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Sample records for inoculated mammary carcinoma-associated

  1. A rat model of bone cancer pain induced by intra-tibia inoculation of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mao-Ying, Q.-L.; Zhao Jun; Dong Zhiqiang; Wang Jun; Yu Jin; Yan Minfen; Zhang Yuqiu; Wu Gencheng; Wang Yanqing . E-mail: wangyanqing@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-07-14

    This study described a modified rat model of bone cancer pain. Syngeneic Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells were injected into the tibia medullary cavity via intercondylar eminence. Series of tests were carried out including bone radiology, bone histology, ambulatory pain, thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, weight bearing ability, and electrophysiological recording from primary afferent fibers. The rats inoculated with carcinoma cells showed significant ambulatory pain, mechanical allodynia, and reduction in weight bearing, as well as increased incidence of spontaneous activity in A{beta} fibers in affected limb, whereas PBS (vehicle) or heat-killed cells (sham) injected rats showed no significant difference in comparison to normal rats. The pain hypersensitive behaviors were aggravated with time and destruction of bone. Interestingly, mechanical allodynia was also observed in the contralateral limb, indicating the involvement of 'mirror image' pain in bone cancer pain. In summary, the present study provided a useful and easily established rat model of bone cancer pain which will contribute to further study of the mechanisms underlying cancer pain.

  2. Comparative expression profiling of E. coli and S. aureus inoculated primary mammary gland cells sampled from cows with different genetic predispositions for somatic cell score

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the past ten years many quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting mastitis incidence and mastitis related traits like somatic cell score (SCS) were identified in cattle. However, little is known about the molecular architecture of QTL affecting mastitis susceptibility and the underlying physiological mechanisms and genes causing mastitis susceptibility. Here, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted to analyze molecular mechanisms of mastitis susceptibility that are affected by a specific QTL for SCS on Bos taurus autosome 18 (BTA18). Thereby, some first insights were sought into the genetically determined mechanisms of mammary gland epithelial cells influencing the course of infection. Methods Primary bovine mammary gland epithelial cells (pbMEC) were sampled from the udder parenchyma of cows selected for high and low mastitis susceptibility by applying a marker-assisted selection strategy considering QTL and molecular marker information of a confirmed QTL for SCS in the telomeric region of BTA18. The cells were cultured and subsequently inoculated with heat-inactivated mastitis pathogens Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. After 1, 6 and 24 h, the cells were harvested and analyzed using the microarray expression chip technology to identify differences in mRNA expression profiles attributed to genetic predisposition, inoculation and cell culture. Results Comparative analysis of co-expression profiles clearly showed a faster and stronger response after pathogen challenge in pbMEC from less susceptible animals that inherited the favorable QTL allele 'Q' than in pbMEC from more susceptible animals that inherited the unfavorable QTL allele 'q'. Furthermore, the results highlighted RELB as a functional and positional candidate gene and related non-canonical Nf-kappaB signaling as a functional mechanism affected by the QTL. However, in both groups, inoculation resulted in up-regulation of genes associated with the Ingenuity

  3. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts: orchestrating the composition of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gascard, Philippe; Tlsty, Thea D

    2016-05-01

    The tumor stroma is no longer seen solely as physical support for mutated epithelial cells but as an important modulator and even a driver of tumorigenicity. Within the tumor stromal milieu, heterogeneous populations of fibroblast-like cells, collectively termed carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), are key players in the multicellular, stromal-dependent alterations that contribute to malignant initiation and progression. This review focuses on novel insights into the contributions of CAFs to disease progression, emergent events leading to the generation of CAFs, identification of CAF-specific biomarkers predictive of disease outcome, and recent therapeutic approaches aimed at blunting or reverting detrimental protumorigenic phenotypes associated with CAFs. PMID:27151975

  4. Automatic agar tray inoculation device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Automatic agar tray inoculation device is simple in design and foolproof in operation. It employs either conventional inoculating loop or cotton swab for uniform inoculation of agar media, and it allows technician to carry on with other activities while tray is being inoculated.

  5. Mammary cancers and pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J M

    1979-01-01

    Uncertainties persist about management and prognosis of mammary cancers that occur during and after pregnancy and during lactation. Pathological features of mammary cancers occurring during pregnancy are the same as those in non-pregnant women and survival rates are comparable. Management should be the same as in non-pregnant patients. Termination of pregnancy does not improve survival but it should be advised if the prognosis is poor. Mastectomy apparently presents little danger to the fetus, though treatment such as chemotherapy and irradiation should be avoided. Women who have received treatment for mammary cancer need not be advised against subsequent pregnancy. Routine ovarian radiation in non-pregnant premenopausal women is not generally to be recommended, since it does not prolong survival and would deprive some of the chance of further pregnancy. In lactating women who develop mammary cancers survival is apparently not adversely affected. Lactation should be suppressed initially and followed by mastectomy. Regimens of immunotherapy, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy may then be begun. Until results of current trials of combined treatments of mammary cancers associated with pregnancy are available, management should be neither aggressive nor tentative. It should be based on a well-balanced concept of applying all available treatments, as in non-pregnant patients. PMID:376044

  6. Ovariectomy is associated with metabolic impairments and enhanced mammary tumor growth in MKR mice.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shmuel, Sarit; Scheinman, Eyal J; Rashed, Rola; Orr, Zila Shen; Gallagher, Emily J; LeRoith, Derek; Rostoker, Ran

    2015-12-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer incidence and mortality. Common features of obesity and T2D are insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. A mammary tumor promoting effect of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia was demonstrated in the transgenic female MKR mouse model of pre-diabetes inoculated with mammary cancer cells. Interestingly, in MKR mice, as well as in other diabetic mouse models, males exhibit severe hyperglycemia, while females display insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia with only a mild increase in blood glucose levels. This gender-specific protection from hyperglycemia may be attributed to estradiol, a key player in the regulation of the metabolic state, including obesity, glucose homeostasis, insulin resistance, and lipid profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ovariectomy (including the removal of endogenous estradiol) on the metabolic state of MKR female mice and subsequently on the growth of Mvt-1 mammary cancer cells, inoculated into the mammary fat pad of ovariectomized mice, compared with sham-operated mice. The results showed an increase in body weight, accompanied by increased fat mass, elevated blood glucose levels, and hypercholesterolemia, in ovariectomized MKR mice. In addition, mammary tumor growth was significantly higher in these mice. The results suggest that ovarian hormone deficiency may promote impaired metabolic homeostasis in the hyperinsulinemic MKR female mice, which in turn is associated with an increased growth of mammary tumors. PMID:26383532

  7. Mammary Glands: Developmental Changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mammary gland progresses from the accumulation of a few cells in the embryonic ectoderm to a highly arborescent tubulo-alveolar gland capable of secreting a highly nutritious product for consumption. Throughout this progression, various changes occur during each developmental stage: prenatal, pr...

  8. Stress inoculation modeled in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brockhurst, J; Cheleuitte-Nieves, C; Buckmaster, C L; Schatzberg, A F; Lyons, D M

    2015-01-01

    Stress inoculation entails intermittent exposure to mildly stressful situations that present opportunities to learn, practice and improve coping in the context of exposure psychotherapies and resiliency training. Here we investigate behavioral and hormonal aspects of stress inoculation modeled in mice. Mice randomized to stress inoculation or a control treatment condition were assessed for corticosterone stress hormone responses and behavior during open-field, object-exploration and tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation training sessions that acutely increased plasma levels of corticosterone diminished subsequent immobility as a measure of behavioral despair on tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation also decreased subsequent freezing in the open field despite comparable levels of thigmotaxis in mice from both treatment conditions. Stress inoculation subsequently decreased novel-object exploration latencies and reduced corticosterone responses to repeated restraint. These results demonstrate that stress inoculation acutely stimulates glucocorticoid signaling and then enhances subsequent indications of active coping behavior in mice. Unlike mouse models that screen for the absence of vulnerability to stress or presence of traits that occur in resilient individuals, stress inoculation training reflects an experience-dependent learning-like process that resembles interventions designed to build resilience in humans. Mouse models of stress inoculation may provide novel insights for new preventive strategies or therapeutic treatments of human psychiatric disorders that are triggered and exacerbated by stressful life events. PMID:25826112

  9. Inoculation in Political Campaign Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfau, Michael; Burgoon, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Posits a strategy of resistance to the influence of attack messages in political campaigns. Finds that political campaign messages can be designed to inoculate supporters of candidates against subsequent attack messages of opposing candidates. (MS)

  10. Expression of different phenotypes in cell lines from canine mammary spindle-cell tumours and osteosarcomas indicating a pluripotent mammary stem cell origin.

    PubMed

    Hellmén, E; Moller, M; Blankenstein, M A; Andersson, L; Westermark, B

    2000-06-01

    Mammary spindle-cell tumours and sarcomas seem to be restricted to dogs and humans. Two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary spindle-cell tumours (CMT-U304 and CMT-U309) and two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary osteosarcomas (CMT-U334 and CMT-U335) were established to study the mesenchymal phenotypes of mammary tumours in the female dog. The cells from the spindle-cell tumours expressed cytokeratin, vimentin and smooth muscle actin filaments. When these cells were inoculated subcutaneously into female and male nude mice they formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as spindle-cell tumours, fibroma and rhabdomyoid tumours (n = 6/8). The cells from the osteosarcomas expressed vimentin filaments and also formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as chondroid, rhabdomyoid, smooth muscle-like and spindle-cell tumours (n = 6/10). The cell lines CMT-U304, CMT-U309 and CMT-U335 had receptors for progesterone but none of the four cell lines had receptors for estrogen. All four cell lines and their corresponding primary tumours showed identical allelic patterns in microsatellite analysis. By in situ hybridization with genomic DNA we could verify that all formed tumours but one were of canine origin. Our results support the hypothesis that canine mammary tumours are derived from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:10965996

  11. Neutrophil recruitment in endotoxin-induced murine mastitis is strictly dependent on mammary alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Sharon; Gonen, Erez; Livneh-Kol, Ayala; Rosenshine, Ilan; Shpigel, Nahum Yehuda

    2009-01-01

    Mastitis, inflammation of the mammary tissue, is a common disease in dairy animals and mammary pathogenic Escherichia coli (MPEC) is a leading cause of the disease. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important virulence factor of MPEC and inoculation of the mammary glands with bacterial LPS is sufficient to induce an inflammatory response. We previously showed using adoptive transfer of normal macrophages into the mammary gland of TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ mice that LPS/TLR4 signaling on mammary alveolar macrophages is sufficient to elicit neutrophil recruitment into the alveolar space. Here we show that TLR4-normal C3H/HeN mice, depleted of alveolar macrophages, were completely refractory to LPS intramammary challenge. These results indicate that alveolar macrophages are both sufficient and essential for neutrophil recruitment elicited by LPS/TLR4 signaling in the mammary gland. Using TNFα gene-knockout mice and adoptive transfer of wild-type macrophages, we show here that TNFα produced by mammary alveolar macrophages in response to LPS/TLR4 signaling is an essential mediator eliciting blood neutrophil recruitment into the milk spaces. Furthermore, using the IL8 receptor or IL1 receptor gene-knockout mice we observed abrogated recruitment of neutrophils into the mammary gland and their entrapment on the basal side of the alveolar epithelium in response to intramammary LPS challenge. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils to IL1 receptor knockout mice, just before LPS challenge, restored normal neutrophil recruitment into the milk spaces. We conclude that neutrophil recruitment to the milk spaces is: (i) mediated through TNFα, which is produced by alveolar macrophages in response to LPS/TLR4 signaling and (ii) is dependent on IL8 and IL1β signaling and regulated by iNOS-derived NO. PMID:19828114

  12. Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J; Flanagan, A

    2000-01-01

    Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease are uncommon intraepithelial adenocarcinomas. Both conditions have similar clinical features, which mimic inflammatory and infective diseases. Histological diagnostic confusion can arise between Paget's disease and other neoplastic conditions affecting the skin, with the most common differential diagnoses being malignant melanoma and atypical squamous disease. The glandular differentiation of both mammary Paget's disease and extramammary Paget's disease is indicated by morphological appearances, the presence of intracellular mucin in many cases, and positive immunohistochemical staining for glandular cytokeratins, epithelial membrane antigen, and carcinoembryonic antigen. This article provides an overview of mammary and extramammary Paget's disease and discusses recent evidence regarding the cell of origin. The concepts of primary and secondary Paget's disease are presented and the differential diagnosis is discussed with reference to immunohistochemical markers that might be of diagnostic value. Key Words: mammary Paget's disease • extramammary Paget's disease PMID:11064666

  13. The antitumor effect of locoregional magnetic cobalt ferrite in dog mammary adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şincai, Mariana; Gângǎ, Diana; Bica, Doina; Vékás, Ladislau

    2001-01-01

    The endocytosis of nanosized magnetic particles by tumor cells led to numerous tests to establish the use of this phenomenon in antitumor therapy. The direct antitumor effect of a biocompatible cobalt-ferrite-based magnetic fluid directly inoculated in bitch mammary tumors was studied. A direct correlation between tumor cell lysis and cobalt ferrite was established in tumors. Massive endocytosis of magnetic particles was observed 1 h after the contact of magnetic fluid with tumor cells.

  14. Expression of prolactin receptors in normal canine mammary tissue, canine mammary adenomas and mammary adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammary tumors represent the most common neoplastic disease in female dogs. Recently, the promoting role of prolactin (PRL) in the development of human breast carcinoma has been shown. Possible proliferative, anti-apoptotic, migratory and angiogenic effects of PRL on human mammary cancer cells in vitro and in vivo were suggested. The effects of PRL are mediated by its receptor, and alterations in receptor expression are likely to play a role in tumor development. Currently, not much data is available about prolactin receptor (PRLR) expression in canine mammary tumors. To set the basis for investigations on the role of PRL in mammary tumorigenesis in this species, prolactin receptor expression was evaluated by semi-quantitative real time PCR and immunohistochemistry on 10 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples each of canine non-neoplastic mammary tissue, mammary adenomas and adenocarcinomas. Results The highest PRLR expression levels were found in normal mammary tissue, while adenomas, and to an even higher degree adenocarcinomas, showed a significant decrease in prolactin receptor expression. Compared to normal tissue, PRLR mRNA was reduced 2.4 fold (p = 0.0261) in adenomas and 4.8 fold (p = 0.008) in adenocarcinomas. PRLR mRNA expression was significantly lower in malignant than in benign lesions (p = 0.0165). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated PRLR expression in all three tissue types with signals mostly limited to epithelial cells. Conclusions Malignant transformation of mammary tissue was associated with a decline in prolactin receptor expression. Further studies are warranted to address the functional significance of this finding. PMID:22647582

  15. Insulin receptors in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding studies were conducted using mammary membrane preparations to further the authors understanding of insulin's role in regulating mammary metabolism, particularly ruminant mammary metabolism. Specific objectives were to: (1) characterize insulin binding to bovine mammary microsomes and determine if the specificity and kinetics of binding indicate the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland; (2) examine and compare insulin binding by liver and mammary microsomes of the pig and dairy cow; (3) examine insulin binding to bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) and evaluate this model's usefulness in assessing insulin receptor regulation in the mammary gland of the cow; (4) examine the effect of dietary fat in insulin binding by rat mammary and liver microsomes. The specificity and kinetics of /sup 125/I-insulin binding of bovine mammary microsomes indicated the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland. Bovine liver and mammary microsomes specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did the corresponding porcine microsomes, and mammary microsomes, regardless of species, specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did liver microsomes. These differences in binding suggest differences in insulin responsiveness between pigs and cattle, as well as between the liver and mammary glands.

  16. A first reported case of clear cell carcinoma associated with delayed extrusion of midurethral tape.

    PubMed

    Lin, Harvard Zhenjia; Wu, Fiona Meiwen; Low, Jeffrey Jen Hui; Venkateswaran, Kotamma; Ng, Roy Kwok Weng

    2016-03-01

    We present the first reported case of clear cell carcinoma associated with a midurethral tape (MUT), the possible hypotheses and the management pitfalls we encountered. We report a 58-year-old woman who presented with symptoms of urinary tract infection and acute retention of urine associated with vaginal tape exposure 10 years after placement of an inside-out transobturator tape. She subsequently had a partial transobturator tape excision and a diagnostic cystoscopy, which revealed inflammatory changes within the urethra. Postoperatively, her symptoms persisted and the vaginal epithelium healed poorly. A biopsy of the friable tissue reported clear cell carcinoma. Imaging showed a locally invasive periurethral mass and bony and lymphatic metastases. This was treated with palliative radiation therapy. She was still receiving palliative care 5 months after the initial surgery. PMID:26590136

  17. [Mucin-like carcinoma-associated antigen: sensitivity and specificity in metastatic breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ammon, A; Eiffert, H; Alhusen, R; Weber, M; Rümelin, B; Groh, E; Bartsch, H; Marschner, N; Nagel, G A; Krieger, G

    1990-06-01

    The clinical usefulness of a tumor marker essentially depends on its sensitivity and specificity for a certain tumor. To prove, wheather the new tumor marker 'mucin-like carcinoma-associated antigen' could be used for the management of breast cancer patients, we determined its serum concentration in 50 healthy blood donors, 130 patients with various non-malignant diseases, 138 patients with different metastazised tumors and 137 breast cancer patients. 78 of the breast cancer patients had known metastases while 59 had no evidence of disease after initial surgical and adjuvant therapy. Only 2% of the blood donors and 3% of the patients with non-malignant diseases exceeded the cut-off level of 15 U/ml. In contrast to these findings, 28% of patients with various metastazised tumors and 77% of patients with metastazised breast cancer had serum levels above 15 U/ml. Breast cancer patients without evidence of disease had elevated marker values in only 3%. In breast cancer the serum levels of this antigen depends on the type of metastases. Maximal concentrations were found in mixed metastases while cutaneous or lymph-node metastases showed the lowest rate of positivity. Furthermore a good correlation of serial determined marker levels with the course of the disease was observed, so that we conclude, that mucin-like carcinoma-associated antigen can be used in follow-up of patients with metastazised breast cancer. Because of its high sensitivity and specificity it provides some advantage over other markers used in this disease. PMID:2204009

  18. The Mammary Glands of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Cline, J. Mark; Wood, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    This review describes the normal biology and physiology of the mammary gland in macaques, including the typical histologic appearance across the life span (development, reproductive maturity, lactation, and senescence). The molecular events regulating breast morphogenesis are described, as well as systemic and local hormonal regulators of mammary gland proliferation, differentiation, and function. Similarities and differences to the human breast are described. Regulatory events are illuminated by discussion of genetically modified mouse models. Tissue response markers, including immunohistochemical markers of proliferation and other hormonally induced changes and studies to date, regarding the effects of exogenous hormones, are briefly summarized. In general, estrogens stimulate progesterone receptor expression and proliferation in the mammary gland, and combinations of estrogens and progestogens cause greater proliferation than estrogens alone. Evaluation of novel chemical agents in macaques requires careful evaluation of age and hormonal context to avoid the confounding effects of mammary gland development, past reproductive history, and other influences on mammary gland morphology. The expression of proliferation markers and progesterone receptors may be used as biomarkers to measure chemically induced hormonal effects. PMID:21475638

  19. T2* relaxation times of intraductal murine mammary cancer, invasive mammary cancer, and normal mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Elizabeth; Fan, Xiaobing; Jansen, Sanaz A.; Markiewicz, Erica J.; Vosicky, James; Newstead, Gillian M.; Conzen, Suzanne D.; Krausz, Thomas; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the feasibility of T2* to be a diagnostic indicator of early breast cancer in a mouse model. T2* is sensitive to susceptibility effects due to local inhomogeneity of the magnetic field, e.g., caused by hemosiderin or deoxyhemoglobin. In these mouse models, unlike in patients, the characteristics of single mammary ducts containing pure intraductal cancer can be evaluated. Methods: The C3(1)SV40Tag mouse model of breast cancer (n = 11) and normal FVB/N mice (n = 6) were used to measure T2* of normal mammary gland tissue, intraepithelial neoplasia, invasive cancers, mammary lymph nodes, and muscle. MRI experiments were performed on a 9.4T animal scanner. High resolution (117 microns) axial 2D multislice gradient echo images with fat suppression were acquired first to identify inguinal mammary gland. Then a multislice multigradient echo pulse sequence with and without fat suppression were performed over the inguinal mammary gland. The modulus of a complex double exponential decay detected by the multigradient echo sequence was used to fit the absolute proton free induction decay averaged over a region of interest to determine the T2* of water and fat signals. Results: The measured T2* values of tumor and muscle are similar (∼15 ms), and almost twice that of lymph nodes (∼8 ms). There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.03) between T2* in normal mammary tissue (13.7 ± 2.9 ms) and intraductal cancers (11 ± 2.0 ms) when a fat suppression pulse was applied. Conclusions: These are the first reported T2* measurements from single mammary ducts. The results demonstrated that T2* measurements may have utility for identifying early pre-invasive cancers in mouse models. This may inspire similar research for patients using T2* for diagnostic imaging of early breast cancer. PMID:22380363

  20. Cellular Foundations of Mammary Tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huebner, Robert J.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The mammary gland is composed of a highly branched network of epithelial tubes, embedded within a complex stroma. The mammary epithelium originates during embryonic development from an epidermal placode. However, the majority of ductal elongation and bifurcation occurs postnatally, in response to steroid hormone and growth factor receptor signaling. The process of pubertal branching morphogenesis involves both elongation of the primary ducts across the length of the fat pad and a wave of secondary branching that elaborates the ductal network. Recent studies have revealed that mammary epithelial morphogenesis is accomplished by transitions between simple and stratified organization. During active morphogenesis, the epithelium is stratified, highly proliferative, has few intercellular junctions, and exhibits incomplete apico-basal polarity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between epithelial architecture, epithelial polarity, and ductal elongation. PMID:24747369

  1. The Impact of Intramammary Escherichia coli Challenge on Liver and Mammary Transcriptome and Cross-Talk in Dairy Cows during Early Lactation Using RNAseq

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, K. M.; Sørensen, P.; Bionaz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to identify the biological response and the cross-talk between liver and mammary tissue after intramammary infection (IMI) with Escherichia coli (E. coli) using RNAseq technology. Sixteen cows were inoculated with live E. coli into one mammary quarter at ~4–6 weeks in lactation. For all cows, biopsies were performed at -144, 12 and 24 h relative to IMI in liver and at 24 h post-IMI in infected and non-infected (control) mammary quarters. For a subset of cows (n = 6), RNA was extracted from both liver and mammary tissue and sequenced using a 100 bp paired-end approach. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and the Dynamic Impact Approach analysis of differentially expressed genes (overall effect False Discovery Rate≤0.05) indicated that IMI induced an overall activation of inflammation at 12 h post-IMI and a strong inhibition of metabolism, especially related to lipid, glucose, and xenobiotics at 24 h post-IMI in liver. The data indicated in mammary tissue an overall induction of inflammatory response with little effect on metabolism at 24 h post-IMI. We identified a large number of up-stream regulators potentially involved in the response to IMI in both tissues but a relatively small core network of transcription factors controlling the response to IMI for liver whereas a large network in mammary tissue. Transcriptomic results in liver and mammary tissue were supported by changes in inflammatory and metabolic mediators in blood and milk. The analysis of potential cross-talk between the two tissues during IMI uncovered a large communication from the mammary tissue to the liver to coordinate the inflammatory response but a relatively small communication from the liver to the mammary tissue. Our results indicate a strong induction of the inflammatory response in mammary tissue and impairment of liver metabolism 24h post-IMI partly driven by the signaling from infected mammary tissue. PMID:27336699

  2. The Impact of Intramammary Escherichia coli Challenge on Liver and Mammary Transcriptome and Cross-Talk in Dairy Cows during Early Lactation Using RNAseq.

    PubMed

    Moyes, K M; Sørensen, P; Bionaz, M

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to identify the biological response and the cross-talk between liver and mammary tissue after intramammary infection (IMI) with Escherichia coli (E. coli) using RNAseq technology. Sixteen cows were inoculated with live E. coli into one mammary quarter at ~4-6 weeks in lactation. For all cows, biopsies were performed at -144, 12 and 24 h relative to IMI in liver and at 24 h post-IMI in infected and non-infected (control) mammary quarters. For a subset of cows (n = 6), RNA was extracted from both liver and mammary tissue and sequenced using a 100 bp paired-end approach. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and the Dynamic Impact Approach analysis of differentially expressed genes (overall effect False Discovery Rate≤0.05) indicated that IMI induced an overall activation of inflammation at 12 h post-IMI and a strong inhibition of metabolism, especially related to lipid, glucose, and xenobiotics at 24 h post-IMI in liver. The data indicated in mammary tissue an overall induction of inflammatory response with little effect on metabolism at 24 h post-IMI. We identified a large number of up-stream regulators potentially involved in the response to IMI in both tissues but a relatively small core network of transcription factors controlling the response to IMI for liver whereas a large network in mammary tissue. Transcriptomic results in liver and mammary tissue were supported by changes in inflammatory and metabolic mediators in blood and milk. The analysis of potential cross-talk between the two tissues during IMI uncovered a large communication from the mammary tissue to the liver to coordinate the inflammatory response but a relatively small communication from the liver to the mammary tissue. Our results indicate a strong induction of the inflammatory response in mammary tissue and impairment of liver metabolism 24h post-IMI partly driven by the signaling from infected mammary tissue. PMID:27336699

  3. The roles of tumor- and metastasis-promoting carcinoma-associated fibroblasts in human carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Mezawa, Yoshihiro; Orimo, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) constitute a substantial proportion of the non-neoplastic mesenchymal cell compartment in various human tumors. These fibroblasts are phenotypically converted from their progenitors via interactions with nearby cancer cells during the course of tumor progression. The resulting CAFs, in turn, support the growth and progression of carcinoma cells. These fibroblasts have a major influence on the hallmarks of carcinoma and promote tumor malignancy through the secretion of tumor-promoting growth factors, cytokines and exosomes, as well as through the remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Coevolution of CAFs and carcinoma cells during tumorigenesis is therefore essential for progression into fully malignant tumors. Recent studies have revealed the molecular mechanisms underlying CAF functions, especially in tumor invasion, metastasis and drug resistance and have highlighted the significant heterogeneity among these cells. In this review, we summarize the impacts of recently identified roles of tumor-promoting CAFs and discuss the therapeutic implications of targeting the heterotypic interactions of these fibroblasts with carcinoma cells. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27506216

  4. The Mesothelial Origin of Carcinoma Associated-Fibroblasts in Peritoneal Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Rynne-Vidal, Angela; Jiménez-Heffernan, José Antonio; Fernández-Chacón, Concepción; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Sandoval, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumors are complex and unstructured organs that, in addition to cancer cells, also contain other cell types. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent an important population in the tumor microenviroment and participate in several stages of tumor progression, including cancer cell migration/invasion and metastasis. During peritoneal metastasis, cancer cells detach from the primary tumor, such as ovarian or gastrointestinal, disseminate through the peritoneal fluid and colonize the peritoneum. Tumor cells metastasize by attaching to and invading through the mesothelial cell (MC) monolayer that lines the peritoneal cavity, then colonizing the submesothelial compact zone where CAFs accumulate. CAFs may derive from different sources depending on the surrounding metastatic niche. In peritoneal metastasis, a sizeable subpopulation of CAFs originates from MCs through a mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT), which promotes adhesion, invasion, vascularization and subsequent tumor growth. The bidirectional communication between cancer cells and MC-derived CAFs via secretion of a wide range of cytokines, growth factors and extracellular matrix components seems to be crucial for the establishment and progression of the metastasis in the peritoneum. This manuscript provides a comprehensive review of novel advances in understanding how peritoneal CAFs provide cancer cells with a supportive microenvironment, as well as the development of future therapeutic approaches by interfering with the MMT in the peritoneum. PMID:26426054

  5. Antitumor effect of temsirolimus against oral squamous cell carcinoma associated with bone destruction.

    PubMed

    Okui, Tatsuo; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Fukazawa, Takuya; Kurio, Naito; Hassan, Nur Mohammad Monsur; Honami, Tatsuki; Takaoka, Munenori; Naomoto, Yoshio; Sasaki, Akira

