weather Stations (AWS), which were collected during the ablation season 2013-14, at elevations between 3466 and 4775 m asl, on the glaciers El Tapado, San Francisco, Bello and El Yeso, which are located in the semiarid Andes of central Chile. We complement our analysis using data from past studies in Juncal Norte Glacier (Chile) and Haut Glacier d'Arolla (Switzerland), during the ablation seasons 2008-09 and 2006, respectively. We use the results of a SEB model, applied to each study site, along the entire season, to calibrate the ETI model. The ETI model was not designed to calculate sublimation amounts, however, results show that their ability is low also to simulate melt amounts at sites where sublimation represents larger percentages of total ablation. In fact, we

  11. Theoretical performance assessment and empirical analysis of super-resolution under unknown affine sensor motion.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Brian J; Valenzuela, John R; LeBlanc, Joel W

    2016-04-01

    This paper deals with super-resolution (SR) processing and associated theoretical performance assessment for under-sampled video data collected from a moving imaging platform with unknown motion and assuming a relatively flat scene. This general scenario requires joint estimation of the high-resolution image and the parameters that determine a projective transform that relates the collected frames to one another. A quantitative assessment of the variance in the random error as achieved through a joint-estimation approach (e.g., SR image reconstruction and motion estimation) is carried out via the general framework of M-estimators and asymptotic statistics. This approach provides a performance measure on estimating the fine-resolution scene when there is a lack of perspective information and represents a significant advancement over previous work that considered only the more specific scenario of mis-registration. A succinct overview of the theoretical framework is presented along with some specific results on the approximate random error for the case of unknown translation and affine motions. A comparison is given between the approximated random error and that actually achieved by an M-estimator approach to the joint-estimation problem. These results provide insight on the reduction in SR reconstruction accuracy when jointly estimating unknown inter-frame affine motion. PMID:27140759

  12. Discrete Lognormal Model as an Unbiased Quantitative Measure of Scientific Performance Based on Empirical Citation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Joao; Zeng, Xiaohan; Amaral, Luis

    2013-03-01

    Assessing the career performance of scientists has become essential to modern science. Bibliometric indicators, like the h-index are becoming more and more decisive in evaluating grants and approving publication of articles. However, many of the more used indicators can be manipulated or falsified by publishing with very prolific researchers or self-citing papers with a certain number of citations, for instance. Accounting for these factors is possible but it introduces unwanted complexity that drives us further from the purpose of the indicator: to represent in a clear way the prestige and importance of a given scientist. Here we try to overcome this challenge. We used Thompson Reuter's Web of Science database and analyzed all the papers published until 2000 by ~1500 researchers in the top 30 departments of seven scientific fields. We find that over 97% of them have a citation distribution that is consistent with a discrete lognormal model. This suggests that our model can be used to accurately predict the performance of a researcher. Furthermore, this predictor does not depend on the individual number of publications and is not easily ``gamed'' on. The authors acknowledge support from FCT Portugal, and NSF grants

  13. The Practice Teaching Platform and System for Innovating Talents and Performing Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Boyu; Hao, Ziqiang

    2014-01-01

    The practice education is an important part of higher educational system and an important approach to cultivating applied innovative talents. This paper studies practice of teaching platform and practical teaching system for the research and practice based on the objective basis of applied innovative talents and the basic characteristics of the…

  14. Examining the Relationship Between Information Acquisition, Entrepreneurial Opportunity Recognition, and Innovation Performance in the High Technology Sector in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Lin; Ellinger, Andrea D.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between information acquisition, entrepreneurial opportunity recognition, and innovation performance in the high technology sector in Taiwan. The results suggest that both information acquisition and entrepreneurial opportunity recognition positively contribute to individual-level and…

  15. Short-term exposure to municipal wastewater influences energy, growth, and swimming performance in juvenile Empire Gudgeons (Hypseleotris compressa).

    PubMed

    Melvin, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Effectively treating domestic wastewater is paramount for preserving the health of aquatic ecosystems. Various technologies exist for wastewater treatment, ranging from simple pond-based systems to advanced filtration, and it is important to evaluate the potential for these different options to produce water that is acceptable for discharge. Sub-lethal responses were therefore assessed in juvenile Empire Gudgeons (Hypseleotris compressa) exposed for a period of two weeks to control, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100% wastewater treated through a multi-stage constructed wetland (CW) treatment system. Effects on basic energy reserves (i.e., lipids and protein), growth and condition, and swimming performance were quantified following exposure. A significant increase in weight and condition was observed in fish exposed to 50 and 100% wastewater dilutions, whereas whole-body lipid content was significantly reduced in these treatments. Maximum swimming velocity increased in a dose-dependent manner amongst treatment groups (although not significantly), whereas angular velocity was significantly reduced in the 50 and 100% dilutions. Results demonstrate that treated domestic wastewater can influence the growth and swimming performance of fish, and that such effects may be related to alterations to primary energy stores. However, studies assessing complex wastewaters present difficulties when it comes to interpreting responses, as many possible factors can contribute towards the observed effects. Future research should address these uncertainties by exploring interaction between nutrients, basic water quality characteristics and relevant contaminant mixtures, for influencing the energetics, growth, and functional performance of aquatic animals. PMID:26073539

  16. The Determinants of Organizational Innovation: An Interpretation and Implications for Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantz, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    The research reported here is focused on a specific type of change in an organization: an innovation. In an empirical analysis of research libraries, it was found that five factors had a significant impact on the innovation performance of the library. These factors relate to the strategy, organizational structure, and leadership of the research…

  17. Measuring market performance in restructured electricity markets: An empirical analysis of the PJM energy market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Russell Jay

    2002-09-01

    performance of the PJM market finds evidence of market power, the measured markups are markedly less than estimates from prior analysis of the PJM market.

  18. HPTLC-aptastaining - Innovative protein detection system for high-performance thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Morschheuser, Lena; Wessels, Hauke; Pille, Christina; Fischer, Judith; Hünniger, Tim; Fischer, Markus; Paschke-Kratzin, Angelika; Rohn, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Protein analysis using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) is not commonly used but can complement traditional electrophoretic and mass spectrometric approaches in a unique way. Due to various detection protocols and possibilities for hyphenation, HPTLC protein analysis is a promising alternative for e.g., investigating posttranslational modifications. This study exemplarily focused on the investigation of lysozyme, an enzyme which is occurring in eggs and technologically added to foods and beverages such as wine. The detection of lysozyme is mandatory, as it might trigger allergenic reactions in sensitive individuals. To underline the advantages of HPTLC in protein analysis, the development of innovative, highly specific staining protocols leads to improved sensitivity for protein detection on HPTLC plates in comparison to universal protein derivatization reagents. This study aimed at developing a detection methodology for HPTLC separated proteins using aptamers. Due to their affinity and specificity towards a wide range of targets, an aptamer based staining procedure on HPTLC (HPTLC-aptastaining) will enable manifold analytical possibilities. Besides the proof of its applicability for the very first time, (i) aptamer-based staining of proteins is applicable on different stationary phase materials and (ii) furthermore, it can be used as an approach for a semi-quantitative estimation of protein concentrations. PMID:27220270

  19. HPTLC-aptastaining – Innovative protein detection system for high-performance thin-layer chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morschheuser, Lena; Wessels, Hauke; Pille, Christina; Fischer, Judith; Hünniger, Tim; Fischer, Markus; Paschke-Kratzin, Angelika; Rohn, Sascha

    2016-05-01

    Protein analysis using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) is not commonly used but can complement traditional electrophoretic and mass spectrometric approaches in a unique way. Due to various detection protocols and possibilities for hyphenation, HPTLC protein analysis is a promising alternative for e.g., investigating posttranslational modifications. This study exemplarily focused on the investigation of lysozyme, an enzyme which is occurring in eggs and technologically added to foods and beverages such as wine. The detection of lysozyme is mandatory, as it might trigger allergenic reactions in sensitive individuals. To underline the advantages of HPTLC in protein analysis, the development of innovative, highly specific staining protocols leads to improved sensitivity for protein detection on HPTLC plates in comparison to universal protein derivatization reagents. This study aimed at developing a detection methodology for HPTLC separated proteins using aptamers. Due to their affinity and specificity towards a wide range of targets, an aptamer based staining procedure on HPTLC (HPTLC-aptastaining) will enable manifold analytical possibilities. Besides the proof of its applicability for the very first time, (i) aptamer-based staining of proteins is applicable on different stationary phase materials and (ii) furthermore, it can be used as an approach for a semi-quantitative estimation of protein concentrations.

  20. Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Tichy; Chuck Murray

    2006-05-31

    This document serves as the Topical Report documenting work completed by Washington State University (WSU) under U.S. Department of Energy Grant, Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings. This project was conducted in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and includes the participation of several industry partners including Weyerhaeuser, APA - The Engineered Wood Association, CertainTeed Corporation and Fortifiber. This document summarizes work completed by Washington State University August 2002 through June 2006. WSU's primary experimental role is the design and implementation of a field testing protocol that monitored long term changes in the hygrothermal response of wall systems. During the project period WSU constructed a test facility, developed a matrix of test wall designs, constructed and installed test walls in the test facility, installed instrumentation in the test walls and recorded data from the test wall specimens. Each year reports were published documenting the hygrothermal response of the test wall systems. Public presentation of the results was, and will continue to be, made available to the building industry at large by industry partners and the University.

  1. Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Tichy; Chuck Murray

    2003-10-01

    This document serves as the Topical Report documenting the first year of work completed by Washington State University (WSU) under US Department of Energy Grant, Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings. This project is being conducted in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and includes the participation of several industry partners including Weyerhaeuser Company, APA - The Engineered Wood Association, CertainTeed Corporation and Fortifiber. This document summarizes work completed by Washington State University August, 2002 through October, 2003. WSU's primary experimental role is the design and implementation of a field testing protocol that will monitor long term changes in the hygrothermal response of wall systems. In the first year WSU constructed a test facility, developed a matrix of test wall designs, constructed and installed test walls in the test facility, and installed instrumentation in the test walls. By the end of the contract period described in this document, WSU was recording data from the test wall specimens. The experiment described in this report will continue through December, 2005. Each year a number of reports will be published documenting the hygrothermal response of the test wall systems. Public presentation of the results will be made available to the building industry by industry partners and the University cooperators.

  2. HPTLC-aptastaining – Innovative protein detection system for high-performance thin-layer chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Morschheuser, Lena; Wessels, Hauke; Pille, Christina; Fischer, Judith; Hünniger, Tim; Fischer, Markus; Paschke-Kratzin, Angelika; Rohn, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Protein analysis using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) is not commonly used but can complement traditional electrophoretic and mass spectrometric approaches in a unique way. Due to various detection protocols and possibilities for hyphenation, HPTLC protein analysis is a promising alternative for e.g., investigating posttranslational modifications. This study exemplarily focused on the investigation of lysozyme, an enzyme which is occurring in eggs and technologically added to foods and beverages such as wine. The detection of lysozyme is mandatory, as it might trigger allergenic reactions in sensitive individuals. To underline the advantages of HPTLC in protein analysis, the development of innovative, highly specific staining protocols leads to improved sensitivity for protein detection on HPTLC plates in comparison to universal protein derivatization reagents. This study aimed at developing a detection methodology for HPTLC separated proteins using aptamers. Due to their affinity and specificity towards a wide range of targets, an aptamer based staining procedure on HPTLC (HPTLC-aptastaining) will enable manifold analytical possibilities. Besides the proof of its applicability for the very first time, (i) aptamer-based staining of proteins is applicable on different stationary phase materials and (ii) furthermore, it can be used as an approach for a semi-quantitative estimation of protein concentrations. PMID:27220270

  3. Performance evaluation of a full-scale innovative swine waste-to-energy system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiele; Adair, Charles W; Deshusses, Marc A

    2016-09-01

    Intensive monitoring was carried out to evaluate the performance of a full-scale innovative swine waste-to-energy system at a commercial swine farm with 8640 heads of swine. Detailed mass balances over each unit of the system showed that the system, which includes a 7600m(3) anaerobic digester, a 65-kW microturbine, and a 4200m(3) aeration basin, was able to remove up to 92% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD), 99% of the biological oxygen demand (BOD), 77% of the total nitrogen (TN), and 82% of the total phosphorous (TP) discharged into the system as fresh pig waste. The overall biogas yield based on the COD input was 64% of the maximum theoretical, a value that indicates that even greater environmental benefits could be obtained with process optimization. Overall, the characterization of the materials fluxes in the system provides a greater understanding of the fate of organics and nutrients in large scale animal waste management systems. PMID:27268434

  4. An Analysis of the Impact of Total Quality Management on Employee Performance with mediating role of Process Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadia Dedy, Aimie; Zakuan, Norhayati; Zaleha Omain, Siti; Rahim, Kamaruzzaman Abdul; Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Sulaiman, Zuraidah; Zameri Mat Saman, Muhamad

    2016-05-01

    TQM practices are important to provide customer satisfaction by improved product performance and sustained towards the organizational goal. The objective of this study was to analyse the relationship between TQM practices, process innovation and employee performance. In this study, six critical success factors of TQM have been identified namely customer focus, leadership, training, teamwork, communication, and top management. Based on thorough literature review, employee performances have been measured by two constructs which are job satisfaction and workplace environment. The study used methodology of quantitative approach. The questionnaires for this study were randomly distributed to 102 employees in the selected car manufacturer companies. The respondents were choosing from management team, supervisor, technician and others worker. Results of the study support the proposed hypotheses that there are significant relationship between TQM practices, process innovation and employee performance.

  5. Building America Top Innovations 2012: High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America solar home research that has demonstrated the ability to reduce peak demand by 75%. Numerous field studies have monitored power production and system effectiveness.

  6. Building America Top Innovations 2012: High-Performance Affordable Housing with Habitat for Humanity

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America support of Habitat for Humanity including researchers who wrote Habitat construction guides and teams that have worked with affiliates on numerous field projects.

  7. The Influence of Organisational Defensive Patterns on Innovation Capacity and Learning of Information and Communication Technology: An Empirical Study in Hong Kong Transport Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yau, Hon Keung; Cheng, Alison Lai Fong

    2010-01-01

    Organisational defensive patterns, including skilled incompetence, organisational defensive routines and fancy footwork, are considered to be a hindrance to effective learning and innovation capacity building in all organisations. The purpose of this research is to investigate: 1) the perceptions of the influence of organisational defensive…

  8. An innovative approach to multimedia waste reduction: Measuring performance for environmental cleanup projects

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, B.E. Jr.; George, S.M. )

    1993-04-01

    One of the greatest challenges we now face in environmental cleanup is measuring the progress of minimizing multimedia transfer releases and achieving waste reduction. Briefly, multimedia transfer refers to the air, land, and water where pollution is not controlled, concentrated, and moved from one medium to another. An example of multimedia transfer would be heavy metals in wastewater sludges moved from water to land disposal. Over $2 billion has been budgeted for environmental restoration site cleanups by the Department of Energy (DOE) for FY 1994. Unless we reduce the huge waste volumes projected to be generated in the near future, then we will devote more and more resources to the management and disposal of these wastes. To meet this challenge, the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has explored the value of a multimedia approach by designing an innovative Pollution Prevention Life-Cycle Model. The model consists of several fundamental elements (Fig. 1) and addresses the two major objectives of data gathering and establishing performance measures. Because the majority of projects are in the remedial investigation phase, the focus is on the prevention of unnecessary generation of investigation-derived waste and multimedia transfers at the source. A state-of-the-art tool developed to support the life-cycle model for meeting these objectives is the Numerical Scoring System (NSS), which is a computerized, user-friendly data base system for information management, designed to measure the effectiveness of pollution prevention activities in each phase of the ER Program. This report contains a discussion of the development of the Pollution Prevention Life-Cycle Model and the role the NSS will play in the pollution prevention programs in the remedial investigation phase of the ER Program at facilities managed by Energy Systems for DOE.

  9. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Affordable High Performance in Production Homes: Artistic Homes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Artistic Homes, a successful New Mexico production builder, who went from code-minimum to under HERS 50 standard on every home, with optional PV upgrades to HERS 35 or true net zero on every home plan offered.

  10. The Effect of Entrepreneurship Education Programmes on Satisfaction with Innovation Behaviour and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Natalia Martin; Escudero, Ana Isabel Rodriguez; Barahona, Juan Hernangomez; Leitao, Fernando Saboia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper attempts to shed light on the effect of educational programmes aimed at entrepreneurs on innovation and business success. Design/methodology/approach: We use as theoretical framework the theory of planned behaviour. We use a sample of 354 entrepreneurs from Castile and Leon, Spain. To estimate the model we use a path analysis…

  11. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – High-Performance Furnace Blowers

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This Top Innovations profile describes Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's work with furnace blower design that led to the creation of a standard for rating blowers, credits for the use of good blowers in Federal tax credit programs and energy codes, and consideration in current federal rulemaking procedures.

  12. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Reduced Call-Backs with High-Performance Production Builders

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes ways Building America teams have helped builders cut call-backs. Harvard University study found builders who worked with Building America had a 50% drop in call-backs. One builder reported a 50-fold reduction in the incidence of pipe freezing, a 50% reduction in drywall cracking, and a 60% decline in call-backs.

  13. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Community Scale High Performance with Solar - Pulte Homes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Pulte Homes of Tucson’s work with Building America to apply a suite of energy-efficiency measures integrated with passive solar design and solar water heating that reduced energy use more than 50% for a community of more than 1,000 homes.

  14. Assessing the performance of community-available global MHD models using key system parameters and empirical relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, E.; Sergeev, V.; Honkonen, I.; Kuznetsova, M.; Rastätter, L.; Palmroth, M.; Janhunen, P.; Tóth, G.; Lyon, J.; Wiltberger, M.

    2015-12-01

    Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling is a powerful tool in space weather research and predictions. There are several advanced and still developing global MHD (GMHD) models that are publicly available via Community Coordinated Modeling Center's (CCMC) Run on Request system, which allows the users to simulate the magnetospheric response to different solar wind conditions including extraordinary events, like geomagnetic storms. Systematic validation of GMHD models against observations still continues to be a challenge, as well as comparative benchmarking of different models against each other. In this paper we describe and test a new approach in which (i) a set of critical large-scale system parameters is explored/tested, which are produced by (ii) specially designed set of computer runs to simulate realistic statistical distributions of critical solar wind parameters and are compared to (iii) observation-based empirical relationships for these parameters. Being tested in approximately similar conditions (similar inputs, comparable grid resolution, etc.), the four models publicly available at the CCMC predict rather well the absolute values and variations of those key parameters (magnetospheric size, magnetic field, and pressure) which are directly related to the large-scale magnetospheric equilibrium in the outer magnetosphere, for which the MHD is supposed to be a valid approach. At the same time, the models have systematic differences in other parameters, being especially different in predicting the global convection rate, total field-aligned current, and magnetic flux loading into the magnetotail after the north-south interplanetary magnetic field turning. According to validation results, none of the models emerges as an absolute leader. The new approach suggested for the evaluation of the models performance against reality may be used by model users while planning their investigations, as well as by model developers and those interesting to quantitatively

  15. Development of empirical models for performance evaluation of UASB reactors treating poultry manure wastewater under different operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Sakar, Suleyman

    2008-05-01

    A nonlinear modeling study was carried out to evaluate the performance of UASB reactors treating poultry manure wastewater under different organic and hydraulic loading conditions. Two identical pilot scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors (15.7 L) were run at mesophilic conditions (30-35 degrees C) in a temperature-controlled environment with three hydraulic retention times (theta) of 15.7, 12 and 8.0 days. Imposed volumetric organic loading rates (L(V)) ranged from 0.65 to 4.257 kg COD/(m(3) day). The pH of the feed varied between 6.68 and 7.82. The hydraulic loading rates (L(H)) were controlled between 0.105 and 0.21 m(3)/(m(2)day). The daily biogas production rates ranged between 4.2 and 29.4 L/day. High volumetric COD removal rates (R(V)) ranging from 0.546 to 3.779 kg COD(removed)/(m(3)day) were achieved. On the basis of experimental results, two empirical models having a satisfactory correlation coefficient of about 0.9954 and 0.9416 were developed to predict daily biogas production (Q(g)) and effluent COD concentration (S(e)), respectively. Findings of this modeling study showed that optimal COD removals ranging from 86.3% to 90.6% were predicted with HRTs of 7.9, 9.5, 11.2, 12.6, 13.7 and 14.3 days, and L(V) of 1.27, 1.58, 1.78, 1.99, 2.20 and 2.45 kg COD/(m(3)day) for the corresponding influent substrate concentrations (S(i)) of 10,000, 15,000, 20,000, 25,000, 30,000 and 35,000 mg/L, respectively. PMID:17913349

  16. Innovation Learning in Comprehensive Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindfors, Eila; Hilmola, Antti

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this article is to clarify the concept of innovation and by presenting a research on the basic education outcome assessment data from an innovation learning perspective, answer to a question: Do students learn innovation in comprehensive education? The empirical information in this research is based on data collected in the national…

  17. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Foro Energy: High Power Lasers - Long Distances (Performer Video)

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2012-03-21

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video from Foro Energy are Joel Moxley, Founder and CEO, Mark Zediker, Founder and CTO, and Paul Deutch, President and COO. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy, also appears briefly in this video to praise the accomplishment of a high powered laser that can transmit that power long distances for faster and more powerful drilling of geothermal, oil, and gas wells.

  18. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Foro Energy: High Power Lasers - Long Distances (Performer Video)

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2012-02-28

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video from Foro Energy are Joel Moxley, Founder and CEO, Mark Zediker, Founder and CTO, and Paul Deutch, President and COO. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy, also appears briefly in this video to praise the accomplishment of a high powered laser that can transmit that power long distances for faster and more powerful drilling of geothermal, oil, and gas wells.

  19. Innovative technologies of waste recycling with production of high performance products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanshin, R.; Ferenets, A. V.; Azimov, Yu I.; Galeeva, A. I.; Gilmanshina, S. I.

    2015-06-01

    The innovative ways of recycling wastes as a tool for sustainable development are presented in the article. The technology of the production of a composite material based on the rubber fiber composite waste tire industry is presented. The results of experimental use of the products in the real conditions. The comparative characteristics of the composite material rubber fiber composite are given. The production technology of construction and repairing materials on the basis of foamed glass is presented.

  20. Analysis of technological innovation and environmental performance improvement in aviation sector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joosung; Mo, Jeonghoon

    2011-09-01

    The past oil crises have caused dramatic improvements in fuel efficiency in all industrial sectors. The aviation sector-aircraft manufacturers and airlines-has also made significant efforts to improve the fuel efficiency through more advanced jet engines, high-lift wing designs, and lighter airframe materials. However, the innovations in energy-saving aircraft technologies do not coincide with the oil crisis periods. The largest improvement in aircraft fuel efficiency took place in the 1960s while the high oil prices in the 1970s and on did not induce manufacturers or airlines to achieve a faster rate of innovation. In this paper, we employ a historical analysis to examine the socio-economic reasons behind the relatively slow technological innovation in aircraft fuel efficiency over the last 40 years. Based on the industry and passenger behaviors studied and prospects for alternative fuel options, this paper offers insights for the aviation sector to shift toward more sustainable technological options in the medium term. Second-generation biofuels could be the feasible option with a meaningful reduction in aviation's lifecycle environmental impact if they can achieve sufficient economies of scale. PMID:22016716

  1. Analysis of Technological Innovation and Environmental Performance Improvement in Aviation Sector

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joosung; Mo, Jeonghoon

    2011-01-01

    The past oil crises have caused dramatic improvements in fuel efficiency in all industrial sectors. The aviation sector—aircraft manufacturers and airlines—has also made significant efforts to improve the fuel efficiency through more advanced jet engines, high-lift wing designs, and lighter airframe materials. However, the innovations in energy-saving aircraft technologies do not coincide with the oil crisis periods. The largest improvement in aircraft fuel efficiency took place in the 1960s while the high oil prices in the 1970s and on did not induce manufacturers or airlines to achieve a faster rate of innovation. In this paper, we employ a historical analysis to examine the socio-economic reasons behind the relatively slow technological innovation in aircraft fuel efficiency over the last 40 years. Based on the industry and passenger behaviors studied and prospects for alternative fuel options, this paper offers insights for the aviation sector to shift toward more sustainable technological options in the medium term. Second-generation biofuels could be the feasible option with a meaningful reduction in aviation’s lifecycle environmental impact if they can achieve sufficient economies of scale. PMID:22016716

  2. Theoretic Fit and Empirical Fit: The Performance of Maximum Likelihood versus Generalized Least Squares Estimation in Structural Equation Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Ulf Henning; Troye, Sigurd Villads; Howell, Roy D.

    1999-01-01

    Used simulation to compare the ability of maximum likelihood (ML) and generalized least-squares (GLS) estimation to provide theoretic fit in models that are parsimonious representations of a true model. The better empirical fit obtained for GLS, compared with ML, was obtained at the cost of lower theoretic fit. (Author/SLD)

  3. Development of innovative techniques and principles that may be used as models to improve plant performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, W.W.; Burton, G.W.

    1989-06-01

    Plant breeding has made possible a large portion of the record yields of our major food crops, and can claim credit for at least half of their increased yield. It can continue to do this but the population explosion demands that it be done in less time. Innovative techniques must be developed. The purpose of this research is: to develop techniques and principles of transferring germplasm from the primary, secondary, and tertiary gene pools of the wild species to cultivated species and evaluate the transferred germplasm; to evaluate diverse cytoplasms from wild species in isogenic lines to detect cytoplasmic effects on agronomic characteristics; and to develop an obligate apomictic pearl millet. 32 refs.

  4. A theoretical and empirical investigation into the willingness-to-pay function for new innovative drugs by Germany's health technology assessment agency (IQWiG).

    PubMed

    Gandjour, Afschin

    2013-11-01

    Under the recently enacted pharmaceutical price and reimbursement regulation in Germany, new drugs are subject to a rapid assessment to determine whether there is sufficient evidence of added clinical benefits compared with the existing standard of treatment. If such added benefits are confirmed, manufacturers and representatives of the Statutory Health Insurance (SHI) are expected to negotiate an appropriate reimbursement price. If parties fail to reach an agreement, a final decision on the reimbursement price will be made by an arbitration body. If one of the parties involved wishes so, then the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (Institut für Qualität und Wirtschaftlichkeit im Gesundheitswesen, IQWiG) will be commissioned with a formal evaluation of costs and benefits of the product in question. IQWiG will make a recommendation for a reimbursement price based on the 'efficiency frontier' in a therapeutic area. The purpose of the assessments is to provide support for decision-making bodies that act on behalf of the SHI insurants. To determine the willingness to pay for new drugs, IQWiG uses the following decision rule: the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of a new drug compared with the next effective intervention should not be higher than that of the next effective intervention compared with its comparator. The purpose of this paper was to investigate the theoretical and empirical relationship between the willingness to pay for drugs and their health benefits. The analysis shows that across disease areas IQWiG has a curvilinear relationship between willingness to pay and health benefits. Future research may address the validity of the willingness-to-pay function from the viewpoint of the individual SHI insurants. PMID:25595007

  5. How an Organization's Environmental Orientation Impacts Environmental Performance and Its Resultant Financial Performance through Green Computing Hiring Practices: An Empirical Investigation of the Natural Resource-Based View of the Firm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aken, Andrew Joseph

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation uses the logic embodied in Strategic Fit Theory, the Natural Resource- Based View of the Firm (NRBV), strategic human resource management, and other relevant literature streams to empirically demonstrate how the environmental orientation of a firm's strategy impacts their environmental performance and resultant financial…

  6. Is a Schools' Performance Related to Technical Change?--A Study on the Relationship between Innovations and Secondary School Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haelermans, Carla; Blank, Jos L. T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the relation between innovations and productivity in Dutch secondary schools. Innovation clusters are directly included in the production model. In order to correct for differences between schools, we add school type, region and year controls. The results indicate that process innovations, teacher professionalization…

  7. Liveness, Mediation and Immediacy--Innovative Technology Use in Process and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Much of the discussion about the incorporation of technologies and mediatised components into performance has focused on the concept of "liveness." This often leads to competing claims about the relative power of live versus mediatised performance and is not necessarily helpful for understanding the scope of opportunities now available for drama…

  8. Automated Performance Tracking and Productivity Improvement Project. Annual Report: Innovations in Protective Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis-Small, Lucretia

    Findings are reported of a process evaluation of the Automated Performance Tracking and Productivity Improvement Project, a project developed to enhance the productivity and efficiency of child protective services (CPS) staff and to enable Region 10 of the Texas Department of Human Services to better meet federal and state performance guidelines.…

  9. Educational Innovation, Quality, and Effects: An Exploration of Innovations and Their Effects in Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofman, Roelande H.; de Boom, Jan; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the extensive literature on educational innovations, there is only limited empirical research available into the impact of innovations on student achievement. In this article, the following research questions will be answered: What form do innovations in secondary education take, are there types of innovative schools, and what effect do…

  10. EVALUATION AND PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF INNOVATIVE LOW-VOC CONTACT ADHESIVES IN WOOD LAMINATING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation and assessment of the perfor-mance, economics, and emission reduction potential upon application of low-volatile organic compound (VOC) waterborne contact adhesive formulations specifically ina manual laminating operation for assembling s...