    2010-11-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is engaged in the molecular pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma, which frequently invades the maxilla or the mandible. However, the effects of a mTOR inhibitor on bone destruction associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of temsirolimus-mediated mTOR inhibition against advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma. Temsirolimus inhibited the proliferation and migration of HSC-2 oral squamous cell carcinoma cells in vitro and suppressed the growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in vivo. Significantly, we clearly show that temsirolimus inhibited osteoclast formation both in vitro and in vivo. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that temsirolimus decreased the mRNA expression of receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand, known as an osteoclast differentiation factor in bone stromal ST2 cells. Moreover, temsirolimus normalized blood-free calcium concentration in mouse models for humoral hypercalcemia. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling is a potential target of oral squamous cell carcinoma associated with bone destruction, and hence we describe the efficacy of temsirolimus for the treatment of advanced oral squamous carcinoma. PMID:20858724

  6. Reprogramming carcinoma associated fibroblasts by AC1MMYR2 impedes tumor metastasis and improves chemotherapy efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yu; Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Xia; Jia, Huan-huan; Zhao, Xiao-hui; Wang, Qi-xue; Han, Lei; Song, Xin; Zhu, Zhi-yan; Sun, Ting; Jiao, Hong-xiao; Tian, Wei-ping; Yang, Yu-qi; Zhao, Xiu-lan; Zhang, Lun; Mei, Mei; Kang, Chun-sheng

    2016-04-28

    Carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) produce a nutrient-rich microenvironment to fuel tumor progression and metastasis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and the inflammation pathway co-operate to transform CAFs. Therefore, elucidating the mechanism mediating the activity of CAFs might identify novel therapies. Abnormal miR-21 expression was reported to be involved in the conversion of resident fibroblasts to CAFs, yet the factor that drives transformation was poorly understood. Here, we reported that high miR-21 expression was strongly associated with lymph node metastasis in breast cancer, and the activation of the miR-21/NF-кB was required for the metastatic promoting effect of CAFs. AC1MMYR2, a small molecule inhibitor of miR-21, attenuated NF-кB activity by directly targeting VHL, thereby blocking the co-precipitation of NF-кB and ß-catenin and nuclear translocation. Taxol failed to constrain the aggressive behavior of cancer cells stimulated by CAFs, whereas AC1MMYR2 plus taxol significantly suppressed tumor migration and invasion ability. Remodeling and depolarization of F-actin, decreased levels of β-catenin and vimentin, and increased E-cadherin were also detected in the combination therapy. Furthermore, reduced levels of FAP-α and α-SMA were observed, suggesting that AC1MMYR2 was competent to reprogram CAFs via the NF-кB/miR-21/VHL axis. Strikingly, a significant reduction of tumor growth and lung metastasis was observed in the combination treated mice. Taken together, our findings identified miR-21 as a critical mediator of metastasis in breast cancer through the tumor environment. AC1MMYR2 may be translated into the clinic and developed as a more personalized and effective neoadjuvant treatment for patients to reduce metastasis and improve the chemotherapy response. PMID:26872723

  7. Gallbladder carcinoma associated with occult pancreatobiliary reflux in the absence of pancreaticobiliary maljunction.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Mitsuhiro; Goto, Junichi; Suzuki, Shigeki; Ishizaki, Akira; Tanno, Satoshi; Kohgo, Yutaka; Tokusashi, Yoshihiko; Miyokawa, Naoyuki; Kasai, Shinichi

    2007-01-01

    We herein report a case of gallbladder carcinoma associated with occult pancreatobiliary reflux (PR) in the absence of pancreatobiliary maljunction. A 67-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for the evaluation and treatment of a gallbladder tumor. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a nodular lesion in the fundus of the gallbladder, indicating the possibility of a gallbladder carcinoma. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed the nodular tumor and thickness of the surrounding epithelium. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a normal pancreaticobiliary junction without the common channel and a slight dilatation of the common bile duct (15 mm in diameter). An open cholecystectomy and partial resection of the liver bed of the gallbladder with regional lymphadenectomy was performed. A C-tube was inserted from the cut end of the cystic duct into the common bile duct to prevent bile stasis. Biliary amylase and lipase levels sampled in the gallbladder were 2604 IU/l and 775 IU/l, respectively. Biliary amylase level in the bile collected from the C-tube in the common bile duct was 119 550 IU/l on postoperative day (POD) 6 and 22 265 IU/l on POD 12. These observations suggested that PR was present in this patient. The histopathological findings of the resected specimen showed a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with invasion to the muscle layer and no metastasis of the resected lymph nodes. A high index of nuclear staining for MIB-I in the cancer cells (about 10%) was exhibited, and a few cells in the normal epithelium also stained positive. PMID:17909727

  8. Value of Mammary Thermography in Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, B. E.; Burn, J. Ian; MacErlean, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Thermographic examinations of the breasts were carried out in 359 women, most of whom had mammary symptoms. Of the 195 patients with abnormal thermograms, 27 had cancer of the breast, 53 had benign lesions, and 115 had no confirmed organic disease. The incidence of false-positive thermograms was 59%. Of the 164 patients with normal thermograms, 116 had no confirmed organic disease, 41 had benign lesions, and 7 had cancer. The incidence of false-negative mammary thermograms was 29%. We conclude that mammary thermography is of no practical value in the differential diagnosis of symptomatic mammary disease. PMID:5022040

  9. Glucose transporter expression in rat mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Burnol, A F; Leturque, A; Loizeau, M; Postic, C; Girard, J

    1990-01-01

    The expression of different glucose transporter isoforms was measured during the development and differentiation of the rat mammary gland. Before conception, when the mammary gland is mainly composed of adipocytes, Glut 4 and Glut 1 mRNAs and proteins were present. During pregnancy, the expression of Glut 4 decreased progressively, whereas that of Glut 1 increased. In the lactating mammary gland only Glut 1 was present, and was expressed at a high level. The absence of Glut 4 suggests that glucose transport is not regulated by insulin in the lactating rat mammary gland. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2396989

  10. Canine mammary tumours, an overview.

    PubMed

    Sleeckx, N; de Rooster, H; Veldhuis Kroeze, E J B; Van Ginneken, C; Van Brantegem, L

    2011-12-01

    Canine mammary tumours (CMTs) are the most common neoplasms in intact female dogs. Although the prevalence of these tumours decreases in regions where preventive ovari(ohyster)ectomy is performed, it remains an important disease entity in veterinary medicine. Moreover, treatment options are limited in comparison with human breast cancer. Nevertheless, recent human treatment protocols might have potential in bitches suffering from CMTs. PMID:21645126

  11. Mammary neoplasms of the bitch.

    PubMed

    Cotchin, E

    1958-01-01

    In this paper, the interrelationships of the neoplasms of the canine mammary gland are investigated. These neoplasms are a group of tumors of a great variety of histological structure and sometimes of uncertain histogenesis. Particular attention is given to the histogenesis of the mucoid, cartilaginous, and bony elements. From 1950-56, a macroscopic and histological examination of mammary neoplasms from 424 bitches (2-17 years of age) was made. The tumors from 381 bitches were removed surgically while the others came from 43 bitches who were examined postmortem. Of the 160 tumors whose location was recorded, 105 occurred in the 2 hinder glands, 19 in the middle glands, and 46 in one or another of the 2 anterior glands. 186 of the 424 bitches bore malignant mammary tumors (87 carcinomas, 73 sarcomas, 27 complex malignant tumors) and 249 had benign tumors (19 simple and 230 complex). 40 of the benign complex tumors contained bone, an additional 63 contained cartilage but no bone, and 67 showed mucoid tissue but no cartilage or bone. It is suggested that there is a predominant proliferation of myoepithelial cells which tend to become embedded in a mucoid or chondroid matrix. The bone in the tumors appears to be formed by endochondral ossification of preformed cartilage, or by intramembranous ossification in the connective tissue of the tumor. Metastases were present in 41 of the 424 bitches. PMID:12311486

  12. Changes in rumen bacterial community composition following feeding of silage inoculated with a commercial silage inoculant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some silage inoculants yield an increase in milk production without increasing fiber digestibility, possibly through altering the rumen microflora. We hypothesized that silage treated with a commercial inoculant (Lactobacillus plantarum, LP) would improve milk production and would alter rumen bacter...

  13. Evo-devo of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, Olav T; Dhouailly, Danielle

    2013-06-01

    We propose a new scenario for mammary evolution based on comparative review of early mammary development among mammals. Mammary development proceeds through homologous phases across taxa, but evolutionary modifications in early development produce different final morphologies. In monotremes, the mammary placode spreads out to form a plate-like mammary bulb from which more than 100 primary sprouts descend into mesenchyme. At their distal ends, secondary sprouts develop, including pilosebaceous anlagen, resulting in a mature structure in which mammary lobules and sebaceous glands empty into the infundibula of hair follicles; these structural triads (mammolobular-pilo-sebaceous units or MPSUs) represent an ancestral condition. In marsupials a flask-like mammary bulb elongates as a sprout, but then hollows out; its secondary sprouts include hair and sebaceous anlagen (MPSUs), but the hairs are shed during nipple formation. In some eutherians (cat, horse, human) MPSUs form at the distal ends of primary sprouts; pilosebaceous components either regress or develop into mature structures. We propose that a preexisting structural triad (the apocrine-pilo-sebaceous unit) was incorporated into the evolving mammary structure, and coupled to additional developmental processes that form the mammary line, placode, bulb and primary sprout. In this scenario only mammary ductal trees and secretory tissue derive from ancestral apocrine-like glands. The mammary gland appears to have coopted signaling pathways and genes for secretory products from even earlier integumentary structures, such as odontode (tooth-like) or odontode-derived structures. We speculate that modifications in signal use (such as PTHrP and BMP4) may contribute to taxonomic differences in MPSU development. PMID:23681303

  14. Seeding Stress Resilience through Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Ashokan, Archana; Sivasubramanian, Meenalochani; Mitra, Rupshi

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a generalized set of physiological and psychological responses observed when an organism is placed under challenging circumstances. The stress response allows organisms to reattain the equilibrium in face of perturbations. Unfortunately, chronic and/or traumatic exposure to stress frequently overwhelms coping ability of an individual. This is manifested as symptoms affecting emotions and cognition in stress-related mental disorders. Thus environmental interventions that promote resilience in face of stress have much clinical relevance. Focus of the bulk of relevant neurobiological research at present remains on negative aspects of health and psychological outcomes of stress exposure. Yet exposure to the stress itself can promote resilience to subsequent stressful episodes later in the life. This is especially true if the prior stress occurs early in life, is mild in its magnitude, and is controllable by the individual. This articulation has been referred to as “stress inoculation,” reminiscent of resilience to the pathology generated through vaccination by attenuated pathogen itself. Using experimental evidence from animal models, this review explores relationship between nature of the “inoculum” stress and subsequent psychological resilience. PMID:26881112

  15. Tumor-produced, active Interleukin-1 {beta} regulates gene expression in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, Jozsef; Fullar, Alexandra; Bitsche, Mario; Schartinger, Volker; Kovalszky, Ilona; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2011-09-10

    Recently we described a co-culture model of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts and SCC-25 lingual squamous carcinoma cells, which resulted in conversion of normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of SCC-25 cells. We have found a constitutive high interleukin-1{beta} (IL1-{beta}) expression in SCC-25 cells in normal and in co-cultured conditions. In our hypothesis a constitutive IL1-{beta} expression in SCC-25 regulates gene expression in fibroblasts during co-culture. Co-cultures were performed between PDL fibroblasts and SCC-25 cells with and without dexamethasone (DEX) treatment; IL1-{beta} processing was investigated in SCC-25 cells, tumor cells and PDL fibroblasts were treated with IL1-{beta}. IL1-{beta} signaling was investigated by western blot and immunocytochemistry. IL1-{beta}-regulated genes were analyzed by real-time qPCR. SCC-25 cells produced 16 kD active IL1-{beta}, its receptor was upregulated in PDL fibroblasts during co-culture, which induced phosphorylation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1), and nuclear translocalization of NF{kappa}B{alpha}. Several genes, including interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2) were induced in CAFs during co-culture. The most enhanced induction was found for IL-6 and COX-2. Treatment of PDL fibroblasts with IL1-{beta} reproduced a time- and dose-dependent upregulation of IL1-receptor, IL-6 and COX-2. A further proof was achieved by DEX inhibition for IL1-{beta}-stimulated IL-6 and COX-2 gene expression. Constitutive expression of IL1-{beta} in the tumor cells leads to IL1-{beta}-stimulated gene expression changes in tumor-associated fibroblasts, which are involved in tumor progression. -- Graphical abstract: SCC-25 cells produce active, processed IL1-{beta}. PDL fibroblasts possess receptor for IL1-{beta}, and its expression is increased 4.56-times in the

  16. B and T cells are required for mouse mammary tumor virus spread within the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Golovkina, T V; Dudley, J P; Ross, S R

    1998-09-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is an infectious retrovirus transmitted through milk from mother to newborns. MMTV encodes a superantigen (SAg) whose activity is indispensable for the virus life cycle, since a genetically engineered virus with a mutation in the sag gene neither amplified in cells of the immune system of suckling pups nor infected their mammary glands. When wild-type MMTV was injected directly into the mammary glands of uninfected pubescent mice, their lymphoid as well as mammary gland cells became virus infected. To test whether this infection of lymphoid cells was dependent on SAg activity and required for virus spread within the mammary gland, we performed mammary gland injections of wild-type MMTV(C3H) into two strains of transgenic mice that lacked SAg-cognate, V beta 14+ T cells. Neither the MTV-ORF or LEL strains showed infection of their mammary glands. Moreover, no MMTV infection of their peripheral lymphocytes was detected. Similar experiments with mice lacking B cells (mu-chain knockouts) showed no detectable virus spread in the mammary glands or lymphoid tissues. These data suggest that SAg activity and MMTV-infected lymphocytes are required, not only for initial steps of viral infection, but also for virus spread within the mammary gland. Virus spread at late times in infection determines whether MMTV induces mammary tumors. PMID:9725233

  17. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    DOEpatents

    Triplett, Eric W.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; Chelius, Marisa K.

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  18. Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease*

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lauro Lourival; Lopes, Ione Maria Ribeiro Soares; Lopes, Lauro Rodolpho Soares; Enokihara, Milvia M. S. S.; Michalany, Alexandre Osores; Matsunaga, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease, described by Sir James Paget in 1874, is classified as mammary and extramammary. The mammary type is rare and often associated with intraductal cancer (93-100% of cases). It is more prevalent in postmenopausal women and it appears as an eczematoid, erythematous, moist or crusted lesion, with or without fine scaling, infiltration and inversion of the nipple. It must be distinguished from erosive adenomatosis of the nipple, cutaneous extension of breast carcinoma, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, chronic eczema, lactiferous ducts ectasia, Bowen's disease, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma and intraductal papilloma. Diagnosis is histological and prognosis and treatment depend on the type of underlying breast cancer. Extramammary Paget's disease is considered an adenocarcinoma originating from the skin or skin appendages in areas with apocrine glands. The primary location is the vulvar area, followed by the perianal region, scrotum, penis and axillae. It starts as an erythematous plaque of indolent growth, with well-defined edges, fine scaling, excoriations, exulcerations and lichenification. In most cases it is not associated with cancer, although there are publications linking it to tumors of the vulva, vagina, cervix and corpus uteri, bladder, ovary, gallbladder, liver, breast, colon and rectum. Differential diagnoses are candidiasis, psoriasis and chronic lichen simplex. Histopathology confirms the diagnosis. Before treatment begins, associated malignancies should be investigated. Surgical excision and micrographic surgery are the best treatment options, although recurrences are frequent. PMID:25830993

  19. Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Lopes Filho, Lauro Lourival; Lopes, Ione Maria Ribeiro Soares; Lopes, Lauro Rodolpho Soares; Enokihara, Milvia M S S; Michalany, Alexandre Osores; Matsunaga, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease, described by Sir James Paget in 1874, is classified as mammary and extramammary. The mammary type is rare and often associated with intraductal cancer (93-100% of cases). It is more prevalent in postmenopausal women and it appears as an eczematoid, erythematous, moist or crusted lesion, with or without fine scaling, infiltration and inversion of the nipple. It must be distinguished from erosive adenomatosis of the nipple, cutaneous extension of breast carcinoma, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, chronic eczema, lactiferous ducts ectasia, Bowen's disease, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma and intraductal papilloma. Diagnosis is histological and prognosis and treatment depend on the type of underlying breast cancer. Extramammary Paget's disease is considered an adenocarcinoma originating from the skin or skin appendages in areas with apocrine glands. The primary location is the vulvar area, followed by the perianal region, scrotum, penis and axillae. It starts as an erythematous plaque of indolent growth, with well-defined edges, fine scaling, excoriations, exulcerations and lichenification. In most cases it is not associated with cancer, although there are publications linking it to tumors of the vulva, vagina, cervix and corpus uteri, bladder, ovary, gallbladder, liver, breast, colon and rectum. Differential diagnoses are candidiasis, psoriasis and chronic lichen simplex. Histopathology confirms the diagnosis. Before treatment begins, associated malignancies should be investigated. Surgical excision and micrographic surgery are the best treatment options, although recurrences are frequent. PMID:25830993

  20. Mouse mammary tumor biology: a short history.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology, and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration, in 1984, that the mouse mammary gland could be molecularly targeted and used to test the oncogenicity of candidate human genes. Now, very few scientists can avoid using a mouse model to test the biology of their favorite gene. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skills to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this short history of mouse mammary tumor biology is to provide a historical perspective for the benefit of the newcomers. If Einstein was correct in that "we stand on the shoulders of giants," the neophytes should meet their giants. PMID:17433908

  1. Inoculated Slightly Hypereutectic Gray Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisamera, Mihai; Riposan, Iulian; Stan, Stelian; Militaru, Cristina; Anton, Irina; Barstow, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The current experimental investigation in this article was designed to characterize the structure of mold (M) and ladle (L) inoculated, low-S (0.025 wt.% S), low-Al (0.003 wt.% Al), slightly hypereutectic (CE = 4.4-4.5 wt.%) electric melted gray irons, typical for high performance thin-wall castings. It describes the effect of a Ca, Al, Zr-FeSi inoculant addition of 0-0.25 wt.% on structure characteristics, and compares to similar treatments with hypoeutectic irons (3.5-3.6 wt.% CE, 0.025 wt.% S, and 0.003 wt.% Al). A complex structure including primary graphite, austenite dendrites, and eutectic cells is obtained in hypereutectic irons, as the result of nonequilibrium solidification following the concept of a coexisting region. Dendrites appear to be distributed between eutectic cells at higher eutectic undercooling, while in inoculated irons and for lower undercooling, the eutectic cells are "reinforced" by eutectic austenite dendrites. A Zr, Ca, Al-FeSi alloy appears to be an effective inoculant in low S, low Al, gray cast irons, especially for a late inoculation technique, with beneficial effects on both graphite and austenite phases. First, inoculation influenced the nucleation of graphite/eutectic cell, and then their characteristics. A further role of these active elements directly contributed to form nucleation sites for austenite, as complex (Mn,X)S particles.

  2. Mammary gland tumors in captive African hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Gerner, M

    2000-04-01

    From December 1995 to July 1999, eight mammary gland tumors were diagnosed in eight adult captive female African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris). The tumors presented as single or multiple subcutaneous masses along the cranial or caudal abdomen that varied in size for each hedgehog. Histologically, seven of eight (88%) mammary gland tumors were malignant. Tumors were classified as solid (4 cases), tubular (2 cases), and papillary (2 cases). Seven tumors had infiltrated into the surrounding stroma and three tumors had histologic evidence of neoplastic vascular invasion. Three hedgehogs had concurrent neoplasms. These are believed to be the first reported cases of mammary gland tumors in African hedgehogs. PMID:10813628

  3. Myoepithelial cells in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Céspedes, Raquel; Millán, Yolanda; Guil-Luna, Silvia; Reymundo, Carlos; Espinosa de Los Monteros, Antonio; Martín de Las Mulas, Juana

    2016-01-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms of female dogs. Compared to mammary tumours of humans and cats, myoepithelial (ME) cell involvement is common in canine mammary tumours (CMT) of any subtype. Since ME cell involvement in CMT influences both histogenetic tumour classification and prognosis, correct identification of ME cells is important. This review describes immunohistochemical methods for identification of canine mammary ME cells used in vivo. In addition, phenotypic and genotypic methods to isolate ME cells for in vitro studies to analyse tumour-suppressor protein production and gene expression are discussed. The contribution of ME cells to both histogenetic classifications and the prognosis of CMT is compared with other species and the potential use of ME cells as a method to identify carcinoma in situ is discussed. PMID:26639832

  4. A Case of Pigmented Mammary Paget's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Kang, Myung Seung; Kim, Joung Soo

    2008-01-01

    Pigmented mammary Paget's disease is a uncommon clinicopathologic variant of mammary Paget's disease, and this mimics malignant melanoma both clinically and histopathologically. Herein, we report on a rare case of pigmented mammary Paget's disease. An 81-year-old woman presented with 2.5×1 cm sized, red and brown, eczematous plaque on her right areola, and she'd had this lesion for 3 years. Histopathology showed large, atypical cells with large nuclei and abundant pale cytoplasm throughout the epidermis. Dispersed melanocytes were noted in the epidermis and some of the Paget's cells contained melanin within their cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that the intraepidermal pagetoid cells were positive for cytokeratin 7; in contrast, they were negative for S-100, Periodic-acid Schiff (PAS), Alcian blue at PH 2.5, HMB-45 and carninoembryonic antigen (CEA). We recommend that pigmented mammary Paget's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of pigmented lesions on the nipple. PMID:27303202

  5. Mammary myofibrosarcoma: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Stark, Matthew; Hoffmann, Andrew; Xiong, Zhenggang

    2011-01-01

    A case of myofibrosarcoma of breast is reported. A female patient aged 81 years presented with a mammary mass lesion. Histologically, the tumor consisted of neoplastic spindle cells arranged in fascicles and with variably cellularity and hyalinization. Immunohistochemical studies showed expression of vimentin, smooth-muscle actin, and Bcl-2, but not desmin, S-100, C-kit, or CD34. Proliferative index identified by Ki67 was approximately 30%. Electron microscopy revealed variable amount of rough endoplasmic reticulum, myofilaments, fibronexus junctions, and fibronectin fibrils. The histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features of this tumor were consistent with myofibrosarcoma. This case will be one of the very few cases of ultrastructurally confirmed mammary myofibrosarcoma reported in the literature and contributes to the recognition of this rare mammary malignant neoplasm. The literature on mammary myofibrosarcoma and its differential diagnosis is also reviewed. PMID:21545434

  6. Lipid Transport in the Lactating Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    McManaman, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells depend on phospholipid (PL) and fatty acid (FA) transport to maintain membrane structure and organization, and to fuel and regulate cellular functions. In mammary glands of lactating animals, copious milk secretion, including large quantities of lipid in some species, requires adaptation and integration of PL and FA synthesis and transport processes to meet secretion demands. At present few details exist about how these processes are regulated within the mammary gland. However, recent advances in our understanding of the structural and molecular biology of membrane systems and cellular lipid trafficking provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the regulation and integration of PL and FA transport processes the lactating mammary gland. This review discusses the PL and FA transport processes required to maintain the structural integrity and organization of the mammary gland and support its secretory functions within the context of current molecular and cellular models of their regulation. PMID:24567110

  7. Gordon Research Conference on Mammary Gland Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 conference was the tenth in the series of biennial Gordon Research Conferences on Mammary Gland Biology. Traditionally this conference brings together scientists from diverse backgrounds and experience but with a common interest in the biology of the mammary gland. Investigators from agricultural and medical schools, biochemists, cell and molecular biologists, endocrinologists, immunologists, and representatives from the emerging biotechnology industries met to discuss current concepts and results on the function and regulation of the normal and neoplastic mammary gland in a variety of species. Of the participants, approximately three-fourths were engaged in studying the normal mammary gland function, whereas the other quarter were engaged in studying the neoplastic gland. The interactions between scientists, clinicians, veterinarians examining both normal and neoplastic cell function serves to foster the multi-disciplinary goals of the conference and has stimulated many cooperative projects among participants in previous years.

  8. The growth and persistence of foot-and-mouth disease virus in the bovine mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, R.; Mann, J. A.; Greig, A.; Chapman, W. G.; Goodridge, D.

    1971-01-01

    In animals exposed to foot-and-mouth disease virus by indirect contact, virus was recovered from the blood, milk, pharynx, vagina and rectum for variable periods of time before clinical disease was apparent. Virus instilled into the mammary gland multiplied rapidly and virus concentrations greater than 107 p.f.u./ml. were recorded within 8-32 hr., depending on the virus strain and dose inoculated. Virus multiplication was accompanied by clinical signs of mastitis but the classical signs of foot-and-mouth disease did not appear for 52-117 hr. Dissemination of virus from the mammary gland occurred within 4-24 hr. and in some animals samples taken from the pharynx, mouth, nose and vagina contained virus for periods up to 97 hr. before the appearance of vesicular lesions. Virus production in the udder declined with the appearance of virus neutralizing activity in the blood and the milk but persisted in some animals for periods of 3-7 weeks. The ability of foot-and-mouth disease virus to persist in mammary tissue was confirmed by the demonstration of virus multiplication in the udders of immune animals. PMID:4326249

  9. Mammary Adipose Tissue-Derived Lysophospholipids Promote Estrogen Receptor-Negative Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Volden, Paul A; Skor, Maxwell N; Johnson, Marianna B; Singh, Puneet; Patel, Feenalie N; McClintock, Martha K; Brady, Matthew J; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2016-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion through G protein-coupled receptors, has been implicated in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including cancer. LPA is converted from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) by the secreted phospholipase autotaxin (ATX). Although various cell types can produce ATX, adipocyte-derived ATX is believed to be the major source of circulating ATX and also to be the major regulator of plasma LPA levels. In addition to ATX, adipocytes secrete numerous other factors (adipokines); although several adipokines have been implicated in breast cancer biology, the contribution of mammary adipose tissue-derived LPC/ATX/LPA (LPA axis) signaling to breast cancer is poorly understood. Using murine mammary fat-conditioned medium, we investigated the contribution of LPA signaling to mammary epithelial cancer cell biology and identified LPA signaling as a significant contributor to the oncogenic effects of the mammary adipose tissue secretome. To interrogate the role of mammary fat in the LPA axis during breast cancer progression, we exposed mammary adipose tissue to secreted factors from estrogen receptor-negative mammary epithelial cell lines and monitored changes in the mammary fat pad LPA axis. Our data indicate that bidirectional interactions between mammary cancer cells and mammary adipocytes alter the local LPA axis and increase ATX expression in the mammary fat pad during breast cancer progression. Thus, the LPC/ATX/LPA axis may be a useful target for prevention in patients at risk of ER-negative breast cancer. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 367-78. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26862086

  10. Bovine Fetal Inoculations with Calf Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Schlafer, D. H.; Schultz, R. D.; Scott, F. W.; Duncan, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The serological and histopathological responses of bovine fetuses to in utero inoculation with virulent and attenuated strains of the calf rotavirus (reovirus-like agent of neonatal calf diarrhea) are described. Thirteen bovine fetuses, 63 to 190 days of gestation, were inoculated in utero with attenuated (three fetuses) or field strain virus (nine fetuses) or both (one fetus). Serum-neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 1:16 to > 1:256 were detected in six of eight fetuses tested, demonstrating the ability of the bovine fetus to respond immunologically to this agent. The youngest fetus in the series was inoculated at 63 days of gestation and developed a titer of 128 in 64 days. This represents the earliest stage of gestation at which a bovine fetus has been inoculated with a bovine virus and found to produce antibody to it. Serum neutralizing titers in six of the eight dams tested increased significantly following the inoculations of their fetuses in utero. Histological changes associated with viral replication and antigenic stimulation of the lymphoreticular system were observed. Pneumonic lesions consisting of both local and diffuse lymphoreticular proliferation were present in five of the nine fetuses that were alive at slaughter. Gliosis and perivascular cuffing were noted in the brains of two of these fetuses and meningitis was seen in one. No evidence of teratogenic change was found. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:232853

  11. Mammary gland involution is associated with rapid down regulation of major mammary Ca**2+-ATPases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixty percent of calcium in milk is transported across the mammary cells apical membrane by the plasma membrane Ca**2+-ATPase 2 (PMCA2). The effect of abrupt cessation of milk production on the Ca**2+-ATPases and mammary calcium transport is unknown. We found that 24 hours after stopping milk prod...