  11. A Semi-Empirical Multi-Scale Dynamic Monte Carlo Model of Organic Photovoltaic Performance in RIR-MAPLE Bulk Heterojunction Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne; Atewologun, Ayomide

    A semi-empirical method for investigating the performance of OPVs in resonant infrared, matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) films is explored. Emulsion-based RIR-MAPLE offers a unique experimental backdrop for investigating trends through simulation and gaining a better understanding of how different thin film characteristics impact OPV device performance. A novel multi-scale formulation of the Dynamic Monte Carlo (DMC) model is developed based on observable morphology features. Specifically, using confocal microscopy, we observe the presence of micro-scale regimes of pure materials and nano-scale regions of the composite blend. This enables us to assign weighted percentages to DMC implementations on two different scales: the microscale and nanoscale regions. In addition to this, we use input simulation parameters acquired by characterization of as-deposited films. The semi-empirical multi-scale model presented serves as a unique simulation opportunity for exploring different properties of RIR-MAPLE deposited OPVs, their effects on OPV performance and potential design routes for improving device efficiencies. This work was supported, in part, by the Office of Naval Research under Grant N00014-10-1-0481 and the NSF Triangle MRSEC on Soft Matter.

  12. An Empirical Study of the Relationship Between Total Quality Management Activities and Business Operational Performance among Taiwan`s High-Tech Manufacturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yi-Chan; Hsu, Yau-Wen; Chen, Ching-Piao; Tsai, Chih-Hung

    This research studies the impact of critical success factors of Total Quality Management (TQM) activities implementation and the impact of TQM activities implementation on business operational performance. The two intermediate variables, industry group and enterprise scale are considered. Through literature review, this research developed a theoretical model of the factors influencing the relations. The empirical analysis results on Taiwan`s high-tech firms in the Hsinchu Science-Based Industrial Park show that the degree of executive involvement in TQM success factors revealed significant influence on the degree of TQM activities execution. Furthermore, the research hypothesis the degree of executive involvement in TQM activities revealed significant influence on business operational performance was statistically tested and proven in this research. The two intermediate variables, industry group and enterprise scale do not show noticeable impact on TQM activities implementation and business operational performance.

  13. A Case of Innovative Integration of High-Performance Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Faye; Baughan, Donna; Motwani, Jaideep

    1998-01-01

    A case study of a Fortune 500 company was used to develop an integrated model of high-performance work organizations. Components are systems thinking, team interaction, team principles, and results. The model requires an ongoing training plan, change agents or champions, and recognition of teams' productive potential and fragile nature. (SK)

  14. InfoMall: An Innovative Strategy for High-Performance Computing and Communications Applications Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Kim; Fox, Geoffrey

    1994-01-01

    Describes the InfoMall, a program led by the Northeast Parallel Architectures Center (NPAC) at Syracuse University (New York). The InfoMall features a partnership of approximately 24 organizations offering linked programs in High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) technology integration, software development, marketing, education and…

  15. How to Improve a School that Is Already High Performing: Innovation in the Field of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caridas, Evangeline; Hammer, Mark

    2006-01-01

    (Purpose) The case study's purpose was to examine Participative Management Style, high performance strategies, intangible and tangible indicators, trust and its creation of superior achievement in a school district for elementary and middle school children (Illinois). (Methodology) A collaboration effort by Superintendent, administrative staff,…

  16. Students Successfully Grapple with Lessons of History in Innovative Group Performance Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Lynn Drew

    1992-01-01

    Describes the California Assessment Program's (CAP) group performance assessment task. Provides a sample task field test in world history, including written and culminating exercises. Suggests that such assessment exercises are popular with students and provide the teacher with an amalgam of curriculum, instruction, and assessment. (DK)

  17. Improve Oral Training: The Method of Innovation Assessment on English Speaking Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Li-Jyu; Chang, Hung-Fan

    2011-01-01

    The advantages of portfolios come from observing the student learning process and recording feedback. Students utilized their own learning portfolios to do learning assessment and self-correction. The research that has been done in Taiwan has shown that using a portfolio is effective in improving English speaking performances (ESP). The purpose of…

  18. Measuring "Progress": Performativity as Both Driver and Constraint in School Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Yvette; Lewin, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we describe one secondary school's radical attempt to rethink the shape and purpose of education for its pupils, and its subsequent return to more traditional methods in the face of pressures of performativity and accountability. Framing our analysis within activity theory and its emphasis on contradiction as a driver for change, we…

  19. An empirical/theoretical model with dimensionless numbers to predict the performance of electrodialysis systems on the basis of operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Leila; Ghassemi, Abbas

    2016-07-01

    Among the different technologies developed for desalination, the electrodialysis/electrodialysis reversal (ED/EDR) process is one of the most promising for treating brackish water with low salinity when there is high risk of scaling. Multiple researchers have investigated ED/EDR to optimize the process, determine the effects of operating parameters, and develop theoretical/empirical models. Previously published empirical/theoretical models have evaluated the effect of the hydraulic conditions of the ED/EDR on the limiting current density using dimensionless numbers. The reason for previous studies' emphasis on limiting current density is twofold: 1) to maximize ion removal, most ED/EDR systems are operated close to limiting current conditions if there is not a scaling potential in the concentrate chamber due to a high concentration of less-soluble salts; and 2) for modeling the ED/EDR system with dimensionless numbers, it is more accurate and convenient to use limiting current density, where the boundary layer's characteristics are known at constant electrical conditions. To improve knowledge of ED/EDR systems, ED/EDR models should be also developed for the Ohmic region, where operation reduces energy consumption, facilitates targeted ion removal, and prolongs membrane life compared to limiting current conditions. In this paper, theoretical/empirical models were developed for ED/EDR performance in a wide range of operating conditions. The presented ion removal and selectivity models were developed for the removal of monovalent ions and divalent ions utilizing the dominant dimensionless numbers obtained from laboratory scale electrodialysis experiments. At any system scale, these models can predict ED/EDR performance in terms of monovalent and divalent ion removal. PMID:27108213

  20. Empirical mode decomposition apparatus, method and article of manufacture for analyzing biological signals and performing curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A computer implemented physical signal analysis method includes four basic steps and the associated presentation techniques of the results. The first step is a computer implemented Empirical Mode Decomposition that extracts a collection of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) from nonlinear, nonstationary physical signals. The decomposition is based on the direct extraction of the energy associated with various intrinsic time scales in the physical signal. Expressed in the IMF's, they have well-behaved Hilbert Transforms from which instantaneous frequencies can be calculated. The second step is the Hilbert Transform which produces a Hilbert Spectrum. Thus, the invention can localize any event on the time as well as the frequency axis. The decomposition can also be viewed as an expansion of the data in terms of the IMF's. Then, these IMF's, based on and derived from the data, can serve as the basis of that expansion. The local energy and the instantaneous frequency derived from the IMF's through the Hilbert transform give a full energy-frequency-time distribution of the data which is designated as the Hilbert Spectrum. The third step filters the physical signal by combining a subset of the IMFs. In the fourth step, a curve may be fitted to the filtered signal which may not have been possible with the original, unfiltered signal.

  1. Empirical mode decomposition apparatus, method and article of manufacture for analyzing biological signals and performing curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A computer implemented physical signal analysis method includes four basic steps and the associated presentation techniques of the results. The first step is a computer implemented Empirical Mode Decomposition that extracts a collection of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) from nonlinear, nonstationary physical signals. The decomposition is based on the direct extraction of the energy associated with various intrinsic time scales in the physical signal. Expressed in the IMF's, they have well-behaved Hilbert Transforms from which instantaneous frequencies can be calculated. The second step is the Hilbert Transform which produces a Hilbert Spectrum. Thus, the invention can localize any event on the time as well as the frequency axis. The decomposition can also be viewed as an expansion of the data in terms of the IMF's. Then, these IMF's, based on and derived from the data, can serve as the basis of that expansion. The local energy and the instantaneous frequency derived from the IMF's through the Hilbert transform give a full energy-frequency-time distribution of the data which is designated as the Hilbert Spectrum. The third step filters the physical signal by combining a subset of the IMFs. In the fourth step, a curve may be fitted to the filtered signal which may not have been possible with the original, unfiltered signal.

  2. An innovative appraisal/reward strategy for high-performance teams.

    PubMed

    Joy, L W

    1997-11-01

    Competitive pressures require today's corporate leaders to maximize productivity. And to achieve long-term bottom line results, they've found that it is necessary to create a culture in which company members want to be their best and work at peak efficiency levels. But what is the formula for success? Perhaps, as suggested by this article, it involves the creation of high-performance teams. PMID:10173990

  3. Innovation in user-centered skills and performance improvement for sustainable complex service systems.

    PubMed

    Karwowski, Waldemar; Ahram, Tareq Z

    2012-01-01

    In order to leverage individual and organizational learning and to remain competitive in current turbulent markets it is important for employees, managers, planners and leaders to perform at high levels over time. Employee competence and skills are extremely important matters in view of the general shortage of talent and the mobility of employees with talent. Two factors emerged to have the greatest impact on the competitiveness of complex service systems: improving managerial and employee's knowledge attainment for skills, and improving the training and development of the workforce. This paper introduces the knowledge-based user-centered service design approach for sustainable skill and performance improvement in education, design and modeling of the next generation of complex service systems. The rest of the paper cover topics in human factors and sustainable business process modeling for the service industry, and illustrates the user-centered service system development cycle with the integration of systems engineering concepts in service systems. A roadmap for designing service systems of the future is discussed. The framework introduced in this paper is based on key user-centered design principles and systems engineering applications to support service competitiveness. PMID:22317322

  4. On the prevalence of gunshot residue in selected populations - an empirical study performed with SEM-EDX analysis.

    PubMed

    Brożek-Mucha, Zuzanna

    2014-04-01

    The study was designed to obtain a comprehensive view on the prevalence of gunshot residue and the factors influencing their dispersion. 273 specimens collected from people of various professions, representing both users and non-users of firearms, as well as from the interior of a forensic laboratory were examined for the presence of gunshot residue. In specimens taken from hands of 100 people declaring no contact with firearms only one spherical particle containing lead, antimony and barium was found. Numbers of particles found in specimens collected from hands of 50 shooters varied from zero to numbers greater than 100 and were strongly correlated with the time interval between last shooting and collecting specimens. Within the first 4h after shooting particles are being lost from the shooter's hands, and so transferred from shooters to their environment. Thus, the relatives of five hunters were examined during both the close and open hunting seasons to trace the potential secondary transfer in practice. Using the criterion of low risk of contamination with gunshot residue, i.e. 5h after last handling a gun, only few specimens were encountered among these collected from hands of firearm users that contained characteristic particles and these occurred in small numbers. Frequent shooters, e.g. shooting instructors or firearm examiners, formed a class for themselves of high risk of contamination with gunshot residue. As a result of continuous monitoring of the laboratory (55 specimens examined so far), where the examinations of gunshot residue are being carried out, it has been proved that the laboratory is free from contamination and so confirmed the usefulness of protocols worked out. The obtained information provided empirical bases to the minimisation of the risk of contamination of the evidence as well as for the evaluation of the analytical findings in the expertise on gunshot incidents. PMID:24595061

  5. Utility-Scale Solar 2014. An Empirical Analysis of Project Cost, Performance, and Pricing Trends in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Seel, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    Other than the nine Solar Energy Generation Systems (“SEGS”) parabolic trough projects built in the 1980s, virtually no large-scale or “utility-scale” solar projects – defined here to include any groundmounted photovoltaic (“PV”), concentrating photovoltaic (“CPV”), or concentrating solar thermal power (“CSP”) project larger than 5 MWAC – existed in the United States prior to 2007. By 2012 – just five years later – utility-scale had become the largest sector of the overall PV market in the United States, a distinction that was repeated in both 2013 and 2014 and that is expected to continue for at least the next few years. Over this same short period, CSP also experienced a bit of a renaissance in the United States, with a number of large new parabolic trough and power tower systems – some including thermal storage – achieving commercial operation. With this critical mass of new utility-scale projects now online and in some cases having operated for a number of years (generating not only electricity, but also empirical data that can be mined), the rapidly growing utility-scale sector is ripe for analysis. This report, the third edition in an ongoing annual series, meets this need through in-depth, annually updated, data-driven analysis of not just installed project costs or prices – i.e., the traditional realm of solar economics analyses – but also operating costs, capacity factors, and power purchase agreement (“PPA”) prices from a large sample of utility-scale solar projects in the United States. Given its current dominance in the market, utility-scale PV also dominates much of this report, though data from CPV and CSP projects are presented where appropriate.

  6. The manometric sorptomat—an innovative volumetric instrument for sorption measurements performed under isobaric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudasik, Mateusz

    2016-03-01

    The present paper discusses the concept of measuring the process of sorption by means of the volumetric method, developed in such a way as to allow measurements performed under isobaric conditions. On the basis of the concept in question, a prototype of a sorption instrument was built: the manometric sorptomat. The paper provides a detailed description of the idea of the instrument, and of the way it works. In order to evaluate the usefulness of the device in sorption measurements carried out under laboratory conditions, comparative studies were conducted, during which the results of sorption measurements obtained with the developed instrument were compared with the results Mateusz obtained with a reference device. The objects of comparison were the sorption capacities of hard coal samples, calculated on the basis of the established courses of the methane sorption process. The results were regarded as compatible if the compared values fell within the range of the measurement uncertainty of the two devices. For the sake of the comparative studies, fifteen granular samples of hard coal—representing the 0.20-0.25 mm grain fraction and coming from various mines of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin—were used. After comparing the results obtained with the original manometric sorptomat with the results obtained with the gravimetric reference device, it was observed that the compatibility of measurements of sorption capacities was over 90%, based on the defined criterion of the measurement compatibility.

  7. Citizens' quality councils: an innovative mechanism for monitoring and providing social endorsement of healthcare providers' performance?

    PubMed

    Ruelas, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, under the influence of continuing improvement and total quality strategies, efforts to improve the quality of healthcare have been generated from within each healthcare organization. External mechanisms, such as accreditation, that drive quality improvement from without, have existed for much longer. However, these accreditation systems incorporated the need to demonstrate the existence of continuing improvement processes as a standard barely 10 years ago; thus, the external mechanism included the development of internal processes as yet another requirement. As Dobrow, Langer, Angus and Sullivan state in the lead article, the existence of a whole evidence-based culture that has spread the concern about quality is beyond doubt; I would add that it has also intensified this concern. Several factors have contributed to this trend, which now seems irreversible. On the one hand, as the paper points out, one of these factors is the growing requirement to allocate resources according to performance. On the other, there is the growing evidence of errors committed by health systems that cause harm to patients. The latter has created increasing demand for reliable information, conceived not only to allow the detection of these situations, but also to invest greater reliability in the health systems in the eyes of patients and general public. In both cases, however, the question remains: Who defines and who measures quality levels in such a way that the information is credible? PMID:16651858

  8. Instructional Innovation, School Choice, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berends, Mark; Penaloza, Roberto V.; Cannata, Marisa; Goldring, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    There is limited empirical research about innovation in various types of schools of choice, although viable choice policies tend to assume clear differentiation amongst schools. Innovation can be conceptualized in many ways and takes place at multiple levels of the school organization. Schools can innovate in terms of the roles and responsibility…

  9. Management of Innovation: The Role of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapero, Albert

    Management of the innovation process is described, and resources on which innovation management must operate are identified. The relationship of information to subsystems in the innovation process is examined using empirical results from sociology, communication, and psychology. Analysis develops from a one-man information model, through a…

  10. Education, Training, Innovation: Evidence from Transition Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akhmedjonov, Alisher R.

    2010-01-01

    Innovation is the key to productivity growth and prosperity. Most empirical cross-country analysis of the determinants of innovation focus mainly on developed countries. The objective of this study is to fill this gap in the research and analyze the determinants of innovation in transition countries of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union.…

  11. Physical fitness and academic performance: empirical evidence from the National Administrative Senior High School Student Data in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pei-An; Chang, Hung-Hao; Wang, Jiun-Hao; Wu, Min-Chen

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between the changes of physical fitness across the 3-year spectrum of senior high school study and academic performance measured by standardized tests in Taiwan. A unique dataset of 149 240 university-bound senior high school students from 2009 to 2011 was constructed by merging two nationwide administrative datasets of physical fitness test performance and the university entrance exam scores. Hierarchical linear regression models were used. All regressions included controls for students' baseline physical fitness status, changes of physical fitness performance over time, age and family economic status. Some notable findings were revealed. An increase of 1 SD on students' overall physical fitness from the first to third school year is associated with an increase in the university entrance exam scores by 0.007 and 0.010 SD for male and female students, respectively. An increase of 1 SD on anaerobic power (flexibility) from the first to third school year is positively associated with an increase in the university entrance exam scores by 0.018 (0.010) SD among female students. We suggest that education and school health policymakers should consider and design policies to improve physical fitness as part of their overall strategy of improving academic performance. PMID:23487558

  12. Test Length and Cognitive Fatigue: An Empirical Examination of Effects on Performance and Test-Taker Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Phillip L.; Kanfer, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Person and situational determinants of cognitive ability test performance and subjective reactions were examined in the context of tests with different time-on-task requirements. Two hundred thirty-nine first-year university students participated in a within-participant experiment, with completely counterbalanced treatment conditions and test…

  13. Organizational Learning, Knowledge Management Practices and Firm's Performance: An Empirical Study of a Heavy Engineering Firm in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Ajay K.; Moreno, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims at investigating the impact of organizational learning (OL) on the firm's performance and knowledge management (KM) practices in a heavy engineering organization in India. Design/Methodology/Approach: The data were collected from 205 middle and senior executives working in the project engineering management division of a…

  14. Physical Fitness and Academic Performance: Empirical Evidence from the National Administrative Senior High School Student Data in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Pei-An; Chang, Hung-Hao; Wang, Jiun-Hao; Wu, Min-Chen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the changes of physical fitness across the 3-year spectrum of senior high school study and academic performance measured by standardized tests in Taiwan. A unique dataset of 149 240 university-bound senior high school students from 2009 to 2011 was constructed by merging two nationwide administrative…

  15. Plastic Cubesat: An innovative and low-cost way to perform applied space research and hands-on education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piattoni, Jacopo; Candini, Gian Paolo; Pezzi, Giulio; Santoni, Fabio; Piergentili, Fabrizio

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the design and the manufacturing of a Cubesat platform based on a plastic structure. The Cubesat structure has been realized in plastic material (ABS) using a "rapid prototyping" technique. The "rapid prototyping" technique has several advantages including fast implementation, accuracy in manufacturing small parts and low cost. Moreover, concerning the construction of a small satellite, this technique is very useful thanks to the accuracy achievable in details, which are sometimes difficult and expensive to realize with the use of tools machine. The structure must be able to withstand the launch loads. For this reason, several simulations using an FEM simulation and an intensive vibration test campaign have been performed in the system development and test phase. To demonstrate that this structure is suitable for hosting a complete satellite system, offering innovative integrated solutions, other subsystems have been developed and assembled. Despite its small size, this single unit (1U) Cubesat has a system for active attitude control, a redundant telecommunication system, a payload camera and a photovoltaic system based on high efficiency solar cells. The developed communication subsystem has small dimensions, low power consumption and low cost. An example of the innovations introduced is the antenna system, which has been manufactured inside the ABS structure. The communication protocol which has been implemented, the AX.25 protocol, is mainly used by radio amateurs. The communication system has the capability to transmit both telemetry and data from the payload, in this case a microcamera. The attitude control subsystem is based on an active magnetic system with magnetorquers for detumbling and momentum dumping and three reaction wheels for fine control. It has a total dimension of about 50×50×50 mm. A microcontroller implements the detumbling control law autonomously taking data from integrated magnetometers and executes pointing

  16. MO-G-17A-01: Innovative High-Performance PET Imaging System for Preclinical Imaging and Translational Researches

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, X; Lou, K; Deng, Z; Shao, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a practical and compact preclinical PET with innovative technologies for substantially improved imaging performance required for the advanced imaging applications. Methods: Several key components of detector, readout electronics and data acquisition have been developed and evaluated for achieving leapfrogged imaging performance over a prototype animal PET we had developed. The new detector module consists of an 8×8 array of 1.5×1.5×30 mm{sup 3} LYSO scintillators with each end coupled to a latest 4×4 array of 3×3 mm{sup 2} Silicon Photomultipliers (with ∼0.2 mm insensitive gap between pixels) through a 2.0 mm thick transparent light spreader. Scintillator surface and reflector/coupling were designed and fabricated to reserve air-gap to achieve higher depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution and other detector performance. Front-end readout electronics with upgraded 16-ch ASIC was newly developed and tested, so as the compact and high density FPGA based data acquisition and transfer system targeting 10M/s coincidence counting rate with low power consumption. The new detector module performance of energy, timing and DOI resolutions with the data acquisition system were evaluated. Initial Na-22 point source image was acquired with 2 rotating detectors to assess the system imaging capability. Results: No insensitive gaps at the detector edge and thus it is capable for tiling to a large-scale detector panel. All 64 crystals inside the detector were clearly separated from a flood-source image. Measured energy, timing, and DOI resolutions are around 17%, 2.7 ns and 1.96 mm (mean value). Point source image is acquired successfully without detector/electronics calibration and data correction. Conclusion: Newly developed advanced detector and readout electronics will be enable achieving targeted scalable and compact PET system in stationary configuration with >15% sensitivity, ∼1.3 mm uniform imaging resolution, and fast acquisition counting rate

  17. Spatial validation of large scale land surface models against monthly land surface temperature patterns using innovative performance metrics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Julian; Siemann, Amanda; Stisen, Simon; Sheffield, Justin

    2016-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are a key tool to enhance process understanding and to provide predictions of the terrestrial hydrosphere and its atmospheric coupling. Distributed LSMs predict hydrological states and fluxes, such as land surface temperature (LST) or actual evapotranspiration (aET), at each grid cell. LST observations are widely available through satellite remote sensing platforms that enable comprehensive spatial validations of LSMs. In spite of the availability of LST data, most validation studies rely on simple cell to cell comparisons and thus do not regard true spatial pattern information. This study features two innovative spatial performance metrics, namely EOF- and connectivity-analysis, to validate predicted LST patterns by three LSMs (Mosaic, Noah, VIC) over the contiguous USA. The LST validation dataset is derived from global High-Resolution-Infrared-Radiometric-Sounder (HIRS) retrievals for a 30 year period. The metrics are bias insensitive, which is an important feature in order to truly validate spatial patterns. The EOF analysis evaluates the spatial variability and pattern seasonality, and attests better performance to VIC in the warm months and to Mosaic and Noah in the cold months. Further, more than 75% of the LST variability can be captured by a single pattern that is strongly driven by air temperature. The connectivity analysis assesses the homogeneity and smoothness of patterns. The LSMs are most reliable at predicting cold LST patterns in the warm months and vice versa. Lastly, the coupling between aET and LST is investigated at flux tower sites and compared against LSMs to explain the identified LST shortcomings.

  18. The Relationship between the Learning Organization Concept and Firms' Financial Performance: An Empirical Assessment. [and] Invited Reaction: Linking Learning with Financial Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellinger, Andrea D.; Ellinger, Alexander E.; Yang, Baiyin; Howton, Shelly W.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a study of 208 manufacturing managers that found a positive correlation between the seven dimensions of learning organizations and four measures of business financial performance. "Invited Reaction" by Timothy T. Baldwin and Camden C. Danielson critiques the use of key respondent perceptions and bottom-line performance. (Contains 61…

  19. Measuring performance in off-patent drug markets: a methodological framework and empirical evidence from twelve EU Member States.

    PubMed

    Kanavos, Panos

    2014-11-01

    This paper develops a methodological framework to help evaluate the performance of generic pharmaceutical policies post-patent expiry or after loss of exclusivity in non-tendering settings, comprising five indicators (generic availability, time delay to and speed of generic entry, number of generic competitors, price developments, and generic volume share evolution) and proposes a series of metrics to evaluate performance. The paper subsequently tests this framework across twelve EU Member States (MS) by using IMS data on 101 patent expired molecules over the 1998-2010 period. Results indicate that significant variation exists in generic market entry, price competition and generic penetration across the study countries. Size of a geographical market is not a predictor of generic market entry intensity or price decline. Regardless of geographic or product market size, many off patent molecules lack generic competitors two years after loss of exclusivity. The ranges in each of the five proposed indicators suggest, first, that there are numerous factors--including institutional ones--contributing to the success of generic entry, price decline and market penetration and, second, MS should seek a combination of supply and demand-side policies in order to maximise cost-savings from generics. Overall, there seems to be considerable potential for faster generic entry, uptake and greater generic competition, particularly for molecules at the lower end of the market. PMID:25201433

  20. A numerical/empirical technique for history matching and predicting cyclic steam performance in Canadian oil sands reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshchyshyn, Theodore Henry

    correlation curves. The key reservoir property used to develop a specific curve was to vary the initial mobile water saturation. Individual pilot wells were then history-matched using these correlation curves, adjusting for thermal net pay using perforation height and a fundamentally derived "net pay factor". Operating days (injection plus production) were required to complete the history matching calculations. Subsequent cycles were then history-matched by applying an Efficiency Multiplication Factor (EMF) to the original first cycle prediction method as well as selecting the proper correlation curve for the specific cycle under analysis by using the appropriate steam injection rates and slug sizes. History matches were performed on eight PHOP wells (two back-to-back, five-spot patterns) completed in the Wabiskaw and, three single-well tests completed just below in the McMurray Formation. Predictions for the PHOP Wabiskaw Formation first cycle bitumen production averaged within 1% of the actual pilot total. Bitumen recovery from individual wells for second cycle onwards, was within 20% of actual values. For testing the correlations, matching was also performed on cyclic steam data from British Petroleum's Wolf Lake Project, the Esso Cold Lake Project, and the PCEJ Fort McMurray Pilot, a joint venture of Petro-Canada, Cities Services (Canadian Occidental), Esso, and Japan-Canada Oil Sands with reasonable results.

  1. Display innovations through glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Lori L.

    2016-03-01

    Prevailing trends in thin, lightweight, high-resolution, and added functionality, such as touch sensing, continue to drive innovation in the display market. While display volumes grow, so do consumers’ need for portability, enhanced optical performance, and mechanical reliability. Technical advancements in glass design and process have enabled display innovations in these areas while supporting industry growth. Opportunities for further innovation remain open for glass manufacturers to drive new applications, enhanced functionality, and increased demand.

  2. Assessing performance of single-sample molecular genetic methods to estimate effective population size: empirical evidence from the endangered Gochu Asturcelta pig breed.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Juan; Álvarez, Isabel; Fernandez, Iván; Menéndez-Arias, Nuria A; Goyache, Félix

    2016-07-01

    Estimating effective population size (N e ) using linkage disequilibrium (LD) information (N e( LD ) ) has the operational advantage of using a single sample. However, N e( LD ) estimates assume discrete generations and its performance are constrained by demographic issues. However, such concerns have received little empirical attention so far. The pedigree of the endangered Gochu Asturcelta pig breed includes individuals classified into discrete filial generations and individuals with generations overlap. Up to 780 individuals were typed with a set of 17 microsatellites. Performance of N e( LD ) was compared with N e estimates obtained using genealogical information, molecular coancestry (N e(M) ) and a temporal (two-sample) method (N e( JR ) ). Molecular-based estimates of N e exceeded those obtained using pedigree data. Estimates of N e( LD ) for filial generations F3 and F4 (17.0 and 17.3, respectively) were lower and steadier than those obtained using yearly or biannual samplings. N e( LD ) estimated for samples including generations overlap could only be compared with those obtained for the discrete filial generations when sampling span approached a generation interval and demographic correction for bias was applied. Single-sample N e(M) estimates were lower than their N e( LD ) counterparts. N e(M) estimates are likely to partially reflect the number of founders rather than population size. In any case, estimates of LD and molecular coancestry tend to covary and, therefore, N e(M) and N e( LD ) can hardly be considered independent. Demographically adjusted estimates of N e( JR ) and N e( LD ) took comparable values when: (1) the two samples used for the former were separated by one equivalent to discrete generations in the pedigree and (2) sampling span used for the latter approached a generation interval. Overall, the empirical evidence given in this study suggested that the advantage of using single-sample methods to obtain molecular-based estimates of N e

  3. Service innovation management practices in the telecommunications industry: what does cross country analysis reveal?

    PubMed

    Rahman, Syed Abidur; Taghizadeh, Seyedeh Khadijeh; Ramayah, T; Ahmad, Noor Hazlina

    2015-01-01

    Service innovation management practice is currently being widely scrutinized mainly in the developed countries, where it has been initiated. The current study attempts to propose a framework and empirically validate and explain the service innovation practices for successful performance in the telecommunications industry of two developing countries, Malaysia and Bangladesh. The research framework proposes relationships among organisational culture, operating core (innovation process, cross-functional organisation, and implementation of tools/technology), competition-informed pricing, and performance. A total of 176 usable data from both countries are analysed for the purpose of the research. The findings show that organisational culture tends to be more influential on innovation process and cross-functional organisation in Malaysian telecommunication industry. In contrast, implementation of tools/technology plays a more instrumental role in competition-informed pricing practices in Bangladesh. This study revealed few differences in the innovation management practices between two developing countries. The findings have strategic implications for the service sectors in both the developing countries regarding implementation of innovative enterprises, especially in Bangladesh where innovation is the basis for survival. Testing the innovation management practices in the developing countries perhaps contains uniqueness in the field of innovation management. PMID:26722630

  4. Reexamining competitive priorities: Empirical study in service sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Fazli; Mohammad, Jihad

    2015-02-01

    The general objective of this study is to validate the multi-level concept of competitive priorities using reflective-formative model at a higher order for service industries. An empirical study of 228 firms from 9 different service industries is conducted to answer the objective of this study. Partial least square analysis with SmartPLS 2.0 was used to perform the analysis. Finding revealed six priorities: cost, flexibility, delivery, quality talent management, quality tangibility, and innovativeness. It emerges that quality are expanded into two types; one is related to managing talent for process improvement and the second one is the physical appearance and tangibility of the service quality. This study has confirmed competitive priorities as formative second-order hierarchical latent construct by using rigorous empirical evidence. Implications, limitation and suggestion for future research are accordingly discussed in this paper.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Innovative Water Main Rehabilitation Cured-In-Place Pipe Lining Product in Cleveland, OH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some utilities are seeking emerging and innovative rehabilitation technologies to extend the service life of and repair a greater portion of their infrastructure systems. However, information on new technologies is not always readily available and easy to obtain. To help provid...

  6. Evaluation of performance including influence by interfering substances of the Innovance D-dimer assay on the Sysmex coagulation analyzer.

    PubMed

    Park, Seo-Jin; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Chun, Soh Hyun; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung

    2011-01-01

    D-dimer is formed during activation of the coagulation system and is commonly assayed in order to diagnose disseminated intravascular coagulation, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been validated as the reference method, but it is a time-consuming procedure. The objective of this study was to evaluate a new immunoturbidimetric, particle-enhanced, Innovance(®) D-dimer immunoassay. A total of 129 plasma samples from apparently healthy individuals and 298 samples from patients were collected for linearity, precision, and correlation studies. Testing the precision of low- and high-controls yielded CV values of 2.08% and 1.76%, respectively. The central 95% non-parametric reference interval estimated from healthy controls was 0.093-0.68 mg/L Fibrinogen Equivalent Units (FEU; median, 0.26 mg/L FEU). Comparison analysis yielded acceptable correlation with the STA Liatest(®) D-dimer assay (R(2) = 0.9471). At a cut-off level of <0.5 mg/L FEU, the sensitivity and specificity indices of the Innovance D-dimer assay were 99.7% and 89.1%, respectively. Thus the Innovance D-dimer method showed acceptable precision and linearity, and the assay results showed acceptable correlation with the STA Liatest D-dimer method. The Innovance method was relatively unaffected by potential interfering substances such as bilirubin and hemoglobin. In conclusion, the Innovance D-dimer assay is suitable for monitoring D-dimer concentrations in various clinical conditions and should be useful in clinical laboratories. PMID:21325250

  7. Characterization and performance evaluation of an innovative mesoporous activated carbon used for drinking water purification in comparison with commercial carbons.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xu-Jin; Li, Wei-Guang; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Zhang, Duo-Ying; Fan, Wen-Biao; Yin, Zhao-Dong

    2015-09-01

    The preparation, characterization, and performance evaluation of an innovative mesoporous activated carbon (C-XHIT) were conducted in this study. Comparative evaluation with commercial carbons (C-PS and C-ZJ15) and long-term performance evaluation of C-XHIT were conducted in small-scale system-A (S-A) and pilot-scale system-B (S-B-1 and S-B-2 in series), respectively, for treating water from Songhua River. The cumulative uptake of micropollutants varied with KBV (water volume fed to columns divided by the mass of carbons, m(3) H2O/kg carbon) was employed in the performance evaluation. The results identified that mesoporous and microporous volumes were simultaneously well-developed in C-XHIT. Higher mesoporosity (63.94 %) and average pore width (37.91 Å) of C-XHIT ensured a higher adsorption capacity for humic acid compared to C-PS and C-ZJ15. When the KBV of S-A reached 12.58 m(3) H2O/kg carbon, cumulative uptake of organic pollutants achieved by C-XHIT increased by 32.82 and 156.29 % for DOC (QC) and 22.53 and 112.48 % for UV254 (QUV) compared to C-PS and C-ZJ15, respectively; in contrast, the adsorption capacity of NH4 (+)-N did not improve significantly. C-XHIT achieved high average removal efficiencies for DOC (77.43 ± 16.54 %) and UV254 (83.18 ± 13.88 %) in S-B over 253 days of operation (KBV = 62 m(3) H2O/kg carbon). Adsorption dominated the removal of DOC and UV254 in the initial phases of KBV (0-15 m(3) H2O/kg carbon), and simultaneous biodegradation and adsorption were identified as the mechanisms for organic pollutant uptake at KBV above 25 m(3) H2O/kg carbon. The average rates contributed by S-B-1 and S-B-2 for QC and QUV were approximately 0.75 and 0.25, respectively. Good linear and exponential correlations were observed between S-A and S-B in terms of QC and QUV obtained by C-XHIT, respectively, for the same KBV ranges, indicating a rapid and cost-saving evaluation method. The linear correlation between mesoporosity and QC

  8. Empirically Based Play Interventions for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Linda A., Ed.; Files-Hall, Tara M., Ed.; Schaefer, Charles E., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Empirically Based Play Interventions for Children" is a compilation of innovative, well-designed play interventions, presented for the first time in one text. Play therapy is the oldest and most popular form of child therapy in clinical practice and is widely considered by practitioners to be uniquely responsive to children's developmental needs.…

  9. Innovative Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsi, Louis M.; Kaebnick, Gweneth W.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of innovation within the university is examined, noting the possibility of innovation as a key to college vitality. A study was conducted using a group of institutions that demonstrated recent innovative spirit. Members of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), each has been recognized in an annual…

  10. WSN system design by using an innovative neural network model to perform thermals forecasting in a urban canyon scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuseppina, Nicolosi; Salvatore, Tirrito

    2015-12-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) were studied by researchers in order to manage Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) indoor systems. WSN can be useful specially to regulate indoor confort in a urban canyon scenario, where the thermal parameters vary rapidly, influenced by outdoor climate changing. This paper shows an innovative neural network approach, by using WSN data collected, in order to forecast the indoor temperature to varying the outdoor conditions based on climate parameters and boundary conditions typically of urban canyon. In this work more attention will be done to influence of traffic jam and number of vehicles in queue.

  11. Hospitals as learning organizations: fostering innovation through interactive learning.

    PubMed

    Dias, Casimiro; Escoval, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The article aims to provide an analytical understanding of hospitals as "learning organizations." It further analyzes the development of learning organizations as a way to enhance innovation and performance in the hospital sector. The article pulls together primary data on organizational flexibility, innovation, and performance from 95 administrators from hospital boards in Portugal, collected through a survey, interviews with hospital's boards, and a nominal group technique with a panel of experts on health systems. Results show that a combination of several organizational traits of the learning organization enhances its capacity for innovation development. The logistic model presented reveals that hospitals classified as "advanced learning organizations" have 5 times more chance of developing innovation than "basic learning organizations." Empirical findings further pointed out incentives, standards, and measurement requirements as key elements for integration of service delivery systems and expansion of the current capacity for structured and real-time learning in the hospital sector. The major implication arising from this study is that policy needs to combine instruments that promote innovation opportunities and incentives, with instruments stimulating the further development of the core components of learning organizations. Such a combination of policy instruments has the potential to ensure a wide external cooperation through a learning infrastructure. PMID:25539491

  12. Why Is Performance on Multiple-Choice Tests and Constructed-Response Tests Not More Closely Related? Theory and an Empirical Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuechler, William L.; Simkin, Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    Both professional certification and academic tests rely heavily on multiple-choice questions, despite the widespread belief that alternate, constructed-response questions are superior measures of a test taker's understanding of the underlying material. Empirically, the search for a link between these two assessment metrics has met with limited…

  13. Preparation, Practice, and Performance: An Empirical Examination of the Impact of Standards-Based Instruction on Secondary Students' Math and Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Carla J.

    2009-01-01

    For almost two decades proponents of educational reform have advocated the use of standards-based education in maths and science classrooms for improving teacher practices, increasing student learning, and raising the quality of maths and science instruction. This study empirically examined the impact of specific standards-based teacher…

  14. An Empirical Investigation of the Proposition that 'School Is Work': A Comparison of Personality-Performance Correlations in School and Work Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lounsbury, John W.; Gibson, Lucy W.; Sundstrom, Eric; Wilburn, Denise; Loveland, James M.

    2004-01-01

    An empirical test of Munson and Rubenstein's (1992) assertion that 'school is work' compared a sample of students in a high school with a sample of workers in a manufacturing plant in the same metropolitan area. Data from both samples included scores on six personality traits--Conscientiousness, Agreeableness, Openness, Emotional Stability,…

  15. The innovation value chain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Morten T; Birkinshaw, Julian

    2007-06-01

    The challenges of coming up with fresh ideas and realizing profits from them are different for every company. One firm may excel at finding good ideas but may have weak systems for bringing them to market. Another organization may have a terrific process for funding and rolling out new products and services but a shortage of concepts to develop. In this article, Hansen and Birkinshaw caution executives against using the latest and greatest innovation approaches and tools without understanding the unique deficiencies in their companies' innovation systems. They offer a framework for evaluating innovation performance: the innovation value chain. It comprises the three main phases of innovation (idea generation, conversion, and diffusion) as well as the critical activities performed during those phases (looking for ideas inside your unit; looking for them in other units; looking for them externally; selecting ideas; funding them; and promoting and spreading ideas companywide). Using this framework, managers get an end-to-end view of their innovation efforts. They can pinpoint their weakest links and tailor innovation best practices appropriately to strengthen those links. Companies typically succumb to one of three broad "weakest-link" scenarios. They are idea poor, conversion poor, or diffusion poor. The article looks at the ways smart companies - including Intuit, P&G, Sara Lee, Shell, and Siemens- modify the best innovation practices and apply them to address those organizations' individual needs and flaws. The authors warn that adopting the chain-based view of innovation requires new measures of what can be delivered by each link in the chain. The approach also entails new roles for employees "external scouts" and "internal evangelists," for example. Indeed, in their search for new hires, companies should seek out those candidates who can help address particular weaknesses in the innovation value chain. PMID:17580654

  16. Education, Training, Innovation--Evidence from Transition Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akhmedjonov, Alisher

    2010-01-01

    Innovation is the key to productivity growth and prosperity. Most empirical cross-country analysis of the determinants of innovation focus mainly on developed countries. The objective of this study is to fill this gap in the research and analyze the determinants of innovation in transition countries of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union.…

  17. Teams as innovative systems: multilevel motivational antecedents of innovation in R&D teams.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gilad; Farh, Jiing-Lih; Campbell-Bush, Elizabeth M; Wu, Zhiming; Wu, Xin

    2013-11-01

    Integrating theories of proactive motivation, team innovation climate, and motivation in teams, we developed and tested a multilevel model of motivators of innovative performance in teams. Analyses of multisource data from 428 members of 95 research and development (R&D) teams across 33 Chinese firms indicated that team-level support for innovation climate captured motivational mechanisms that mediated between transformational leadership and team innovative performance, whereas members' motivational states (role-breadth self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation) mediated between proactive personality and individual innovative performance. Furthermore, individual motivational states and team support for innovation climate uniquely promoted individual innovative performance, and, in turn, individual innovative performance linked team support for innovation climate to team innovative performance. PMID:23565898

  18. Innovation @ NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the activities National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is doing to encourage innovation across the agency. All information provided is available publicly.

  19. Do organizations spend wisely on employees? Effects of training and development investments on learning and innovation in organizations

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Sun Young; Choi, Jin Nam

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of training and development on organizational innovation. We specifically suggest that the training and development investments of an organization affect its innovative performance by promoting various learning practices. We empirically tested our hypothesis by using time-lagged, multi-source data collected from 260 Korean companies that represent diverse industries. Our analysis showed that corporate expenditure for internal training predicts interpersonal and organizational learning practices, which, in turn, increase innovative performance. The data also revealed that the positive relationship between interpersonal and organizational learning practices and innovative performance is stronger within organizations that have stronger innovative climates. By contrast, investment in employee development through financial support for education outside an organization poses a significant negative effect on its innovative performance and no significant effect on learning practices. The present study provides a plausible explanation for a mechanism through which the investment of an organization in employees enhances its innovative performance. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. PMID:25598576

  20. Mapping your innovation strategy.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Scott D; Eyring, Matt; Gibson, Lib

    2006-05-01

    In the complex sport of American football, teams rely on playbooks as thick as the Manhattan phone directory. But when it comes to creating innovative growth businesses-which is at least as complicated as professional football--most companies have not developed detailed game plans. Indeed, many managers have concluded that a fog enshrouds the world of innovation, obscuring high-potential opportunities. The authors believe that companies can penetrate that fog by developing growth strategies based on disruptive innovations, as defined by Clayton Christensen. Such innovations conform to a pattern: They offer an entirely new solution; they perform adequately along traditional dimensions and much better along other dimensions that matter more to target customers; and they are not initially appealing to powerful incumbents. Companies can develop customized checklists, or playbooks, by combining this basic pattern with analysis of major innovations in their markets. The key early on is to focus not on detailed financial estimates--which will always guide companies toward the markets most hostile to disruptive innovations--but on how well the innovation fits the pattern of success. It's also crucial to encourage flexibility: Companies must be willing to kill projects that are going nowhere, exempt innovations from standard development processes, and avoid burdening project teams with extra financing, which can keep them heading in the wrong direction. Companies can create competitive advantage by becoming champions at defining the pattern of successful innovations and executing against it. But as that pattern becomes obvious--and others emerge-building a sustainable advantage on innovation competencies will again prove elusive. PMID:16649702

  1. Fifteen Years of Collaborative Innovation and Achievement: NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 15-Year Program Performance and Results Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Michaela M. (Editor); Bowen, Brent D.; Fink, Mary M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Avery Shelly; Calamaio, Caprice; Carstenson, Larry; Dugan, James; Farr, Lynne; Farritor, Shane

    2003-01-01

    This 15-year evaluation serves as a summary document highlighting the numerous and complete successes of the Nebraska Space Grant Program. Innovation has been highlighted through significant new endeavors during this 5-year period, such as placement of students and faculty at NASA Centers and the expansion of NSGC Native American Outreach Programs. While the last national program evaluation resulted in Nebraska s ranking as the top Capability Enhancement Consortium, and 5th best overall, Nebraska felt there was room for significant growth and development. This has been validated through the recent competitive attainment of Designated Grant status and has allowed for the exploration of new initiatives, as well as the expansion of already successful programs. A comprehensive strategic planning effort has involved all Nebraska representative entities and has guided Nebraska Space Grant through the evaluation period, providing a basis for continual advancement. Nebraska rigorously employs evaluation techniques to ensure that stated outcomes and metrics are achieved and that weaknesses are identified and corrected. With this coordinated approach, Nebraska expects that the next 5 years will yield new opportunities for significant achievement. Nebraska Space Grant will embrace new national endeavors, including the integration of Pender Public Schools -Nebraska s NASA Explorer School, geospatial initiatives, and the National Student Satellite Program.

  2. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling City University of New York (CUNY): Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage (Performer Video)

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2012-02-28

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video are Sanjoy Banerjee, Director of CUNY Energy Institute and Dan Steingart (Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, CUNY). The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

  3. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling City University of New York (CUNY): Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage (Performer Video)

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2012-03-21

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video are Sanjoy Banerjee, Director of CUNY Energy Institute and Dan Steingart (Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, CUNY). The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

  4. Law of Empires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores issues raised by empires and imperial law. The first article, "Clash of Empires: The Fight for North America," looks at the clash of empires and the fight for North America during the 18th century. The second article, "When Roman Law Ruled the Western World," examines Roman Law, which helped hold…

  5. Development of innovative techniques and principles that may be used as models to improve plant performance: Technical progress report, February 1, 1988--January 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, W.W.

    1988-09-01

    We propose to help develop innovative techniques to improve plant performance. Cytoplasms from wild Pennisetum species have been identified that affect forage yields, days to anthesis, head length, seed weight, and cytoplasmic-genic male sterility (cms). A number of new cytoplasms for cms are being identified. The A' genome from the secondary gene pool in Pennisetum is proving to be a valuable source of genes that can be rapidly used to improve cultivated pearl millet. The discovery and use of this germplasm may have a significant impact on developing pearl millet as a new drought tolerant grain crop for the US. Significant progress is being made in transferring gene(s) controlling apomixis from wild P. squamulatum to cultivated pearl millet for the purpose of producing true-breeding hybrids. 27 refs.

  6. Process innovation in high-performance systems: From polymeric composites R&D to design and build of airplane showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Jui

    In the aerospace industry reducing aircraft weight is key because it increases flight performance and drives down operating costs. With fierce competition in the commercial aircraft industry, companies that focused primarily on exterior aircraft performance design issues are turning more attention to the design of aircraft interior. Simultaneously, there has been an increase in the number of new amenities offered to passengers especially in first class travel and executive jets. These new amenities present novel and challenging design parameters that include integration into existing aircraft systems without sacrificing flight performance. The objective of this study was to design a re-circulating shower system for an aircraft that weighs significantly less than pre-existing shower designs. This was accomplished by integrating processes from polymeric composite materials, water filtration, and project management. Carbon/epoxy laminates exposed to hygrothermal cycling conditions were evaluated and compared to model calculations. Novel materials and a variety of fabrication processes were developed to create new types of paper for honeycomb applications. Experiments were then performed on the properties and honeycomb processability of these new papers. Standard water quality tests were performed on samples taken from the re-circulating system to see if current regulatory standards were being met. These studies were executed and integrated with tools from project management to design a better shower system for commercial aircraft applications.

  7. Impact of technological innovation on a nursing home performance and on the medication-use process safety.

    PubMed

    Baril, Chantal; Gascon, Viviane; Brouillette, Christel

    2014-03-01

    Despite the fact that since 1985 the government of Québec increased by 5.75 % on average the amount of money spent on healthcare per year, little improvement was noted. It is obvious that an optimal use of resources is essential to reduce waiting times and provide safer and faster services to patients. The use of new technology can contribute to improve the healthcare system efficiency. Our study aims to assess the impact of a medication distribution technology on 1) the performance of a health and social services center's pharmacy, 2) the performance of one care unit in a nursing home and on 3) the medication-use process safety. To measure performance we were inspired by the Lean approach. The results show that medication distribution technology is considered as an effective way to significantly detect medication errors, to allow nurses to focus more on patients and pharmacy to react more rapidly to changes in patient medications. PMID:24627187

  8. AprenDes-PERU: Innovations in Decentralization and Active Schools. Report on Year 1. Aprendes Performance Monitoring Plan. Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montane, Angelica; Chesterfield, Ray

    2005-01-01

    This document summarizes the results obtained by the AprenDes project in 2004, the project's first year of implementation. It provides the principal findings on program performance from a baseline in May 2004 to the end of the school year (late October 2004). Progress on a number of project objectives related to decentralized school- and…

  9. Monitoring the Impact of Testing and Evaluation Innovations Project: State Activity and Interest Concerning Performance-Based Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing, Los Angeles, CA.

    Information was gathered about current state interest, activity, and concerns related to performance assessment for students. The Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing of the University of California (Los Angeles) conducted telephone interviews with directors of testing in each of the 50 states in the spring of 1990.…

  10. Performance of innovative PU-foam and natural fiber-based composites for the biofiltration of a mixture of volatile organic compounds by a fungal biofilm.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Acosta, O B; Arriaga, S; Escobar-Barrios, V A; Casas-Flores, S; Almendarez-Camarillo, A

    2012-01-30

    The performance of perlite and two innovative carriers that consist of polyurethane (PU) chemically modified with starch; and polypropylene reinforced with agave fibers was evaluated in the biofiltration of a mixture of VOCs composed of hexane, toluene and methyl-ethyl-ketone. At a total organic loading rate of 145 gCm(-3)h(-1) the elimination capacities (ECs) obtained were 145, 24 and 96 gCm(-3)h(-1) for the biofilters packed with the PU, the reinforced polypropylene, and perlite, respectively. Specific maximum biodegradation rates of the mixture, in the biofilters, were 416 mgCg(protein)(-1)  h(-1) for the PU and 63 mgCg(protein)(-1) h(-1) for perlite, which confirms the highest performance of the PU-composite. 18S rDNA analysis from the PU-biofilter revealed the presence of Fusarium solani in its sexual and asexual states, respectively. The modified PU carrier significantly reduced the start-up period of the biofilter and enhanced the EC of the VOCs. Thus, this study gives new alternatives in the field of packing materials synthesis, promoting the addition of easily biodegradable sources to enhance the performance of biofilters. PMID:22178276

  11. Innovative Partnerships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szemraj, John

    2001-01-01

    A major responsibility of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to ensure geospatial data availability. This includes the cooperative production of digital geospatial data through the National Mapping Program's Innovative Partnerships (IP) initiative, which began in October 1992.

  12. Performance analysis of innovative collector fields for solar-electric plants, using air as heat transfer medium

    SciTech Connect

    De Marchi Desenzani, P.; Gaia, M.

    1984-08-01

    The production of electricity by thermodynamic conversion of the heat supplied by flat plate collectors has been tried many times. The use of air as heat transfer medium could allow a dramatic simplification of the collector field and a relevant reduction of thermal inertia. The paper discusses the characteristics of a system based on air collectors and ORC engine. Both multilayer inflated plastic sheet collectors and vacuum tubes collectors are proposed as suitable solutions. The field fan power consumption is optimized jointly with the power cycle evaporator design. Both the envisaged solutions are investigated on the point of view of overall cost/performance ratio.

  13. POET: Parameterized Optimization for Empirical Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Q; Seymour, K; You, H; Vuduc, R; Quinlan, D

    2007-01-29

    The excessive complexity of both machine architectures and applications have made it difficult for compilers to statically model and predict application behavior. This observation motivates the recent interest in performance tuning using empirical techniques. We present a new embedded scripting language, POET (Parameterized Optimization for Empirical Tuning), for parameterizing complex code transformations so that they can be empirically tuned. The POET language aims to significantly improve the generality, flexibility, and efficiency of existing empirical tuning systems. We have used the language to parameterize and to empirically tune three loop optimizations-interchange, blocking, and unrolling-for two linear algebra kernels. We show experimentally that the time required to tune these optimizations using POET, which does not require any program analysis, is significantly shorter than that when using a full compiler-based source-code optimizer which performs sophisticated program analysis and optimizations.

  14. Shift work: health, performance and safety problems, traditional countermeasures, and innovative management strategies to reduce circadian misalignment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mark R; Eastman, Charmane I

    2012-01-01

    There are three mechanisms that may contribute to the health, performance, and safety problems associated with night-shift work: (1) circadian misalignment between the internal circadian clock and activities such as work, sleep, and eating, (2) chronic, partial sleep deprivation, and (3) melatonin suppression by light at night. The typical countermeasures, such as caffeine, naps, and melatonin (for its sleep-promoting effect), along with education about sleep and circadian rhythms, are the components of most fatigue risk-management plans. We contend that these, while better than nothing, are not enough because they do not address the underlying cause of the problems, which is circadian misalignment. We explain how to reset (phase-shift) the circadian clock to partially align with the night-work, day-sleep schedule, and thus reduce circadian misalignment while preserving sleep and functioning on days off. This involves controlling light and dark using outdoor light exposure, sunglasses, sleep in the dark, and a little bright light during night work. We present a diagram of a sleep-and-light schedule to reduce circadian misalignment in permanent night work, or a rotation between evenings and nights, and give practical advice on how to implement this type of plan. PMID:23620685

  15. Innovative surface modification of Ti-6Al-4V alloy with a positive effect on osteoblast proliferation and fatigue performance.

    PubMed

    Havlikova, Jana; Strasky, Josef; Vandrovcova, Marta; Harcuba, Petr; Mhaede, Mansour; Janecek, Milos; Bacakova, Lucie

    2014-06-01

    A novel approach of surface treatment of orthopaedic implants combining electric discharge machining (EDM), chemical milling (etching) and shot peening is presented in this study. Each of the three techniques have been used or proposed to be used as a favourable surface treatment of biomedical titanium alloys. But to our knowledge, the three techniques have not yet been used in combination. Surface morphology and chemistry were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Fatigue life of the material was determined and finally several in-vitro biocompatibility tests have been performed. EDM and subsequent chemical milling leads to a significant improvement of osteoblast proliferation and viability thanks to favourable surface morphology and increased oxygen content on the surface. Subsequent shot-peening significantly improves the fatigue endurance of the material. Material after proposed combined surface treatment possesses favourable mechanical properties and enhanced osteoblast proliferation. EDM treatment and EDM with shot peening also supported early osteogenic cell differentiation, manifested by a higher expression of collagen type I. The combined surface treatment is therefore promising for a range of applications in orthopaedics. PMID:24863238

  16. Innovations for Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFann, Howard H.; And Others

    Four papers on research and innovation in military training within the Army Training system deal with procedures for individualizing training, the Project IMPACT prototype system of computer assisted and programed instructions, student motivation and performance, and prospects for the 1970's and 1980's, and the implications of research in learning…

  17. ASEAN benchmarking in terms of science, technology, and innovation from 1999 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, V; Soeparwata, A

    2012-09-01

    This article provides an empirical assessment of the performance of the member states of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations in terms of science, technology, and innovation. This study is relevant because it employs a larger data set, examines more countries, and covers more years than previous studies. The results indicate that these countries had differing patterns of performance, and the pattern of growth among them was asymmetrical. Additional findings suggest that these countries performed idiosyncratically with respect to the six quantitative dimensions we examined. Our research includes a form of comparative policy evaluation that might assist the monitoring of the implementation of "Vision 2020". The results simplify how we determine the relative strengths and weaknesses of national innovation systems and are relevant to policy discussions. In relation to transferability, the findings demonstrate similarities to the European Union with regard to performance and governance. PMID:22904577

  18. Innovation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyka, Andreas; Scharnhorst, Andrea

    The idea for this book started when we organized a topical workshop entitled "Innovation Networks - New Approaches in Modeling and Analyzing" (held in Augsburg, Germany in October 2005), under the auspices of Exystence, a network of excellence funded in the European Union's Fifth Framework Program. Unlike other conferences on innovation and networks, however, this workshop brought together scientists from economics, sociology, communication science, science and technology studies, and physics. With this book we aim to build further on a bridge connecting the bodies of knowledge on networks in economics, the social sciences and, more recently, statistical physics.

  19. An innovative architectural design to enhance the electrochemical performance of La2NiO4+δ cathodes for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rakesh K.; Burriel, Mónica; Dessemond, Laurent; Martin, Vincent; Bassat, Jean-Marc; Djurado, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    An architectural design of the cathode microstructure based on combining electrostatic spray deposition (ESD) and screen-printing (SP) techniques has demonstrated to be an innovative strategy to enhance the electrochemical properties of La2NiO4+δ (LNO) as oxygen electrode on Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ (CGO) electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells. For this purpose, the influence of the ESD process parameters on the microstructure has been systematically investigated. Electrochemical performances of four selected cathode microstructures are investigated: (i) 3-D coral nanocrystalline (average particle size ∼ 100 nm) LNO film grown by ESD; (ii) 3-D coral nanocrystalline film (average particle size ∼ 150 nm) grown by ESD with a continuous nanometric dense interface; (iii) porous screen-printed LNO film (average particle size ∼ 400 nm); and (iv) 3-D coral nanocrystalline film (average particle size ∼ 150 nm) with a continuous nanometric dense interface prepared by ESD topped by a LNO current collector prepared by SP. A significant reduction in the polarization resistance (Rpol) is obtained (0.08 Ω cm2 at 700 °C) for 3-D coral topped by the SP layer. Moreover LNO is found to be stable and compatible with CGO up to 800 °C for only 10 days duration in air, making it potentially suitable for SOFCs cathode application.

  20. Mathematical Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research funds from the Stennis Space Center, MathSoft, Inc., developed a system that can provide the building blocks for signal analysis and rapid prototyping. The product is the result of work to help NASA develop a complete understanding propulsion test data by using time frequency displays, automatic estimation and denoising, and data analysis plots for wavelet decomposition.

  1. Accelerating Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The word "innovation" seems to be in everyone's lexicon these days; it's even turning up as part of new education job titles in school districts and states. The ideas that undergird it are animating a growing movement that's spurring new policies, programs, and products that carry with them the potential to transform how students learn and how…

  2. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of QASE RT is to enable system analysts and software engineers to evaluate performance and reliability implications of design alternatives. The program resulted from two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects. After receiving a description of the system architecture and workload from the user, QASE RT translates the system description into simulation models and executes them. Simulation provides detailed performance evaluation. The results of the evaluations are service and response times, offered load and device utilizations and functional availability.

  3. A fast and innovative microextraction technique, μSPEed, followed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of phenolic compounds in teas.