  12. Spleen tyrosine kinase regulates mammary epithelial cell proliferation in mammary glands of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaoming; Lin, Lin; Xing, Weinan; Yang, Yang; Duan, Xiaoyu; Li, Qingzhang; Gao, Xuejun; Lin, Ye

    2016-05-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that has been considered a hematopoietic cell-specific signal transducer involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the role of SYK in normal mammary gland is still poorly understood. Here we show that SYK is expressed in mammary glands of dairy cows. Expression of SYK was higher in dry period mammary tissues than in lactating mammary tissues. Knockdown and overexpression of SYK affected dairy cow mammary epithelial cell proliferation as well as the expression of signal molecules involved in proliferation, including protein kinase B (PKB, also known as AKT1), p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). Dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that SYK increased the transcriptional activity of the AKT1 promoter, and cis-elements within the AKT1 promoter region from -439 to -84 bp mediated this regulation. These results suggest that SYK affects mammary epithelial cell proliferation by activating AKT1 at the transcriptional level in mammary glands of dairy cows, which is important for the mammary remodeling process in dry cows as well as for increasing persistency of lactation in lactating cows. PMID:26947307

  13. Morphological and histological characteristics of mammary dysplasias occurring in cell dissociation-derived murine mammary outgrowths

    SciTech Connect

    Ethier, S.P.; Adams, L.M.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    The morphological and histological characteristics of ductal dysplasias that were observed in mammary outgrowths derived from monodispersed mammary cells of carcinogen-treated mice are described. Mammary outgrowths were derived by injecting either 10(4) or 10(5) enzymatically dissociated mammary cells, obtained from control or carcinogen-treated BALB/c mice, into gland-free mammary fat pads of syngeneic hosts. The mammary dysplasias observed varied considerably in morphological and histological characteristics. The majority of the lesions were ductal in origin and were associated with epithelial hyperplasia which ranged from mild hyperplasia, in which only a few extra layers of epithelium were present, to severe hyperplasia, in which the ducts and end buds were occluded and distended with epithelial cells. In addition, papillary and lobular lesions were observed which were also associated with varying degrees of hyperplasia. The range of mammary dysplasias observed in these outgrowths closely resembles that of lesions associated with the pathogenesis of mammary carcinoma in mice, rats, and humans.

  14. Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Lead the Invasion of Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Cells by Creating an Invasive Track

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao; Jia, Zhuqiang; Kong, Jing; Zhang, Fuyin; Fang, Shimeng; Li, Xiaojie; Li, Wuwei; Yang, Xuesong; Luo, Yong; Lin, Bingcheng; Liu, Tingjiao

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are critical in determining tumor invasion and metastasis. However the role of CAFs in the invasion of salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is poorly understood. In this study, we isolated primary CAFs from two ACC patients. ACC-derived CAFs expressed typical CAF biomarkers and showed increased migration and invasion activity. Conditioned medium collected from CAFs significantly promoted ACC cell migration and invasion. Co-culture of CAFs with ACC cells in a microfluidic device further revealed that CAFs localized at the invasion front and ACC cells followed the track behind the CAFs. Interfering of both matrix metalloproteinase and CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway inhibited ACC invasion promoted by CAFs. Overall, our study demonstrates that ACC-derived CAFs exhibit the most important defining feature of CAFs by promoting cancer invasion. In addition to secretion of soluble factors, CAFs also lead ACC invasion by creating an invasive track in the ECM. PMID:26954362

  15. Automatic Surface Inoculation of Agar Trays1

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Judd R.; Mills, Stacey M.; Boykin, Elizabeth H.

    1972-01-01

    A machine is described which automatically inoculates a plastic tray containing agar media with a culture by use of either a conventional inoculating loop or a cotton swab. Isolated colonies were obtained with an inoculating loop when a heavy inoculum (109 cells/ml) was used or with a cotton swab when a light inoculum (ca. 104 cells/ml) was used. Trays containing combinations of differential or selective media were used to (i) separate mixtures of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, (ii) facilitate isolation of organisms from clinical specimens, and (iii) compare colony growth characteristics of pure cultures. The design of the machine is simple, it is easy to use, and it relieves the operator from the manual task of streaking cultures. Images PMID:16349943

  16. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed without..., swine, and goats shall not be saved for edible purposes. (d) The udders from cows officially...

  17. Inoculation testing of Apollo 12 materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    E. Landrum Young, Brown and Root Northrop, injects a young Japanese quail with a suspension of pulvarized Apollo 12 lunar material within a quarantine cabinet in the Invertebrate, Aves and Fish Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory, bldg 37, Manned Spacecraft Center. The bird is being inoculated in the abdominal cavity.

  18. Coping With Pain: Studies in Stress Inoculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horan, John J.; And Others

    The stress-inoculation paradigm for helping clients deal with pain consists of education about the psychological dimensions of pain, training in a number of coping skills relevant to each dimension, and practice in applying these skills to the noxious stimulus. Presented are two studies, the first of which represents a component analysis of stress…

  19. Comparative aspects of mammary gland development and homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary glands are crucial to the reproductive strategy of mammals and the milk of domesticated ruminants serves as an important source of nutrients for the human population. The majority of mammary gland development occurs postnatally and the mammary gland undergoes cyclical periods of growth, dif...

  20. Cutaneous metastases of a mammary carcinoma in a llama.

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, T L; Turner, O; Mason, G L; Barrington, G M

    2001-01-01

    An 8-year-old, female llama was evaluated for nonhealing, ulcerative, cutaneous lesions, which also involved the mammary gland. Biopsies of the lesions distant from and within the mammary gland area revealed an aggressive carcinoma. The tumor was confirmed at necropsy to be a mammary gland adenocarcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. Images Figure 1. PMID:11265189

  1. Ability of bovine mammary macrophages to enhance proliferation of autologous blood and mammary secretion lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Concha, C; Holmberg, O

    1990-02-01

    Cells were obtained by centrifuging the mammary secretion of healthy udders of 19 cows during the dry-period and during mid-lactation. The suspended cells were incubated in plastic wells. Those adhered cells classified as mammary macrophages were incubated with pokeweed mitogen (PWM). Autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes were added to wells containing untreated macrophage cultures or cultures pretreated with PWM. In seven cows autologous dry-period mammary lymphocytes were added instead of blood lymphocytes. The macrophages + lymphocyte cultures were subjected to the lymphocyte stimulation test (LST). For comparison, peripheral blood lymphocytes and dry-period secretion lymphocytes were also subjected to the LST in the presence of PWM. In all cases, mitogenic responses were higher in pretreated macrophage cultures than in background control cultures. The stimulation indices (SI) showed that PWM-pretreated dry-period mammary macrophages enhanced the proliferation of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes to a greater extent than did blood lymphocytes plus PWM (49 +/- 10 v. 30 +/- 6; P less than or equal to 0.05). Mammary macrophages taken from the same cows but during midlactation also clearly induced proliferation of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes but to a lesser extent than dry-period macrophages (16 +/- 2 v. 49 +/- 10; 16 +/- 2 v. 30 +/- 6; P less than or equal to 0.01 and P less than or equal to 0.05). The PWM pretreatment of mammary macrophages increased the proliferation of autologous dry-period mammary lymphocytes by at least a factor of three (28 +/- 8 v. 8 +/- 2 P less than or equal to 0.05). The present results indicate that bovine mammary macrophages pretreated with PWM enhance proliferation as well as modulation of mammary and peripheral blood lymphocytes. The modulation of lymphocyte stimulation as demonstrated here in vitro, has great significance regarding aspects of local immunostimulation related to modern treatment of mastitis. PMID

  2. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  3. Sequential inoculation versus co-inoculation in Cabernet Franc wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Pedro Miguel Izquierdo; Romero, Esteban García; Pérez-Martín, Fátima; Seseña, Susana; Palop, María Llanos

    2015-04-01

    A study has been carried out in order to determine the effect of the lactic acid bacteria inoculation time on the kinetic of vinification and on chemical and sensory characteristics of Cabernet Franc wines. Traditional vinifications, with lactic acid bacteria inoculated after completion of alcoholic fermentation were compared with vinifications where yeast and bacteria were co-inoculated at the beginning of vinification. One commercial yeast strain and an autochthonous Oenococcus oeni strain (C22L9), previously identified and selected at our laboratory, were used. Monitoring of alcoholic and malolactic fermentations was carried out by yeast and lactic acid bacteria counts and by measuring l-malic acid concentration. Wines were chemically characterized and analysed for volatile compounds content. A sensory analysis, consisting of a descriptive and a triangular test, was also carried out. Results from this study showed that the concurrent yeast/bacteria inoculation of musts at the beginning of vinification produced a reduction in duration of the process without an excessive increase in volatile acidity. Differences in volatile compounds content and the corresponding impact on the sensorial profile of wines were also displayed. These results suggest that co-inoculation is a worthwhile alternative for winemaking of Cabernet Franc wines, if compared with traditional post-alcoholic fermentation lactic acid bacteria inoculation. PMID:24583599

  4. Canine Mammary Mixed Tumours: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dantas Cassali, Geovanni; Cavalheiro Bertagnolli, Angélica; Ferreira, Enio; Araújo Damasceno, Karine; de Oliveira Gamba, Conrado; Bonolo de Campos, Cecília

    2012-01-01

    Mammary mixed tumours are the most frequent neoplasias in female dogs. In humans, mixed tumours are frequently found in the salivary glands and are known as pleomorphic adenomas. In addition to their histomorphologic similarities, mixed tumours and pleomorphic adenomas have the potential to become malignant and give rise to carcinomas in mixed tumours and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenoma, respectively. The factors associated with malignant transformation are still poorly known in the case of canine mixed tumours. However, this form of neoplasia tends to be associated with a better prognosis than other malignant histological types. This paper discusses the main features associated with female canine mammary mixed tumours. PMID:23193497

  5. Stromal Effects on Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Werb, Zena

    2002-05-01

    Breast cancer manifests itself in the mammary epithelium, yet there is a growing recognition that mammary stromal cells also play an important role in tumorigenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer, and many of the stromal factors necessary for mammary development also promote or protect against breast cancer. Here we review our present knowledge of the specific factors and cell types that contribute to epithelial-stromal crosstalk during mammary development. To find cures for diseases like breast cancer that rely on epithelial-stromal crosstalk, we must understand how these different cell types communicate with each other.

  6. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF MAMMARY MASSES IN CAPTIVE LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Craig, Linden E; Ramsay, Edward C; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin; Garner, Michael M

    2016-03-01

    A multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 330 pathology accessions from 285 different lions found 15 captive, female African lions (Panthera leo) with confirmed mammary masses. Aside from the presence of a mammary mass, the most common initial clinical sign was inappetence. Histologic diagnoses were predominantly adenocarcinoma (n = 12), though two benign masses (mammary hyperplasia and a mammary cyst) and one squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Nine of 13 malignant tumors had metastasized to lymph nodes or viscera at the time of necropsy. Six lions with adenocarcinoma and two lions with benign mammary masses had received hormonal contraception, though little evidence of mammary lobular hyperplasia was seen in association with the adenocarcinomas. The most common concurrent disease processes found at necropsy were chronic urinary tract disease and other malignancies. These cases demonstrate that mammary malignancies occur in captive lions and frequently metastasize. PMID:27010273

  7. The Mammary Gland Microenvironment Directs Progenitor Cell Fate In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bussard, Karen M.; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2011-01-01

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that continually undergoes postnatal developmental changes. In mice, the mammary gland is formed via signals from terminal end buds, which direct ductal growth and elongation. Intriguingly, it is likely that the entire cellular repertoire of the mammary gland is formed from a single antecedent cell. Furthermore, in order to produce progeny of varied lineages (e.g., luminal and myoepithelial cells), signals from the local tissue microenvironment influence mammary stem/progenitor cell fate. Data have shown that cells from the mammary gland microenvironment reprogram adult somatic cells from other organs (testes, nerve) into cells that produce milk and express mammary epithelial cell proteins. Similar results were found for human tumorigenic epithelial carcinoma cells. Presently, it is unclear how the deterministic power of the mammary gland microenvironment controls epithelial cell fate. Regardless, signals generated by the microenvironment have a profound influence on progenitor cell differentiation in vivo. PMID:21647291

  8. Inoculation Stress Hypothesis of Environmental Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Crofton, Elizabeth J.; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    One hallmark of psychiatric conditions is the vast continuum of individual differences in susceptibility vs. resilience resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental enrichment paradigm is an animal model that is useful for studying a range of psychiatric conditions, including protective phenotypes in addiction and depression models. The major question is how environmental enrichment, a non-drug and non-surgical manipulation, can produce such robust individual differences in such a wide range of behaviors. This paper draws from a variety of published sources to outline a coherent hypothesis of inoculation stress as a factor producing the protective enrichment phenotypes. The basic tenet suggests that chronic mild stress from living in a complex environment and interacting non-aggressively with conspecifics can inoculate enriched rats against subsequent stressors and/or drugs of abuse. This paper reviews the enrichment phenotypes, mulls the fundamental nature of environmental enrichment vs. isolation, discusses the most appropriate control for environmental enrichment, and challenges the idea that cortisol/corticosterone equals stress. The intent of the inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment is to provide a scaffold with which to build testable hypotheses for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective phenotypes and thus provide new therapeutic targets to treat psychiatric/neurological conditions. PMID:25449533

  9. Lactate is a mediator of metabolic cooperation between stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts and glycolytic tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Rattigan, Yanique I.; Patel, Brijesh B.; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Sukenick, George; Koutcher, Jason A.; Glod, John W.; and others

    2012-02-15

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are bone marrow-derived stromal cells, which play a role in tumor progression. We have shown earlier that breast cancer cells secrete higher levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) under hypoxia, leading to the recruitment of hMSCs towards hypoxic tumor cells. We found that (i) MDA-MB-231 cells secrete significantly higher levels of lactate (3-fold more) under hypoxia (1% O{sub 2}) than under 20% O{sub 2} and (ii) lactate recruits hMSCs towards tumor cells by activating signaling pathways to enhance migration. The mRNA and protein expression of functional MCT1 in hMSCs is increased in response to lactate exposure. Thus, we hypothesized that hMSCs and stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the tumor microenvironment have the capacity to take up lactate expelled from tumor cells and use it as a source of energy. Our {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic measurements indicate that {sup 13}C-lactate is converted to {sup 13}C-alpha ketoglutarate in hMSCs and CAFs supporting this hypothesis. To our knowledge this is the first in vitro model system demonstrating that hMSCs and CAFs can utilize lactate produced by tumor cells.

  10. PTCH1+/− Dermal Fibroblasts Isolated from Healthy Skin of Gorlin Syndrome Patients Exhibit Features of Carcinoma Associated Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Thomas; Ripoche, Hugues; Brellier, Florence; Chevallier-Lagente, Odile; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Gorlin's or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) causes predisposition to basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the commonest cancer in adult human. Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTCH1 are responsible for this autosomal dominant syndrome. In NBCCS patients, as in the general population, ultraviolet exposure is a major risk factor for BCC development. However these patients also develop BCCs in sun-protected areas of the skin, suggesting the existence of other mechanisms for BCC predisposition in NBCCS patients. As increasing evidence supports the idea that the stroma influences carcinoma development, we hypothesized that NBCCS fibroblasts could facilitate BCC occurence of the patients. WT (n = 3) and NBCCS fibroblasts bearing either nonsense (n = 3) or missense (n = 3) PTCH1 mutations were cultured in dermal equivalents made of a collagen matrix and their transcriptomes were compared by whole genome microarray analyses. Strikingly, NBCCS fibroblasts over-expressed mRNAs encoding pro-tumoral factors such as Matrix Metalloproteinases 1 and 3 and tenascin C. They also over-expressed mRNA of pro-proliferative diffusible factors such as fibroblast growth factor 7 and the stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha, known for its expression in carcinoma associated fibroblasts. These data indicate that the PTCH1+/− genotype of healthy NBCCS fibroblasts results in phenotypic traits highly reminiscent of those of BCC associated fibroblasts, a clue to the yet mysterious proneness to non photo-exposed BCCs in NBCCS patients. PMID:19287498

  11. Human carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells promote ovarian cancer chemotherapy resistance via a BMP4/HH signaling loop

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, Lan G.; Choi, Yun-Jung; McLean, Karen; Allen, Benjamin L.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Buckanovich, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is critical to cancer growth and therapy resistance. We previously characterized human ovarian carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells (CA-MSCs). CA-MSCs are multi-potent cells that can differentiate into tumor microenvironment components including fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and adipocytes. We previously reported CA-MSCs, compared to normal MSCs, express high levels of BMP proteins and promote tumor growth by increasing numbers of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). We demonstrate here that ovarian tumor cell-secreted Hedgehog (HH) induces CA-MSC BMP4 expression. CA-MSC-derived BMP4 reciprocally increases ovarian tumor cell HH expression indicating a positive feedback loop. Interruption of this loop with a HH pathway inhibitor or BMP4 blocking antibody decreases CA-MSC-derived BMP4 and tumor-derived HH preventing enrichment of CSCs and reversing chemotherapy resistance. The impact of HH inhibition was only seen in CA-MSC-containing tumors, indicating the importance of a humanized stroma. These results are reciprocal to findings in pancreatic and bladder cancer, suggesting HH signaling effects are tumor tissue specific warranting careful investigation in each tumor type. Collectively, we define a critical positive feedback loop between CA-MSC-derived BMP4 and ovarian tumor cell-secreted HH and present evidence for the further investigation of HH as a clinical target in ovarian cancer. PMID:26755648

  12. Accessing inoculation methods of maize and wheat with Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Josiane; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Araujo, Ricardo Silva; Hungria, Mariangela

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of inoculants containing Azospirillum is becoming more popular due to increasing reports of expressive gains in grain yields. However, incompatibility with pesticides used in seed treatments represents a main limitation for a successful inoculation. Therefore, in this study we searched for alternatives methods for seed inoculation of maize and wheat, aiming to avoid the direct contact of bacteria with pesticides. Different doses of inoculants containing Azospirillum brasilense were employed to perform inoculation in-furrow, via soil spray at sowing and via leaf spray after seedlings had emerged, in comparison to seed inoculation. Experiments were conducted first under greenhouse controlled conditions and then confirmed in the field at different locations in Brazil. In the greenhouse, most parameters measured responded positively to the largest inoculant dose used in foliar sprays, but benefits could also be observed from both in-furrow and soil spray inoculation. However, our results present evidence that field inoculation with plant-growth promoting bacteria must consider inoculant doses, and point to the need of fine adjustments to avoid crossing the threshold of growth stimulation and inhibition. All inoculation techniques increased the abundance of diazotrophic bacteria in plant tissues, and foliar spray improved colonization of leaves, while soil inoculations favored root and rhizosphere colonization. In field experiments, inoculation with A. brasilense allowed for a 25 % reduction in the need for N fertilizers. Our results have identified alternative methods of inoculation that were as effective as the standard seed inoculation that may represent an important strategy to avoid the incompatibility between inoculant bacteria and pesticides employed for seed treatment. PMID:26759120

  13. Dietary genistein stimulates mammary development in gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible role of the phytoestrogen, genistein, on prepubertal development of mammary glands, hormonal status and bone resorption was investigated in gilts. Forty-five gilts were fed a control diet containing soya (CTLS, n = 15), a control diet without soya (CTL0, n = 15) or the CTLS diet supplem...

  14. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  15. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  16. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  17. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  18. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  19. Inoculation in Boston from 1721 to American Independence.

    PubMed

    Oda, Y

    1999-03-01

    In 1721, a smallpox epidemic in Boston occurred and inoculation was introduced. It has been said that the inoculation in Boston was under the influence of England, but it has been shown this is not correct. It was clergyman Mather and surgeon Boylston who promoted inoculation, while doctor Douglass, a graduate from Edinburgh University, strongly opposed inoculation. The selectmen in Boston opened a town-meeting and discussed inoculation, and finally rejected the introduction of inoculation into Boston. The Boston citizens were also strongly opposed to inoculation and they even threw a lighted hand grenade into Mather's room. Since then, controversies over inoculation broke out every time a smallpox epidemic occurred. In 1775, George Washington became the commander of the war of Independence. He took a countermeasure to get rid of the smallpox epidemic in his army and he inoculated all army and recruit members. Meanwhile the English commander Howe, who did not pay attention to smallpox, had to decide to withdraw from Boston, since the smallpox epidemic broke out among the English army. In this paper I tried to clarify the controversies over inoculation in Boston, and the fact that smallpox epidemic and inoculation were related to the success of the immigration of the Puritans and also to the success of the independence of the New World from the British Empire. PMID:11623749

  20. Letrozole-induced functional changes in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and their influence on breast cancer cell biology.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaifu; Kang, Hua; Wang, Yajun; Hai, Tao; Rong, Guohua; Sun, Haichen

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) influence the efficacy of endocrine therapy. Aromatase inhibitors inhibit the growth of breast tumors by inhibiting the synthesis of estrogen. However, it remains unknown whether the aromatase inhibitor letrozole has an additional impact on CAFs, which further influence the efficacy of endocrine therapy. Primary CAFs were isolated from primary estrogen receptor-positive human breast tumors. Estrogen-deprived culture medium was used to exclude the influence of steroids. In co-culture, primary cultured CAFs increased MCF7 cell adhesion, invasion, migration and proliferation, and letrozole treatment inhibited these increases, except for the increase in proliferation. In total, 258 up-regulated genes and 47 down-regulated genes with an absolute fold change >2 were identified in CAFs co-cultured with MCF7 cell after letrozole treatment. One up-regulated genes (POSTN) and seven down-regulated genes (CCL2, CCL5, CXCL1, IL-8, CXCL5, LEP and NGF) were further validated by real-time PCR. The changes in CCL2 and CXCL1 expression were further confirmed using an automated microscopic imaging-based, high content analysis platform. Although the results need further functional validation, this study is the first to describe the differential tumor-promoting phenotype of CAFs induced by letrozole and the associated gene expression alterations. Most importantly, our data revealed that down-regulation of several secreted factors (CCL2, CCL5, CXCL1 etc.) in CAFs might be partially responsible for the efficacy of letrozole. PMID:27235140

  1. Rationale Behind Targeting Fibroblast Activation Protein–Expressing Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts as a Novel Chemotherapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Brennen, W. Nathaniel; Isaacs, John T.; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment has emerged as a novel chemotherapeutic strategy in the treatment of cancer. This is most clearly exemplified by the antiangiogenesis class of compounds. Therapeutic strategies that target fibroblasts within the tumor stroma offer another treatment option. However, despite promising data obtained in preclinical models, such strategies have not been widely used in the clinical setting, largely due to a lack of effective treatments that specifically target this population of cells. The identification of fibroblast activation protein α (FAP) as a target selectively expressed on fibroblasts within the tumor stroma or on carcinoma-associated fibroblasts led to intensive efforts to exploit this novel cellular target for clinical benefit. FAP is a membrane-bound serine protease of the prolyl oligopeptidase family with unique post-prolyl endopeptidase activity. Until recently, the majority of FAP-based therapeutic approaches focused on the development of small-molecule inhibitors of enzymatic activity. Evidence suggests, however, that FAP’s pathophysiological role in carcinogenesis may be highly contextual, depending on both the exact nature of the tumor microenvironment present and the cancer type in question to determine its tumor-promoting or tumor-suppressing phenotype. As an alternative strategy, we are taking advantage of FAP’s restricted expression and unique substrate preferences to develop a FAP-activated prodrug to target the activation of a cytotoxic compound within the tumor stroma. Of note, this strategy would be effective independently of FAP’s role in tumor progression because its therapeutic benefit would rely on FAP’s localization and activity within the tumor microenvironment rather than strictly on inhibition of its function. PMID:22323494

  2. Establishment and characterization of a new cell line of canine inflammatory mammary cancer: IPC-366.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J; Illera, Maria J; Lopez, Mirtha S; Woodward, Wendy A; Reuben, James M; Illera, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %). At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the comparative

  3. Establishment and Characterization of a New Cell Line of Canine Inflammatory Mammary Cancer: IPC-366

    PubMed Central

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J.; Illera, Maria J.; Lopez, Mirtha S.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Reuben, James M.; Illera, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %). At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the comparative

  4. Soil inoculation steers restoration of terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Wubs, E R Jasper; van der Putten, Wim H; Bosch, Machiel; Bezemer, T Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Many natural ecosystems have been degraded because of human activities(1,2) and need to be restored so that biodiversity is protected. However, restoration can take decades and restoration activities are often unsuccessful(3) because of abiotic constraints (for example, eutrophication, acidification) and unfavourable biotic conditions (for example, competition or adverse soil community composition). A key question is what manageable factors prevent transition from degraded to restored ecosystems and what interventions are required for successful restoration(2,4). Experiments have shown that the soil community is an important driver of plant community development(5-8), suggesting that manipulation of the soil community is key to successful restoration of terrestrial ecosystems(3,9). Here we examine a large-scale, six-year-old field experiment on ex-arable land and show that application of soil inocula not only promotes ecosystem restoration, but that different origins of soil inocula can steer the plant community development towards different target communities, varying from grassland to heathland vegetation. The impact of soil inoculation on plant and soil community composition was most pronounced when the topsoil layer was removed, whereas effects were less strong, but still significant, when the soil inocula were introduced into intact topsoil. Therefore, soil inoculation is a powerful tool to both restore disturbed terrestrial ecosystems and steer plant community development. PMID:27398907

  5. The role of neutralizing antibodies for mouse mammary tumor virus transmission and mammary cancer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Daniela; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) infection establishes chronic germinal centers and a lifelong neutralizing Ab response. We show that removal of the draining lymph node after establishment of the germinal center reaction led to complete loss of neutralizing Abs despite comparable infection levels in peripheral lymphocytes. Importantly, in the absence of neutralization, only the exocrine organs mammary gland, salivary gland, pancreas, and skin showed strikingly increased infection, resulting in accelerated mammary tumor development. Induction of stronger neutralization did not influence chronic infection levels of peripheral lymphoid organs but strongly inhibited mammary gland infection and virus transmission to the next generation. Taken together, we provide evidence that a tight equilibrium in virus neutralization allows limited infection of exocrine organs and controls cancer development in susceptible mouse strains. These experiments show that a strong neutralizing Ab response induced after infection is not able to control lymphoid MMTV infection. Strong neutralization, however, is capable of blocking amplification of mammary gland infection, tumor development, and virus transmission to the next generation. The results also indicate a role of neutralization in natural resistance to MMTV infection.

  6. Radiologic and histologic presentation of male mammary myofibroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Omar, Lena A; Rojanapremsuk, Theera; Saluja, Karan; Merchant, Kanwal A; Sharma, Pooja B

    2016-07-01

    Mammary myofibroblastoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that typically presents in older men and women. Less commonly, these benign tumors may also occur in soft tissues located outside of the breast, in which case they are referred to as mammary-type myofibroblastomas. The histologic composition of this benign spindle cell tumor can be markedly varied. We present a case of a large mammary myofibroblastoma in a male patient and discuss the typical imaging and histologic makeup of these tumors. PMID:27365886

  7. Radiologic and histologic presentation of male mammary myofibroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Rojanapremsuk, Theera; Saluja, Karan; Merchant, Kanwal A.; Sharma, Pooja B.

    2016-01-01

    Mammary myofibroblastoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that typically presents in older men and women. Less commonly, these benign tumors may also occur in soft tissues located outside of the breast, in which case they are referred to as mammary-type myofibroblastomas. The histologic composition of this benign spindle cell tumor can be markedly varied. We present a case of a large mammary myofibroblastoma in a male patient and discuss the typical imaging and histologic makeup of these tumors. PMID:27365886

  8. Adaptive Immune Regulation of Mammary Postnatal Organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Plaks, Vicki; Boldajipour, Bijan; Linnemann, Jelena R; Nguyen, Nguyen H; Kersten, Kelly; Wolf, Yochai; Casbon, Amy-Jo; Kong, Niwen; van den Bijgaart, Renske J E; Sheppard, Dean; Melton, Andrew C; Krummel, Matthew F; Werb, Zena

    2015-09-14

    Postnatal organogenesis occurs in an immune competent environment and is tightly controlled by interplay between positive and negative regulators. Innate immune cells have beneficial roles in postnatal tissue remodeling, but roles for the adaptive immune system are currently unexplored. Here we show that adaptive immune responses participate in the normal postnatal development of a non-lymphoid epithelial tissue. Since the mammary gland (MG) is the only organ developing predominantly after birth, we utilized it as a powerful system to study adaptive immune regulation of organogenesis. We found that antigen-mediated interactions between mammary antigen-presenting cells and interferon-γ (IFNγ)-producing CD4+ T helper 1 cells participate in MG postnatal organogenesis as negative regulators, locally orchestrating epithelial rearrangement. IFNγ then affects luminal lineage differentiation. This function of adaptive immune responses, regulating normal development, changes the paradigm for studying players of postnatal organogenesis and provides insights into immune surveillance and cancer transformation. PMID:26321127

  9. Atherosclerosis and the internal mammary arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.N.

    1983-06-01

    One hundred and fifty patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), 14 (9.3%) of whom had coexisting peripheral vascular disease, underwent bilateral internal mammary arteriography to study the incidence and extent of atherosclerosis in these vessels. Significant atherosclerosis of the internal mammary arteries (IMAs) was present in three patients (2%), of whom one had coexisting peripheral vascular disease. Lesions in the IMAs were found either proximally, close to the origin or distally, around the terminal bifurcation. Six of the 14 patients with peripheral vascular disease (4% of total subjects) had significant atherosclerosis of the brachiocephalic arteries. Atherosclerotic involvement of the IMA is very unusual and rarely interferes with the use of these vessels for coronary bypass. More common, however, is atherosclerosis of the subclavian arteries, a contraindication for IMA grafting if the lesion is proximal to the IMA origin.

  10. Save or sacrifice the internal mammary pedicle during anterior mediastinotomy?

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, Efstratios; Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos A; Chlapoutakis, Serafeim; Prokakis, Christos

    2014-07-01

    Ligation and dissection of internal mammary vessels is the most under-estimated complication of anterior mediastinotomy. However, patients requiring anterior mediastinotomy may experience long survival that makes the development of ischemic heart disease throughout their life possible. Therefore, the un-judicial sacrifice of the internal mammary pedicle may deprive them from the benefit to have their internal mammary artery used as a graft in order to successfully bypass severe left anterior descending artery stenoses. We recommend the preservation of the internal mammary pedicle during anterior mediastinotomy, which should be a common message among our colleagues from the beginning of their training. PMID:24987471

  11. Absence of canine papillomavirus sequences in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Sardon, D; Blundell, R; Burrai, G P; Alberti, A; Tore, G; Passino, E Sanna; Antuofermo, E

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (PVs) are found in human breast cancer tissue; however, it remains controversial as to whether these viruses play a role in the aetiology of this tumour. There has been minimal study of whether PVs are found in normal or abnormal mammary glands of animals. The present study investigated whether a PV sequence could be found in the mammary glands of 33 female dogs by rolling circle amplification and polymerase chain reaction. No PV DNA was found in normal or neoplastic canine mammary tissues, suggesting that canine PVs are probably not involved in the pathogenesis of canine mammary neoplasia. PMID:25435511

  12. Epigenetic regulation of LSD1 during mammary carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yadi; Zhou, Binhua P

    2014-01-01

    Inheritable epigenetic regulation is integral to the dynamic control of gene expression under different stimuli for cellular homeostasis and disease progression. Histone methylation is a common and important type of chromatin modification. LSD1, the first known histone lysine-specific demethylase, operates as a key component of several corepressor complexes during development and in disease states. In this review, we focus on the regulation of LSD1 in mammary carcinogenesis. LSD1 plays a role in promoting mammary tumor metastasis and proliferation and in maintaining mammary cancer stem cells. Therefore, LSD1 represents a viable therapeutic target for effective treatment of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:27308339

  13. Foxa1 is essential for mammary duct formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yongbing; Skerry, Benjamin; Wang, Xiao; Colin-Cassin, Christelle; Radisky, Derek C; Kaestner, Klaus H; Li, Zhaoyu

    2016-05-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) plays a critical role in the proliferation of human breast cancer cells, particularly estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive luminal breast cancer cells. However, genetic studies of the requirement for Foxa1 in mammary tumor formation in mice have been hampered by the lack of a conditional gene ablation. We examined three mouse models of mammary-specific ablation of Foxa1 in ductal epithelial cells to identify the best system for complete and mammary-specific ablation of Foxa1. We found that MMTV-Cre and MMTV-rtTA;Tet-On-Cre led to partial deletion of Foxa1 and attenuated mammary duct formation, whereas Krt14-Cre led to complete ablation of Foxa1 and abolished mammary duct formation, in Foxa1(loxP/loxP) mice. These results demonstrate that Foxa1 is essential for mammary duct formation, and reveal a series of mouse models in which mammary expression of Foxa1 can be attenuated or completely blocked. Our study also suggests a potentially powerful model for complete ablation of Foxa1 in mammary epithelial cells using Krt14-driven Cre expression in an inducible manner, such as Krt14-rtTA;Tet-On-Cre. This model system will facilitate further in vivo functional studies of Foxa1 or other factors in mammary gland development and tumor formation and progression. genesis 54:277-285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26919034

  14. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  15. PKA signaling drives mammary tumorigenesis through Src.

    PubMed

    Beristain, A G; Molyneux, S D; Joshi, P A; Pomroy, N C; Di Grappa, M A; Chang, M C; Kirschner, L S; Privé, G G; Pujana, M A; Khokha, R

    2015-02-26

    Protein kinase A (PKA) hyperactivation causes hereditary endocrine neoplasias; however, its role in sporadic epithelial cancers is unknown. Here, we show that heightened PKA activity in the mammary epithelium generates tumors. Mammary-restricted biallelic ablation of Prkar1a, which encodes for the critical type-I PKA regulatory subunit, induced spontaneous breast tumors characterized by enhanced type-II PKA activity. Downstream of this, Src phosphorylation occurs at residues serine-17 and tyrosine-416 and mammary cell transformation is driven through a mechanism involving Src signaling. The phenotypic consequences of these alterations consisted of increased cell proliferation and, accordingly, expansion of both luminal and basal epithelial cell populations. In human breast cancer, low PRKAR1A/high SRC expression defines basal-like and HER2 breast tumors associated with poor clinical outcome. Together, the results of this study define a novel molecular mechanism altered in breast carcinogenesis and highlight the potential strategy of inhibiting SRC signaling in treating this cancer subtype in humans. PMID:24662820

  16. Tweak induces mammary epithelial branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Jennifer S; Cho, Sandy; Browning, Beth; Zheng, Timothy S; Lincecum, John M; Wang, Monica Z; Hsu, Yen-Ming; Burkly, Linda C

    2005-04-14

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily regulate cell survival and proliferation and have been implicated in cancer. Tweak (TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis) has pleiotropic biological functions including proapoptotic, proangiogenic and proinflammatory activities. We explored a role for Tweak in mammary gland transformation using a three-dimensional model culture system. Tweak stimulates a branching morphogenic phenotype, similar to that induced by pro-oncogenic factors, in Eph4 mammary epithelial cells cultured in matrigel. Increased proliferation and invasiveness are observed, with a concomitant inhibition of functional differentiation. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are significantly increased following Tweak treatment. Notably, MMP inhibitors are sufficient to block the branching phenotype induced by Tweak. The capacity to promote proliferation, inhibit differentiation and induce invasion suggests a role for Tweak in mammary gland tumorigenesis. Consistent with this, we have observed elevated protein levels of the Tweak receptor, Fn14, in human breast tumor cell lines and xenograft models as well as in primary human breast tumors. Together, our results suggest that the Tweak/Fn14 pathway may be protumorigenic in human breast cancer. PMID:15735761

  17. Mammary stem cells: expansion and animal productivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Identification and characterization of mammary stem cells and progenitor cells from dairy animals is important in the understanding of mammogenesis, tissue turnover, lactation persistency and regenerative therapy. It has been realized by many investigators that altered lactation, long dry periods (non-milking period between two consecutive lactation cycles), abrupt cessation of lactation (common in water buffaloes) and disease conditions like mastitis, greatly reduce milk yield thus render huge financial losses within the dairy sector. Cellular manipulation of specialized cell types within the mammary gland, called mammary stem cells (MaSCs)/progenitor cells, might provide potential solutions to these problems and may improve milk production. In addition, MaSCs/progenitor cells could be used in regenerative therapy against tissue damage caused by mastitis. This review discusses methods of MaSC/progenitor cell manipulation and their mechanisms in bovine and caprine animals. Author believes that intervention of MaSCs/progenitor cells could lessen the huge financial losses to the dairy industry globally. PMID:25057352

  18. IL-17A Is an Important Effector of the Immune Response of the Mammary Gland to Escherichia coli Infection.

    PubMed

    Porcherie, Adeline; Gilbert, Florence B; Germon, Pierre; Cunha, Patricia; Trotereau, Angélina; Rossignol, Christelle; Winter, Nathalie; Berthon, Patricia; Rainard, Pascal

    2016-01-15

    The cytokine IL-17A has been shown to play critical roles in host defense against bacterial and fungal infections at different epithelial sites, but its role in the defense of the mammary gland (MG) has seldom been investigated, although infections of the MG constitute the main pathology afflicting dairy cows. In this study, we showed that IL-17A contributes to the defense of the MG against Escherichia coli infection by using a mouse mastitis model. After inoculation of the MG with a mastitis-causing E. coli strain, the bacterial load increased rapidly, triggering an intense influx of leukocytes into mammary tissue and increased concentrations of IL-6, IL-22, TNF-α, and IL-10. Neutrophils were the first cells that migrated intensely to the mammary tissue, in line with an early production of CXCL2. Depletion of neutrophils induced an increased mammary bacterial load. There was a significant increase of IL-17-containing CD4(+) αβ T lymphocyte numbers in infected glands. Depletion of IL-17A correlated with an increased bacterial colonization and IL-10 production. Intramammary infusion of IL-17A at the onset of infection was associated with markedly decreased bacterial numbers, decreased IL-10 production, and increased neutrophil recruitment. Depletion of CD25(+) regulatory T cells correlated with a decreased production of IL-10 and a reduced bacterial load. These results indicate that IL-17A is an important effector of MG immunity to E. coli and suggest that an early increased local production of IL-17A would improve the outcome of infection. These findings point to a new lead to the development of vaccines against mastitis. PMID:26685206

  19. Morcellation complications: From direct trauma to inoculation.

    PubMed

    Noel, Nyia L; Isaacson, Keith B

    2016-08-01

    Morcellation is the fragmentation of tissue to facilitate removal of the specimen through small incision in minimally invasive surgery. This technique is not unique to gynecology and is used in general surgery with the goal of improved surgical outcomes including decreased pain, cost, hospital length of stay, and rapid return to normal activities and work. Gynecologic laparoscopic power morcellation (LPM) has come under increased scrutiny over the last 2 years due to widespread attention to a known but rare complication, an unanticipated dissemination of malignancy, namely occult uterine leiomyosarcoma. This chapter focuses on complications associated with gynecologic tissue morcellation from inoculation of benign or malignant tissue fragments within the peritoneal cavity and direct trauma from morcellation techniques. We also include a review of the various morcellation techniques from knife to electrical and the use of intraperitoneal specimen containment systems. PMID:26879674

  20. Yeast Interactions in Inoculated Wine Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Maurizio; Capece, Angela; Comitini, Francesca; Canonico, Laura; Siesto, Gabriella; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    The use of selected starter culture is widely diffused in winemaking. In pure fermentation, the ability of inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae to suppress the wild microflora is one of the most important feature determining the starter ability to dominate the process. Since the wine is the result of the interaction of several yeast species and strains, many studies are available on the effect of mixed cultures on the final wine quality. In mixed fermentation the interactions between the different yeasts composing the starter culture can led the stability of the final product and the analytical and aromatic profile. In the present review, we will discuss the recent developments regarding yeast interactions in pure and in mixed fermentation, focusing on the influence of interactions on growth and dominance in the process. PMID:27148235

  1. Targeting Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Within the Tumor Stroma With a Fibroblast Activation Protein-Activated Prodrug

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibroblasts undergo a morphological transformation to a reactive phenotype in the tumor microenvironment characterized by the expression of proteins such as fibroblast activation protein (FAP), a post-prolyl endopeptidase with expression largely restricted to carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. Thapsigargin (TG) is a highly toxic natural plant product that triggers a rise in intracellular calcium levels and apoptosis. FAP is therefore a provocative target for the activation of prodrugs consisting of a FAP-specific peptide coupled to a potent cytotoxic analog of TG. Methods The efficacy of FAP-activated peptidyl-TG prodrugs was tested in vitro in cell proliferation assays and effects on intracellular calcium in human cancer cell lines. The effects of FAP-activated prodrugs on tumor growth and host toxicity were tested in Balb-C nude MCF-7 and LNCaP xenograft mice (n = 9–11 per group). P values were calculated using permutation tests based on 50 000 permutations. Mixed effects models were used to account for correlations among replicate measures. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results FAP-activated prodrugs killed human cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations (MCF-7 cells: IC50 = 3.5nM). Amino acid-12ADT analogs from FAP-cleaved prodrugs, but not uncleaved prodrugs, produced a rapid rise in intracellular calcium within minutes of exposure. Immunohistochemical analysis of xenografts exposed to FAP-prodrugs documented stromal-selective cell death of fibroblasts, pericytes, and endothelial cells of sufficient magnitude to inhibit growth of MCF-7 and LNCaP xenografts with minimal systemic toxicity, whereas non-FAP cleavable prodrugs were inactive. MCF-7 and LNCaP xenografts treated with a FAP-activated prodrug had maximal treated-to-control tumor volume ratios of 0.36 (treated: mean = 0.206mm3, 95% CI = 0.068 to 0.344mm3; control: mean = 0.580mm3, 95% CI = 0.267 to 0.893mm3) and 0.24 (treated: mean = 0.131mm3, 95% CI = 0.09 to 0.180mm3; control

  2. Reisolation of Staphylococcus aureus from bovine milk following experimental inoculation is influenced by fat percentage and specific immunoglobulin G1 titer in milk.

    PubMed

    Boerhout, E M; Koets, A P; Vernooij, J C M; Mols-Vorstermans, T G T; Nuijten, P J M; Rutten, V P M G; Bijlsma, J J E; Eisenberg, S W F

    2016-06-01

    The associations of management parameters, herd characteristics, and individual cow factors with bovine mastitis have been subject of many studies. The present study aimed to evaluate the association between milk composition parameters, including fat, protein, lactose, urea, and specific immunoglobulin levels, at the time of experimental bacterial inoculation of the mammary gland and subsequent shedding dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus. Sixty-eight cows were experimentally infected with S. aureus and closely monitored for 3 wk. Mixed model analyses were used to determine the influence of management and herd characteristics (farm and experimental group), individual cow factors (days in milk, milk yield, and quarter position), and a challenge-related parameter (inoculation dose) in combination with either the milk components fat, protein, lactose and urea, or the S. aureus-specific antibody isotype titers at the time of bacterial inoculation, on the number of S. aureus reisolated from milk after inoculation. A positive association was observed between the milk fat percentage and the number of S. aureus reisolated from quarter milk, and a negative relationship between the S. aureus-specific IgG1 titer in milk and the number of S. aureus. These findings should be considered in the development of a vaccine against S. aureus-induced bovine mastitis. PMID:26995117

  3. Inoculation effect in prevention of increased verbal aggression in schools.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Steven

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents an argument for the use of intervention programs as inoculation agents in adolescents' social behavior, specifically the prevention of abusive and antisocial verbal aggression. The theoretical substance of the intervention is social-cognitive and eclectic, borrowing from several strategies known to be effective. The bridge between theory and curriculum is an inoculation-like process. Inoculation is not a strategy to change beliefs but rather to reinforce prosocial attitudes and assist students in overcoming influences that might lessen their prosocial stance. Results must include a control group to assess the effect of inoculation. PMID:15762403

  4. Contribution of host-derived growth factors to in vivo growth of a transplantable murine mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, D. E.; Farmer, S.; White, J.; Senior, P. V.; Warnes, S. L.; Alexander, P.

    1994-01-01

    The contribution of host-derived growth factors to tumour growth in vivo was studied using the transplantable murine mammary carcinoma, MT1, grown in syngeneic mice. Promotion of growth of the mammary carcinoma by a factor(s) from the host was evident in experiments in which the carcinoma cells were inoculated intraperitoneally. In this environment, tumours develop as multiple solid nodules, each probably arising from an individual cell or a small cluster of cells. Tumour growth was found to occur in the peritoneal cavity following inoculation of 10(3) cells, but an inoculum of as few as ten cells grew if a leucocyte-rich exudate had first been induced. To determine which host-derived growth factors might contribute to growth of MT1, extracts of the tumour were first examined for growth factor activity. Fractionation of tumour extracts by either ion-exchange chromatography or gel filtration revealed several peaks of mitogenic activity, but none of this could be attributed to epidermal growth factor (EGF). Accordingly, an anti-EGF antibody was tested as a putative inhibitor of tumour growth as any effect of this antibody could be ascribed to removal of EGF derived from the host. The antibody was found to have potent anti-tumour activity when tested against MT1 tumours that had been inoculated into the peritoneal cavity. In contrast, the antibody had little effect on growth of the discrete tumour mass which formed when MT1 was transplanted subcutaneously. The results suggest that host-derived EGF contributes to establishment of microcolonies of MT1 carcinoma within the peritoneal cavity. This may be directly, by providing growth factors to supplement those produced by the tumour until it reaches a certain critical mass to sustain autocrine growth, or indirectly, by affecting the production of other growth-stimulatory factors or cytokines. PMID:8054274

  5. Mammary tissue microenvironment determines T cell-dependent breast cancer-associated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kei; Nagai, Nao; Ogura, Keisuke; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Saiki, Ikuo; Irimura, Tatsuro; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-01

    Although the importance of the host tissue microenvironment in cancer progression and metastasis has been established, the spatiotemporal process establishing a cancer metastasis-prone tissue microenvironment remains unknown. In this study, we aim to understand the immunological character of a metastasis-prone microenvironment in a murine 4T1 breast tumor model, by using the activation of nuclear factor-κb (NF-κB) in cancer cells as a sensor of inflammatory status and by monitoring its activity by bioluminescence imaging. By using a 4T1 breast cancer cell line stably expressing an NF-κB/Luc2 reporter gene (4T1 NF-κB cells), we observed significantly increased bioluminescence approximately 7 days after metastasis-prone orthotopic mammary fat-pad inoculation but not ectopic s.c. inoculation of 4T1 NF-κB cells. Such in vivo NF-κB activation within the fat-pad 4T1 tumor was diminished in immune-deficient SCID or nude mice, or T cell-depleted mice, suggesting the requirement of host T cell-mediated immune responses. Given the fat-pad 4T1 tumor expressed higher inflammatory mediators in a T cell-dependent mechanism compared to the s.c. tumor, our results imply the importance of the surrounding tissue microenvironment for inflaming tumors by collaborating with T cells to instigate metastatic spread of 4T1 breast cancer cells. PMID:25940224

  6. Influenza Transmission in the Mother-Infant Dyad Leads to Severe Disease, Mammary Gland Infection, and Pathogenesis by Regulating Host Responses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Stephen S. H.; Almansa, Raquel; Leon, Alberto; Xu, Luoling; Bartoszko, Jessica; Kelvin, David J.; Kelvin, Alyson A.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza viruses are typically restricted to the human upper respiratory tract whereas influenza viruses with greater pathogenic potential often also target extra-pulmonary organs. Infants, pregnant women, and breastfeeding mothers are highly susceptible to severe respiratory disease following influenza virus infection but the mechanisms of disease severity in the mother-infant dyad are poorly understood. Here we investigated 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection and transmission in breastfeeding mothers and infants utilizing our developed infant-mother ferret influenza model. Infants acquired severe disease and mortality following infection. Transmission of the virus from infants to mother ferrets led to infection in the lungs and mother mortality. Live virus was also found in mammary gland tissue and expressed milk of the mothers which eventually led to milk cessation. Histopathology showed destruction of acini glandular architecture with the absence of milk. The virus was localized in mammary epithelial cells of positive glands. To understand the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland infection, we performed global transcript analysis which showed downregulation of milk production genes such as Prolactin and increased breast involution pathways indicated by a STAT5 to STAT3 signaling shift. Genes associated with cancer development were also significantly increased including JUN, FOS and M2 macrophage markers. Immune responses within the mammary gland were characterized by decreased lymphocyte-associated genes CD3e, IL2Ra, CD4 with IL1β upregulation. Direct inoculation of H1N1 into the mammary gland led to infant respiratory infection and infant mortality suggesting the influenza virus was able to replicate in mammary tissue and transmission is possible through breastfeeding. In vitro infection studies with human breast cells showed susceptibility to H1N1 virus infection. Together, we have shown that the host-pathogen interactions of influenza virus

  7. Influenza Transmission in the Mother-Infant Dyad Leads to Severe Disease, Mammary Gland Infection, and Pathogenesis by Regulating Host Responses.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Stéphane G; Banner, David; Huang, Stephen S H; Almansa, Raquel; Leon, Alberto; Xu, Luoling; Bartoszko, Jessica; Kelvin, David J; Kelvin, Alyson A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal influenza viruses are typically restricted to the human upper respiratory tract whereas influenza viruses with greater pathogenic potential often also target extra-pulmonary organs. Infants, pregnant women, and breastfeeding mothers are highly susceptible to severe respiratory disease following influenza virus infection but the mechanisms of disease severity in the mother-infant dyad are poorly understood. Here we investigated 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection and transmission in breastfeeding mothers and infants utilizing our developed infant-mother ferret influenza model. Infants acquired severe disease and mortality following infection. Transmission of the virus from infants to mother ferrets led to infection in the lungs and mother mortality. Live virus was also found in mammary gland tissue and expressed milk of the mothers which eventually led to milk cessation. Histopathology showed destruction of acini glandular architecture with the absence of milk. The virus was localized in mammary epithelial cells of positive glands. To understand the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland infection, we performed global transcript analysis which showed downregulation of milk production genes such as Prolactin and increased breast involution pathways indicated by a STAT5 to STAT3 signaling shift. Genes associated with cancer development were also significantly increased including JUN, FOS and M2 macrophage markers. Immune responses within the mammary gland were characterized by decreased lymphocyte-associated genes CD3e, IL2Ra, CD4 with IL1β upregulation. Direct inoculation of H1N1 into the mammary gland led to infant respiratory infection and infant mortality suggesting the influenza virus was able to replicate in mammary tissue and transmission is possible through breastfeeding. In vitro infection studies with human breast cells showed susceptibility to H1N1 virus infection. Together, we have shown that the host-pathogen interactions of influenza virus

  8. Bovine mammary stem cells: Cell biology meets production agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue ...

  9. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qing Cissy; Verheyen, Esther M.; Zeng, Yi Arial

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology. PMID:27420097

  10. An autoregulatory enhancer controls mammary-specific STAT5 functions

    PubMed Central

    Metser, Gil; Shin, Ha Youn; Wang, Chaochen; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Sumin; Villarino, Alejandro V.; O'Shea, John J.; Kang, Keunsoo; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STATs) are principal transcription factors downstream of cytokine receptors. Although STAT5A is expressed in most tissues it remains to be understood why its premier, non-redundant functions are restricted to prolactin-induced mammary gland development and function. We report that the ubiquitously expressed Stat5a/b locus is subject to additional lineage-specific transcriptional control in mammary epithelium. Genome-wide surveys of epigenetic status and transcription factor occupancy uncovered a putative mammary-specific enhancer within the intergenic sequences separating the two Stat5 genes. This region exhibited several hallmarks of genomic enhancers, including DNaseI hypersensitivity, H3K27 acetylation and binding by GR, NFIB, ELF5 and MED1. Mammary-specific STAT5 binding was obtained at two canonical STAT5 binding motifs. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing was used to delete these sites in mice and determine their biological function. Mutant animals exhibited an 80% reduction of Stat5 levels in mammary epithelium and a concomitant reduction of STAT5-dependent gene expression. Transcriptome analysis identified a class of mammary-restricted genes that was particularly dependent on high STAT5 levels as a result of the intergenic enhancer. Taken together, the mammary-specific enhancer enables a positive feedback circuit that contributes to the remarkable abundance of STAT5 and, in turn, to the efficacy of STAT5-dependent mammary physiology. PMID:26446995

  11. Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cell Lineages and Parenchymal Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary development proceeds from an aggregation of cells in the ventral ectoderm to the establishment of an elaborate tree of alveoli, ducts, and cisternae. However, despite abundant data on endocrine regulation of ruminant mammary growth, we know comparatively little about cell lineages, express...

  12. Roles of Fas and Fas ligand during mammary gland remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Joon; Sapi, Eva; Brown, Wendi; Nilsen, Jon; Tartaro, Karrie; Kacinski, Barry M.; Craft, Joseph; Naftolin, Frederick; Mor, Gil

    2000-01-01

    Mammary involution is associated with degeneration of the alveolar structure and programmed cell death of mammary epithelial cells. In this study, we evaluated the expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) in the mammary gland tissue and their possible role in the induction of apoptosis of mammary cells. FasL-positive cells were observed in normal mammary epithelium from pregnant and lactating mice, but not in nonpregnant/virgin mouse mammary tissue. Fas expression was observed in epithelial and stromal cells in nonpregnant mice but was absent during pregnancy. At day 1 after weaning, high levels of both Fas and FasL proteins and caspase 3 were observed and coincided with the appearance of apoptotic cells in ducts and glands. During the same period, no apoptotic cells were found in the Fas-deficient (MRL/lpr) and FasL-deficient (C3H/gld) mice. Increase in Fas and FasL protein was demonstrated in human (MCF10A) and mouse (HC-11) mammary epithelial cells after incubation in hormone-deprived media, before apoptosis was detected. These results suggest that the Fas-FasL interaction plays an important role in the normal remodeling of mammary tissue. Furthermore, this autocrine induction of apoptosis may prevent accumulation of cells with mutations and subsequent neoplastic development. Failure of the Fas/FasL signal could contribute to tumor development. PMID:11086022

  13. Pim-1 kinase expression during murine mammary development

    SciTech Connect

    Gapter, Leslie A.; Magnuson, Nancy S.; Ng, Ka-yun; Hosick, Howard L. . E-mail: hosick@wsu.edu

    2006-07-07

    Pim-1 kinase phosphorylates substrates whose activities are linked to proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although pim-1 is induced by hormones and cytokines, the hormonal control and contribution of Pim-1 to mammary gland development have not been evaluated. We examined Pim-1 expression in mammary cell lines, investigated whether Pim-1 levels could be altered in breast epithelia by mammogenic hormones, and evaluated Pim-1 expression during mammary development. We found that Pim-1 was elevated in most mammary carcinoma cell lines and progesterone increased Pim-1 protein to some extent in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelia. Pim-1 expression in situ was consistent with the documented profile of progesterone activity in mouse mammary glands. Pim-1 nuclear localization correlated with cytoplasmic distribution for its substrate, p21{sup CIP/Waf1}, and we found that Pim-1 and p21 associate in vitro. Our results suggest that Pim-1 expression may be regulated by progesterone during mammary development and Pim-1 associates with p21 in mammary epithelial cells.