    PubMed

    Porto-Figueira, Priscilla; Figueira, José A; Pereira, Jorge A M; Câmara, José S

    2015-12-11

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a promising solid phase microextraction technique, μSPEed, in the analysis of selected phenolic compounds from teas by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (μSPEed/UHPLC-PDA). The innovative μSPEed configuration uses 3-μm sorbent particles tightly packed in a disposable needle equipped with a pressure-driven valve to withdraw samples in a single direction. The system was operated by the electronic pipette eVol® and different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency, as the nature of sorbent, pH, loading and elution conditions, and solvents were optimized. The best extracting conditions were obtained by loading twice 100μL of tea samples through the PS/DVB-RP sorbent and eluting with 50μL of acidified MeOH 95%. The following chromatographic separation was carried out in an Acquity C18 BEH capillary column using a gradient of 0.1% FA and acetonitrile. The optimized μSPEed/UHPLC-PDA methodology is selective and specific and was properly validated for 8 phenolic compounds widely reported in different teas. Overall, an excellent analytical performance was obtained in the 0.2-20μg/L linear dynamic range (LDR), with very low limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs), ranging between 3.5-16.8ng/mL and 10.6-50.6ng/mL, respectively, high recoveries (89.3-103.3%), good precision (RSD<5%) and negligible matrix effect. The methodology was used to assess the target polyphenols concentration in several tea samples. Rutin and quercetin-3-glucoside were the most abundant phenolics in all tea samples analysed and, with exception of naringenin and cinnamic acid, which are present in high amounts in the investigated citric teas, remain phenolic compounds are present in trace levels. PMID:26585207

  4. A Framework for Studying Organizational Innovation in Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantz, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is two-fold: to propose a theoretical framework and model for studying organizational innovation in research libraries and to set forth propositions that can provide directions for future empirical studies of innovation in research libraries. Research libraries can be considered members of a class of organizations…

  5. Innovation and design approaches within prospective ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Liem, André; Brangier, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this conceptual article the topic of "Prospective Ergonomics" will be discussed within the context of innovation, design thinking and design processes & methods. Design thinking is essentially a human-centred innovation process that emphasises observation, collaboration, interpretation, visualisation of ideas, rapid concept prototyping and concurrent business analysis, which ultimately influences innovation and business strategy. The objective of this project is to develop a roadmap for innovation, involving consumers, designers and business people in an integrative process, which can be applied to product, service and business design. A theoretical structure comprising of Innovation perspectives (1), Worldviews supported by rationalist-historicist and empirical-idealistic dimensions (2) and Models of "design" reasoning (3) precedes the development and classification of existing methods as well as the introduction of new ones. PMID:22317532

  6. Innovating Firms and Aggregate Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klette, Tor Jakob; Kortum, Samuel

    2004-01-01

    We develop a parsimonious model of innovation to confront firm-level evidence. It captures the dynamics of individual heterogeneous firms, describes the behavior of an industry with firm entry and exit, and delivers a general equilibrium model of technological change. While unifying the theoretical analysis of firms, industries, and the aggregate…

  7. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Meat Cutter. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, J. Rick; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the meat cutter is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are essential for…

  8. An Empirical Examination of the Permanence of Performance and Response Patterns Generated by a CRM-Reading Produced by Expert Judgment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Richard Wayne

    Stability of performance on a criterion referenced reading test was examined for 413 students in grades one through six. The test, which measures 367 behavioral reading objectives, was administered twice to each student, with an interval of at least three weeks between the first and second administrations. Three statistical indices of permanence…

  9. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Tree Service Worker. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddy, Paul H.; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the tree service worker is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are essential…

  10. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Sawmill Worker. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddy, Paul H.; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the sawmill worker is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills whcih are performed and are essential for…

  11. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as an All-Round Logger. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddy, Paul H.; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the all-round logger is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are essential for…

  12. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Forage Producer. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, J. Rick; And Others

    To improve vocational education programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the forage producer is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are essential for…

  13. The Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities III's Cognitive Performance Model: Empirical Support for Intermediate Factors within CHC Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Gordon E.; McGrew, Kevin S.

    2014-01-01

    The Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability Third Edition is developed using the Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) measurement-theory test design as the instrument's theoretical blueprint. The instrument provides users with cognitive scores based on the Cognitive Performance Model (CPM); however, the CPM is not a part of CHC theory. Within the…

  14. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Swine Farmer. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, J. Rick; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the swine farmer is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are essential for…

  15. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Bulk Fertilizer Plant Worker. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Daniel R.; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the bulk fertilizer plant worker is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are…

  16. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Commercial Vegetable Producer. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, J. Rick; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the commercial vegetable producer is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are…

  17. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Beef Farmer. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, J. Rick; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the beef farmer is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are essential for…

  18. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Chemical Applicator. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Daniel R.; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the chemical applicator is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are essential…

  19. An Empirical Study of a District Wide K-2 Performance Assessment Program: Teacher Practices, Information Gained, and Use of Assessment Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanting, Ashley

    This study used a qualitative research methodology to examine how four primary teachers used a district literacy performance assessment. Data were collected through observations, interviews, and documents. Grounded theory and NUD*IST software were used for text analysis and theory building. Findings show that a theory-grounded teacher-empowered…

  20. Research on Educational Innovations. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Arthur K.

    The focus of this book is major educational innovations, that is, programs and curricula that have achieved widespread influence. It presents such fundamentals as definitions, descriptions, theoretical and empirical bases, critical analyses, and conclusions from published research. (The book discusses only published research.) Titles of the 15…

  1. Evaluating Innovation: The Case Study Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saez, Maria Jose; Carretero, Antonia J.

    1998-01-01

    Characterized the methodology of case studies, using examples from science education, with regard to their potential for the analysis of innovation and formulation of emerging trends. The theoretical and empirical support of evaluation will generate a call for negotiation as the formula that regulates the assessment of a program's efficiency and…

  2. Innovation through developing consumers’ community. Part I: Innovation in action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gălăţanu (Avram, E.; Avasilcăi, S.

    2015-11-01

    Technological changes and need for innovation represents the main concerns for organizational growth and profitability. However the main priority is still about achieving high performance through product development and consumers' engagement activities. As implementation of open innovation applications increased and value co — creation became well known and major process, companies were engaged into value co — innovation activities. From this point of view the need for joint efforts with consumers in product development arose. Thus the primary condition for an organization to be consumer centric is to define clear the vision and mission which reflects the common efforts for co — creation and diffusion of innovation. As Research & Development processes evolved and interest for innovative concepts and products arose, companies started to implement the specific instruments for consumers' attraction and engagement into design and product development. The digitalized innovation became the main source for establishing the direct communication with the consumers. In order to achieve organization growth, profitability and recognition, the companies should be aware of the innovation importance and the need for internal change. From this point of view, there is necessary to assess the organizational structures, to implement new policies and to establish strategic targets. Basically it is justified the need for platform occurrence and development. Based on case study of BMW Group, recognised leader in automotive industry for innovative concepts, there will be analysed main features within organizational context which promotes the innovation implementation. There will be provided the review of the BMW Group experience of innovation activities, main consumers' engagement strategies, the values which promote the consumer — centric product development, new opportunities assessment, major policies and concerns. The foreseen result is to understand how companies are

  3. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, C D; Bohndiek, S E; Royle, G; Blue, A; Liang, H X; Clark, A; Prydderch, M; Turchetta, R; Speller, R

    2007-12-01

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525 x 525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25 x 25 microm pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10(5) electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 microm, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at approximately 0.44 microC/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a: Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled

  4. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitis, C. D.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Royle, G.; Blue, A.; Liang, H. X.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Speller, R.

    2007-12-15

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525x525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25x25 {mu}m pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10{sup 5} electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 {mu}m, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at {approx}0.44 {mu}C/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a:Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled to

  5. Non-Empirical Confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawid, Richard

    2016-06-01

    In fundamental physics today, some theories are taken to be probably viable despite a lack of strong (or any) empirical confirmation. This situation suggests, I argue, an extension of the concept of theory confirmation that allows for confirmation by observations that are not predicted by the theory in question. "Non-empirical confirmation", as I call the latter form of confirmation, plays a more conspicuous role today than in earlier periods of physics. It has always constituted a significant albeit implicit element of the assessment of physical theory, however, that has not been adequately accounted for in canonical reconstructions of the scientific method. The talk discusses the core argumentative structure of non-empirical confirmation, analyses the concept’s reliance on the empirical testability of the theories in question and addresses some worries that have been raised in its regard.

  6. An empirical study of the performance of APMOVPE AM0 InP homojunction solar cells as a function of emitter thickness and doping, and base doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Gessert, T. A.; Emery, K. A.; Coutts, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Their excellent radiation resistance and conversion efficiencies greater than 20 percent, measured under global conditions, make InP shallow-homojunction solar cells very attractive for space or terrestrial application. In addition, modeling studies show that, for optimized design, efficiencies of these devices should exceed 20 percent even under AM0 conditions. However, a systematic experimental investigation of the influence of the various cell design parameters on cell performance has not as yet been made. For the n+/p/p+ structures investigated in the previous modeling study, the design parameters include the impurity concentrations and thicknesses of the emitter and base layers. In the work reported here, researchers discuss an experimental investigation of the effects on cell performance of varying the impurity concentrations of the emitter and base and thickness of the emitter.

  7. To empower or not to empower your sales force? An empirical examination of the influence of leadership empowerment behavior on customer satisfaction and performance.

    PubMed

    Ahearne, Michael; Mathieu, John; Rapp, Adam

    2005-09-01

    This research focuses on the impact of leadership empowerment behavior (LEB) on customer service satisfaction and sales performance, as mediated by salespeople's self-efficacy and adaptability. Moreover, the authors propose an interactive relationship whereby LEB will be differentially effective as a function of employees' empowerment readiness. The authors' hypotheses are tested using survey data from a sample of 231 salespeople in the pharmaceutical field, along with external ratings of satisfaction from 864 customers and archival sales performance information. Results indicated that contrary to popular belief, employees with low levels of product/industry knowledge and low experience benefit the most from leadership behaviors that are empowering, whereas high-knowledge and experienced employees reap no clear benefit. The authors conclude with directions for future research and application. PMID:16162066

  8. [Empiric treatment of pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Iarovoĭ, S K; Shimanovskiĭ, N L; Kareva, E N

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the most typical clinical situations in empirical treatment of pyelonephritis including situations with comorbid severe diseases: decompensated diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, HIV-infection. Choice of antibacterial medicines for empiric treatment of pyelonephritis is based on the results of the latest studies of antibioticoresistance of pyelonephritis pathogens as well as on specific features of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibacterial drugs. PMID:21815461

  9. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Du Hong; Wang Yi; Street, Robert A.; Ho, Jackson; Weisfield, Richard; Yao, William

    2009-07-15

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and/or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 {mu}m. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 {mu}m pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of {approx}80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 {mu}m pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or

  10. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays

    PubMed Central

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Du, Hong; Wang, Yi; Street, Robert A.; Ho, Jackson; Weisfield, Richard; Yao, William

    2009-01-01

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and∕or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 μm. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 μm pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of ∼80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 μm pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or continuous

  11. School System Empires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberman, Michael

    1972-01-01

    Although most educational systems are resistant to change, there are some features of the community, of the teachers, of government, and of the system that enable one to predict the likelihood of an innovation being accepted and implemented. (AL)

  12. An innovative architectural design to enhance the electrochemical performance of La2NiO4+δ cathodes for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rakesh K.; Burriel, Mónica; Dessemond, Laurent; Martin, Vincent; Bassat, Jean-Marc; Djurado, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    An architectural design of the cathode microstructure based on combining electrostatic spray deposition (ESD) and screen-printing (SP) techniques has demonstrated to be an innovative strategy to enhance the electrochemical properties of La2NiO4+δ (LNO) as oxygen electrode on Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ (CGO) electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells. For this purpose, the influence of the ESD process parameters on the microstructure has been systematically investigated. Electrochemical performances of four selected cathode microstructures are investigated: (i) 3-D coral nanocrystalline (average particle size ∼ 100 nm) LNO film grown by ESD; (ii) 3-D coral nanocrystalline film (average particle size ∼ 150 nm) grown by ESD with a continuous nanometric dense interface; (iii) porous screen-printed LNO film (average particle size ∼ 400 nm); and (iv) 3-D coral nanocrystalline film (average particle size ∼ 150 nm) with a continuous nanometric dense interface prepared by ESD topped by a LNO current collector prepared by SP. A significant reduction in the polarization resistance (Rpol) is obtained (0.08 Ω cm2 at 700 °C) for 3-D coral topped by the SP layer. Moreover LNO is found to be stable and compatible with CGO up to 800 °C for only 10 days duration in air, making it potentially suitable for SOFCs cathode application.

  13. Identification of Empirical Dimensions of the Diffusion Process: Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kester, Ralph J.; Hull, William L.

    The objective of the research study was to determine if dimensions of the innovation diffusion process could be identified empirically. Questionnaires were administered to a sample of 300 educational practitioners in various roles in Kansas and Ohio. The data resulting from the 82 percent response are divided into two categories. One category…

  14. Achieving Excellence: Investing in People, Knowledge and Opportunity. Canada's Innovation Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    To become one of the world's most innovative countries, Canada requires a national innovation strategy for the 21st century. It is progressing toward a more innovative economy, but lags behind many developed countries in terms of overall innovation performance. A national innovation strategy to meet Canada's innovation challenge proposes goals,…

  15. Mediating effect of sustainable product development on relationship between quality management practices and organizational performance: Empirical study of Malaysian automotive industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mohd Akhir; Asaad, Mohd Norhasni; Saad, Rohaizah; Iteng, Rosman; Rahim, Mohd Kamarul Irwan Abdul

    2016-08-01

    Global competition in the automotive industry has encouraged companies to implement quality management practices in all managerial aspects to ensure customer satisfaction in products and reduce costs. Therefore, guaranteeing only product quality is insufficient without considering product sustainability, which involves economic, environment, and social elements. Companies that meet both objectives gain advantages in the modern business environment. This study addresses the issues regarding product quality and sustainability in small and medium-sized enterprises in the Malaysian automotive industry. A research was carried out in 91 SMEs automotive suppliers in throughout Malaysia. The analyzed using SPSS ver.23 has been proposed in correlation study. Specifically, this study investigates the relationship between quality management practices and organizational performance as well as the mediating effect of sustainable product development on this relationship.

  16. Empirical and theoretical investigation of the noise performance of indirect detection, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) for diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Siewerdsen, J H; Antonuk, L E; el-Mohri, Y; Yorkston, J; Huang, W; Boudry, J M; Cunningham, I A

    1997-01-01

    Noise properties of active matrix, flat-panel imagers under conditions relevant to diagnostic radiology are investigated. These studies focus on imagers based upon arrays with pixels incorporating a discrete photodiode coupled to a thin-film transistor, both fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon. These optically sensitive arrays are operated with an overlying x-ray converter to allow indirect detection of incident x rays. External electronics, including gate driver circuits and preamplification circuits, are also required to operate the arrays. A theoretical model describing the signal and noise transfer properties of the imagers under conditions relevant to diagnostic radiography, fluoroscopy, and mammography is developed. This frequency-dependent model is based upon a cascaded systems analysis wherein the imager is conceptually divided into a series of stages having intrinsic gain and spreading properties. Predictions from the model are compared with x-ray sensitivity and noise measurements obtained from individual pixels from an imager with a pixel format of 1536 x 1920 pixels at a pixel pitch of 127 microns. The model is shown to be in excellent agreement with measurements obtained with diagnostic x rays using various phosphor screens. The model is used to explore the potential performance of existing and hypothetical imagers for application in radiography, fluoroscopy, and mammography as a function of exposure, additive noise, and fill factor. These theoretical predictions suggest that imagers of this general design incorporating a CsI: Tl intensifying screen can be optimized to provide detective quantum efficiency (DQE) superior to existing screen-film and storage phosphor systems for general radiography and mammography. For fluoroscopy, the model predicts that with further optimization of a-Si:H imagers, DQE performance approaching that of the best x-ray image intensifier systems may be possible. The results of this analysis suggest strategies for

  17. 78 FR 6316 - Empire Pipeline, Inc. (Empire); Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Empire Pipeline, Inc. (Empire); Notice of Filing Take notice that on November 29, 2012 Empire Pipeline Company (Empire) submitted a request for a waiver of the...

  18. Innovations in Vocational Education and Difficulties in Their Empirical Substantiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickolaus, Reinhold; Knoll, Bernd; Gschwendtner, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    As a consequence of findings and theses on the change in demand for qualifications, the debates on lifelong learning and a large number of articles on the theory of didactics, since the mid-1980s the concept has become established that traditional methods of teaching and learning in vocational education are dysfunctional and should be replaced or…

  19. Empires of the Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Shirley Ann

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the challenge of educating students for service and leadership in this flat and integrated world, yet asymmetrical and unstable. She says that the future is now and educators have the opportunity and responsibility to create the environments that foster the empires of the mind, and to ensure that the future…

  20. Empirical Research without Certainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floden, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Robert Floden reviews three recent volumes in the Philosophy, Theory, and Educational Research series that address the philosophical implications of three "isms"-- postpositivism, pragmatism, and poststructuralism--for empirical educational research. These volumes, written by D.C. Phillips, Gert J.J. Biesta, and Michael A. Peters,…

  1. Empirical quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Hirokazu

    1996-06-01

    Machida and Namiki developed a many-Hilbert-spaces formalism for dealing with the interaction between a quantum object and a measuring apparatus. Their mathematically rugged formalism was polished first by Araki from an operator-algebraic standpoint and then by Ozawa for Boolean quantum mechanics, which approaches a quantum system with a compatible family of continuous superselection rules from a notable and perspicacious viewpoint. On the other hand, Foulis and Randall set up a formal theory for the empirical foundation of all sciences, at the hub of which lies the notion of a manual of operations. They deem an operation as the set of possible outcomes and put down a manual of operations at a family of partially overlapping operations. Their notion of a manual of operations was incorporated into a category-theoretic standpoint into that of a manual of Boolean locales by Nishimura, who looked upon an operation as the complete Boolean algebra of observable events. Considering a family of Hilbert spaces not over a single Boolean locale but over a manual of Boolean locales as a whole, Ozawa's Boolean quantum mechanics is elevated into empirical quantum mechanics, which is, roughly speaking, the study of quantum systems with incompatible families of continuous superselection rules. To this end, we are obliged to develop empirical Hilbert space theory. In particular, empirical versions of the square root lemma for bounded positive operators, the spectral theorem for (possibly unbounded) self-adjoint operators, and Stone's theorem for one-parameter unitary groups are established.

  2. Auditory Imagery: Empirical Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d)…

  3. Innovation: It's Academic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Carl

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of innovation and business incubators, including the stages of innovation typically addressed by such programs. Describes the efforts of the Thayer School, a graduate professional school at Dartmouth College, in establishing an innovation incubator. (TW)

  4. Differentially Private Empirical Risk Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Kamalika; Monteleoni, Claire; Sarwate, Anand D.

    2011-01-01

    Privacy-preserving machine learning algorithms are crucial for the increasingly common setting in which personal data, such as medical or financial records, are analyzed. We provide general techniques to produce privacy-preserving approximations of classifiers learned via (regularized) empirical risk minimization (ERM). These algorithms are private under the ε-differential privacy definition due to Dwork et al. (2006). First we apply the output perturbation ideas of Dwork et al. (2006), to ERM classification. Then we propose a new method, objective perturbation, for privacy-preserving machine learning algorithm design. This method entails perturbing the objective function before optimizing over classifiers. If the loss and regularizer satisfy certain convexity and differentiability criteria, we prove theoretical results showing that our algorithms preserve privacy, and provide generalization bounds for linear and nonlinear kernels. We further present a privacy-preserving technique for tuning the parameters in general machine learning algorithms, thereby providing end-to-end privacy guarantees for the training process. We apply these results to produce privacy-preserving analogues of regularized logistic regression and support vector machines. We obtain encouraging results from evaluating their performance on real demographic and benchmark data sets. Our results show that both theoretically and empirically, objective perturbation is superior to the previous state-of-the-art, output perturbation, in managing the inherent tradeoff between privacy and learning performance. PMID:21892342

  5. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

    2009-06-01

    Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

  6. Crossing and creating boundaries in healthcare innovation.

    PubMed

    Ingerslev, Karen

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - This paper reports from a qualitative case study of a change initiative undertaken in a Danish public hospital setting during national healthcare reforms. The purpose of this paper is to challenge understandings of innovations as defined by being value-adding per se. Whether the effects of attempting to innovate are positive or negative is in this paper regarded as a matter of empirical investigation. Design/methodology/approach - Narrative accounts of activities during the change initiative are analysed in order to elucidate the effects of framing the change initiative as innovation on which boundaries are created and crossed. Findings - Framing change initiatives as innovation leads to intended as well as unanticipated boundary crossings where healthcare practitioners from different organizations recognize a shared problem and task. It also leads to unintended boundary reinforcements between "us and them" that may exclude the perspectives of patients or stakeholders when confronting complex problems in healthcare. This boundary reinforcement can lead to further fragmentation of healthcare despite the stated intention to create more integrated services. Practical implications - The paper suggests that researchers as well as practitioners should not presume that intentions to innovate will by themselves enhance creativity and innovation. When analysing the intended, unintended as well as unanticipated consequences of framing change initiatives as innovation, researchers and practitioner gain nuanced knowledge about the effects of intending to innovate in complex settings such as healthcare. Originality/value - This paper suggests the need for an analytical move from studying the effects of innovation to studying the effects of framing complex problems as a call for innovation. PMID:27296877

  7. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract resulted in a series of commercially available lasers, which have application in fiber optic communications, difference frequency generation, fiber optic sensing and general laboratory use. Developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Phase Doppler Particles Analyzer is a non-disruptive, highly accurate laser-based method of determining particle size, number density, trajectory, turbulence and other information about particles passing through a measurement probe volume. The system consists of an optical transmitter and receiver, signal processor and computer with data acquisition and analysis software. A variety of systems are offered for applications including spray characterization for paint, and agricultural and other sprays. The Microsizer, a related product, is used in medical equipment manufacturing and analysis of contained flows. High frequency components and subsystems produced by Millitech Corporation are marketed for both research and commercial use. These systems, which operate in the upper portion of the millimeter wave, resulted from a number of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects. By developing very high performance mixers and multipliers, the company has advanced the state of the art in sensitive receiver technology. Components are used in receivers and transceivers for monitoring chlorine monoxides, ozone, in plasma characterization and in material properties characterization.

  8. Match your innovation strategy to your innovation ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Adner, Ron

    2006-04-01

    High-definition televisions should, by now, be a huge success. Philips, Sony, and Thompson invested billions of dollars to develop TV sets with astonishing picture quality. From a technology perspective, they've succeeded: Console manufacturers have been ready for the mass market since the early 1990s. Yet the category has been an unmitigated failure, not because of deficiencies, but because critical complements such as studio production equipment were not developed or adopted in time. Under-performing complements have left console producers in the position of offering a Ferrari in a world without gasoline or highways--an admirable engineering feat, but not one that creates value for customers. The HDTV story exemplifies the promise and peril of innovation ecosystems--the collaborative arrangements through which firms combine their individual offers into a coherent, customer-facing solution. When they work, innovation ecosystems allow companies to create value that no one firm could have created alone. The benefits of these systems are real. But for many organizations the attempt at ecosystem innovation has been a costly failure. This is because, along with new opportunities, innovation ecosystems also present a new set of risks that can brutally derail a firm's best efforts. Innovation ecosystems are characterized by three fundamental types of risk: initiative risks--the familiar uncertainties of managing a project; interdependence risks--the uncertainties of coordinating with complementary innovators; and integration risks--the uncertainties presented by the adoption process across the value chain. Firms that assess ecosystem risks holistically and systematically will be able to establish more realistic expectations, develop a more refined set of environmental contingencies, and arrive at a more robust innovation strategy. Collectively, these actions will lead to more effective implementation and more profitable innovation. PMID:16579417

  9. Sources of Information as Determinants of Product and Process Innovation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use a panel of manufacturing firms in Spain to examine the extent to which they use internal and external sources of information (customers, suppliers, competitors, consultants and universities) to generate product and process innovation. Our results show that, although internal sources are influential, external sources of information are key to achieve innovation performance. These results are in line with the open innovation literature because they show that firms that are opening up their innovation process and that use different information sources have a greater capacity to generate innovations. We also find that the importance of external sources of information varies depending on the type of innovation (product or process) considered. To generate process innovation, firms mainly rely on suppliers while, to generate product innovation, the main contribution is from customers. The potential simultaneity between product and process innovation is also taken into consideration. We find that the generation of both types of innovation is not independent. PMID:27035456

  10. Sources of Information as Determinants of Product and Process Innovation.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Jaime; Salazar, Idana; Vargas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use a panel of manufacturing firms in Spain to examine the extent to which they use internal and external sources of information (customers, suppliers, competitors, consultants and universities) to generate product and process innovation. Our results show that, although internal sources are influential, external sources of information are key to achieve innovation performance. These results are in line with the open innovation literature because they show that firms that are opening up their innovation process and that use different information sources have a greater capacity to generate innovations. We also find that the importance of external sources of information varies depending on the type of innovation (product or process) considered. To generate process innovation, firms mainly rely on suppliers while, to generate product innovation, the main contribution is from customers. The potential simultaneity between product and process innovation is also taken into consideration. We find that the generation of both types of innovation is not independent. PMID:27035456

  11. Intuitive Expertise: Theories and Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harteis, Christian; Billett, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Intuition has been long seen as an element of effective human performance in demanding tasks (i.e. expertise). But its form, constitutive elements and development remain subject to diverse explanations. This paper discusses these elements and explores theories and empirical evidence about what constitutes intuitive expertise, and offers an account…

  12. Should financial incentives be used to differentially reward 'me-too' and innovative drugs?

    PubMed

    Pekarsky, Brita

    2010-01-01

    Strategies to change the existing mix of innovative and 'me-too' drugs are intended to increase societal value of a given investment in R&D by providing an incentive for firms to invest in drugs that are more likely to be clinically innovative. How can financial incentives be used to change this mix? Will a strategy have its intended consequence or will it have the unintended outcome of reducing the rate at which the population burden of disease is reduced? The perspective of this review is a country such as Australia, Canada or the UK that has universal health insurance and a drug reimbursement process that is informed by economic evidence. A review of the literature was performed and the views of both the proponents and the opponents of such strategies and the mechanisms by which they could be implemented were summarized. The debate is based largely on hypothesized responses by firms to changes in incentives rather than empirical evidence. The main point of contention is whether a changed mix of new molecular entities (NMEs) increases or decreases the total amount of clinical innovation launched each year. The argument presented in this article is that, despite the limited empirical evidence, it is possible to improve our assessment of the likely costs and consequences of a proposed strategy by appealing to economic theory and observations about the reimbursement process. First, the empirical evidence supporting the view that changing a mix of drugs will improve clinical innovation is based on the average launched drug, not the marginal innovative drug otherwise not developed, and therefore could be misleading. Second, the dynamic and complex nature of evidence of clinical innovation will reduce the feasibility of using contractually based mechanisms to implement such a strategy. Also, a single country is unlikely to have an impact on R&D decisions, and variation in the per capita economic value of new drugs would make multi-jurisdiction contracts with one firm

  13. Medical innovation laws: an unnecessary innovation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Bernadette

    2016-06-01

    Objective This paper aims to demonstrate that any suggestion that there is a need for specific innovation laws is flawed. Innovation is central to good medical practice and is adequately supported by current law. Methods The paper reviews the nature of medical innovation and outlines recent attempts in the UK to introduce specific laws aimed at 'encouraging' and 'supporting' innovation. The current legal framework is outlined and the role of the law in relation to medical innovation explored. Results The analysis demonstrates the cyclic relationship between medical advancement and the law and concludes that there is no requirement for specific innovation laws. Conclusions The law not only supports innovation and development in medical treatment but encourages it as central to a functioning medical system. There is no need to introduce specific laws aimed at medical innovation; to do so represents an unnecessary legal innovation and serves to complicate matters. What is known about the topic? Over recent months, there has been a great deal of discussion surrounding the law in the context of medical innovation. This was driven by the attempts in the UK to introduce specific laws in the Medical Innovation Bill. The general subject matter - negligence and the expected standard of care in the provision of treatment - is very well understood, but not in cases where the treatment can be described as innovative. The general rhetoric in both the UK and Australia around the Medical Innovation Bill demonstrates a lack of understanding of the position of the law with regards to innovative treatment. What does this paper add? This paper adds clarity to the debate. It presents the law and explains the manner in which the law can operate around innovative treatment. The paper asserts that medical innovation is both supported and encouraged by existing legal principles. What are the implications for practitioners? The paper presents an argument that can guide the policy position

  14. Empirical microeconomics action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Du, Xin; Tanputraman, Winson

    2015-06-01

    A statistical generalization of microeconomics has been made in Baaquie (2013), where the market price of every traded commodity, at each instant of time, is considered to be an independent random variable. The dynamics of commodity market prices is modeled by an action functional-and the focus of this paper is to empirically determine the action functionals for different commodities. The correlation functions of the model are defined using a Feynman path integral. The model is calibrated using the unequal time correlation of the market commodity prices as well as their cubic and quartic moments using a perturbation expansion. The consistency of the perturbation expansion is verified by a numerical evaluation of the path integral. Nine commodities drawn from the energy, metal and grain sectors are studied and their market behavior is described by the model to an accuracy of over 90% using only six parameters. The paper empirically establishes the existence of the action functional for commodity prices that was postulated to exist in Baaquie (2013).