  14. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing Cissy; Verheyen, Esther M; Zeng, Yi Arial

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology. PMID:27420097

  15. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: The Role of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, C.; van Diest, P.J.; Vooijs, M.

    2014-01-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies. PMID:21506923

  16. Huntingtin regulates mammary stem cell division and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Elias, Salah; Thion, Morgane S; Yu, Hua; Sousa, Cristovao Marques; Lasgi, Charlène; Morin, Xavier; Humbert, Sandrine

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation during mammary gland morphogenesis. Here, we report the presence of huntingtin, the protein mutated in Huntington's disease, in mouse mammary basal and luminal cells throughout mammogenesis. Keratin 5-driven depletion of huntingtin results in a decreased pool and specification of basal and luminal progenitors, and altered mammary morphogenesis. Analysis of mitosis in huntingtin-depleted basal progenitors reveals mitotic spindle misorientation. In mammary cell culture, huntingtin regulates spindle orientation in a dynein-dependent manner. Huntingtin is targeted to spindle poles through its interaction with dynein and promotes the accumulation of NUMA and LGN. Huntingtin is also essential for the cortical localization of dynein, dynactin, NUMA, and LGN by regulating their kinesin 1-dependent trafficking along astral microtubules. We thus suggest that huntingtin is a component of the pathway regulating the orientation of mammary stem cell division, with potential implications for their self-renewal and differentiation properties. PMID:24749073

  17. Mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Boutinaud, Marion; Herve, Lucile; Lollivier, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Milk is produced in the udder by mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Milk contains MEC, which are gradually exfoliated from the epithelium during lactation. Isolation of MEC from milk using immunomagnetic separation may be a useful non-invasive method to investigate transcriptional regulations in ruminants’ udder. This review aims to describe the process of isolating MEC from milk, to provide an overview on the studies that use this method to analyze gene expression by qRT PCR and to evaluate the validity of this method by analyzing and comparing the results between studies. In several goat and cow studies, consistent reductions in alpha-lactalbumin mRNA levels during once-daily milking (ODM) and in SLC2A1 mRNA level during feed restriction are observed. The effect of ODM on alpha-lactalbumin mRNA level was similarly observed in milk isolated MEC and mammary biopsy. Moreover, we and others showed decreasing alpha-lactalbumin and increasing BAX mRNA levels with advanced stages of lactation in dairy cows and buffalo. The relevance of using the milk-isolated MEC method to analyze mammary gene expression is proven, as the transcript variations were also consistent with milk yield and composition variations under the effect of different factors such as prolactin inhibition or photoperiod. However, the RNA from milk-isolated MEC is particularly sensitive to degradation. This could explain the differences obtained between milk-isolated MEC and mammary biopsy in two studies where gene expression was compared using qRT-PCR or RNA Sequencing analyses. As a conclusion, when the RNA quality is conserved, MEC isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary mRNA to study various factors that impact milk yield and composition (ODM, feeding level, endocrine status, photoperiod modulation, and stage of lactation). PMID:26579195

  18. Expression of growth hormone in canine mammary tissue and mammary tumors. Evidence for a potential autocrine/paracrine stimulatory loop.

    PubMed Central

    van Garderen, E.; de Wit, M.; Voorhout, W. F.; Rutteman, G. R.; Mol, J. A.; Nederbragt, H.; Misdorp, W.

    1997-01-01

    The role of progestins in the pathogenesis of breast cancer in women remains controversial. To advance this discussion, we report the demonstration and localization of progestin-induced biosynthesis of growth hormone (GH) in canine mammary gland tissue. Nontumorous mammary tissues and tumors, both benign and malignant, were obtained from private household dogs. Immunoreactive GH was localized in mammary epithelial cells and correlated with the presence of GH mRNA. Local synthesis of GH was also proven immunoelectron microscopically by demonstrating GH-containing secretory granules. Cellular GH production in nontumorous tissues was more extensive during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase of the ovarian cycle or during exposure to synthetic progestins than during anestrus. GH was also associated with areas of hyperplastic mammary epithelium, which may indicate that locally produced GH enhances proliferation, acting in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. In 41 of 44 tumors, GH was present. Of 3 GH-negative tumor samples, 2 were from progestin-depleted, castrated bitches. In nonmalignant mammary tissues, GH production is stimulated by progesterone and synthetic progestins interacting with progesterone receptors. In some progesterone-receptor-negative malignant tumors, GH expression was found, indicating loss of this control. Progestin-induced GH probably participates in the cyclic development of the mammary gland but may promote mammary tumorigenesis by stimulating proliferation of susceptible, and sometimes transformed, mammary epithelial cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9060840

  19. Expression of growth hormone in canine mammary tissue and mammary tumors. Evidence for a potential autocrine/paracrine stimulatory loop.

    PubMed

    van Garderen, E; de Wit, M; Voorhout, W F; Rutteman, G R; Mol, J A; Nederbragt, H; Misdorp, W

    1997-03-01

    The role of progestins in the pathogenesis of breast cancer in women remains controversial. To advance this discussion, we report the demonstration and localization of progestin-induced biosynthesis of growth hormone (GH) in canine mammary gland tissue. Nontumorous mammary tissues and tumors, both benign and malignant, were obtained from private household dogs. Immunoreactive GH was localized in mammary epithelial cells and correlated with the presence of GH mRNA. Local synthesis of GH was also proven immunoelectron microscopically by demonstrating GH-containing secretory granules. Cellular GH production in nontumorous tissues was more extensive during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase of the ovarian cycle or during exposure to synthetic progestins than during anestrus. GH was also associated with areas of hyperplastic mammary epithelium, which may indicate that locally produced GH enhances proliferation, acting in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. In 41 of 44 tumors, GH was present. Of 3 GH-negative tumor samples, 2 were from progestin-depleted, castrated bitches. In nonmalignant mammary tissues, GH production is stimulated by progesterone and synthetic progestins interacting with progesterone receptors. In some progesterone-receptor-negative malignant tumors, GH expression was found, indicating loss of this control. Progestin-induced GH probably participates in the cyclic development of the mammary gland but may promote mammary tumorigenesis by stimulating proliferation of susceptible, and sometimes transformed, mammary epithelial cells. PMID:9060840

  20. Genistein-mediated inhibition of mammary stromal adipocyte differentiation limits expansion of mammary stem/progenitor cells by paracrine signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary adiposity may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by releasing cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that promote mammary epithelial proliferation. We evaluated the effects of soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) on the adipogenic differentiation of a SV40-immortalized mou...

  1. Early Effects of Blueberry and Concord Grape Intake on Rat Mammary Gland Development Suggest Potential Protective Mechanisms for Mammary Tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries (BB) and Concord grapes (CG) are rich in anthocyanins and other polyphenols, which may be linked to reduced incidence of chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis in animal models. We evaluated the early effects of dietary exposure to BB and CG on mammary glands of female rat offspring. ...

  2. Aflatoxin Contamination in Corn Differs Among Inoculation Techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin in corn (Zea mays L.) is dependent on heat and drought stress during to contaminate the grain. Two experiments, one comparing pin-bar vs. side needle inoculation and the other comparing spraying vs. solid material inoculation were conducted at Stoneville, MS in 2004, 2006, and 2007. Both...

  3. Improving alfalfa silage quality with inoculants and silo management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two areas of silage management are addressed: silage inoculants and plastic film quality. Inoculants are the most common silage additives in the United States. These products contain lactic acid bacteria to supplement the lactic acid bacteria naturally on the crop and help insure a consistent fermen...

  4. Lactating cow response to lucerne silage inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is unclear why bacterial silage inoculants improve milk production in lactating dairy cattle. However, recent in vitro results suggest that inoculated silage effects on milk production may be tied to greater production of rumen microorganisms. Our objective was to determine if alfalfa silage trea...

  5. Internal and external carriage of inoculated salmonella in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    External and internal persistence of inoculated Salmonella and spread to uninoculated broiler chicks in the same pens were studied by sampling ceca and rinses of feathered carcasses in two experiments. Half of the day-old chicks in pens were orally inoculated with a nalidixic-acid-resistant strain ...

  6. Silage Inoculant Effects on In Vitro Rumen Fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four inoculants, B (Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecium), C (Lactobacillus plantarum), D (Lactobacillus pentosus), E (Lactococcus lactis), were compared with an uninoculated treatment (A) on alfalfa (38% DM, AS), corn (36% DM, CS), and brown midrib corn (33% DM, BMR) silages. All inocul...

  7. EFFECTS OF CORN SILAGE INOCULANTS ON AEROBIC STABILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerobic stability of corn silage can be a major problem for farmers particularly in warm weather. Silage inoculants, while the most common type of silage additive, have not been consistently effective at improving aerobic stability. This study investigated new and proposed inoculant products over ...

  8. Malaria entomological inoculation rates in western Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Palis, Y; Wirtz, R A; Curtis, C F

    1992-12-01

    Over 61,000 anophelines collected between January 1988 and October 1989 in three villages in western Venezuela were assayed by ELISA for Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite (CS) protein. The six specimens confirmed positive belonged to three species: Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) nuneztovari Gabaldón, 1940, A. albitarsis Arribalzaga, 1878 sensu lato and A. oswaldoi (Peryassu, 1922). The estimated CS protein rate for all species combined was 0.01% (95% confidence limits 0.004-0.02%). This CS protein rate and the mean number of bites received by the collectors indicated a sporozoite inoculation rate of about 10.5 infective bites per person per year. From this value and the number of human malaria cases reported it was estimated that only 0.32% of bites by CS-positive mosquitoes led to a malaria infection. The CS protein rate is so low that this parameter would not be a practical indicator of the efficacy of control campaigns in this area. PMID:1363181

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-binding protein null mutation results in defective mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuzhi; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zhu, Yiwei Tony; Rao, Sambasiva M; Zhu, Yi-Jun

    2005-03-18

    A conditional null mutation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-binding protein (PBP) gene was generated to understand its role in mammary gland development. PBP-deficient mammary glands exhibited retarded ductal elongation during puberty, and decreased alveolar density during pregnancy and lactation. PBP-deficient mammary glands could not produce milk to nurse pups during lactation. Both the mammary ductal elongation in response to estrogen treatment and the mammary lobuloalveolar proliferation stimulated by estrogen plus progesterone were attenuated in PBP-deficient mammary glands. The proliferation index was decreased in PBP-deficient mammary glands. PBP-deficient mammary epithelial cells expressed abundant beta-casein, whey acidic protein, and WDNM1 mRNA, indicating a relatively intact differentiated function. PBP-deficient epithelial cells were unable to form mammospheres, which were considered to be derived from mammary progenitor/stem cells. We conclude that PBP plays a pivotal role in the normal mammary gland development. PMID:15647257

  10. Genetic diversity of symbiotic Bradyrhizobium elkanii populations recovered from inoculated and non-inoculated Acacia mangium field trials in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Perrineau, M M; Le Roux, C; de Faria, S M; de Carvalho Balieiro, F; Galiana, A; Prin, Y; Béna, G

    2011-07-01

    Acacia mangium is a legume tree native to Australasia. Since the eighties, it has been introduced into many tropical countries, especially in a context of industrial plantations. Many field trials have been set up to test the effects of controlled inoculation with selected symbiotic bacteria versus natural colonization with indigenous strains. In the introduction areas, A. mangium trees spontaneously nodulate with local and often ineffective bacteria. When inoculated, the persistence of inoculants and possible genetic recombination with local strains remain to be explored. The aim of this study was to describe the genetic diversity of bacteria spontaneously nodulating A. mangium in Brazil and to evaluate the persistence of selected strains used as inoculants. Three different sites, several hundred kilometers apart, were studied, with inoculated and non-inoculated plots in two of them. Seventy-nine strains were isolated from nodules and sequenced on three housekeeping genes (glnII, dnaK and recA) and one symbiotic gene (nodA). All but one of the strains belonged to the Bradyrhizobium elkanii species. A single case of housekeeping gene transfer was detected among the 79 strains, suggesting an extremely low rate of recombination within B. elkanii, whereas the nodulation gene nodA was found to be frequently transferred. The fate of the inoculant strains varied depending on the site, with a complete disappearance in one case, and persistence in another. We compared our results with the sister species Bradyrhizobium japonicum, both in terms of population genetics and inoculant strain destiny. PMID:21531520

  11. Changes in ruminal bacterial community composition following feeding of alfalfa silage inoculated with a commercial silage inoculant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some silage inoculants promote an increase in milk production, possibly through altering the rumen microflora. In this study, dairy cows fed alfalfa silage treated with the inoculant, Lactobacillus plantarum MTD/1 (LPS), were compared to cows fed untreated silage (Ctrl) with the objectives: 1) to de...

  12. Survival of E. coli O157:H12 in creek sediments after inoculation and re-inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The objective of this work was to test the hypothesis that the E. coli inactivation rates after streambed sediment inoculation do not differ significantly from the inactivation rates in the same sediment after re-inoculation, and to elucidate the relative importance of nutrient availability an...

  13. Prognostic factors in canine mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Misdorp, W; Hart, A A

    1976-04-01

    From a follow-up study of dogs surgically treated for mammary cancer, ten characteristics were analyzed statistically with special reference to their association with prognosis (expressed as survival for 2 years). The interrelations among five of the characteristics were also tested. The histologic type (descending range in malignancy: sarcomas greater than simple carcinomas greater than complex carcinomas), mode of growth (highly infiltrating greater than moderately infiltrating greater than expansive), clinical stage of complex carcinomas (large tumors and/or tumors involving the skin or underlying tissue greater than small, well-defined tumors), and size (greater than 15 cm greater than 11-15 cm greater than 5-10 cm greater than 0-5 cm) were of definite prognostic importance. The histologic grade was of possible prognostic importance. Localization, type of surgical therapy (mastectomy, block-dissection), growth in lymph vessels, involvement of regional lymph nodes, and duration of symptoms before treatment were not important to prognosis. A comparison between the factors associated with the prognosis of canine and human mammary cancer showed many similarities. However, the involvement of regional lymph nodes, important in women, was not so in bitches. PMID:1255797

  14. Progesterone induces adult mammary stem cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Purna A; Jackson, Hartland W; Beristain, Alexander G; Di Grappa, Marco A; Mote, Patricia A; Clarke, Christine L; Stingl, John; Waterhouse, Paul D; Khokha, Rama

    2010-06-10

    Reproductive history is the strongest risk factor for breast cancer after age, genetics and breast density. Increased breast cancer risk is entwined with a greater number of ovarian hormone-dependent reproductive cycles, yet the basis for this predisposition is unknown. Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) are located within a specialized niche in the basal epithelial compartment that is under local and systemic regulation. The emerging role of MaSCs in cancer initiation warrants the study of ovarian hormones in MaSC homeostasis. Here we show that the MaSC pool increases 14-fold during maximal progesterone levels at the luteal dioestrus phase of the mouse. Stem-cell-enriched CD49fhi cells amplify at dioestrus, or with exogenous progesterone, demonstrating a key role for progesterone in propelling this expansion. In aged mice, CD49fhi cells display stasis upon cessation of the reproductive cycle. Progesterone drives a series of events where luminal cells probably provide Wnt4 and RANKL signals to basal cells which in turn respond by upregulating their cognate receptors, transcriptional targets and cell cycle markers. Our findings uncover a dynamic role for progesterone in activating adult MaSCs within the mammary stem cell niche during the reproductive cycle, where MaSCs are putative targets for cell transformation events leading to breast cancer. PMID:20445538

  15. Periareolar techniques for mammary reduction and elevation.

    PubMed

    de Benito, J; Sanza, I F

    1993-01-01

    Between June 1990 and June 1992 we carried out 56 breast operations: 18 reductions, 32 mastopexies, and 6 implant changes. The surgical techniques used in all cases basically consisted of three phases: the periareolar incision, the creation of the superior pedicle with two medial and lateral flaps, and the "anchoring," crossed by both flaps in order to hold up the mammary gland. The diameter of the "doughnut" of skin that we had to deepidermize varied between 5 and 15 cm, thus raising the nipple-areola complex by as much as 10 cm. The volume of tissue removed from the hypertrophic breast ranged from 70 to 520 g. In 24 of the 32 mastopexies, the use of a silicone implant was necessary in order to provide greater volume, texture, and better mammary contour. In these cases the size of the prostheses varied between 120 and 300 cc. All patients completed the postop followup in the normal way. Only three patients suffered a slight dehiscence of the periareolar suture, which was solved within a few days of the operation by means of a Friedreich. The periareolar cutaneous pleats and the hardness of the breast gradually disappeared, as predicted, within a period of 3-4 months; afterward the breast looked perfectly natural. PMID:8273533

  16. Surface scanning: an application to mammary surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigotti, Camilla; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio

    1998-04-01

    The possibility of mathematically describing the body surface represents a useful tool for several medical sectors, such as prosthetics or plastic surgery, and could improve diagnosis and objective evaluation of deformities and the follow-up of progressive diseases. The approach presented is based on the acquisition of a surface scanned by a laser beam. The 3D coordinates of the spot generated on the surface by the laser beam are computed by an automatic image analyzer. Using at least two different views of the subject, the 3D coordinates are obtained by stereophotogrammetry. A software package for graphic representation and extraction of linear superficial and volumetric features from the acquired surface has been developed and some preliminary results with mammary reconstruction are presented. A good mammary reconstruction after mastectomy must achieve two results. First, the reconstruction should follow the patients' wishes and second, the reconstructed breast should be as similar as possible to the contralateral one. To achieve these goals, a knowledge of breast volume, area, and shape features are essential for the surgeon. In such a context, this system could be a valuable tool in improving breast reconstructive surgery.

  17. Persistent mammary hyperplasia in FVB/N mice.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Ana I; Shyamala, G; Galvez, Jose J; Thordarson, Gudmundur; Wakefield, Lalage M; Cardiff, Robert D

    2003-08-01

    The inbred FVB/N mouse strain is widely used for creating transgenic mice. Over the past decade, persistent mammary hyperplasia has been detected in many multiparous FVB/N female mice sent to the University of California, Davis (UCD) Mutant Mouse Pathology Laboratory (MMPL) by a number of different laboratories. However, the experimental details concerning most specimens were not always available. To confirm these empiric findings, experiments were carried out to evaluate the mammary glands of FVB/N mice under controlled conditions. Persistent mammary hyperplasia that related to parity was found. Weeks after their first to fourth pregnancy, 10 FVB/N female mice from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) colony were studied and the mammary glands were evaluated. The percentage of fat pad filled was estimated, using image analysis. Serum samples and the pituitary gland from other FVB/N mice from the LBNL were assayed for prolactin concentration. Multiparous FVB/N females consistently had persistent mammary hyperplasia. Four of seven females in the LBNL colony had hyperplasia after three pregnancies. A few foci of squamous nodules and sporadic carcinomas also were observed. Thus, some FVB/N females may have persistent mammary hyperplasia after three pregnancies without detectable pituitary abnormalities. Mammary carcinomas also may develop sporadically. These background phenotypes must be considered when interpreting the effect of genetic manipulation in FVB/N mice. PMID:14524420

  18. STAT signaling in mammary gland differentiation, cell survival and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Haricharan, S; Li, Y

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that undergoes extensive and profound changes during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, lactation and involution. The changes that take place during puberty involve large-scale proliferation and invasion of the fat-pad. During pregnancy and lactation, the mammary cells are exposed to signaling pathways that inhibit apoptosis, induce proliferation and invoke terminal differentiation. Finally, during involution the mammary gland is exposed to milk stasis, programed cell death and stromal reorganization to clear the differentiated milk-producing cells. Not surprisingly, the signaling pathways responsible for bringing about these changes in breast cells are often subverted during the process of tumorigenesis. The STAT family of proteins is involved in every stage of mammary gland development, and is also frequently implicated in breast tumorigenesis. While the roles of STAT3 and STAT5 during mammary gland development and tumorigenesis are well studied, others members, e.g. STAT1 and STAT6, have only recently been observed to play a role in mammary gland biology. Continued investigation into the STAT protein network in the mammary gland will likely yield new biomarkers and risk factors for breast cancer, and may also lead to novel prophylactic or therapeutic strategies against breast cancer. PMID:23541951

  19. Mammary gland-specific ablation of focal adhesion kinase reduces the incidence of p53-mediated mammary tumour formation

    PubMed Central

    van Miltenburg, M H A M; van Nimwegen, M J; Tijdens, I; Lalai, R; Kuiper, R; Klarenbeek, S; Schouten, P C; de Vries, A; Jonkers, J; van de Water, B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Elevated expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) occurs in numerous human cancers including colon-, cervix- and breast cancer. Although several studies have implicated FAK in mammary tumour formation induced by ectopic oncogene expression, evidence supporting a role for FAK in spontaneous mammary tumour development caused by loss of tumour suppressor genes such as p53 is lacking. Alterations in the tumour suppressor gene p53 have been implicated in over 50% of human breast cancers. Given that elevated FAK expression highly correlates with p53 mutation status in human breast cancer, we set out to investigate the importance of FAK in p53-mediated spontaneous mammary tumour development. Methods: To directly assess the role of FAK, we generated mice with conditional inactivation of FAK and p53. We generated female p53lox/lox/FAK+/+/WapCre, p53lox/lox/FAKflox/+/WapCre and p53lox/lox/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice, and mice with WapCre-mediated conditional expression of p53R270H, the mouse equivalent of human p53R273H hot spot mutation, together with conditional deletion of FAK, P53R270H/+/FAKlox/+/WapCre and p53R270H/+/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice. All mice were subjected to one pregnancy to induce WapCre-mediated deletion of p53 or expression of p53 R270H, and Fak genes flanked by two loxP sites, and subsequently followed the development of mammary tumours. Results: Using this approach, we show that FAK is important for p53-induced mammary tumour development. In addition, mice with the mammary gland-specific conditional expression of p53 point mutation R270H, the mouse equivalent to human R273H, in combination with conditional deletion of Fak showed reduced incidence of p53R270H-induced mammary tumours. In both models these effects of FAK were related to reduced proliferation in preneoplastic lesions in the mammary gland ductal structures. Conclusions: Mammary gland-specific ablation of FAK hampers p53-regulated spontaneous mammary tumour formation. Focal adhesion

  20. Sequencing the transcriptome of milk production: milk trumps mammary tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of normal human mammary gland development and function have mostly relied on cell culture, limited surgical specimens, and rodent models. Although RNA extracted from human milk has been used to assay the mammary transcriptome non-invasively, this assay has not been adequately validated in primates. Thus, the objectives of the current study were to assess the suitability of lactating rhesus macaques as a model for lactating humans and to determine whether RNA extracted from milk fractions is representative of RNA extracted from mammary tissue for the purpose of studying the transcriptome of milk-producing cells. Results We confirmed that macaque milk contains cytoplasmic crescents and that ample high-quality RNA can be obtained for sequencing. Using RNA sequencing, RNA extracted from macaque milk fat and milk cell fractions more accurately represented RNA from mammary epithelial cells (cells that produce milk) than did RNA from whole mammary tissue. Mammary epithelium-specific transcripts were more abundant in macaque milk fat, whereas adipose or stroma-specific transcripts were more abundant in mammary tissue. Functional analyses confirmed the validity of milk as a source of RNA from milk-producing mammary epithelial cells. Conclusions RNA extracted from the milk fat during lactation accurately portrayed the RNA profile of milk-producing mammary epithelial cells in a non-human primate. However, this sample type clearly requires protocols that minimize RNA degradation. Overall, we validated the use of RNA extracted from human and macaque milk and provided evidence to support the use of lactating macaques as a model for human lactation. PMID:24330573

  1. Bilateral internal mammary arteries: evidence and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, J. James B.; Wilson, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral internal mammary artery (BIMA) grafts are used for coronary revascularisation by only a minority of surgeons, despite a growing body of evidence suggesting improved survival when compared to use of only one internal mammary artery with additional saphenous vein grafts. Herein we review the evidence supporting revascularisation with BIMA and suggest reasons why the majority of surgeons use only one internal mammary artery. We discuss technical considerations, various graft combinations and the use of BIMA to facilitate anaortic off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB). PMID:23977638

  2. Chemoprevention of mammary tumor virus-induced and chemical carcinogen-induced rodent mammary tumors by natural plant products.

    PubMed

    Bhide, S V; Azuine, M A; Lahiri, M; Telang, N T

    1994-01-01

    The natural plant products turmeric, beta-carotene, catechin, and betel leaf extract were evaluated for their antitumor effects on mammary tumorigenesis in murine mammary tumor expressing C3H (Jax) mice and in Wistar rats treated with the chemical carcinogen 7-12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Administration of turmeric through the diet and of beta-carotene, catechin, and betel leaf extract through the drinking water to virgin female C3H mice resulted in decreased tumor incidence and tumor burden. Administering 5% turmeric in the diet from 2 months of age showed suppression of mammary tumor virus-related reverse transcriptase activity and of preneoplastic changes in the mammary glands. Furthermore, feeding turmeric from 6 months of age resulted in a 100% inhibition of mammary tumors. In the DMBA model of rat mammary tumorigenesis, administration of turmeric, catechin, and betel leaf extract resulted in decreased tumor burden and tumor incidence, and a delay in the onset of mammary tumors. PMID:7526904

  3. Lactation stage-dependent expression of transporters in rat whole mammary gland and primary mammary epithelial organoids.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Samuel E; Alcorn, Jane

    2010-04-01

    Since solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play pivotal roles in the transport of both nutrients and drugs into breast milk, drug-nutrient transport interactions at the lactating mammary gland are possible. Our purpose was to characterize lactation stage-dependent changes in transporter expression in rat mammary gland and isolated mammary epithelial organoids (MEO) to provide additional insight for the safe use of maternal medications during breastfeeding. We used quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess the temporal expression patterns of SLC and ABC transporters in rat mammary gland and isolated MEO at different stages of lactation. In whole mammary gland five distinct patterns of expression emerged relative to late gestation: (i) decreasing throughout lactation (Mdr1a, Mdr1b, Mrp1, Octn2, Ent2, Ent3, Ncbt2, Mtx1); (ii) prominent increase in early lactation, which may remain elevated or decline with advancing lactation (Octn1, Cnt2, Cnt3, Ent1, Pept1, Pept2); (iii) constant but decreasing later in lactation (Octn3, Dmt1); (iv) increasing until mid-to-late lactation (Oct1, Cnt1); and (v) prominent increase late in lactation (Ncbt1). In isolated MEO (an enriched source of mammary epithelial cells) major differences in expression patterns were noted for Octn3, Ncbt1, and Mtx1, but otherwise were reasonably similar with the whole mammary gland. In conclusion our study augments existing data on transporter expression in the lactating mammary gland. These data should facilitate investigations into lactation-stage dependent changes in drug or nutrient milk-to-serum concentration ratios, the potential for drug- or disease-transporter interactions, and mechanistic studies of transporter function in the lactating mammary gland. PMID:19702690

  4. Escherichia coli infection induces distinct local and systemic transcriptome responses in the mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Coliform bacteria are the most common etiologic agents in severe mastitis of cows. Escherichia coli infections are mostly restricted to a single udder quarter whereas neighboring quarters stay clinically inapparent, implicating the presence of a systemic defense reaction. To address its underlying mechanism, we performed a transcriptome study of mammary tissue from udder quarters inoculated with E. coli (6 h and 24 h post infection), from neighboring quarters of the same animals, and from untreated control animals. Results After 6 h 13 probe sets of differentially expressed genes (DEG) were detected in infected quarters versus control animals. Eighteen hours later 2154 and 476 DEG were found in infected and in neighboring quarters vs. control animals. Cluster analysis revealed DEG found only in infected quarters (local response) and DEG detected in both infected and neighboring quarters (systemic response). The first group includes genes mainly involved in immune response and inflammation, while the systemic reaction comprises antigen processing and presentation, cytokines, protein degradation and apoptosis. Enhanced expression of antimicrobial genes (S100A8, S100A9, S100A12, CXCL2, GNLY), acute phase genes (LBP, SAA3, CP, BF, C6, C4BPA, IF), and indicators of oxidative stress (GPX3, MT1A, MT2A, SOD2) point to an active defense reaction in infected and neighboring healthy quarters. Its early onset is indicated by increased transcription of NFIL3 at 6 h. NFIL3 is a predicted regulator of many genes of the systemic response at 24 h. The significance of our transcriptome study was evidenced by some recent findings with candidate gene based approaches. Conclusions The discovery and holistic analysis of an extensive systemic reaction in the mammary gland significantly expands the knowledge of host-pathogen interactions in mastitis which may be relevant for the development of novel therapies and for genetic selection towards mastitis resistance. PMID:20184744

  5. Lessons Learned from Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Jaquelin P; Golovkina, Tatyana V; Ross, Susan R

    2016-03-31

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), which was discovered as a milk-transmitted, infectious, cancer-inducing agent in the 1930s, has been used as an animal model for the study of retroviral infection and transmission, antiviral immune responses, and breast cancer and lymphoma biology. The main target cells for MMTV infection in vivo are cells of the immune system and mammary epithelial cells. Although the host mounts an immune response to the virus, MMTV has evolved multiple means of evading this response. MMTV causes mammary tumors when the provirus integrates into the mammary epithelial and lymphoid cell genome during viral replication and thereby activates cellular oncogene expression. Thus, tumor induction is a by-product of the infection cycle. A number of important oncogenes have been discovered by carrying out MMTV integration site analysis, some of which may play a role in human breast cancer. PMID:27034391

  6. Use of tamoxifen in the control of canine mammary neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Morris, J S; Dobson, J M; Bostock, D E

    1993-11-27

    Ninety-three bitches which had undergone mammary tumour surgery were entered into a clinical trial to examine the effects of ovariohysterectomy (spaying) at the time of mammary surgery and the use of the drug tamoxifen in preventing the recurrence of the tumour and/or the development of new mammary tumours. Twenty-three of the bitches which had been spayed were allocated tamoxifen but only 18 of them complied with the treatment and in nine of these the treatment was stopped owing to side effects (mostly oestrogenic). Too few animals were studied to draw conclusions about the possible preventative effects of tamoxifen on mammary neoplasia, but the high percentage of bitches affected by oestrogen-like side effects may reduce the compliance of owners and prevent tamoxifen being widely used in dogs. PMID:8116156

  7. Developmental biology: cell fate in the mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most breast cancers have their origin in the luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland. Defining how a master regulator controls the development of this cell lineage could provide important hints about why this should be. ...