  15. Mentoring, training and support to global health innovators: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dan-Bi; Cole, Donald; Simiyu, Ken; Luong, Winnie; Neufeld, Vic

    2013-09-01

    Global health innovators must navigate substantial complexities to successfully develop, implement and sustain global health innovations with impact through application of an Integrated InnovationTM approach. We sought to examine the nature of the literature and evidence around mentoring, training and support of global health innovators. We conducted a scoping review searching eight databases with terms capturing different kinds of innovation and support. Assessment of relevance and mapping was completed by two reviewers, with interpretation by the review team. Twenty-eight relevant papers provided perspectives on fostering global health innovators and innovation. Fifteen included empirical data on supports to global health innovators involving a wide range of innovators. Eight included documentation of outcomes but without designs to determine effectiveness. The diverse mentoring, training and support activities included: business incubators, support organizations and centres for entrepreneurship, technology transfer and intellectual property management, internship programs for business skill development, initiatives to bridge industry and researchers, and platforms for South-led innovation for global health. We propose the cultivation of a pipeline of global health innovators to increase the number of appropriate, sustainable innovations with impact in global health. Further empirical work on how to effectively support global health innovators is needed. PMID:23985118

  16. Uneven illumination removal and image enhancement using empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Soo-Chang; Hsiao, Yu-Zhe; Tzeng, Mary; Chang, Feng Ju

    2013-10-01

    Uneven light distribution problems often arise in poorly scanned text or text-photo images and natural images taken by digital camera. An innovative image-processing technique for uneven illumination removal using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is proposed. The EMD is local, adaptive, and useful for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary signals. In this method, we decompose images by EMD and get the background level locally and adaptively. This algorithm can enhance the local reflectance in the image while removing uneven illumination for black/white text images, text-photo images, and natural color/gray-level images. The proposed technique can be very helpful for image and text recognition. The EMD can also be applied to the three color channels (RGB) of color images separately to estimate the reflectances of the three color channels. After we relight these channels using white light and the estimated reflectances, a simple color constancy task can be performed to correct certain poorly lighted color images. Our technique is compared with recently proposed methods for correcting images with uneven illumination and the experimental results demonstrated that the proposed approach can effectively enhance natural color/gray-level images and make text and text-photo images more readable under uneven illumination.

  17. Performance.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2006-01-01

    High performance is difficult to maintain because it is dynamic and not well understood. Based on a synthesis of many sources, a model is proposed where performance is a function of the balance between capacity and challenge. Too much challenge produces coping (or a crash); excess capacity results in boredom. Over time, peak performance drifts toward boredom. Performance can be managed by adjusting our level of ability, our effort, the opportunity to perform, and the challenge we agree to take on. Coping, substandard but acceptable performance, is common among professionals and its long-term side effects can be debilitating. A crash occurs when coping mechanisms fail. PMID:17020177

  18. Studies on price indexes and innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon-Rodriguez, Victor G.

    This thesis develops two studies on price indexes and innovation. The first one analyzes the problems on the computation of price indexes when there are improvements in the goods' quality. These problems arise because we use price indexes that measure the prices of the goods that consumers buy rather than the prices of the services that consumers enjoy. In order to see this, I compute a true price for gasoline that is based on the services that it provides. We ask for the cost of moving one ton at a speed of 40 mph for a distance of 100 miles. This true price is compared with the official price for gasoline. The average annual bias (the rise in the official price relative to the true price) is 3.2% per year. We also compute the hours of work required to cover that cost. We find that in 1925 there were needed almost 1.5 hours of work, while by 1992 there were just needed about 8 minutes to move one ton as specified above. The second one develops a model of Cournot competition in innovation. This model introduces two new features. First, firm's investment in research and development is divided into two pieces, expenditures in human capital and expenditures in all other inputs (called R&D for simplicity). Second, the government also allocates resources to research and development, which affect the stock of knowledge available to the firms. Some interesting results arise from this model. First, investments in human capital and in R&D are increasing in the past government's investment. Second, investments per firm are decreasing in the number of firms in the industry, but the totals are larger if some conditions on the elasticities are satisfied. Third, the welfare analysis tells us that if there are entry barriers, each firm is overinvesting in both inputs. On the other hand, if there is free entry, there are too many firms engaged in the innovative race. Finally, we perform an empirical analysis and we find that there are lagged effects of the government's investment

  19. Innovation Constructs: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Paul L.; O'Donnell, Joseph B.

    2007-01-01

    Many organizations strive to improve performance by creating and marketing new products and/or services. Understanding why some new products and services succeed while others fail is critical to managers and marketing researchers. Diffusion of innovation theory addresses the reasons for, and rate of, the adoption of new ideas, products, and…

  20. Innovation Research in E-Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bing; Xu, WenXia; Ge, Jun

    This study is a productivity review on the literature gleaned from SSCI, SCIE databases concerning innovation research in E-Learning. The result indicates that the number of literature productions on innovation research in ELearning is still growing from 2005. The main research development country is England, and from the analysis of the publication year, the number of papers is increasing peaking in 25% of the total in 2010. Meanwhile the main source title is British Journal of Educational Technology. In addition the subject area concentrated on Education & Educational Research, Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications and Computer Science, Software Engineering. Moreover the research focuses on are mainly conceptual research and empirical research, which were used to explore E-Learning in respective of innovation diffusion theory, also the limitations and future research of these research were discussed for further research.

  1. Innovation in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Riskin, Daniel J.; Longaker, Michael T.; Gertner, Michael; Krummel, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the field of surgical innovation from a historical perspective, applying new findings from research in technology innovation. Background: While surgical innovation has a rich tradition, as a field of study it is embryonic. Only a handful of academic centers of surgical innovation exist, all of which have arisen within the last 5 years. To this point, the field has not been well defined, nor have future options to promote surgical innovation been thoroughly explored. It is clear that surgical innovation is fundamental to surgical progress and has significant health policy implications. A process of systematically evaluating and promoting innovation in surgery may be critical in the evolving practice of medicine. Methods: A review of the academic literature in technology innovation was undertaken. Articles and books were identified through technical, medical, and business sources. Luminaries in surgical innovation were interviewed to develop further relevance to surgical history. The concepts in technology innovation were then applied to innovation in surgery, using the historical example of surgical endoscopy as a representative area, which encompasses millennia of learning and spans multiple specialties of care. Results: The history of surgery is comprised largely of individual, widely respected surgeon innovators. While respecting individual accomplishments, surgeons as a group have at times hindered critical innovation to the detriment of our profession and patients. As a clinical discipline, surgery relies on a tradition of research and attracting the brightest young minds. Innovation in surgery to date has been impressive, but inconsistently supported. Conclusion: A body of knowledge on technology innovation has been developed over the last decade but has largely not been applied to surgery. New surgical innovation centers are working to define the field and identify critical aspects of surgical innovation promotion. It is our

  2. Innovation, Outcomes, and the State Budgeting Process (Conference Summary of State-Level Concerns for Performance Measures, Assessments, and Budgeting for Postsecondary Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Marvin W.

    State-level concerns for postsecondary education are discussed as part of an inservice education conference. Attention is directed to the purposes of a performance approach, distinctions between performance measures and other kinds of measures used for assessment in higher education, concerns about reaching consensus on performance criteria within…

  3. State and municipal innovations in obesity policy: why localities remain a necessary laboratory for innovation.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Belinda; Ashe, Marice; Farias, Ruben; Gostin, Lawrence

    2015-03-01

    Municipal and state governments are surging ahead in obesity prevention, providing a testing ground for innovative policies and shifting social norms in the process. Though high-profile measures such as New York City's soda portion rule attract significant media attention, we catalog the broader array of initiatives in less-known localities. Local innovation advances prevention policy, but faces legal and political constraints-constitutional challenges, preemption, charges of paternalism, lack of evidence, and widening health inequalities. These arguments can be met with astute framing, empirical evidence, and policy design, enabling local governments to remain at the forefront in transforming obesogenic environments. PMID:25602886

  4. Enhanced performance of an innovative dengue IgG/IgM rapid diagnostic test using an anti-dengue EDI monoclonal antibody and dengue virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihoo; Kim, Young-Eun; Kim, Hak-Yong; Sinniah, Mangalam; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2015-01-01

    High levels of anti-dengue IgM or IgG can be detected using numerous rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). However, the sensitivity and specificity of these tests are reduced by changes in envelope glycoprotein antigenicity that inevitably occur in limited expression systems. A novel RDT was designed to enhance diagnostic sensitivity. Dengue viruses cultured in animal cells were used as antigens to retain the native viral coat protein. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were then developed, for the first time, against domain I of envelope glycoprotein (EDI). The anti-dengue EDI mAb was employed as a capturer, and EDII and EDIII, which are mainly involved in the induction of neutralizing antibodies in patients, were fully available to bind to anti-dengue IgM or IgG in patients. A one-way automatic blood separation device prevented reverse migration of plasma and maximize the capture of anti-dengue antibodies at the test lines. A clinical evaluation in the field proved that the novel RDT (sensitivities of 96.5% and 96.7% for anti-dengue IgM and IgG) is more effective in detecting anti-dengue antibodies than two major commercial tests (sensitivities of 54.8% and 82% for SD BIOLINE; 50.4% and 75.3% for PanBio). The innovative format of RDT can be applied to other infectious viral diseases. PMID:26655854

  5. Enhanced performance of an innovative dengue IgG/IgM rapid diagnostic test using an anti-dengue EDI monoclonal antibody and dengue virus antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jihoo; Kim, Young-Eun; Kim, Hak-Yong; Sinniah, Mangalam; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2015-01-01

    High levels of anti-dengue IgM or IgG can be detected using numerous rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). However, the sensitivity and specificity of these tests are reduced by changes in envelope glycoprotein antigenicity that inevitably occur in limited expression systems. A novel RDT was designed to enhance diagnostic sensitivity. Dengue viruses cultured in animal cells were used as antigens to retain the native viral coat protein. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were then developed, for the first time, against domain I of envelope glycoprotein (EDI). The anti-dengue EDI mAb was employed as a capturer, and EDII and EDIII, which are mainly involved in the induction of neutralizing antibodies in patients, were fully available to bind to anti-dengue IgM or IgG in patients. A one-way automatic blood separation device prevented reverse migration of plasma and maximize the capture of anti-dengue antibodies at the test lines. A clinical evaluation in the field proved that the novel RDT (sensitivities of 96.5% and 96.7% for anti-dengue IgM and IgG) is more effective in detecting anti-dengue antibodies than two major commercial tests (sensitivities of 54.8% and 82% for SD BIOLINE; 50.4% and 75.3% for PanBio). The innovative format of RDT can be applied to other infectious viral diseases. PMID:26655854

  6. Innovating a way out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    The ongoing European Union fiscal crisis has taken its toll on research and innovation across several member states. A number of initiatives aim to boost technological innovation as a tool for increasing wealth.

  7. Innovation and STEM Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Julia Link

    2015-01-01

    How do schools with a focus on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fit in with state goals to increase innovation and to boost the economy? This article briefly discusses how educators can encourage creativity and innovation.

  8. Mentoring, Training and Support to Global Health Innovators: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Dan-Bi; Cole, Donald; Simiyu, Ken; Luong, Winnie; Neufeld, Vic

    2013-01-01

    Global health innovators must navigate substantial complexities to successfully develop, implement and sustain global health innovations with impact through application of an Integrated Innovation™ approach. We sought to examine the nature of the literature and evidence around mentoring, training and support of global health innovators. We conducted a scoping review searching eight databases with terms capturing different kinds of innovation and support. Assessment of relevance and mapping was completed by two reviewers, with interpretation by the review team. Twenty-eight relevant papers provided perspectives on fostering global health innovators and innovation. Fifteen included empirical data on supports to global health innovators involving a wide range of innovators. Eight included documentation of outcomes but without designs to determine effectiveness. The diverse mentoring, training and support activities included: business incubators, support organizations and centres for entrepreneurship, technology transfer and intellectual property management, internship programs for business skill development, initiatives to bridge industry and researchers, and platforms for South-led innovation for global health. We propose the cultivation of a pipeline of global health innovators to increase the number of appropriate, sustainable innovations with impact in global health. Further empirical work on how to effectively support global health innovators is needed. PMID:23985118

  9. On Strategies of Educational Innovation: Between Substitution and Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westera, Wim

    2004-01-01

    The innovation of education seems to be self-evident. Boosted by a wide range of new technologies, educational institutes all over the world are innovating their educational systems, in order to extend their services, to improve their performances or to reduce costs. The apparent self-evidence of educational innovation hardly prompts the…

  10. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Under an Army Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, Symbiotics, Inc. developed a software system that permits users to upgrade products from standalone applications so they can communicate in a distributed computing environment. Under a subsequent NASA SBIR grant, Symbiotics added additional tools to the SOCIAL product to enable NASA to coordinate conventional systems for planning Shuttle launch support operations. Using SOCIAL, data may be shared among applications in a computer network even when the applications are written in different programming languages. The product was introduced to the commercial market in 1993 and is used to monitor and control equipment for operation support and to integrate financial networks. The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry. InQuisiX is a reuse library providing high performance classification, cataloging, searching, browsing, retrieval and synthesis capabilities. These form the foundation for software reuse, producing higher quality software at lower cost and in less time. Software Productivity Solutions, Inc. developed the technology under Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects funded by NASA and the Army and is marketing InQuisiX in conjunction with Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry.

  11. The Impact of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Banion, Terry; Weidner, Laura; Wilson, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    With funding from MetLife Foundation, the League for Innovation in the Community College engaged in a yearlong study in 2009 of the nature of innovation in the community college. Using recipients of the League's Innovation of the Year Award at 19 community colleges during the period from 1999 through 2008 as a data set, the authors used document…

  12. China's Innovation Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    China aims to become an innovation-led nation by 2020, but its leadership is generally sceptical--and oftentimes hostile--to the market forces, open exchange of ideas, and creative destruction that have unlocked innovation in other countries. Instead, Beijing hopes to promote innovation in China through a massive expansion in higher education,…

  13. Creative Self-Efficacy and Innovative Behavior in a Service Setting: Optimism as a Moderator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Michael L. A.; Hou, Sheng-Tsung; Fan, Hsueh-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Creativity research on the personality approach has focused on the relationship between individual attributes and innovative behavior. However, few studies have empirically examined the effects of positive psychological traits on innovative behavior in an organizational setting. This study examines the relationships among creative self-efficacy,…

  14. How to Promote Innovative Behavior at Work? The Role of Justice and Support within Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Linn D.

    2012-01-01

    To provide a more developed research model of innovation in organizations, we reconsidered current thinking about the effects of organizational justice on innovative behavior at work. We investigated the mediating role of perceived organizational support (POS) between the two constructs. As hypothesized, empirical results showed that justice…

  15. Measurement Properties of Two Innovative Item Formats in a Computer-Based Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Lei; Henly, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Many innovative item formats have been proposed over the past decade, but little empirical research has been conducted on their measurement properties. This study examines the reliability, efficiency, and construct validity of two innovative item formats--the figural response (FR) and constructed response (CR) formats used in a K-12 computerized…

  16. Value Innovation in Learner-Centered Design. How to Develop Valuable Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breuer, Henning; Schwarz, Heinrich; Feller, Kristina; Matsumoto, Mitsuji

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows how to address technological, cultural and social transformations with empirically grounded innovation. Areas in transition such as higher education and learning techniques today bring about new needs and opportunities for innovative tools and services. But how do we find these tools? The paper argues for using a strategy of…

  17. Innovation Attributes, Policy Intervention, and the Diffusion of Computer Applications Among Local Governments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, James L.; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

    1978-01-01

    Argues that innovation attributes, together with policies associated with the diffusion on an innovation, account for significant differences in diffusion patterns. An empirical analysis of this thesis focuses on the diffusion of computer applications software in local government. Available from Elsevier Scientific Publishing Co., Box 211,…

  18. Ties with Potential: Social Network Structure and Innovative Climate in Dutch Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Daly, Alan J.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Similar to the United States, government efforts to improve education in the Netherlands are focused on innovation and the development of collaborative structures to support the generation of new knowledge. However, empirical evidence of the relationship between social linkages and innovation in education is scarce. Objective:…

  19. Assessing Risk of Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, GO

    2001-08-15

    Today's manufacturing systems and equipment must perform at levels thought impossible a decade ago. Companies must push operations, quality, and efficiencies to unprecedented levels while holding down costs. In this new economy, companies must be concerned with market shares, equity growth, market saturation, and profit. U.S. manufacturing is no exception and is a prime example of businesses forced to adapt to constant and rapid changes in customer needs and product mixes, giving rise to the term ''Agile Manufacturing''. The survival and ultimate success of the American Manufacturing economy may depend upon its ability to create, innovate, and quickly assess the impact that new innovations will have on its business practices. Given the need for flexibility, companies need proven methods to predict and measure the impact that new technologies and strategies will have on overall plant performance from an enterprise perspective. The Value-Derivative Model provides a methodology and approach to assess such impacts in terms of energy savings, production increases, quality impacts, emission reduction, and maintenance and operating costs as they relate to enabling and emerging technologies. This is realized by calculating a set of first order sensitivity parameters obtained from expanding a Taylor Series about the system's operating point. These sensitivity parameters are invariant economic and operational indicators that quantify the impact of any proposed technology in terms of material throughput, efficiency, energy usage, environmental effects, and costs. These parameters also provide a mechanism to define metrics and performance measures that can be qualified in terms of real economic impact. Value-Derivative Analysis can be applied across all manufacturing and production segments of our economy and has found specific use in steel and textiles. Where economic models give the cost of conducting a business, Value-Derivative Analysis provides the cost to conduct

  20. Auditory imagery: empirical findings.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Timothy L

    2010-03-01

    The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d) auditory imagery's relationship to perception and memory (detection, encoding, recall, mnemonic properties, phonological loop), and (e) individual differences in auditory imagery (in vividness, musical ability and experience, synesthesia, musical hallucinosis, schizophrenia, amusia) are considered. It is concluded that auditory imagery (a) preserves many structural and temporal properties of auditory stimuli, (b) can facilitate auditory discrimination but interfere with auditory detection, (c) involves many of the same brain areas as auditory perception, (d) is often but not necessarily influenced by subvocalization, (e) involves semantically interpreted information and expectancies, (f) involves depictive components and descriptive components, (g) can function as a mnemonic but is distinct from rehearsal, and (h) is related to musical ability and experience (although the mechanisms of that relationship are not clear). PMID:20192565

  1. InnovateEDU, Inc.: Brooklyn Laboratory Charter Schools (LAB)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Entrepreneurial learning is the backbone of this Brooklyn charter school network which opened in Fall 2014 to serve grades 6-12, including English language learners and students with disabilities. LAB's academic model combines empirically effective learning practices with innovative implementation strategies, including a blended learning model…

  2. Induced Innovation and Social Inequality: Evidence from Infant Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, David M.; Meara, Ellen; Richards-Shubik, Seth

    2012-01-01

    We develop a model of induced innovation that applies to medical research. Our model yields three empirical predictions. First, initial death rates and subsequent research effort should be positively correlated. Second, research effort should be associated with more rapid mortality declines. Third, as a byproduct of targeting the most common…

  3. Applying Diffusion of Innovation Theory to Intervention Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearing, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Few social science theories have a history of conceptual and empirical study as long as does the diffusion of innovations. The robustness of this theory derives from the many disciplines and fields of study in which diffusion has been studied, from the international richness of these studies, and from the variety of new ideas, practices, programs,…

  4. EVALUATION AND PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF INNOVATIVE LOW-VOC CONTACT ADHESIVES IN WOOD LAMINATING OPERATIONS (EPA/600/R-98/055)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation and assessment of the perfor-mance, economics, and emission reduction potential upon application of low-volatile organic compound (VOC) waterborne contact adhesive formulations specifically ina manual laminating operation for assembling s...

  5. Engineering management and innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Although improved management methods can enhance the performance of some enterprises, they can lower that of research organizations. The prevalent use of cost-effectiveness criteria as a management tool overvalues identifiable short-term accomplishment at the expense of long-term research efforts, which often serve as the antecedents upon which a new, seemingly unrelated technology is later founded. Medical instruments used in the treatment of emphysema, for example, evolved from NASA-sponsored research devoted to the measurement of the composition of the atmospheres of the planets. The best manager is the manager who creates an environment that enables his research engineers to pursue ideas with a minimum of interference. Such an environment consists of broad research objectives, adequate facilities, and proper technical support. Within a framework of prudent spending, the manager's aim is to cultivate innovation.

  6. [Creativity and innovation: competences on nursing management].

    PubMed

    Feldman, Liliane Bauer; Ruthes, Rosa Maria; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the importance of the creativity and innovation on health services, distinguishing those concepts. Creative behavior is the improvement of an element or known actions: whereas innovation means finding new alternatives. Considering competences like knowledge, skill and attitude--KSA, it is understood that by stimulating creativity and innovation, the performance of the health professional will be optimized. Therefore, creativity and innovation are key elements for improvement and organization, and, more specifically, for Nursing to find alternatives for solving problems related to the occupation as a whole. In this way, this approach brings a strategic tool on the process of management and a differential for the nurse, which by innovating and creating will amaze herself with her potential. PMID:18572846

  7. Exploring the Emergence of Community Support for School and Encouragement of Innovation for Improving Rural School Performance: Lessons Learned at Kitamburo in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngalawa, Athanas; Simmt, Elaine; Glanfield, Florence

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative exploration of a primary school in a remote rural community of Tanzania, whose students showed promising performance in mathematics, as measured by the Primary School Leaving Examinations (PSLE). Case study methods were used to conduct research about the school and the community and included interviews, focus…

  8. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF AN INNOVATIVE FIBER REINFORCED GEOPOLYMER SPRAY-APPLIED MORTAR FOR LARGE DIAMETER WASTEWATER MAIN REHABILITATION IN HOUSTON, TX

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the performance evaluation of a fiber reinforced geopolymer spray-applied mortar, which has potential as a structural alternative to traditional open cut techniques used in large-diameter sewer pipes. Geopolymer is a sustainable green material that incorpor...

  9. Situation Analysis of R & D Activities: An Empirical Study in Iranian Pharmaceutical Companies

    PubMed Central

    Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Mehralian, Gholamhossein; Vatankhah-Mohammadabadi, Abbas Ali

    2012-01-01

    As global competition intensifies, research and development (R & D) organizations need to enhance their strategic management in order to become goal-directed communities for innovation and allocate their resources consistent with their overall R & D strategy. The world pharmaceutical market has undergone fast, unprecedented, tremendous and complex changes in the last several years. The pharmaceutical industry is today still one of the most inventive, innovative and lucrative of the so-called “high-tech” industries. This industry serves a dual role in modern society. On one hand, it is a growing industry, and its output makes a direct contribution to gross domestic product (GDP). On the other side, drugs, this industry’s major output, are an input in the production of good health. The purpose of this study is to evaluate R & D activities of pharmaceutical companies, and also to highlight critical factors which have influential effect on results of these activities. To run this study a valid questionnaire based on literature review and experts’ opinion was designed and delivered to 11 pharmaceutical companies. Empirical data show there is not acceptable situations considering of the factors that should be taken in to account by managers including; management commitment, human resource management, information technology and financial management. Furthermore, we concluded some interesting results related to different aspects of R & D management. In conclusion, managers must be aware about their performance in R & D activities, accordingly they will able to take a comprehensive policy in both national and within the company. PMID:24250532

  10. Situation analysis of R & d activities: an empirical study in Iranian pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Mehralian, Gholamhossein; Vatankhah-Mohammadabadi, Abbas Ali

    2012-01-01

    As global competition intensifies, research and development (R & D) organizations need to enhance their strategic management in order to become goal-directed communities for innovation and allocate their resources consistent with their overall R & D strategy. The world pharmaceutical market has undergone fast, unprecedented, tremendous and complex changes in the last several years. The pharmaceutical industry is today still one of the most inventive, innovative and lucrative of the so-called "high-tech" industries. This industry serves a dual role in modern society. On one hand, it is a growing industry, and its output makes a direct contribution to gross domestic product (GDP). On the other side, drugs, this industry's major output, are an input in the production of good health. The purpose of this study is to evaluate R & D activities of pharmaceutical companies, and also to highlight critical factors which have influential effect on results of these activities. To run this study a valid questionnaire based on literature review and experts' opinion was designed and delivered to 11 pharmaceutical companies. Empirical data show there is not acceptable situations considering of the factors that should be taken in to account by managers including; management commitment, human resource management, information technology and financial management. Furthermore, we concluded some interesting results related to different aspects of R & D management. In conclusion, managers must be aware about their performance in R & D activities, accordingly they will able to take a comprehensive policy in both national and within the company. PMID:24250532

  11. Applying the Concepts of Innovation Strategies to Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yirong; Kotsis, Sandra V.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plastic surgery has a well-known history of innovative procedures and products. However, with the rise in competition, such as aesthetic procedures being performed by other medical specialties, there is a need for continued innovation in plastic surgery to create novel treatments to advance this specialty. Although many articles introduce innovative technologies and procedures, there is a paucity of publications to highlight the application of principles of innovation in plastic surgery. Methods: We review the literature regarding business strategies for innovation. Results: We evaluate concepts of innovation, process of innovation (idea generation, idea evaluation, idea conversion, idea diffusion and adoption), ethical issues, and the application to plastic surgery. Conclusions: Adopting a business model of innovation is helpful to promote a new paradigm of progress to propel plastic surgery to new avenues of creativity. PMID:23897344

  12. The discipline of innovation.

    PubMed

    Drucker, P F

    1998-01-01

    Some innovations spring from a flash of genius. But as Peter Drucker points out in this HBR Classic, most result from a conscious, purposeful search for opportunities. For managers seeking innovation, engaging in disciplined work is more important than having an entrepreneurial personality. Writing originally in the May-June 1985 issue, Drucker describes the major sources of opportunities for innovation. Within a company or industry, opportunities can be found in unexpected occurrences, incongruities of various kinds, process needs, or changes in an industry or market. Outside a company, opportunities arise from demographic changes, changes in perception, or new knowledge. These seven sources overlap, and the potential for innovation may well lie in more than one area at a time. Innovations based on new knowledge, of course, tend to have the greatest effect on the marketplace. But it often takes decades before the ideas are translated into actual products, processes, or services. The other sources of innovation are easier and simpler to handle, yet they still require managers to look beyond established practices. Drucker emphasizes that in seeking opportunities, innovators need to look for simple, focused solutions to real problems. The greatest praise an innovation can receive is for people to say, "This is obvious!" Grandiose ideas designed to revolutionize an industry rarely work. Innovation, like any other endeavor, takes talent, ingenuity, and knowledge. But Drucker cautions that if diligence, persistence, and commitment are lacking, companies are unlikely to succeed at the business of innovation. PMID:10187245

  13. Empire strikes back. [Empire Coal Co. coal desulfurization plant

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.

    1984-11-01

    Empire Coal Co. in eastern Ohio mines high-sulphur coal which in the past was supplied direct to a local power station. In 1982, restrictions on power plant emissions meant that Empire would have to install a preparation plant if it were to continue to supply the coal. The 500,000 ton/year jig-froth flotation plant which was built is described.

  14. Empirically Driven Software Engineering Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rombach, Dieter

    Software engineering is a design discipline. As such, its engineering methods are based on cognitive instead of physical laws, and their effectiveness depends highly on context. Empirical methods can be used to observe the effects of software engineering methods in vivo and in vitro, to identify improvement potentials, and to validate new research results. This paper summarizes both the current body of knowledge and further challenges wrt. empirical methods in software engineering as well as empirically derived evidence regarding software typical engineering methods. Finally, future challenges wrt. education, research, and technology transfer will be outlined.

  15. The wheel of innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Herbig, P.; Golden, J.E.

    1993-11-01

    The wheel of innovation refers to the concept whereby those very same forces that create an innovative hot spot eventually provide the seeds for the hot spot`s decline. An innovative hot spot creates economic prosperity. An increasing demand for economic entitlements within the hot spot creates negative structure that is not conductive to later entrepreneurs or new ventures. This tends to put a damper on further innovative activity within the maturing hot spot. This rags-to-riches-to-rags evolution of innovation hot spots is termed the wheel of innovation. This paper examines the phenomenon from a historical perspective and provide insights on how a country and a region can continue to succeed without falling victim to the phenomenon. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. The discipline of innovation.

    PubMed

    Drucker, P F

    1985-01-01

    As managers recognize the heightened importance of innovation to competitive success, they face an apparent paradox: the orderly and predictable decisions on which a business rests depend increasingly on the disorderly and unpredictable process of innovation. How can managers expect to plan for--or count on--a process that is itself so utterly dependent on creativity, inspiration, and old-fashioned luck? Drawing on his many years' experience studying innovative and entrepreneurial companies, the author argues that this paradox is apparent only, not real. Most of what happens in successful innovations is not the happy occurrence of a blinding flash of insight but, rather, the careful implementation of an unspectacular but systematic management discipline. At the heart of that discipline lies the knowledge of where to look for innovation opportunities and how to identify them. It is to this study of the sources of innovation that Mr. Drucker here addresses himself. PMID:10272260

  17. EMPIRICAL MODEL OF VEHICLE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An empirical model that characterizes the relationship between equilibrium vehicle emission distributions and malfunction, repair, and replacement rates by splitting vehicles into two emission categories has been developed. ross emitters and clean vehicles are defined by the magn...

  18. Innovative technology demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Luttrell, S.P. ); Hartley, J.N. . Environmental Management Operations); Hinchee, R. )

    1992-08-01

    Environmental Management Operations (EMO) is conducting an Innovative Technology Demonstration Program for Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB). Several innovative technologies are being demonstrated to address specific problems associated with remediating two contaminated test sites at the base. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) is a form of testing that can rapidly characterize a site. This technology was selected to evaluate its applicability in the tight clay soils and consolidated sandstone sediments found at TAFB. Directionally drilled horizontal wells was selected as a method that may be effective in accessing contamination beneath Building 3001 without disrupting the mission of the building, and in enhancing the extraction of contamination both in ground water and in soil. A soil gas extraction (SGE) demonstration, also known as soil vapor extraction, will evaluate the effectiveness of SGE in remediating fuels and TCE contamination contained in the tight clay soil formations surrounding the abandoned underground fuel storage vault located at the SW Tanks Site. In situ sensors have recently received much acclaim as a technology that can be effective in remediating hazardous waste sites. Sensors can be useful for determining real-time, in situ contaminant concentrations during the remediation process for performance monitoring and in providing feedback for controlling the remediation process. Following the SGE demonstration, the SGE system and SW Tanks test site will be modified to demonstrate bioremediation as an effective means of degrading the remaining contaminants in situ. The bioremediation demonstration will evaluate a bioventing process in which the naturally occurring consortium of soil bacteria will be stimulated to aerobically degrade soil contaminants, including fuel and TCE, in situ.