  8. Mammary stem cell research in veterinary science: an update.

    PubMed

    Borena, Bizunesh M; Bussche, Leen; Burvenich, Christian; Duchateau, Luc; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2013-06-15

    The mammary gland is an organ with a remarkable regenerative capacity that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation, and involution. Growing evidence suggests that these changes are driven by the coordinated division and differentiation of mammary stem cell populations (MaSC). Whereas information regarding MaSC and their role in comparative mammary gland physiology is readily available in human and mice, such information remains scarce in most veterinary mammal species such as cows, horses, sheep, goats, pigs, and dogs. We believe that a better knowledge on the MaSC in these species will not only help to gain more insights into mammary gland (patho) physiology in veterinary medicine, but will also be of value for human medicine. Therefore, this review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell isolation and characterization in different mammals of veterinary importance. PMID:23360296

  9. Metabolic adaptations in goat mammary tissue during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Wilde, C J; Henderson, A J; Knight, C H

    1986-01-01

    Metabolic adaptations of goat mammary tissue during pregnancy and lactation were monitored in serial biopsies of the tissue. Changes in the synthetic capacity of secretory cells were studied by combining measurements of enzyme activities with short-term culture of mammary explants to measure lactose, casein and total protein synthesis. By these criteria, the main phase of mammary differentiation began in late pregnancy and was essentially complete by Week 5 of lactation, coinciding with the achievement of peak milk yield. While milk yield declined after Week 5, the activities of key enzymes expressed per mg DNA and the rates of lactose and casein synthesis in mammary explants were maintained over a considerable period. The results suggest that changes in the synthetic capacity of epithelial cells may account for much of the rise in milk yield in early lactation, but are not responsible for the declining phase of milk production characteristic of lactation in ruminants. PMID:2868125

  10. Mammary tumors induce select cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Pyter, Leah M; Cochrane, Sally F; Ouwenga, Rebecca L; Patel, Priyesh N; Pineros, Vanessa; Prendergast, Brian J

    2010-08-01

    Cancer, in addition to many other chronic diseases, is associated with serious and problematic behavioral symptoms, including cognitive impairments. In humans, various factors likely contribute to cancer-associated cognitive deficits including disease awareness and chemotherapy; however, the endogenous biological factors arising from tumor development may also play a causal role. In the present study, rats with mammary tumors exhibited impaired spatial reference memory on a radial arm maze and amnesia for familiar objects in an object recognition memory test. In contrast, their performance in the Morris water maze and in fear conditioning tests was comparable to that of controls. These select cognitive impairments were accompanied by elevations in hippocampal interleukin-1beta mRNA expression, but were not associated with decreases in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression. Together the results indicate that peripheral tumors alone are sufficient to induce increases in hippocampal cytokine expression and select deficits in hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. PMID:20188817

  11. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  12. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  13. Mammary gene expression profiles during an intramammary challenge reveal potential mechanisms linking negative energy balance with impaired immune response

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, Kasey M.; Drackley, James K.; Morin, Dawn E.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris A.

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles during a Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis) mastitis challenge between lactating cows subjected to dietary-induced negative energy balance (NEB; n = 5) and cows fed ad libitum to maintain positive energy balance (PEB; n = 5) to better understand the mechanisms associated with NEB and risk of mastitis during the transition period. The NEB cows were feed-restricted to 60% of calculated net energy for lactation requirements for 7 days, and cows assigned to PEB were fed the same diet for ad libitum intake. Five days after feed restriction, one rear mammary quarter of each cow was inoculated with 5,000 cfu of S. uberis (O140J). At 20 h postinoculation, S. uberis-infected mammary quarters from all cows were biopsied for RNA extraction. Negative energy balance resulted in 287 differentially expressed genes (DEG; false discovery rate ≤ 0.05), with 86 DEG upregulated and 201 DEG downregulated in NEB vs. PEB. Canonical pathways most affected by NEB were IL-8 signaling (10 genes), glucocorticoid receptor signaling (13), and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response (10). Among the genes differentially expressed by NEB, cell growth and proliferation (48) and cellular development (36) were the most enriched functions. Regarding immune response, HLA-A was upregulated due to NEB, whereas the majority of genes involved in immune response were downregulated (e.g., AKT1, IRAK1, MAPK9, and TRAF6). This study provided new avenues for investigation into the mechanisms relating NEB and susceptibility to mastitis in lactating dairy cows. PMID:20103698

  14. Sensitivity of locally recurrent rat mammary tumour cell lines to syngeneic polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Aeed, P A; Welch, D R

    1988-12-01

    Using a recently developed model for studying the biology of locally recurrent (LR) mammary tumours in the 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma system, we examined the sensitivity to polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis. The parental MTF7(T20) cell line; the 'primary' tumours which arose following subcutaneous inoculation into the mammary fat pad, sc1 and sc3; and the local recurrences (following surgical excision) LR1 and LR1a from sc1, and LR3 from sc3 were all cells generally resistant to specific PMN cytolysis. LPS-activated macrophages caused 25.1%, 38.7% and 58.8% specific cytolysis in MTF7, sc1 and LR1 cells, respectively at E:T of 20:1 and 72 h co-incubation. LR1a, sc3 and LR3 lysis ranged from 0-4.4% under the same conditions. Non-activated macrophages did not lyse any of the cell lines. Locally recurrent and 'primary' tumour cell lines were also not lysed by naive NK cells (range 0.5-4.0% cytolysis). NK cells activated with bropirimine, a potent immunomodulator currently being studied in clinical trials, and/or interleukin-2 were mildly more effective at killing LR cells. Our results show that locally recurrent tumours exhibit heterogeneous sensitivities and are different from 'primary' tumour cells in sensitivities to immune cell killing, but they are not necessarily more or less sensitive. Results with bropirimine-activated or IL-2-activated NK cells emphasize that nonspecific activation is insufficient to eliminate all tumour subpopulations. PMID:3224080

  15. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Shlomo E.; Heller, Elimelech D.; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  16. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  17. Effect of ovariohysterectomy in bitches with mammary neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Morris, J S; Dobson, J M; Bostock, D E; O'Farrell, E

    1998-06-13

    Ninety bitches with mammary tumours were studied for two years after the surgical removal of the primary tumour(s). Twenty-nine of the bitches had been spayed before the development of the mammary tumour, 22 were spayed when the tumours were removed and 39 were left entire. Fifty-eight of the bitches (64 per cent) had benign tumours and, of these, 15 (26 per cent) developed a new mammary tumour within two years, irrespective of whether the bitch was spayed. The other 32 bitches had malignant tumours which were grouped into 'invasive' and 'well defined' carcinomas. Sixty-three per cent of the spayed bitches and 57 per cent of the entire bitches, with invasive carcinoma were dead within two years of surgery as a result of their mammary tumours. For those with well defined carcinomas the tumour-related death rates were 18 per cent and 33 per cent respectively for the spayed and entire bitches. These findings suggest that ovariohysterectomy when mammary tumours are removed does not have a significant effect on the progression of malignant disease, and that about one in four bitches with a benign mammary tumour is likely to develop a further tumour in another gland. PMID:9670443

  18. Technical note: Isolation and characterization of porcine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dahanayaka, S; Rezaei, R; Porter, W W; Johnson, G A; Burghardt, R C; Bazer, F W; Hou, Y Q; Wu, Z L; Wu, G

    2015-11-01

    Within the mammary gland, functional synthesis of milk is performed by its epithelial (alveolar) cells. The availability of a stable mammary epithelial cell line is essential for biochemical studies to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for nutritional regulation of lactation. Therefore, porcine mammary epithelial cells (PMEC) were isolated from mammary glands of a 9-mo-old nonpregnant and nonlactating gilt and cultured to establish a nonimmortalized cell line. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin-18 (an intermediate filament specific for epithelial cells), β-casein (a specific marker for mammary epithelial cells), and α-lactalbumin. In culture, the PMEC doubled in number every 24 h and maintained a cobblestone morphology, typical for cultured epithelial cells, for at least 15 passages. Addition of 0.2 to 2 μg/mL prolactin to culture medium for 3 d induced the production of β-casein and α-lactalbumin by PMEC in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we have successfully developed a useful PMEC line for future studies of cellular and molecular regulation of milk synthesis by mammary epithelial cells of the sow. PMID:26641038

  19. TCDD exposure disrupts mammary epithelial cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Loretta L.; Lew, Betina J.; Lawrence, B. Paige

    2011-01-01

    Mammary gland growth and differentiation during pregnancy is a developmental process that is sensitive to the toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). TCDD is a widespread environmental contaminant and a potent ligand for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We demonstrate reduced β-casein protein induction in mouse mammary glands and in cultured SCp2 mammary epithelial cells following exposure to TCDD. SCp2 cells exposed to TCDD also show reduced cell clustering and less alveolar-like structure formation. SCp2 cells express transcriptionally active AhR, and exposure to TCDD induces expression of the AhR target gene CYP1B1. Exposure to TCDD during pregnancy reduced expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin in the mammary gland and decreased phosphorylation of STAT5, a known regulator of β-casein gene expression. These data provide morphological and molecular evidence that TCDD-mediated AhR activation disrupts structural and functional differentiation of the mammary gland, and present an in vitro model for studying the effects of TCDD on mammary epithelial cell function. PMID:19490989

  20. Studies on acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase from rat mammary gland and mammary tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, P M; Feltman, D S; Ahmad, F

    1982-01-01

    The activities of two lipogenic enzymes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase, were determined in two transplantable mammary adenocarcinomas (13762 and R3230AC) carried by non-pregnant, pregnant and lactating rats, and in mammary tissue of control animals (non-tumour-carrying) of comparable physiological states. During mammary-gland differentiation of control or tumour-carrying animals, the activities of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase in the lactating gland increased by about 40--50-fold over the values found in non-pregnant animals. On the other hand, in tumours carried by lactating dams there were only modest increases (1.5--2-fold) in acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase compared with the neoplasms carried by non-pregnant animals. On the basis of the Km values for different substrates and immunodiffusion and immunotitration data, the fatty acid synthase of neoplastic tissues appeared to be indistinguishable from the control mammary-gland enzyme. However, a comparison of the immunotitration and immunodiffusion experiments indicated that the mammary-gland acetyl-CoA carboxylase might differ from the enzyme present in mammary neoplasms. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6130760

  1. Neuropilin-2 promotes branching morphogenesis in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Bae, Donggoo; Pursell, Bryan; Gouvin, Lindsey M; Lu, Shaolei; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2011-07-01

    Although the neuropilins were characterized as semaphorin receptors that regulate axon guidance, they also function as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors and contribute to the development of other tissues. Here, we assessed the role of NRP2 in mouse mammary gland development based on our observation that NRP2 is expressed preferentially in the terminal end buds of developing glands. A floxed NRP2 mouse was bred with an MMTV-Cre strain to generate a mammary gland-specific knockout of NRP2. MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mice exhibited significant defects in branching morphogenesis and ductal outgrowth compared with either littermate MMTV-Cre;NRP2(+/loxP) or MMTV-Cre mice. Mechanistic insight into this morphological defect was obtained from a mouse mammary cell line in which we observed that VEGF(165), an NRP2 ligand, induces branching morphogenesis in 3D cultures and that branching is dependent upon NRP2 as shown using shRNAs and a function-blocking antibody. Epithelial cells in the mouse mammary gland express VEGF, supporting the hypothesis that this NRP2 ligand contributes to mammary gland morphogenesis. Importantly, we demonstrate that VEGF and NRP2 activate focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and promote FAK-dependent branching morphogenesis in vitro. The significance of this mechanism is substantiated by our finding that FAK activation is diminished significantly in developing MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mammary glands compared with control glands. Together, our data reveal a VEGF/NRP2/FAK signaling axis that is important for branching morphogenesis and mammary gland development. In a broader context, our data support an emerging hypothesis that directional outgrowth and branching morphogenesis in a variety of tissues are influenced by signals that were identified initially for their role in axon guidance. PMID:21693513

  2. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Rocheli; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP) traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria. PMID:26537605

  3. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rocheli de; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2015-12-01

    Plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP) traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria. PMID:26537605

  4. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  5. Enriching the Inoculation Construct: The Role of Critical Components in the Process of Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfau, Michael; Tusing, Kyle James; Koerner, Ascan F.; Lee, Waipeng; Godbold, Linda C.; Penaloza, Linda J.; Yang, Violet Shu-Huei; Hong, Yah-Huei

    1997-01-01

    Tests effectiveness of inoculation treatments on 790 undergraduate students. Probes relationship between threat and involvement, their role in inoculation, and nature of cognitive processes triggered via inoculation. Suggests inoculation elicits threat, threat contributes to resistance, and resistance is most pronounced for more involved receivers…

  6. Inducing Resistance to Conspiracy Theory Propaganda: Testing Inoculation and Metainoculation Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banas, John A.; Miller, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the boundaries of inoculation theory by examining how inoculation can be applied to conspiracy theory propaganda as well as inoculation itself (called metainoculation). A 3-phase experiment with 312 participants compared 3 main groups: no-treatment control, inoculation, and metainoculation. Research questions explored…

  7. Modeling mechanical interactions between cancerous mammary acini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jeffrey; Liphardt, Jan; Rycroft, Chris

    2015-03-01

    The rules and mechanical forces governing cell motility and interactions with the extracellular matrix of a tissue are often critical for understanding the mechanisms by which breast cancer is able to spread through the breast tissue and eventually metastasize. Ex vivo experimentation has demonstrated the the formation of long collagen fibers through collagen gels between the cancerous mammary acini responsible for milk production, providing a fiber scaffolding along which cancer cells can disorganize. We present a minimal mechanical model that serves as a potential explanation for the formation of these collagen fibers and the resultant motion. Our working hypothesis is that cancerous cells induce this fiber formation by pulling on the gel and taking advantage of the specific mechanical properties of collagen. To model this system, we employ a new Eulerian, fixed grid simulation method to model the collagen as a nonlinear viscoelastic material subject to various forces coupled with a multi-agent model to describe individual cancer cells. We find that these phenomena can be explained two simple ideas: cells pull collagen radially inwards and move towards the tension gradient of the collagen gel, while being exposed to standard adhesive and collision forces.

  8. Automatic inoculating apparatus. [includes movable carraige, drive motor, and swabbing motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automatic inoculating apparatus for agar trays is described and using a simple inoculating element, such as a cotton swab or inoculating loop. The apparatus includes a movable carriage for supporting the tray to be inoculated, a drive motor for moving the tray along a trackway, and a swabbing motor for automatically swabbing the tray during the movement. An actuator motor controls lowering of the inoculating element onto the tray and lifting of the inoculating element. An electrical control system, including limit microswitches, enables automatic control of the actuator motor and return of the carriage to the initial position after inoculating is completed.

  9. Assessment of Pediococcus acidilactici as a Potential Silage Inoculant

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimons, A.; Duffner, F.; Curtin, D.; Brophy, G.; O'Kiely, P.; O'Connell, M.

    1992-01-01

    Eighteen Pediococcus strains were screened for their potential as silage inoculants. Pediococcus acidilactici G24 was found to be the most suitable, exhibiting a short lag phase on both glucose and fructose, a rapid rate of acid production, a high sugar-to-lactate conversion efficiency, no detectable breakdown of proteins or lactic acid, and the ability to grow within a broad range of pH and temperature. When tested in laboratory silos using grass with a water-soluble carbohydrate content of 24 g/kg of aqueous extract, P. acidilactici G24 stimulated the natural Lactobacillus plantarum population and accelerated the rates of lactic acid production and pH decrease. After 6 days of fermentation, the inoculated silage exhibited a 12% decrease in ammonia nitrogen and an 11% increase in crude protein levels compared with uninoculated controls. The use of an L. plantarum inoculant at a rate of 104 bacteria per g of grass in conjunction with P. acidilactici G24 produced no additional beneficial effect. Inoculation of grass with a water-soluble carbohydrate level of 8 g/kg of aqueous extract with P. acidilactici G24 led to no acceleration in the rate of L. plantarum growth or pH decrease. However, after 7 days of fermentation the inoculated silage had a 14% lower ammonia nitrogen protein content than did uninoculated controls. The results suggest that P. acidilactici G24 may be useful as a silage inoculant for crops with a sufficiently high water-soluble carbohydrate level. PMID:16348773

  10. Classification and grading of canine malignant mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tavasoly, Abbas; Golshahi, Hannaneh; Rezaie, Annahita; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Histological grading is a good parameter to stratify tumors according to their biological aggressiveness. The Elston and Ellis grading method in humans, invasive ductal breast carcinomas and other invasive tumors are routinely used. The aims of this study were classification of mammary gland tumors and also application of a human grading method in canine mammary carcinoma. The samples included 37 tumors of mammary glands. Mammary tumors were carcinomas (n = 32) and sarcomas (n = 5). The carcinomas were classified as simple carcinoma 56.8% (n = 21), complex carcinoma 13.5% (n = 5), carcinoma arising from benign tumor 10.8% (n= 4) and special type of carcinoma 5.4% (n = 2). Out of 32 carcinomas studied, 37.5% (n = 12) grade I, 46.9% (n = 15) grade II and 15.6% (n = 5) grade III. This study demonstrated that the Elston and Ellis method of histological grading in canine mammary tumor is a reliable prognostic factor which is correlated with histopathological classification. PMID:25593682

  11. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Fractions from Mammary Epithelial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Chanat, Eric; Le Parc, Annabelle; Lahouassa, Hichem; Badaoui, Bouabid

    2016-06-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating animals, the mammary epithelial cells that surround the lumen of the acini produce and secrete copious amounts of milk. Functional differentiation of these mammary epithelial cells depends on the development of high-efficiency secretory pathways, notably for protein and lipid secretion. Protein secretion is a fundamental process common to all animal cells that involves a subset of cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. In contrast, en masse secretion of triglycerides and cholesterol esters in the form of milk fat globules is a unique feature of the mammary epithelial cell. Cytoplasmic lipid droplets, the intracellular precursors of milk fat globules, originate from the endoplasmic reticulum, as do most milk-specific proteins. This organelle is therefore pivotal in the biogenesis of milk components. Fractionation of the cell into its subcellular parts is an approach that has proven very powerful for understanding organelle function and for studying the specific role of an organelle in a given cell activity. Here we describe a method for the purification of both smooth and rough microsomes, the membrane-bound endoplasmic reticulum fragments that form from endoplasmic reticulum domains when cells are broken up, from mammary gland tissue at lactation. PMID:27048289

  12. Unloading the hired gun: Inoculation effects in expert witness testimony.

    PubMed

    Ziemke, Mitchell H; Brodsky, Stanley L

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the efficacy of inoculation as a trial strategy designed to counter mock jurors' perceptions that an expert is a hired gun in a criminal trial. The effect of narrative and fragmented expert responses to cross-examination questions was also examined. The significant results were that not using inoculation led to higher ratings of expert knowledge compared to other conditions. Response style did not make a difference in the criminal setting. Implications of these results regarding "hired gun" expert witnesses and courtroom persuasion are discussed. PMID:26299600

  13. In vitro expansion of the mammary stem/progenitor cell population by xanthosinetreatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Mammary stem cells are critical for growth and maintenance of the mammary gland and therefore of considerable interest for improving productivity and efficiency of dairy animals. Xanthosine (Xs) treatment has been demonstrated to promote expansion of putative mammary stem cells in vivo ...

  14. Mammary carcinogenesis in rats: basic facts and recent results in Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, s.

    1982-01-01

    Some research results from experiments investigating neutron-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats are presented. The additive effects of neutrons and 3-methylcholanthrene on mammary adenocarcinoma were determined. Synergism between diethylstilbestrol and neutrons was likewise studied. Differences in mammary neoplastic response between strains of laboratory rats was also investigated. (ACR)

  15. Interaction of dimethylbenzanthracene and diethylstilbestrol on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; McKnight, B.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1980-06-01

    It has been reported that x-irradiation and diethylstilbestrol (DES) act synergistically on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats. The physical carcinogen, x-irradiation, was replaced by a chemical carcinogen, dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA), and their interaction was studied in this system. Thirty-three female ACI rats were given 13.3 mg of DMBA per 100 grams of body weight. A total of 10 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 8 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 2 in a single rat, over a 266-day study period. Twenty-nine rats were implanted with a cholesterol pellet containing 5 mg of DES, and a total of 47 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 5 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 42 in 5 rats with 2 or more mammary adenocarcinomas. Twenty-four rats were given a combined treatment of both compounds, DES 2 days before DMBA, and a total of 126 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 2 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 124 in 18 rats with 2 or more mammary adenocarcinomas. The interaction between DMBA and DES was interpreted to be synergistic in regard to the proportion of rats with one or more mammary adenocarcinomas, and the median times of appearance of both first and second mammary adenocarcinomas. These interactions between DMBA and DES resemble the previously reported synergistic interactions between radiation and DES on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats.

  16. Bovine mammary stem cells: Transcriptome profiling and the stem cell niche

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification and transcriptome analysis of mammary stem cells (MaSC) are important steps toward understanding the molecular basis of mammary epithelial growth, homeostasis and tissue repair. Our objective was to evaluate the molecular profiles of four categories of cells within the bovine mammary ...

  17. p62: a hub of multiple signaling pathways in HER2-induced mammary tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cai-McRae, Xiaofeng; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that depletion of p62 in the background of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression sensitizes mammary tumor cells to amino acid deprivation, abolishes cellular transformation in vitro, and suppresses mammary tumorigenesis in vivo. Extensive investigation on the underlying molecular mechanisms has revealed a multifaceted role for p62 in HER2-associated mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:27308451

  18. Expression of novel, putative stem cell markers in prepubertal and lactating mammary glands of bovine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) are essential for growth and maintenance of the mammary epithelium. Two main phases of mammary growth include ductal elongation prior to puberty and lobulo-alveolar growth and development during pregnancy. Some studies have utilized morphological characteristics and retenti...

  19. Enrichment of Mammary Basal and Luminal Cells for Cell-of-Origin Metastasis Studies.

    PubMed

    Kabeer, Farhia; Podsypanina, Katrina; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is an important model system in metastasis research. Mammary epithelial stem cells are of particular interest because of their capacity for regeneration and their role in cancer initiation. This protocol describes how to enrich for mammary basal and luminal epithelial cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). PMID:26832681

  20. Progestogens and mammary tumours in the beagle bitch.

    PubMed

    Briggs, M H

    1980-03-01

    Progesterone administration induces specific cytosol receptors for progesterone in the mammary glands and uterus of adult beagle bitches but not in the mammary tissues or uterus of adult female rats. The specifiity of the progesterone receptor of dog myometrium is unlike that of human myometrium and is significantly different from progesterone receptors in tissues of th guinea pig. A spontaneous mammary benign mixed adenoma from an old beagle bitch was shown to contain specific progesterone receptors of similar affinity for progestogens as the dog uterine receptor. It is proposed that chronic toxicity tests of progestogens in the bitch cannot predict potential adverse human side effects because the regulatory mechanism for progesterone receptors is so different in the dog and major species differences exist in cytosol receptor affinity for particular progestational compounds. PMID:7414066

  1. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguruparan, R; Subapriya, R; Balachandran, C; Manohar, B Murali; Thangadurai, A; Nagini, S

    2006-09-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms in female dogs. The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between different clinical stages with activities of phase I and phase II carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes in canine mammary tumours. The levels of cytochrome P450 and cytochrome b5 and the activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), DT-diaphorase (DTD) and NADPH diaphorase in tumour tissues of 25 bitches was estimated. Enhanced levels of cytochrome P450 and b5 and phase II enzyme activities were observed in tumour tissues compared to the corresponding uninvolved adjacent tissues. The magnitude of the changes in phase I and phase II enzyme status was, however, more pronounced in stages I and II compared to stages III and IV. The results suggest that the balance between phase I carcinogen activation and phase II detoxification systems may play an important role in canine mammary tumour development. PMID:16014333

  2. Mammary blood flow regulation in the nursing rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, M.; Creasy, R.K.

    1984-11-01

    Cardiac output and mammary blood flow distribution prior to and after suckling were studied in 10 nursing rabbits by means of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Suckling was followed by a 5.8% rise in cardiac output and a 20.4% rise in mammary blood flow. Determinations of intraglandular blood flow distribution have shown that there was a 43% increase in blood flow to the glands suckled from as compared to a 22.7% rise to the contralateral untouched glands and a 4.9% rise in the remainder of untouched glands. The conclusion is that a local mechanism may be involved in the regulation of mammary blood flow in the nursing rabbit.

  3. Survivin and related proteins in canine mammary tumors: immunohistochemical expression.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, L; Romanucci, M; Malatesta, D; D'Andrea, A; Ciccarelli, A; Della Salda, L

    2015-03-01

    Survivin is reexpressed in most human breast cancers, where its expression has been associated with tumor aggressiveness, poor prognosis, and poor response to therapy. Survivin expression was evaluated in 41 malignant canine mammary tumors (CMTs) by immunohistochemistry, in relation to histological grade and stage, and correlated with that of some related molecules (β-catenin, caspase 3, heat shock proteins) to understand their possible role in canine mammary tumorigenesis. An increase in nuclear survivin expression, compared with healthy mammary glands, was observed in CMTs, where nuclear immunolabeling was related to the presence of necrosis. No statistically significant relation was found between the expression of the investigated molecules and the histological grade or stage. The present study may suggest an important involvement of survivin in CMT tumorigenesis. Its overexpression in most of the cases evaluated might suggest that targeting survivin in CMTs may be a valid anticancer therapy. PMID:24686389

  4. Oxytocin binding by myoepithelial cell membranes from involuted mammary tissue.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, A; Olins, G M; Eakle, K A; Bremel, R D

    1983-04-29

    Oxytocin binding activity of myoepithelial cell membranes from mammary tissue was measured under a variety of different experimental conditions. Mammary tissue from non-lactating rats bound oxytocin with a Kd of 9.2 +/- 1.6 nM (+/- S.E.) and indicates that receptors are retained by the myoepithelial cells in a non-lactating state. Ovariectomy of non-lactating rats did not depress the binding activity of the membranes. Administration of the estrogenic compounds estradiol-17 beta and diethylstibestrol at doses which affect uterine weight and are known to increase uterine oxytocin binding did not influence the binding activity of the myoepithelial cells. This indicates that the oxytocin receptors of the mammary gland are not under the same endocrine control as the uterine receptors. PMID:6303330

  5. [Hormones and mammary tumors in the bitch: a review].