  19. Learning in innovation networks: Some simulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Nigel; Ahrweiler, Petra; Pyka, Andreas

    2007-05-01

    According to the organizational learning literature, the greatest competitive advantage a firm has is its ability to learn. In this paper, a framework for modeling learning competence in firms is presented to improve the understanding of managing innovation. Firms with different knowledge stocks attempt to improve their economic performance by engaging in radical or incremental innovation activities and through partnerships and networking with other firms. In trying to vary and/or to stabilize their knowledge stocks by organizational learning, they attempt to adapt to environmental requirements while the market strongly selects on the results. The simulation experiments show the impact of different learning activities, underlining the importance of innovation and learning.

  20. Morphological innovation, diversification and invasion of a new adaptive zone

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Elizabeth R.; Dávalos, Liliana M.; Goldberg, Aaron; Santana, Sharlene E.; Rex, Katja; Voigt, Christian C.

    2012-01-01

    How ecological opportunity relates to diversification is a central question in evolutionary biology. However, there are few empirical examples of how ecological opportunity and morphological innovation open new adaptive zones, and promote diversification. We analyse data on diet, skull morphology and bite performance, and relate these traits to diversification rates throughout the evolutionary history of an ecologically diverse family of mammals (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae). We found a significant increase in diversification rate driven by increased speciation at the most recent common ancestor of the predominantly frugivorous subfamily Stenodermatinae. The evolution of diet was associated with skull morphology, and morphology was tightly coupled with biting performance, linking phenotype to new niches through performance. Following the increase in speciation rate, the rate of morphological evolution slowed, while the rate of evolution in diet increased. This pattern suggests that morphology stabilized, and niches within the new adaptive zone of frugivory were filled rapidly, after the evolution of a new cranial phenotype that resulted in a certain level of mechanical efficiency. The tree-wide speciation rate increased non linearly with a more frugivorous diet, and was highest at measures of skull morphology associated with morphological extremes, including the most derived Stenodermatines. These results show that a novel stenodermatine skull phenotype played a central role in the evolution of frugivory and increasing speciation within phyllostomids. PMID:22113035

  1. Morphological innovation, diversification and invasion of a new adaptive zone.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Elizabeth R; Dávalos, Liliana M; Goldberg, Aaron; Santana, Sharlene E; Rex, Katja; Voigt, Christian C

    2012-05-01

    How ecological opportunity relates to diversification is a central question in evolutionary biology. However, there are few empirical examples of how ecological opportunity and morphological innovation open new adaptive zones, and promote diversification. We analyse data on diet, skull morphology and bite performance, and relate these traits to diversification rates throughout the evolutionary history of an ecologically diverse family of mammals (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae). We found a significant increase in diversification rate driven by increased speciation at the most recent common ancestor of the predominantly frugivorous subfamily Stenodermatinae. The evolution of diet was associated with skull morphology, and morphology was tightly coupled with biting performance, linking phenotype to new niches through performance. Following the increase in speciation rate, the rate of morphological evolution slowed, while the rate of evolution in diet increased. This pattern suggests that morphology stabilized, and niches within the new adaptive zone of frugivory were filled rapidly, after the evolution of a new cranial phenotype that resulted in a certain level of mechanical efficiency. The tree-wide speciation rate increased non linearly with a more frugivorous diet, and was highest at measures of skull morphology associated with morphological extremes, including the most derived Stenodermatines. These results show that a novel stenodermatine skull phenotype played a central role in the evolution of frugivory and increasing speciation within phyllostomids. PMID:22113035

  2. Experimental Study of the Flexural and Compression Performance of an Innovative Pultruded Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Wood Composite Profile

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yujun; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Weiqing; Fang, Hai; Lu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The plate of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer or fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) profile produced via a pultrusion process is likely to undergo local buckling and cracking along the fiber direction under an external load. In this study, we constructed a pultruded glass-fiber-reinforced polymer-light wood composite (PGWC) profile to explore its mechanical performance. A rectangular cross-sectional PGWC profile was fabricated with a paulownia wood core, alkali-free glass fiber filaments, and unsaturated phthalate resin. Three-point bending and short column axial compression tests were conducted. Then, the stress calculation for the PGWC profile in the bending and axial compression tests was performed using the Timoshenko beam theory and the composite component analysis method to derive the flexural and axial compression rigidity of the profile during the elastic stress stage. The flexural capacity for this type of PGWC profile is 3.3-fold the sum of the flexural capacities of the wood core and the glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shell. The equivalent flexural rigidity is 1.5-fold the summed flexural rigidity of the wood core and GFRP shell. The maximum axial compressive bearing capacity for this type of PGWC profile can reach 1.79-fold the sum of those of the wood core and GFRP shell, and its elastic flexural rigidity is 1.2-fold the sum of their rigidities. These results indicate that in PGWC profiles, GFRP and wood materials have a positive combined effect. This study produced a pultruded composite material product with excellent mechanical performance for application in structures that require a large bearing capacity. PMID:26485431

  3. Experimental Study of the Flexural and Compression Performance of an Innovative Pultruded Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Wood Composite Profile.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yujun; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Weiqing; Fang, Hai; Lu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The plate of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer or fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) profile produced via a pultrusion process is likely to undergo local buckling and cracking along the fiber direction under an external load. In this study, we constructed a pultruded glass-fiber-reinforced polymer-light wood composite (PGWC) profile to explore its mechanical performance. A rectangular cross-sectional PGWC profile was fabricated with a paulownia wood core, alkali-free glass fiber filaments, and unsaturated phthalate resin. Three-point bending and short column axial compression tests were conducted. Then, the stress calculation for the PGWC profile in the bending and axial compression tests was performed using the Timoshenko beam theory and the composite component analysis method to derive the flexural and axial compression rigidity of the profile during the elastic stress stage. The flexural capacity for this type of PGWC profile is 3.3-fold the sum of the flexural capacities of the wood core and the glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shell. The equivalent flexural rigidity is 1.5-fold the summed flexural rigidity of the wood core and GFRP shell. The maximum axial compressive bearing capacity for this type of PGWC profile can reach 1.79-fold the sum of those of the wood core and GFRP shell, and its elastic flexural rigidity is 1.2-fold the sum of their rigidities. These results indicate that in PGWC profiles, GFRP and wood materials have a positive combined effect. This study produced a pultruded composite material product with excellent mechanical performance for application in structures that require a large bearing capacity. PMID:26485431

  4. Proposed Core Competencies and Empirical Validation Procedure in Competency Modeling: Confirmation and Classification.

    PubMed

    Baczyńska, Anna K; Rowiński, Tomasz; Cybis, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Competency models provide insight into key skills which are common to many positions in an organization. Moreover, there is a range of competencies that is used by many companies. Researchers have developed core competency terminology to underline their cross-organizational value. The article presents a theoretical model of core competencies consisting of two main higher-order competencies called performance and entrepreneurship. Each of them consists of three elements: the performance competency includes cooperation, organization of work and goal orientation, while entrepreneurship includes innovativeness, calculated risk-taking and pro-activeness. However, there is lack of empirical validation of competency concepts in organizations and this would seem crucial for obtaining reliable results from organizational research. We propose a two-step empirical validation procedure: (1) confirmation factor analysis, and (2) classification of employees. The sample consisted of 636 respondents (M = 44.5; SD = 15.1). Participants were administered a questionnaire developed for the study purpose. The reliability, measured by Cronbach's alpha, ranged from 0.60 to 0.83 for six scales. Next, we tested the model using a confirmatory factor analysis. The two separate, single models of performance and entrepreneurial orientations fit quite well to the data, while a complex model based on the two single concepts needs further research. In the classification of employees based on the two higher order competencies we obtained four main groups of employees. Their profiles relate to those found in the literature, including so-called niche finders and top performers. Some proposal for organizations is discussed. PMID:27014111

  5. Proposed Core Competencies and Empirical Validation Procedure in Competency Modeling: Confirmation and Classification

    PubMed Central

    Baczyńska, Anna K.; Rowiński, Tomasz; Cybis, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Competency models provide insight into key skills which are common to many positions in an organization. Moreover, there is a range of competencies that is used by many companies. Researchers have developed core competency terminology to underline their cross-organizational value. The article presents a theoretical model of core competencies consisting of two main higher-order competencies called performance and entrepreneurship. Each of them consists of three elements: the performance competency includes cooperation, organization of work and goal orientation, while entrepreneurship includes innovativeness, calculated risk-taking and pro-activeness. However, there is lack of empirical validation of competency concepts in organizations and this would seem crucial for obtaining reliable results from organizational research. We propose a two-step empirical validation procedure: (1) confirmation factor analysis, and (2) classification of employees. The sample consisted of 636 respondents (M = 44.5; SD = 15.1). Participants were administered a questionnaire developed for the study purpose. The reliability, measured by Cronbach’s alpha, ranged from 0.60 to 0.83 for six scales. Next, we tested the model using a confirmatory factor analysis. The two separate, single models of performance and entrepreneurial orientations fit quite well to the data, while a complex model based on the two single concepts needs further research. In the classification of employees based on the two higher order competencies we obtained four main groups of employees. Their profiles relate to those found in the literature, including so-called niche finders and top performers. Some proposal for organizations is discussed. PMID:27014111

  6. Is Sustainability Possible? A Review and Commentary on Empirical Studies of Program Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheirer, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    An important final step in the life cycles of programs and their evaluation involves assessing new programs' or innovations' sustainability. This review and synthesis of 19 empirical studies of the sustainability of American and Canadian health-related programs examines the extent of sustainability achieved and summarizes factors contributing to…

  7. An empirical model to remove the influence of illumination and viewing angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; Capaccioni, F.; De Sanctis, M. C.

    2014-04-01

    We show an innovative approach to correct spectral data for illumination and viewing angles, based on a statistical analysis of observations and empirical definition of reflectance families. The method has been successfully applied to planetary surfaces (Vesta and Lutetia) and atmospheres (Venus) and is planned to be applied to Churyumov-Gerasimenko data from Rosetta VIRTIS spectrometer.

  8. INNOVATIVE EDDY CURRENT PROBE FOR MICRO DEFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Telmo G.; Vilaca, Pedro; Quintino, Luisa; Santos, Jorge dos; Rosado, Luis

    2010-02-22

    This paper reports the development of an innovative eddy current (EC) probe, and its application to micro-defects on the root of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The new EC probe presents innovative concept issues, allowing 3D induced current in the material, and a lift-off independence. Validation experiments were performed on aluminium alloys processed by FSW. The results clearly show that the new EC probe is able to detect and sizing surface defects about 60 microns depth.

  9. Innovative Eddy Current Probe for Micro Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Telmo G.; Vilaça, Pedro; dos Santos, Jorge; Quintino, Luísa; Rosado, Luís

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports the development of an innovative eddy current (EC) probe, and its application to micro-defects on the root of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The new EC probe presents innovative concept issues, allowing 3D induced current in the material, and a lift-off independence. Validation experiments were performed on aluminium alloys processed by FSW. The results clearly show that the new EC probe is able to detect and sizing surface defects about 60 microns depth.

  10. Performance of and methanogenic communities involved in an innovative anaerobic process for the treatment of food wastewater in a pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungyong; Lee, Bowon; Han, Gyuseong; Yoon, Heechul; Kim, Woong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, dual-cylindrical anaerobic digesters were designed and built on the pilot plant scale for the improvement of anaerobic digestion efficiency. The removal efficiency of organics, biogas productivity, yield, and microbial communities was evaluated as performance parameters of the digester. During the stable operational period in the continuous mode, the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand and total solids were 74.1 and 65.1%, respectively. Biogas productivities of 63.9 m(3)/m(3)-FWW and 1.3 m(3)/kg-VSremoved were measured. The hydrogenotrophic methanogen orders, Methanomicrobiales and Methanobacteriales, were predominant over the aceticlastic methanogen order, Methanosarcinaceae, probably due to the tolerance of the hydrogenotrophs to environmental perturbation in the field and their faster growth rate compared with that of the aceticlastics. PMID:25744534

  11. Innovation under cap-and-trade programs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Margaret R

    2012-03-27

    Policies incentivizing the private sector to reach its innovative potential in "clean" technologies are likely to play a key role in achieving climate stabilization. This article explores the relationship between innovation and cap-and-trade programs (CTPs)--the world's most prominent climate policy instrument--through empirical evidence drawn from successful CTPs for sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide control. The article shows that before trading began for these CTPs, analysts overestimated the value of allowances in a pattern suggestive of the frequent a priori overestimation of the compliance costs of regulation. When lower-than-expected allowance prices were observed, in part because of the unexpected range of abatement approaches used in the lead-up to trading, emissions sources chose to bank allowances in significant numbers and reassess abatement approaches going forward. In addition, commercially oriented inventive activity declined for emissions-reducing technologies with a wide range of costs and technical characteristics, dropping from peaks before the establishment of CTPs to nadirs a few years into trading. This finding is consistent with innovators deciding during trading that their research and development investments should be reduced, based on assessments of future market conditions under the relevant CTPs. The article concludes with a discussion of the results and their implications for innovation and climate policy. PMID:22411797

  12. Innovation under cap-and-trade programs

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Margaret R.

    2012-01-01

    Policies incentivizing the private sector to reach its innovative potential in “clean” technologies are likely to play a key role in achieving climate stabilization. This article explores the relationship between innovation and cap-and-trade programs (CTPs)—the world's most prominent climate policy instrument—through empirical evidence drawn from successful CTPs for sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide control. The article shows that before trading began for these CTPs, analysts overestimated the value of allowances in a pattern suggestive of the frequent a priori overestimation of the compliance costs of regulation. When lower-than-expected allowance prices were observed, in part because of the unexpected range of abatement approaches used in the lead-up to trading, emissions sources chose to bank allowances in significant numbers and reassess abatement approaches going forward. In addition, commercially oriented inventive activity declined for emissions-reducing technologies with a wide range of costs and technical characteristics, dropping from peaks before the establishment of CTPs to nadirs a few years into trading. This finding is consistent with innovators deciding during trading that their research and development investments should be reduced, based on assessments of future market conditions under the relevant CTPs. The article concludes with a discussion of the results and their implications for innovation and climate policy. PMID:22411797

  13. The Impact of Organismal Innovation on Functional and Ecological Diversification.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Peter C; Price, Samantha A

    2016-09-01

    Innovations in organismal functional morphology are thought to be a major force in shaping evolutionary patterns, with the potential to drive adaptive radiation and influence the evolutionary prospects for lineages. But the evolutionary consequences of innovation are diverse and usually do not result in adaptive radiation. What factors shape the macroevolutionary impact of innovations? We assert that little is known in general about the macroevolutionary outcomes associated with functional innovations and we discuss a framework for studying biological innovations in an evolutionary context. Innovations are novel functional mechanisms that enhance organismal performance. The ubiquity of trade-offs in functional systems means that enhanced performance on one axis often occurs at the expense of performance on another axis, such that many innovations result in an exchange of performance capabilities, rather than an expansion. Innovations may open up new resources for exploitation but their consequences for functional and ecological diversification depend heavily on the adaptive landscape around these novel resources. As an example of a broader program that we imagine, we survey five feeding innovations in labrid fishes, an exceptionally successful and ecologically diverse group of reef fishes, and explore their impact on the rate of evolution of jaw functional morphology. All of the innovations provide performance enhancements and result in changes in patterns of resource use, but most are not associated with subsequent functional diversification or substantial ecological diversification. Because selection acts on a specific performance enhancement and not on the evolutionary potential of an innovation, the enhancement of diversity may be highly serendipitous. The macroevolutionary potential of innovations depends critically on the interaction between the performance enhancement and the ecological opportunity that is exposed. PMID:27375274

  14. Innovation Incubator Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    The document introduces a college program designed to encourage the initiation and evaluation of strategies to increase student learning through innovative teaching methods. It also contains reports on completed individual projects. The principal activity of the Innovation Incubator at the College of DuPage (Illinois) is to support specific…

  15. 2012 Innovators Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David; Namahoe, Kanoe

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the 2012 Campus Technology Innovators. These IT leaders have deployed extraordinary technology solutions to meet campus challenges. The authors also recognize the vendors and products involved in making these innovative projects a success. The 10 winners are: (1) University of Arizona (Student Systems and…

  16. ERM Ideas and Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, Lenore

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the new "Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship" column entitled "ERM Ideas and Innovations," which will appear in each issue of JERL for the next 2 years, and possibly more, beginning with this issue. The overall focus of each column will be to introduce and expand ideas, discuss innovations, and ultimately encourage and foster…

  17. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  18. Innovation and the City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiman, Neil; Forman, Adam; Ko, Jae; Giles, David; Bowles, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    With Washington trapped in budget battles and partisan gridlock, cities have emerged as the best source of government innovation. Nowhere is this more visible than in New York City. Since taking office in 2002, Mayor Bloomberg has introduced a steady stream of innovative policies, from a competition to recruit a new applied sciences campus and a…

  19. Knowledge, Innovation and Internationalisation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Technology Policy Council of Finland, Helsinki.

    Finland is challenged to make the most of globalization by reinforcing its positive aspects. The 1990s taught that success in creating innovations is a key factor for success of business and societies. A precondition, high-level technological and business know-how, requires systematic input into producing social innovations that prevent societal…

  20. Innovation in san francisco.

    PubMed

    Travis, J

    1992-08-01

    In San Francisco 2 weeks ago, AAAS and Science sponsored a new meeting, Science Innovation '92. The unusual gathering focused not on research results but on new techniques and instruments, particularly for biomedical science. As seen in the stories below, some of the most eye-catching innovations emerged at the intersection of physics and biology. PMID:17736460

  1. Second Life as Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guder, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    In terms of exploring the status of Second Life (SL) usage in libraries, it would be useful to not only look at how and why the virtual world is being used but also how SL compares to successfully implemented innovations of the past. Comparing and contrasting the characteristics of previously accepted innovations with those of SL will help…

  2. Calling All Innovators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In a study of highly innovative young people in their 20s, the author found that although many people in the millennial generation want to do meaningful work and make a difference in the world, conventional high schools and colleges are not preparing their graduates to be innovators and entrepreneurs. This is a serious problem, he asserts, because…

  3. Pillars of Power: Silver and Steel of the Ottoman Empire.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerantzis, N.

    The Ottoman Empire was forged over disintegrating Byzantium, stretching across Anatolia and the Balkans and ruled for almost five centuries. One crucial parameter that allowed for its quick expansion has been a combination of economic wealth and superiority of armed forces. The Ottomans succeeded in both sectors by promoting innovative technology in the field of silver and steel production for supplying their monetary system and weapons industry. Rich mines and smelting workshops provided increased output in metals, allowing for quick expansion and economic growth. Some of the major centres for silver and steel production are being discussed in this paper in conjunction with analytical data from smelting residues.

  4. Empirical evaluation of interest-level criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahar, Sigal; Mansour, Yishay

    1999-02-01

    Efficient association rule mining algorithms already exist, however, as the size of databases increases, the number of patterns mined by the algorithms increases to such an extent that their manual evaluation becomes impractical. Automatic evaluation methods are, therefore, required in order to sift through the initial list of rules, which the datamining algorithm outputs. These evaluation methods, or criteria, rank the association rules mined from the dataset. We empirically examined several such statistical criteria: new criteria, as well as previously known ones. The empirical evaluation was conducted using several databases, including a large real-life dataset, acquired from an order-by-phone grocery store, a dataset composed from www proxy logs, and several datasets from the UCI repository. We were interested in discovering whether the ranking performed by the various criteria is similar or easily distinguishable. Our evaluation detected, when significant differences exist, three patterns of behavior in the eight criteria we examined. There is an obvious dilemma in determining how many association rules to choose (in accordance with support and confidence parameters). The tradeoff is between having stringent parameters and, therefore, few rules, or lenient parameters and, thus, a multitude of rules. In many cases, our empirical evaluation revealed that most of the rules found by the comparably strict parameters ranked highly according to the interestingness criteria, when using lax parameters (producing significantly more association rules). Finally, we discuss the association rules that ranked highest, explain why these results are sound, and how they direct future research.

  5. Fifty Years of Innovation in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Marcus, Hani J; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Hettiaratchy, Shehan

    2016-01-01

    Background Innovation has molded the current landscape of plastic surgery. However, documentation of this process only exists scattered throughout the literature as individual articles. The few attempts made to profile innovation in plastic surgery have been narrative, and therefore qualitative and inherently biased. Through the implementation of a novel innovation metric, this work aims to identify and characterise the most prevalent innovations in plastic surgery over the last 50 years. Methods Patents and publications related to plastic surgery (1960 to 2010) were retrieved from patent and MEDLINE databases, respectively. The most active patent codes were identified and grouped into technology areas, which were subsequently plotted graphically against publication data. Expert-derived technologies outside of the top performing patents areas were additionally explored. Results Between 1960 and 2010, 4,651 patents and 43,118 publications related to plastic surgery were identified. The most active patent codes were grouped under reconstructive prostheses, implants, instruments, non-invasive techniques, and tissue engineering. Of these areas and other expert-derived technologies, those currently undergoing growth include surgical instruments, implants, non-invasive practices, transplantation and breast surgery. Innovations related to microvascular surgery, liposuction, tissue engineering, lasers and prostheses have all plateaued. Conclusions The application of a novel metric for evaluating innovation quantitatively outlines the natural history of technologies fundamental to the evolution of plastic surgery. Analysis of current innovation trends provides some insight into which technology domains are the most active. PMID:27019807

  6. Improvement of Image Quality and Diagnostic Performance by an Innovative Motion-Correction Algorithm for Prospectively ECG Triggered Coronary CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Yan, Hong-Bing; Mu, Chao-Wei; Gao, Yang; Hou, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Kun; Parinella, Ashley H.; Leipsic, Jonathon A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of a novel motion-correction algorithm (Snap-short Freeze, SSF) on image quality and diagnostic accuracy in patients undergoing prospectively ECG-triggered CCTA without administering rate-lowering medications. Materials and Methods Forty-six consecutive patients suspected of CAD prospectively underwent CCTA using prospective ECG-triggering without rate control and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Image quality, interpretability, and diagnostic performance of SSF were compared with conventional multisegment reconstruction without SSF, using ICA as the reference standard. Results All subjects (35 men, 57.6 ± 8.9 years) successfully underwent ICA and CCTA. Mean heart rate was 68.8±8.4 (range: 50–88 beats/min) beats/min without rate controlling medications during CT scanning. Overall median image quality score (graded 1–4) was significantly increased from 3.0 to 4.0 by the new algorithm in comparison to conventional reconstruction. Overall interpretability was significantly improved, with a significant reduction in the number of non-diagnostic segments (690 of 694, 99.4% vs 659 of 694, 94.9%; P<0.001). However, only the right coronary artery (RCA) showed a statistically significant difference (45 of 46, 97.8% vs 35 of 46, 76.1%; P = 0.004) on a per-vessel basis in this regard. Diagnostic accuracy for detecting ≥50% stenosis was improved using the motion-correction algorithm on per-vessel [96.2% (177/184) vs 87.0% (160/184); P = 0.002] and per-segment [96.1% (667/694) vs 86.6% (601/694); P <0.001] levels, but there was not a statistically significant improvement on a per-patient level [97.8 (45/46) vs 89.1 (41/46); P = 0.203]. By artery analysis, diagnostic accuracy was improved only for the RCA [97.8% (45/46) vs 78.3% (36/46); P = 0.007]. Conclusion The intracycle motion correction algorithm significantly improved image quality and diagnostic interpretability in patients undergoing CCTA with prospective ECG triggering and

  7. Creativity: the fuel of innovation.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, M J

    1999-01-01

    Market-leveled changes occurring in the health care industry require new and creative models of organization, management, and service delivery. One of today's primary management challenges is the development of organizational cultures that value innovation, change, and creativity. The adoption of an ethic of innovativeness allows the organization to stretch the limits of individual and collective knowledge, skill, and ability to meet complex consumer needs. Creativity within organizations is influenced by management practices in conjunction with creativity-relevant work group skills. A common wisdom exists that professional nurses are creative in finding solutions for complex patient care needs. The expansion of this creativity within organizational systems will allow for the evolution of professional nursing practice, improvement in care delivery, and organizational performance. PMID:10205475

  8. The Effect of R&D Alliances on the Speed of Innovation: Evidence from Chinese SMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minghong; Yin, Xinke

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the R&D alliances' effect on technological innovation. There are many factors that have effect on technological innovation, but few empirical literatures have studied R&D alliances. After reviewing related literature, we propose some hypotheses and test them with a sample of 504 small and medium enterprises that have carried out R&D activities and joined in R&D alliances. The results indicate that, for small and medium enterprises, participating in R&D alliances is good for technological innovation. Moreover, capital investment and human resource has positive impacts on innovation, but which industry that enterprises belong to has no effect.

  9. Bayesian photometric redshifts with empirical training sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Christian

    2009-07-01

    We combine in a single framework the two complementary benefits of χ2 template fits and empirical training sets used e.g. in neural nets: χ2 is more reliable when its probability density functions (PDFs) are inspected for multiple peaks, while empirical training is more accurate when calibration and priors of query data and training set match. We present a χ2 empirical method that derives PDFs from empirical models as a subclass of kernel regression methods, and apply it to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 sample of >75000 quasi-stellar objects, which is full of ambiguities. Objects with single-peak PDFs show <1 per cent outliers, rms redshift errors <0.05 and vanishing redshift bias. At z > 2.5, these figures are two times better. Outliers result purely from the discrete nature and limited size of the model, and rms errors are dominated by the intrinsic variety of object colours. PDFs classed as ambiguous provide accurate probabilities for alternative solutions and thus weights for using both solutions and avoiding needless outliers. E.g. the PDFs predict 78.0 per cent of the stronger peaks to be correct, which is true for 77.9 per cent of them. Redshift incompleteness is common in faint spectroscopic surveys and turns into a massive undetectable outlier risk above other performance limitations, but we can quantify residual outlier risks stemming from size and completeness of the model. We propose a matched χ2 error scale for noisy data and show that it produces correct error estimates and redshift distributions accurate within Poisson errors. Our method can easily be applied to future large galaxy surveys, which will benefit from the reliability in ambiguity detection and residual risk quantification.

  10. Dynamics of human innovative behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Ting; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-01-01

    How to promote the innovative activities is an important problem for modern society. In this paper, combining the evolutionary games with information spreading, we propose a lattice model to investigate dynamics of human innovative behaviors based on benefit-driven assumption. Simulations show several properties in agreement with peoples’ daily cognition on innovative behaviors, such as slow diffusion of innovative behaviors, gathering of innovative strategy on “innovative centers”, and quasi-localized dynamics. Furthermore, our model also emerges rich non-Poisson properties in the temporal-spatial patterns of the innovative status, including the scaling law in the interval time of innovation releases and the bimodal distributions on the spreading range of innovations, which would be universal in human innovative behaviors. Our model provides a basic framework on the study of the issues relevant to the evolution of human innovative behaviors and the promotion measurement of innovative activities.

  11. Promoting innovation in pediatric nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Truly impactful innovation can only be recognized in retrospect. Moreover, almost by definition, developing algorithmic paths on roadmaps for innovation are likely to be unsuccessful because innovators do not generally follow established routes. Nonetheless, environments can be established within ...

  12. Empire: An Analytical Category for Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coloma, Roland Sintos

    2013-01-01

    In this article Roland Sintos Coloma argues for the relevance of empire as an analytical category in educational research. He points out the silence in mainstream studies of education on the subject of empire, the various interpretive approaches to deploying empire as an analytic, and the importance of indigeneity in research on empire and…

  13. Accelerating Innovation: Turning Goals into Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The success of NASA's programs depends upon innovation, which is recognized by several characteristics. All aspects of a program including tools, processes, materials, subsystems, vehicles, and operations should be evaluated to determine possible innovations which might be implemented. Several examples are presented of ways in which innovation has substantially furthered the goals of NASA. The specific fields mentioned include high performance computing, advanced technologies for aerospace system design, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, neural based flight control, linear aerospike engines, advanced space propulsion systems, high altitude and long duration autonomous flights, advanced vehicle concepts, advanced space propulsion systems, as well as advanced weather information. A final list details the perceived ways in which NASA can benefit from continued innovation in such ways as partnering with the private sector.