    PubMed

    Rutteman, G R

    1992-02-01

    Toxicity studies as well as epidemiological studies in veterinary medicine have shown that both ovarian steroids and a large number of synthetic derivatives may promote the formation of mammary tumours in dogs. Abnormalities in pituitary function, particularly in the secretion of growth hormones, have been assumed to be involved in this process. In the present paper the possible role of endogenous and exogenous hormones in the pathogenesis of mammary tumours in bitches is reviewed. The available evidence suggests that steroid hormones may act at an early stage in the development of tumours by stimulating the proliferation of normal epithelium. This results in an increase in the number of susceptible cells. In addition a growth-stimulating action may be exerted upon cells which have undergone partial malignant transformation, but possibly to a lesser extent upon fully malignant cells at a late stage of tumour development. In advanced mammary cancers steroid receptors are frequently absent, which may indicate a more autonomous pattern of growth. It seems justified to conclude that in clinical practice ovariectomy at an early age as a measure to prevent oestrus is to be preferred to progestin treatment with regard to the risk of mammary carcinoma. Still, there is no indication that in dogs, ovariectomy will reduce the risk of metastasis once the animal is presented with a mammary carcinoma. The earlier assumption that overproduction of growth hormone is an important factor in the pathogenesis of spontaneous mammary tumours in the dogs could not be proven. The role of prolactin and of thyroid hormones in this process continues to be uncertain. PMID:1736405

  6. Malignant mammary tumor in female dogs: environmental contaminants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mammary tumors of female dogs have greatly increased in recent years, thus demanding rapid diagnosis and effective treatment in order to determine the animal survival. There is considerable scientific interest in the possible role of environmental contaminants in the etiology of mammary tumors, specifically in relation to synthetic chemical substances released into the environment to which living beings are either directly or indirectly exposed. In this study, the presence of pyrethroid insecticide was observed in adjacent adipose tissue of canine mammary tumor. High Precision Liquid Chromatography - HPLC was adapted to detect and identify environmental contaminants in adipose tissue adjacent to malignant mammary tumor in nine female dogs, without predilection for breed or age. After surgery, masses were carefully examined for malignant neoplastic lesions. Five grams of adipose tissue adjacent to the tumor were collected to detect of environmental contaminants. The identified pyrethroids were allethrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and tetramethrin, with a contamination level of 33.3%. Histopathology demonstrated six female dogs (66.7%) as having complex carcinoma and three (33.3%) with simple carcinoma. From these tumors, seven (77.8%) presented aggressiveness degree III and two (22.2%) degree I. Five tumors were positive for estrogen receptors in immunohistochemical analysis. The contamination level was observed in more aggressive tumors. This was the first report in which the level of environmental contaminants could be detected in adipose tissue of female dogs with malignant mammary tumor, by HPLC. Results suggest the possible involvement of pyrethroid in the canine mammary tumor carcinogenesis. Hence, the dog may be used as a sentinel animal for human breast cancer, since human beings share the same environment and basically have the same eating habits. PMID:20587072

  7. The Epigenetic Landscape of Mammary Gland Development and Functional Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rijnkels, Monique; Kabotyanski, Elena; Montazer-Torbati, Mohamad B.; Beauvais, C. Hue; Vassetzky, Yegor; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Devinoy, Eve

    2010-01-01

    Most of the development and functional differentiation in the mammary gland occur after birth. Epigenetics is defined as the stable alterations in gene expression potential that arise during development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes are mediated at the biochemical level by the chromatin conformation initiated by DNA methylation, histone variants, post-translational modifications of histones, non-histone chromatin proteins, and non-coding RNAs. Epigenetics plays a key role in development. However, very little is known about its role in the developing mammary gland or how it might integrate the many signalling pathways involved in mammary gland development and function that have been discovered during the past few decades. An inverse relationship between marks of closed (DNA methylation) or open chromatin (DnaseI hypersensitivity, certain histone modifications) and milk protein gene expression has been documented. Recent studies have shown that during development and functional differentiation, both global and local chromatin changes occur. Locally, chromatin at distal regulatory elements and promoters of milk protein genes gains a more open conformation. Furthermore, changes occur both in looping between regulatory elements and attachment to nuclear matrix. These changes are induced by developmental signals and environmental conditions. Additionally, distinct epigenetic patterns have been identified in mammary gland stem and progenitor cell sub-populations. Together, these findings suggest that epigenetics plays a role in mammary development and function. With the new tools for epigenomics developed in recent years, we now can begin to establish a framework for the role of epigenetics in mammary gland development and disease. PMID:20157770

  8. SEQUENTIAL INOCULATION AS AN ADJUNCT IN ENTERIC VIRUS PLAQUE ENUMERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential utility of sequentially inoculating a virus sample onto two different cultures of similar dissimilar cell lines was evaluated in conjunction with IDU (5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine) treatment of the cells as a potential adjunct in viral plaque formation assays. his evaluat...

  9. Inoculant effects on alfalfa silage: fermentation products and nutritive value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of fourteen microbial inoculants on the fermentation and nutritive value of alfalfa silages was studied under laboratory conditions. First (477 g dry matter (DM)/kg) and second cuttings (393 g DM /kg) of a second year alfalfa stand were ensiled in two experiments. In both experiments, alf...

  10. Stem versus leaflet inoculation of peanut with Sclerotinia minor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tamspan 90, a Spanish peanut cultivar, exhibits physiological resistance to Sclerotinia minor (S.M), as indicated by the low rate of lesion expansion (RLE) on inoculated stems. The purpose of this study was to determine the RLE on stems and leaflets of two peanut cultivars (Okrun, a susceptible cul...

  11. Streptococcus bovis as a Silage Inoculant, a Second Chance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research indicated that Streptococcus bovis, a lactate producing ruminal bacterium, was similar or better than commercial silage inoculants. This study assessed the potential of two S. bovis strains, JB1 (a bacteriocin negative strain) and HC5 (a bacteriocin producing strain). Four treatmen...

  12. A NOVEL GAMMAHERPESVIRUS IN NORTHERN FUR SEALS (CALLORHINUS URSINUS) IS CLOSELY RELATED TO THE CALIFORNIA SEA LION (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS) CARCINOMA-ASSOCIATED OTARINE HERPESVIRUS-1.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Hinojosa, Galaxia; Gulland, Frances M D; DeLong, Robert; Gelatt, Tom; Archer, Linda; Wellehan, James F X

    2016-01-01

    Otarine herpesvirus 1 (OtHV1) is strongly associated with California sea lion (CSL, Zalophus californianus) urogenital carcinoma, the most common cancer documented in marine mammals. In addition to CSL, OtHV1 has also been found in association with carcinoma in South American fur seals (Arctocephalus australis), demonstrating it can infect related species. Northern fur seals (NFS, Callorhinus ursinus) are sympatric with CSL, and copulation between these species has been observed; yet, there are no reports of urogenital carcinoma in NFS. We describe a new Otarine herpesvirus found in vaginal swabs from NFS, herein called OtHV4. Partial sequencing of the polymerase gene and the glycoprotein B gene revealed OtHV4 is closely related to OtHV1, with 95% homology in the region of polymerase sequenced, and phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that they are sister taxa. An OtHV4-specific hydrolysis probe quantitative PCR was developed and validated, and its use on vaginal swabs revealed 16 of 50 (32%) wild adult female NFS were positive for OtHV4. The identification of a virus highly similar to the carcinoma-associated OtHV1 in a sympatric species without carcinoma suggests that comparative genomics of OtHV1 and OtHV4 may identify candidate viral oncogenes. PMID:26555110

  13. A case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma associated with long-term dialysis showing false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 as Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Michiko; Mitani, Keiko; Fukumura, Yuki; Nagashima, Yoji; Argani, Pedrum; Yao, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Renal carcinomas associated with Xp11.2 translocations/transcription factor 3 (TFE3) gene fusion (Xp11 translocation RCC) are a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma. A middle-aged Japanese man, who had a medical history of dialysis for more than 12 years, had bilateral renal cancers with a background of acquired cystic disease of the kidney and remarkable deposition of calcium oxalate in the tumorous area. The right renal tumor showed papillary architecture of clear cells with diffuse and strong immunoreactivity for TFE3 and focal and weak positivity for cathepsin K, suggesting a possibility of Xp11 translocation RCC. However, RT-PCR failed to detect any type of the reported fusion genes involving TFE3. Thus, the sample was sent for a TFE3 break-apart FISH assay in a renal tumor consultation service, which reported no evidence of TFE3 gene rearrangement. The right renal tumor was finally diagnosed as papillary renal cell carcinoma with cystic change. We report here a case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma in a patient undergoing long-term dialysis, which showed false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 immunostaining. Titration of TFE3 immunohistochemical staining (IHC) should be performed and cross-referenced with the FISH or RT-PCR results to avoid the misinterpretation of TFE3 IHC results. PMID:24228124

  14. Characterization of cis-acting elements regulating transcription of the human DF3 breast carcinoma-associated antigen (MUC1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, M; Kufe, D

    1993-01-01

    The present studies have examined the sequences responsible for regulating transcription of the human DF3 breast carcinoma-associated antigen (MUC1) gene. A region 1656 base pairs upstream to the DF3 transcription initiation site was fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Transient expression assays using a series of deleted constructs demonstrated that the region from position -618 contains the regulatory sequences necessary for DF3 transcription in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Further analysis with internal deletion vectors and heterologous promoter constructs indicated the involvement of cis-acting elements in the fragment extending from positions -598 to -485. By gel retardation and DNA footprinting, we have identified a protein in MCF-7 cells that recognizes sequences between positions -505 and -485. The results of Southwestern studies demonstrate that this protein has an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa. Taken together, these results suggest that DF3 gene transcription is regulated by a previously undescribed transacting factor. Images PMID:8419933

  15. Bile duct carcinoma associated with congenital biliary dilatation in a 16-year-old female: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hideki; Yazawa, Naoki; Furukawa, Daisuke; Masuoka, Yoshihito; Yamada, Misuzu; Mashiko, Taro; Kawashima, Yohei; Ogawa, Masami; Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Mine, Tetsuya; Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Nakagohri, Toshio

    2016-12-01

    We encountered a very rare case of bile duct carcinoma associated with congenital biliary dilatation (CBD) in a 16-year-old female who was admitted to our hospital because of right upper abdominal pain and vomiting. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a cystic dilatation of the common bile duct measuring 7 cm in diameter and two enhanced tumors 4 cm in diameter located in the inferior bile duct and middle bile duct. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography clearly demonstrated a cystic dilatation of the extrahepatic bile duct (Todani's CBD classification: type 4-A). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography also revealed two tumors. Biopsy results of one of the tumors confirmed adenocarcinoma. Excision of the perihilar bile duct and subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy with dissection of the major lymph nodes were performed. A postoperative histopathologic examination revealed a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma, which remained within the mucosal layer, and no lymph node metastasis was found. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged 10 days after surgery and has remained disease-free for 21 months. PMID:26943681

  16. Coronary bypass using bilateral internal mammary arteries in an achondroplast.

    PubMed

    Alassal, Mohamed Abdulwahab; Youssef, Mostafa; Koudieh, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Coronary bypass grafting for ischemic heart disease in achondroplastic dwarfs is very rare. Shortage of veins and inadequate vein quality may cause difficulties during surgery. Only 2 cases of coronary bypass surgery in an achondroplastic dwarf, in which the left internal mammary artery and vein grafts were used, have been reported. We describe the case of a 55-year-old male achondroplastic dwarf who had triple-vessel coronary disease and underwent successful coronary bypass surgery using one saphenous vein graft and bilateral internal mammary artery grafts. The anatomic and surgical challenges in achondroplasia are highlighted. PMID:24887865

  17. Cadherin Cell Adhesion System in Canine Mammary Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Adelina; Schmitt, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Cadherin-catenin adhesion complexes play important roles by providing cell-cell adhesion and communication in different organ systems. Abnormal expression of cadherin adhesion molecules constitutes a common phenomenon in canine mammary cancer and has been frequently implicated in tumour progression. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on cadherin/catenin adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, β-catenin, and P-cadherin) in canine mammary cancer, focusing on the putative biological functions and clinical significance of these molecules in this disease. This paper highlights the need for further research studies in this setting in order to elucidate the role of these adhesion molecules during tumour progression and metastasis. PMID:22973534

  18. [Physiology of secretory cells in the mouse mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Tolkunov, Iu A; Markov, A G

    2000-08-01

    Secretory cells' membrane potential and transepithelial potential difference in the mouse mammary gland diminish within 2.5 hours following breast-feeding of the litter. The transepithelial resistance for up to 20 hours after the feeding did not drop below 40-70 k omega. The secret pressure in the mammary gland does not grow during this period. Therefore an increase of interval between litter feeding up to 20 hours does not entail any mechanical lesion of the secretory epithelium. The latter's cells seem to secrete organic and inorganic substances in concentrations which do not change significantly during their transfer along the outgoing ducts. PMID:11059022

  19. Plasma free amino acid profiles of canine mammary gland tumors

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Kazuo; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Minami, Saburo; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between plasma free amino acid (PFAA) levels and the clinical stages of mammary gland tumors (MGT) in dogs. PFAA levels in canines with malignant mammary tumors were decreased compared to those of healthy animals. The levels of aspartate and ornithine, in the dogs with tumor metastasis were significantly decreased when compared to those of dogs that did not have metastases. Results of this study indicate that PFAA levels could be a risk factor or biomarker for canine MGT metastasis. PMID:23271187

  20. Periductal mastitis and mammary duct ectasia in a male.

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, M. T.; Corcoran, G. D.; Haqqani, M. T.

    1985-01-01

    A case of periductal mastitis and mammary duct ectasia is presented in a 50 year old male, with presenting symptoms similar to those of females, namely subareolar breast lump and mastalgia. As far as can be ascertained only 4 cases of mammary duct ectasia and periductal mastitis in males have been reported previously. Since this entity is not well known in males it is possible that it may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed clinically and histologically. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:4040633

  1. Polyurethane-covered mammary implants: a 12-year experience.

    PubMed

    Gasperoni, C; Salgarello, M; Gargani, G

    1992-10-01

    Polyurethane-covered mammary implants are the implants of choice in aesthetic and reconstructive mammary surgery. These implants give very good results in regard to breast contour and consistency, and have a very low complication rate. We present our 12-year experience using polyurethane-covered prostheses. We place the implant mostly in the subglandular or subcutaneous site, and their capsular contracture rate is extremely low (3.3%). Based on our experience, we also review the other complications and side effects occurring with polyurethane prostheses and discuss them in detail. PMID:1466525

  2. Mammary-type myofibroblastoma with the nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vankawala, Preksha; Kuperman, Michael B.; Mennel, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a 23-year-old white man who presented with anasarca and a new periumbilical mass. He had preserved kidney function and laboratory findings consistent with nephrotic syndrome, including 9.7 g/day albuminuria. Serum serologies were positive for anti-SSa and anti-SSb and low complements but were negative for antinuclear antibody. Pathologic findings of the abdominal mass showed a mammary-type myofibroblastoma. A kidney biopsy revealed a diffuse proliferative and membranous immune-mediated glomerulonephritis with 10% interstitial fibrosis. This is a novel case of mammary-type myofibroblastoma associated with nephrotic syndrome mimicking a proliferative lupus pattern. PMID:27365885

  3. Modeling mammary gland morphogenesis as a reaction-diffusion process.

    PubMed

    Grant, Mark R; Hunt, C Anthony; Xia, Lan; Fata, Jimmie E; Bissell, Mina J

    2004-01-01

    Mammary ducts are formed through a process of branching morphogenesis. We present results of experiments using a simulation model of this process, and discuss their implications for understanding mammary duct extension and bifurcation. The model is a cellular automaton approximation of a reaction-diffusion process in which matrix metalloproteinases represent the activator, inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases represent the inhibitor, and growth factors serve as a substrate. We compare results from the simulation model with those from in-vivo experiments as part of an assessment of whether duct extension and bifurcation during morphogenesis may be a consequence of a reaction-diffusion mechanism mediated by MMPs and TIMPs. PMID:17271768

  4. Tumours and dysplasias of the mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, J. F.; Misdorp, W.

    1974-01-01

    As mammary tumours occur frequently in the dog and cat but rarely in other domestic animals, only the tumours of these two species are classified. The epithelial tumours are termed “complex” when they consist of cells resembling both secretory and myoepithelial cells: these tumours are biologically less malignant than tumours of the “simple” type in which only one of these kinds of cell is present. The carcinomas are subdivided into adenocarcinoma, solid carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma. The term “carcinosarcoma or malignant mixed tumour” was used only when there were cells morphologically resembling not only one or both of the epithelial components but also connective tissue cells with their products of differentiation. The benign tumours are classed as adenoma, papilloma, fibroadenoma, or benign soft tissue tumour. The dysplasias are described under the following headings: cyst, adenosis, regular typical epithelial proliferation in ducts and lobules (epitheliosis), duct ectasia, fibrosclerosis, and lobular hyperplasia. ImagesFig. 41Fig. 42Fig. 43Fig. 44Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 45Fig. 46Fig. 47Fig. 48Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36 PMID:4371737

  5. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  6. The mammary glands of the Amazonian manatee, Trichechus inunguis (Mammalia: Sirenia): morphological characteristics and microscopic anatomy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernanda Rosa; da Silva, Vera Maria Ferreira; Barcellos, José Fernando Marques

    2014-08-01

    The mammaries from carcasses of two female Amazonian manatees were examined. Trichechus inunguis possesses two axillary mammaries beneath the pectoral fins, one on each side of the body. Each papilla mammae has a small hole on its apex--the ostium papillare. The mammaries are covered by a stratified squamous keratinized epithelium. The epithelium of the mammary ducts became thinner more deeply in the tissue and varied from stratified to simple cuboidal. There was no evidence of glandular activity or secretion into the ducts of the mammary glands. PMID:24920139

  7. An in vitro model of epithelial cell growth stimulation in the rodent mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Ehmann, U K; DeVries, J T; Chen, M S C; Adamos, A A; Guzman, R C; Omary, M B

    2003-08-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cell cultures previously described bring about extensive proliferation and a cell population with the appropriate markers for luminal ductal epithelial cells, and also the ability to form normal tissue after implantation into mice. This success may result from a culture environment that resembles certain aspects of the environment in the mammary gland. Mouse mammary epithelial cells, whose proliferation is limited when plated alone, can be stimulated to multiply by contact with lethally irradiated cells of the LA7 rat mammary tumour line. Most of the proliferative stimulus is imparted by direct cell contact between LA7 and mouse mammary cells. Junctions, including adherens junctions, form among all cells in the culture, much as junctions form in the mammary gland. LA7 cells secrete TGFalpha and bFGF, factors found in the mammary gland, and factors to which mouse mammary cells respond in culture. Mouse mammary cells express keratins 8 and 18, markers for luminal cells of the mammary duct. LA7 cells express keratin 14 and vimentin, markers for myoepithelial cells. These facts, taken together, fit a model of cell replacement in an epithelial tissue and also imitate the relationship between luminal ductal cells and myoepithelial cells in the mammary gland. This method of culturing cells is useful, not only for in vitro-in vivo carcinogenesis studies, but also for the study of mechanisms by which growth signals are imparted from one cell to another. PMID:12950387

  8. Nuances in Inoculation: The Role of Inoculation Approach, Ego-Involvement, and Message Processing Disposition in Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfau, Michael; Tusing, Kyle James; Lee, Waipeng; Godbold, Linda C.; Koerner, Ascan; Penaloza, Linda J.; Hong, Yah-huei; Yang, Violet Shu-huei

    1997-01-01

    Indicates that inoculation treatments, using central and peripheral approaches, confer resistance to influence and thus imply that threat is more prominent than refutational preemption in the process of resistance. Suggests that greater receiver need for cognition enhances resistance but only with highly involving issues. Rules out assimilation…

  9. Diet-induced obesity disrupts ductal development in the mammary glands of nonpregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Akihiro; Ichii, Osamu; Yamaji, Daisuke; Imao, Takeshi; Suzuki, Chiharu; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Terao, Akira; Kon, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Kazuhiro

    2009-05-01

    Mammary glands develop postnatally in response to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Obesity-induced changes in the local environment, however, retard mammary gland development during late pregnancy and lactation. To clarify the effects of obesity on fundamental duct development, we compared the mammary glands of nulliparous nonpregnant obese mice fed a high-fat diet with those of lean mice fed a normal diet. Obese mice had enlarged mammary glands, reflecting fat pad size, whereas the ducts in obese mice showed a less dense distribution with less frequent branching. Additionally, the ducts were surrounded by thick collagen layers, and were incompletely lined with myoepithelium. Because leptin receptors were localized in the epithelium region and leptin that was highly expressed in the obese glands suppressed mammary epithelial cell proliferation in vitro, the present results suggest that obesity disrupts mammary ductal development, possibly by remodeling the mammary microenvironment and promoting the expression of such paracrine factors as leptin. PMID:19384959

  10. Quantification of mammary organoid toxicant response and mammary tissue motility using OCT fluctuation spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Blackmon, Richard L.; Carabas-Hernendez, Patricia; Fuller, Ashley; Troester, Melissa A.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-03-01

    Mammary epithelial cell (MEC) organoids in 3D culture recapitulate features of breast ducts in vivo. OCT has the ability to monitor the evolution of MEC organoids non-invasively and longitudinally. The anti-cancer drug Doxorubicin (Dox) is able to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells and has been widely used for chemotherapy of breast cancers; while environmental toxins implicated in breast cancer such as estrogen regulates mammary tumor growth and stimulates the proliferation and metastatic potential of breast cancers. Here we propose a quantitative method for measuring motility of breast cells in 3D cultures based upon OCT speckle fluctuation spectroscopy. The metrics of the inverse power-law exponent (α) and fractional modulation amplitude (M) were extracted from speckle fluctuation spectra. These were used to quantify the responses of MEC organoids to Dox, and estrogen. We investigated MEC organoids comprised of two different MEC lines: MCF10DCIS.com exposed to Dox, and MCF7 exposed to estrogen. We found an increase (p<0.001) in α of MEC along time (t=0, 1 hour, 24 hours, 48 hours and 6 days) at each dose of Dox (0, 1 μM and 10 μM), indicating lower fluctuation intensity at higher frequencies. We also observed a decrease (p<0.001) in M for increasing time. However, both α and M of MCF7 treated with estrogen (0, 1 nM and 10 nM) exhibited the opposite trend along time. This novel technology provides rapid and non-invasive measurements of the effects of toxicants on MEC motility for understanding breast cancer development and assessing anti-cancer drugs.

  11. Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy: abandon or persist?

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peng-Fei; Liu, Yan-Bing; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Although the 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer incorporated the internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy (IM-SLNB) concept, there has been little change in surgical practice patterns due to the low visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes with the traditional injection technique. Meanwhile, as internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLN) metastases are mostly found concomitantly with axillary lymph nodes (ALN) metastases, previous IM-SLNB clinical trials fail to evaluate the status of IMLN in patients who are really in need (only in clinically ALN negative patients). Our modified injection technique (periareolar intraparenchymal, high volume, and ultrasonographic guidance) significantly improved the visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes, making the routine IM-SLNB possible in daily practice. IM-SLNB could provide individual minimally invasive staging, prognosis, and decision-making for breast cancer patients, especially for patients with clinically positive ALN. Moreover, IMLN radiotherapy should be tailored and balanced between the potential benefit and toxicity, and IM-SLNB-guided IMLN radiotherapy could achieve this goal. In the era of effective adjuvant therapy, within the changing treatment approach - more systemic therapy, less loco-regional therapy - clinicians should deliberate the application of regional IMLN therapy. PMID:27390528

  12. Pten in Stromal Fibroblasts Suppresses Mammary Epithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Trimboli, Anthony J.; Cantemir-Stone, Carmen Z.; Li, Fu; Wallace, Julie A.; Merchant, Anand; Creasap, Nicholas; Thompson, John C.; Caserta, Enrico; Wang, Hui; Chong, Jean-Leon; Naidu, Shan; Wei, Guo; Sharma, Sudarshana M.; Stephens, Julie A.; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Gurcan, Metin N.; Weinstein, Michael B.; Barsky, Sanford H.; Yee, Lisa; Rosol, Thomas J.; Stromberg, Paul C.; Robinson, Michael L.; Pepin, Francois; Hallett, Michael; Park, Morag; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Leone, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The tumor stroma is believed to contribute to some of the most malignant characteristics of epithelial tumors. However, signaling between stromal and tumor cells is complex and remains poorly understood. Here we show that the genetic inactivation of Pten in stromal fibroblasts of mouse mammary glands accelerated the initiation, progression and malignant transformation of mammary epithelial tumors. This was associated with the massive remodeling of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM), innate immune cell infiltration and increased angiogenesis. Loss of Pten in stromal fibroblasts led to increased expression, phosphorylation (T72) and recruitment of Ets2 to target promoters known to be involved in these processes. Remarkably, Ets2 inactivation in Pten stroma-deleted tumors ameliorated disruption of the tumor microenvironment and was sufficient to decrease tumor growth and progression. Global gene expression profiling of mammary stromal cells identified a Pten-specific signature that was highly represented in the tumor stroma of breast cancer patients. These findings identify the Pten-Ets2 axis as a critical stroma-specific signaling pathway that suppresses mammary epithelial tumors. PMID:19847259

  13. Mechanisms of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid inhibition of mammary cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Said, Thenaa K; Moraes, Ricardo CB; Sinha, Raghu; Medina, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in cell growth inhibition involved induction of pRb-2/p130 interaction and nuclear translocation with E2F-4, followed by significant repression in E2F-1 and PCNA nuclear levels, which led to inhibition in DNA synthesis in mammary epithelial cell lines. PMID:11250759

  14. Proliferation of human mammary cancer cells exposed to 27-hydroxycholesterol

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ, PAMELA; TORRES, CRISTIAN; RAMÍREZ, MARÍA EUGENIA; EPUÑÁN, MARÍA JOSÉ; VALLADARES, LUIS EMILIO; SIERRALTA, WALTER DANIEL

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the possible mechanisms by which certain estradiol receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumor cells remain resistant to treatment with anti-estrogens or inhibitors of local estradiol (E2) production. To this end, we compared the proliferative effects on mammary cancer cells of the novel selective ER modulator 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHC) to those of E2, and evaluated their inhibition by ICI 182,780 (ICI). Analysis of the effects on the cell cycle of 27OHC and E2 in the absence or presence of ICI was conducted. In ER-positive mammary tumor cells, we detected the blocking of 27OHC proliferation-stimulatory activity by simvastatin, as well as the inhibition of E2-stimulated proliferation by an α-fetoprotein-derived cyclic nonapeptide. The effects reported herein may be extrapolated to infiltrating mammary cancer, where the activity of local macrophages may stimulate tumor growth. We suggest that increased breast cancer growth in obese patients may be related to increased 27OHC circulatory levels. PMID:22993572

  15. The epigenetic landscape of mammary gland development and functional differentiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of the development and functional differentiation in the mammary gland occur after birth. Epigenetics is defined as the stable alterations in gene expression potential that arise during development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes are mediated at the biochemical level by the chromatin conf...