  14. Dramatic innovations in modern surgical subspecialties

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.; Sutherland, Francis; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Dixon, Elijah; MacLean, Anthony R.; Mack, Lloyd A.; Feliciano, David V.; Rajani, Ravi R.; Karmy-Jones, Riyad; Buie, W. Donald; Temple, Walley J.; Rozycki, Grace S.; Simeone, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Innovation is defined as the introduction of something new, whether an idea, method or device. In this article, we describe the most important and innovative concepts and techniques that have advanced patient care within modern surgical subspecialties. We performed a systematic literature review and consulted academic subspecialty experts to evaluate recent changes in practice. The identified innovations included reduced blood loss and improved training in hepatobiliary surgery, total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant therapies in colorectal surgery, prosthetic mesh in outpatient surgery, sentinel lymph node theory in surgical oncology, endovascular and wire-based skills in vascular and cardiovascular surgery, and the acceptance of abnormal anatomy through damage-control procedures in trauma and critical care. The common denominator among all subspecialties is an improvement in patient care manifested as a decrease in morbidity and mortality. Surgeons must continue to pursue innovative thinking, technological advances, improved training and systematic research. PMID:20858379

  15. Empiric and creative: Are these opposed?

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Colleen T; Mauksch, Larry B

    2015-12-01

    We feel proud that Families, Systems, and Health disseminates different ways of knowing, and different ways of influencing thought: empiric work such as research papers and conceptual papers in contrast to creative work such as personal narrative, poetry, and 55-word stories. In this issue, we feature an interview with Dr. Julie Phillips, a family physician, scholar, and poet, who has contributed both research papers and creative manuscripts to the medical literature. Our commitment to publishing creative writing is balanced by our longstanding pursuit of scientific knowledge, which also requires creative thinking. In this issue, three knowledgeable scholars and members of our discipline set forth a call for papers for a special issue. Jodi Polaha, Ph.D., Jennifer S. Funderburk, Ph.D., and Deborah Cohen, Ph.D. will be the guest editors of a future issue blending two goals. We want to help our readers learn how to study their innovations and describe their learning so others can benefit. This special issue of Families, Systems, and Health seeks contributions from authors willing to help others learn to generate generalizable learning. In the process of doing this, we hope they will share the results of their studies to improve, implement, and disseminate integrated health care. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26641864

  16. Empirical mode decomposition for analyzing acoustical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention discloses a computer implemented signal analysis method through the Hilbert-Huang Transformation (HHT) for analyzing acoustical signals, which are assumed to be nonlinear and nonstationary. The Empirical Decomposition Method (EMD) and the Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) are used to obtain the HHT. Essentially, the acoustical signal will be decomposed into the Intrinsic Mode Function Components (IMFs). Once the invention decomposes the acoustic signal into its constituting components, all operations such as analyzing, identifying, and removing unwanted signals can be performed on these components. Upon transforming the IMFs into Hilbert spectrum, the acoustical signal may be compared with other acoustical signals.

  17. Empirically derived injury prevention rules.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, L; Schick, B

    1993-01-01

    This study describes a set of empirically derived safety rules that if followed, would have prevented the occurrence of minor injuries. Epidemiologists have criticized behavioral interventions as increasing "safe" behavior but failing to demonstrate a decrease in injury. The present study documents retrospectively the link between safe behavior and injury. It demonstrates that these empirically derived rules are very similar to rules for the prevention of serious injury. The study also shows that these rules are not widely accepted and implemented by parents. Suggestions for future research in this area are advanced. PMID:8307829

  18. Innovative Education? A Test of Specialist Mimicry or Generalist Assimilation in Trends in Charter School Specialization over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renzulli, Linda A.; Barr, Ashley B.; Paino, Maria

    2015-01-01

    By most media accounts, charter schools are innovative schools. But little empirical work interrogates this idea. We examine the growth and decline of specialist charter school mission statements as one indicator of innovation. In line with theories of resource partitioning, we find that specialist charter school missions--those asserting…

  19. Innovations in Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Boeing 777 carries with it basic and applied research, technology, and aerodynamic knowledge honed at several NASA field centers. Several Langley Research Center innovations instrumental to the development of the aircraft include knowledge of how to reduce engine and other noise for passengers and terminal residents, increased use of lightweight aerospace composite structures for increased fuel efficiency and range, and wind tunnel tests confirming the structural integrity of 777 wing-airframe integration. Test results from Marshall Space Flight Center aimed at improving the performance of the Space Shuttle engines led to improvements in the airplane's new, more efficient jet engines. Finally, fostered by Ames Research Center, the Boeing 777 blankets that protect areas of the plane from high temperatures and fire have a lineage to Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation used on certain areas of the Space Shuttle. According to Boeing Company estimates, the 777 has captured three-quarters of new orders for airplanes in its class since the program was launched.

  20. Innovative Separations Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    J. Tripp; N. Soelberg; R. Wigeland

    2011-05-01

    Reprocessing used nuclear fuel (UNF) is a multi-faceted problem involving chemistry, material properties, and engineering. Technology options are available to meet a variety of processing goals. A decision about which reprocessing method is best depends significantly on the process attributes considered to be a priority. New methods of reprocessing that could provide advantages over the aqueous Plutonium Uranium Reduction Extraction (PUREX) and Uranium Extraction + (UREX+) processes, electrochemical, and other approaches are under investigation in the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Separations Campaign. In an attempt to develop a revolutionary approach to UNF recycle that may have more favorable characteristics than existing technologies, five innovative separations projects have been initiated. These include: (1) Nitrogen Trifluoride for UNF Processing; (2) Reactive Fluoride Gas (SF6) for UNF Processing; (3) Dry Head-end Nitration Processing; (4) Chlorination Processing of UNF; and (5) Enhanced Oxidation/Chlorination Processing of UNF. This report provides a description of the proposed processes, explores how they fit into the Modified Open Cycle (MOC) and Full Recycle (FR) fuel cycles, and identifies performance differences when compared to 'reference' advanced aqueous and fluoride volatility separations cases. To be able to highlight the key changes to the reference case, general background on advanced aqueous solvent extraction, advanced oxidative processes (e.g., volumetric oxidation, or 'voloxidation,' which is high temperature reaction of oxide UNF with oxygen, or modified using other oxidizing and reducing gases), and fluorination and chlorination processes is provided.

  1. Differentiating innovation priorities among stakeholder in hospital care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Decisions to adopt a particular innovation may vary between stakeholders because individual stakeholders may disagree on the costs and benefits involved. This may translate to disagreement between stakeholders on priorities in the implementation process, possibly explaining the slow diffusion of innovations in health care. In this study, we explore the differences in stakeholder preferences for innovations, and quantify the difference in stakeholder priorities regarding costs and benefits. Methods The decision support technique called the analytic hierarchy process was used to quantify the preferences of stakeholders for nine information technology (IT) innovations in hospital care. The selection of the innovations was based on a literature review and expert judgments. Decision criteria related to the costs and benefits of the innovations were defined. These criteria were improvement in efficiency, health gains, satisfaction with care process, and investments required. Stakeholders judged the importance of the decision criteria and subsequently prioritized the selected IT innovations according to their expectations of how well the innovations would perform for these decision criteria. Results The stakeholder groups (patients, nurses, physicians, managers, health care insurers, and policy makers) had different preference structures for the innovations selected. For instance, self-tests were one of the innovations most preferred by health care insurers and managers, owing to their expected positive impacts on efficiency and health gains. However, physicians, nurses and patients strongly doubted the health gains of self-tests, and accordingly ranked self-tests as the least-preferred innovation. Conclusions The various stakeholder groups had different expectations of the value of the nine IT innovations. The differences are likely due to perceived stakeholder benefits of each innovation, and less to the costs to individual stakeholder groups. This study

  2. NREL Spectrum of Innovation

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    There are many voices calling for a future of abundant clean energy. The choices are difficult and the challenges daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. The innovation process at NREL is interdependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  3. [Hypersensitivity to innovations].

    PubMed

    Boutellier, R; Andereggen, S

    2009-04-15

    Innovation is an important source of our prosperity. Miniaturization that is behind the combination of modules into new products together with today's high technology acceptance lead us to a wave of innovations, of such dimension humanity has never seen in its whole history. However, new technologies are accompanied by risks that often emerge rather late. In compliance to this, man reacts sensitively to the insertion of new technologies. Restrictions and bans are the consequences. Today, we face the challenge of assisting innovation by assessing and limiting their risks at the same time. PMID:19373762

  4. Balancing innovation and evidence.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Jobeth W

    2015-01-01

    Nurse educators are encouraged to use evidence to guide their teaching strategies. However, evidence is not always available. How can educators make decisions regarding strategies when data are limited or absent? Where do innovation and creativity fit? How can innovation be balanced with evidence? This article provides a discussion regarding other sources of evidence, such as extrapolations, theories and principles, and collective expertise. Readers are encouraged to review the options and then analyze how they might be applied to innovation in education. PMID:25790361

  5. How to Develop Innovators? Innovation Education for the Gifted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavinina, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    Many people correctly believe that a majority of innovators come from the population of gifted and talented children. If we want to develop innovative abilities of the gifted, then a special, new direction in gifted education is needed: innovation education. This article introduces innovation education, which refers to a wide range of educational…

  6. About Empire State College Mentors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, A. Paul, Jr.; Adamson, Judith

    This document reports demographic information about mentors, the faculty of Empire State College (ESC), a new, nontraditional college without a campus of the State University of New York. Results show ESC mentors statistically like any faculty, though perhaps more oriented to private education than most state college faculties and more varied in…

  7. Empirical equation estimates geothermal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Kutasov, I.M. )

    1995-01-02

    An empirical equation can estimate geothermal (natural) temperature profiles in new exploration areas. These gradients are useful for cement slurry and mud design and for improving electrical and temperature log interpretation. Downhole circulating temperature logs and surface outlet temperatures are used for predicting the geothermal gradients.

  8. Minority Innovation Challenges Institute

    NASA Video Gallery

    Do you want to learn more about how to compete in NASA’s technical challenges for both prestige and significant cash prizes? NASA’s Minority Innovation Challenges Institute trains and mentors mino...

  9. Innovations in plasma sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gershman, Daniel J.

    2016-04-01

    During the history of space exploration, ever improving instruments have continued to enable new measurements and discoveries. Focusing on plasma sensors, we examine the processes by which such new instrument innovations have occurred over the past decades. Due to risk intolerance prevalent in many NASA space missions, innovations in plasma instrumentation occur primarily when heritage systems fail to meet science requirements, functional requirements as part of its space platform, or design constraints. We will review such innovation triggers in the context of the design literature and with the help of two case studies, the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer on MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and the Fast Plasma Investigation on Magnetosphere Multiscale. We will then discuss the anticipated needs for new plasma instrument innovations to enable the science program of the next decade.

  10. INNOVATIVE THERMAL TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper contains discussions of several innovative thermal processes for treating or destroying hazardous wastes. Processes discussed can be included in the categories wet oxidation, molten glass, fluidized bed incineration, pyrolysis, molten salt, electric reactors, and plasma...

  11. Innovative island mobile vet.

    PubMed

    Forster, Dan

    2016-06-11

    One of the UK's first mobile veterinary clinics was recently awarded a Queen's Award for Innovation. Mobile Vet was launched on the Isle of Wight in 2013 by Dan Forster and his wife Kirsty, a veterinary nurse. PMID:27288178

  12. Supporting teachers who introduce curricular innovations into their classrooms: A problem-solving perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerushalmi, Edit; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2013-06-01

    When classroom teachers introduce curricular innovations that conflict with their former deeply rooted practices, the teachers themselves experience a process of change. One professional development framework intended to support this change is the customization workshop, in which teachers cooperatively customize innovations to their own classroom contexts, reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of classroom implementation, and refine their innovations. Two goals sometimes conflict in such workshops: developing teachers’ skills as reflective practitioners (process) and maintaining crucial characteristics of the original innovations (product). This paper explores how to meet both challenges using the insights from a perspective that provides a striking parallel: developing expertlike problem-solving skills (process) as well as conceptual understanding (product) in the physics classroom. We apply this perspective by (a) characterizing an expertlike approach to pedagogical problem solving in the context of customization workshops, (b) determining the nature of pedagogical problems best suited for developing such an expertlike approach, (c) suggesting how to design customization workshops that support teachers to develop an expertlike approach to pedagogical problem solving. In particular, we hypothesize that applying cognitive apprenticeship in customization workshops in a manner similar to its application in the teaching of expertlike problem solving in the physics classroom should effectively help teachers approach the pedagogical problem of customization in an expertlike manner. We support our hypothesis with an empirical study of three year-long cooperative customization workshops for physics teachers that differed in terms of mentoring approach. We examined the questions (a) under which mentoring approaches did teachers perform an expertlike pedagogical problem-solving process and (b) which practices and perceptions emerged through execution of this process?

  13. Beyond Making the Case, Creating the Space for Innovation.

    PubMed

    Boston-Fleischhauer, Carol

    2016-06-01

    Disruptive innovation results in something different from incremental change. Instead of focusing on improving an existing process, product, or service through performance improvement, disruptive innovation disregards status quo service or work and uses very different approaches to change, seeking to design the product, process, or service according to the consumer's perspective versus the providers' By its very nature, disruptive innovation provokes organizational, professional, and cultural controversy. PMID:27214331

  14. Impediments to rapid insertion of innovative displays and peripherals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Gail

    2012-06-01

    In order to optimize system performance and minimize cost for a system to fill capability gaps, an improvement to rapid insertion of innovative display and peripheral technology is required to take advantage of human-machine intersections. Current approaches to testing and integration impedes successful rapid insertion of innovative technology for new systems and incremental upgrades. Considerations to innovative displays and peripherals must occur further to the left of the lifecycle to be successful and key integration areas must be address for success.

  15. Open-market innovation.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Darrell; Zook, Chris

    2002-10-01

    Companies in many industries are feeling immense pressure to improve their ability to innovate. Even in these tough economic times, executives have pushed innovation initiatives to the top of their priority lists, but they know that the best ideas aren't always coming out of their own R&D labs. That's why a growing number of companies are exploring the idea of open-market innovation--an approach that uses tools such as licensing, joint ventures, and strategic alliances to bring the benefits of free trade to the flow of new ideas. For instance, when faced with the unanticipated anthrax scare last fall, Pitney Bowes had nothing in its R&D pipeline to help its customers combat the deadly spores. So it sought help from outside innovators to come up with scanning and imaging technologies that could alert its customers to tainted letters and packages. And Dow Chemical and Cargill jointly produced a new form of plastic derived from plant starches--a breakthrough product that neither company could have created on its own. In this article, Bain consultants Darrell Rigby and Chris Zook describe the advantages and disadvantages of open-market innovation and the ways some companies are using it to gain competitive advantage. By importing ideas from the outside, the authors say, companies can collect more and better ideas from different kinds of experts. Creative types within a company will stick around longer if they know their ideas will eventually find a home--as internal R&D projects or as concepts licensed to outside buyers. Exporting ideas also gives companies a way to measure an innovation's real value. However, the authors warn against entering into open-market innovation without properly structuring deals: Xerox and TRW virtually gave away their innovations and had to stand by while other companies capitalized on them. PMID:12389463

  16. Innovation Process Design: A Change Management and Innovation Dimension Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peisl, Thomas; Reger, Veronika; Schmied, Juergen

    The authors propose an innovative approach to the management of innovation integrating business, process, and maturity dimensions. Core element of the concept is the adaptation of ISO/IEC 15504 to the innovation process including 14 innovation drivers. Two managerial models are applied to conceptualize and visualize the respective innovation strategies, the Balanced Scorecard and a Barriers in Change Processes Model. An illustrative case study shows a practical implementation process.

  17. Toward a Curriculum Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoronka, Kevin F. W.

    2008-05-01

    This paper proposes an innovation on HIV prevention, in response to the United Nations Millennium Development Goal to combat HIV/AIDS. The curriculum innovation is through a participatory research design of life skills based education course, involving both healthy faculty tutors and young community leaders at the centre. The innovation builds onto the strengths of previous IIV prevention interventions and argues that effective life skills based education targets the individual, peers and the wider community since the same levels are crucial in HIV transmission. The innovation also recommends a rethinking of the content used to teach and learn life skill based education to prevent HIV and recommends that such content is to be co-conducted by the young community involvement. The content is to be delivered in a participatory way in order for the young community leaders to engage in critical action to prevent HIV. Because of the novelty of such an intervention, the innovation recognizes that such an approach to the design and implementation of the curriculum initiative is complex and involves careful planning, monitoring and evaluation to yield desired outcomes. In conclusion, the innovation recommends that HIV prevention can be possible even in a country such as Sierra Leone, with increasing HIV prevalence in the world.

  18. The innovator's DNA.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Jeffrey H; Gregersen, Hal B; Christensen, Clayton M

    2009-12-01

    "How do I find innovative people for my organization? And how can I become more innovative myself?" These are questions that stump most senior executives, who know that the ability to innovate is the "secret sauce" of business success. Perhaps for this reason most of us stand in awe of the work of visionary entrepreneurs such as Apple's Steve Jobs, Amazon's Jeff Bezos, eBay's Pierre Omidyar, and P&G's A.G. Lafley. How do these individuals come up with groundbreaking new ideas? In this article, Dyer, of Brigham Young University; Gregersen, of Insead; and Christensen, of Harvard Business School, reveal how innovative entrepreneurs differ from typical executives. Their study demonstrates that five "discovery skills" distinguish the most creative executives: Associating helps them discover new directions by making connections among seemingly unrelated questions, problems, or ideas. Questioning allows innovators to break out of the status quo and consider new ideas. Through observing, innovators carefully and consistently look out for small behavioral details--in the activities of customers, suppliers, and other companies -to gain insights about new ways of doing things. In experimenting, they relentlessly try on new experiences and explore the world. And through networking with diverse individuals from an array of backgrounds, they gain radically different perspectives. PMID:19968057

  19. Adult Learning in Innovative Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland Olsen, Dorothy

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between learning and innovation has been a central theme in studies of innovation (Fagerberg et al., 2005, Borras & Edquist, 2014, Lundvall & Johnsen, 1994). Studies of the workplace have also claimed a relationship between skills or training and a firm's ability to innovate (Toner, 2011). Recent studies of innovation in…

  20. Accuracy of Population Validity and Cross-Validity Estimation: An Empirical Comparison of Formula-Based, Traditional Empirical, and Equal Weights Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, Nambury S.; Bilgic, Reyhan; Edwards, Jack E.; Fleer, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    Performed an empirical Monte Carlo study using predictor and criterion data from 84,808 U.S. Air Force enlistees. Compared formula-based, traditional empirical, and equal-weights procedures. Discusses issues for basic research on validation and cross-validation. (SLD)

  1. Fuelling innovation in building design.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2012-08-01

    Established in 2005 on a 78-acre site near Watford by a research-based consultancy, testing, and training organisation with a reputation for independence and impartiality, the BRE's Watford Innovation Park is today home to a broad range of research, consultancy, and testing activities, for the built environment. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, met with BRE director of Strategic Research, Peter Ball, to learn about the organisation's history and current-day activities, and tour of some of the key facilities where staff undertake cutting-edge research, consultancy, and testing, to improve the performance, efficiency, and sustainability, of a wide range of buildings. PMID:22984739

  2. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT XRF TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEASURING TRACE ELEMENTS IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT INNOV-X XT400 SERIES XRF ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Innov-X Systems (Innov-X) XT400 series (XT400) x-ray flurescence (XRF) analyzer was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The demonstration was designed to collect reliable performance and...

  3. On the empirical relevance of the transient in opinion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banisch, Sven; Araújo, Tanya

    2010-07-01

    While the number and variety of models to explain opinion exchange dynamics is huge, attempts to justify the model results using empirical data are relatively rare. As linking to real data is essential for establishing model credibility, this Letter develops an empirical confirmation experiment by which an opinion model is related to real election data. The model is based on a representation of opinions as a vector of k bits. Individuals interact according to the principle that similarity leads to interaction and interaction leads to still more similarity. In the comparison to real data we concentrate on the transient opinion profiles that form during the dynamic process. An artificial election procedure is introduced which allows to relate transient opinion configurations to the electoral performance of candidates for which data are available. The election procedure based on the well-established principle of proximity voting is repeatedly performed during the transient period and remarkable statistical agreement with the empirical data is observed.

  4. Innovative technology demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Hartley, J.N.; Luttrell, S.P.

    1992-04-01

    Currently, several innovative technologies are being demonstrated at Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB) to address specific problems associated with remediating two contaminated test sites at the base. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) is a form of testing that can rapidly characterize a site. This technology was selected to evaluate its applicability in the tight clay soils and consolidated sandstone sediments found at TAFB. Directionally drilled horizontal wells have been successfully installed at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site to test new methods of in situ remediation of soils and ground water. This emerging technology was selected as a method that may be effective in accessing contamination beneath Building 3001 without disrupting the mission of the building, and in enhancing the extraction of contamination both in ground water and in soil. A soil gas extraction (SGE) demonstration, also known as soil vapor extraction, will evaluate the effectiveness of SGE in remediating fuels and TCE contamination contained in the tight clay soil formations surrounding the abandoned underground fuel storage vault located at the SW Tanks Site. In situ sensors have recently received much acclaim as a technology that can be effective in remediating hazardous waste sites. Sensors can be useful for determining real-time, in situ contaminant concentrations during the remediation process for performance monitoring and in providing feedback for controlling the remediation process. A demonstration of two in situ sensor systems capable of providing real-time data on contamination levels will be conducted and evaluated concurrently with the SGE demonstration activities. Following the SGE demonstration, the SGE system and SW Tanks test site will be modified to demonstrate bioremediation as an effective means of degrading the remaining contaminants in situ.

  5. Innovative technology demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Hartley, J.N.; Luttrell, S.P.

    1992-04-01

    Currently, several innovative technologies are being demonstrated at Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB) to address specific problems associated with remediating two contaminated test sites at the base. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) is a form of testing that can rapidly characterize a site. This technology was selected to evaluate its applicability in the tight clay soils and consolidated sandstone sediments found at TAFB. Directionally drilled horizontal wells have been successfully installed at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site to test new methods of in situ remediation of soils and ground water. This emerging technology was selected as a method that may be effective in accessing contamination beneath Building 3001 without disrupting the mission of the building, and in enhancing the extraction of contamination both in ground water and in soil. A soil gas extraction (SGE) demonstration, also known as soil vapor extraction, will evaluate the effectiveness of SGE in remediating fuels and TCE contamination contained in the tight clay soil formations surrounding the abandoned underground fuel storage vault located at the SW Tanks Site. In situ sensors have recently received much acclaim as a technology that can be effective in remediating hazardous waste sites. Sensors can be useful for determining real-time, in situ contaminant concentrations during the remediation process for performance monitoring and in providing feedback for controlling the remediation process. A demonstration of two in situ sensor systems capable of providing real-time data on contamination levels will be conducted and evaluated concurrently with the SGE demonstration activities. Following the SGE demonstration, the SGE system and SW Tanks test site will be modified to demonstrate bioremediation as an effective means of degrading the remaining contaminants in situ.

  6. Towards a separable ``empirical reality''?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Espagnat, Bernard

    1990-10-01

    “To be” or “to be found”? Some contributions relative to this modern variant of Hamlet's question are presented here. They aim at better apprehending the differences between the points of view of the physicists who consider that present-day quantum measurement theories do reach their objective and those who deny they do. It is pointed out that these two groups have different interpretations of the verbs “to be” and “to have” and of the criterion for truth. These differences are made explicit. A notion of “empirical reality” is constructed within the representation of which the physicists of the first named group can consistently uphold their claim. A detailed way of sharpening this definition so as to make empirical reality free of nonlocal actions at a distance is also described.

  7. Assessing empirical research in bioethics.

    PubMed

    Brody, B A

    1993-09-01

    Empirical research can aid ethical reflection in bioethics by identifying issues, by seeing how they are currently resolved, and by assessing the consequences of these current resolutions. This potential can be misused when the ethical issues in question are fundamentally non-consequentialist or when they are consequentialist but the empirical research fails to address the important consequences. An example of the former problem is some recent studies about bad consequences resulting from commercialized living kidney donor programs. These consequences could be avoided, but the crucial non-consequentialist ethical issues about exploitation and commercialization would still remain. Examples of the latter problem are provided by recent studies of the allocation of ICU beds and of physician deception, where important consequences were not adequately studied. PMID:8259528

  8. A research program in empirical computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    During the grant reporting period our primary activities have been to begin preparation for the establishment of a research program in experimental computer science. The focus of research in this program will be safety-critical systems. Many questions that arise in the effort to improve software dependability can only be addressed empirically. For example, there is no way to predict the performance of the various proposed approaches to building fault-tolerant software. Performance models, though valuable, are parameterized and cannot be used to make quantitative predictions without experimental determination of underlying distributions. In the past, experimentation has been able to shed some light on the practical benefits and limitations of software fault tolerance. It is common, also, for experimentation to reveal new questions or new aspects of problems that were previously unknown. A good example is the Consistent Comparison Problem that was revealed by experimentation and subsequently studied in depth. The result was a clear understanding of a previously unknown problem with software fault tolerance. The purpose of a research program in empirical computer science is to perform controlled experiments in the area of real-time, embedded control systems. The goal of the various experiments will be to determine better approaches to the construction of the software for computing systems that have to be relied upon. As such it will validate research concepts from other sources, provide new research results, and facilitate the transition of research results from concepts to practical procedures that can be applied with low risk to NASA flight projects. The target of experimentation will be the production software development activities undertaken by any organization prepared to contribute to the research program. Experimental goals, procedures, data analysis and result reporting will be performed for the most part by the University of Virginia.

  9. The empirical war on drugs.

    PubMed

    Vitellone, Nicole

    2013-05-01

    In a special issue of the journal Addictions (1995) academics, researchers and health care professionals debated the status of the empirical in socially orientated drugs research. A number of researchers noted that our knowledge and understanding of drugs and drug users has changed significantly since the 1990s. Post AIDS this shift is identified as a consequence of the development of qualitative research methods. The qualitative turn in drugs research has involved a shift away form traditional epidemiological approaches and the pursuit of more socially focused methods. Whilst qualitative research has yielded important empirical data on risk behavior the pursuit of these methods has not been without controversy. In addressing the debate on methods in the drugs field this article investigates the effects of social science methods for research on injecting drug use. In so doing I examine what counts and what gets left out of research on injecting beaviour. Drawing on Actor Network Theory (ANT) I suggest Bruno Latour's methodological approach offers critical insights for addressing the empirical objects of injecting drug use. PMID:23528994

  10. Two concepts of empirical ethics.

    PubMed

    Parker, Malcolm

    2009-05-01

    The turn to empirical ethics answers two calls. The first is for a richer account of morality than that afforded by bioethical principlism, which is cast as excessively abstract and thin on the facts. The second is for the facts in question to be those of human experience and not some other, unworldly realm. Empirical ethics therefore promises a richer naturalistic ethics, but in fulfilling the second call it often fails to heed the metaethical requirements related to the first. Empirical ethics risks losing the normative edge which necessarily characterizes the ethical, by failing to account for the nature and the logic of moral norms. I sketch a naturalistic theory, teleological expressivism (TE), which negotiates the naturalistic fallacy by providing a more satisfactory means of taking into account facts and research data with ethical implications. The examples of informed consent and the euthanasia debate are used to illustrate the superiority of this approach, and the problems consequent on including the facts in the wrong kind of way. PMID:19338521

  11. Higher Education in Facts & Figures: Research and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This edition of Higher education in facts and figures focusses on Research and innovation. Research and innovation are crucial to the future of the UK's competitiveness. Universities are the prime drivers for this, both through producing, and acting as a magnet for, the best knowledge and talent. The UK's research performance is exceptionally…

  12. Why Do Children Lack the Flexibility to Innovate Tools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Nicola; Apperly, Ian A.; Beck, Sarah R.

    2011-01-01

    Despite being proficient tool users, young children have surprising difficulty in innovating tools (making novel tools to solve problems). Two experiments found that 4- to 7-year-olds had difficulty on two tool innovation problems and explored reasons for this inflexibility. Experiment 1 (N = 51) showed that children's performance was unaffected…

  13. Training for Innovation in India: Cultural Considerations and Strategic Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, L. Roxanne

    2008-01-01

    Global organizations with personnel in India rank innovation as a primary workforce development objective to stay competitive in the global market (NASSCOM, [2007]). This analysis reviews relevant literature for evidence of cultural factors that stand in the way of innovative performance in Indian personnel and discusses implications for the…

  14. Innovation and nested preferential growth in chess playing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, J. I.; Jo, H.-H.; Schaigorodsky, A. L.; Billoni, O. V.

    2013-11-01

    Complexity develops via the incorporation of innovative properties. Chess is one of the most complex strategy games, where expert contenders exercise decision making by imitating old games or introducing innovations. In this work, we study innovation in chess by analyzing how different move sequences are played at the population level. It is found that the probability of exploring a new or innovative move decreases as a power law with the frequency of the preceding move sequence. Chess players also exploit already known move sequences according to their frequencies, following a preferential growth mechanism. Furthermore, innovation in chess exhibits Heaps' law suggesting similarities with the process of vocabulary growth. We propose a robust generative mechanism based on nested Yule-Simon preferential growth processes that reproduces the empirical observations. These results, supporting the self-similar nature of innovations in chess are important in the context of decision making in a competitive scenario, and extend the scope of relevant findings recently discovered regarding the emergence of Zipf's law in chess.