  16. MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT: EARLY LIFE EFFECTS FROM THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary Gland Development: Early Life Effects from the Environment

    S.E. Fenton. Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    As signs of precocious puberty in girls reach ...

  17. Selective transport of IgE into ovine mammary secretions.

    PubMed

    Hine, B C; Hunt, P W; Beasley, A M; Windon, R G; Glover, S A; Colditz, I G

    2010-10-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) E is actively transported into ovine colostrum. Here we examine the degree of selectivity and the mechanism by which this transfer occurs in sheep. Results indicate that during colostrogenesis in sheep, transfer of immunoglobulins was most selective for IgG1 and IgA followed by IgE, IgM and IgG2. In milk, selectivity was greatest for IgA, followed by IgM, IgE, IgG1 and IgG2. The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and poly immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) mediate the transport of IgG1 and IgA across the ovine mammary epithelium respectively. In primates and rodents, the low-affinity IgE receptor, Fc epsilonRII, functions to transport IgE across the intestinal epithelium. We therefore investigated the expression of the low-affinity IgE receptor (CD23), pIgR and FcRn transcripts in the ovine mammary gland. The expression profiles of FcRn, pIgR and CD23 mRNA reflected concentrations of their Ig ligands in mammary secretions. These findings suggest a role for CD23 in transport of IgE across the mammary epithelium of sheep. PMID:20226487

  18. The dynamics of murine mammary stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    DONG, Qiaoxiang; SUN, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The stem/progenitor cells in the murine mammary gland are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for ductal elongation in puberty, homeostasis maintenance in adult, and lobulo-alveolar genesis during pregnancy. In recent years understanding the epithelial cell hierarchy within the mammary gland is becoming particularly important as these different stem/progenitor cells were perceived to be the cells of origin for various subtypes of breast cancer. Although significant advances have been made in enrichment and isolation of stem/progenitor cells by combinations of antibodies against cell surface proteins together with flow cytometry, and in identification of stem/progenitor cells with multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal using mammary fat pad reconstitution assay and in vivo genetic labeling technique, a clear understanding of how these different stem/progenitors are orchestrated in the mammary gland is still lacking. Here we discuss the different in vivo and in vitro methods currently available for stem/progenitor identification, their associated caveats, and a possible new hierarchy model to reconcile various putative stem/progenitor cell populations identified by different research groups. PMID:25580105

  19. FEEDING GENISTEIN TO PREPUBERTAL GILTS STIMULATES THEIR MAMMARY DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible role of dietary genistein on mammary development of prepubertal gilts was investigated. Forty-five gilts were fed one of three diets from 90 d of age until slaughter (day 183 ± 1). Diets were: without soya (CTL0, n=15); soya-based commercial (CTLS, n=15); and soya-based commercial with ...

  20. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  1. Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy: abandon or persist?

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Peng-Fei; Liu, Yan-Bing; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Although the 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer incorporated the internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy (IM-SLNB) concept, there has been little change in surgical practice patterns due to the low visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes with the traditional injection technique. Meanwhile, as internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLN) metastases are mostly found concomitantly with axillary lymph nodes (ALN) metastases, previous IM-SLNB clinical trials fail to evaluate the status of IMLN in patients who are really in need (only in clinically ALN negative patients). Our modified injection technique (periareolar intraparenchymal, high volume, and ultrasonographic guidance) significantly improved the visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes, making the routine IM-SLNB possible in daily practice. IM-SLNB could provide individual minimally invasive staging, prognosis, and decision-making for breast cancer patients, especially for patients with clinically positive ALN. Moreover, IMLN radiotherapy should be tailored and balanced between the potential benefit and toxicity, and IM-SLNB-guided IMLN radiotherapy could achieve this goal. In the era of effective adjuvant therapy, within the changing treatment approach – more systemic therapy, less loco-regional therapy – clinicians should deliberate the application of regional IMLN therapy. PMID:27390528

  2. Precursors of hexoneogenesis within the human mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human mammary gland is capable of de novo synthesis of glucose and galactose (hexoneogenesis); however, the carbon source is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the role of acetate, glutamine, lactate and glycerol as potential carbon sources for hexoneogenesis. Healthy breast...

  3. Aflatoxins ingestion and canine mammary tumors: There is an association?

    PubMed

    Frehse, M S; Martins, M I M; Ono, E Y S; Bracarense, A P F R L; Bissoqui, L Y; Teixeira, E M K; Santos, N J R; Freire, R L

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of mycotoxins on dogs feed and to explore the potential association between mycotoxins exposure and the chance of mamary tumors in a case-control study. The study included 256 female dogs from a hospital population, 85 with mammary tumors (case group) and 171 without mammary tumors (control group). An epidemiological questionnaire was applied to both groups, and the data were analyzed by the EpiInfo statistical package. For the study, 168 samples of the feed offered to dogs were analyzed for the presence of aflatoxins, fumonisins and zearalenone by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mycotoxins were found in 79 samples (100%) in the case group and 87/89 (97.8%) in the control group. Mycotoxins were detected in all types of feed, regardless feed quality. Level of aflatoxin B1 (p = 0.0356, OR = 2.74, 95%, CI 1.13 to 6.60), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) (p = 0.00007, OR = 4.60, 95%, CI = 2.16 to 9.79), and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) (p = 0.0133, OR = 9.91, 95%, CI 1.21 to 81.15) were statistically higher in case of mammary cancer. In contrast, neutering was a protective factor for mammary cancer (p = 0.0004, OR = 0.32, 95%, CI = 0.17 to 0.60). PMID:26271706

  4. Three-Dimensional Cultures of Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an ideal “model organism” for studying tissue specificity and gene expression in mammals: it is one of the few organs that develop after birth and it undergoes multiple cycles of growth, differentiation and regression during the animal’s lifetime in preparation for the important function of lactation. The basic “functional differentiation” unit in the gland is the mammary acinus made up of a layer of polarized epithelial cells specialized for milk production surrounded by myoepithelial contractile cells, and the two-layered structure is surrounded by basement membrane. Much knowledge about the regulation of mammary gland development has been acquired from studying the physiology of the gland and of lactation in rodents. Culture studies, however, were hampered by the inability to maintain functional differentiation on conventional tissue culture plastic. We now know that the microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and tissue architecture, plays a crucial role in directing functional differentiation of organs. Thus, in order for culture systems to be effective experimental models, they need to recapitulate the basic unit of differentiated function in the tissue or organ and to maintain its three-dimensional (3D) structure. Mouse mammary culture models evolved from basic monolayers of cells to an array of complex 3D systems that observe the importance of the microenvironment in dictating proper tissue function and structure. In this chapter, we focus on how 3D mouse mammary epithelial cultures have enabled investigators to gain a better understanding of the organization, development and function of the acinus, and to identify key molecular, structural, and mechanical cues important for maintaining mammary function and architecture. The accompanying chapter of Vidi et al. describes 3D models developed for human cells. Here, we describe how mouse primary epithelial cells and cell lines—essentially those we use in our

  5. Inoculation methods using Rhodococcus erythropolis strain P30 affects bacterial assisted phytoextraction capacity of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-López, V; Prieto-Fernández, A; Janssen, J; Herzig, R; Vangronsveld, J; Kidd, P S

    2016-01-01

    In this study different bacterial inoculation methods were tested for tobacco plants growing in a mine-soil contaminated with Pb, Zn, and Cd. The inoculation methods evaluated were: seed inoculation, soil inoculation, dual soil inoculation event, and seed+soil inoculation. Each inoculum was added at two bacterial densities (10(6) CFUs mL(-1) and 10(8) CFUs mL(-1)). The objectives were to evaluate whether or not the mode of inoculation or the number of applied microorganisms influences plant response. The most pronounced bacterial-induced effect was found for biomass production, and the soil inoculation treatment (using 10(6) CFUs mL(-1)) led to the highest increase in shoot dry weight yield (up to 45%). Bacterial-induced effects on shoot metal concentrations were less pronounced; although a positive effect was found on shoot Pb concentration when using 10(8) CFUs mL(-1) in the soil inoculation (29% increase) and in the seed+soil inoculation (34% increase). Also shoot Zn concentration increased by 24% after seed inoculation with 10(6) CFUs mL(-1). The best effects on the total metal yield were not correlated with an increasing number of inoculated bacteria. In fact the best results were found after a single soil inoculation using the lower cellular density of 10(6) CFUs mL(-1). PMID:26552496

  6. Advocating Inoculation in the Eighteenth Century: Exemplarity and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Argument Smallpox inoculation was introduced in Europe in the early eighteenth century and has been considered the first mass treatment of disease based on practical use of probability calculations and mathematical tools of computation. The article argues that these new approaches were deeply entangled with other rationalities, most emphatically that of exemplarity. Changes in inoculation methods around mid-century gradually changed the conceptualization of disease, seeing all cases as fundamentally equal, and thus making it more relevant to count them. Arithmetic changed the ways of thinking about smallpox epidemics, but new ways of conceptualizing disease were vital to making it a matter of arithmetic at all. The article investigates what happened when numbers and figures were introduced into medical matters: Who did the figures really concern, and what types of argument were they fitted into? How were numbers transformed into metaphors, and how did quantitative argument work together with arguments from exemplarity? PMID:27171893

  7. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Paolo; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Watters, James; Loboda, Andrey; Kulkarni, Amit; Castle, John; Palombo, Fabio; Viti, Valentina; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Zappulli, Valentina; Marconato, Laura; Abramo, Francesca; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Lahm, Armin; La Monica, Nicola; de Rinaldis, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies. PMID:19327144

  8. ATG proteins mediate efferocytosis and suppress inflammation in mammary involution

    PubMed Central

    Teplova, Irina; Lozy, Fred; Price, Sandy; Singh, Sukhwinder; Barnard, Nicola; Cardiff, Robert D.; Birge, Raymond B.; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2013-01-01

    Involution is the process of post-lactational mammary gland regression to quiescence and it involves secretory epithelial cell death, stroma remodeling and gland repopulation by adipocytes. Though reportedly accompanying apoptosis, the role of autophagy in involution has not yet been determined. We now report that autophagy-related (ATG) proteins mediate dead cell clearance and suppress inflammation during mammary involution. In vivo, Becn1+/− and Atg7-deficient mammary epithelial cells (MECs) produced ‘competent’ apoptotic bodies, but were defective phagocytes in association with reduced expression of the MERTK and ITGB5 receptors, thus pointing to defective apoptotic body engulfment. Atg-deficient tissues exhibited higher levels of involution-associated inflammation, which could be indicative of a tumor-modulating microenvironment, and developed ductal ectasia, a manifestation of deregulated post-involution gland remodeling. In vitro, ATG (BECN1 or ATG7) knockdown compromised MEC-mediated apoptotic body clearance in association with decreased RAC1 activation, thus confirming that, in addition to the defective phagocytic processing reported by other studies, ATG protein defects also impair dead cell engulfment.   Using two different mouse models with mammary gland-associated Atg deficiencies, our studies shed light on the essential role of ATG proteins in MEC-mediated efferocytosis during mammary involution and provide novel insights into this important developmental process. This work also raises the possibility that a regulatory feedback loop exists, by which the efficacy of phagocytic cargo processing in turn regulates the rate of engulfment and ultimately determines the kinetics of phagocytosis and dead cell clearance. PMID:23380905

  9. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  10. Upregulation of long non-coding RNA urothelial carcinoma associated 1 by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α contributes to bladder cancer cell growth and reduced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    XUE, MEI; LI, XU; WU, WENJING; ZHANG, SHUWAN; WU, SHOUZHEN; LI, ZHENGKUN; CHEN, WEI

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA urothelial carcinoma associated 1 (lncRNA-UCA1) is upregulated in bladder cancer and plays a pivotal role in bladder cancer progression and metastasis. Recent studies and our research found that lncRNA-UCA1 may be an important biomarker and therapeutic target for bladder cancer. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the upregulation of lncRNA-UCA1 in bladder cancer is largely unknown. In the present study, we showed that lncRNA-UCA1 expression in bladder cancer cells was upregulated by transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα), which was the only candidate transcription factor simultaneously predicted by a total of five bioinformatical software programs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that C/EBPα bound to the lncRNA-UCA1 core promoter region in vitro and in vivo. The luciferase assays further showed that there was a point mutation (A231G) in the C/EBPα binding site of the lncRNA-UCA1 core promoter in various bladder cancer cell lines, which in turn significantly increased the transcriptional activity of lncRNA-UCA1. We also demonstrated that C/EBPα siRNA treatment contributed to the downregulation of lncRNA-UCA1 expression, whereas overexpression of C/EBPα enhanced lncRNA-UCA1 expression. Furthermore, lncRNA-UCA1 transcriptional repression by C/EBPα siRNA sharply reduced cell viability and induced cell apoptosis in vitro. Collectively, our results provide a novel therapeutic strategy for bladder cancer by effectively interrupting the binding of the lncRNA-UCA1 promoter and certain transcription factors, so as to reverse the upregulation of lncRNA-UCA1 and prevent bladder cancer progression. PMID:24648007

  11. Saprophytic growth of inoculated Frankia sp. in soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Babur S; Welsh, Allana; Hahn, Dittmar

    2007-12-01

    The potential of two Frankia strains to grow saprophytically was studied in nonsterile soil microcosms with ground leaf litter of Alnus glutinosa as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. Strains Ag45/Mut15 and ArI3, which represent two taxonomic subgroups within the Alnus host infection group were inoculated alone, or together to investigate potential competition. Their growth was analyzed by in situ and dot-blot hybridization. A significant increase in cell numbers and filament length was observed during the first 6 weeks after inoculation for strain Ag45/Mut15, both alone and in mixed culture with strain ArI3, followed by a decrease until the end of the study after 12 weeks. The number of filaments remained unchanged. In contrast, the cell numbers and filament length of strain ArI3 were reduced significantly during the first 2 weeks and were undetectable for the remainder of the study. These results were comparable with those obtained in sterile mineral medium amended with leaf litter of A. glutinosa, although reductions in cell numbers and filament length were less pronounced than in soil microcosms. In concomitant control studies without leaf litter amendments for both experimental setups, filaments of both strains could only be detected immediately after inoculation. These results were matched in all experimental setups by concomitant shifts in the rRNA content of both strains, i.e., an immediate decline in the rRNA content for strain ArI3 after inoculation, and an increase in the rRNA content, followed by a late decline during incubation for strain Ag45/Mut15. These results demonstrated that Frankia strain Ag45/Mut15 could grow saprophytically in soil with complex carbon and nitrogen sources such as leaf litter, while the growth of strain ArI3 was not supported. PMID:17916077

  12. Enhanced mammary progesterone receptor-A isoform activity in the promotion of mammary tumor progression by dietary soy in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary contribution to breast cancer risk, recurrence, and progression remains incompletely understood. Increased consumption of soy and soy isoflavones is associated with reduced mammary cancer susceptibility in women and in rodent models of carcinogenesis. In rats treated with N-Methyl-N-Nitrosou...

  13. Functional characterization of Mammary Gland Protein-40, a chitinase-like glycoprotein expressed during mammary gland apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Anand, Vijay; Jaswal, Shalini; Singh, Surender; Kumar, Sudarshan; Jena, Manoj Kumar; Verma, Arvind Kumar; Yadav, Munna Lal; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Lotfan, Masoud; Malakar, Dhruba; Dang, Ajay Kumar; Mohanty, Tushar Kumar; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar

    2016-02-01

    MGP-40 is a chitinase-like protein which is over expressed during mammary gland involution. However, its physiological function in the mammary gland is poorly understood. In the present investigation, we have reported the functional significance of buffalo specific MGP-40 in the mammary gland by using an in vitro model of the buffalo mammary epithelial cell (BuMEC) line. MGP-40 was highly up regulated in BuMECs in serum starved condition as well as after treatment with prolactin suggesting its role in the stress response. Subsequently, to study the effect of MGP-40 on BuMECs, the cells were transfected with a mammalian expression construct of pCI neo harboring MGP-40 gene. It was observed that over expression of MGP-40 enhanced proliferation of BuMECs and protected the cells from apoptosis under serum free condition. In contrast, MGP-40 attenuated the mitogenic effect of insulin in BuMECs. Besides, over expression of the MGP-40 reduced dome formation, acinar polarization and casein synthesis in BuMECs in the presence of lactogenic hormones, it also induced Stat3 phosphorylation and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) -like features. Together, our data suggest that MGP-40 is involved in protection of BuMECs under stress conditions, inhibits cellular differentiation and induces EMT-like features. A schematic diagram depicting possible association of MGP-40 in various molecular pathways has been presented. PMID:26659075

  14. Regulation of adipocyte lipid homeostasis by genistein alters mammary epithelial cell differentiation: a paracrine mechanism for mammary tumor protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological and animal studies have shown a negative correlation between breast cancer incidence and intake of soy rich foods. Our laboratory has studied soy protein isolate (SPI), the primary component of soy infant formula, as a paradigm to evaluate diet as a risk factor in mammary cancer. We ...

  15. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8+ T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3−/− mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way. PMID:26667202

  16. Mycorrhizal fungal establishment in agricultural soils: factors determining inoculation success.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Erik; van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Rillig, Matthias C; Kiers, E Toby

    2013-03-01

    Soil biota provide a number of key ecological services to natural and agricultural ecosystems. Increasingly, inoculation of soils with beneficial soil biota is being considered as a tool to enhance plant productivity and sustainability of agricultural ecosystems. However, one important bottleneck is the establishment of viable microbial populations that can persist over multiple seasons. Here, we explore the factors responsible for establishment of the beneficial soil fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which can enhance the yield of a wide range of agricultural crops. We evaluate field application potential and discuss ecological and evolutionary factors responsible for application success. We identify three factors that determine inoculation success and AM fungal persistence in soils: species compatibility (can the introduced species thrive under the imposed circumstances?); field carrying capacity (the habitat niche available to AMF); and priority effects (the influence of timing and competition on the establishment of alternative stable communities). We explore how these factors can be employed for establishment and persistence of AMF. We address the importance of inoculum choice, plant choice, management practices and timing of inoculation for the successful manipulation of the resulting AMF community. PMID:23495389

  17. Stability of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Inoculants after Introduction into Soil

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, Brigitte; Cleyet-Marel, Jean-Claude; Normand, Philippe; Bardin, Rene

    1988-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 125-Sp, USDA 138, and USDA 138-Sm had been used as inoculants for soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in soils previously free of B. japonicum. At 8 to 13 years after their release, these strains were reisolated from soil samples. A total of 115 isolates were obtained through nodules, and seven colonies were obtained directly by a serological method. The stability of the inoculants was confirmed by comparing the reisolated cultures with their respective parental strains which had been preserved by being lyophilized or stored on a yeast extract-mannitol agar slant at 4°C. Comparisons were made on morphological and serological characters, carbon compound utilization (8 tested), intrinsic antibiotic resistance (9 tested), and enzymatic activity (19 tested). Mucous and nonmucous isolates of serogroup 125 were analyzed for symbiotic effectiveness and restriction fragment hybridization with a DNA probe. Our data suggest that the B. japonicum inoculants have survived for up to 13 years in the soils without significant mutation except for two reisolates with a slightly increased kanamycin resistance level. Images PMID:16347768

  18. Ectodysplasin/NF-κB Promotes Mammary Cell Fate via Wnt/β-catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Voutilainen, Maria; Lönnblad, Darielle; Shirokova, Vera; Elo, Teresa; Rysti, Elisa; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Schneider, Pascal; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammary gland development commences during embryogenesis with the establishment of a species typical number of mammary primordia on each flank of the embryo. It is thought that mammary cell fate can only be induced along the mammary line, a narrow region of the ventro-lateral skin running from the axilla to the groin. Ectodysplasin (Eda) is a tumor necrosis factor family ligand that regulates morphogenesis of several ectodermal appendages. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of Eda (K14-Eda mice) induces formation of supernumerary mammary placodes along the mammary line. Here, we investigate in more detail the role of Eda and its downstream mediator transcription factor NF-κB in mammary cell fate specification. We report that K14-Eda mice harbor accessory mammary glands also in the neck region indicating wider epidermal cell plasticity that previously appreciated. We show that even though NF-κB is not required for formation of endogenous mammary placodes, it is indispensable for the ability of Eda to induce supernumerary placodes. A genome-wide profiling of Eda-induced genes in mammary buds identified several Wnt pathway components as potential transcriptional targets of Eda. Using an ex vivo culture system, we show that suppression of canonical Wnt signalling leads to a dose-dependent inhibition of supernumerary placodes in K14-Eda tissue explants. PMID:26581094

  19. Ectodysplasin/NF-κB Promotes Mammary Cell Fate via Wnt/β-catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voutilainen, Maria; Lindfors, Päivi H; Trela, Ewelina; Lönnblad, Darielle; Shirokova, Vera; Elo, Teresa; Rysti, Elisa; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Schneider, Pascal; Mikkola, Marja L

    2015-11-01

    Mammary gland development commences during embryogenesis with the establishment of a species typical number of mammary primordia on each flank of the embryo. It is thought that mammary cell fate can only be induced along the mammary line, a narrow region of the ventro-lateral skin running from the axilla to the groin. Ectodysplasin (Eda) is a tumor necrosis factor family ligand that regulates morphogenesis of several ectodermal appendages. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of Eda (K14-Eda mice) induces formation of supernumerary mammary placodes along the mammary line. Here, we investigate in more detail the role of Eda and its downstream mediator transcription factor NF-κB in mammary cell fate specification. We report that K14-Eda mice harbor accessory mammary glands also in the neck region indicating wider epidermal cell plasticity that previously appreciated. We show that even though NF-κB is not required for formation of endogenous mammary placodes, it is indispensable for the ability of Eda to induce supernumerary placodes. A genome-wide profiling of Eda-induced genes in mammary buds identified several Wnt pathway components as potential transcriptional targets of Eda. Using an ex vivo culture system, we show that suppression of canonical Wnt signalling leads to a dose-dependent inhibition of supernumerary placodes in K14-Eda tissue explants. PMID:26581094

  20. Survival of Rhizobium phaseoli in coal-based legume inoculants applied to seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, S.L.; Berryhill, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Eight coals used as carriers in legume inoculants promoted the survival of Rhizobium phaseoli on pinto bean seeds. Although peat was more protective, most coal-based inoculants provided >10/sup 4/ viable rhizobia per seed after 4 weeks.

  1. Tree Growth Stage and Environment after Pathogen Inoculation Alters Susceptibility of Pear Trees to Phytophthora Canker

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated whether growth stage of pear (Pyrus communis) tree rootstock and environment after inoculation with Phytophthora syringae influences tree susceptibility to infection. Trees at different stages of dormancy development were inoculated with the pathogen and maintained in different condi...

  2. Comparison of visual and electronic evaluations of detached strawberry leaves inoculated with colletotrichum species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculation of detached strawberry leaves with Colletotrichum species may provide an accurate, rapid, non-destructive method of identifying anthracnose resistant germplasm. Two measures of anthracnose disease severity were compared on detached strawberry leaves inoculated with Colletotrichum fragar...

  3. Regulation of mammary stem cell population with dietary intake of soy protein isolate reveals novel mechanisms for diet-mediated control of mammary tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breast cancer risk is highly modified by environmental factors including diet. Previously, we showed that dietary intake of soy protein isolate (SPI) decreased mammary tumor incidence and increased mammary tumor latency in rats relative to those fed a control casein (CAS) diet, when exposed to the c...

  4. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity on peanut infection by Sclerotinia minor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. minor. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DOE), and five were closed for d...

  5. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity (RH) on peanut infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. sclerotiorum, isolated from pumpkin. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DO...

  6. On-farm produced microbial soil inoculants effects on bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of microbial soil inoculants in agriculture is of increasing interest among growers and scientists. Research on the efficacy and application of soil inoculants, especially on-farm produced inoculants, is limited. This study aimed to determine the effects of a commercially available arbuscu...

  7. The Potential of Inoculation in Promoting Resistance to the Effectiveness of Comparative Advertising Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfau, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Examines the potential of the inoculation message strategy to deflect the persuasiveness of comparative advertisements. Indicates modest potential for inoculation, confirming that inoculation pretreatments confer resistance to a comparative ad's influence on consumer attitudes, especially on behalf of high-involving products. (SR)

  8. Optimization and characterization of an in vitro bovine mammary cell culture system to study regulation of milk protein synthesis and mammary differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Talhouk, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    A long term bovine mammary cell culture system that maintains normal mammary cell function was established and optimized to study milk protein synthesis and secretion and mammary differentiation. This culture system used bovine mammary acini isolated from developing or lactating mammary gland by enzymatic dissociation, and cryopreserved until thawed and plated for growth in vitro for these studies. Cells in M199 with lactogenic hormones {plus minus} fetal calf serum (FCS) were cultured on plastic, 100ul and 500ul type I collagen, and Matrigel, or embedded within type I collagen. Cell morphology, cell number, and total TCA-precipitable {sup 35}S-labelled proteins were monitored. Milk protein ({alpha}{sub s,1}-casein, lactoferrin (LF), {alpha}-lactalbumin, and {beta}-lactoglobulin) secretion and intracellular levels were determined by an ELISA assay.

  9. Autocrine-paracrine regulation of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Weaver, S R; Hernandez, L L

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland has a remarkable capacity for regulation at a local level, particularly with respect to its main function: milk secretion. Regulation of milk synthesis has significant effects on animal and human health, at the level of both the mother and the neonate. Control by the mammary gland of its essential function, milk synthesis, is an evolutionary necessity and is therefore tightly regulated at a local level. For at least the last 60 yr, researchers have been interested in elucidating the mechanisms underpinning the mammary gland's ability to self-regulate, largely without the influence from systemic hormones or signals. By the 1960s, scientists realized the importance of milk removal in the capacity of the gland to produce milk and that the dynamics of this removal, including emptying of the alveolar spaces and frequency of milking, were controlled locally as opposed to traditional systemic hormonal regulation. Using both in vitro systems and various mammalian species, including goats, marsupials, humans, and dairy cows, it has been demonstrated that the mammary gland is largely self-regulating in its capacity to support the young, which is the evolutionary basis for milk production. Local control occurs at the level of the mammary epithelial cell through pressure and stretching negative-feedback mechanisms, and also in an autocrine fashion through bioactive factors within the milk which act as inhibitors, regulating milk secretion within the alveoli themselves. It is only within the last 20 to 30 yr that potential candidates for these bioactive factors have been examined at a molecular level. Several, including parathyroid hormone-related protein, growth factors (transforming growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, epidermal growth factor), and serotonin, are synthesized within and act upon the gland and possess dynamic receptor activity resulting in diverse effects on growth, calcium homeostasis, and milk composition. This review will focus on the

  10. Key stages in mammary gland development: the mammary end bud as a motile organ.

    PubMed

    Hinck, Lindsay; Silberstein, Gary B

    2005-01-01

    In the rodent, epithelial end buds define the tips of elongating mammary ducts. These highly motile structures undergo repeated dichotomous branching as they aggressively advance through fatty stroma and, turning to avoid other ducts, they finally cease growth leaving behind the open, tree-like framework on which secretory alveoli develop during pregnancy. This review identifies the motility of end buds as a unique developmental marker that represents the successful integration of systemic and local mammotrophic influences, and covers relevant advances in ductal growth regulation, extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, and cell adhesion in the inner end bud. An unexpected growth-promoting synergy between insulin-like growth factor-1 and progesterone, in which ducts elongate without forming new end buds, is described as well as evidence strongly supporting self-inhibition of ductal elongation by end-bud-secreted transforming growth factor-beta acting on stromal targets. The influence of the matrix metalloproteinase ECM-remodeling enzymes, notably matrix metalloproteinase-2, on end bud growth is discussed in the broader context of enzymes that regulate the polysaccharide-rich glycosaminoglycan elements of the ECM. Finally, a critical, motility-enabling role for the cellular architecture of the end bud is identified and the contribution of cadherins, the netrin/neogenin system, and ErbB2 to the structure and motility of end buds is discussed. PMID:16280048