  15. Innovativeness and the Organizational Attributes of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eidell, Terry L.; And Others

    Five papers focus on the interrelated themes of school organization and innovation. They report on some preliminary analyses of field studies conducted during 1968 on such structural, sociocultural, and sociopsychological variables as division of labor, performance of organizational functions, decision making studies and processes, hierarchies of…

  16. Conceptions of Giftedness and Expertise Put to the Empirical Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harder, Bettina; Vialle, Wilma; Ziegler, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Recent handbooks of giftedness or expertise propose a plethora of conceptions on the development of excellent performance but, to our knowledge, there are no comparative studies that provide empirical evidence of their validity to guide researchers and practitioners in their adoption of a particular conception. This study sought to close that gap…

  17. Innovating for cash.

    PubMed

    Andrew, James P; Sirkin, Harold L

    2003-09-01

    Despite companies' almost fanatical worship of innovation, most new products don't generate money. That's because executives don't realize that the approach they take to commercializing a new product is as important as the innovation itself. Different approaches can generate very different levels of profit. Companies tend to favor one of three different innovation approaches, each with its own investment profile, profitability pattern, risk profile, and skill requirements. Most organizations are instinctively integrators: They manage all the steps needed to take a product to market themselves. Organizations can also choose to be orchestrators: They focus on some parts of the commercialization process and depend on partners to manage the rest. And finally, companies can be licensers: They sell or license a new product or idea to another organization that handles the commercialization process. Different innovations require different approaches. Selecting the most suitable approach, the authors' research found, often yields two or three times the profits of the least optimal approach. Yet companies tend to rely only on the mode most familiar to them. Executives would do better to take several different factors into account before deciding which tack to take, including the industry they're trying to enter, the specific characteristics of the innovation, and the risks involved in taking the product to market. By doing so, companies can match the approach to the opportunity and reap the maximum profit. Choosing the wrong approach, like Polaroid did, for example, can lead to the failure of both the product and the company. Optimizing their approaches, as Whirlpool has done, helps ensure that companies' innovations make money. PMID:12964395

  18. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, John Howard; Allen, Todd Randall; Hildebrandt, Philip Clay; Baker, Suzanne Hobbs

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  19. Understanding the adoption dynamics of medical innovations: affordances of the da Vinci robot in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Abrishami, Payam; Boer, Albert; Horstman, Klasien

    2014-09-01

    This study explored the rather rapid adoption of a new surgical device - the da Vinci robot - in the Netherlands despite the high costs and its controversial clinical benefits. We used the concept 'affordances' as a conceptual-analytic tool to refer to the perceived promises, symbolic meanings, and utility values of an innovation constructed in the wider social context of use. This concept helps us empirically understand robot adoption. Data from 28 in-depth interviews with diverse purposively-sampled stakeholders, and from medical literature, policy documents, Health Technology Assessment reports, congress websites and patients' weblogs/forums between April 2009 and February 2014 were systematically analysed from the perspective of affordances. We distinguished five interrelated affordances of the robot that accounted for shaping and fulfilling its rapid adoption: 'characteristics-related' affordances such as smart nomenclature and novelty, symbolising high-tech clinical excellence; 'research-related' affordances offering medical-technical scientific excellence; 'entrepreneurship-related' affordances for performing better-than-the-competition; 'policy-related' affordances indicating the robot's liberalised provision and its reduced financial risks; and 'communication-related' affordances of the robot in shaping patients' choices and the public's expectations by resonating promising discourses while pushing uncertainties into the background. These affordances make the take-up and use of the da Vinci robot sound perfectly rational and inevitable. This Dutch case study demonstrates the fruitfulness of the affordances approach to empirically capturing the contextual dynamics of technology adoption in health care: exploring in-depth actors' interaction with the technology while considering the interpretative spaces created in situations of use. This approach can best elicit real-life value of innovations, values as defined through the eyes of (potential) users. PMID

  20. Regional Resource Centers for Innovation Brochure (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Wogsland, J.

    2000-09-14

    This brochure describes OIT's Regional Resource Centers for Innovation (RCIs), which provide the Innovation and Invention program grantees and other small business energy innovators commercialization assistance.

  1. Community for Innovations: Developing an Integrated Concept for Open Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretschneider, Ulrich; Huber, Michael; Leimeister, Jan Marco; Krcmar, Helmut

    This paper presents a research project called GENIE. It aims at developing a concept for integrating external stakeholders into a company's innovation management through a virtual community. This novel instrument for opening up a company's innovation process to external stakeholders enables collaborative creation and implementation of innovations along the entire innovation process. We focus on software companies and aim at developing and testing this approach in several real-world settings.

  2. A Proposed Integration Environment for Enhanced User Interaction and Value-Adding of Electronic Documents: An Empirical Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liew, Chern Li; Chennupati, K. R.; Foo, Schubert

    2001-01-01

    Explores the potential and impact of an innovative information environment in enhancing user activities in using electronic documents for various tasks, and to support the value-adding of these e-documents. Discusses the conceptual design and prototyping of a proposed environment, PROPIE. Presents an empirical and formative evaluation of the…

  3. Solution mechanism guide: implementing innovation within a research & development organization.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Kathryn E; Richard, Elizabeth E; Davis, Jeffrey R

    2014-10-01

    In order to create a culture more open to novel problem-solving mechanisms, NASA's Human Health and Performance Directorate (HH&P) created a strategic knowledge management tool that educates employees about innovative problem-solving techniques, the Solution Mechanism Guide (SMG). The SMG is a web-based, interactive guide that leverages existing and innovative problem-solving methods and presents this information as a unique user experience so that the employee is empowered to make the best decision about which problem-solving tool best meets their needs. By integrating new and innovative methods with existing problem solving tools, the SMG seamlessly introduces open innovation and collaboration concepts within HH&P to more effectively address human health and performance risks. This commentary reviews the path of creating a more open and innovative culture within HH&P and the process and development steps that were taken to develop the SMG. PMID:25245908

  4. Empirical data from Oort's cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desemme, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Empirical evidence on the size and origin of the Oort cloud of comets is compared with theories on the origin of the Oort cloud. Data on the binding energy of the very long period comets indicate that the Oort cloud is five times smaller than previously thought and that the mean velocity perturbation introduced by stellar passages is smaller than Oort believed. The bimodal brightness distribution of 'new' comets indicates that their formation mechanism is straightforward accretion without later fragmentation. Data on retrograde versus prograde orbits and their relevance to the rotation of the Oort cloud are examined. Models of the solar nebula are discussed in the light of the foregoing evidence.

  5. Developing Communities of Innovation by Identifying Innovation Champions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coakes, Elayne; Smith, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose that a form of communities of practice (CoP), a community of innovation (CoInv), is the best support for sustainable innovation. It aims to outline a method for identifying champions of innovation in organisation. Design/methodology/approach: The paper draws on extant research to argue that…

  6. Innovator: A Tradition of Excellence through Innovation, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Italia, Nancy, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents four Innovator newsletters from the League for Innovation in the Community College (California). Number one contains the following articles: "Focus on Globalization, Learning, and the Human Touch for 1998 Conference on Information Technology,""Internet-in-Education Project Exceeds Goals,""First 'Innovations' Conference…

  7. Diagnosing Organizational Innovation: Measuring the Capacity for Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cropley, David H.; Cropley, Arthur J.; Chiera, Belinda A.; Kaufman, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Organizational innovation involves reconciling many contradictions or paradoxes. Dividing the process of innovation into phases ranging from Activation to Validation and examining each phase in terms of the six Ps of creativity offers a framework for making sense of these contradictions. The Innovation Phase Assessment Instrument (IPAI) was…

  8. Everyday Innovation: Ten Practical Tips for Fostering Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkins, Michael

    2006-01-01

    For educators to be successful in teaching students to step up and become tomorrow's innovators, they must become innovators themselves. Enter school leadership. This article provides 10 practical steps any superintendent, principal, or other administrator can take to help make that happen: (1) Go on record; (2) Model innovation; (3) Pollinate;…

  9. "Innovate-Ideagora": Introducing a New Feature in "Innovate"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Alan; Easton, Denise; Shimabukuro, James N.

    2008-01-01

    Alan McCord, Denise Easton, and James Shimabukuro discuss "Innovate-Ideagora", a new social and professional networking site designed to enhance professional communication in the "Innovate" community. The site will both increase and elevate discussion among "Innovate" readers, providing a forum in which collaboration and complex problem solving…

  10. Tradition and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Honors programs and colleges are sources of innovation and risk-taking, but they often maintain some roots in the origins of their home institutions. From its founding in 1913, when a small group of businessmen gathered to formally study business, to 2015 when that Evening School of Commerce had grown to a vibrant 32,000-student research…

  11. 2008 Campus Technology Innovators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article features the 14 winners of the 2008 Campus Technology Innovators. This article offers an insider's view of the winners' campus technology initiatives, their project leads, and vendor partners jointly recognized for a unique ability to advance teaching, learning, administration, and operation on North American college and university…

  12. TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS AND SOCIETY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MORSE, DEAN; WARNER, AARON W.

    THE PAPERS AND DISCUSSIONS IN THIS BOOK REPRESENT THE DELIBERATIONS OF THE 1964-65 COLUMBIA SEMINAR OF TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN WHICH, DURING REGULAR MONTHLY MEETINGS THROUGHOUT THE ACADEMIC YEAR, A DIVERSE GROUP OF PHYSICAL SCIENTISTS, SOCIAL SCIENTISTS, BUSINESS LEADERS, AND PUBLIC OFFICIALS ATTEMPED TO RELATE TECHNOLOGY TO INNOVATION AND…

  13. Nurturing the Innovative Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, James J.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the innovative minority. Gifted students differ from the average students. There are those who argue that the differences are a matter merely of quantitative degree reference studies of IQ scores, or SAT scores, which are clearly quantitative scales, and point out that gifted students appear at the top level of these scales…

  14. Investing in Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Governors Association, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Investing in Innovation" provides a snapshot of trends in the states and identifies a wide range of strategies now employed. California's big investments, such as $3 billion for stem cell research, have already grabbed national headlines. But states like Arizona, Indiana and North Dakota, which haven't historically been big research and…

  15. Readings in Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gryskiewicz, Stanley S., Ed.; Hills, David A., Ed.

    This book was created to place side by side the ideas of researchers and practitioners concerned with organizational innovation. Included are 18 papers: (1) "Social Environments That Kill Creativity" (Teresa Amabile); (2) "High Creativity versus Low Creativity: What Makes the Difference?" (Teresa Amabile and Sharon Sensabaugh); (3) "Creativity and…

  16. Innovations in Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2000-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" looks at historical and recent innovations in law. The first article examines the code of laws developed by the ancient Hebrews which influenced Roman law, English law, and the U.S. Declaration of Independence and Constitution. The second article explores Thomas Jefferson's writing of the Declaration of…

  17. 2007 Campus Technology Innovators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles the winners of this year's competition for outstanding technology innovation on US college and university campuses. The winners are: (1) Rice University, Texas (virtualized networks); (2) Drexel University, Pennsylvania (rich media); (3) Harvard Business School, Massachusetts (network management); (4) Louisiana State…

  18. Innovations Without Added Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cereghino, Edward

    1974-01-01

    There is no question that we are in a tight money market, and schools are among the first institutions to feel the squeeze. Therefore, when a plan is offered that provides for innovations without added costs, its something worth noting. (Editor)

  19. Innovation and Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on innovation and creativity and their relationship to human resource development (HRD). "Intrapreneurial Programs and Their Impact on Sales, Profit, and Return to Investors" (Melissa H. Marcus, Dennis G. Tesolowski, Clinton H. Isbell) reports on a study in which 100 of 217 randomly selected…

  20. Innovations and School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Jo-Ann; Glaubman, Rivka

    1990-01-01

    Findings from a study of 42 Israeli elementary schools indicate that schools which adopted technological innovation (open education) were characterized by significantly more of the organizational processes associated with the self-renewing school than when schools which adopted managerial (the management team) or multilevel (the management team…

  1. Building an innovation factory.

    PubMed

    Hargadon, A; Sutton, R I

    2000-01-01

    New ideas are the precious currency of the new economy, but generating them doesn't have to be a mysterious process. The image of the lone genius inventing from scratch is a romantic fiction. Businesses that constantly innovate have systematized the production and testing of new ideas, and the system can be replicated by practically any organization. The best innovators use old ideas as the raw materials for new ideas, a strategy the authors call knowledge brokering. The system for sustaining innovation is the knowledge brokering cycle, and the authors discuss its four parts. The first is capturing good ideas from a wide variety of sources. The second is keeping those ideas alive by playing with them, discussing them, and using them. Imagining new uses for old ideas is the third part--some knowledge brokers encourage cross-pollination by creating physical layouts that allow, or even force, people to interact with one another. The fourth is turning promising concepts into real services, products, processes, or business models. Companies can use all or part of the cycle. Large companies in particular desperately need to move ideas from one place to another. Some will want to build full-fledged consulting groups dedicated to internal knowledge brokering. Others can hire people who have faced problems similar to the companies' current problems. The most important lesson is that business leaders must change how they think about innovation, and they must change how their company cultures reflect that thinking. PMID:11183977

  2. Educational Innovations in Bahrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlSaleh, Faiqa Saeed, Ed.

    Information about innovative projects in education in Bahrain is presented in a series of program descriptions collected for the INNODATA Databank of the International Bureau of Education (Geneva), a program of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization. The 36 programs are grouped into the following categories: (1)…

  3. EDUCATIONAL PARTICIPATION AND INNOVATIVENESS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AVERILL, THOMAS B.

    FARMERS WERE CLASSIFIED INTO FOUR GROUPS ACCORDING TO THEIR TENDENCY TO ADOPT FARM PRACTICE INNOVATIONS. PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATIVE ACTIVITIES WAS POSTULATED TO BE RELATED TO THEIR OPENNESS TO NEW IDEAS AND PRACTICES. A STRUCTURED INTERVIEW SCHEDULE WAS USED TO DETERMINE THE FARMERS' PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES--READING BOOKS AND…

  4. Innovation during a Drought.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielden, Derrick

    1981-01-01

    The author presents a number of innovative adult education projects which are being developed despite reduced budgets. These include the use of volunteers in language teaching, training for part-time teachers through a self-running staff development program, new course models, and a television program on entrepreneurship. (CT)

  5. Theme: Innovative Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, David M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "Risking the Future" (Coffey); "Breaking Tradition" (Paynton); "Sustainable Farm Plan Activity" (Vahoviak et al.); "Curriculum Integration and Ornamental Horticulture" (Clark); "Ties That Bind" (Barden et al.); "Building Capacity for an Innovative Elementary Agriscience Curriculum" (Trexler); "Aquaculture Is Agriculture" (Mooring, Hoyle);…

  6. Drive Innovation Faster.

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, Douglas K.

    2005-08-01

    Authored article by Doug Lemon. An expert opinion/thought piece on how PNNL approaches R&D projects, incorporating IP protection earlier in the process of innovation to shorten the development timeline. Article cites example of SMART program to illustrate point.

  7. Innovation, Translation, and Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    The 9th Wound Healing and Tissue Repair and Regeneration Annual Meeting of Chinese Tissue Repair Society was hold in Wuhan, China. This meeting was focused on the innovation, translation application, and cooperation in wound care both in China and other countries. More than 400 delegates took part in this meeting and communicated successfully. PMID:25515372

  8. Innovation Can Be Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cankar, Stanka Setnikar; Cankar, Franc

    2013-01-01

    A two-year project was organised to promote creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship for young people in eight Slovenian regions. The project's aim was to train teacher-mentors, who then trained pupils and worked with them and local community representatives to carry out projects. The paper presents the findings of a project that monitored the…

  9. 2006 Campus Technology Innovators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article features the winners of this year's "Campus Technology Innovator" competition. The winners are: (1) Drexel University, Pennsylvania (outsourcing); (2) Darton College, Georgia (3D); (3) Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (ePortfolios); (4) University of Michigan (the Web); (5) University of Tennessee College of Veterinary…

  10. INNOVATIVE THERMAL DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten innovative technologies for thermally destroying hazardous wastes were selected and described in this paper. hese technologies were either supported by EPA's RCRA or SARA programs or developed by industry since 1980. wo of the important criteria used in selecting these techno...

  11. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2012-01-01

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  12. School Libraries and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Kevin G.

    2015-01-01

    School library programs have measured success by improved test scores. But how do next-generation school libraries demonstrate success as they strive to be centers of innovation and creativity? These libraries offer solutions for school leaders who struggle to restructure existing systems built around traditional silos of learning (subjects and…

  13. Equality, Innovation and Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Offers some ideas concerning promotion of gender equality and diversity within European Union-funded programs and activities. Reviews efforts since the 1970s to foster equal access in European schools and universities, examines some principles of innovation and entrepreneurship, and considers stages in diversity policy development. (DB)

  14. Peer review and innovation.

    PubMed

    Spier, Raymond E

    2002-01-01

    Two important aspects of the relationship between peer review and innovation includes the acceptance of articles for publication in journals and the assessment of applications for grants for the funding of research work. While there are well-known examples of the rejection by journals of first choice of many papers that have radically changed the way we think about the world outside ourselves, such papers do get published eventually, however tortuous the process required. With grant applications the situation differs in that the refusal of a grant necessarily curtails the possible research that may be attempted. Here there are many reasons for conservatism and reservation as to the ability of a grant allocation process based on peer review to deliver truly innovative investigations. Other methods are needed; although such methods need not be applied across the board, they should constitute the methods whereby some 10-20% of the grant monies are assigned. The nomination of prizes for specific accomplishments is one way of achieving innovation although this presumes that investigators or institution already have available the money necessary to effect the innovations; otherwise it is a question of the selection and funding of particular individuals or institutions and requiring them to solve particular problems that are set in the broadest of terms. PMID:11840960

  15. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    ScienceCinema

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2013-05-29

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  16. Recommendations for Neophyte Innovators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Peter J.

    1979-01-01

    The study recorded the origin, development, and implementation of the physical facilities, organizational structure, and program of Chamisa Elementary School, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Recommendations made pertain to administrative and public support, physical facilities, faculty selection, innovating on a limited scale, curriculum development, team…

  17. Federal Barriers to Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Raegen; Lake, Robin

    2012-01-01

    With educational outcomes inadequate, resources tight, and students' academic needs growing more complex, America's education system is certainly ready for technological innovation. And technology itself is ripe to be exploited. Devices harnessing cheap computing power have become smart and connected. Voice recognition, artificial intelligence,…

  18. Inclusive Services Innovation Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. This innovation configuration identifies the components of inclusive services that should be incorporated in teacher…

  19. Semi-Empirical Modeling of SLD Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Potapczuk, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of supercooled large droplets (SLD) in icing have been an area of much interest in recent years. As part of this effort, the assumptions used for ice accretion software have been reviewed. A literature search was performed to determine advances from other areas of research that could be readily incorporated. Experimental data in the SLD regime was also analyzed. A semi-empirical computational model is presented which incorporates first order physical effects of large droplet phenomena into icing software. This model has been added to the LEWICE software. Comparisons are then made to SLD experimental data that has been collected to date. Results will be presented for the comparison of water collection efficiency, ice shape and ice mass.

  20. Delta method, an empirical drag buildup technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feagin, R. C.; Morrison, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    An empirical drag correlation technique was developed from analysis of 19 subsonic and supersonic military aircraft and 15 advanced or supercritical airfoil configurations which can be applied in conceptual and advanced aircraft design activities. The Delta Method may be used for estimating the clean wing drag polar for cruise and maneuver conditions up to buffet onset, and to approximately Mach 2.0. This technique incorporates a unique capability of predicting the off-design performance of advanced or supercritical airfoil sections. The buffet onset limit may also be estimated. The method is applicable to wind tunnel models as well as to full scale configurations. This technique has been converted into a computer code for use on the IBM 360 and CDC 7600 computer facilities at NASA AMES. Results obtained using this method to predict known aircraft characteristics are good and agreement can be obtained within a degree of accuracy judged to be sufficient for the initial processes of preliminary design.

  1. No complexity-stability relationship in empirical ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Claire; Moritz, Charlotte; Morissette, Lyne; Legagneux, Pierre; Massol, François; Archambault, Philippe; Gravel, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for stability and persistence of ecosystems is one of the greatest challenges in ecology. Robert May showed that, contrary to intuition, complex randomly built ecosystems are less likely to be stable than simpler ones. Few attempts have been tried to test May's prediction empirically, and we still ignore what is the actual complexity-stability relationship in natural ecosystems. Here we perform a stability analysis of 116 quantitative food webs sampled worldwide. We find that classic descriptors of complexity (species richness, connectance and interaction strength) are not associated with stability in empirical food webs. Further analysis reveals that a correlation between the effects of predators on prey and those of prey on predators, combined with a high frequency of weak interactions, stabilize food web dynamics relative to the random expectation. We conclude that empirical food webs have several non-random properties contributing to the absence of a complexity-stability relationship. PMID:27553393

  2. No complexity–stability relationship in empirical ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Claire; Moritz, Charlotte; Morissette, Lyne; Legagneux, Pierre; Massol, François; Archambault, Philippe; Gravel, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for stability and persistence of ecosystems is one of the greatest challenges in ecology. Robert May showed that, contrary to intuition, complex randomly built ecosystems are less likely to be stable than simpler ones. Few attempts have been tried to test May's prediction empirically, and we still ignore what is the actual complexity–stability relationship in natural ecosystems. Here we perform a stability analysis of 116 quantitative food webs sampled worldwide. We find that classic descriptors of complexity (species richness, connectance and interaction strength) are not associated with stability in empirical food webs. Further analysis reveals that a correlation between the effects of predators on prey and those of prey on predators, combined with a high frequency of weak interactions, stabilize food web dynamics relative to the random expectation. We conclude that empirical food webs have several non-random properties contributing to the absence of a complexity–stability relationship. PMID:27553393

  3. Trend extraction using empirical mode decomposition and statistical empirical mode decomposition: Case study: Kuala Lumpur stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber, Abobaker M.

    2014-12-01

    Two nonparametric methods for prediction and modeling of financial time series signals are proposed. The proposed techniques are designed to handle non-stationary and non-linearity behave and to extract meaningful signals for reliable prediction. Due to Fourier Transform (FT), the methods select significant decomposed signals that will be employed for signal prediction. The proposed techniques developed by coupling Holt-winter method with Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and it is Extending the scope of empirical mode decomposition by smoothing (SEMD). To show performance of proposed techniques, we analyze daily closed price of Kuala Lumpur stock market index.

  4. UK businesses bag innovation awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Five UK firms have received innovation awards from the Institute of Physics (IOP), which publishes Physics World. Hallmarq Veterinary Imaging, Metrasens, M Squared Lasers, Silixa and Tracerco have all won an IOP award for developing new innovative products.

  5. The Epistemology of Innovator Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, W. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This satire reports an imaginary research study which found three motivations for educational innovation: money, happiness, and garlic. The article facetiously traces the careers of three innovators: the director of an institute, a government official, and a popular writer. (SJL)

  6. Helicopter/Rover Innovation Project

    NASA Video Gallery

    This successful innovation project at the Johnson Space Center was born from some Orion engineers and then joined by engineers from other programs. The innovation teams creation can save funds and ...

  7. Science and the French Empire.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Michael A

    2005-03-01

    Scholarly interest in French colonial science, interpreted to include colonial medical and scientific institutions as well as personages and other "actors" in France serving colonial agendas, has been robust for some two decades. This essay characterizes the complex and interlinked historical relationships between French metropolitan and colonial science as one of asymmetric coevolution. In analyzing scholarship on diverse topics from physics and military technology to colonial botany, medicine, geography, and racial theory, it interrogates the concepts of French nation and French empire and questions the historiographical and explanatory utility of the core-periphery model. Special scrutiny falls on a trope common to historigraphical studies of the postrevolutionary era, that of a firm French nationalism enabling largely rational colonial agendas and the promotion of these agendas by highly centralized Parisian bureaucracies. The essay calls for a reading of French history inclusive of regional colonialist activities and argues for the prevalence of municipal and regional maritime, technological, scientific, and military interests in constructing the modern French empire. PMID:16114803

  8. Uncertainty of empirical correlation equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.; Lovell-Smith, J. W.; Saunders, P.; Seitz, S.

    2016-08-01

    The International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) has published a set of empirical reference equations of state, forming the basis of the 2010 Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater (TEOS-10), from which all thermodynamic properties of seawater, ice, and humid air can be derived in a thermodynamically consistent manner. For each of the equations of state, the parameters have been found by simultaneously fitting equations for a range of different derived quantities using large sets of measurements of these quantities. In some cases, uncertainties in these fitted equations have been assigned based on the uncertainties of the measurement results. However, because uncertainties in the parameter values have not been determined, it is not possible to estimate the uncertainty in many of the useful quantities that can be calculated using the parameters. In this paper we demonstrate how the method of generalised least squares (GLS), in which the covariance of the input data is propagated into the values calculated by the fitted equation, and in particular into the covariance matrix of the fitted parameters, can be applied to one of the TEOS-10 equations of state, namely IAPWS-95 for fluid pure water. Using the calculated parameter covariance matrix, we provide some preliminary estimates of the uncertainties in derived quantities, namely the second and third virial coefficients for water. We recommend further investigation of the GLS method for use as a standard method for calculating and propagating the uncertainties of values computed from empirical equations.

  9. MINERGY CORPORATION GLASS FURNACE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION: INNOVATION TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents performance and economic data for a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program demonstration of the Minergy Corporation (Minergy) Glass Furnace Technology (GFT). The demonstration evaluated the techno...

  10. Building America Top Innovations 2012: EEBA Water Management Guide

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored Water Management Guide, which identifies durability issues and solutions for high-performance homes. The Water Management Guide has sold 15,000 copies since its first printing.

  11. COGNIS TERRAMET® LEAD EXTRACTION PROCESS; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents an evaluation of lead removal from sands and fines fractions of contaminated soils by the COGNIS TERRAMET® lead extraction process (COGNIS process). The evaluation was performed under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund Innovative Technolog...

  12. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Basement Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes research on basement insulation, which identifies the wall installation methods and materials that perform best in terms of insulation and water resistance.

  13. 75 FR 59685 - Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship; the National Advisory Council on Innovation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship; the National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship: National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship AGENCY: Office of Innovation and... Committee on Innovation and Entrepreneurship will hold a meeting via conference call on Tuesday, October...

  14. Innovation Motivation and Artistic Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joy, Stephen P.

    2005-01-01

    Innovation motivation is a social learning model of originality comprising two variables: the need to be different and innovation expectancy. This study examined their contribution to artistic creativity in a sample of undergraduates. Participants completed measures of both innovation motivation variables as well as intelligence, adjustment, and…

  15. Innovative Ideas in Student Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amershek, Kathleen; Barbour, Chandler

    This is a collection of reports on innovative practices in student teaching programs. The label "innovative" is justified on the basis of the investigation's scope. Identification of innovative student teaching practices was accomplished by contacting chief state school officers, chairmen and members of state commissions on teacher education and…

  16. Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David

    2010-01-01

    Each year in judging the Campus Technology Innovators awards, the authors have the privilege of reading through hundreds of fascinating examples of technology innovation on campus. Nominated projects cover the gamut of technology areas, from assessment and advising to wireless and web 2.0. This article presents 11 innovator award winners of this…

  17. Separations innovative concepts: Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.E.

    1988-05-01

    This project summary includes the results of 10 innovations that were funded under the US Department's Innovative Concept Programs. The concepts address innovations that can substantially reduce the energy used in industrial separations. Each paper describes the proposed concept, and discusses the concept's potential energy savings, market applications, technical feasibility, prior work and state of the art, and future development needs.

  18. Innovating Traditional Nursing Administration Challenges.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Lindell; Fowler, Debra

    2016-03-01

    The evolving and complex practice environment calls for new mindsets among nurse leaders, academics, and nurse innovators to envision innovative ways to manage and optimize traditional tasks and processes in nursing administration. The purpose of this article is to present 3 case studies that used linear programming and simulation to innovate staffing enterprises, financial management of healthcare systems, and curricula development. PMID:26906516

  19. Rewiring the network. What helps an innovation to diffuse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna; Szwabiński, Janusz; Weron, Rafał; Weron, Tomasz

    2014-03-01

    A fundamental question related to innovation diffusion is how the structure of the social network influences the process. Empirical evidence regarding real-world networks of influence is very limited. On the other hand, agent-based modeling literature reports different, and at times seemingly contradictory, results. In this paper we study innovation diffusion processes for a range of Watts-Strogatz networks in an attempt to shed more light on this problem. Using the so-called Sznajd model as the backbone of opinion dynamics, we find that the published results are in fact consistent and allow us to predict the role of network topology in various situations. In particular, the diffusion of innovation is easier on more regular graphs, i.e. with a higher clustering coefficient. Moreover, in the case of uncertainty—which is particularly high for innovations connected to public health programs or ecological campaigns—a more clustered network will help the diffusion. On the other hand, when social influence is less important (i.e. in the case of perfect information), a shorter path will help the innovation to spread in the society and—as a result—the diffusion will be easiest on a random graph.

  20. Clean Energy Innovation: Sources of Technical and Commercial Breakthroughs

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, T. D., IV; Miller, M.; Fleming, L.; Younge, K.; Newcomb, J.

    2011-03-01

    Low-carbon energy innovation is essential to combat climate change, promote economic competitiveness, and achieve energy security. Using U.S. patent data and additional patent-relevant data collected from the Internet, we map the landscape of low-carbon energy innovation in the United States since 1975. We isolate 10,603 renewable and 10,442 traditional energy patents and develop a database that characterizes proxy measures for technical and commercial impact, as measured by patent citations and Web presence, respectively. Regression models and multivariate simulations are used to compare the social, institutional, and geographic drivers of breakthrough clean energy innovation. Results indicate statistically significant effects of social, institutional, and geographic variables on technical and commercial impacts of patents and unique innovation trends between different energy technologies. We observe important differences between patent citations and Web presence of licensed and unlicensed patents, indicating the potential utility of using screened Web hits as a measure of commercial importance. We offer hypotheses for these revealed differences and suggest a research agenda with which to test these hypotheses. These preliminary findings indicate that leveraging empirical insights to better target research expenditures would augment the speed and scale of innovation and deployment of clean energy technologies.